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Sample records for documented cardiac arrhythmias

  1. Carbon monoxide exposure of subjects with documented cardiac arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E.; Byers, S.; Carroll, L.W.; Younis, L.T.; Wiens, R.D. )

    1992-09-01

    The impact of low-level carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency in patients with ischemic heart disease has not been thoroughly studied. The issue is of concern because of the potential proarrhythmic effect of carbon monoxide in patients with ischemic heart disease. We studied 30 subjects with well-documented coronary artery disease who had an average of at least 30 ventricular ectopic beats per hour over a 20-hour monitoring interval. By using appropriate inclusion and exclusion criteria, subjects were selected and enrolled in a randomized double-blind study to determine the effects of carbon monoxide exposure on ventricular arrhythmia frequency at rest, during exercise, and during ambulatory activities. The carbon monoxide exposure was designed to result in 3% or 5% carboxyhemoglobin levels, as measured by gas chromatography. The carbon monoxide exposure protocol produced target levels in 60 minutes, and the levels were maintained for an additional 90 minutes to provide adequate time to assess the impact of carbon monoxide on the frequency of ventricular ectopic beats. The data on total and repetitive ventricular arrhythmias were analyzed for seven specific time intervals: (1) two hours before carbon monoxide exposure; (2) during the two-hour carbon monoxide or air exposure; (3) during a two-hour rest period; (4) during an exercise period; (5) during an exercise recovery period; (6) six hours after carbon monoxide or air exposure; and (7) approximately 10 hours after exposure, or the remaining recording interval on the Holter monitor. There was no increase in ventricular arrhythmia frequency after carbon monoxide exposure, regardless of the level of carboxyhemoglobin or the type of activity.

  2. Cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Robert J; Garan, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    As more women with repaired congenital heart disease survive to their reproductive years and many other women are delaying pregnancy until later in life, a rising concern is the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy. Naturally occurring cardiovascular changes during pregnancy increase the likelihood that a recurrence of a previously experienced cardiac arrhythmia or a de novo arrhythmia will occur. Arrhythmias should be thoroughly investigated to determine if there is a reversible etiology, and risks/benefits of treatment options should be fully explored. We discuss the approach to working up and treating various arrhythmias during pregnancy with attention to fetal and maternal risks as well as treatment of fetal arrhythmias. Acute management in stable patients includes close monitoring and intravenous pharmacologic therapy, while DC cardioversion should be used to terminate arrhythmias in hemodynamically unstable patients. Long-term management may require continued oral antiarrhythmic therapy, with particular attention to fetal safety, to prevent complications associated with arrhythmias. PMID:25037518

  3. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26459200

  4. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  5. Carbon monoxide exposure of subjects with documented cardiac arrhythmias. Research report, August 1987-July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E.; Byers, S.; Carroll, L.W.; Younis, L.T.

    1992-09-01

    The authors studied 30 subjects with well-documented coronary artery disease who had an average of at least 30 ventricular ectopic beats per hour over a 20-hour monitoring interval. Subjects were selected and enrolled in a randomized double-blind study; the carbon monoxide exposure was designed to result in 3% or 5% carboxyhemoglobin levels, as measured by gas chromatography. Total and repetitive ventricular arrhythmias were measured for four specific time intervals: (1) two hours before carbon monoxide exposure; (2) during the two-hour carbon monoxide exposure; (3) six hours after carbon monoxide exposure; and (4) approximately 10 hours after exposure, or the remaining recording interval on the Holter monitor. There was no increase in ventricular arrhythmia frequency after carbon monoxide exposure, regardless of the level of carboxyhemoglobin or the type of activity. During steady-state conditions at rest, the number of ventricular ectopic beats per hour was 115 + or - 153 (SD) for room air exposure (0.7% carboxyhemoglobin), 121 + or - 171 for the lower carbon monoxide exposure (3.2% carboxyhemoglobin), and 94 + or - 129 for the higher carbon monoxide exposure (5.1% carboxyhemoglobin). The frequency of complex ventricular ectopy was not altered at the levels of carbon monoxide studied. Secondary analysis of the impact of carbon monoxide on ventricular ectopic beat frequency stratified by baseline ejection fraction, baseline ventricular ectopic beat frequency, and exercise-induced ST-segment changes did not indicate an effect of carbon monoxide on ventricular arrhythmias. However, patients with symptomatic ventricular arrhythmias and symptomatic myocardial ischemia were excluded from the present study.

  6. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) metabolism and cardiac arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, D.M.; Man, R.Y.K.; Arthur, G.; Choy, P.C.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of LPC in the production of cardiac arrhythmias in isolated mammalian hearts has been well-documented. Cardiac arrhythmias are initiated by the accumulation of the lysolipid in the cardiac membrane. When isolated rat hearts were perfused in 10 ..mu..M LPC for 10 min, severe arrhythmias were observed in all experiments. In isolated guinea pig hearts that were perfused under identical conditions, the development of severe arrhythmias was never observed, and mild arrhythmias were produced in less than 50% of the hearts used. When the hearts of both species were perfused with (/sup 14/C-palmitate)-LPC, the labellings found in the microsomal fractions (expressed in mg protein) were similar. However, a higher amount of labelled LPC (2-fold) was found in rat heart microsomes, whereas a higher amount of labelled fatty acid was located in the guinea pig heart microsomes. Determination of lysophospholipase activities in these microsomal fractions revealed that the specific activity of the enzyme was much higher in the guinea pig heart than the rat heart. The authors conclude that the differential effect of LPC-induced arrhythmias between the rat and guinea pig heart may be a direct result of the lysophospholipase activities in these hearts. The ability to catabolize LPC more rapidly in the guinea pig heart may decrease the accumulation of LPC in the membrane, and hence, reduce the production of arrhythmias.

  7. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  8. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms “Long QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Short QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Brugada Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia” (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  9. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue to treat ventricular tachycardia and other arrhythmias while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In operation, microwave energy between about 1 Gigahertz and 12 Gigahertz is applied to monopole microwave radiator having a surface wave limiter. A test setup provides physical testing of microwave radiators to determine the temperature profile created in actual heart tissue or ersatz heart tissue. Saline solution pumped over the heart tissue with a peristaltic pump simulates blood flow. Optical temperature sensors disposed at various tissue depths within the heart tissue detect the temperature profile without creating any electromagnetic interference. The method may be used to produce a desired temperature profile in other body tissues reachable by catheter such as tumors and the like.

  10. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: ‘cardiac arrhythmias’ and ‘epilepsy’. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  11. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Paul; Balaji, Seshadri

    2009-01-01

    Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy. PMID:19898654

  12. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hector, Sven Magnus; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krassioukov, Andrei; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2013-01-01

    Context/Objectives To review the current literature to reveal the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and its relation to spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods Data source: MEDLINE database, 304 hits, and 32 articles were found to be relevant. The relevant articles all met the inclusion criteria: (1) contained original data (2) on cardiac arrhythmias (3) in humans with (4) traumatic SCI. Results In the acute phase of SCI (1–14 days after injury) more cranial as well as more severe injuries seemed to increase the incidence of bradycardia. Articles not covering the first 14 days after injury, thus describing the chronic phase of SCI, showed that individuals with SCI did not have a higher incidence of cardiac arrhythmias compared with able-bodied controls. Furthermore, their heart rate did not differ significantly. Penile vibro-stimulation was the procedure investigated most likely to cause bradycardia, which in turn was associated with episodes of autonomic dysreflexia. The incidence of bradycardia was found to be 17–77% for individuals with cervical SCI. For individuals with thoracolumbar SCI, the incidence was 0–13%. Conclusion Bradycardia was commonly seen in the acute stage after SCI as well as during procedures such as penile vibro-stimulation and tracheal suction. These episodes of bradycardia were seen more often in individuals with cervical injuries. Longitudinal studies with continuous electrocardiogram recordings are needed to uncover the true relation between cardiac arrhythmias and SCI. PMID:24090076

  13. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke. PMID:26802767

  14. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome). PMID:26072438

  15. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    NASA seeks to transfer the NASA developed microwave ablation technology, designed for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (irregular heart beat), to industry. After a heart attack, many cells surrounding the resulting scar continue to live but are abnormal electrically; they may conduct impulses unusually slowly or fire when they would typically be silent. These diseased areas might disturb smooth signaling by forming a reentrant circuit in the muscle. The objective of microwave ablation is to heat and kill these diseased cells to restore appropriate electrical activity in the heart. This technology is a method and apparatus that provides for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In comparison with other methods that involve direct-current pulses or radio frequencies below 1 GHz, this method may prove more effective in treating ventricular tachycardia. This is because the present method provides for greater control of the location, cross-sectional area, and depth of a lesion via selection of the location and design of the antenna and the choice of microwave power and frequency.

  16. Classification of cardiac arrhythmias using competitive networks.

    PubMed

    Leite, Cicilia R M; Martin, Daniel L; Sizilio, Glaucia R A; Dos Santos, Keylly E A; de Araujo, Bruno G; Valentim, Ricardo A M; Neto, Adriao D D; de Melo, Jorge D; Guerreiro, Ana M G

    2010-01-01

    Information generated by sensors that collect a patient's vital signals are continuous and unlimited data sequences. Traditionally, this information requires special equipment and programs to monitor them. These programs process and react to the continuous entry of data from different origins. Thus, the purpose of this study is to analyze the data produced by these biomedical devices, in this case the electrocardiogram (ECG). Processing uses a neural classifier, Kohonen competitive neural networks, detecting if the ECG shows any cardiac arrhythmia. In fact, it is possible to classify an ECG signal and thereby detect if it is exhibiting or not any alteration, according to normality. PMID:21096338

  17. HERG1 Channel Agonists and Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG1) potassium channels are a key determinant of normal repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Loss of function mutations in hERG1 channels cause inherited long QT syndrome and increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. Many common medications that block hERG1 channels as an unintended side effect also increase arrhythmic risk. Routine preclinical screening for hERG1 block led to the discovery of agonists that shorten action potential duration and QT interval. Agonists have the potential to be used as pharmacotherapy for long QT syndrome, but can also be proarrhythmic. Recent studies have elucidated multiple mechanisms of action for these compounds and the structural basis for their binding to the pore domain of the hERG1 channel. PMID:24721650

  18. HERG1 channel agonists and cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2014-04-01

    Type 1 human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG1) potassium channels are a key determinant of normal repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Loss of function mutations in hERG1 channels cause inherited long QT syndrome and increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death. Many common medications that block hERG1 channels as an unintended side effect also increase arrhythmic risk. Routine preclinical screening for hERG1 block led to the discovery of agonists that shorten action potential duration and QT interval. Agonists have the potential to be used as pharmacotherapy for long QT syndrome, but can also be proarrhythmic. Recent studies have elucidated multiple mechanisms of action for these compounds and the structural basis for their binding to the pore domain of the hERG1 channel. PMID:24721650

  19. Basic Cardiac Electrophysiology and Common Drug-induced Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aimee; Pickham, David

    2016-09-01

    Drugs can be a double-edged sword, providing the benefit of symptom alleviation and disease modification but potentially causing harm from adverse cardiac arrhythmic events. Proarrhythmia is the ability of a drug to cause an arrhythmia, the number one reason for drugs to be withdrawn from the patient. Drug-induced arrhythmias are defined as the production of de novo arrhythmias or aggravation of existing arrhythmias, as a result of previous or concomitant pharmacologic treatment. This review summarizes normal cardiac cell and tissue functioning and provides an overview of drugs that effect cardiac repolarization and the adverse effects of commonly administered antiarrhythmics. PMID:27484663

  20. Method for classifying cardiac arrhythmias using photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Polania, Luisa F; Mestha, Lalit K; Huang, David T; Couderc, Jean-Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Advances in mobile computing and miniature devices have contributed to the accelerated development of wearable technologies for clinical applications. The new trend of wearable technologies has fostered a growth of interest for sensors that can be easily integrated into wearable devices. In particular, photoplethysmography (PPG) is especially suitable for wearable sensing, as it is low-cost, noninvasive, and does not require wet electrodes like the electrocardiogram. Photoplethysmograph signals contain rich information about the blood pulsating variation which is strongly related to the electrical activities of the heart. Therefore, in this paper we hypothesize that the ambulatory PPG monitoring could be employed for arrhythmia detection and classification. This paper presents a method for classifying ventricular premature contraction (VPC) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) from normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and supraventricular premature contraction (SVPC) recorded in patients going through ablation therapy for arrhythmia. Although occasional VPCs are benign, the increase in the frequency of VPC events may lead to VT, which in turn,could evolve into ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Therefore the accurate measurement of VPC frequency and early detection of VT events becomes essential for patients with cardiac disease. PMID:26737799

  1. Fetal Arrhythmias Associated with Cardiac Rhabdomyomas

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F; Cuneo, Bettina; Wiggins, Delonia; Gotteiner, Nina; Wakai, Ronald T

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary heart tumors in fetuses are rare and mainly represent rhabdomyomas. The tumors have a variable expression and can be associated with arrhythmias, including both wide and narrow QRS tachycardia. Although multiple Doppler techniques exist to assess fetal heart rhythm, it can be difficult to record precise electrophysiological pathologies in fetal life. Objective Investigations defining precise electrophysiological diagnosis were performed using fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Methods In addition to routine fetal echocardiography, fMCG was used to investigate electrophysiologic rhythm patterns in a series of 10 fetuses with cardiac rhabdomyomas. Results The mean gestational age of the fetuses was 28.6 weeks (SD ± 4.7 weeks). The multiple rhabdomyomas were mainly located in the right and left ventricles as well as around the AV groove. Arrhythmias or conduction abnormalities were diagnosed in all 10 patients, although only six of them were referred due to that indication. Remarkably, 80% (8/10) had associated Wolff-Parkinson-White pre-excitation. In addition, we found prominent p waves in four fetuses. Conclusion In fetuses with rhabdomyomas, a disease where rhythm pathology is common, precise electrophysiological diagnosis can now be made by fMCG. fMCG is complimentary to echocardiography for rhythm assessment, and can detect conduction abnormalities that are not possible to diagnose prenatally with M-mode or pulsed Doppler ultrasound. Risk factor assessment using fMCG can support pregnancy management and post-natal treatment and follow-up. PMID:24333285

  2. Ethanol for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Schurmann, Paul; Peñalver, Jorge; Valderrábano, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ethanol infusion was an early mode of ablative treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. Its initial descriptions involved coronary intra-arterial delivery, targeting arrhythmogenic substrates in drug-refractory ventricular tachycardia or the atrioventricular node. Largely superseded by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and other contact-based technologies as a routine ablation strategy, intracoronary arterial ethanol infusion remains as an alternative option in the treatment of ventricular tachycardia when conventional ablation fails. Arrhythmic foci that are deep-seated in the myocardium may not be amenable to catheter ablation from either the endocardium or the epicardium by RFA, but they can be targeted by an ethanol infusion. Recent findings Recently, we have explored ethanol injection through cardiac venous systems, in order to avoid the risks of complications and limitations of coronary arterial instrumentation. Vein of Marshall ethanol infusion is being studied as an adjunctive procedure in ablation of atrial fibrillation, and coronary venous ethanol infusion for ventricular tachycardia. Conclusion Ethanol ablation remains useful as a bail-out technique for refractory cases to RFA, or as an adjunctive therapy that may improve the efficacy of catheter ablation procedures. PMID:26049378

  3. Cardiac Arrhythmia Management: Why Women Are Different from Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... led to incorrect diagnoses including anxiety neurosis and panic attacks. However, since serotonin reuptake inhibitors can be effective ... Cardiac Arrhythmia Management in Women | Heart Disease Facts | Panic Attack or Heart Attack | Three Women from New Jersey | ...

  4. Maternal cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy and lactation

    PubMed Central

    Cordina, Rachael; McGuire, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    Arrhythmias occurring during pregnancy can cause significant symptoms and even death in mother and fetus. The management of these arrhythmias is complicated by the need to avoid harm to the fetus and neonate. It is useful to classify patients with arrhythmias into those with and without structural heart disease. Those with a primary electrical problem, but an otherwise normal heart, often tolerate rapid heart rates without compromise whereas patients with problems such as rheumatic heart disease, congenital heart disease or cardiomyopathy may quickly decompensate during an arrhythmia.

  5. [Cardiac arrhythmias in targeted connexin deficient mice: significance for the arrhythmia field].

    PubMed

    Hagendorff, A; Plum, A

    2000-12-01

    Intercellular communication can be mediated by gap junction channels. One channel is composed of two hexameric hemichannels which consist of six polypeptide subunits called connexines (Cx). Three different connexines were documented in the cardiac myocytes: Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45. The labeling by number represents the rounded, molecular mass of the amino acid sequences given in kD. Identical connexons form homotypic channels different connexons can form heterotypic channels. Each channel type has specific properties regarding permeability and electrical conductance. Beside a typical age-dependent alignment of gap junction channels on the surface of the cardiac myocytes, regional distribution of the different connexins is different at distinct parts of the mouse heart. The ventricular working myocardium is characterized by Cx43, whereas Cx40 and Cx45 were not found in this region. In the atria as well as in the conduction system, Cx40 is the most frequently expressed. Cx45 appears to form a border zone between conductive and the surrounding working myocardium. In line with the localization and the conduction properties of distinct homotypic gap junction channels, the Cx43 deficient mouse is suitable for analysis of ventricular arrhythmias and the Cx40 deficient mouse primarily for studies of atrial arrhythmias. Increased ventricular conduction velocity and increased ventricular vulnerability were observed in the presence of a decreased number and density of Cx43 gap junction channels. This observation, however, is controversially discussed. Cx40 deficiency induces an impairment of the sinuatrial, intraatrial and atrioventricular conduction properties and is associated with an increased atrial vulnerability. Transgenic mouse models and new mapping techniques for detection of the electrical wavefront propagation provide new insights into the mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis. Geneticists, clinicians and basic researchers need to collaborate in order to explore the clinical

  6. [Arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Misaki, Takuro; Fukahara, Kazuaki

    2004-07-01

    The success of the radiofrequency catheter ablation procedure for most types of supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia largely eliminated the role of surgical therapy of arrhythmias. However, there remains a subset of arrhythmia patients in whom urgent surgical treatments are required. In this review we mention recent developments of the urgent surgical treatment for arrhythmias. In cases with complete atrioventricular (AV) block and ventricular fibrillation which associated with sudden death, temporary cardiac pacing and cardiac defibrillation using direct current (DC) cardioversion must be immediately induced and followed by implantation of permanent cardiac pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), if necessary. In addition to usual cardiac pacing therapy, novel pacing therapy has been developed recently for the patients with symptomatic heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) using biventricular pacing is an emerging therapy for improvement of cardiac function in patients with heart failure in association with intraventricular conduction delay. To prevent the sudden death in patients with heart failure, biventricular pacing combined with ICD are also implanted and its efficacy are reported. With the exception of the pacing therapy, curative surgical treatments are limited in drug-refractory atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia after myocardial infarction requiring Dor's type operation. In any case surgical treatment must be performed promptly and suitably with lower invasive methods. PMID:15362552

  7. Cardiac arrhythmias during exercise testing in healthy men.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, E. F.; Owen, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Clinically healthy male executives who participate in a long-term physical conditioning program have demonstrated cardiac arrhythmia during and after periodic ergometric testing at submaximal and maximal levels. In 1,385 tests on 248 subjects, it was found that 34% of subjects demonstrated an arrhythmia at some time and 13% of subjects developed arrhythmia on more than one test. Premature systoles of ventricular origin were most common, but premature systoles of atrial origin, premature systoles of junctional origin, paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, atrioventricular block, wandering pacemaker, and pre-excitation were also seen. Careful post-test monitoring and pulse rate regulated training sessions are suggested for such programs.

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias in hypokalemic periodic paralysis: Hypokalemia as only cause?

    PubMed

    Stunnenberg, Bas C; Deinum, Jaap; Links, Thera P; Wilde, Arthur A; Franssen, Hessel; Drost, Gea

    2014-09-01

    It is unknown how often cardiac arrhythmias occur in hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) and if they are caused by hypokalemia alone or other factors. This systematic review shows that cardiac arrhythmias were reported in 27 HypoPP patients. Cases were confirmed genetically (13 with an R528H mutation in CACNA1S, 1 an R669H mutation in SCN4A) or had a convincing clinical diagnosis of HypoPP (13 genetically undetermined) if reported prior to the availability of genetic testing. Arrhythmias occurred during severe hypokalemia (11 patients), between attacks at normokalemia (4 patients), were treatment-dependent (2 patients), or unspecified (10 patients). Nine patients died from arrhythmia. Convincing evidence for a pro-arrhythmogenic factor other than hypokalemia is still lacking. The role of cardiac expression of defective skeletal muscle channels in the heart of HypoPP patients remains unclear. Clinicians should be aware of and prevent treatment-induced cardiac arrhythmia in HypoPP. PMID:25088161

  9. Controlled Exposures to Air Pollutants and Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Simon J.; Hunter, Amanda J.; Shah, Anoop S.V.; Bosson, Jenny A.; Unosson, Jon; Barath, Stefan; Lundbäck, Magnus; Cassee, Flemming R.; Donaldson, Ken; Sandström, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders; Newby, David E.; Mills, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have reported associations between air pollution exposure and increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Exposure to air pollutants can influence cardiac autonomic tone and reduce heart rate variability, and may increase the risk of cardiac arrhythmias, particularly in susceptible patient groups. Objectives: We investigated the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias during and after controlled exposure to air pollutants in healthy volunteers and patients with coronary heart disease. Methods: We analyzed data from 13 double-blind randomized crossover studies including 282 participants (140 healthy volunteers and 142 patients with stable coronary heart disease) from whom continuous electrocardiograms were available. The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias was recorded for each exposure and study population. Results: There were no increases in any cardiac arrhythmia during or after exposure to dilute diesel exhaust, wood smoke, ozone, concentrated ambient particles, engineered carbon nanoparticles, or high ambient levels of air pollution in either healthy volunteers or patients with coronary heart disease. Conclusions: Acute controlled exposure to air pollutants did not increase the short-term risk of arrhythmia in participants. Research employing these techniques remains crucial in identifying the important pathophysiological pathways involved in the adverse effects of air pollution, and is vital to inform environmental and public health policy decisions. Citation: Langrish JP, Watts SJ, Hunter AJ, Shah AS, Bosson JA, Unosson J, Barath S, Lundbäck M, Cassee FR, Donaldson K, Sandström T, Blomberg A, Newby DE, Mills NL. 2014. Controlled exposures to air pollutants and risk of cardiac arrhythmia. Environ Health Perspect 122:747–753; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307337 PMID:24667535

  10. Cardiac arrhythmias in space. Role of vagotonia.

    PubMed

    Leguay, G; Seigneuric, A

    1981-07-01

    Rhythm disorders observed in space have always been minor but they are not unfrequent. They include: ventricular or supra-ventricular extrasystoles, nodal arrhythmias, auriculo-ventricular conduction disorders. There are several etiopathogenetic hypotheses: a strict selection must permit its elimination of an underlying heart disease; the potassium deficiency is often advanced but its role is not certain; the role of catecholamines is also discussed; the role of hypervagotony is extensively analysed as great clinical and electro-cardiographic evidence speaks for it. It can induce disorders which are more serious than those observed so far, particularly fibrillation or intermittent atrial flutter; weightlessness itself could partly condition the vagotonic state; and the effects of fluid shifts are also discussed from this point of view. The possible therapies for various atrial, nodal, ventricular disorders are reviewed, with greater detail for vagal atrial arrhythmias. PMID:11542963

  11. Circadian rhythms in cardiac arrhythmias and opportunities for their chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Portaluppi, Francesco; Hermida, Ramón C

    2007-08-31

    It is now well established that nearly all functions of the body, including those that influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of medications, exhibit significant 24-hour variation. The electrical properties of the heart as well as cardiac arrhythmias also vary as circadian rhythms, even though the suboptimal methods initially used for their investigation slowed their identification and thorough characterization. The application of continuous Holter monitoring of the electrical properties of the heart has revealed 24-hour variation in the occurrence of ventricular premature beats with the peak in events, in diurnally active persons, between 6 a.m. and noon. After the introduction of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation were also found to peak in the same period of the day. Even defibrillator energy requirements show circadian variation, thus supporting the need for a temporal awareness in the therapeutic approach to arrhythmias. Imbalanced autonomic tone, circulating levels of catecholamines, increased heart rate and blood pressure, all established determinants of cardiac arrhythmias, show circadian variations and underlie the genesis of the circadian pattern of cardiac arrhythmias. Arrhythmogenesis appears to be suppressed during nighttime sleep, and this can influence the evaluation of the efficacy of antiarrhythmic medications in relation to their administration time. Unfortunately, very few studies have been undertaken to assess the proper timing (chronotherapy) of antiarrhythmic medications as means to maximize efficacy and possibly reduce side effects. Further research in this field is warranted and could bring new insight and clinical advantage. PMID:17659808

  12. Innovation in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Paul A; Eldar, Michal; Ovsyshcher, I Eli

    2012-08-01

    The 11th International Dead Sea Symposium on Cardiac Arrhythmias and Device Therapy - the 20th Anniversary of the meeting - was held in Jerusalem, Israel on the 26-29 February 2012. The global meeting was conducted with the goal of providing a venue for a multidisciplinary approach to exchange knowledge in all areas related to arrhythmia care. In addition to presentations of original research and keynote lectures, special educational sessions were offered that included hands-on anatomy training and interesting case presentations. A series of innovations sessions included presentations by start-up companies and inventors, leveraging the venue's entrepreneurial environment. PMID:23030286

  13. Caveolae, Ion Channels and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Balijepalli, Ravi C.; Kamp, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Caveolae are specialized membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids which are present in multiple cell types including cardiomyocytes. Along with the essential scaffolding protein caveolin-3, a number of different ion channels and transporters have been localized to caveolae in the heart including L-type Ca2+ channels (Cav1.2), Na+ channels (Nav1.5), pacemaker channels (HCN4), Na+/Ca2+ exchnager (NCX1) and others. Closely associated with these channels are specific macromolecular signaling complexes that provide highly localized regulation of the channels. Mutations in the caveolin-3 gene (CAV3) have been linked with the congenital long QT syndrome (LQT9), and mutations in caveolar-localized ion channels may contribute to other inherited arrhythmias. Changes in the caveolar microdomain in acquired heart disease may also lead to dysregulation and dysfunction of ion channels, altering the risk of arrhythmias in conditions such as heart failure. This review highlights the existing evidence identifying and characterizing ion channels localized to caveolae in cardiomyocytes and their role in arrhythmogenesis. PMID:19351512

  14. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed. PMID:26218181

  15. Macrolide Antibiotics and the Risk of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduces the morbidity of patients with cystic fibrosis, non–cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. Lower levels of evidence indicate that chronic macrolides are also effective in treating patients with panbronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and rejection after lung transplant. Macrolides are known to cause torsade des pointes and other ventricular arrhythmias, and a recent observational study prompted the FDA to strengthen the Warnings and Precautions section of azithromycin drug labels. This summary describes the electrophysiological effects of macrolides, reviews literature indicating that the large majority of subjects experiencing cardiac arrhythmias from macrolides have coexisting risk factors and that the incidence of arrhythmias in absence of coexisting risk factors is very low, examines recently published studies describing the relative risk of arrhythmias from macrolides, and concludes that this risk has been overestimated and suggests an approach to patient evaluation that should reduce the relative risk and the incidence of arrhythmias to the point that chronic macrolides can be used safely in the majority of subjects for whom they are recommended. PMID:24707986

  16. Development of a remote handheld cardiac arrhythmia monitor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swaroop S; Hsiao, Henry S

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present the design and development of a real-time remote handheld cardiac arrhythmic monitoring system (RCAM). A client-server model based on Internet protocols was used. ECG data was transmitted from the remote handheld client to a centralized server, where the QRS and premature ventricular contraction detection algorithms were implemented and graded depending on the number and pattern of PVCs present. The QRS sensitivity and specificity on ECG records from Physionet archives in absence of arrhythmia was 100% and 99.62%, while in presence of arrhythmia was 99.34% and 99.31%. The average 'negative time' measured on ventricular tachyarrhythmia records was 92 seconds. The RCAM can provide remote detection of cardiac abnormalities and give specific diagnosis and recommendations of actions to be taken immediately. The limitation due to the inability of the PDA to perform complex computations was overcome by the use of the remote server. PMID:17947043

  17. Update on management of cardiac arrhythmias in acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Willich, T; Goette, A

    2015-04-01

    This review summarizes different types of arrhythmias in patients with acute coronary syndromes and provides an overview of the available therapeutic options for acute care and management of critical arrhythmias. The different therapeutic options are depending on the origin and type of arrhythmia. The main common dominant mechanisms are intramural re-entry in ischemia and triggered activity in reperfusion. The different forms of arrhythmia were explained in detail. Atrial arrhythmias are mainly atrial fibrillation; other forms are rare and usually self-limited. As therapeutic options antiarrhythmic drug therapy with beta-blockers or amiodarone and direct current cardioversion are suitable. Ventricular arrhythmias can be divided in premature ventricular complexes, accelerated idioventricular rhythm, non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF) and electrical storm. As therapeutic options antiarrhythmic drug therapy, implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy (ICD), radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) and stellate ganglion blockade are available. The treatment with antiarrhythmic drug is rather cautious recommended, with the exception of beta-blockers. An additional drug therapy with ranolazine may be considered. The advantage of ICD therapy for long-term primary or secondary prophylactic therapy has been well documented. ICD therapy is associated with significant reduction in mortality compared with antiarrhythmic drug therapy (mainly amiodarone), with the exception of beta-blockers. RFA and stellate ganglion blockade are rather intended as therapeutically options for incessant VT/VF or electrical storm. PMID:25612305

  18. Nonlinear dynamics, chaos and complex cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, L.; Courtemanche, M.; Shrier, A.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Periodic stimulation of a nonlinear cardiac oscillator in vitro gives rise to complex dynamics that is well described by one-dimensional finite difference equations. As stimulation parameters are varied, a large number of different phase-locked and chaotic rhythms is observed. Similar rhythms can be observed in the intact human heart when there is interaction between two pacemaker sites. Simplified models are analyzed, which show some correspondence to clinical observations.

  19. Feature-based MRI data fusion for cardiac arrhythmia studies.

    PubMed

    Magtibay, Karl; Beheshti, Mohammadali; Foomany, Farbod Hosseyndoust; Massé, Stéphane; Lai, Patrick F H; Zamiri, Nima; Asta, John; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Jaffray, David; Krishnan, Sridhar; Umapathy, Karthikeyan

    2016-05-01

    Current practices in studying cardiac arrhythmias primarily use electrical or optical surface recordings of a heart, spatially limited transmural recordings, and mathematical models. However, given that such arrhythmias occur on a 3D myocardial tissue, information obtained from such practices lack in dimension, completeness, and are sometimes prone to oversimplification. The combination of complementary Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI)-based techniques such as Current Density Imaging (CDI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) could provide more depth to current practices in assessing the cardiac arrhythmia dynamics in entire cross sections of myocardium. In this work, we present an approach utilizing feature-based data fusion methods to demonstrate that complimentary information obtained from electrical current distribution and structural properties within a heart could be quantified and enhanced. Twelve (12) pairs of CDI and DTI image data sets were gathered from porcine hearts perfused through a Langendorff setup. Images were fused together using feature-based data fusion techniques such as Joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA), Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA), and their combination (CCA+jICA). The results suggest that the complimentary information of cardiac states from CDI and DTI are enhanced and are better classified with the use of data fusion methods. For each data set, an increase in mean correlations of fused images were observed with 38% increase from CCA+jICA compared to the original images while mean mutual information of the fused images from jICA and CCA+jICA increased by approximately three-fold. We conclude that MRI-based techniques present potential viable tools in furthering studies for cardiac arrhythmias especially Ventricular Fibrillation. PMID:26970857

  20. The EINTHOVEN system: toward an improved cardiac arrhythmia monitor.

    PubMed Central

    Widman, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Contemporary cardiac arrhythmia monitors, used commonly in intensive care settings, are highly sensitive to artifact, resulting in high false alarm rates, inability to detect P waves reliably, and crude rhythm interpretation. We report on two new approaches that address these problems: a noise preprocessor that characterizes the type and degree of artifact in an ECG, and a model-based rhythm interpretation algorithm. PMID:1807639

  1. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in structural brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2013-07-31

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently observed after acute cerebrovascular events. The precise mechanism that leads to the development of these arrhythmias is still uncertain, though increasing evidence suggests that it is mainly due to autonomic nervous system dysregulation. In massive brain lesions sympathetic predominance and parasympathetic withdrawal during the first 72 h are associated with the occurrence of severe secondary complications in the first week. Right insular cortex lesions are also related with sympathetic overactivation and with a higher incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly QT prolongation, in patients with ischemic stroke. Additionally, female sex and hypokalemia are independent risk factors for severe prolongation of the QT interval which subsequently results in malignant arrhythmias and poor outcome. The prognostic value of repolarization changes commonly seen after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as ST segment, T wave, and U wave abnormalities, still remains controversial. In patients with traumatic brain injury both intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion correlate with low heart rate variability and increased mortality. Given that there are no firm guidelines for the prevention or treatment of the arrhythmias that appear after cerebral incidents this review aims to highlight important issues on this topic. Selected patients with the aforementioned risk factors could benefit from electrocardiographic monitoring, reassessment of the medications that prolong QTc interval, and administration of antiadrenergic agents. Further research is required in order to validate these assumptions and to establish specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:22809542

  2. Statistical Versus Individual Forecasting Of Life-Threatening Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Niels; Meyerfeldt, Udo; Ziehmann, Christine; Schirdewan, Alexander; Kurths, Jürgen

    2002-07-01

    Ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT) as fatal cardiac arrhythmias are the main factors triggering sudden cardiac death. The objective of this investigation is to find early signs of sustained VT in patients with an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). These devices are able to safeguard patients by returning their hearts to a normal rhythm via strong defibrillatory shocks; additionally, they are able to store at least 1000 beat-to-beat intervals immediately before the onset of a life-threatening arrhythmia. We study these 1000 beat-to-beat intervals of 63 chronic heart failure ICD patients before the onset of a life-threatening arrhythmia and at a control time, i.e. without VT event. To characterize these rather short data sets, we calculate heart rate variability (HRV) parameters from time and frequency domain, from symbolic dynamics as well as the finite-time growth rates. We find that no linear parameter shows significant differences in HRV between the VT and the control time series. However, the nonlinear parameters detected a significant increase in short phases with low variability before the onset of VT (p<0.05, for time series with less than 10% ectopy). Finally, we are investigating whether these results may lead to individual predictions of VT.

  3. Multiple cardiac arrhythmia recognition using adaptive wavelet network.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chen, Pei-Jarn; Chen, Yung-Fu; Lee, You-Yun; Chen, Tainsong

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for electrocardiogram (ECG) heartbeat pattern recognition using adaptive wavelet network (AWN). The ECG beat recognition can be divided into a sequence of stages, starting from feature extraction and conversion of QRS complexes, and then identifying cardiac arrhythmias based on the detected features. The discrimination method of ECG beats is a two-subnetwork architecture, consisting of a wavelet layer and a probabilistic neural network (PNN). Morlet wavelets are used to extract the features from each heartbeat, and then PNN is used to analyze the meaningful features and perform discrimination tasks. The AWN is suitable for application in a dynamic environment, with add-in and delete-off features using automatic target adjustment and parameter tuning. The experimental results obtained by testing the data of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:17281539

  4. Classification enhancible grey relational analysis for cardiac arrhythmias discrimination.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung

    2006-04-01

    This paper proposes a method for electrocardiogram (ECG) heartbeat recognition using classification enhancible grey relational analysis (GRA). The ECG beat recognition can be divided into a sequence of stages, starting with feature extraction and then according to characteristics to identify the cardiac arrhythmias including the supraventricular ectopic beat, bundle branch ectopic beat, and ventricular ectopic beat. Gaussian wavelets are used to enhance the features from each heartbeat, and GRA performs the recognition tasks. With the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database, the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed non-invasive method. Compared with artificial neural network, the test results also show high accuracy, good adaptability, and faster processing time for the detection of heartbeat signals. PMID:16937172

  5. Cryotherapy of cardiac arrhythmia: From basic science to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Avitall, Boaz; Kalinski, Arthur

    2015-10-01

    This review focuses on the basic science of cellular destruction by tissue freezing and application of transvenous cryocatheter technology to treat cardiac arrhythmia. Ideally, foci for arrhythmias are selectively ablated, arrhythmogenic tissues are destroyed, and reentry circuits are bisected in order to silence adverse electrical activity, with the goal of restoring normal sinus rhythm. The mechanism of ablation using cryotherapy results in distinct lesion qualities advantageous to radiofrequency (Khairy P, Chauvet M, Lehman J, et al. Lower incidence of thrombus formation with cryoenergy versus radiofrequency catheter ablation. Circulation 2003;107:2045-2050). This review is devoted to the mechanism of cryoablation, postablation histopathological changes, and how this information should be used by the clinicians to improve safety and maximize ablation success. PMID:26031374

  6. Brain-heart interactions. The neurocardiology of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A M; Natelson, B H

    1993-01-01

    Neuroanatomic connections between the brain and the heart provide links that allow cardiac arrhythmias to occur in response to brain activation. Recognition and analysis of such links in the pathogenesis of malignant cardiac arrhythmia are emphasized in this review. Neurocardiac links have been shown to produce arrhythmia both experimentally and clinically; specific examples, including stroke, epilepsy, and environmental stress are presented. We hypothesize that the individual with a diseased heart has a greater likelihood of experiencing cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death when the neurocardiac axis is activated. Reviewing possible mechanisms of brain-related arrhythmias, we suggest that the nervous system directs the events leading to cardiac damage by raising catecholamine levels and potentially inducing arrhythmia. PMID:8219819

  7. Cardiac ultrasonography in structural abnormalities and arrhythmias. Recognition and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, M M; Silverman, N H; Villegas, M

    1993-01-01

    Fetal cardiac ultrasonography has become an important tool in the evaluation of fetuses at risk for cardiac anomalies. It can both guide prenatal treatment and assist the management and timing of delivery. We recommend that a fetal echocardiogram be done when there is a family history of congenital heart disease; maternal disease that may affect the fetus; a history of maternal drug use, either therapeutic or illegal; evidence of other fetal abnormalities; or evidence of fetal hydrops. The optimal timing of evaluation is 18 to 22 weeks' gestation. An entire range of structural cardiac defects can be visualized prenatally, including atrioventricular septal defect, ventricular septal defect, cardiomyopathy, ventricular outlet obstruction, and complex cardiac defects. The outcome for a fetus with a recognized abnormality is unfavourable, with less than 50% surviving the neonatal period. Fetal cardiac arrhythmias are also a common occurrence, 15% in the series described here. Premature atrial or ventricular contractions are most commonly seen and usually require no treatment. Supraventricular tachycardia can result in hydrops and require in utero treatment to prevent fetal demise. Complete heart block, particularly in association with structural heart disease, has a poor prognosis for fetal survival. Images PMID:8236970

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias produced by ultrasound and contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Claudio

    Ultrasound is used widely in medicine for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Ultrasound contrast agents are suspensions of gas-filled microbubbles used to enhance diagnostic imaging. Microbubble contrast agents can increase the likelihood of bioeffects of ultrasound associated with acoustic cavitation. Under certain exposure conditions, the interaction of ultrasound with cardiac tissues can produce cardiac arrhythmias. The general objective of this thesis was to develop a greater understanding of ultrasound-induced premature cardiac beats. The hypothesis guiding this work was that acoustic cavitation is the physical mechanism for the production of arrhythmias with ultrasound. This hypothesis was tested through a series of experiments with mice in vivo and theoretical investigations. Results of this research supported the acoustic cavitation hypothesis. The acoustic pressure threshold for premature beats was significantly lower with microbubble contrast agents present in the blood than without. With microbubbles, the threshold for premature beats was below the current output limits of diagnostic devices. The threshold was not significantly dependent upon contrast agent type and was not influenced by contrast agent dose over three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the dependence of the threshold on acoustic frequency was consistent with the frequency dependence of acoustic cavitation. Experimentally determined thresholds for premature beats in vivo were in excellent agreement with theoretically estimated thresholds for inertial cavitation. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to measure the acoustic emissions produced by cavitating microbubbles in vivo. A direct correlation between the amplitude of the PCD and the percentage of ultrasound pulses producing a premature beat was consistent with cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect. Although this thesis focused on the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound-induced arrhythmias, more persistent

  9. Detection and Prevention of Cardiac Arrhythmias During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pillai, Dilip; Rosenbaum, David S.; Liszka, Kathy J.; York, David W.; Mackin, Michael A.; Lichter, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    There have been reports suggesting that long-duration space flight might lead to an increased risk of potentially serious heart rhythm disturbances. If space flight does, in fact, significantly decrease cardiac electrical stability, the effects could be catastrophic, potentially leading to sudden cardiac death. It will be important to determine the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in order to prepare for long-term manned lunar and interplanetary missions and to develop appropriate countermeasures. Electrical alternans affecting the ST segment and T-wave have been demonstrated to be common among patients at increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias. Subtle electrical alternans on the ECG may serve as a noninvasive marker of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. We are studying indices of electrical instability in the heart for long term space missions by non-invasively measuring microvolt level T-wave alternans in a reduced gravity environment. In this investigation we are using volunteer subjects on the KC-135 aircraft as an initial study of the effect of electrical adaptation of the heart to microgravity. T-wave alternans will be analyzed for heart rate variability and QT restitution curve plotting will be compared for statistical significance.

  10. Introduction: Mapping and control of complex cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Christini, David J.; Glass, Leon

    2002-09-01

    This paper serves as an introduction to the Focus Issue on mapping and control of complex cardiac arrhythmias. We first introduce basic concepts of cardiac electrophysiology and describe the main clinical methods being used to treat arrhythmia. We then provide a brief summary of the main themes contained in the articles in this Focus Issue. In recent years there have been important advances in the ability to map the spread of excitation in intact hearts and in laboratory settings. This work has been combined with simulations that use increasingly realistic geometry and physiology. Waves of excitation and contraction in the heart do not always propagate with constant velocity but are often subject to instabilities that may lead to fluctuations in velocity and cycle time. Such instabilities are often treated best in the context of simple one- or two-dimensional geometries. An understanding of the mechanisms of propagation and wave stability is leading to the implementation of different stimulation protocols in an effort to modify or eliminate abnormal rhythms. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779601

  11. Arrhythmias, Sudden Cardiac Death and incapacitation of pilots

    PubMed Central

    Mantziari, L; Styliadis, C; Kourtidou-Papadeli, C; Styliadis, I

    2008-01-01

    Inflight medical emergencies occur at a rate of 20 to 100 per million passengers, with a death rate of 0.1 to 1 per million. Cardiac, neurologic, and respiratory complaints comprise the more serious emergencies, as defined by aircraft diversion or use of ground-based medical assistance. In this paper, we review changes seen in the resting electrocardiogram in normal individuals exposed to high altitude, alongside important implications for patients with heart diseases in high altitude exposures and the possible effects of high altitude to permanent cardiac pacemakers. Arrhythmias in pilots and public safety are revisited together with the guidelines of the Joint Aviation Requirements (JAR) in Europe. The situation of Military flights is also discussed. Physicians ought to become knowledgeable about the specific medical job standards for their patients when asked to render opinions regarding fitness to fly. A database must be established to obtain prospective data that defines the risk of accidents in patients who are or were being treated for arrhythmias. Current guidelines could then be updated and revised as appropriate. PMID:19050752

  12. Role of CaMKII in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism in vertebrates for the regulation of signaling. With regard to the cardiovascular system, phosphorylation of myocyte targets is critical for the regulation of excitation contraction coupling, metabolism, intracellular calcium regulation, mitochondrial activity, transcriptional regulation, and cytoskeletal dynamics. In fact, pathways that tune protein kinase signaling have been a mainstay for cardiovascular therapies for the past 60 years. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase with numerous roles in human physiology. Dysfunction in CaMKII-based signaling has been linked with a host of cardiovascular phenotypes including heart failure and arrhythmia, and CaMKII levels are elevated in human and animal disease models of heart disease. While nearly a decade has been invested in targeting CaMKII for the treatment of heart failure and arrhythmia phenotypes, to date, approaches to target the molecule for antiarrhythmic benefit have been unsuccessful for reasons that are still not entirely clear, although (1) lack of compound specificity and (2) the multitude of downstream targets are likely contributing factors. This review will provide an update on current pathways regulated by CaMKII with the goal of illustrating potential upstream regulatory mechanisms and downstream targets that may be modulated for the prevention of cardiac electrical defects. While the review will cover multiple aspects of CaMKII dysfunction in cardiovascular disease, we have given special attention to the potential of CaMKII-associated late Na(+) current as a novel therapeutic target for cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:25577293

  13. 78 FR 36787 - Rechanneling the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk Assessment During Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Rechanneling the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia... the Current Cardiac Risk Paradigm: Arrhythmia Risk Assessment During Drug Development Without the... the current guidelines, and the importance of a uniform assay schema. Date and Time: The...

  14. Aconitine "challenge" test reveals a single whole-body exposure to diesel exhaust increases cardiac arrhythmia risk in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between cardiac electrical dysfunction, arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electri...

  15. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    A change in the heart's normal electrical conduction system can result in an arrhythmia or irregular heartbeat. An arrhythmia can be an abnormally slow heartbeat, or an abnormally fast heartbeat. In ...

  16. Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    An arrhythmia is a problem with the rate or rhythm of your heartbeat. It means that your heart beats ... is called bradycardia. The most common type of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and ...

  17. Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Arrhythmia? Español An arrhythmia (ah-RITH-me-ah) is a problem with ... rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, ...

  18. Ventricular Arrhythmias in Apparently Normal Hearts: Who Needs an Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator?

    PubMed

    Tan, Alex Y; Ellenbogen, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia is often considered a benign form of ventricular arrhythmia in patients without apparent structural heart disease. However, a subset of patients may develop malignant ventricular arrhythmias and present with syncope and sudden cardiac arrest. Survivors of cardiac arrest are candidates for implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs). The indications for ICDs in patients with less than a full-blown cardiac arrest presentation but with electrocardiographically high-risk ectopy features remain uncertain. This article addresses some of the uncertainties and pitfalls in ICD risk stratification in this patient group and explores potential mechanisms for malignant conversion of benign premature ventricular complexes to sustained arrhythmia. PMID:27521094

  19. Exact coherent structures: from fluid turbulence to cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Roman; Marcotte, Christopher; Byrne, Gregory

    2014-03-01

    Ventricular fibrillation, a life threatening cardiac arrhythmia, is an example of spatiotemporally chaotic state dominated by multiple interacting spiral waves. Recent studies of weak fluid turbulence suggest that spatiotemporal chaos in general can be understood as a walk among exact unstable regular solutions (exact coherent states, ECS) of nonlinear evolution equations. Several classes of ECS are believed to play a dominant role; most typically these are equilibria and periodic orbits or relative equilibria and relative periodic orbits for systems with global continuous symmetries. Numerical methods originally developed in the context of fluid turbulence can also be applied to models of cardiac dynamics which possess translational and rotational symmetries and, indeed, allowed us to identify relative equilibria and periodic orbits describing isolated spirals with, respectively, fixed and drifting cores. In order to find regular solutions featuring multiple interacting spirals a new approach is required that takes into consideration the dynamics of slowly drifting cores associated with local, rather than global, symmetries. We describe how local symmetries can be reduced and more general types of ECS computed that dominate spiral wave chaos in models of cardiac tissue.

  20. A Case for Pharmacogenomics in Management of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Kandoi, Gaurav; Nanda, Anjali; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Disorders of the cardiac rhythm are quite prevalent in clinical practice. Though the variability in drug response between individuals has been extensively studied, this information has not been widely used in clinical practice. Rapid advances in the field of pharmacogenomics have provided us with crucial insights on inter-individual genetic variability and its impact on drug metabolism and action. Technologies for faster and cheaper genetic testing and even personal genome sequencing would enable clinicians to optimize prescription based on the genetic makeup of the individual, which would open up new avenues in the area of personalized medicine. We have systematically looked at literature evidence on pharmacogenomics markers for anti-arrhythmic agents from the OpenPGx consortium collection and reason the applicability of genetics in the management of arrhythmia. We also discuss potential issues that need to be resolved before personalized pharmacogenomics becomes a reality in regular clinical practice. PMID:22557843

  1. Role of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Haruaki

    2014-05-01

    The sarcolemmal adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K(+) (sarcKATP) channel in the heart is a hetero-octamer comprising the pore-forming subunit Kir6.2 and the regulatory subunit sulfonylurea receptor SUR2A. By functional analysis of genetically engineered mice lacking sarcKATP channels, the pathophysiological roles of the K(+) channel in the heart have been extensively evaluated. Although mitochondrial KATP (mitoKATP) channel is proposed to be an important effector for the protection of ischemic myocardium and the inhibition of ischemia/reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias, the molecular identity of mitoKATP channel has not been established. Although selective sarcKATP-channel blockers can prevent ischemia/reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias by inhibiting the action potential shortening in the acute phase, the drugs may aggravate the ischemic damages due to intracellular Ca(2+) overload. The sarcKATP channel is also mandatory for optimal adaptation to hemodynamic stress such as sympathetic activation. Dysfunction of mutated sarcKATP channels in atrial cells may lead to electrical instability and atrial fibrillation. Recently, it has been proposed that the gain-of-function mutation of cardiac Kir6.1 channel can be a pathogenic substrate for J wave syndromes, a cause of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation as early repolarization syndrome or Brugada syndrome, whereas loss of function of the channel mutations can underlie sudden infant death syndrome. However, precise role of Kir6.1 channels in cardiac cells remains to be defined and further study may be needed to clarify the role of Kir6.1 channel in the heart. PMID:24367007

  2. Ubiquitous health monitoring and real-time cardiac arrhythmias detection: a case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Haiying; Zuo, Decheng; Hou, Kun-Mean; De Vaulx, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    As the symptoms and signs of heart diseases that cause sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmia has attracted great attention. Due to limitations in time and space, traditional approaches to cardiac arrhythmias detection fail to provide a real-time continuous monitoring and testing service applicable in different environmental conditions. Integrated with the latest technologies in ECG (electrocardiograph) analysis and medical care, the pervasive computing technology makes possible the ubiquitous cardiac care services, and thus brings about new technical challenges, especially in the formation of cardiac care architecture and realization of the real-time automatic ECG detection algorithm dedicated to care devices. In this paper, a ubiquitous cardiac care prototype system is presented with its architecture framework well elaborated. This prototype system has been tested and evaluated in all the clinical-/home-/outdoor-care modes with a satisfactory performance in providing real-time continuous cardiac arrhythmias monitoring service unlimitedly adaptable in time and space. PMID:24211993

  3. Detection and Prevention of Cardiac Arrhythmias During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pillai, Dilip; Rosenbaum, David S.; Liszka, Kathy J.; York, David W.; Mackin, Michael A.; Lichter, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    There have been reports suggesting that long-duration space flight might lead to an increased risk of potentially serious heart rhythm disturbances. If space flight does, in fact, significantly decrease cardiac electrical stability, the effects could be catastrophic, potentially leading to sudden cardiac death. It will be important to determine the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in order to prepare for long-term manned lunar and interplanetary missions and to develop appropriate countermeasures. Our hypothesis is that prolonged exposure to microgravity will alter T wave alternans measurements, decrease heart rate variance, increase QT dispersion, decrease heart rate recovery and alter QT restitution curve. A recently published study has shown that long duration spaceflights prolong cardiac conduction and repolarization. They concluded that long duration flight is associated with QT interval prolongation and may increase arrhythmia susceptibility. We propose using computer technology as a noninvasive clinical tool to detect and study clinically significant TWA during standard exercise testing using electrode systems specifically adapted for the purpose of obtaining and measuring TWA. A population of approximately 15 healthy men and 5 healthy women subjects, representative of the astronaut cohort will be asked to voluntarily participate in this study. Their blood pressure and ECG/TWA will be measured pre-flight and in-flight. Prior to flight, subjects will be asked to participate in an orientation session. Still photos will be taken of the skin where the conductive gel is used for the multi-segment sensors. Photos will be recorded preflight, immediately postflight, and several times during the proceeding week until it has been determined that any skin reaction has disappeared or that no rash is present and will not appear.

  4. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with a liquid protein diet for the treatment of obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Lantigua, R.A.; Amatruda, J.M.; Biddle, T.L.; Forbes, G.B.; Lockwood, D.H.

    1980-09-25

    Our data demonstrate that a liquid protein diet is frequently associated with potentially life-threatening arrhythmias that are not detected on routine electrocardiography. Several studies of metabolic balance failed to reveal a cause for these arrhythmias. We recommended that the use of liquid protein diets should be terminated pending further investigation of the causes and prevention of the cardiac toxicity.

  5. Getting your signals straight. Comparing radio-frequency ablation and cryoablation for treating cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    2010-08-01

    Radio-frequency ablation has proven to be an effective method for treating cardiac arrhythmias. However, a newer treatment method called cryoablation is becoming increasingly popular. In this article, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. PMID:21305902

  6. Proton Pump Inhibitor Use Is not Associated with Cardiac Arrhythmia in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kenneth P.; Lee, Joon; Mark, Roger G.; Feng, Mornin; Celi, Leo A.; Danziger, John

    2016-01-01

    Hypomagnesemia can lead to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, observational data has linked chronic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) exposure to hypomagnesemia. Whether PPI exposure increases the risk for arrhythmias has not been well studied. Using a large, single center inception cohort of critically ill patients, we examined whether PPI exposure was associated with admission electrocardiogram (ECG) readings of a cardiac arrhythmia in over 8000 patients. There were 24.5% PPI users while 6% were taking a histamine 2 antagonist. 14.3% had a cardiac arrhythmia. PPI use was associated with a 1.18 (95% CI=1.02–1.36, p=0.02) unadjusted and 0.96 (95% CI=0.83–1.12, p=0.62) adjusted risk of arrhythmia. Amongst diuretic users (n=2468), PPI use was similarly not associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. In summary, in a large cohort of critically ill patients, PPI exposure is not associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:25655574

  7. Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... beats too quickly, too slowly, or with an irregular pattern. When the heart beats faster than normal, ... of arrhythmia is atrial fibrillation, which causes an irregular and fast heart beat. Many factors can affect ...

  8. Exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in horses: Review of the literature and comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Navas de Solis, C

    2016-07-01

    Arrhythmias are common in equine athletes during and immediately after exercise. Many of these rhythm variations are not clinically relevant. In horses, a link between different exercising arrhythmias and poor performance or between exercising arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is strongly suspected but not fully understood or proven. SCD during races or competitions is rare, but has catastrophic consequences for the safety of the human partner and public perceptions of welfare during equestrian sports. This review summarises current knowledge of equine exercise arrhythmias and their implications in SCD and compares existing principles and recommendations for equine subjects with those for human athletes. PMID:27156002

  9. Aconitine Challenge Test Reveals a Single Exposure to Air Pollution Causes Increased Cardiac Arrhythmia Risk in Hypertensive Rats - Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electrical dysfunction. In this study, ...

  10. Recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias for Holter Monitoring Services

    PubMed Central

    Lorga Filho, Adalberto; Cintra, Fatima Dumas; Lorga, Adalberto; Grupi, Cesar José; Pinho, Claudio; Moreira, Dalmo Antonio Ribeiro; Sobral Filho, Dario C.; de Brito, Fabio Sandoli; Kruse, José Claudio Lupi; Neto, José Sobral

    2013-01-01

    Background There are innumerous indicators to assure the quality of a service. However, medical competence and the proper performance of a procedure determine its final quality. The Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias recommends minimum parameters necessary to guarantee the excellence of ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring services. Objective To recommend minimum medical competences and the information required to issue a Holter monitoring report. Methods This study was grounded in the concept of evidence-based medicine and, when evidence was not available, the opinion of a writing committee was used to formulate the recommendation. That committee consisted of professionals with experience on the difficulties of the method and management in providing services in that area. Results The professional responsible for the Holter monitoring analysis should know cardiovascular pathologies and have consistent formation on electrocardiography, including cardiac arrhythmias and their differential diagnoses. The report should be written in a clear and objective way. The minimum parameters that comprise a Holter report should include statistics of the exam, as well as quantification and analysis of the rhythm disorders observed during monitoring. Conclusion Ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring should be performed by professionals knowledgeable about electrocardiographic analysis, whose report should comprise the minimum parameters mentioned in this document. PMID:24030077

  11. Unveiling specific triggers and precipitating factors for fatal cardiac events in inherited arrhythmia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadashi; Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes, such as long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, early repolarization syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and their latent forms, are at risk for fatal arrhythmias. These diseases are typically associated with genetic mutations that perturb cardiac ionic currents. The analysis of cardiac events by genotype-phenotype correlation studies has revealed that fatal arrhythmias in some genotypes are triggered by physical or emotional stress, and those in the others are more likely to occur during sleep or at rest. Thus, the risk stratification and management of affected patients differ strikingly according to the genetic variant of the inherited arrhythmia syndrome. Risk stratification may be further refined by considering the precipitating factors, such as drugs, bradycardia, electrolyte disturbances, fever, and cardiac memory. Moreover, an increasing number of studies imply that the susceptibility of fatal arrhythmias in patients with acute coronary syndrome or takotsubo cardiomyopathy is at least partly ascribed to the genetic variants causing inherited arrhythmia syndromes. In this article, we review the recent advances in the understanding of the molecular genetics and genotype-phenotype correlations in inherited arrhythmia syndromes and consider the triggers and precipitating factors for fatal arrhythmias in these disorders. Further studies to explore the triggers and precipitating factors specific to the genotypes and diseases are needed for better clinical management. PMID:25925977

  12. The electrocardiogram in the assessment of the effect of drugs on cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, D S

    1978-01-01

    The search for the ideal antiarrhythmic drug continues since none of the available agents offers optimum antiarrhythmic therapy. The continuing search coupled with the interest in the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias has led to the development of new techniques for the study of arrhythmias and antiarrhythmic drugs. In this article it is proposed to discuss the electrocardiographic methods used in the assessment of antiarrhythmic drugs. Firstly, to discuss the electrocardiogram in the assessment of the clinical electrophysiological properties of a drug and secondly, the electrocardiogram in the assessment of the value of the drug in the management of cardiac arrhythmias in man. PMID:365208

  13. Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Sprouting and Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias after Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Yi; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmogenesis is thought to be a common cause of sudden cardiac death following myocardial infarction (MI). Nerve remodeling as a result of MI is known to be an important genesis of life-threatening arrhythmias. It is hypothesized that neural modulation might serve as a therapeutic option of malignant arrhythmias. In fact, left stellectomy or β-blocker therapy is shown to be effective in the prevention of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), and sudden cardiac death (SCD) after MI both in patients and in animal models. Results from decades of research already evidenced a positive relationship between abnormal nerve density and ventricular arrhythmias after MI. In this review, we summarized the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac sympathetic rejuvenation and mechanisms related to sympathetic hyperinnervation and arrhythmogenesis after MI and analyzed the potential therapeutic implications of nerve sprouting modification for ventricular arrhythmias and SCD control. PMID:26793403

  14. Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Sprouting and Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang-Yi; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmogenesis is thought to be a common cause of sudden cardiac death following myocardial infarction (MI). Nerve remodeling as a result of MI is known to be an important genesis of life-threatening arrhythmias. It is hypothesized that neural modulation might serve as a therapeutic option of malignant arrhythmias. In fact, left stellectomy or β-blocker therapy is shown to be effective in the prevention of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), and sudden cardiac death (SCD) after MI both in patients and in animal models. Results from decades of research already evidenced a positive relationship between abnormal nerve density and ventricular arrhythmias after MI. In this review, we summarized the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac sympathetic rejuvenation and mechanisms related to sympathetic hyperinnervation and arrhythmogenesis after MI and analyzed the potential therapeutic implications of nerve sprouting modification for ventricular arrhythmias and SCD control. PMID:26793403

  15. The influence of motor activity on the development of cardiac arrhythmias during experimental emotional stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulyaninskiy, L. S.; Urmancheyeva, T. G.; Stepanyan, Y. P.; Fufacheva, A. A.; Gritsak, A. V.; Kuznetsova, B. A.; Kvitka, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental emotional stress which can produce various disorders of cardiac rhythm: sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, ventricular, extrasystoles and paroxysmal ventricular tachysystoles was studied. In these conditions the adrenalin content in the blood and myocardium is increased 3 to 4 times. It is found that moderate motor activity leads to a relative decrease of adrenalin in the myocardium and arrest of cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. Sympathetic restraint of respiratory sinus arrhythmia: implications for vagal-cardiac tone assessment in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Myers, C. W.; Halliwill, J. R.; Seidel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Clinicians and experimentalists routinely estimate vagal-cardiac nerve traffic from respiratory sinus arrhythmia. However, evidence suggests that sympathetic mechanisms may also modulate respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Our study examined modulation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia by sympathetic outflow. We measured R-R interval spectral power in 10 volunteers that breathed sequentially at 13 frequencies, from 15 to 3 breaths/min, before and after beta-adrenergic blockade. We fitted changes of respiratory frequency R-R interval spectral power with a damped oscillator model: frequency-dependent oscillations with a resonant frequency, generated by driving forces and modified by damping influences. beta-Adrenergic blockade enhanced respiratory sinus arrhythmia at all frequencies (at some, fourfold). The damped oscillator model fit experimental data well (39 of 40 ramps; r = 0.86 +/- 0.02). beta-Adrenergic blockade increased respiratory sinus arrhythmia by amplifying respiration-related driving forces (P < 0.05), without altering resonant frequency or damping influences. Both spectral power data and the damped oscillator model indicate that cardiac sympathetic outflow markedly reduces heart period oscillations at all frequencies. This challenges the notion that respiratory sinus arrhythmia is mediated simply by vagal-cardiac nerve activity. These results have important implications for clinical and experimental estimation of human vagal cardiac tone.

  17. The role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to treatment of patients with cardiac arrhythmias: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Chen, Jian; Dobreanu, Dan; Madrid, Antonio Hernandez; Tilz, Roland; Dagres, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias is increasingly complex because of continuous technological advance and multifaceted clinical conditions associated with ageing of the population, the presence of co-morbidities and the need for polypharmacy. The aim of this European Heart Rhythm Association Scientific Initiatives Committee survey was to provide an insight into the role of the Arrhythmia Team, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to management of patients with cardiac arrhythmias. Forty-eight centres from 18 European countries replied to the Web-based questionnaire. The presence of an Arrhythmia Team was reported by 44% of the respondents, whereas 17% were not familiar with this term. Apart from the electrophysiologist, health professionals who should belong to such teams, according to the majority of the respondents, include a clinical cardiologist, a nurse, a cardiac surgeon, a heart failure specialist, a geneticist, and a geriatrician. Its main activity should be dedicated to the management of patients with complex clinical conditions or refractory or inherited forms of arrhythmias. When present, the Arrhythmia Team was considered helpful by 95% of respondents; the majority of centres (79%) agreed that it should be implemented. The Arrhythmia Team seems to be connected to important expectations in the management of cardiac arrhythmias. The efficacy of such an integrated and multidisciplinary approach should be encouraged and tested in clinical practice. PMID:27174994

  18. Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... chambers. The walls of the heart squeeze together (contract) to push blood through the chambers. The contractions ... heart beats too slowly. Cardiac defibrillation (very brief electric shock) can be used to stop an abnormal ...

  19. Next Generation Sequencing for the Diagnosis of Cardiac Arrhythmia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, Steven A.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes are collectively associated with substantial morbidity, yet our understanding of the genetic architecture of these conditions remains limited. Recent technological advances in DNA sequencing have led to the commercialization of genetic testing now widely available in clinical practice. In particular, next generation sequencing allows the large-scale and rapid assessment of entire genomes. Although next generation sequencing represents a major technological advance, it has introduced numerous challenges with respect to the interpretation of genetic variation, and has opened a veritable floodgate of biological data of unknown clinical significance to practitioners. In this review, we discuss current genetic testing indications for inherited arrhythmia syndromes, broadly outline characteristics of next generation sequencing techniques, and highlight challenges associated with such testing. We further summarize future directions that will be necessary to address to enable the widespread adoption of next generation sequencing in the routine management of patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes. PMID:25625719

  20. Sympathetic cardiac hyperinnervation and atrial autonomic imbalance in diet-induced obesity promote cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Wohaib; Streiff, Cole T.; Houle, Jennifer C.; Woodward, William R.; Giraud, George D.; Brooks, Virginia L.; Habecker, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but the mechanisms are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that obesity-induced cardiac sympathetic outgrowth and hyperinnervation promotes the development of arrhythmic events. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–275 g), fed a high-fat diet (33% kcal/fat), diverged into obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) groups and were compared with rats fed normal chow (13% kcal/fat; CON). In vitro experiments showed that both OR and OP rats exhibited hyperinnervation of the heart and high sympathetic outgrowth compared with CON rats, even though OR rats are not obese. Despite the hyperinnervation and outgrowth, we showed that, in vivo, OR rats were less susceptible to arrhythmic events after an intravenous epinephrine challenge compared with OP rats. On examining total and stimulus-evoked neurotransmitter levels in an ex vivo system, we demonstrate that atrial acetylcholine content and release were attenuated in OP compared with OR and CON groups. OP rats also expressed elevated atrial norepinephrine content, while norepinephrine release was suppressed. These findings suggest that the consumption of a high-fat diet, even in the absence of overt obesity, stimulates sympathetic outgrowth and hyperinnervation of the heart. However, normalized cardiac parasympathetic nervous system control may protect the heart from arrhythmic events. PMID:24014675

  1. Functional interaction between charged nanoparticles and cardiac tissue: a new paradigm for cardiac arrhythmia?

    PubMed Central

    Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Korchev, Yuri E; Lab, Max J; Tetley, Teresa D; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effect of surface charge of therapeutic nanoparticles on sarcolemmal ionic homeostasis and the initiation of arrhythmias. Materials & methods Cultured neonatal rat myocytes were exposed to 50 nm-charged polystyrene latex nanoparticles and examined using a combination of hopping probe scanning ion conductance microscopy, optical recording of action potential characteristics and patch clamp. Results Positively charged, amine-modified polystyrene latex nanoparticles showed cytotoxic effects and induced large-scale damage to cardiomyocyte membranes leading to calcium alternans and cell death. By contrast, negatively charged, carboxyl-modified polystyrene latex nanoparticles (NegNPs) were not overtly cytotoxic but triggered formation of 50–250-nm nanopores in the membrane. Cells exposed to NegNPs revealed pro-arrhythmic events, such as delayed afterdepolarizations, reduction in conduction velocity and pathological increment of action potential duration together with an increase in ionic current throughout the membrane, carried by the nanopores. Conclusion The utilization of charged nanoparticles is a novel concept for targeting cardiac excitability. However, this unique nanoscopic investigation reveals an altered electrophysiological substrate, which sensitized the heart cells towards arrhythmias. PMID:23140503

  2. Fetal cardiac arrhythmia detection and in utero therapy

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Janette F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    The human fetal heart develops arrhythmias and conduction disturbances in response to ischemia, inflammation, electrolyte disturbances, altered load states, structural defects, inherited genetic conditions, and many other causes. Yet sinus rhythm is present without altered rate or rhythm in some of the most serious electrophysiological diseases, which makes detection of diseases of the fetal conduction system challenging in the absence of magnetocardiographic or electrocardiographic recording techniques. Life-threatening changes in QRS or QT intervals can be completely unrecognized if heart rate is the only feature to be altered. For many fetal arrhythmias, echocardiography alone can assess important clinical parameters for diagnosis. Appropriate treatment of the fetus requires awareness of arrhythmia characteristics, mechanisms, and potential associations. Criteria to define fetal bradycardia specific to gestational age are now available and may allow detection of ion channelopathies, which are associated with fetal and neonatal bradycardia. Ectopic beats, once thought to be entirely benign, are now recognized to have important pathologic associations. Fetal tachyarrhythmias can now be defined precisely for mechanism-specific therapy and for subsequent monitoring of response. This article reviews the current and future diagnostic techniques and pharmacologic treatments for fetal arrhythmia. PMID:20418904

  3. Non-Linear Dynamics of Cardiac Alternans: Subcellular to Tissue-Level Mechanisms of Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Gaeta, Stephen A.; Christini, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac repolarization alternans is a rhythm disturbance of the heart in which rapid stimulation elicits a beat-to-beat alternation in the duration of action potentials and magnitude of intracellular calcium transients in individual cardiac myocytes. Although this phenomenon has been identified as a potential precursor to dangerous reentrant arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, significant uncertainty remains regarding its mechanism and no clinically practical means of halting its occurrence or progression currently exists. Cardiac alternans has well-characterized tissue, cellular, and subcellular manifestations, the mechanisms and interplay of which are an active area of research. PMID:22783195

  4. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26733873

  5. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26733873

  6. Congenital Deafness with Cardiac Arrhythmias: The Jervell and Lange-Nielsen Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Richard A.; Macdonald, Dick, II

    1980-01-01

    The Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome, affecting 0.3 percent of congenitally deaf persons, consists of severe cardiac arrhythmias and sensorineural hearing loss. The authors recommend that every congenitally deaf child with suspicious symptoms receive an electrocardiogram and that professionals who work with deaf children not only inform…

  7. Cardiac arrhythmia classification using multi-modal signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalidas, V; Tamil, L S

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, as a contribution to the Physionet/Computing in Cardiology 2015 Challenge, we present individual algorithms to accurately classify five different life threatening arrhythmias with the goal of suppressing false alarm generation in intensive care units. Information obtained by analysing electrocardiogram, photoplethysmogram and arterial blood pressure signals was utilized to develop the classification models. Prior to classification, the signals were subject to a signal pre-processing stage for quality analysis. Classification was performed using a combination of support vector machine based machine learning approach and logical analysis techniques. The predicted result for a certain arrhythmia classification model was verified by logical analysis to aid in reduction of false alarms. Separate feature vectors were formed for predicting the presence or absence of each arrhythmia, using both spectral and time-domain information. The training and test data were obtained from the Physionet/CinC Challenge 2015 database. Classification algorithms were written for two different categories of data, namely real-time and retrospective, whose data lengths were 10 s and an additional 30 s, respectively. For the real-time test dataset, sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 82% were obtained. Similarly, for the retrospective test dataset, sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 86% were obtained. PMID:27454417

  8. Pharmacy Students’ Performance and Perceptions in a Flipped Teaching Pilot on Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Eric J.; Lopes, Ingrid; Rajagopalan, Vanishree

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To implement the flipped teaching method in a 3-class pilot on cardiac arrhythmias and to assess the impact of the intervention on academic performance and student perceptions. Design. An intervention group of 101 first-year pharmacy students, who took the class with the flipped teaching method, were supplied with prerecorded lectures prior to their 3 classes (1 class in each of the following subjects: basic sciences, pharmacology, and therapeutics) on cardiac arrhythmias. Class time was focused on active-learning and case-based exercises. Students then took a final examination that included questions on cardiac arrhythmias. The examination scores of the intervention group were compared to scores of the Spring 2011 control group of 105 first-year students who took the class with traditional teaching methods. An online survey was conducted to assess student feedback from the intervention group. Assessment. The mean examination scores of the intervention group were significantly higher than the mean examination scores of the control group for the cardiac arrhythmia classes in pharmacology (with 89.6 ± 2.0% vs 56.8 ± 2.2%, respectively) and therapeutics (89.2 ± 1.4% vs 73.7 ± 2.1%, respectively). The survey indicated higher student satisfaction for flipped classes with highly rated learning objectives, recordings, and in-class activities. Conclusion. Use of the flipped teaching method in a 3-class pilot on cardiac arrhythmias improved examination scores for 2 of the 3 classes (pharmacology and therapeutics). Student satisfaction was influenced by the quality of the learning objectives, prerecorded lectures, and inclass active-learning activities. PMID:25657372

  9. Postoperative arrhythmias after cardiac surgery: incidence, risk factors, and therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Peretto, Giovanni; Durante, Alessandro; Limite, Luca Rosario; Cianflone, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias are a known complication after cardiac surgery and represent a major cause of morbidity, increased length of hospital stay, and economic costs. However, little is known about incidence, risk factors, and treatment of early postoperative arrhythmias. Both tachyarrhythmias and bradyarrhythmias can present in the postoperative period. In this setting, atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder. Postoperative atrial fibrillation is often self-limiting, but it may require anticoagulation therapy and either a rate or rhythm control strategy. However, ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances can also occur. Sustained ventricular arrhythmias in the recovery period after cardiac surgery may warrant acute treatment and long-term preventive strategy in the absence of reversible causes. Transient bradyarrhythmias may be managed with temporary pacing wires placed at surgery, but significant and persistent atrioventricular block or sinus node dysfunction can occur with the need for permanent pacing. We provide a complete and updated review about mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment strategies for the main postoperative arrhythmias. PMID:24511410

  10. Postoperative Arrhythmias after Cardiac Surgery: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Therapeutic Management

    PubMed Central

    Cianflone, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias are a known complication after cardiac surgery and represent a major cause of morbidity, increased length of hospital stay, and economic costs. However, little is known about incidence, risk factors, and treatment of early postoperative arrhythmias. Both tachyarrhythmias and bradyarrhythmias can present in the postoperative period. In this setting, atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder. Postoperative atrial fibrillation is often self-limiting, but it may require anticoagulation therapy and either a rate or rhythm control strategy. However, ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances can also occur. Sustained ventricular arrhythmias in the recovery period after cardiac surgery may warrant acute treatment and long-term preventive strategy in the absence of reversible causes. Transient bradyarrhythmias may be managed with temporary pacing wires placed at surgery, but significant and persistent atrioventricular block or sinus node dysfunction can occur with the need for permanent pacing. We provide a complete and updated review about mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment strategies for the main postoperative arrhythmias. PMID:24511410

  11. New directions in cardiac arrhythmia management: present challenges and future solutions.

    PubMed

    Nattel, Stanley; Andrade, Jason; Macle, Laurent; Rivard, Lena; Dyrda, Katia; Mondesert, Blandine; Khairy, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a major contributor to population morbidity and mortality. Enormous advances in arrhythmia management have occurred over the 60 years since the founding of the Montreal Heart Institute, but important challenges remain. The purpose of this article is to identify the areas of cardiac arrhythmia therapy that need improvement and to discuss the evolving approaches that promise solutions. Challenges in diagnosis, detection, and risk-stratification include difficulties in separating benign from high-risk syncope and pinpointing the underlying causes, the detection of silent atrial fibrillation in patients at risk of stroke, and inadequate identification of sudden-death risk. Implantable devices are limited by the need for battery and device replacements, device complications like infection and dysfunction, and lead complications like fracture, infection, or displacement. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy, although widely used, is plagued by a very limited range of available agents, supply issues, insufficient efficacy, and significant adverse effect risk. Health economic concerns include the high cost of new technologies, challenges in establishing cost effectiveness, and restrictive practices of government or third-party payers. Major improvements in arrhythmia management can be expected from new discoveries and technological developments in genetics, innovative diagnostic tools for arrhythmia monitoring, imaging and analysis, new approaches to antiarrhythmic drug development, biological therapies, and continuing improvement in implantable device technology like further miniaturization, leadless technology, and use of novel energy sources. As exciting as the developments in arrhythmia management have been in the past, we can look forward to exponential improvement in our ability to manage arrhythmia patients in the near future. PMID:25432137

  12. Cardiac bidomain bath-loading effects during arrhythmias: interaction with anatomical heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Martin J; Vigmond, Edward; Plank, Gernot

    2011-12-21

    Cardiac tissue is always surrounded by conducting fluid, both in vivo (blood) and in experimental preparations (Tyrode's solution), which acts to increase conduction velocity (CV) close to the tissue-fluid interface, inducing transmural wavefront curvature. Despite its potential importance, computer modeling studies focused on arrhythmia mechanisms have previously not accounted for these bath-loading effects. Here, we investigate the increase in CV and concomitant change in transmural wavefront profiles upon both propagation and arrhythmia dynamics within models of differing anatomical complexity. In simplified slab models, in absence of transmural fiber rotation, bath-loading induced transmural wavefront curvature dominates, significantly increasing arrhythmia complexity compared to no bath. In the presence of fiber rotation, bath-loading effects are less striking and depend upon propagation direction: the bath accentuates natural concave curvature caused by transmurally rotating fibers, but attenuates convex curvature, which negates overall impact upon arrhythmia complexity. Finally, we demonstrate that the high degree of anatomical complexity within whole ventricular models modulates bath-loading induced transmural wavefront curvature. However, key is the increased surface CV that dramatically reduces both arrhythmia inducibility and resulting complexity by increasing wavelength and reducing the available excitable gap. Our findings highlight the importance of including bath-loading effects during arrhythmia mechanism investigations, which could have implications for interpreting and comparing simulation results with experimental data where such effects are inherently present. PMID:22208185

  13. Frequency of cardiac arrhythmias in high- and low- yielding dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Jafari Dehkordi, Afshin; Nasser Mohebi, Abdonnaser; Heidari Soreshjani, Masoumeh

    2014-01-01

    Electrocardiography (ECG) may be used to recognize cardiac disorders. Levels of milk production may change the serum electrolytes which its imbalance has a role in cardiac arrhythmia. Fifty high yielding and fifty low yielding Holstein dairy cows were used in this study. Electrocardiography was recorded by base-apex lead and blood samples were collected from jugular vein for measurement of serum elements such as sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorous, iron and magnesium. Cardiac dysrhythmias were detected more frequent in low yielding Holstein cows (62.00%) compared to high yielding Holstein cows (46.00%). The cardiac dysrhythmias that were observed in low yielding Holstein cows included sinus arrhythmia (34.70%), wandering pacemaker (22.45 %), bradycardia (18.37%), tachycardia (10.20%), atrial premature beat (2.04%), sinoatrial block (2.04%), atrial fibrillation (8.16%) and atrial tachycardia (2.04%). The cardiac dysrhythmias were observed in high yielding Holstein cows including, sinus arrhythmia (86.95%) and wandering pacemaker (13.05%). Also, notched P wave was observed to be 30% and 14% in high- and low- yielding Holstein cows respectively. The serum calcium concentration of low yielding Holstein cows was significantly lower than that of high yielding Holstein cows. There was not any detectable significant difference in other serum elements between high- and low- yielding Holstein cows. Based on the result of present study, could be concluded that low serum concentration of calcium results to more frequent dysrhythmias in low yielding Holstein cows. PMID:25568685

  14. Central Sympathetic Inhibition: a Neglected Approach for Treatment of Cardiac Arrhythmias?

    PubMed

    Cagnoni, Francesca; Destro, Maurizio; Bontempelli, Erika; Locatelli, Giovanni; Hering, Dagmara; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. Overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of comorbidities related to AF such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, obesity, insulin resistance, and obstructive sleep apnea. Methods that reduce sympathetic drive, such as centrally acting sympatho-inhibitory agents, have been shown to reduce the incidence of spontaneous or induced atrial arrhythmias, suggesting that neuromodulation may be helpful in controlling AF. Moxonidine acts centrally to reduce activity of the SNS, and clinical trials indicate that this is associated with a decreased AF burden in hypertensive patients with paroxysmal AF and reduced post-ablation recurrence of AF in patients with hypertension who underwent pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Furthermore, device-based approaches to reduce sympathetic drive, such as renal denervation, have yielded promising results in the prevention and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. In light of these recent findings, targeting elevated sympathetic drive with either pharmacological or device-based approaches has become a focus of clinical research. Here, we review the data currently available to explore the potential utility of sympatho-inhibitory therapies in the prevention and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26781253

  15. Ischemic, genetic and pharmacological origins of cardiac arrhythmias: The contribution of the Quebec Heart Institute

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, Benoît; Simard, Chantale; Gailis, Laimonis; Daleau, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Research in the field of basic electrophysiology at the Quebec Heart Institute (Laval Hospital, Quebec City, Quebec) has evolved since its beginning in the 1990s. Interests were focused on cardiac arrhythmias induced by drugs, allelic variants and metabolic factors produced during ischemia. The results have contributed to the creation of new standards in drug development, more specifically, testing all new drugs for their potential effects on cardiac potassium currents, which could produce life-threatening proarrhythmic effects. In a French-Canadian population, three heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms in hKv1.5, a gene encoding for a major atrial repolarizing current, were found. These variants affect the expression level of the hKv1.5 channel and change the inactivation process in the presence of its accessory beta subunit. Because these effects could shorten atrial action potential, their presence was tested in postcoronary bypass patients and a higher prevalence was found in patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation. Finally, three potentially proarrhythmic factors characteristic of ischemia were identified: pH decrease; oxygen free radicals, which both increase the flow of K+ ions through human ether-a-go-go-related gene and hKv1.5, producing a reduction in action potential duration, frequently leading to cardiac arrhythmias; and lysophosphatidylcholine, a metabolite involved in the production of cardiac arrhythmias early during ischemia that was shown to be a major cause of electrical uncoupling. Over the past decade, the Quebec Heart Institute has provided a significant amount of original data in the field of basic cardiac electrophysiology, specifically concerning arrhythmias originating from pharmacological agents, genetic background and cardiac ischemia. PMID:17932583

  16. Cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients taking antipsychotic drugs: cohort study using administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Sean; Bilker, Warren B; Knauss, Jill S; Margolis, David J; Kimmel, Stephen E; Reynolds, Robert F; Glasser, Dale B; Morrison, Mary F; Strom, Brian L

    2002-01-01

    Objective To examine the rates of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients with treated schizophrenia and in non-schizophrenic controls. Design Cohort study of outpatients using administrative data. Setting 3 US Medicaid programmes. Participants Patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine, haloperidol, risperidone, or thioridazine; a control group of patients with glaucoma; and a control group of patients with psoriasis. Main outcome measure Diagnosis of cardiac arrest or ventricular arrhythmia. Results Patients with treated schizophrenia had higher rates of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia than controls, with rate ratios ranging from 1.7 to 3.2. Overall, thioridazine was not associated with an increased risk compared with haloperidol (rate ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.7 to 1.2). However, thioridazine showed an increased risk of events at doses ⩾600 mg (2.6, 1.0 to 6.6; P=0.049) and a linear dose-response relation (P=0.038). Conclusions The increased risk of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients with treated schizophrenia could be due to the disease or its treatment. Overall, the risk with thioridazine was no worse than that with haloperidol. Thioridazine may, however, have a higher risk at high doses, although this finding could be due to chance. To reduce cardiac risk, thioridazine should be prescribed at the lowest dose needed to obtain an optimal therapeutic effect. What is already known on this topicThioridazine seems to prolong the electrocardiographic QT interval more than haloperidolAlthough QT prolongation is used as a marker of arrhythmogenicity, it is unknown whether thioridazine is any worse than haloperidol with regard to cardiac safetyWhat this study addsPatients taking antipsychotic drugs had higher risks of cardiac events than control patients with glaucoma or psoriasisOverall, the risk of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia was not higher with thioridazine than haloperidolThioridazine may

  17. Defects in Cytoskeletal Signaling Pathways, Arrhythmia, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sakima; Curran, Jerry; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Ankyrin polypeptides are cellular adapter proteins that tether integral membrane proteins to the cytoskeleton in a host of human organs. Initially identified as integral components of the cytoskeleton in erythrocytes, a recent explosion in ankyrin research has demonstrated that these proteins play prominent roles in cytoskeletal signaling pathways and membrane protein trafficking/regulation in a variety of excitable and non-excitable cells including heart and brain. Importantly, ankyrin research has translated from bench to bedside with the discovery of human gene variants associated with ventricular arrhythmias that alter ankyrin–based pathways. Ankyrin polypeptides have also been found to play an instrumental role in various forms of sinus node disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). Mouse models of ankyrin-deficiency have played fundamental roles in the translation of ankyrin-based research to new clinical understanding of human sinus node disease, AF, and ventricular tachycardia. PMID:22586405

  18. Current and future modalities of catheter ablation for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Haines, D E

    1992-01-01

    Catheter ablation has proven to be a safe and effective treatment for a wide variety of cardiac arrhythmias. By destroying the critical zone of conductive tissue responsible for impulse generation or propagation, the arrhythmias may be cured. A variety of modalities of catheter ablation have been tested in the past decade. Initially, high energy direct current shocks delivered through a conventional electrode catheter were used. Now, use of radiofrequency energy as a power supply has resulted in higher efficacy and much improved safety of this technique. New approaches including low energy direct current shock ablation, microwave hyperthermic ablation, and laser photocoagulation are being tested, and may result in further refinement of nonsurgical curative therapy of arrhythmias. PMID:10147817

  19. Control of Cardiac Arrhythmia by Nonlinear Spatiotemporal Delayed Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroujeni, Forough Rezaei; Vasegh, Nastaran; Sedigh, Ali Khaki

    The dynamic feedback control of the cardiac pacing interval has been widely used to suppress alternans. In this paper, temporally and spatially suppressing the alternans for cardiac tissue consisting of a one-dimensional chain of cardiac units is investigated. The model employed is a nonlinear partial difference equation. The model's fixed points and their stability conditions are determined, and bifurcations and chaos phenomenon have been studied by numerical simulations. The main objective of this paper is to stabilize the unstable fixed point of the model. The proposed approach is nonlinear spatiotemporal delayed feedback, and the appropriate interval for controller feedback gain is calculated using the linear stability analysis. It is proven that the proposed approach is robust with respect to all bifurcation parameter variations. Also, set point tracking is achieved by employing delayed feedback with an integrator. Finally, simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  20. Cardiac sodium channel palmitoylation regulates channel availability and myocyte excitability with implications for arrhythmia generation.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zifan; Xiao, Yucheng; Meng, Jingwei; Hudmon, Andy; Cummins, Theodore R

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav1.5) play an essential role in regulating cardiac electric activity by initiating and propagating action potentials in the heart. Altered Nav1.5 function is associated with multiple cardiac diseases including long-QT3 and Brugada syndrome. Here, we show that Nav1.5 is subject to palmitoylation, a reversible post-translational lipid modification. Palmitoylation increases channel availability and late sodium current activity, leading to enhanced cardiac excitability and prolonged action potential duration. In contrast, blocking palmitoylation increases closed-state channel inactivation and reduces myocyte excitability. We identify four cysteines as possible Nav1.5 palmitoylation substrates. A mutation of one of these is associated with cardiac arrhythmia (C981F), induces a significant enhancement of channel closed-state inactivation and ablates sensitivity to depalmitoylation. Our data indicate that alterations in palmitoylation can substantially control Nav1.5 function and cardiac excitability and this form of post-translational modification is likely an important contributor to acquired and congenital arrhythmias. PMID:27337590

  1. Cardiac sodium channel palmitoylation regulates channel availability and myocyte excitability with implications for arrhythmia generation

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zifan; Xiao, Yucheng; Meng, Jingwei; Hudmon, Andy; Cummins, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav1.5) play an essential role in regulating cardiac electric activity by initiating and propagating action potentials in the heart. Altered Nav1.5 function is associated with multiple cardiac diseases including long-QT3 and Brugada syndrome. Here, we show that Nav1.5 is subject to palmitoylation, a reversible post-translational lipid modification. Palmitoylation increases channel availability and late sodium current activity, leading to enhanced cardiac excitability and prolonged action potential duration. In contrast, blocking palmitoylation increases closed-state channel inactivation and reduces myocyte excitability. We identify four cysteines as possible Nav1.5 palmitoylation substrates. A mutation of one of these is associated with cardiac arrhythmia (C981F), induces a significant enhancement of channel closed-state inactivation and ablates sensitivity to depalmitoylation. Our data indicate that alterations in palmitoylation can substantially control Nav1.5 function and cardiac excitability and this form of post-translational modification is likely an important contributor to acquired and congenital arrhythmias. PMID:27337590

  2. Online cardiac arrhythmia classification by means of circle maps analysis implemented on an intelligent miniaturized sensor.

    PubMed

    Schiek, Michael; Schlösser, Mario; Schnitzer, Andreas; Ying, Hong

    2008-01-01

    The intermittent occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias like e.g. atrial fibrillation hampers their diagnosis and hence the treatment. Since persons suffering from atrial fibrillation are known to have a remarkable increased risk of stroke the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation is a matter of great importance. Easy and comfortable to use long term ECG recording systems capable of online arrhythmia classification might help to solve this problem. We developed an intelligent, miniaturized, and wireless networking sensor which allows lossless local data recordings up to 4 GB. With its outer dimensions of 20mm per rim and less than 15g of weight including the Lithium-Ion battery our modular designed sensor node is thoroughly capable of up to eight channel recordings with 8 kHz sample rate each and provides sufficient computational power for online digital signal processing. For online arrhythmia classification we will record one ECG channel and 3-axis accelerometer data with 512 Hz each, the later being used for activity classification based artifact identification. We adapted our recently developed circle maps analysis of short term heart rate variation to run on this miniaturized intelligent sensor powered by the Texas Instruments MSP430 microcontroller derivate F1611. With this configuration we started to evaluate the cardiac arrhythmia classification in long term ECG recordings. PMID:19162988

  3. Electrocardiographic Presentation, Cardiac Arrhythmias, and Their Management in β-Thalassemia Major Patients.

    PubMed

    Russo, Vincenzo; Rago, Anna; Papa, Andrea Antonio; Nigro, Gerardo

    2016-07-01

    Beta-thalassemia major (β-TM) is a genetic hemoglobin disorder characterized by an absent synthesis of globin chains that are essential for hemoglobin formation, causing chronic hemolytic anemia. Clinical management of thalassemia major consists in regular long-life red blood cell transfusions and iron chelation therapy to remove iron introduced in excess with transfusions. Iron deposition in combination with inflammatory and immunogenic factors is involved in the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in these patients. Heart failure and arrhythmias, caused by myocardial siderosis, are the most important life-limiting complications of iron overload in beta-thalassemia patients. Cardiac complications are responsible for 71% of global death in the beta-thalassemia major patients. The aim of this review was to describe the most frequent electrocardiographic abnormalities and arrhythmias observed in β-TM patients, analyzing their prognostic impact and current treatment strategies. PMID:27324981

  4. Mouse Models of SCN5A-Related Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Derangeon, Mickael; Montnach, Jérôme; Baró, Isabelle; Charpentier, Flavien

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of SCN5A gene, which encodes the α-subunit of the voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.5, underlie hereditary cardiac arrhythmic syndromes such as the type 3 long QT syndrome, cardiac conduction diseases, the Brugada syndrome, the sick sinus syndrome, a trial standstill, and numerous overlap syndromes. Patch-clamp studies in heterologous expression systems have provided important information to understand the genotype-phenotype relationships of these diseases. However, they could not clarify how SCN5A mutations can be responsible for such a large spectrum of diseases, for the late age of onset or the progressiveness of some of these diseases and for the overlapping syndromes. Genetically modified mice rapidly appeared as promising tools for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiac SCN5A-related arrhythmic syndromes and several mouse models have been established. This review presents the results obtained on these models that, for most of them, recapitulate the clinical phenotypes of the patients. This includes two models knocked out for Nav1.5 β1 and β3 auxiliary subunits that are also discussed. Despite their own limitations that we point out, the mouse models still appear as powerful tools to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of SCN5A-related diseases and offer the opportunity to investigate the secondary cellular consequences of SCN5A mutations such as the expression remodeling of other genes. This points out the potential role of these genes in the overall human phenotype. Finally, they constitute useful tools for addressing the role of genetic and environmental modifiers on cardiac electrical activity. PMID:22737129

  5. Cell and gene therapy for arrhythmias: Repair of cardiac conduction damage

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials generated in the sinoatrial node (SAN) dominate the rhythm and rate of a healthy human heart. Subsequently, these action potentials propagate to the whole heart via its conduction system. Abnormalities of impulse generation and/or propagation in a heart can cause arrhythmias. For example, SAN dysfunction or conduction block of the atrioventricular node can lead to serious bradycardia which is currently treated with an implanted electronic pacemaker. On the other hand, conduction damage may cause reentrant tachyarrhythmias which are primarily treated pharmacologically or by medical device-based therapies, including defibrillation and tissue ablation. However, drug therapies sometimes may not be effective or are associated with serious side effects. Device-based therapies for cardiac arrhythmias, even with well developed technology, still face inadequacies, limitations, hardware complications, and other challenges. Therefore, scientists are actively seeking other alternatives for antiarrhythmic therapy. In particular, cells and genes used for repairing cardiac conduction damage/defect have been investigated in various studies both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the complexities of the excitation and conduction systems of the heart, cell and gene-based strategies provide novel alternatives for treatment or cure of cardiac arrhythmias. This review summarizes some highlights of recent research progress in this field. PMID:22783301

  6. Risk Prediction of One-Year Mortality in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias Using Random Survival Forest

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Fen; Cai, Yun-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Li, Ye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Existing models for predicting mortality based on traditional Cox proportional hazard approach (CPH) often have low prediction accuracy. This paper aims to develop a clinical risk model with good accuracy for predicting 1-year mortality in cardiac arrhythmias patients using random survival forest (RSF), a robust approach for survival analysis. 10,488 cardiac arrhythmias patients available in the public MIMIC II clinical database were investigated, with 3,452 deaths occurring within 1-year followups. Forty risk factors including demographics and clinical and laboratory information and antiarrhythmic agents were analyzed as potential predictors of all-cause mortality. RSF was adopted to build a comprehensive survival model and a simplified risk model composed of 14 top risk factors. The built comprehensive model achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.81 measured by c-statistic with 10-fold cross validation. The simplified risk model also achieved a good accuracy of 0.799. Both results outperformed traditional CPH (which achieved a c-statistic of 0.733 for the comprehensive model and 0.718 for the simplified model). Moreover, various factors are observed to have nonlinear impact on cardiac arrhythmias prognosis. As a result, RSF based model which took nonlinearity into account significantly outperformed traditional Cox proportional hazard model and has great potential to be a more effective approach for survival analysis. PMID:26379761

  7. A Real-Time Cardiac Arrhythmia Classification System with Wearable Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Wei, Hongxing; Chen, Youdong; Tan, Jindong

    2012-01-01

    Long term continuous monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG) in a free living environment provides valuable information for prevention on the heart attack and other high risk diseases. This paper presents the design of a real-time wearable ECG monitoring system with associated cardiac arrhythmia classification algorithms. One of the striking advantages is that ECG analog front-end and on-node digital processing are designed to remove most of the noise and bias. In addition, the wearable sensor node is able to monitor the patient's ECG and motion signal in an unobstructive way. To realize the real-time medical analysis, the ECG is digitalized and transmitted to a smart phone via Bluetooth. On the smart phone, the ECG waveform is visualized and a novel layered hidden Markov model is seamlessly integrated to classify multiple cardiac arrhythmias in real time. Experimental results demonstrate that the clean and reliable ECG waveform can be captured in multiple stressed conditions and the real-time classification on cardiac arrhythmia is competent to other workbenches. PMID:23112746

  8. Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Bungo, Michael W.; Platts, Steven H.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Johnston, Smith L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias (Integrated Cardiovascular) will quantify the extent of long-duration space flightassociated cardiac atrophy (deterioration) on the International Space Station crewmembers.

  9. Role for the Unfolded Protein Response in Heart Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has been extensively investigated in neurological diseases and diabetes, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. Activated UPR participates in multiple cardiac conditions and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, the UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure by affecting cardiac ion channels expression, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease for treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:26729106

  10. Chaos for cardiac arrhythmias through a one-dimensional modulation equation for alternans

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shu; Schaeffer, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Instabilities in cardiac dynamics have been widely investigated in recent years. One facet of this work has studied chaotic behavior, especially possible correlations with fatal arrhythmias. Previously chaotic behavior was observed in various models, specifically in the breakup of spiral and scroll waves. In this paper we study cardiac dynamics and find spatiotemporal chaotic behavior through the Echebarria–Karma modulation equation for alternans in one dimension. Although extreme parameter values are required to produce chaos in this model, it seems significant mathematically that chaos may occur by a different mechanism from previous observations. PMID:20590327

  11. Arrhythmias and Cardiac Bedside Monitoring in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Sherri L

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac physiology is unique in neonates and infants; there are several physiologic changes that occur in the first weeks of life. Important changes can be captured on the bedside monitor and provide vital data in a noninvasive way to providers. The importance of diligent observation cannot be overstated. Bedside monitoring has improved in the last decade, which has enhanced the ability to detect changes in heart rates and rhythms. The purpose here is to review cardiac physiology, describe those arrhythmias able to be observed on bedside monitors, and highlight heart rate changes that can be early signs of sepsis. PMID:27484664

  12. Challenges of genetic testing in adolescents with cardiac arrhythmia syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lilian Liou; Stolerman, Marina; Walsh, Christine; Wasserman, David; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2011-01-01

    The ability to sequence individual genomes is leading to the identification of an increasing number of genetic risk factors for serious diseases. Knowledge of these risk factors can often provide significant medical and psychological benefit, but also raises complex ethical and social issues. This paper focuses on one area of rapid progress: the identification of mutations causing long QT syndrome and other cardiac channel disorders, which can explain some previously unexplained deaths in infants (SIDS) and children and adults (SUDS) and prevent others from occurring. This genetic knowledge, discovered posthumously in many cases, has implications for clinical care for surviving family members who might carry the same mutations. The information obtained from genetic testing, in the context of personal and family history, can guide individually tailored interventions that reduce risk and save lives. At the same time, obtaining and disclosing genetic information raises difficult issues about confidentiality and decision making within families. We draw on the experience of the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Cardiogenetics, which has played a leading role in the genetic diagnosis and clinical management of cardiac channel diseases, to explore some of the challenging ethical questions arising in affected families with adolescent children. We focus on the related issues of (1) family confidentiality, privacy and disclosure and (2) adolescent decision making about genetic risk, and argue for the value of interdisciplinary dialogue with affected families in resolving these issues. PMID:21955955

  13. Non-invasive cardiac mapping in clinical practice: Application to the ablation of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Rémi; Shah, Ashok J; Hocini, Mélèze; Denis, Arnaud; Derval, Nicolas; Cochet, Hubert; Sacher, Frédéric; Bear, Laura; Duchateau, Josselin; Jais, Pierre; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) started to demonstrate its efficiency in clinical settings. The initial application to localize focal ventricular arrhythmias such as ventricular premature beats was probably the easiest to challenge and validates the concept. Our clinical experience in using this non-invasive mapping technique to identify the sources of electrical disorders and guide catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats) and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome) is described here. PMID:26403066

  14. The pioneering work of George Mines on cardiac arrhythmias: groundbreaking ideas that remain influential in contemporary cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Martin; Nattel, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    George Mines was a pioneering physiologist who, despite an extremely short period of professional activity and only primitive experimental methodology, succeeded in formulating concepts that continue to be of great influence today. Here, we review some of his most important discoveries and their impact on contemporary concepts and clinical practice. Mines' greatest contribution was his conceptualization and characterization of circus movement reentry. His observations and ideas about the basis for cardiac reentrant activity underlie how we understand and manage a wide range of important clinical rhythm disturbances today. The notions he introduced regarding the influence of premature extrastimuli on reentry (termination, resetting and entrainment) are central to contemporary assessment of arrhythmia mechanisms in clinical electrophysiology laboratories and modern device therapy of cardiac tachyarrhythmias. Refinements of his model of reentry have led to sophisticated biophysical theories of the mechanisms underlying cardiac fibrillation. His seminal observations on the influence of electrolyte derangements and autonomic tone on the heart are relevant to our understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of arrhythmias caused by cardiac pathology. In this era of advanced technology, it is important to appreciate that ideas of lasting impact come from great minds and do not necessarily require great tools. PMID:26607760

  15. Cardiac BIN1 folds T-tubule membrane, controlling ion flux and limiting arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Hong, TingTing; Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cho, Hee Cheol; Kalashnikova, Mariya; Sun, Baiming; Zhang, Hao; Bhargava, Anamika; Grabe, Michael; Olgin, Jeffrey; Gorelik, Julia; Marbán, Eduardo; Jan, Lily Y; Shaw, Robin M

    2014-06-01

    Cardiomyocyte T tubules are important for regulating ion flux. Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) is a T-tubule protein associated with calcium channel trafficking that is downregulated in failing hearts. Here we find that cardiac T tubules normally contain dense protective inner membrane folds that are formed by a cardiac isoform of BIN1. In mice with cardiac Bin1 deletion, T-tubule folding is decreased, which does not change overall cardiomyocyte morphology but leads to free diffusion of local extracellular calcium and potassium ions, prolonging action-potential duration and increasing susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We also found that T-tubule inner folds are rescued by expression of the BIN1 isoform BIN1+13+17, which promotes N-WASP-dependent actin polymerization to stabilize the T-tubule membrane at cardiac Z discs. BIN1+13+17 recruits actin to fold the T-tubule membrane, creating a 'fuzzy space' that protectively restricts ion flux. When the amount of the BIN1+13+17 isoform is decreased, as occurs in acquired cardiomyopathy, T-tubule morphology is altered, and arrhythmia can result. PMID:24836577

  16. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death in transgenic rabbits with long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Michael; Peng, Xuwen; Liu, Gong Xin; Ren, Xiao-Qin; Ziv, Ohad; Choi, Bum-Rak; Mathur, Rajesh; Hajjiri, Mohammed; Odening, Katja E.; Steinberg, Eric; Folco, Eduardo J.; Pringa, Ekatherini; Centracchio, Jason; Macharzina, Roland R.; Donahay, Tammy; Schofield, Lorraine; Rana, Naveed; Kirk, Malcolm; Mitchell, Gary F.; Poppas, Athena; Zehender, Manfred; Koren, Gideon

    2008-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a heritable disease associated with ECG QT interval prolongation, ventricular tachycardia, and sudden cardiac death in young patients. Among genotyped individuals, mutations in genes encoding repolarizing K+ channels (LQT1:KCNQ1; LQT2:KCNH2) are present in approximately 90% of affected individuals. Expression of pore mutants of the human genes KCNQ1 (KvLQT1-Y315S) and KCNH2 (HERG-G628S) in the rabbit heart produced transgenic rabbits with a long QT phenotype. Prolongations of QT intervals and action potential durations were due to the elimination of IKs and IKr currents in cardiomyocytes. LQT2 rabbits showed a high incidence of spontaneous sudden cardiac death (>50% at 1 year) due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. Optical mapping revealed increased spatial dispersion of repolarization underlying the arrhythmias. Both transgenes caused downregulation of the remaining complementary IKr and IKs without affecting the steady state levels of the native polypeptides. Thus, the elimination of 1 repolarizing current was associated with downregulation of the reciprocal repolarizing current rather than with the compensatory upregulation observed previously in LQTS mouse models. This suggests that mutant KvLQT1 and HERG interacted with the reciprocal wild-type α subunits of rabbit ERG and KvLQT1, respectively. These results have implications for understanding the nature and heterogeneity of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. PMID:18464931

  17. Cardiac Spliced BIN1 Folds T-tubule Membrane, Controlling Ion Flux and Limiting Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, TingTing; Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cho, Hee Cheol; Kalashnikova, Mariya; Sun, Baiming; Zhang, Hao; Bhargava, Anamika; Grabe, Michael; Olgin, Jeffrey; Gorelik, Julia; Marbán, Eduardo; Jan, Lily Y.; Shaw, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte T-tubules are important for regulating ionic flux. Bridging Integrator 1 (BIN1) is a T-tubule protein associated with calcium channel trafficking that is down-regulated in failing hearts. Here we find that cardiac T-tubules normally contain dense protective inner membrane folds that are formed by a cardiac spliced isoform of BIN1. In mice with cardiac Bin1 deletion, T-tubule folding is decreased which does not change overall cardiomyocyte morphology, but frees diffusion of local extracellular calcium and potassium ions, prolonging action potential duration, and increasing susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We also find that T-tubule inner folds are rescued only by the BIN1 isoform BIN1+13+17, which promotes N-WASP dependent actin polymerization to stabilize T-tubule membrane at cardiac Z-discs. In conclusion, BIN1+13+17 recruits actin to fold T-tubule membrane, creating a fuzzy space that protectively restricts ionic flux. When BIN1+13+17 is decreased, as occurs in acquired cardiomyopathy, T-tubule morphology is altered and arrhythmias can result. PMID:24836577

  18. Human sinus arrhythmia as an index of vagal cardiac outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The human central vagal mechanisms were investigated by measuring the intervals between heartbeats during controlled breathing (at breathing intervals of 2.5-10 s and nominal tidal volumes of 1000 and 1500 ml) in six young men and women. It was found that as the breathing interval increased, the longest heart periods became longer, the shortest heart periods became shorter, and the peak-valley P-P intervals increased asymptotically. Peak-valley intervals also increased in proportion to tidal volume, although this influence was small. The phase angles between heart period changes and respiration were found to vary as linear functions of breathing interval. Heart period shortening began in inspiration at short breathing intervals and in expiration at long breathing intervals, while heart period lengthening began in early expiration at all breathing intervals studied. It is concluded that a close relationship exists between variations of respiratory depth and interval and the quantity, periodicity, and timing of vagal cardiac outflow in conscious humans. The results indicate that at usual breathing rates, phasic respiration-related changes of vagal motoneuron activity begin in expiration, progress slowly, and are incompletely expressed at fast breathing ratges.

  19. Automatic recognition of cardiac arrhythmias based on the geometric patterns of Poincaré plots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Guo, Tianci; Xi, Bin; Fan, Yang; Wang, Kun; Bi, Jiacheng; Wang, Ying

    2015-02-01

    The Poincaré plot emerges as an effective tool for assessing cardiovascular autonomic regulation. It displays nonlinear characteristics of heart rate variability (HRV) from electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings and gives a global view of the long range of ECG signals. In the telemedicine or computer-aided diagnosis system, it would offer significant auxiliary information for diagnosis if the patterns of the Poincaré plots can be automatically classified. Therefore, we developed an automatic classification system to distinguish five geometric patterns of the Poincaré plots from four types of cardiac arrhythmias. The statistics features are designed on measurements and an ensemble classifier of three types of neural networks is proposed. Aiming at the difficulty to set a proper threshold for classifying the multiple categories, the threshold selection strategy is analyzed. 24 h ECG monitoring recordings from 674 patients, which have four types of cardiac arrhythmias, are adopted for recognition. For comparison, Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers with linear and Gaussian kernels are also applied. The experiment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the extracted features and the better performance of the designed classifier. Our study can be applied to diagnose the corresponding sinus rhythm and arrhythmia substrates disease automatically in the telemedicine and computer-aided diagnosis system. PMID:25582837

  20. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillator Treatment in a Child with Heart Failure and Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Ju; Cho, Sungkyu; Kim, Woong-Han

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a new treatment for refractory heart failure. However, most patients with heart failure treated with CRT are adults, middle-aged or older with idiopathic or ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. We treated a 12-year-old boy, who was transferred after cardiac arrest, with dilated cardiomyopathy, left bundle-branch block, and ventricular tachycardia. We performed cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D). After CRT-D, left ventricular ejection fraction improved from 22% to 44% assessed by echocardiogram 1 year postoperatively. On electrocardiogram, QRS duration was shortened from 206 to 144 ms. The patient’s clinical symptoms also improved. For pediatric patients with refractory heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia, CRT-D could be indicated as an effective therapeutic option. PMID:27525239

  1. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillator Treatment in a Child with Heart Failure and Ventricular Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Ju; Cho, Sungkyu; Kim, Woong-Han

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a new treatment for refractory heart failure. However, most patients with heart failure treated with CRT are adults, middle-aged or older with idiopathic or ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. We treated a 12-year-old boy, who was transferred after cardiac arrest, with dilated cardiomyopathy, left bundle-branch block, and ventricular tachycardia. We performed cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D). After CRT-D, left ventricular ejection fraction improved from 22% to 44% assessed by echocardiogram 1 year postoperatively. On electrocardiogram, QRS duration was shortened from 206 to 144 ms. The patient's clinical symptoms also improved. For pediatric patients with refractory heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia, CRT-D could be indicated as an effective therapeutic option. PMID:27525239

  2. Contemporary Mapping Techniques of Complex Cardiac Arrhythmias - Identifying and Modifying the Arrhythmogenic Substrate.

    PubMed

    Koutalas, Emmanuel; Rolf, Sascha; Dinov, Borislav; Richter, Sergio; Arya, Arash; Bollmann, Andreas; Hindricks, Gerhard; Sommer, Philipp

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology has moved a long way forward during recent decades in the comprehension and treatment of complex cardiac arrhythmias. Contemporary electroanatomical mapping systems, along with state-of-the-art technology in the manufacture of electrophysiology catheters and cardiac imaging modalities, have significantly enriched our armamentarium, enabling the implementation of various mapping strategies and techniques in electrophysiology procedures. Beyond conventional mapping strategies, ablation of complex fractionated electrograms and rotor ablation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures, the identification and modification of the underlying arrhythmogenic substrate has emerged as a strategy that leads to improved outcomes. Arrhythmogenic substrate modification also has a major role in ventricular tachycardia ablation procedures. Optimisation of contact between tissue and catheter and image integration are a further step forward to augment our precision and effectiveness. Hybridisation of existing technologies with a reasonable cost should be our goal over the next few years. PMID:26835095

  3. Contemporary Mapping Techniques of Complex Cardiac Arrhythmias – Identifying and Modifying the Arrhythmogenic Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Koutalas, Emmanuel; Rolf, Sascha; Dinov, Borislav; Richter, Sergio; Arya, Arash; Bollmann, Andreas; Hindricks, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology has moved a long way forward during recent decades in the comprehension and treatment of complex cardiac arrhythmias. Contemporary electroanatomical mapping systems, along with state-of-the-art technology in the manufacture of electrophysiology catheters and cardiac imaging modalities, have significantly enriched our armamentarium, enabling the implementation of various mapping strategies and techniques in electrophysiology procedures. Beyond conventional mapping strategies, ablation of complex fractionated electrograms and rotor ablation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures, the identification and modification of the underlying arrhythmogenic substrate has emerged as a strategy that leads to improved outcomes. Arrhythmogenic substrate modification also has a major role in ventricular tachycardia ablation procedures. Optimisation of contact between tissue and catheter and image integration are a further step forward to augment our precision and effectiveness. Hybridisation of existing technologies with a reasonable cost should be our goal over the next few years. PMID:26835095

  4. Ranolazine: Electrophysiologic Effect, Efficacy, and Safety in Patients with Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shenasa, Mohammad; Assadi, Hamid; Heidary, Shahriar; Shenasa, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Ranolazine is currently approved as an antianginal agent in patients with chronic angina (class IIA). Ranolazine exhibits antiarrhythmic effects that are related to its multichannel blocking effect, predominantly inhibition of late sodium (late INa) current and the rapid potassium rectifier current (IKr), as well as ICa, late ICa, and INa-Ca. It also suppresses the early and delayed after depolarizations. Ranolazine is effective in the suppression of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias (off-label use) without significant proarrhythmic effect. Currently, ongoing trials are evaluating the efficacy and safety of ranolazine in patients with cardiac arrhythmias; preliminary results suggest that ranolazine, when used alone or in combination with dronedarone, is safe and effective in reducing atrial fibrillation. Ranolazine is not currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as an antiarrhythmic agent. PMID:27261835

  5. Can we protect from malignant arrhythmias by modulation of cardiac cell-to-cell coupling?

    PubMed

    Tribulova, Narcis; Szeiffova Bacova, Barbara; Benova, Tamara; Viczenczova, Csilla

    2015-01-01

    Defects in intercellular coupling in the heart play a key role in the initiation and persistence of malignant arrhythmias. Such disorders result from abnormal expression and distribution of connexins, the major constituents of cardiac gap junction channels. The alterations of myocardial connexin are well established as a consistent feature of both human and animal heart disease and aging. Following these facts, the modulation of connexin mediated intercellular coupling is suggested as a new antiarrhythmic approach. This review provides recent data supporting this concept. It can be challenging for the development of new antiarrhythmic drugs. Moreover, findings point out the implication of some endogenous compounds in protection from life-threatening arrhythmias via preservation of myocardial connexin. PMID:25732099

  6. Alk7 Depleted Mice Exhibit Prolonged Cardiac Repolarization and Are Predisposed to Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Shaozhen; Cao, Hong; Hu, He; Wang, Xin; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of activin receptor-like kinase (ALK7) in regulating cardiac electrophysiology. Here, we showed that Alk7-/- mice exhibited prolonged QT intervals in telemetry ECG recordings. Furthermore, Langendorff-perfused Alk7-/- hearts had significantly longer action potential duration (APD) and greater incidence of ventricular arrhythmia (AV) induced by burst pacing. Using whole-cell patch clamp, we found that the densities of repolarizing K+ currents Ito and IK1 were profoundly reduced in Alk7-/- ventricular cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, the expression of Kv4.2 (a major subunit of Ito carrying channel) and KCHIP2 (a key accessory subunit of Ito carrying channel), was markedly decreased in Alk7-/- hearts. These findings suggest that endogenous expression of ALK7 is necessary to maintain repolarizing K+ currents in ventricular cardiomyocytes, and finally prevent action potential prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:26882027

  7. [The use of helium-neon laser in drug-resistant cardiac arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Gel'fgat, E B; Abdullaev, R F; Babaev, Z M; Musabekov, S Sh

    1992-02-01

    Out of 85 patients with cardiac arrhythmias in the presence of chronic coronary heart disease, 28 who were resistant to ethacisine and allapinine were included into the study. They had frequent and persistent arrhythmias. The patients were divided into 2 groups: (1) the patients receiving intravenous He-Ne laser therapy in combination with one of the above drugs; (n = 17) and (2) those taking He-Ne laser therapy alone (n = 11). The efficacy of the therapies were controlled by 24-hour monitoring. An antiarrhythmic effect was more frequently observed when He-Ne laser was combined with one of the above drugs than when it was given alone (67.4 and 36.3%, respectively). PMID:1527940

  8. Arrhythmia and cardiac defects are a feature of spinal muscular atrophy model mice

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Christopher R.; Satta, Rosalba; Lutz, Cathleen; DiDonato, Christine J.

    2010-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Traditionally, SMA has been described as a motor neuron disease; however, there is a growing body of evidence that arrhythmia and/or cardiomyopathy may present in SMA patients at an increased frequency. Here, we ask whether SMA model mice possess such phenotypes. We find SMA mice suffer from severe bradyarrhythmia characterized by progressive heart block and impaired ventricular depolarization. Echocardiography further confirms functional cardiac deficits in SMA mice. Additional investigations show evidence of both sympathetic innervation defects and dilated cardiomyopathy at late stages of disease. Based upon these data, we propose a model in which decreased sympathetic innervation causes autonomic imbalance. Such imbalance would be characterized by a relative increase in the level of vagal tone controlling heart rate, which is consistent with bradyarrhythmia and progressive heart block. Finally, treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, a drug known to benefit phenotypes of SMA model mice, produces prolonged maturation of the SMA heartbeat and an increase in cardiac size. Treated mice maintain measures of motor function throughout extended survival though they ultimately reach death endpoints in association with a progression of bradyarrhythmia. These data represent the novel identification of cardiac arrhythmia as an early and progressive feature of murine SMA while providing several new, quantitative indices of mouse health. Together with clinical cases that report similar symptoms, this reveals a new area of investigation that will be important to address as we move SMA therapeutics towards clinical success. PMID:20693262

  9. Remodeling of cardiac passive electrical properties and susceptibility to ventricular and atrial arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Dhein, Stefan; Seidel, Thomas; Salameh, Aida; Jozwiak, Joanna; Hagen, Anja; Kostelka, Martin; Hindricks, Gerd; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Coordinated electrical activation of the heart is essential for the maintenance of a regular cardiac rhythm and effective contractions. Action potentials spread from one cell to the next via gap junction channels. Because of the elongated shape of cardiomyocytes, longitudinal resistivity is lower than transverse resistivity causing electrical anisotropy. Moreover, non-uniformity is created by clustering of gap junction channels at cell poles and by non-excitable structures such as collagenous strands, vessels or fibroblasts. Structural changes in cardiac disease often affect passive electrical properties by increasing non-uniformity and altering anisotropy. This disturbs normal electrical impulse propagation and is, consequently, a substrate for arrhythmia. However, to investigate how these structural changes lead to arrhythmias remains a challenge. One important mechanism, which may both cause and prevent arrhythmia, is the mismatch between current sources and sinks. Propagation of the electrical impulse requires a sufficient source of depolarizing current. In the case of a mismatch, the activated tissue (source) is not able to deliver enough depolarizing current to trigger an action potential in the non-activated tissue (sink). This eventually leads to conduction block. It has been suggested that in this situation a balanced geometrical distribution of gap junctions and reduced gap junction conductance may allow successful propagation. In contrast, source-sink mismatch can prevent spontaneous arrhythmogenic activity in a small number of cells from spreading over the ventricle, especially if gap junction conductance is enhanced. Beside gap junctions, cell geometry and non-cellular structures strongly modulate arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The present review elucidates these and other implications of passive electrical properties for cardiac rhythm and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:25404918

  10. Anti-addiction drug ibogaine inhibits hERG channels: a cardiac arrhythmia risk.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Xaver; Kovar, Michael; Boehm, Stefan; Sandtner, Walter; Hilber, Karlheinz

    2014-03-01

    Ibogaine, an alkaloid derived from the African shrub Tabernanthe iboga, has shown promising anti-addictive properties in animals. Anecdotal evidence suggests that ibogaine is also anti-addictive in humans. Thus, it alleviates drug craving and impedes relapse of drug use. Although not licensed as therapeutic drug, and despite evidence that ibogaine may disturb the rhythm of the heart, this alkaloid is currently used as an anti-addiction drug in alternative medicine. Here, we report that therapeutic concentrations of ibogaine reduce currents through human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channels. Thereby, we provide a mechanism by which ibogaine may generate life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:22458604

  11. Children and Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ...

  12. Treating Arrhythmias in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ... and is at risk for sudden arrhythmias including sudden death. Learn about special considerations for cardiac arrest in ...

  13. Family and population strategies for screening and counselling of inherited cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    van Langen, I M; Hofman, N; Tan, H L; Wilde, A A M

    2004-01-01

    Family screening in inherited cardiac arrhythmias has been performed in The Netherlands since 1996, when diagnostic DNA testing in long QT syndrome (LQTS) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) became technically possible. In multidisciplinary outpatient academic clinics, an adjusted protocol for genetic counselling, originally derived from predictive testing in Huntington's disease, is being used. 1110 individuals, including 842 relatives of index patients, were informed about their risks, and most were tested molecularly and/or clinically for carriership of the disease present in their family. Of 345 relatives who were referred for cardiologic follow-up, 189 are being treated, because of an increased risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. Evaluation of the psychological and social consequences of family screening for inherited arrhythmias can be performed by using the adapted criteria of Wilson and Jüngner, i.e., from a point of view of public health. Preliminary results of psychological research show that parents of children at risk for LQTS show high levels of distress. Many other aspects have to be evaluated yet, making final conclusions about the feasibility of family screening difficult, particularly in HCM. Clinical guidelines are urgently needed. Population screening by molecular testing, for instance in athletic preparticipation screening, will become possible in the future and has its own prerequisites for success. PMID:15176433

  14. Disturbance of cardiac gene expression and cardiomyocyte structure predisposes Mecp2-null mice to arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Munetsugu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Mitsumasu, Chiaki; Igata, Sachiyo; Takano, Makoto; Minami, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Okayama, Satoko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Okabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takemura, Genzou; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that is essential for normal brain development. Mutations in MeCP2 lead to disrupted neuronal function and can cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies reported cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmias in both RTT patients and animal models of RTT. In addition, recent studies indicate that MeCP2 may be involved in cardiac development and dysfunction, but its role in the developing and adult heart remains unknown. In this study, we found that Mecp2-null ESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes, but the development and further differentiation of cardiovascular progenitors were significantly affected in MeCP2 deficiency. In addition, we revealed that loss of MeCP2 led to dysregulation of endogenous cardiac genes and myocardial structural alterations, although Mecp2-null mice did not exhibit obvious cardiac functional abnormalities. Furthermore, we detected methylation of the CpG islands in the Tbx5 locus, and showed that MeCP2 could target these sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that MeCP2 is an important regulator of the gene-expression program responsible for maintaining normal cardiac development and cardiomyocyte structure. PMID:26073556

  15. Disturbance of cardiac gene expression and cardiomyocyte structure predisposes Mecp2-null mice to arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Hara, Munetsugu; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Mitsumasu, Chiaki; Igata, Sachiyo; Takano, Makoto; Minami, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Okayama, Satoko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Okabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Takemura, Genzou; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is an epigenetic regulator of gene expression that is essential for normal brain development. Mutations in MeCP2 lead to disrupted neuronal function and can cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Previous studies reported cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmias in both RTT patients and animal models of RTT. In addition, recent studies indicate that MeCP2 may be involved in cardiac development and dysfunction, but its role in the developing and adult heart remains unknown. In this study, we found that Mecp2-null ESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes, but the development and further differentiation of cardiovascular progenitors were significantly affected in MeCP2 deficiency. In addition, we revealed that loss of MeCP2 led to dysregulation of endogenous cardiac genes and myocardial structural alterations, although Mecp2-null mice did not exhibit obvious cardiac functional abnormalities. Furthermore, we detected methylation of the CpG islands in the Tbx5 locus, and showed that MeCP2 could target these sequences. Taken together, these results suggest that MeCP2 is an important regulator of the gene-expression program responsible for maintaining normal cardiac development and cardiomyocyte structure. PMID:26073556

  16. Cardiac arrhythmia and ischaemic events after combination chemotherapy for testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Villani, F; Misrachi, D; Galimberti, M

    1994-11-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the type and the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and ischaemic events in patients suffering from testicular cancer and submitted to combination chemotherapy with cisplatin, bleomycin and vinblastine (PVB) or etoposide (PEB). Forty-seven patients took part in the study; 23 were treated with PVB and 24 with PEB. Holter monitoring was performed in each patient before chemotherapy and on the 1st, 2nd and 5th day of the first cycle of drug administration. The results showed that combination chemotherapy with PVB or PEB was accompanied by the appearance of, or an increase in, the incidence of supraventricular ectopic beats. No significant difference was found between the two groups. No significant conduction disturbances were recorded. These results show that combination chemotherapy with PVB or PEB, at least during the first cycle, has no significant ventricular arrhythmogenic or ischaemic potency in young people with no history of cardiac disease. PMID:7530660

  17. The pathology and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias: focus on atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Constanze; Kisselbach, Jana; Schweizer, Patrick A; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequently encountered sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Effective treatment of AF still remains an unmet medical need. Treatment of AF is based on drug therapy and ablative strategies. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is limited by a relatively high recurrence rate and proarrhythmic side effects. Catheter ablation suppresses paroxysmal AF in the majority of patients without structural heart disease but is more difficult to achieve in patients with persistent AF or with concomitant cardiac disease. Stroke is a potentially devastating complication of AF, requiring anticoagulation that harbors the risk of bleeding. In search of novel treatment modalities, targeted pharmacological treatment and gene therapy offer the potential for greater selectivity than conventional small-molecule or interventional approaches. This paper summarizes the current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying AF. Established drug therapy and interventional treatment of AF is reviewed, and emerging clinical and experimental therapeutic approaches are highlighted. PMID:21490945

  18. Histone-deacetylase Inhibition Reverses Atrial Arrhythmia Inducibility and Fibrosis in Cardiac Hypertrophy Independent of Angiotensin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Levin, Mark D.; Petrenko, Nataliya B.; Lu, Min Min; Wang, Tao; Yuan, Li Jun; Stout, Andrea L.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrosis influences the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), particularly in the setting of structural heart disease where angiotensin-inhibition is partially effective for reducing atrial fibrosis and AF. Histone-deacetylase inhibition reduces cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, so we sought to determine if the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) could reduce atrial fibrosis and arrhythmias. Mice over-expressing homeodomain-only protein (HopXTg), which recruits HDAC activity to induce cardiac hypertrophy were investigated in 4 groups (aged 14-18 weeks): wild-type (WT), HopXTg, HopXTg mice treated with TSA for 2 weeks (HopX-TSA) and wild-type mice treated with TSA for 2 weeks (WT-TSA). These groups were characterized using invasive electrophysiology, atrial fibrosis measurements, atrial connexin immunocytochemistry and myocardial angiotensin II measurements. Invasive electrophysiologic stimulation, using the same attempts in each group, induced more atrial arrhythmias in HopXTg mice (48 episodes in 13 of 15 HopXTg mice versus 5 episodes in 2 of 15 HopX-TSA mice, P<0.001; versus 9 episodes in 2 of 15 WT mice, P<0.001; versus no episodes in any WT-TSA mice, P<0.001). TSA reduced atrial arrhythmia duration in HopXTg mice (1307±289 milliseconds versus 148±110 milliseconds, P<0.01) and atrial fibrosis (8.1±1.5% versus 3.9±0.4%, P<0.001). Atrial connexin40 was lower in HopXTg compared to WT mice, and TSA normalized the expression and size distribution of connexin40 gap junctions. Myocardial angiotensin II levels were similar between WT and HopXTg mice (76.3±26.0 versus 69.7±16.6 pg/mg protein, P=NS). Therefore, it appears HDAC inhibition reverses atrial fibrosis, connexin40 remodeling and atrial arrhythmia vulnerability independent of angiotensin II in cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:18926829

  19. LV Dyssynchrony Is Helpful in Predicting Ventricular Arrhythmia in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Chuan; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Chiang, Kuo-Feng; Lin, Wan-Yu; Huang, Jin-Long; Hung, Guang-Uei; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract For patients with coronary artery disease, larger scar burdens are associated with higher risk of ventricular arrhythmia. Left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony is associated with increased risk of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. The purpose of this study was to assess the values of LV dyssynchrony and myocardial scar assessed by myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) in predicting the development of ventricular arrhythmia in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Twenty-two patients (16 males, mean age: 66 ± 13) with irreversible ischemic cardiomyopathy received cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) for at least 12 months were enrolled for MPS. Quantitative parameters, including LV dyssynchrony with phase standard deviation (phase SD) and bandwidth, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and scar (% of total areas), were generated by Emory Cardiac Toolbox. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) recorded in the CRT device during follow-up were used as the reference standard of diagnosing ventricular arrhythmia. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed for determining the independent predictors of VT/VF and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used for generating the optimal cut-off values for predicting VT/VF. Nine (41%) of the 22 patients developed VT/VF during the follow-up periods. Patients with VT/VF had significantly lower LVEF, larger scar, larger phase SD, and larger bandwidth (all P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed LVEF and bandwidth were independent predictors of VT/VF. ROC curve analysis showed the areas under the curves were 0.71 and 0.83 for LVEF and bandwidth, respectively. The optimal cut-off values were <36% and > 139° for LVEF and bandwidth, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 100%, 39%, 53%, and 100%, respectively, for LVEF; and were 78%, 92%, 88%, and 86%, respectively, for bandwidth. LV

  20. Myocyte-fibroblast communication in cardiac fibrosis and arrhythmias: Mechanisms and model systems.

    PubMed

    Pellman, Jason; Zhang, Jing; Sheikh, Farah

    2016-05-01

    Development of cardiac fibrosis and arrhythmias is controlled by the activity of and communication between cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts in the heart. Myocyte-fibroblast interactions occur via both direct and indirect means including paracrine mediators, extracellular matrix interactions, electrical modulators, mechanical junctions, and membrane nanotubes. In the diseased heart, cardiomyocyte and fibroblast ratios and activity, and thus myocyte-fibroblast interactions, change and are thought to contribute to the course of disease including development of fibrosis and arrhythmogenic activity. Fibroblasts have a developing role in modulating cardiomyocyte electrical and hypertrophic activity, however gaps in knowledge regarding these interactions still exist. Research in this field has necessitated the development of unique approaches to isolate and control myocyte-fibroblast interactions. Numerous methods for 2D and 3D co-culture systems have been developed, while a growing part of this field is in the use of better tools for in vivo systems including cardiomyocyte and fibroblast specific Cre mouse lines for cell type specific genetic ablation. This review will focus on (i) mechanisms of myocyte-fibroblast communication and their effects on disease features such as cardiac fibrosis and arrhythmias as well as (ii) methods being used and currently developed in this field. PMID:26996756

  1. A Field Study of the Effects of Traffic Noise on Heart Rate and Cardiac Arrhythmia During Sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, N. L.; Ingham, P.; Tran, K.; Hunyor, S. N.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that traffic noise could increase heart rate, and the frequency or severity of cardiac arrhythmias in susceptible people while asleep. Physiological indicators of sleep, electrocardiograph, and respiration and blood oxygen saturation were monitored continuously overnight in seven elderly men living on a busy road. Continuous recordings of the noise outdoors, at the facade, and indoors in the bedrooms, and video recordings of the traffic were made, simultaneously with the physiological measurements. LAeq, LAmax, LApk , LA90, LA10 and LA1 were measured in each 20 s interval, and noise events exceeding 70 dB(A) outdoors and 50 dB(A) indoors for 2 s or longer were logged. Between 03:00 and 05:00 hours, 65% of the traffic consisted of heavy vehicles. With windows open slightly, indoor and outdoor noise exceeded all local, and internationally recommended criteria for adequate sleep by a wide margin. Cardiac arrhythmia occurred during sleep in four of the men. Heart rate and frequency of cardiac arrhythmia were not correlated with indoor LAeq , LApk or LA1, in stage 2, stage 4 and REM sleep. Two of the four subjects with cardiac arrhythmia showed a significant association ( p < 0·05), predominantly in stage 4 sleep, between single indoor noise events and the frequency of cardiac ectopic beats 20-40 s later.

  2. Genetic and forensic implications in epilepsy and cardiac arrhythmias: a case series.

    PubMed

    Partemi, Sara; Vidal, Monica Coll; Striano, Pasquale; Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Pezzella, Marianna; Elia, Maurizio; Parisi, Pasquale; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Casellato, Susanna; Giordano, Lucio; Mastrangelo, Massimo; Pietrafusa, Nicola; Striano, Salvatore; Zara, Federico; Bianchi, Amedeo; Buti, Daniela; La Neve, Angela; Tassinari, Carlo Alberto; Oliva, Antonio; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 3% of the world's population, and sudden death is a significant cause of death in this population. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) accounts for up to 17% of all these cases, which increases the rate of sudden death by 24-fold as compared to the general population. The underlying mechanisms are still not elucidated, but recent studies suggest the possibility that a common genetic channelopathy might contribute to both epilepsy and cardiac disease to increase the incidence of death via a lethal cardiac arrhythmia. We performed genetic testing in a large cohort of individuals with epilepsy and cardiac conduction disorders in order to identify genetic mutations that could play a role in the mechanism of sudden death. Putative pathogenic disease-causing mutations in genes encoding cardiac ion channel were detected in 24% of unrelated individuals with epilepsy. Segregation analysis through genetic screening of the available family members and functional studies are crucial tasks to understand and to prove the possible pathogenicity of the variant, but in our cohort, only two families were available. Despite further research should be performed to clarify the mechanism of coexistence of both clinical conditions, genetic analysis, applied also in post-mortem setting, could be very useful to identify genetic factors that predispose epileptic patients to sudden death, helping to prevent sudden death in patients with epilepsy. PMID:25119684

  3. CYP2J2 Overexpression Protects against Arrhythmia Susceptibility in Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Christina; Spallek, Bastian; Konkel, Anne; Marko, Lajos; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; DeGraff, Laura M.; Schubert, Carola; Bradbury, J. Alyce; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Falck, John R.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Müller, Dominik N.; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen; Fischer, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy predisposes one to arrhythmia and sudden death. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) promote anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms, and are involved in the regulation of cardiac Ca2+-, K+- and Na+-channels. To test the hypothesis that enhanced cardiac EET biosynthesis counteracts hypertrophy-induced electrical remodeling, male transgenic mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of the human epoxygenase CYP2J2 (CYP2J2-TG) and wildtype littermates (WT) were subjected to chronic pressure overload (transverse aortic constriction, TAC) or β-adrenergic stimulation (isoproterenol infusion, ISO). TAC caused progressive mortality that was higher in WT (42% over 8 weeks after TAC), compared to CYP2J2-TG mice (6%). In vivo electrophysiological studies, 4 weeks after TAC, revealed high ventricular tachyarrhythmia inducibility in WT (47% of the stimulation protocols), but not in CYP2J2-TG mice (0%). CYP2J2 overexpression also enhanced ventricular refractoriness and protected against TAC-induced QRS prolongation and delocalization of left ventricular connexin-43. ISO for 14 days induced high vulnerability for atrial fibrillation in WT mice (54%) that was reduced in CYP-TG mice (17%). CYP2J2 overexpression also protected against ISO-induced reduction of atrial refractoriness and development of atrial fibrosis. In contrast to these profound effects on electrical remodeling, CYP2J2 overexpression only moderately reduced TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and did not affect the hypertrophic response to β-adrenergic stimulation. These results demonstrate that enhanced cardiac EET biosynthesis protects against electrical remodeling, ventricular tachyarrhythmia, and atrial fibrillation susceptibility during maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24023684

  4. Aging is a primary risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias: disruption of intracellular Ca2+ regulation as a key suspect.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Fiona; Lancaster, Matthew K; Jones, Sandra A

    2011-08-01

    Aging is an inevitable time-dependent progression associated with a functional decline of the cardiovascular system even in 'healthy' individuals. Age positively correlates with an increasing risk of cardiac problems including arrhythmias. Not only the prevalence but also the severity of arrhythmias escalates with age. The reasons for this are multifactorial but dysregulation of intracellular calcium within the heart is likely to play a key role in initiating and perpetuating these life-threatening events. We now know that several aspects of cardiac calcium regulation significantly change with advancing age - changes that could produce electrical instability. Further development of knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these changes will allow us to reduce what currently is an inevitable increase in the incidence of arrhythmias in the elderly. PMID:21878050

  5. Primary Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Syncope and Refractory Atrial Arrhythmia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Thangam, Manoj; Nathan, Sriram; Kar, Biswajit; Petrovic, Marija; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Buja, L Maximilian; Gregoric, Igor D

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the case of a 38-year-old black man who presented at our hospital with his first episode of syncope, recently developed atrial arrhythmias refractory to pharmacologic therapy, and a left atrial thrombus. He was diagnosed with primary cardiac sarcoidosis characterized by predominant involvement of the epicardium that caused atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Histologic analysis of his epicardial lesions yielded a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This patient's atrial arrhythmia was successfully treated with a hybrid operation that involved resection of his atrial appendage, an Epicor maze procedure, and radiofrequency ablation during a catheter-based electrophysiologic study. The cardiac sarcoidosis was successfully managed with corticosteroid therapy. Our case report shows that sarcoidosis can initially manifest itself as syncope with new-onset atrial arrhythmia. Sarcoidosis is important in the differential diagnosis because of its progressive nature and its potential for treatment with pharmacologic, surgical, and catheter-based interventions. PMID:27303240

  6. Primary Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Syncope and Refractory Atrial Arrhythmia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thangam, Manoj; Nathan, Sriram; Kar, Biswajit; Petrovic, Marija; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Buja, L. Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of a 38-year-old black man who presented at our hospital with his first episode of syncope, recently developed atrial arrhythmias refractory to pharmacologic therapy, and a left atrial thrombus. He was diagnosed with primary cardiac sarcoidosis characterized by predominant involvement of the epicardium that caused atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Histologic analysis of his epicardial lesions yielded a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. This patient's atrial arrhythmia was successfully treated with a hybrid operation that involved resection of his atrial appendage, an Epicor maze procedure, and radiofrequency ablation during a catheter-based electrophysiologic study. The cardiac sarcoidosis was successfully managed with corticosteroid therapy. Our case report shows that sarcoidosis can initially manifest itself as syncope with new-onset atrial arrhythmia. Sarcoidosis is important in the differential diagnosis because of its progressive nature and its potential for treatment with pharmacologic, surgical, and catheter-based interventions. PMID:27303240

  7. KCNE genetics and pharmacogenomics in cardiac arrhythmias: much ado about nothing?

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels respond to changes in membrane potential with conformational shifts that either facilitate or stem the movement of charged ions across the cell membrane. This controlled movement of ions is particularly important for the action potentials of excitable cells such as cardiac myocytes, and therefore essential for timely beating of the heart. Inherited mutations in ion channel genes and in the genes encoding proteins that regulate them can cause lethal cardiac arrhythmias either by direct channel disruption or by altering interactions with therapeutic drugs, the best-understood example of both these scenarios being Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Unsurprisingly, mutations in the genes encoding ion channel pore-forming α subunits underlie the large majority (~90%) of identified cases of inherited LQTS. Given that inherited LQTS is comparatively rare in itself (~0.04% of the US population), is pursuing study of the remaining known and unknown LQTS-associated genes subject to the law of diminishing returns? Here, with a particular focus on the KCNE family of single transmembrane domain K+ channel ancillary subunits, the significance to cardiac pharmacogenetics of ion channel regulatory subunits is discussed. PMID:23272793

  8. Rapidly detecting disorder in rhythmic biological signals: A spectral entropy measure to identify cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniczenko, Phillip P. A.; Lee, Chiu Fan; Jones, Nick S.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the use of a running measure of power spectrum disorder to distinguish between the normal sinus rhythm of the heart and two forms of cardiac arrhythmia: atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. This spectral entropy measure is motivated by characteristic differences in the power spectra of beat timings during the three rhythms. We plot patient data derived from ten-beat windows on a “disorder map” and identify rhythm-defining ranges in the level and variance of spectral entropy values. Employing the spectral entropy within an automatic arrhythmia detection algorithm enables the classification of periods of atrial fibrillation from the time series of patients’ beats. When the algorithm is set to identify abnormal rhythms within 6s , it agrees with 85.7% of the annotations of professional rhythm assessors; for a response time of 30s , this becomes 89.5%, and with 60s , it is 90.3%. The algorithm provides a rapid way to detect atrial fibrillation, demonstrating usable response times as low as 6s . Measures of disorder in the frequency domain have practical significance in a range of biological signals: the techniques described in this paper have potential application for the rapid identification of disorder in other rhythmic signals.

  9. Automatic cardiac arrhythmia detection and classification using vectorcardiograms and complex networks.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Vinícius; Luz, Eduardo; Moreira, Gladston; Guarda, Álvaro; Menotti, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper intends to bring new insights in the methods for extracting features for cardiac arrhythmia detection and classification systems. We explore the possibility for utilizing vectorcardiograms (VCG) along with electrocardiograms (ECG) to get relevant informations from the heartbeats on the MIT-BIH database. For this purpose, we apply complex networks to extract features from the VCG. We follow the ANSI/AAMI EC57:1998 standard, for classifying the beats into 5 classes (N, V, S, F and Q), and de Chazal's scheme for dataset division into training and test set, with 22 folds validation setup for each set. We used the Support Vector Machinhe (SVM) classifier and the best result we chose had a global accuracy of 84.1%, while still obtaining relatively high Sensitivities and Positive Predictive Value and low False Positive Rates, when compared to other papers that follows the same evaluation methodology that we do. PMID:26737464

  10. Single-Nucleotide Variations in Cardiac Arrhythmias: Prospects for Genomics and Proteomics Based Biomarker Discovery and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Abunimer, Ayman; Smith, Krista; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Lam, Phuc; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a large contributor to causes of early death in developed countries. Some of these conditions, such as sudden cardiac death and atrial fibrillation, stem from arrhythmias—a spectrum of conditions with abnormal electrical activity in the heart. Genome-wide association studies can identify single nucleotide variations (SNVs) that may predispose individuals to developing acquired forms of arrhythmias. Through manual curation of published genome-wide association studies, we have collected a comprehensive list of 75 SNVs associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Ten of the SNVs result in amino acid changes and can be used in proteomic-based detection methods. In an effort to identify additional non-synonymous mutations that affect the proteome, we analyzed the post-translational modification S-nitrosylation, which is known to affect cardiac arrhythmias. We identified loss of seven known S-nitrosylation sites due to non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs). For predicted nitrosylation sites we found 1429 proteins where the sites are modified due to nsSNV. Analysis of the predicted S-nitrosylation dataset for over- or under-representation (compared to the complete human proteome) of pathways and functional elements shows significant statistical over-representation of the blood coagulation pathway. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis displays statistically over-represented terms related to muscle contraction, receptor activity, motor activity, cystoskeleton components, and microtubule activity. Through the genomic and proteomic context of SNVs and S-nitrosylation sites presented in this study, researchers can look for variation that can predispose individuals to cardiac arrhythmias. Such attempts to elucidate mechanisms of arrhythmia thereby add yet another useful parameter in predicting susceptibility for cardiac diseases. PMID:24705329

  11. Inherited arrhythmia syndromes leading to sudden cardiac death in the young: A global update and an Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Priya; Wilde, Arthur A.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited primary arrhythmias, namely congenital long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, account for a significant proportion of sudden cardiac deaths in young and apparently healthy individuals. Genetic testing plays an integral role in the diagnosis, risk-stratification and treatment of probands and family members. It is increasingly obvious that collaborative efforts are required to understand and manage these relatively rare but potentially lethal diseases. This article aims to update readers on the recent developments in our knowledge of inherited arrhythmias and to lay the foundation for a national synergistic effort to characterize them in the Indian population. PMID:24568830

  12. Gating pore currents, a new pathological mechanism underlying cardiac arrhythmias associated with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels (VGIC) are transmembrane proteins responsible for the generation of electrical signals in excitable cells. VGIC were first described in 1952 by Hodgkin and Huxley,1 and have since been associated with various physiological functions such as propagating nerve impulses, locomotion, and cardiac excitability. VGIC include channels specialized in the selective passage of K+, Ca2+ Na+, or H+. They are composed of 2 main structures: the pore domain (PD) and the voltage sensor domain (VSD). The PD ensures the physiological flow of ions and is typically composed of 8 transmembrane segments (TM). The VSD detects voltage variations and is composed of 4 TM (S1-S4). Given their crucial physiological role, VGIC dysfunctions are associated with diverse pathologies known as ion channelopathies. These dysfunctions usually affect the membrane expression of ion channels or voltage-dependent conformational changes of the pore. However, an increasing number of ion channelopathies, including periodic paralysis, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) associated with cardiac arrhythmias, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH), have been linked to the appearance of a new pathological mechanism involving the creation of an alternative permeation pathway through the normally non-conductive VSD of VGIC. This permeation pathway is called the gating pore or omega pore. PMID:26046592

  13. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, C. Ian; Baba, Shiro; Nakamura, Kenta; Hua, Ethan A.; Sears, Marie A.F.; Fu, Chi-cheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Balijepalli, Sadguna; Tomoda, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Yohei; Lizarraga, Paweena; Wojciak, Julianne; Scheinman, Melvin M.; Aalto-Setälä, Katriina; Makielski, Jonathan C.; January, Craig T.; Healy, Kevin E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP). Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM). In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T), APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site. PMID:25254341

  14. Disclosing Genetic Information to Family Members About Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmias: An Obligation or a Choice?

    PubMed

    Vavolizza, Rick D; Kalia, Isha; Erskine Aaron, Kathleen; Silverstein, Louise B; Barlevy, Dorit; Wasserman, David; Walsh, Christine; Marion, Robert W; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2015-08-01

    Inherited cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome, present clinical as well as ethical, legal, and social challenges. Many individuals who carry a deleterious mutation are largely asymptomatic and therefore may not be diagnosed until after the occurrence of a personal or family member's cardiac event. The familial nature of inherited genetic information raises numerous ethical, legal, and social issues regarding the sharing of genetic information, particularly when an individual found to carry a deleterious mutation refuses to disclose his or her results to at-risk family members who could benefit from life-saving treatments. This qualitative study sought to understand the experiences with genetic testing for individuals (n = 50) with a personal or family history of cardiac events or sudden death. Unstructured in-person focus groups or interviews were conducted for each participant in the study. The recordings of these interviews were transcribed verbatim and subsequently analyzed and coded. Participants' comments regarding sharing of genetic information centered around four main themes: (1) motivation to disclose; (2) extent of disclosure; (3) effect of disclosure on family dynamics; and (4) reasons for not sharing genetic information. The majority of individuals believed that affected individuals are obligated to disclose genetic information to family members. In the era of personalized medicine, the disclosure of genetic information provides individuals the opportunities to learn about the genetics, disease characteristics, and treatment options in order to reduce morbidity and mortality in themselves and their family members. Further research is necessary to identify and explore the barriers to sharing genetic information with at-risk family members. PMID:25400212

  15. Prolonged Hypoxia Increases Survival Even in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Showing Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Renate; Bauer, Ines; Ramalingam, Anil; Egg, Margit; Schwerte, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Tolerance towards hypoxia is highly pronounced in zebrafish. In this study even beneficial effects of hypoxia, specifically enhanced survival of zebrafish larvae, could be demonstrated. This effect was actually more pronounced in breakdance mutants, which phenotypically show cardiac arrhythmia. Breakdance mutants (bre) are characterized by chronically reduced cardiac output. Despite an about 50% heart rate reduction, they become adults, but survival rate significantly drops to 40%. Normoxic bre animals demonstrate increased hypoxia inducible factor 1 a (Hif-1α) expression, which indicates an activated hypoxic signaling pathway. Consequently, cardiovascular acclimation, like cardiac hypertrophy and increased erythrocyte concentration, occurs. Thus, it was hypothesized, that under hypoxic conditions survival might be even more reduced. When bre mutants were exposed to hypoxic conditions, they surprisingly showed higher survival rates than under normoxic conditions and even reached wildtype values. In hypoxic wildtype zebrafish, survival yet exceeded normoxic control values. To specify physiological acclimation, cardiovascular and metabolic parameters were measured before hypoxia started (3 dpf), when the first differences in survival rate occurred (7 dpf) and when survival rate plateaued (15 dpf). Hypoxic animals expectedly demonstrated Hif-1α accumulation and consequently enhanced convective oxygen carrying capacity. Moreover, bre animals showed a significantly enhanced heart rate under hypoxic conditions, which reached normoxic wildtype values. This improvement in convective oxygen transport ensured a sufficient oxygen and nutrient supply and was also reflected in the significantly higher mitochondrial activity. The highly optimized energy metabolism observed in hypoxic zebrafish larvae might be decisive for periods of higher energy demand due to organ development, growth and increased activity. However, hypoxia increased survival only during a short period of

  16. Nonischemic Left Ventricular Scar as a Substrate of Life-Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmias and Sudden Cardiac Death in Competitive Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rigato, Ilaria; De Lazzari, Manuel; Susana, Angela; Niero, Alice; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Migliore, Federico; Rizzo, Stefania; Giorgi, Benedetta; De Conti, Giorgio; Sarto, Patrizio; Serratosa, Luis; Patrizi, Giampiero; De Maria, Elia; Pelliccia, Antonio; Basso, Cristina; Schiavon, Maurizio; Bauce, Barbara; Iliceto, Sabino; Thiene, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Background— The clinical profile and arrhythmic outcome of competitive athletes with isolated nonischemic left ventricular (LV) scar as evidenced by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance remain to be elucidated. Methods and Results— We compared 35 athletes (80% men, age: 14–48 years) with ventricular arrhythmias and isolated LV subepicardial/midmyocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (group A) with 38 athletes with ventricular arrhythmias and no LGE (group B) and 40 healthy control athletes (group C). A stria LGE pattern with subepicardial/midmyocardial distribution, mostly involving the lateral LV wall, was found in 27 (77%) of group A versus 0 controls (group C; P<0.001), whereas a spotty pattern of LGE localized at the junction of the right ventricle to the septum was respectively observed in 11 (31%) versus 10 (25%; P=0.52). All athletes with stria pattern showed ventricular arrhythmias with a predominant right bundle branch block morphology, 13 of 27 (48%) showed ECG repolarization abnormalities, and 5 of 27 (19%) showed echocardiographic hypokinesis of the lateral LV wall. The majority of athletes with no or spotty LGE pattern had ventricular arrhythmias with a predominant left bundle branch block morphology and no ECG or echocardiographic abnormalities. During a follow-up of 38±25 months, 6 of 27 (22%) athletes with stria pattern experienced malignant arrhythmic events such as appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator shock (n=4), sustained ventricular tachycardia (n=1), or sudden death (n=1), compared with none of athletes with no or LGE spotty pattern and controls. Conclusions— Isolated nonischemic LV LGE with a stria pattern may be associated with life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden death in the athlete. Because of its subepicardial/midmyocardial location, LV scar is often not detected by echocardiography. PMID:27390211

  17. Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollution and Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuping; Liu, Yu; Hu, Yuling; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Tian, Jinhui; Ding, Guowu; Wang, Shigong

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to assess the transient association between air pollution and cardiac arrhythmia. Five databases were searched for studies investigating the association between daily increases in air pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and arrhythmia hospitalization or arrhythmia mortality. Two reviewers independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Outcomes were analyzed via a random-effects model and reported as relative risk and 95% confidence interval. 25 studies satisfied our inclusion criteria and 23 contributed to the meta-analysis. Arrhythmia hospitalization or mortality were associated with increases in PM2.5 (RR = 1.015 per 10 μg/m3, 95% CI: 1.006–1.024), PM10 (RR = 1.009 per 10 μg/m3, 95% CI: 1.004–1.014), carbon monoxide (RR = 1.041 per 1 ppm, 95% CI: 1.017–1.065), nitrogen dioxide (RR = 1.036 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 1.020–1.053), and sulfur dioxide (RR = 1.021 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 1.003–1.039), but not ozone (RR = 1.012 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 0.997–1.027). Both particulate and gaseous components, with the exception of ozone, have a temporal association with arrhythmia hospitalization or mortality. Compared with Europe and North America, a stronger association was noted in Asia. PMID:27367707

  18. Short-Term Exposure to Air Pollution and Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuping; Liu, Yu; Hu, Yuling; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Tian, Jinhui; Ding, Guowu; Wang, Shigong

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to assess the transient association between air pollution and cardiac arrhythmia. Five databases were searched for studies investigating the association between daily increases in air pollutants (PM2.5, PM10, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and arrhythmia hospitalization or arrhythmia mortality. Two reviewers independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Outcomes were analyzed via a random-effects model and reported as relative risk and 95% confidence interval. 25 studies satisfied our inclusion criteria and 23 contributed to the meta-analysis. Arrhythmia hospitalization or mortality were associated with increases in PM2.5 (RR = 1.015 per 10 μg/m³, 95% CI: 1.006-1.024), PM10 (RR = 1.009 per 10 μg/m³, 95% CI: 1.004-1.014), carbon monoxide (RR = 1.041 per 1 ppm, 95% CI: 1.017-1.065), nitrogen dioxide (RR = 1.036 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 1.020-1.053), and sulfur dioxide (RR = 1.021 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 1.003-1.039), but not ozone (RR = 1.012 per 10 ppb, 95% CI: 0.997-1.027). Both particulate and gaseous components, with the exception of ozone, have a temporal association with arrhythmia hospitalization or mortality. Compared with Europe and North America, a stronger association was noted in Asia. PMID:27367707

  19. Particles Alter Diesel Exhaust Gases-Induced Hypotension, Cardiac Arrhythmia,Conduction Disturbance, and Autonomic Imbalance in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that acute exposures to vehicular traffic and particulate matter (PM) air pollution are key causes of fatal cardiac arrhythmia, especially in those with preexisting cardiovascular disease. Researchers point to electrophysiologic dysfunction and auto...

  20. How are arrhythmias detected by implanted cardiac devices managed in Europe? Results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derick; Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio; Proclemer, Alessandro; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Estner, Heidi; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-09-01

    The management of arrhythmias detected by implantable cardiac devices can be challenging. There are no formal international guidelines to inform decision-making. The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess the management of various clinical scenarios among members of the EHRA electrophysiology research network. There were 49 responses to the questionnaire. The survey responses were mainly (81%) from medium-high volume device implanting centres, performing more than 200 total device implants per year. Clinical scenarios were described focusing on four key areas: the implantation of pacemakers for bradyarrhythmia detected on an implantable loop recorder (ILR), the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmia detected by an ILR or pacemaker, the management of atrial fibrillation in patients with pacemakers and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices and the management of ventricular tachycardia in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. PMID:26443791

  1. Investigation of mechanisms and non-pharmacological therapy of cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vago, Hajnalka

    apply effectively biatrial pacemaker and biatrial cardioverter defibrillator for the prevention of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. In the majority of patients frequency of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation decreased significantly due to biatrial stimulation or combined pharmacological and resynchronisation therapy. Parasymphathetic cardiac neurostimulation is a promising new non-pharmacological treatment option in certain types of arrhythmias. In our clinical study we were able to stimulate cardiac parasympathetic nerves innervating atrioventricular node achieving ventricular rate control during atrial tachyarrhythmias with chronically implanted coronary sinus lead. In our study biventricular pacemakers and cardioverter defibrillators were applied successfully in the treatment of drug refractory congestive heart failure combined with inter- and/or intraventricular conduction disturbances. AV sequential left sided chronic pacing using a single lead located in the coronary sinus has not been previously reported. Left sided DDD pacing was effective chronically in the improvement of the functional stage of patient suffering from congestive heart disease combined with left bundle branch block and binodal disease. Parallel with the investigation of pathomechanism of life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias and the most common, clinically relevant atrial fibrillation due to recent technical development, we were able to support nonpharmacological therapeutic modalities, gaining popularity in clinical management, with novel observations.

  2. Neuromodulation targets intrinsic cardiac neurons to attenuate neuronally mediated atrial arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, David D; Southerland, E Marie; Hoover, Donald B; Beaumont, Eric; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2012-02-01

    Our objective was to determine whether atrial fibrillation (AF) results from excessive activation of intrinsic cardiac neurons (ICNs) and, if so, whether select subpopulations of neurons therein represent therapeutic targets for suppression of this arrhythmogenic potential. Trains of five electrical stimuli (0.3-1.2 mA, 1 ms) were delivered during the atrial refractory period to mediastinal nerves (MSN) on the superior vena cava to evoke AF. Neuroanatomical studies were performed by injecting the neuronal tracer DiI into MSN sites that induced AF. Functional studies involved recording of neuronal activity in situ from the right atrial ganglionated plexus (RAGP) in response to MSN stimulation (MSNS) prior to and following neuromodulation involving either preemptive spinal cord stimulation (SCS; T(1)-T(3), 50 Hz, 200-ms duration) or ganglionic blockade (hexamethonium, 5 mg/kg). The tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) neuronal tracer labeled a subset (13.2%) of RAGP neurons, which also colocalized with cholinergic or adrenergic markers. A subset of DiI-labeled RAGP neurons were noncholinergic/nonadrenergic. MSNS evoked an ∼4-fold increase in RAGP neuronal activity from baseline, which SCS reduced by 43%. Hexamethonium blocked MSNS-evoked increases in neuronal activity. MSNS evoked AF in 78% of right-sided MSN sites, which SCS reduced to 33% and hexamethonium reduced to 7%. MSNS-induced bradycardia was maintained with SCS but was mitigated by hexamethonium. We conclude that MSNS activates subpopulations of intrinsic cardiac neurons, thereby resulting in the formation of atrial arrhythmias leading to atrial fibrillation. Stabilization of ICN local circuit neurons by SCS or the local circuit and autonomic efferent neurons with hexamethonium reduces the arrhythmogenic potential. PMID:22088304

  3. Effect of Continued Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Ventricular Arrhythmias After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Schleifer, John William; Mookadam, Farouk; Kransdorf, Evan P; Nanda, Udai; Adams, Jonathon C; Cha, Stephen; Pajaro, Octavio E; Steidley, David Eric; Scott, Robert L; Carvajal, Tomas; Saadiq, Rayya A; Srivathsan, Komandoor

    2016-08-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces ventricular arrhythmia (VA) burden in some patients with heart failure, but its effect after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation is unknown. We compared VA burden in patients with CRT devices in situ who underwent LVAD implantation and continued CRT (n = 39) to those who had CRT turned off before discharge (n = 26). Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks were significantly reduced in patients with continued CRT (1.5 ± 2.7 shocks per patient vs 5.5 ± 9.3 with CRT off, p = 0.014). There was a nonsignificant reduction in cumulative VA episodes per patient with CRT continued at discharge (42 ± 105 VA per patient vs 82 ± 198 with CRT off, p = 0.29). On-treatment analysis by whether CRT was on or off identified a significantly lower burden of VA (17 ± 1 per patient-year CRT on vs 37 ± 1 per patient-year CRT off, p <0.0001) and ICD shocks (1.2 ± 0.3 per patient-year CRT on vs 1.7 ± 0.3 per patient-year CRT off, p = 0.018). In conclusion, continued CRT is associated with significantly reduced ICD shocks and VA burden after LVAD implantation. PMID:27328958

  4. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a modifier of cardiac conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Marsman, Roos F.J.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Freiberg, Fabian; Verkerk, Arie O.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Podliesna, Svitlana; Chen, Chen; Purfürst, Bettina; Spallek, Bastian; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Baczko, Istvan; dos Remedios, Cristobal G.; George, Alfred L.; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Lodder, Elisabeth M.; de Bakker, Jacques M.T.; Fischer, Robert; Coronel, Ruben; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Gotthardt, Michael; Remme, Carol Ann

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the modulatory effect of the Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on ventricular conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Background A heritable component in risk for ventricular fibrillation (VF) during myocardial infarction (MI) has been well established. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) for VF during acute MI has led to the identification of a locus on chromosome 21q21 (rs2824292) in the vicinity of the CXADR gene. CXADR encodes the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a cell adhesion molecule predominantly located at intercalated discs of the cardiomyocyte. Methods The correlation between CAR transcript levels and rs2824292 genotype was investigated in human left ventricular samples. Electrophysiological studies and molecular analyses were performed CAR haploinsufficient mice (CAR+/−). Results In human left ventricular samples, the risk allele at the chr21q21 GWAS locus was associated with lower CXADR mRNA levels, suggesting that decreased cardiac levels of CAR predispose to ischemia-induced VF. Hearts from CAR+/− mice displayed ventricular conduction slowing in addition to an earlier onset of ventricular arrhythmias during the early phase of acute myocardial ischemia following LAD ligation. Connexin43 expression and distribution was unaffected, but CAR+/− hearts displayed increased arrhythmia susceptibility upon pharmacological electrical uncoupling. Patch-clamp analysis of isolated CAR+/− myocytes showed reduced sodium current magnitude specifically at the intercalated disc. Moreover, CAR co-precipitated with NaV1.5 in vitro, suggesting that CAR affects sodium channel function through a physical interaction with NaV1.5. Conclusion We identify CAR as a novel modifier of ventricular conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Genetic determinants of arrhythmia susceptibility (such as CAR) may constitute future targets for risk

  5. Human G109E-inhibitor-1 impairs cardiac function and promotes arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Kobra; Pritchard, Tracy J; Liu, Guan-Sheng; Singh, Vivek P; Bidwell, Philip; Lam, Chi Keung; Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Das, Parthib; Ma, Jianyong; Kunduri, Swati; Sanoudou, Despina; Florea, Stela; Vanderbilt, Erica; Wang, Hong-Shang; Rubinstein, Jack; Hajjar, Roger J; Kranias, Evangelia G

    2015-12-01

    A hallmark of human and experimental heart failure is deficient sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca-uptake reflecting impaired contractile function. This is at least partially attributed to dephosphorylation of phospholamban by increased protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) activity. Indeed inhibition of PP1 by transgenic overexpression or gene-transfer of constitutively active inhibitor-1 improved Ca-cycling, preserved function and decreased fibrosis in small and large animal models of heart failure, suggesting that inhibitor-1 may represent a potential therapeutic target. We recently identified a novel human polymorphism (G109E) in the inhibitor-1 gene with a frequency of 7% in either normal or heart failure patients. Transgenic mice, harboring cardiac-specific expression of G109E inhibitor-1, exhibited decreases in contractility, Ca-kinetics and SR Ca-load. These depressive effects were relieved by isoproterenol stimulation. Furthermore, stress conditions (2Hz +/- Iso) induced increases in Ca-sparks, Ca-waves (60% of G109E versus 20% in wild types) and after-contractions (76% of G109E versus 23% of wild types) in mutant cardiomyocytes. Similar findings were obtained by acute expression of the G109E variant in adult cardiomyocytes in the absence or presence of endogenous inhibitor-1. The underlying mechanisms included reduced binding of mutant inhibitor-1 to PP1, increased PP1 activity, and dephosphorylation of phospholamban at Ser16 and Thr17. However, phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor at Ser2808 was not altered while phosphorylation at Ser2814 was increased, consistent with increased activation of Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), promoting aberrant SR Ca-release. Parallel in vivo studies revealed that mutant mice developed ventricular ectopy and complex ventricular arrhythmias (including bigeminy, trigeminy and ventricular tachycardia), when challenged with isoproterenol. Inhibition of CaMKII activity by KN-93 prevented the increased propensity to

  6. Treatment of cardiac arrhythmias in a mouse model of Rett syndrome with Na+-channel-blocking antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Herrera, José A; Ward, Christopher S; Pitcher, Meagan R; Percy, Alan K; Skinner, Steven; Kaufmann, Walter E; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    One quarter of deaths associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, are sudden and unexpected. RTT is associated with prolonged QTc interval (LQT), and LQT-associated cardiac arrhythmias are a potential cause of unexpected death. The standard of care for LQT in RTT is treatment with β-adrenergic antagonists; however, recent work indicates that acute treatment of mice with RTT with a β-antagonist, propranolol, does not prevent lethal arrhythmias. In contrast, acute treatment with the Na(+) channel blocker phenytoin prevented arrhythmias. Chronic dosing of propranolol may be required for efficacy; therefore, we tested the efficacy of chronic treatment with either propranolol or phenytoin on RTT mice. Phenytoin completely abolished arrhythmias, whereas propranolol showed no benefit. Surprisingly, phenytoin also normalized weight and activity, but worsened breathing patterns. To explore the role of Na(+) channel blockers on QT in people with RTT, we performed a retrospective analysis of QT status before and after Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Individuals with RTT and LQT significantly improved their QT interval status after being started on Na(+) channel blocker antiepileptic therapies. Thus, Na(+) channel blockers should be considered for the clinical management of LQT in individuals with RTT. PMID:25713300

  7. Splicing misregulation of SCN5A contributes to cardiac-conduction delay and heart arrhythmia in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Freyermuth, Fernande; Rau, Frédérique; Kokunai, Yosuke; Linke, Thomas; Sellier, Chantal; Nakamori, Masayuki; Kino, Yoshihiro; Arandel, Ludovic; Jollet, Arnaud; Thibault, Christelle; Philipps, Muriel; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Udd, Bjarne; Day, John W; Duboc, Denis; Wahbi, Karim; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Mochizuki, Hideki; Deryckere, François; Kimura, Takashi; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Ishiura, Shoichi; Lacroix, Vincent; Campan-Fournier, Amandine; Navratil, Vincent; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Horie, Minoru; Imoto, Keiji; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Swanson, Maurice S; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Inada, Shin; Itoh, Hideki; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Ashihara, Takashi; Wang, Eric; Zimmer, Thomas; Furling, Denis; Takahashi, Masanori P; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by the expression of mutant RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats that sequester muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, leading to alternative splicing changes. Cardiac alterations, characterized by conduction delays and arrhythmia, are the second most common cause of death in DM. Using RNA sequencing, here we identify novel splicing alterations in DM heart samples, including a switch from adult exon 6B towards fetal exon 6A in the cardiac sodium channel, SCN5A. We find that MBNL1 regulates alternative splicing of SCN5A mRNA and that the splicing variant of SCN5A produced in DM presents a reduced excitability compared with the control adult isoform. Importantly, reproducing splicing alteration of Scn5a in mice is sufficient to promote heart arrhythmia and cardiac-conduction delay, two predominant features of myotonic dystrophy. In conclusion, misregulation of the alternative splicing of SCN5A may contribute to a subset of the cardiac dysfunctions observed in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:27063795

  8. Splicing misregulation of SCN5A contributes to cardiac-conduction delay and heart arrhythmia in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Freyermuth, Fernande; Rau, Frédérique; Kokunai, Yosuke; Linke, Thomas; Sellier, Chantal; Nakamori, Masayuki; Kino, Yoshihiro; Arandel, Ludovic; Jollet, Arnaud; Thibault, Christelle; Philipps, Muriel; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Udd, Bjarne; Day, John W.; Duboc, Denis; Wahbi, Karim; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Mochizuki, Hideki; Deryckere, François; Kimura, Takashi; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Ishiura, Shoichi; Lacroix, Vincent; Campan-Fournier, Amandine; Navratil, Vincent; Chautard, Emilie; Auboeuf, Didier; Horie, Minoru; Imoto, Keiji; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Swanson, Maurice S.; de Munain, Adolfo Lopez; Inada, Shin; Itoh, Hideki; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Ashihara, Takashi; Wang, Eric; Zimmer, Thomas; Furling, Denis; Takahashi, Masanori P.; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by the expression of mutant RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats that sequester muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins, leading to alternative splicing changes. Cardiac alterations, characterized by conduction delays and arrhythmia, are the second most common cause of death in DM. Using RNA sequencing, here we identify novel splicing alterations in DM heart samples, including a switch from adult exon 6B towards fetal exon 6A in the cardiac sodium channel, SCN5A. We find that MBNL1 regulates alternative splicing of SCN5A mRNA and that the splicing variant of SCN5A produced in DM presents a reduced excitability compared with the control adult isoform. Importantly, reproducing splicing alteration of Scn5a in mice is sufficient to promote heart arrhythmia and cardiac-conduction delay, two predominant features of myotonic dystrophy. In conclusion, misregulation of the alternative splicing of SCN5A may contribute to a subset of the cardiac dysfunctions observed in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:27063795

  9. Short-term forecasting of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias based on symbolic dynamics and finite-time growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Niels; Ziehmann, Christine; Kurths, Jürgen; Meyerfeldt, Udo; Schirdewan, Alexander; Voss, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT-VF) as fatal cardiac arrhythmias are the main factors triggering sudden cardiac death. The objective of this study is to find early signs of sustained VT-VF in patients with an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). These devices are able to safeguard patients by returning their hearts to a normal rhythm via strong defibrillatory shocks; additionally, they store the 1000 beat-to-beat intervals immediately before the onset of a life-threatening arrhythmia. We study these 1000 beat-to-beat intervals of 17 chronic heart failure ICD patients before the onset of a life-threatening arrhythmia and at a control time, i.e., without a VT-VF event. To characterize these rather short data sets, we calculate heart rate variability parameters from the time and frequency domain, from symbolic dynamics as well as the finite-time growth rates. We find that neither the time nor the frequency domain parameters show significant differences between the VT-VF and the control time series. However, two parameters from symbolic dynamics as well as the finite-time growth rates discriminate significantly both groups. These findings could be of importance in algorithms for next generation ICD's to improve the diagnostics and therapy of VT-VF.

  10. ST depression, arrhythmia, vagal dominance, and reduced cardiac micro-RNA in particulate-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Farraj, Aimen K; Hazari, Mehdi S; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Lamb, Christina; Winsett, Darrell W; Ge, Yue; Ledbetter, Allen D; Carll, Alex P; Bruno, Maribel; Ghio, Andy; Costa, Daniel L

    2011-02-01

    Recently, investigators demonstrated associations between fine particulate matter (PM)-associated metals and adverse health effects. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA), a waste product of fossil fuel combustion from boilers, is rich in the transition metals Fe, Ni, and V, and when released as a fugitive particle, is an important contributor to ambient fine particulate air pollution. We hypothesized that a single-inhalation exposure to transition metal-rich PM will cause concentration-dependent cardiovascular toxicity in spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. Rats implanted with telemeters to monitor heart rate and electrocardiogram were exposed once by nose-only inhalation for 4 hours to 3.5 mg/m(3), 1.0 mg/m(3), or 0.45 mg/m(3) of a synthetic PM (dried salt solution), similar in composition to a well-studied ROFA sample consisting of Fe, Ni, and V. Exposure to the highest concentration of PM decreased T-wave amplitude and area, caused ST depression, reduced heart rate (HR), and increased nonconducted P-wave arrhythmias. These changes were accompanied by increased pulmonary inflammation, lung resistance, and vagal tone, as indicated by changes in markers of HR variability (increased root of the mean of squared differences of adjacent RR intervals [RMSSD], low frequency [LF], high frequency [HF], and decreased LF/HF), and attenuated myocardial micro-RNA (RNA segments that suppress translation by targeting messenger RNA) expression. The low and intermediate concentrations of PM had less effect on the inflammatory, HR variability, and micro-RNA endpoints, but still caused significant reductions in HR. In addition, the intermediate concentration caused ST depression and increased QRS area, whereas the low concentration increased the T-wave parameters. Thus, PM-induced cardiac dysfunction is mediated by multiple mechanisms that may be dependent on PM concentration and myocardial vulnerability (this abstract does not reflect the policy of the United States Environmental

  11. Pilot evaluation of an integrated monitor-adhesive patch for long-term cardiac arrhythmia detection in India.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Maneesh; Padte, Sanjay; Arora, Vanita; Biffi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Electrocardiographic monitoring represents one of the most reliable and time-tested methods for reducing ambiguity in cardiac arrhythmia diagnosis. In India, the resting ECG is generally the first tool of choice for in-clinic diagnosis. The external loop recorder (ELR) is another useful tool that compounds the advantages of traditional tools by coupling ambulatory monitoring with a long-term window. Thus, the objective was to test the use of a 7-day ELR for arrhythmia diagnosis in India for a broad range of presenting symptoms. In this study set in the Indian healthcare environment, an auto-triggered, wireless patch-type ELR was used with 125 patients (62.5 ± 16.7 years, 76 males) presenting a broad range of symptoms. Eighty percent of the symptoms were related to syncope, presyncope or palpitations. Patients were administered an ELR for 7-28 days depending on the physician's prescription. Prespecified significant arrhythmias included sinus pause >2 s, symptomatic bradycardia <40 b.p.m., second-degree (and higher) AV block, complete heart block, ventricular fibrillation, sustained/nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (>3 beats), atrial fibrillation (chronic or paroxysmal), atrial flutter and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) >130 b.p.m. Diagnostic yield was 38% when a stringent tabulation methodology considering only clinically significant arrhythmia was used. When first-degree AV block, premature atrial and ventricular beats, couplets (both atrial and ventricular in origin), bigeminy or trigeminy, or sudden changes in rate (noted as sinus arrhythmia) were included in the calculation, diagnostic yield was 80%. Patient compliance was 98%; patients wore the patch for the entire prescribed monitoring period without disruption. Seventy percent of the reported symptoms corresponded with an arrhythmia. Use of the ELR led to therapy change in 24% of patients: 15 patients went on to receive an implantable cardioverter defibrillator or pacemaker, 4 received ablation

  12. Dipyridamole-thallium tests are predictive of severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Saragoca, M.A.; Canziani, M.E.; Gil, M.A.; Castiglioni, M.L.; Cassiolato, J.L.; Barbieri, A.; Lima, V.C.; Draibe, S.A.; Martinez, E.E. )

    1991-01-01

    In a population of patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) and a high prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) undergoing chronic hemodialysis, the authors investigated the association between the results of dipyridamole-thallium tests (DTTs) and the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias. They observed a positive significant association between positive DTTs and the occurrence of severe forms of ventricular arrhythmias. A significant association was also observed between the presence of severe LVH and the occurrence of severe ventricular arrhythmias. However, no association was found between the presence of LVH and the positivity of the DTT. As most of their patients with positive DTTs had unimpaired coronary circulations, they conclude that positive DTTs, although falsely indicative of impaired myocardial blood supply, does have an important clinical relevance, indicating increased risk of morbidity (and, possibly, mortality) due to ventricular arrhythmias in a population of CRF patients submitted to chronic renal function replacement program.

  13. [Insertable Cardiac Monitor].

    PubMed

    Lewalter, Thorsten; Koutsouraki, Ilia; Brodherr, Turgut

    2015-08-01

    Intermittent cardiac arrhythmias are sometimes difficult to register using conventional detection concepts. The implantable event recorders offer a unique opportunity to document short lasting or rare and even asymptomatic arrhythmias. This manuscript describes event recorder implantation in a step-by-step manner. PMID:26306017

  14. Cardiac arrhythmia is the primary response of embryonic Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) exposed to crude oil during weathering.

    PubMed

    Incardona, John P; Carls, Mark G; Day, Heather L; Sloan, Catherine A; Bolton, Jennie L; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2009-01-01

    Teleost embryos develop a syndrome characterized by edema when exposed to water that weathers substrates contaminated with crude oil. Previous studies using zebrafish demonstrated that crude oil exposure causes cardiogenic edema, and that the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in weathered crude oils (tricyclic fluorenes, dibenzothiophenes, and phenanthrenes) are cardiotoxic, causing arrhythmia through a pathway that does not require activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We demonstrate here for Pacific herring, a species impacted by the Exxon Valdez oil spill, that the developing heart is the primary target of crude oil exposure. Herring embryos exposed to the effluent of oiled gravel columns developed dose-dependent edema and irregular cardiac arrhythmia soon afterthe heartbeat was established. At a dose that produced cardiac dysfunction in 100% of exposed embryos, tissue levels of tricyclic PAHs were below 1 micromol/kg, suggesting a specific, high affinity target in the heart. These findings have implications for understanding the mechanism of tricyclic PAH cardiotoxicity, the development of biomarkers for the effects of PAH exposure in fish, and understanding the long-term impacts of oil spills and other sources of PAH pollution in aquatic environments. PMID:19209607

  15. Next-generation sequencing for the diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Steven A; Ellinor, Patrick T

    2015-05-01

    Inherited arrhythmia syndromes are collectively associated with substantial morbidity, yet our understanding of the genetic architecture of these conditions remains limited. Recent technological advances in DNA sequencing have led to the commercialization of genetic testing now widely available in clinical practice. In particular, next-generation sequencing allows the large-scale and rapid assessment of entire genomes. Although next-generation sequencing represents a major technological advance, it has introduced numerous challenges with respect to the interpretation of genetic variation and has opened a veritable floodgate of biological data of unknown clinical significance to practitioners. In this review, we discuss current genetic testing indications for inherited arrhythmia syndromes, broadly outline characteristics of next-generation sequencing techniques, and highlight challenges associated with such testing. We further summarize future directions that will be necessary to address to enable the widespread adoption of next-generation sequencing in the routine management of patients with inherited arrhythmia syndromes. PMID:25625719

  16. Inhibition of Thromboxane A2-Induced Arrhythmias and Intracellular Calcium Changes in Cardiac Myocytes by Blockade of the Inositol Trisphosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kosloski, L. M.; Gilbert, W. J. R.; Touchberry, C. D.; Moore, D. S.; Kelly, J. K.; Brotto, M.; Orr, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently reported that left atrial injections of the thromboxane A2 (TXA2) mimetic, (5Z)-7-[(1R,4S,5S,6R)-6-[(1E,3S)-3-hydroxy-1-octenyl]-2 -oxabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-yl]-5-heptenoic acid (U46619), induced ventricular arrhythmias in the anesthetized rabbit. Data from this study led us to hypothesize that TXA2 may be inducing direct actions on the myocardium to induce these arrhythmias. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanism responsible for these arrhythmias. We report that TXA2R is expressed at both the gene and protein levels in atrial and ventricular samples of adult rabbits. In addition, TXA2R mRNA was identified in single, isolated ventricular cardiac myocytes. Furthermore, treatment of isolated cardiac myocytes with U46619 increased intracellular calcium in a dose-dependent manner and these increases were blocked by the specific TXA2R antagonist, 7-(3-((2-((phenylamino)carbonyl)hydrazino)methyl)-7-oxabicyclo(2.2.1)hept-2-yl)-5-heptenoic acid (SQ29548). Pretreatment of myocytes with an inhibitor of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) formation, gentamicin, or with an inhibitor of IP3 receptors, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate (2-APB), blocked the increase in intracellular calcium. In vivo pretreatment of anesthetized rabbits with either gentamicin or 2-APB subsequently inhibited the formation of ventricular arrhythmias elicited by U46619. These data support the hypothesis that TXA2 can induce arrhythmias via a direct action on cardiac myocytes. Furthermore, these arrhythmogenic actions were blocked by inhibitors of the IP3 pathway. In summary, this study provides novel evidence for direct TXA2-induced cardiac arrhythmias and provides a rationale for IP3 as a potential target for the treatment of TXA2-mediated arrhythmias. PMID:19741149

  17. Examining the role of TRPA1 in air pollution-induced cardiac arrhythmias and autonomic imbalance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we describe how air pollution causes cardiac arrhythmogenesis through sensory irritation in the airways. Time-series studies show the risk of adverse cardiac events increases significantly in the hours to days after expos...

  18. Oxidative Stress Induced Ventricular Arrhythmia and Impairment of Cardiac Function in Nos1ap Deleted Mice.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Koji; Sasano, Tetsuo; Kurokawa, Junko; Takahashi, Kentaro; Okamura, Tadashi; Kato, Norihiro; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Furukawa, Tetsushi

    2016-05-25

    Genome-wide association study has identified that the genetic variations at NOS1AP (neuronal nitric oxide synthase-1 adaptor protein) were associated with QT interval and sudden cardiac death (SCD). However, the mechanism linking a genetic variant of NOS1AP and SCD is poorly understood. We used Nos1ap knockout mice (Nos1ap(-/-)) to determine the involvement of Nos1ap in SCD, paying special attention to oxidative stress.At baseline, a surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and ultrasound echocardiography (UCG) showed no difference between Nos1ap(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice. Oxidative stress was induced by a single injection of doxorubicin (Dox, 25 mg/kg). After Dox injection, Nos1ap(-/-) showed significantly higher mortality than WT (93.3 versus 16.0% at day 14, P < 0.01). ECG showed significantly longer QTc in Nos1ap(-/-) than WT, and UCG revealed significant reduction of fractional shortening (%FS) only in Nos1ap(-/-) after Dox injection. Spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias were documented by telemetry recording after Dox injection only in Nos1ap(-/-). Ex vivo optical mapping revealed that the action potential duration (APD)90 was prolonged at baseline in Nos1ap(-/-), and administration of Dox lengthened APD90 more in Nos1ap(-/-) than in WT. The expression of Bnp and the H2O2 level were higher in Nos1ap(-/-) after Dox injection. Nos1ap(-/-) showed a reduced amplitude of calcium transient in isolated cardiomyocytes after Dox injection. Administration of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine significantly reduced mortality of Nos1ap(-/-) by Dox injection, accompanied by prevention of QT prolongation and a reduction in %FS.Although Nos1ap(-/-) mice have apparently normal hearts, oxidative stress evokes ventricular tachyarrhythmia and heart failure, which may cause sudden cardiac death. PMID:27170476

  19. Influence of electromagnetic interference on implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Motoyuki; Mizutani, Noboru; Waseda, Katsuhisa

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the susceptibility of implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices to electromagnetic interference in and around a magnetically levitated linear motor car [High-Speed Surface Transport (HSST)]. During the study, cardiac devices were connected to a phantom model that had similar characteristics to the human body. Three pacemakers from three manufacturers and one implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) were evaluated in and around the magnetically levitated vehicle. The system is based on a normal conductive system levitated by the attractive force of magnets and propelled by a linear induction motor without wheels. The magnetic field strength at 40 cm from the vehicle in the nonlevitating state was 0.12 mT and that during levitation was 0.20 mT. The magnetic and electric field strengths on a seat close to the variable voltage/variable frequency inverter while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.13 mT, 2.95 V/m and 0.04 mT, 0.36 V/m, respectively. Data recorded on a seat close to the reactor while the vehicle was moving and at rest were 0.09 mT, 2.45 V/m and 0.05 mT, 1.46 V/m, respectively. Measured magnetic and electric field strengths both inside and outside the linear motor car were too low to result in device inactivation. No sensing, pacing, or arrhythmic interactions were noted with any pacemaker or ICD programmed in either bipolar and unipolar configurations. In conclusion, our data suggest that a permanent programming change or a device failure is unlikely to occur and that the linear motor car system is probably safe for patients with one of the four implanted cardiac arrhythmia devices used in this study under the conditions tested. PMID:16235032

  20. Geophysical variables and behavior: CIII. Days with sudden infant deaths and cardiac arrhythmias in adults share a factor with PC1 geomagnetic pulsations: implications for pursuing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Persinger, M A; O'Connor, R P

    2001-06-01

    If geomagnetic-mediated stimuli trigger many sudden infant deaths, then the days in which they and hospital admissions for cardiac arrhythmias for adults occur should share a similar source of variance. Factor analyses of the days in which a sudden infant death occurred in Ontario or adults were admitted for one of eight categories of cardiac crisis in the Sudbury (Ontario) Region for the year 1984 supported the hypothesis. This factor, with which infant deaths and adult cardiac arrhythmias each shared about 40% of their variance, also shared about 40% of the variance with a factor with which about 35% of the variance in daily occurrence of geomagnetic pulsations (0.2 Hz to 5 Hz) was associated. These results are consistent with the important role of geomagnetic variables in the occurrence of transient electrical anomalies in brain function rather than cardiac blood flow. PMID:11453188

  1. The effects of B0, B20 and B100 soy biodiesel exhaust on aconitine-induced cardiac arrhythmia in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    CONTEXT: Diesel exhaust (DE) has been shown to increase the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. Although biodiesel has been proposed as a "safer" alternative to diesel, it is still uncertain whether it actually poses less threat.OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that exposure to pure...

  2. Assessment of Cardiac Rate and Rhythm in Fetuses with Arrhythmia via Maternal Abdominal Fetal Electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Hari K.; Vignola, Emilia F.; Fifer, William P.; Williams, Ismee A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to report our experience using the Monica AN24 (Monica Healthcare Ltd., Nottingham, United Kingdom), a maternal transabdominal fetal electrocardiographic monitor, in a case series of fetuses with arrhythmias. Study Design We recorded fetal electrocardiograms (fECGs) on subjects with fetal arrhythmias diagnosed by fetal echocardiogram. Fetal heart rate and rhythm were determined via manual fECG analysis. Results Overall, 20 fECGs were recorded from a pool of 13 subjects. Fetal heart rate acquisition was determined to be high, medium, and poor quality in 10, 3, and 7 tracings, respectively. High-quality tracings were obtained in 9 of 11 subjects with gestational age < 26 or > 34 weeks. P waves were detectable in five tracings. Conclusion In subjects < 26 or > 34 weeks' gestational age, there was reasonable success in fetal heart rate acquisition. Further study is warranted to determine the potential role of this device in the monitoring of subjects with fetal arrhythmias. PMID:26495180

  3. Cardiac arrhythmia induced by genetic silencing of “funny” (f) channels is rescued by GIRK4 inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Mesirca, Pietro; Alig, Jacqueline; Torrente, Angelo G.; Müller, Jana Christina; Marger, Laurine; Rollin, Anne; Marquilly, Claire; Vincent, Anne; Dubel, Stefan; Bidaud, Isabelle; Fernandez, Anne; Seniuk, Anika; Engeland, Birgit; Singh, Jasmin; Miquerol, Lucile; Ehmke, Heimo; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Nargeot, Joel; Wickman, Kevin; Isbrandt, Dirk; Mangoni, Matteo E.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying cardiac automaticity are still incompletely understood and controversial. Here we report the complete conditional and time-controlled silencing of the "funny" current (If) by expression of a dominant-negative, non-conductive HCN4-channel subunit (hHCN4-AYA). Heart-specific If silencing caused altered [Ca2+]i release and Ca2+ handling in the sinoatrial node, impaired pacemaker activity, and symptoms reminiscent of severe human disease of pacemaking. The effects of If silencing critically depended on the activity of the autonomic nervous system. We were able to rescue the failure of impulse generation and conduction by additional genetic deletion of cardiac muscarinic G-protein-activated (GIRK4) channels in If-deficient mice without impairing heartbeat regulation. Our study establishes the role of f-channels in cardiac automaticity and indicates that arrhythmia related to HCN loss-of-function may be managed by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of GIRK4 channels, thus offering a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of heart rhythm diseases. PMID:25144323

  4. Incidence and Factors Predicting Skin Burns at the Site of Indifferent Electrode during Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Hussain; Finta, Bohuslav; Rind, Jubran

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) has become a mainstay for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Skin burns at the site of an indifferent electrode patch have been a rare, serious, and likely an underreported complication of RFA. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of skin burns in cardiac RFA procedures performed at one institution. Also, we wanted to determine the factors predicting skin burns after cardiac RFA procedures at the indifferent electrode skin pad site. Methods. A retrospective case control study was performed to compare the characteristics in patients who developed skin burns in a 2-year period. Results. Incidence of significant skin burns after RFA was 0.28% (6/2167). Four of the six patients were female and all were Caucasians. Four controls for every case were age and sex matched. Burn patients had significantly higher BMI, procedure time, and postprocedure pain, relative to control subjects (p < 0.05, one-tailed testing). No one in either group had evidence of dispersive pad malattachment. Conclusions. Our results indicate that burn patients had higher BMI and longer procedure times compared to control subjects. These findings warrant further larger studies on this topic. PMID:27213077

  5. Effect of early bisoprolol administration on ventricular arrhythmia and cardiac death in patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, Edd; Zheng, Sean; Nabeebaccus, Adam; O'Gallagher, Kevin; Stewart, Adrian; Webb, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of early oral beta blockade in patients presenting with acute non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Methods We retrospectively identified 890 consecutive patients presenting with NSTEMI to a single UK centre from 2012 to 2014. Included patients all received standardised antiplatelet therapy plus low-dose oral bisoprolol (1.25–2.5 mg) within 4 h (mean 2.2±1.36; ‘Early Group’) or within 5–24 h (mean 15.4±5.7; ‘Late Group’) of presentation. Patients were followed up for the duration of hospital stay with the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE—defined as ventricular arrhythmia, cardiac death or repeat infarction) set as the primary outcome. Multivariate logistic regression models analysed early versus late bisoprolol administration and adjusted for potential confounders. Results 399 patients were included. Of the patient parameters, only the GRACE score was significantly different between the early (n=99, GRACE 164.5±29.6) and late (n=300, GRACE 156.7±31.4) groups (p=0.033). The early group had significantly fewer ventricular arrhythmias (1 vs 20, p=0.034), cardiac deaths (0 vs 13, p=0.044) and consequently MACE (1 vs 27, p=0.005) than the late group. After adjusting for the confounders of pulse, blood pressure, smoking and creatinine, logistic regression analysis identified early bisoprolol administration as protective for ventricular arrhythmia (p=0.038, OR 0.114, CI 0.015 to 0.885) and MACE (p=0.011, OR 0.064, CI 0.008 to 0.527). There was one episode of symptomatic bradycardia in the late group. Conclusions This study suggests that low-dose oral bisoprolol administered to patients with NSTEMI within 4 h of admission may be protective and lead to reduced inpatient MACE. PMID:27326220

  6. Safe Oral Triiodo-L-Thyronine Therapy Protects from Post-Infarct Cardiac Dysfunction and Arrhythmias without Cardiovascular Adverse Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Zhang, Youhua; Ojamaa, Kaie; Chen, Yue-feng; Pingitore, Alessandro; Pol, Christine J.; Saunders, Debra; Balasubramanian, Krithika; Towner, Rheal A.; Gerdes, A. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background A large body of evidence suggests that thyroid hormones (THs) are beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. We have shown that 3 days of triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) treatment in myocardial infarction (MI) rats increased left ventricular (LV) contractility and decreased myocyte apoptosis. However, no clinically translatable protocol is established for T3 treatment of ischemic heart disease. We hypothesized that low-dose oral T3 will offer safe therapeutic benefits in MI. Methods and Results Adult female rats underwent left coronary artery ligation or sham surgeries. T3 (~6 μg/kg/day) was available in drinking water ad libitum immediately following MI and continuing for 2 month(s) (mo). Compared to vehicle-treated MI, the oral T3-treated MI group at 2 mo had markedly improved anesthetized Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based LV ejection fraction and volumes without significant negative changes in heart rate, serum TH levels or heart weight, indicating safe therapy. Remarkably, T3 decreased the incidence of inducible atrial tachyarrhythmias by 88% and improved remodeling. These were accompanied by restoration of gene expression involving several key pathways including thyroid, ion channels, fibrosis, sympathetic, mitochondria and autophagy. Conclusions Low-dose oral T3 dramatically improved post-MI cardiac performance, decreased atrial arrhythmias and cardiac remodeling, and reversed many adverse changes in gene expression with no observable negative effects. This study also provides a safe and effective treatment/monitoring protocol that should readily translate to humans. PMID:26981865

  7. Cardiac glycosides and the risk of breast cancer in women with chronic heart failure and supraventricular arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Couraud, Sébastien; Dell'Aniello, Sophie; Bouganim, Nathaniel; Azoulay, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether the use of cardiac glycosides (CGs), drugs used in the treatment of congestive heart failure (CHF) and supra-ventricular arrhythmia, is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. A cohort of 53,454 women newly diagnosed with CHF or supra-ventricular arrhythmia between January 1, 1988 and December 31, 2010, followed until December 31, 2012, was identified using the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink. A nested case-control analysis was performed, where all incident cases of breast cancer occurring during follow-up were identified and matched with up to 10 controls on age, cohort entry date, and duration of follow-up. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) of incident breast cancer associated with the use of CGs, along with measures of cumulative duration of use and dose. All analyses considered a one year lag period prior to the event, necessary for latency considerations and to minimize detection bias. The 898 breast cancer cases diagnosed beyond one year of follow-up were matched to 8,940 controls. Overall, use of CGs was not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer when compared to non-use (OR 1.07, 95 % CI 0.90-1.26). Furthermore, the risk did not vary with cumulative duration of use or cumulative dose. The findings of this large population-based study indicate that the use of CGs is not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. This should provide reassurance to physicians and patients using these drugs. PMID:25038879

  8. Derivation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cells to Heritable Cardiac Arrhythmias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Inherited Cardiac Arrythmias; Long QT Syndrome (LQTS); Brugada Syndrome (BrS); Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT); Early Repolarization Syndrome (ERS); Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy (AC, ARVD/C); Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM); Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM); Muscular Dystrophies (Duchenne, Becker, Myotonic Dystrophy); Normal Control Subjects

  9. Mitochondria and Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential to providing ATP thereby satisfying the energy demand of the incessant electrical activity and contractile action of cardiac muscle. Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction can adversely impact cardiac electrical functioning by impairing the intracellular ion homeostasis and membrane excitability through reduced ATP production and excessive reactive oxidative species (ROS) generation, resulting in increased propensity to cardiac arrhythmias. In this review, the molecular mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to cardiac arrhythmias are discussed with an emphasis on the impact of increased mitochondrial ROS on the cardiac ion channels and transporters that are critical to maintaining normal electromechanical functioning of the cardiomyocytes. The potential of using mitochondria-targeted antioxidants as a novel anti-arrhythmia therapy is highlighted. PMID:24713422

  10. Cardiac effects of the extract and active components of radix stephaniae tetrandrae. II. Myocardial infarct, arrhythmias, coronary arterial flow and heart rate in the isolated perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Yu, X C; Wu, S; Wang, G Y; Shan, J; Wong, T M; Chen, C F; Pang, K T

    2001-05-11

    The primary purpose of the present study was to compare the cardioprotective effects of the extract from radix stephaniae tetrandrae (RST) and its individual compounds, tetrandrine (Tet) and fanchinoline (Fan). Secondly, we also compared the cardiac effects of the individual compounds and the RST extract with those of verapamil, a classical Ca2+ channel blocker. The Langendorff isolated perfused rat heart preparation was used. Regional ischaemia and reperfusion was employed to induce myocardial infarct and arrhythmia. Infarct, arrhythmia, heart rate and coronary artery flow were determined in hearts treated with vehicle, RST extract, Tet, Fan, or verapamil. It was found that RST extract, of which only 9% was Tet, and Tet alone produced equally potent ameliorating effects on arrhythmia and infarct induced by ischaemia and reperfusion without further inhibiting ischaemia-reduced heart rate and coronary artery flow. Fan had no effects on arrhythmia and infarct induced by ischaemia and reperfusion; but it induced S-T segment elevation and further reduced heart rate and coronary artery flow during ischaemia. Verapamil also ameliorated the effects of ischaemia and reperfusion on arrhythmia and infarct. It should be noted that 1 microM verapamil, that produced comparable effects on infarct and arrhythmia to the RST extract and Tet, further inhibited heart rate during ischaemia. The results indicate that the RST extract produces equally potent cardioprotective and anti-arrhythmic effects as Tet alone. Both RST extract and Tet may be better choices for the treatment of arrhythmia and infarct induced by myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion than the classical Ca2+ channel blocker, verapamil as they do not further reduce heart rate during ischaemia. PMID:11432452

  11. Evaluation of the Effects of CHF6001, an Inhaled PDE4 Inhibitor, on Cardiac Repolarization and Cardiac Arrhythmias in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Antonio; Compagnoni, Anna; Nandeuil, Anne; Maison-Blanche, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multicomponent condition characterized by airway inflammation and associated to comorbidities, including cardiovascular diseases. Among anti-inflammatory agents in development for COPD, the phosphodiesterase inhibitors administrated by inhalation have the potential for increased efficacy and reduced systemic side effects. CHF6001 is an inhaled PDE4 inhibitor with proven anti-inflammatory properties in animal models. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was aimed to demonstrate its cardiovascular safety and tolerability in healthy male volunteers with normal electrocardiogram and cardiac parameters. Single and multiple ascending doses (7 days of administration) of CHF6001 were administered. Three electrocardiograms were recorded at several pharmacokinetic time points and at each time points, postdose heart rate, QRS and PR intervals, and presence of arrhythmia were evaluated. In single ascending dose, QTcF intervals did not increase more than 30 milliseconds from the baseline, all heart rate was between 45 and 100 bpm, and no statistically significant differences were observed in PR and QRS intervals. In multiple ascending dose, cardiac parameters did not differ significantly from baseline. In the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis, no medically or clinically significant changes were found. Further studies are ongoing to demonstrate that CHF6001 is safe and well tolerated in COPD patients as well. PMID:26945156

  12. Biological therapies for cardiac arrhythmias: can genes and cells replace drugs and devices?

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Cheol; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-03-01

    Cardiac rhythm disorders reflect failures of impulse generation and/or conduction. With the exception of ablation methods that yield selective endocardial destruction, present therapies are nonspecific and/or palliative. Progress in understanding the underlying biology opens up prospects for new alternatives. This article reviews the present state of the art in gene- and cell-based therapies to correct cardiac rhythm disturbances. We begin with the rationale for such approaches, briefly discuss efforts to address aspects of tachyarrhythmia, and review advances in creating a biological pacemaker to cure bradyarrhythmia. Insights gained bring the field closer to a paradigm shift away from devices and drugs, and toward biologics, in the treatment of rhythm disorders. PMID:20203316

  13. Effects of Osmotic Stress on the Probability of Stretch-Induced Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Kk; Taylor, Lk; Wray, Cj; Wikswo, Jp; Hansen, De

    1997-11-01

    Ion channels within the plasma membrane of ventricular myocardial cells may relieve cytoskeletal and membrane mechanical stresses. Volume control channels modulate intracellular volume. Stretch-activated channels have a critical role in the initiation of stretch-induced arrhythmias (SIA) and may provide an additional pathway for Ca++ influx that modulates contractility. We tested the hypothesis that the mechanisms by which these two types of channels sense mechanical stresses are similiar. We studied the arrhythmogenic effects of mechanical stretch in six Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts in which we altered osmotic pressure across the cell membranes. In diastole, the volume was transiently increased in a left ventricular intracavitary fluid- filled ballon, which was connected to a computer-controlled piston pump. Epicardial monophasic action potential recordings showed a marked decrease in the probability of SIA during hypotonic conditions (cells swollen) (from P=0.51 to P=0.06,p=0.009), and contractility (max systolic pressure) decreased (from 51.1 to 19.6 mmHg, p=0.007). Upon return to the isotonic condition, the probability of SIA returned to baseline condition. One explanation for these findings is that stress relaxation of the viscoelastic cytoskeleton during sustained osmotic loading reduces arrhythmogenic effects of elastic loading produced by transient diastolic stretch.

  14. Is respiratory sinus arrhythmia a good index of cardiac vagal tone in exercise?

    PubMed

    Casadei, B; Moon, J; Johnston, J; Caiazza, A; Sleight, P

    1996-08-01

    To assess the relative roles of neural and nonneural mechanisms in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) at rest and during exercise (steady-state supine cycle ergometry at 25% of peak oxygen uptake), we studied 10 healthy men (mean age 21 +/- 1 yr) before (control) and during ganglion blockade (GB) with trimetaphan camsylate (3-5 mg/min i.v.). GB was confirmed by the abolition of the reflex bradycardia in response to intravenous phenylephrine and of the blood pressure rise with the cold pressor test. RSA was calculated from the power of the spectral component of the R-R interval variability centered at the breathing frequency. GB decreased but did not abolish RSA. At rest, this nonneural component of RSA was negligible, accounting for < 1% of the control RSA. During GB, exercise did not affect RSA significantly. However, because control RSA was decreased by exercise, the proportion of nonneural RSA increased by 32% (range from 17 to 75%). These results indicate that as the vagal tone decreases with exercise, an increasing proportion of RSA is due to nonneural mechanisms. PMID:8872618

  15. Mosaic Deficiency in Mitochondrial Oxidative Metabolism Promotes Cardiac Arrhythmia during Aging.

    PubMed

    Baris, Olivier R; Ederer, Stefan; Neuhaus, Johannes F G; von Kleist-Retzow, Jürgen-Christoph; Wunderlich, Claudia M; Pal, Martin; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Peeva, Viktoriya; Zsurka, Gabor; Kunz, Wolfram S; Hickethier, Tilman; Bunck, Alexander C; Stöckigt, Florian; Schrickel, Jan W; Wiesner, Rudolf J

    2015-05-01

    Aging is a progressive decline of body function, during which many tissues accumulate few cells with high levels of deleted mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), leading to a defect of mitochondrial functions. Whether this mosaic mitochondrial deficiency contributes to organ dysfunction is unknown. To investigate this, we generated mice with an accelerated accumulation of mtDNA deletions in the myocardium, by expressing a dominant-negative mutant mitochondrial helicase. These animals accumulated few randomly distributed cardiomyocytes with compromised mitochondrial function, which led to spontaneous ventricular premature contractions and AV blocks at 18 months. These symptoms were not caused by a general mitochondrial dysfunction in the entire myocardium, and were not observed in mice at 12 months with significantly lower numbers of dysfunctional cells. Therefore, our results suggest that the disposition to arrhythmia typically found in the aged human heart might be due to the random accumulation of mtDNA deletions and the subsequent mosaic respiratory chain deficiency. PMID:25955204

  16. Cardiac Arrhythmias Classification Method Based on MUSIC, Morphological Descriptors, and Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghsh-Nilchi, Ahmad R.; Kadkhodamohammadi, A. Rahim

    2009-12-01

    An electrocardiogram (ECG) beat classification scheme based on multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm, morphological descriptors, and neural networks is proposed for discriminating nine ECG beat types. These are normal, fusion of ventricular and normal, fusion of paced and normal, left bundle branch block, right bundle branch block, premature ventricular concentration, atrial premature contraction, paced beat, and ventricular flutter. ECG signal samples from MIT-BIH arrhythmia database are used to evaluate the scheme. MUSIC algorithm is used to calculate pseudospectrum of ECG signals. The low-frequency samples are picked to have the most valuable heartbeat information. These samples along with two morphological descriptors, which deliver the characteristics and features of all parts of the heart, form an input feature vector. This vector is used for the initial training of a classifier neural network. The neural network is designed to have nine sample outputs which constitute the nine beat types. Two neural network schemes, namely multilayered perceptron (MLP) neural network and a probabilistic neural network (PNN), are employed. The experimental results achieved a promising accuracy of 99.03% for classifying the beat types using MLP neural network. In addition, our scheme recognizes NORMAL class with 100% accuracy and never misclassifies any other classes as NORMAL.

  17. Complexity-Measure-Based Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Real-Time Detection of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Szi-Wen

    2006-12-01

    A novel approach that employs a complexity-based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) technique for real-time detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) is presented. A dataset consisting of a number of VF and VT electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings drawn from the MIT-BIH database was adopted for such an analysis. It was split into two smaller datasets for algorithm training and testing, respectively. Each ECG recording was measured in a 10-second interval. For each recording, a number of overlapping windowed ECG data segments were obtained by shifting a 5-second window by a step of 1 second. During the windowing process, the complexity measure (CM) value was calculated for each windowed segment and the task of pattern recognition was then sequentially performed by the SHT procedure. A preliminary test conducted using the database produced optimal overall predictive accuracy of[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]. The algorithm was also implemented on a commercial embedded DSP controller, permitting a hardware realization of real-time ventricular arrhythmia detection.

  18. Use of an Implantable Loop Recorder in a Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) to Monitor Cardiac Arrhythmias and Assess the Effects of Acupuncture and Laser Therapy.

    PubMed

    Magden, Elizabeth R; Sleeper, Meg M; Buchl, Stephanie J; Jones, Rebekah A; Thiele, Erica J; Wilkerson, Gregory K

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in captive chimpanzees and is often associated with myocardial fibrosis, which increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. In this case report, we present a 36-y-old male chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) diagnosed with frequent ventricular premature complexes (VPC). We placed a subcutaneous implantable loop recorder for continual ECG monitoring to assess his arrhythmias without the confounding effects of anesthetics. During his initial treatment with the antiarrhythmia medication amiodarone, he developed thrombocytopenia, and the drug was discontinued. After reviewing other potential therapies for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, we elected to try acupuncture and laser therapy in view of the positive results and the lack of adverse side effects reported in humans. We used 2 well-known cardiac acupuncture sites on the wrist, PC6 (pericardium 6) and HT7 (heart 7), and evaluated the results of the therapy by using the ECG recordings from the implantable loop recorder. Although periodic increases in the animal's excitement level introduced confounding variables that caused some variation in the data, acupuncture and laser therapy appeared to decrease the mean number of VPC/min in this chimpanzee. PMID:26884410

  19. Effects of Acupuncture at the Yintang and the Chengjiang Acupoints on Cardiac Arrhythmias and Neurocardiogenic Syncope in Emergency First Aid.

    PubMed

    Fabrin, Saulo; Soares, Nayara; Pezarezi Yoshimura, Daiana; Hallak Regalo, Simone Cecilio; Donizetti Verri, Edson; de Freitas Vianna, Jacqueline Rodrigues; Gatti Regueiro, Eloisa Maria; Torres da Silva, Josie Resende

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of YinTang and ChengJiang acupoints on patients with cardiac arrhythmia and neurocardiogenic syncope in emergency first aid. A 45 year old woman underwent acupuncture. She had a previous history of a valvuloplasty for rheumatic disease and two acute myocardial infarctions, followed by four catheterizations and an angioplasty. Needling of the YinTang acupoint and stimulation of the ChengJiang acupoint through acupressure were performed for 20 minutes soon after syncope and during tachycardia, hypertension, tachypnea, and precordial pain, without any effect on peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) or the glycemic index. Data were analyzed comparatively by using the following parameters at rest, during syncope, and at 1 minute and 10 minutes after an emergency acupuncture procedure: blood pressure; heart rate; SpO2; and respiratory rate. We found that acupuncture at YinTang and ChenJiang acupoints induced cardiovascular responses, increased the limits of the body's homeostasis, and normalized the patient's condition in the case of syncope. Acupuncture using a combination of ChengJiang and YinTang acupoints had an immediate effect on the autonomic nervous system and on maintaining homeostasis and energy balance in the body. Although this technique was effective, the patient was still referred to the Emergency Room. PMID:26896074

  20. Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Cardiac Nerves on Atrial Arrhythmia in Experimental Pulmonary Artery Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingyan; Deng, Hongping; Jiang, Xuejun; Dai, Zixuan; Wang, Xiaozhan; Wang, Xule; Guo, Zongwen; Hu, Wei; Yu, Shengbo; Yang, Bo; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2015-11-01

    Atrial arrhythmia, which includes atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL), is common in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), who often have increased sympathetic nerve activity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that autonomic nerves play important roles in vulnerability to AF/AFL in PAH. The atrial effective refractory period and AF/AFL inducibility at baseline and after anterior right ganglionated plexi ablation were determined during left stellate ganglion stimulation or left renal sympathetic nerve stimulation in beagle dogs with or without PAH. Then, sympathetic nerve, β-adrenergic receptor densities and connexin 43 expression in atrial tissues were assessed. The sum of the window of vulnerability to AF/AFL was increased in the right atrium compared with the left atrium at baseline in the PAH dogs but not in the controls. The atrial effective refractory period dispersion was increased in the control dogs, but not in the PAH dogs, during left stellate ganglion stimulation. The voltage thresholds for inducing AF/AFL during anterior right ganglionated plexi stimulation were lower in the PAH dogs than in the controls. The AF/AFL inducibility was suppressed after ablation of the anterior right ganglionated plexi in the PAH dogs. The PAH dogs had higher sympathetic nerve and β1-adrenergic receptor densities, increased levels of nonphosphorylated connexin 43, and heterogeneous connexin 43 expression in the right atrium when compared with the control dogs. The anterior right ganglionated plexi play important roles in the induction of AF/AFL. AF/AFL induction was associated with right atrium substrate remodeling in dogs with PAH. PMID:26418021

  1. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing--an editorial overview of selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2014-04-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management.This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing. PMID:24783482

  2. Cardiac vagal control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia during hypercapnia in humans.

    PubMed

    Brown, S J; Mundel, T; Brown, J A

    2007-12-01

    Normoxic hypercapnia may increase high-frequency (HF) power in heart rate variability (HRV) and also increase respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). Low-frequency (LF) power may remain unchanged. In this study, 5-min ECG recordings (N = 10) were analyzed in time and frequency domains while human subjects breathed normoxic 5% CO2 (5%CO2) or room air (RA). Tidal volume (VT), inhalatory (TI), and exhalatory (TE) times of breaths in the final minute were measured. ECG time domain measures were unaffected by CO2 inhalation (P > 0.05). Following natural logarithmic transformation (LN), LFLN was unaltered (RA: 7.14 +/- 0.95 vs. 5%CO2: 7.35 +/- 1.12, P > 0.05), and HFLN increased (RA: 7.65 +/- 1.37 vs. 5%CO2: 8.58 +/- 1.11, P < 0.05) with CO2 inhalation. When changes in total power (NU) were corrected, LF(NU) decreased (RA: 34.4 +/- 22.9 vs. 5%CO2: 23.8 +/- 23.1, P < 0.01), and HFNU increased (RA: 56.5 +/- 22.3 vs. 5%CO2: 66.8 +/- 22.9, P < 0.01) with CO2 inhalation. TI (RA: 2.0 +/- 1.0 vs. 5%CO2: 1.9 +/- 0.8 s) and TE (RA: 2.5 +/- 1.1 vs. 5%CO2: 2.4 +/- 0.9 s) remained unchanged, but VT increased with CO2 inhalation (RA: 1.1 +/- 0.3 vs. 5%CO2: 2.0 +/- 0.8 L, P < 0.001). Heart rates during inhalation (RA: 35.2 +/- 4.4, 5%CO2: 34.5 +/- 4.8 beats min(-1)) were different from heart rates during exhalation (RA: 28.8 +/- 4.4, 5%CO2: 29.1 +/- 3.1 beats min(-1)). Hypercapnia did not increase the clustering of heart beats during inhalation, and we suggest that the HF component may not adequately reflect RSA. PMID:17996126

  3. Shock-induced termination of reentrant cardiac arrhythmias: Comparing monophasic and biphasic shock protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Bragard, Jean Simic, Ana; Elorza, Jorge; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Fenton, Flavio H.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Gilmour, Robert F.; Otani, Niels F.

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we compare quantitatively the efficiency of three different protocols commonly used in commercial defibrillators. These are based on monophasic and both symmetric and asymmetric biphasic shocks. A numerical one–dimensional model of cardiac tissue using the bidomain formulation is used in order to test the different protocols. In particular, we performed a total of 4.8 × 10{sup 6} simulations by varying shock waveform, shock energy, initial conditions, and heterogeneity in internal electrical conductivity. Whenever the shock successfully removed the reentrant dynamics in the tissue, we classified the mechanism. The analysis of the numerical data shows that biphasic shocks are significantly more efficient (by about 25%) than the corresponding monophasic ones. We determine that the increase in efficiency of the biphasic shocks can be explained by the higher proportion of newly excited tissue through the mechanism of direct activation.

  4. Shock-induced termination of reentrant cardiac arrhythmias: Comparing monophasic and biphasic shock protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, Jean; Simic, Ana; Elorza, Jorge; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Gilmour, Robert F.; Otani, Niels F.; Fenton, Flavio H.

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we compare quantitatively the efficiency of three different protocols commonly used in commercial defibrillators. These are based on monophasic and both symmetric and asymmetric biphasic shocks. A numerical one-dimensional model of cardiac tissue using the bidomain formulation is used in order to test the different protocols. In particular, we performed a total of 4.8 × 106 simulations by varying shock waveform, shock energy, initial conditions, and heterogeneity in internal electrical conductivity. Whenever the shock successfully removed the reentrant dynamics in the tissue, we classified the mechanism. The analysis of the numerical data shows that biphasic shocks are significantly more efficient (by about 25%) than the corresponding monophasic ones. We determine that the increase in efficiency of the biphasic shocks can be explained by the higher proportion of newly excited tissue through the mechanism of direct activation.

  5. Cardiac Repolarization Instability during Psychological Stress in Patients with Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Abisse, Saddam S.; Lampert, Rachel; Burg, Mattew; Soufer, Robert; Shusterman, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Changes in the autonomic nervous system activity (ANS) are a major trigger of life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTA). Mental arithmetic, a condition administered in a laboratory setting, can provide insight into the ANS effects on cardiac physiology. We examined the responses of cardiac repolarization to laboratory-induced psychological stressors in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) with the objective of identifying the indices that differentiate patients with and without subsequent VTA in follow-up. Methods Continuous ECG signals were recorded using 3 standard bipolar (Holter) leads in 56 patients (age: 63.6±11.9, female: 12%, LVEF: 32.3±11) with ICDs during mental arithmetic. The patients were separated into those with subsequent VTA during 3–4 years of follow-up (Group 1: N=9 pts) and those without VTA (Group 2: N=47 pts). Changes in repolarization (QT-interval, mean T-wave amplitude (Tamp), and T-wave area (Tarea) were analyzed during 5min of baseline, stress and recovery. The temporal instability of Tamp and Tarea was examined using the range (Δ) and variance (σ2) of beat-to-beat variations of the corresponding parameters. Results There were no significant differences in HR between the two groups at baseline (61 vs. 63 bpm, p=0.97), during stress (64 vs. 65 bpm, p=0.40), and recovery (62 vs. 61 bpm, p= 0.88). However, during mental stress and post-stress recovery ΔTamp was almost 2-fold greater in Group 1 compared with Group 2 (111 (57–203)) vs. 68 (44–94) μV p=0.04, respectively). Changes in QT-intervals were also greater in Group 1 compared with Group 2 (p=0.02). Conclusion Among patients with ICDs, changes of T-wave amplitude after psychological stress were greater in those with subsequent arrhythmic events. This might signal proarrhythmic repolarization response and help identify patients who would benefit the most from ICD implantation and proactive management. PMID:21920534

  6. Inhibition of Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy and Associated Ventricular Arrhythmias by a p21 Activated Kinase 1 Bioactive Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wee K.; Zhang, Yanmin; Liu, Wei; Huang, Kai; Terrar, Derek A.; Solaro, R. John; Wang, Xin; Ke, Yunbo; Lei, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy increases the risk of morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease and thus inhibiting such hypertrophy is beneficial. In the present study, we explored the effect of a bioactive peptide (PAP) on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertrophy and associated ventricular arrhythmias in in vitro and in vivo models. PAP enhances p21 activated kinase 1 (Pak1) activity by increasing the level of phosphorylated Pak1 in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). Such PAP-induced Pak1 activation is associated with a significant reduction of Ang II-induced hypertrophy in NRVMs and C57BL/6 mice, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Furthermore, PAP antagonizes ventricular arrhythmias associated with Ang II-induced hypertrophy in mice. Its antiarrhythmic effect is likely to be involved in multiple mechanisms to affect both substrate and trigger of ventricular arrhythmogenesis. Thus our results suggest that Pak1 activation achieved by specific bioactive peptide represents a potential novel therapeutic strategy for cardiac hypertrophy and associated ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:25014109

  7. Identification and Characterization of a Compound That Protects Cardiac Tissue from Human Ether-à-go-go-related Gene (hERG)-related Drug-induced Arrhythmias*

    PubMed Central

    Potet, Franck; Lorinc, Amanda N.; Chaigne, Sebastien; Hopkins, Corey R.; Venkataraman, Raghav; Stepanovic, Svetlana Z.; Lewis, L. Michelle; Days, Emily; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Engers, Darren W.; Zou, Beiyan; Afshartous, David; George, Alfred L.; Campbell, Courtney M.; Balser, Jeffrey R.; Li, Min; Baudenbacher, Franz J.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Weaver, C. David; Kupershmidt, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    The human Ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG)-encoded K+ current, IKr is essential for cardiac repolarization but is also a source of cardiotoxicity because unintended hERG inhibition by diverse pharmaceuticals can cause arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. We hypothesized that a small molecule that diminishes IKr block by a known hERG antagonist would constitute a first step toward preventing hERG-related arrhythmias and facilitating drug discovery. Using a high-throughput assay, we screened a library of compounds for agents that increase the IC70 of dofetilide, a well characterized hERG blocker. One compound, VU0405601, with the desired activity was further characterized. In isolated, Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts, optical mapping revealed that dofetilide-induced arrhythmias were reduced after pretreatment with VU0405601. Patch clamp analysis in stable hERG-HEK cells showed effects on current amplitude, inactivation, and deactivation. VU0405601 increased the IC50 of dofetilide from 38.7 to 76.3 nm. VU0405601 mitigates the effects of hERG blockers from the extracellular aspect primarily by reducing inactivation, whereas most clinically relevant hERG inhibitors act at an inner pore site. Structure-activity relationships surrounding VU0405601 identified a 3-pyridiyl and a naphthyridine ring system as key structural components important for preventing hERG inhibition by multiple inhibitors. These findings indicate that small molecules can be designed to reduce the sensitivity of hERG to inhibitors. PMID:23033485

  8. Calcium signalling microdomains and the t-tubular system in atrial mycoytes: potential roles in cardiac disease and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Trafford, Andrew W; Clarke, Jessica D; Richards, Mark A; Eisner, David A; Dibb, Katharine M

    2013-05-01

    The atria contribute 25% to ventricular stroke volume and are the site of the commonest cardiac arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation (AF). The initiation of contraction in the atria is similar to that in the ventricle involving a systolic rise of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). There are, however, substantial inter-species differences in the way systolic Ca(2+) is regulated in atrial cells. These differences are a consequence of a well-developed and functionally relevant transverse (t)-tubule network in the atria of large mammals, including humans, and its virtual absence in smaller laboratory species such as the rat. Where T-tubules are absent, the systolic Ca(2+) transient results from a 'fire-diffuse-fire' sequential recruitment of Ca(2+) release sites from the cell edge to the centre and hence marked spatiotemporal heterogeneity of systolic Ca(2+). Conversely, the well-developed T-tubule network in large mammals ensures a near synchronous rise of [Ca(2+)](i). In addition to synchronizing the systolic rise of [Ca(2+)](i), the presence of T-tubules in the atria of large mammals, by virtue of localization of the L-type Ca(2+) channels and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger antiporters on the T-tubules, may serve to, respectively, accelerate changes in the amplitude of the systolic Ca(2+) transient during inotropic manoeuvres and lower diastolic [Ca(2+)](i). On the other hand, the presence of T-tubules and hence wider cellular distribution of the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger may predispose the atria of large mammals to Ca(2+)-dependent delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs); this may be a determining factor in why the atria of large mammals spontaneously develop and maintain AF. PMID:23386275

  9. [Cardiac arrhythmias in hypertensive subjects with and without left ventricular hypertrophy compared to the circadian profile of the blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Novo, S; Barbagallo, M; Abrignani, M G; Alaimo, G; Longo, B; Corrao, S; Nardi, E; Liquori, M; Forte, G; Raineri, A

    1990-08-01

    To evaluate possible correlations between cardiac arrhythmias and circadian pattern of blood pressure (BP) and of heart rate (HR), we studied 2 groups of 20 males with stable arterial hypertension of mild to moderate entity, with (Group I) or without (Group II) left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). In patients with LVH the mean age (56 vs 46 years), the duration of the hypertensive state (48.1 vs 15.7 months), the thickening of interventricular septum (IVS; 13.7 vs 9.6 mm) and of the posterior wall of the left ventricle (13.2 vs 9.2 mm) and the mass of LV (149.8 vs 99.7 g/m2) were significantly greater (p less than 0.01). On the contrary, the 2 groups did not show significant differences concerning casual BP determined in the morning (178.3/108.4 vs 171.5/106.2 mmHg). After a pharmacological washout of 2 weeks, patients underwent a noninvasive, intermittent, monitoring of BP (every 15 min during daytime and every 30 min from 11 pm to 7 am), using a pressure meter II Del Mar Avionics, and a continuous monitoring of ECG for 24 hours, employing an instrument 445/B Del Mar Avionics. Mean 24-hour BP was not different in the 2 groups of patients (161.7/99.0 vs 158.2/98.3 mmHg); however, patients with LVH showed a significantly greater variability of BP in the morning (7 am-3 pm), while mean 24-hour HR was significantly less (71.6 vs 78.2 b/min).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2150345

  10. Role of sarcomere mechanics and Ca2+ overload in Ca2+ waves and arrhythmias in rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    ter Keurs, Henk E D J; Wakayama, Yuji; Sugai, Yoshinao; Price, Guy; Kagaya, Yutaka; Boyden, Penelope A; Miura, Masahito; Stuyvers, Bruno D M

    2006-10-01

    Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) depends on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load and the cytosolic Ca(2+) level. Arrhythmogenic Ca(2+) waves underlying triggered propagated contractions arise from Ca(2+) overloaded regions near damaged areas in the cardiac muscle. Ca(2+) waves can also be induced in undamaged muscle, in regions with nonuniform excitation-contraction (EC) coupling by the cycle of stretch and release in the border zone between the damaged and intact regions. We hypothesize that rapid shortening of sarcomeres in the border zone during relaxation causes Ca(2+) release from troponin C (TnC) on thin filaments and initiates Ca(2+) waves. Elimination of this shortening will inhibit the initiation of Ca(2+) waves, while SR Ca(2+) overload will enhance the waves. Force, sarcomere length (SL), and [Ca(2+)](i) were measured and muscle length was controlled. A small jet of Hepes solution with an extracellular [Ca(2+)] 10 mM (HC), or HC containing BDM, was used to weaken a 300 mum long muscle segment. Trains of electrical stimuli were used to induce Ca(2+) waves. The effects of small exponential stretches on triggered propagatory contraction (TPC) amplitude and propagation velocity of Ca(2+) waves (V(prop)) were studied. Sarcomere shortening was uniform prior to activation. HC induced spontaneous diastolic sarcomere contractions in the jet region and attenuated twitch sarcomere shortening; HC+ butanedione monoxime (BDM) caused stretch only in the jet region. Stimulus trains induced Ca(2+) waves, which started inside the HC jet region during twitch relaxation. Ca(2+) waves started in the border zone of the BDM jet. The initial local [Ca(2+)](i) rise of the waves by HC was twice that by BDM. The waves propagated at a V(prop) of 2.0 +/- 0.2 mm/sec. Arrhythmias occurred frequently in trabeculae following exposure to the HC jet. Stretch early during relaxation, which reduced sarcomere shortening in the weakened regions, substantially

  11. [New diagnostic tools for arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Teres, C; Burri, H

    2015-05-27

    Cardiac arrhythmias are common conditions that often manifest themselves intermittently, thus complicating their diagnosis, particularly in the ambulatory setting. Recently, technological advances have facilitated public access to health applications and devices. This article reviews the available technologies and analyses their usefulness for the diagnosis of arrhythmias in the context of everyday clinical practice. PMID:26182638

  12. How are European patients at risk of malignant arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death identified and informed about their risk profile: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dagres, Nikolaos; Sciaraffia, Elena; Todd, Derick; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this EP wire is to examine clinical practice in the field of screening of patients of risk of ventricular arrhythmias and/or sudden cardiac death (SCD) in European countries. A systematic screening programme existed in the majority of centres and was organized by a multidisciplinary dedicated team or by an activity programme of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) or heart failure clinics. In particular, high-risk subgroups of patients with ischaemic and non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy ICD implantation are considered strongly indicated within 90 days of myocardial revascularization or initial diagnosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging appears as an important tool to better characterize the left ventricular arrhythmogenic substrate in patients at risk of SCD. PMID:26023178

  13. Hemodynamics in fetal arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Sven-Erik; Acharya, Ganesh

    2016-06-01

    Fetal arrhythmias are among the few conditions that can be managed in utero. However, accurate diagnosis is essential for appropriate management. Ultrasound-based imaging methods can be used to study fetal heart structure and function noninvasively and help to understand fetal cardiovascular pathophysiology, and they remain the mainstay of evaluating fetuses with arrhythmias in clinical settings. Hemodynamic evaluation using Doppler echocardiography allows the elucidation of the electrophysiological mechanism and helps to make an accurate diagnosis. It can also be used as a tool to understand fetal cardiac pathophysiology, for assessing fetal condition and monitoring the effect of antiarrhythmic treatment. This narrative review describes Doppler techniques that are useful for evaluating fetal cardiac rhythms to refine diagnosis and provides an overview of hemodynamic changes observed in different types of fetal arrhythmia. PMID:26660845

  14. Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and Related Members of the Alpha Subdivision of the Proteobacteria in Dogs with Cardiac Arrhythmias, Endocarditis, or Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Atkins, Clarke E.; Brown, Talmage T.; Kordick, Dorsey L.; Snyder, Patti S.

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias, endocarditis, or myocarditis was identified in 12 dogs, of which 11 were seroreactive to Bartonella vinsonii subspecies berkhoffii antigens. Historical abnormalities were highly variable but frequently included substantial weight loss, syncope, collapse, or sudden death. Fever was an infrequently detected abnormality. Cardiac disease was diagnosed following an illness of short duration in most dogs, but a protracted illness of at least 6 months' duration was reported for four dogs. Valvular endocarditis was diagnosed echocardiographically or histologically in eight dogs, two of which also had moderate to severe multifocal myocarditis. Four dogs lacking definitive evidence of endocarditis were included because of seroreactivity to B. vinsonii antigens and uncharacterized heart murmurs and/or arrhythmias. Alpha proteobacteria were not isolated from the blood by either conventional or lysis centrifugation blood culture techniques. Using PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of a portion of the 16S rRNA gene, B. vinsonii was identified in the blood or heart valves of three dogs. DNA sequence alignment of PCR amplicons derived from blood or tissue samples from seven dogs clustered among members of the alpha subdivision of the Proteobacteria and suggested the possibility of involvement of one or more alpha proteobacteria; however, because of the limited quantity of sequence, the genus could not be identified. Serologic or molecular evidence of coinfection with tick-transmitted pathogens, including Ehrlichia canis, Babesia canis, Babesia gibsonii, or spotted fever group rickettsiae, was obtained for seven dogs. We conclude that B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and closely related species of alpha proteobacteria are an important, previously unrecognized cause of arrhythmias, endocarditis, myocarditis, syncope, and sudden death in dogs. PMID:10523564

  15. Arrhythmias in Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Robert M.; Tseng, Zian H.

    2014-01-01

    Late after surgical repair of complex congenital heart disease, atrial arrhythmias are a major cause of morbidity, and ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death are a major cause of mortality. The six cases in this article highlight common challenges in the management of arrhythmias in the adult congenital heart disease population. PMID:25197326

  16. TRPA1 and Sympathetic Activation Contribute to Increased Risk of Triggered Cardiac Arrhythmias in Hypertensive Rats Exposed to Diesel Exhaust

    PubMed Central

    Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Winsett, Darrell W.; Krantz, Q. Todd; King, Charly; Costa, Daniel L.; Farraj, Aimen K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diesel exhaust (DE), which is emitted from on- and off-road sources, is a complex mixture of toxic gaseous and particulate components that leads to triggered adverse cardiovascular effects such as arrhythmias. Objective: We hypothesized that increased risk of triggered arrhythmias 1 day after DE exposure is mediated by airway sensory nerves bearing transient receptor potential (TRP) channels [e.g., transient receptor potential cation channel, member A1 (TRPA1)] that, when activated by noxious chemicals, can cause a centrally mediated autonomic imbalance and heightened risk of arrhythmia. Methods: Spontaneously hypertensive rats implanted with radiotelemeters were whole-body exposed to either 500 μg/m3 (high) or 150 μg/m3 (low) whole DE (wDE) or filtered DE (fDE), or to filtered air (controls), for 4 hr. Arrhythmogenesis was assessed 24 hr later by continuous intravenous infusion of aconitine, an arrhythmogenic drug, while heart rate (HR) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were monitored. Results: Rats exposed to wDE or fDE had slightly higher HRs and increased low-frequency:high-frequency ratios (sympathetic modulation) than did controls; ECG showed prolonged ventricular depolarization and shortened repolarization periods. Rats exposed to wDE developed arrhythmia at lower doses of aconitine than did controls; the dose was even lower in rats exposed to fDE. Pretreatment of low wDE–exposed rats with a TRPA1 antagonist or sympathetic blockade prevented the heightened sensitivity to arrhythmia. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a single exposure to DE increases the sensitivity of the heart to triggered arrhythmias. The gaseous components appear to play an important role in the proarrhythmic response, which may be mediated by activation of TRPA1, and subsequent sympathetic modulation. As such, toxic inhalants may partly exhibit their toxicity by lowering the threshold for secondary triggers, complicating assessment of their risk. PMID:21377951

  17. Arrhythmias in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rajdev, Archana; Garan, Hasan; Biviano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are important contributors to morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Such patients manifest a substrate resulting from altered autonomics, repolarization abnormalities, and ischemia. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and flutter are associated with worsened outcomes, and maintenance of sinus rhythm is a goal. Sudden death is a relatively common issue, though the contribution of malignant ventricular arrhythmias versus bradyarrhythmias differs from non-PAH patients. Congenital heart disease patients with PAH benefit from catheter ablation of medically refractory arrhythmias. Clinical studies of defibrillator/pacemaker therapy for primary prevention against sudden death in PAH patients are lacking. PMID:23009914

  18. Arrhythmias in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Archana; Garan, Hasan; Biviano, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are important contributors to morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Such patients manifest a substrate resulting from altered autonomics, repolarization abnormalities, and ischemia. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and flutter are associated with worsened outcomes, and maintenance of sinus rhythm is a goal. Sudden death is a relatively common issue, though the contribution of malignant ventricular arrhythmias versus bradyarrhythmias differs from non-PAH patients. Congenital heart disease patients with PAH benefit from catheter ablation of medically refractory arrhythmias. Clinical studies of defibrillator/pacemaker therapy for primary prevention against sudden death in PAH patients are lacking. PMID:23009914

  19. TRPA1 and Sympathetic Activation contribute to increased risk of triggered cardiac arrhythmias in hypertensive rats exposed to diesel exhaust

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background -Diesel exhaust (DE), which is emitted from on-and off-road sources, is a complex mixture of toxic gaseous and particulate components that results in adverse cardiovascular effects. Arrhythmias, which are often triggered in the hours and days following exposure, are on...

  20. Changes in heart rate, arrhythmia frequency, and cardiac biomarker values in horses during recovery after a long-distance endurance ride.

    PubMed

    Flethøj, Mette; Kanters, Jørgen K; Haugaard, Maria M; Pedersen, Philip J; Carstensen, Helena; Balling, Johanne D; Olsen, Lisbeth H; Buhl, Rikke

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmia frequency as well as changes in cardiac biomarker values and their association with heart rate in horses before and after an endurance ride. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. ANIMALS 28 Arabian horses competing in a 120- or 160-km endurance ride. PROCEDURES ECG recordings were obtained from each horse before (preride) and after (recovery) an endurance ride to evaluate changes in heart rate and the SD of normal R-R intervals (SDNN) during the initial 12 hours of recovery. Frequencies of supraventricular and ventricular premature complexes before and after the ride were evaluated. Blood samples were obtained before the ride and twice during recovery. Hematologic analyses included measurement of serum cardiac troponin I concentration and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB activity. RESULTS Heart rate was significantly increased and SDNN was decreased during the recovery versus preride period. Frequency of ventricular premature complexes increased during recovery, albeit not significantly, whereas frequency of supraventricular premature complexes was not significantly different between preride and recovery periods. Serum cardiac troponin I concentration and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB activity were significantly increased in the recovery versus preride period. No associations were identified between cardiac biomarkers and velocity, distance, or mean heart rate. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Heart rate increased and SDNN decreased in horses after completion of an endurance ride. These and other cardiac changes suggested that prolonged exercise such as endurance riding might have cardiac effects in horses. Additional studies are needed to clarify the clinical relevance of the findings. PMID:27074612

  1. Arrhythmias in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Bisbal, F; Mont, L

    2012-06-01

    Regular exercise provides substantial health benefits, mostly by reducing cardiovascular risk factors. However, it may also trigger acute cardiac events and cause sudden cardiac death in individuals with a pre-existing condition. In an otherwise healthy population, intense regular exercise may lead to morphological and electrical cardiac adaptations commonly referred as "athlete's heart." Recent data suggest that this may itself produce structural changes of atrial and ventricular myocardium with enlargement and fibrosis, creating the substrate for development of arrhythmias in apparently healthy athletes. The state of the art in this controversial issue is reviewed. PMID:22782729

  2. Fetal and Neonatal Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Jaeggi, Edgar; Öhman, Annika

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an important aspect of fetal and neonatal medicine. Premature complexes of atrial or ventricular origin are the main cause of an irregular heart rhythm. The finding is typically unrelated to an identifiable cause and no treatment is required. Tachyarrhythmia most commonly relates to supraventricular reentrant tachycardia, atrial flutter, and sinus tachycardia. Several antiarrhythmic agents are available for the perinatal treatment of tachyarrhythmias. Enduring bradycardia may result from sinus node dysfunction, complete heart block and nonconducted atrial bigeminy as the main arrhythmia mechanisms. The management and outcome of bradycardia depend on the underlying mechanism. PMID:26876124

  3. Characterization of Cardiac Anoctamin1 Ca²⁺-Activated Chloride Channels and Functional Role in Ischemia-Induced Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhen; Wu, Ming-Ming; Wang, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Chao; Yu, Chang-Jiang; Gong, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Song, Bin-Lin; Yu, Kuai; Hartzell, H Criss; Duan, Dayue Darrel; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2015-02-01

    Anoctamin1 (ANO1) encodes a Ca(2+)-activated chloride (Cl(-)) channel (CaCC) in variety tissues of many species. Whether ANO1 expresses and functions as a CaCC in cardiomyocytes remain unknown. The objective of this study is to characterize the molecular and functional expression of ANO1 in cardiac myocytes and the role of ANO1-encoded CaCCs in ischemia-induced arrhythmias in the heart. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining assays, and immunohistochemistry identified the molecular expression, location, and distribution of ANO1 in mouse ventricular myocytes (mVMs). Patch-clamp recordings combined with pharmacological analyses found that ANO1 was responsible for a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current (I(Cl.Ca)) in cardiomyocytes. Myocardial ischemia led to a significant increase in the current density of I(Cl.Ca), which was inhibited by a specific ANO1 inhibitor, T16A(inh)-A01, and an antibody targeting at the pore area of ANO1. Moreover, cardiomyocytes isolated from mice with ischemia-induced arrhythmias had an accelerated early phase 1 repolarization of action potentials (APs) and a deeper "spike and dome" compared to control cardiomyocytes from non-ischemia mice. Application of the antibody targeting at ANO1 pore prevented the ischemia-induced early phase 1 repolarization acceleration and caused a much shallower "spike and dome". We conclude that ANO1 encodes CaCC and plays a significant role in the phase 1 repolarization of APs in mVMs. The ischemia-induced increase in ANO1 expression may be responsible for the increased density of I(Cl.Ca) in the ischemic heart and may contribute, at least in part, to ischemia-induced arrhythmias. PMID:24962810

  4. Cardioprotective activity of alcoholic extract of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers in calcium chloride-induced cardiac arrhythmia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish Kumar; Kishore, Kunal; Sharma, Divya; Srinivasan, B.P; Agarwal, Shyam Sunder; Sharma, Ashok; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Gaur, Samir; Jatav, Vijay Singh

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the antiarrhythmic activity of alcoholic extract of Tinospora cordifolia (T. cordifolia) in CaCl2 induced arrhythmia. CaCl2 (25 mg/kg) was administered by intravenous infusion (iv) to produce arrhythmia in rats. The animals were then treated with T. cordifolia extract (150, 250, and 450 mg/kg) and verapamil (5 mg/kg,iv). Lead II electrocardiogram was monitored. Plasma calcium, sodium and potassium levels were measured. In CaCl2 induced arrhythmia, heart rate was decreased by 41.10%, T. cordifolia at 150, 300, and 450 mg/kg decreased the heart rate by 26.30%, 29.16%, and 38.29%, respectively, and verapamil reduced the heart rate by 9.70% compared to the normal group. The PQRST waves were normalized and atrial and ventricular fibrillation was controlled in rats treated with verapamil and T. cordifolia. CaCl2 increased calcium and sodium levels and decreased potassium levels in blood. T. cordifolia dose-dependently decreased calcium and sodium levels and increased potassium levels. Hence, T. cordifolia can be used in antiarrhythmic clinical settings and beneficial in atrial and ventricular fibrillation and flutter and may be indicated in ventricular tachyarrhythmia. PMID:23554702

  5. Hexabromocyclododecane exposure induces cardiac hypertrophy and arrhythmia by inhibiting miR-1 expression via up-regulation of the homeobox gene Nkx2.5.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meifang; Wu, Di; Wang, Chonggang; Guo, Zhizhun; Li, Bowen; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2016-01-25

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants. Although studies have reported that HBCD can cause a wide range of toxic effects on animals including humans, limited information can be found about its cardiac toxicity. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to HBCD at low concentrations of 0, 2, 20 and 200 nM. The results showed that HBCD exposure could induce cardiac hypertrophy and increased deposition of collagen. In addition, disordered calcium (Ca(2+)) handling was observed in H9C2 rat cardiomyocyte cells exposed to HBCD. Using small RNA sequencing and real-time quantitative PCR, HBCD exposure was shown to induce significant changes in the miRNA expression profile associated with the cardiovascular system. Further findings indicated that miR-1, which was depressed by Nkx2.5, might play a fundamental role in mediating cardiac hypertrophy and arrhythmia via its target genes Mef2a and Irx5 after HBCD treatment. HBCD exposure induced an arrhythmogenic disorder, which was triggered by the imbalance of Ryr2, Serca2a and Ncx1 expression, inducing Ca(2+) overload in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and high Ca(2+)-ATPase activities in the H9C2 cells. PMID:26476318

  6. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  7. [Alcohol and arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, D; Jurisch, D; Neef, M; Hagendorff, A

    2016-09-01

    The effects of alcohol on induction of arrhythmias is dose-dependent, independent of preexisting cardiovascular diseases or heart failure and can affect otherwise healthy subjects. While the probability of atrial fibrillation increases with the alcohol dosage, events of sudden cardiac death are less frequent with low and moderate consumption but occur more often in heavy drinkers with alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Men are first affected at higher dosages of alcohol but women can suffer from arrhythmias at lower dosages. Thromboembolisms and ischemic stroke can occur less often at lower dosages of alcohol; however, hemorrhagic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage are increased with higher alcohol dosages. Recognizable protective mechanisms of alcohol with respect to cardiovascular diseases only occur with lower amounts of alcohol of less than 10 g per day. Underlying mechanisms explain these controversial effects. Specific therapeutic options for alcohol-related arrhythmias apart from abstinence from alcohol consumption are not known. PMID:27582366

  8. Genetics of inherited primary arrhythmia disorders

    PubMed Central

    Spears, Danna A; Gollob, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    A sudden unexplained death is felt to be due to a primary arrhythmic disorder when no structural heart disease is found on autopsy, and there is no preceding documentation of heart disease. In these cases, death is presumed to be secondary to a lethal and potentially heritable abnormality of cardiac ion channel function. These channelopathies include congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, and short QT syndrome. In certain cases, genetic testing may have an important role in supporting a diagnosis of a primary arrhythmia disorder, and can also provide prognostic information, but by far the greatest strength of genetic testing lies in the screening of family members, who may be at risk. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic genetic and molecular pathophysiology of the primary inherited arrhythmia disorders, and to outline a rational approach to genetic testing, management, and family screening. PMID:26425105

  9. Prediction of fatal or near-fatal cardiac arrhythmia events in patients with depressed left ventricular function after an acute myocardial infarction†

    PubMed Central

    Huikuri, Heikki V.; Raatikainen, M.J. Pekka; Moerch-Joergensen, Rikke; Hartikainen, Juha; Virtanen, Vesa; Boland, Jean; Anttonen, Olli; Hoest, Nis; Boersma, Lucas V.A.; Platou, Eivind S.; Messier, Marc D.; Bloch-Thomsen, Poul-Erik

    2009-01-01

    Aims To determine whether risk stratification tests can predict serious arrhythmic events after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤ 0.40). Methods and results A total of 5869 consecutive patients were screened in 10 European centres, and 312 patients (age 65 ± 11 years) with a mean LVEF of 31 ± 6% were included in the study. Heart rate variability/turbulence, ambient arrhythmias, signal-averaged electrocardiogram (SAECG), T-wave alternans, and programmed electrical stimulation (PES) were performed 6 weeks after AMI. The primary endpoint was ECG-documented ventricular fibrillation or symptomatic sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). To document these arrhythmic events, the patients received an implantable ECG loop-recorder. There were 25 primary endpoints (8.0%) during the follow-up of 2 years. The strongest predictors of primary endpoint were measures of heart rate variability, e.g. hazard ratio (HR) for reduced very-low frequency component (<5.7 ln ms2) adjusted for clinical variables was 7.0 (95% CI: 2.4–20.3, P < 0.001). Induction of sustained monomorphic VT during PES (adjusted HR = 4.8, 95% CI, 1.7–13.4, P = 0.003) also predicted the primary endpoint. Conclusion Fatal or near-fatal arrhythmias can be predicted by many risk stratification methods, especially by heart rate variability, in patients with reduced LVEF after AMI. PMID:19155249

  10. High-throughput cardiac safety evaluation and multi-parameter arrhythmia profiling of cardiomyocytes using microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Kristin H; Lewis, Gregory F; Gay, Elaine A; Sellgren, Katelyn L; Grego, Sonia

    2015-10-15

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) recording extracellular field potentials of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) provide a rich data set for functional assessment of drug response. The aim of this work is the development of a method for a systematic analysis of arrhythmia using MEAs, with emphasis on the development of six parameters accounting for different types of cardiomyocyte signal irregularities. We describe a software approach to carry out such analysis automatically including generation of a heat map that enables quick visualization of arrhythmic liability of compounds. We also implemented signal processing techniques for reliable extraction of the repolarization peak for field potential duration (FPD) measurement even from recordings with low signal to noise ratios. We measured hiPS-CM's on a 48 well MEA system with 5minute recordings at multiple time points (0.5, 1, 2 and 4h) after drug exposure. We evaluated concentration responses for seven compounds with a combination of hERG, QT and clinical proarrhythmia properties: Verapamil, Ranolazine, Flecainide, Amiodarone, Ouabain, Cisapride, and Terfenadine. The predictive utility of MEA parameters as surrogates of these clinical effects were examined. The beat rate and FPD results exhibited good correlations with previous MEA studies in stem cell derived cardiomyocytes and clinical data. The six-parameter arrhythmia assessment exhibited excellent predictive agreement with the known arrhythmogenic potential of the tested compounds, and holds promise as a new method to predict arrhythmic liability. PMID:26232523

  11. Dual optical recordings for action potentials and calcium handling in induced pluripotent stem cell models of cardiac arrhythmias using genetically encoded fluorescent indicators.

    PubMed

    Song, LouJin; Awari, Daniel W; Han, Elizabeth Y; Uche-Anya, Eugenia; Park, Seon-Hye E; Yabe, Yoko A; Chung, Wendy K; Yazawa, Masayuki

    2015-05-01

    Reprogramming of human somatic cells to pluripotency has been used to investigate disease mechanisms and to identify potential therapeutics. However, the methods used for reprogramming, in vitro differentiation, and phenotyping are still complicated, expensive, and time-consuming. To address the limitations, we first optimized a protocol for reprogramming of human fibroblasts and keratinocytes into pluripotency using single lipofection and the episomal vectors in a 24-well plate format. This method allowed us to generate multiple lines of integration-free and feeder-free induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from seven patients with cardiac diseases and three controls. Second, we differentiated human iPSCs derived from patients with Timothy syndrome into cardiomyocytes using a monolayer differentiation method. We found that Timothy syndrome cardiomyocytes showed slower, irregular contractions and abnormal calcium handling compared with the controls. The results are consistent with previous reports using a retroviral method for reprogramming and an embryoid body-based method for cardiac differentiation. Third, we developed an efficient approach for recording the action potentials and calcium transients simultaneously in control and patient cardiomyocytes using genetically encoded fluorescent indicators, ArcLight and R-GECO1. The dual optical recordings enabled us to observe prolonged action potentials and abnormal calcium handling in Timothy syndrome cardiomyocytes. We confirmed that roscovitine rescued the phenotypes in Timothy syndrome cardiomyocytes and that these findings were consistent with previous studies using conventional electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging with dyes. The approaches using our optimized methods and dual optical recordings will improve iPSC applicability for disease modeling to investigate mechanisms underlying cardiac arrhythmias and to test potential therapeutics. PMID:25769651

  12. History of arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Janse, M J; Rosen, M R

    2006-01-01

    A historical overview is given on the techniques to record the electrical activity of the heart, some anatomical aspects relevant for the understanding of arrhythmias, general mechanisms of arrhythmias, mechanisms of some specific arrhythmias and nonpharmacological forms of therapy. The unravelling of arrhythmia mechanisms depends, of course, on the ability to record the electrical activity of the heart. It is therefore no surprise that following the construction of the string galvanometer by Einthoven in 1901, which allowed high-fidelity recording of the body surface electrocardiogram, the study of arrhythmias developed in an explosive way. Still, papers from McWilliam (1887), Garrey (1914) and Mines (1913, 1914) in which neither mechanical nor electrical activity was recorded provided crucial insights into re-entry as a mechanism for atrial and ventricular fibrillation, atrioventricular nodal re-entry and atrioventricular re-entrant tachycardia in hearts with an accessory atrioventricular connection. The components of the electrocardiogram, and of extracellular electrograms directly recorded from the heart, could only be well understood by comparing such registrations with recordings of transmembrane potentials. The first intracellular potentials were recorded with microelectrodes in 1949 by Coraboeuf and Weidmann. It is remarkable that the interpretation of extracellular electrograms was still controversial in the 1950s, and it was not until 1962 that Dower showed that the transmembrane action potential upstroke coincided with the steep negative deflection in the electrogram. For many decades, mapping of the spread of activation during an arrhythmia was performed with a "roving" electrode that was subsequently placed on different sites on the cardiac surface with a simultaneous recording of another signal as time reference. This method could only provide reliable information if the arrhythmia was strictly regular. When multiplexing systems became available in

  13. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise. PMID:26927864

  14. NASPE expert consensus document: use of i.v. (conscious) sedation/analgesia by nonanesthesia personnel in patients undergoing arrhythmia specific diagnostic, therapeutic, and surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Bubien, R S; Fisher, J D; Gentzel, J A; Murphy, E K; Irwin, M E; Shea, J B; Dick, M; Ching, E; Wilkoff, B L; Benditt, D G

    1998-02-01

    Use of IV (Conscious) Sedation/Analgesia by Nonanesthesia Personnel in Patients Undergoing Arrhythmia Specific Diagnostic, Therapeutic, and Surgical Procedures. This article is intended to inform practitioners, payers, and other interested parties of the opinion of the North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology (NASPE) concerning evolving areas of clinical practice or technologies or both, that are widely available or are new to the practice community. Expert consensus documents are so designated because the evidence base and experience with the technology or clinical practice are not yet sufficiently well developed, or rigorously controlled trials are not yet available that would support a more definitive statement. This article has been endorsed by the American College of Cardiology, October 1997. PMID:9507538

  15. Dynamic reciprocity of sodium and potassium channel expression in a macromolecular complex controls cardiac excitability and arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Michelle L; Musa, Hassan; Balbuena, Daniela Ponce; Anumonwo, Justus M B; Auerbach, David S; Furspan, Philip B; Hou, Luqia; Hu, Bin; Schumacher, Sarah M; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Martens, Jeffrey R; Jalife, José

    2012-07-31

    The cardiac electrical impulse depends on an orchestrated interplay of transmembrane ionic currents in myocardial cells. Two critical ionic current mechanisms are the inwardly rectifying potassium current (I(K1)), which is important for maintenance of the cell resting membrane potential, and the sodium current (I(Na)), which provides a rapid depolarizing current during the upstroke of the action potential. By controlling the resting membrane potential, I(K1) modifies sodium channel availability and therefore, cell excitability, action potential duration, and velocity of impulse propagation. Additionally, I(K1)-I(Na) interactions are key determinants of electrical rotor frequency responsible for abnormal, often lethal, cardiac reentrant activity. Here, we have used a multidisciplinary approach based on molecular and biochemical techniques, acute gene transfer or silencing, and electrophysiology to show that I(K1)-I(Na) interactions involve a reciprocal modulation of expression of their respective channel proteins (Kir2.1 and Na(V)1.5) within a macromolecular complex. Thus, an increase in functional expression of one channel reciprocally modulates the other to enhance cardiac excitability. The modulation is model-independent; it is demonstrable in myocytes isolated from mouse and rat hearts and with transgenic and adenoviral-mediated overexpression/silencing. We also show that the post synaptic density, discs large, and zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) domain protein SAP97 is a component of this macromolecular complex. We show that the interplay between Na(v)1.5 and Kir2.1 has electrophysiological consequences on the myocardium and that SAP97 may affect the integrity of this complex or the nature of Na(v)1.5-Kir2.1 interactions. The reciprocal modulation between Na(v)1.5 and Kir2.1 and the respective ionic currents should be important in the ability of the heart to undergo self-sustaining cardiac rhythm disturbances. PMID:22509027

  16. SU-C-303-06: Treatment Planning Study for Non-Invasive Cardiac Arrhythmia Ablation with Scanned Carbon Ions in An Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, A; Constantinescu, A; Prall, M; Kaderka, R; Durante, M; Graeff, C; Lehmann, H I; Takami, M; Packer, D L; Lugenbiel, P; Thomas, D; Richter, D; Bert, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Scanned carbon ion beams might offer a non-invasive alternative treatment for cardiac arrhythmia, which are a major health-burden. We studied the feasibility of this procedure in an animal model. The underlying treatment planning and motion mitigation strategies will be presented. Methods: The study was carried out in 15 pigs, randomly distributed to 3 target groups: atrioventricular node (AVN, 8 animals with 25, 40, and 55 Gy target dose), left ventricular free-wall (LV, 4 animals with 40 Gy) and superior pulmonary vein (SPV, 3 animals with 40 Gy). Breathing motion was suppressed by repeated enforced breathholds at end exhale. Cardiac motion was mitigated by an inhomogeneous rescanning scheme with up to 15 rescans. The treatment planning was performed using the GSI in-house software TRiP4D on cardiac-gated 4DCTs, applying a range-considering ITV based on an extended CTV. For AVN and SPV isotropic 5 mm margins were applied to the CTV, while for the LV 2mm+2% range margins were used. The opposing fields for AVN and LV targets were optimized independently (SFUD), while SPV treatments were optimized as IMPT deliveries, including dose restrictions to the radiosensitive AVN. Results: Median value of D{sub 95} over all rescanning simulations was 99.1% (AVN), 98.0% (SPV) and 98.3% (LV) for the CTV and 94.7% (AVN) and 92.7% (SPV) for the PTV, respectively. The median D{sub 5}-D{sub 95} was improved with rescanning compared to unmitigated delivery from 13.3 to 6.5% (CTV) and from 23.4 to 11.6% (PTV). ICRP dose limits for aorta, trachea, esophagus and skin were respected. The maximal dose in the coronary arteries was limited to 30 Gy. Conclusion: We demonstrated the feasibility of a homogeneous dose delivery to different cardiac structures in a porcine model using a time-optimized inhomogeneous rescanning scheme. The presented treatment planning strategies were applied in a pig study with the analysis ongoing. Funding: This work was supported in part by the

  17. An evaluation of potential signals for ventricular arrhythmia and cardiac arrest with dolasetron, ondansetron, and granisetron in the fda combined spontaneous reporting system/adverse event reporting system

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Frederick M.; Coop, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. The PRR, used as a parameter to detect a potential signal within the database, was 3.23, 1.31, and 1.13 for dolasetron, ondansetron, and granisetron, respectively. The number of observed ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrests was ∼3-fold higher with dolasetron compared with the expected value (calculated by dividing the individual agent's total number of events reported by the proportion of adverse events for all agents combined). The results for dolasetron fulfilled the criteria we used to define a potential signal. Conclusions: This analysis detected a potential signal for ventricular arrhythmiasand cardiac arrest with dolasetron, but not with ondansetron or granisetron. However, there are limitations of a PRR analysis, which include only measuring cases that have been reported, providing relative frequencies instead of actual rates, and not providing information on the severity of adverse events or causal relationships. In addition, our analysis does not include consideration of concomitant medications, and only 2 search terms were used. Errors in identifying potential signals may also include confounding factors, such as the underlying disease, potential confusion with reporting under trade and generic names, and potential multiple reporting of the same case. PMID:24790242

  18. Left regional cardiac perfusion in vitro with platelet-activating factor, norepinephrine and K+ reveals that ischaemic arrhythmias are caused by independent effects of endogenous ‘mediators' facilitated by interactions, and moderated by paradoxical antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kathryn E; Curtis, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    Various putative drug targets for suppression of ischaemia-induced ventricular fibrillation (VF) have been proposed, but therapeutic success in the suppression of sudden cardiac death (SCD) has been disappointing. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a known component of the ischaemic milieu. We examined its arrhythmogenic activity, and its interaction with two other putative mediators, norepinephrine and K+, using an ischaemia-free in vitro heart bioassay, and a specific PAF antagonist (BN-50739). PAF (0.1–100 nmol) was administered selectively to the left coronary bed of rat isolated hearts using a specially designed catheter. In some hearts, PAF was administered to the left coronary bed during concomitant regional perfusion with norepinephrine and/or K+. In separate studies, PAF accumulation in the perfused cardiac tissue was evaluated using 3H-PAF. PAF evoked ventricular arrhythmias concentration-dependently (P<0.05). It also widened QT interval and reduced coronary flow selectively in the PAF-exposed left coronary bed (both P<0.05). Two exposures of hearts to PAF were necessary to evoke the QT and rhythm effects. The PAF-induced arrhythmias and coronary vasoconstriction were partially suppressed by the PAF antagonist BN-50739 (10 μM), although BN-50739 itself widened QT interval. K+ (8 and 15 mM) unexpectedly antagonised the arrhythmogenic effects of PAF without itself eliciting arrhythmias (P<0.05). Norepinephrine (0.1 μM) had little or no effect on the actions of PAF, while failing to evoke arrhythmias itself. Nevertheless, the combination of 15 mM K+ and 0.1 μM norepinephrine evoked arrhythmias of a severity similar to arrhythmias evoked by PAF alone, without adding to or diminishing the arrhythmogenic effects of PAF. 3H-PAF accumulated in the cardiac tissue, with 43±5% still present 5 min after bolus administration, accounting for the need for two exposures of the heart to PAF for evocation of arrhythmias. Thus, PAF, by activating specific receptors

  19. Non-Invasive Drosophila ECG Recording by Using Eutectic Gallium-Indium Alloy Electrode: A Feasible Tool for Future Research on the Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Cardiac Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Po-Hung; Tzeng, Te-Hsuen; Huang, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yu-Hao; Chang, Yi-Chung; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Wu, June-Tai; Lee, Hsiu-Hsian; Lai, Po-Jung; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Cheng, Ya-Chen; Lu, Shey-Shi

    2014-01-01

    on the molecular mechanism involved in cardiac arrhythmia, as well as research related to drug screening and development. PMID:25226390

  20. Iron-Sensitive Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prediction of Ventricular Arrhythmia Risk in Patients with Chronic Myocardial Infarction: Early Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cokic, Ivan; Kali, Avinash; Yang, Hsin-Jung; Yee, Raymond; Tang, Richard; Tighiouart, Mourad; Wang, Xunzhang; Jackman, Warren S.; Chugh, Sumeet S.; White, James A.; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent canines studies have shown that iron deposition within chronic myocardial infarction (CMI) influences the electrical behavior of the heart. To date, the link between the iron deposition and malignant ventricular arrhythmias (mVA) in humans with CMI is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS CMI patients (n=94) who underwent late-gadolinium-enhanced CMR prior to ICD implantation for primary and secondary prevention were retrospectively analyzed. The predictive values of hypointense cores (HIC) in balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) images and conventional CMR and ECG mVA parameters for the prediction of primary combined outcome (appropriate ICD therapy, survived cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death) were studied. The use of HIC within CMI on bSSFP as a marker of iron deposition was validated in a canine MI model (n=18). Nineteen patients met the study criteria with events occurring at a median of 249 (interquartile range (IQR) of 540) days after ICD placement. Of the 19 patients meeting the primary endpoint, 18 were classified as HIC+, while only 1 was HIC−. Among the cohort in whom the primary endpoint was not met, there were 28 HIC+ and 47 HIC− patients. ROC analysis demonstrated an additive predictive value of HIC for mVAs with an increased AUC to 0.87 when added to LVEF (LVEF alone 0.68). Both CMR and histological validation studies performed in canines demonstrated that HIC regions in bSSFP images within CMI likely result from iron depositions. CONCLUSIONS Hypointense cores within CMI on bSSFP CMR can be used as a marker of iron deposition and yields incremental information toward improved prediction of mVA. PMID:26259581

  1. Weather-induced ischemia and arrhythmia in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation: another difference between men and women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Alexandra; Schuh, Angela; Maetzel, Friedrich-Karl; Rückerl, Regina; Breitner, Susanne; Peters, Annette

    2008-07-01

    Given the accumulating evidence that people with underlying heart disease are a particularly vulnerable group for triggers like changing meteorological parameters, the objective of this longitudinal study was to analyze the influence of weather parameters on blood pressure, arrhythmia and ischemia in cardiovascular patients. A panel study with repeated measurements was conducted in a rehabilitation clinic in Timmendorfer Strand (Baltic Sea, Germany) with 872 cardiovascular patients. Heart rate, blood pressure and electrocardiography changes were measured during repeated bicycle ergometries. Generalized Estimating Equations were used for regression analyses of immediate, delayed and cumulative influences of the daily measured meteorological data. For men, a decrease in air temperature and in water vapor pressure doubled the risk of ST-segment depression during ergometry [odds ratio (OR) for 1 day delay: 1.88 (1.24; 2.83) for air temperature] with a delay of 1-2 days. For women, an increase of their heart rate before the start of the ergometry [same day: 4.36 beats/min (0.99; 7.74) for air temperature] and a 2- to 3-fold higher risk for ventricular ectopic beats [1 day delay: OR 2.43 (1.17; 5.05) for air temperature] was observed with an increase in temperature and water vapor pressure in almost all analyzed time-windows. The study indicates that meteorological parameters can induce changes in heart function which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events especially in susceptible, diseased individuals. The observed effect on ST-segment depression could be a link between the association of weather changes and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  2. Absence of triadin, a protein of the calcium release complex, is responsible for cardiac arrhythmia with sudden death in human

    PubMed Central

    Roux-Buisson, Nathalie; Cacheux, Marine; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Fauconnier, Jeremy; Brocard, Julie; Denjoy, Isabelle; Durand, Philippe; Guicheney, Pascale; Kyndt, Florence; Leenhardt, Antoine; Le Marec, Hervé; Lucet, Vincent; Mabo, Philippe; Probst, Vincent; Monnier, Nicole; Ray, Pierre F.; Santoni, Elodie; Trémeaux, Pauline; Lacampagne, Alain; Fauré, Julien; Lunardi, Joël; Marty, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an inherited arrhythmogenic disease so far related to mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) or the cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) genes. Because mutations in RYR2 or in CASQ2 are not retrieved in all CPVT cases, we searched for mutations in the physiological protein partners of RyR2 and CSQ2 in a large cohort of CPVT patients with no detected mutation in these two genes. Based on a candidate gene approach, we focused our investigations on triadin and junctin, two proteins that link RyR2 and CSQ2. Mutations in the triadin (TRDN) and in the junctin (ASPH) genes were searched in a cohort of 97 CPVT patients. We identified three mutations in triadin which cosegregated with the disease on a recessive mode of transmission in two families, but no mutation was found in junctin. Two TRDN mutations, a 4 bp deletion and a nonsense mutation, resulted in premature stop codons; the third mutation, a p.T59R missense mutation, was further studied. Expression of the p.T59R mutant in COS-7 cells resulted in intracellular retention and degradation of the mutant protein. This was confirmed after in vivo expression of the mutant triadin in triadin knock-out mice by viral transduction. In this work, we identified TRDN as a new gene responsible for an autosomal recessive form of CPVT. The mutations identified in the two families lead to the absence of the protein, thereby demonstrating the importance of triadin for the normal function of the cardiac calcium release complex in humans. PMID:22422768

  3. Arrhythmias in the Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occur with variable prevalence mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. These patients are at risk for development for bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The non-cardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms (limited mobility and respiratory weakness masking cardiac manifestations), affect decision to implant prophylactic device (quantity vs. quality of life) and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  4. [Reperfusion arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Jurkovicová, O; Cagán, S

    1998-01-01

    Reperfusion arrhythmias originate as a consequence of the complex of cellular and humoral reactions accompanying the opening of coronary artery. As the primary cause of their generation are considered the chemically defined substances that are produced and accumulated in myocardium during reperfusion. The key role is ascribed to free oxygen radicals but of importance are also other substances such as calcium, thrombin, platelet activating factor, inositol triphosphate, angiotensin II and others. These chemical mediators of reperfusion arrhythmias operate as modulators of cellular electrophysiology causing the complex changes at the level of ion channels. It is supposed that in the genesis of reperfusion arrhythmias unlike ischemic arrhytmias operate nonreentrant mechanisms such as abnormal or enhanced automacy and triggered activity due to afterdepolarizations. As a typical reperfusion arrhythmia is considered an early (within 6 hours after start of thrombolysis), frequent (> 30 episodes/hour) and repetitive (occurring during > 3 consecutive hours) accelerated idioventricular rhythm (AIVR). AIVR with such characteristics has a high specificity and positive predictive accuracy but relative low sensitivity as a predictor of reperfusion. Thus, in occurrence of AIVR, recanalization of infarction-related coronary artery is very probable, but in absence of AIVR, reperfusion is still not excluded. The following arrhythmias are regarded also as markers of reperfusion: frequent premature ventricular complexes (> twofold increase in frequency within 90 minutes after the start of thrombolysis), a significant increase of episodes in nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, sinus bradycardia and probably also high-degree atrioventricular blocks. At present, there is no definite evidence, as to whether sustained ventricular tachycardia and especially ventricular fibrillation can be caused by reperfusion. Reperfusion arrhythmias are an important noninvasive marker of successful

  5. Feasibility of spinal cord stimulation in angina pectoris in patients with chronic pacemaker treatment for cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Ekre, Olof; Börjesson, Mats; Edvardsson, Nils; Eliasson, Tore; Mannheimer, Clas

    2003-11-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used since 1985 as additional symptom-relieving treatment for patients with severe angina pectoris despite optimal conventional medical and invasive treatment. SCS has antiischemic effects and is safe and effective in long-term use. Several patients with coronary artery disease also suffer from disorders that necessitate the use of a cardiac permanent pacemaker (PPM). The combination of SCS and PPM has previously been considered hazardous because of possible false inhibition of the PPM. To assess if thoracic SCS and PPM can be safely combined in patients with refractory angina pectoris, 18 patients treated with both SCS and PPM were tested. The PPM settings were temporarily modified to increase the probability of interference, while the SCS intensity (used in bipolar mode) was increased to the maximum level tolerated by the patient. Any sign of inhibition of the ventricular pacing was recorded by continuous ECG monitoring. With the aid of a questionnaire, symptoms of interference during long-term treatment were evaluated. No patient had signs of inhibition during the tests. Reprogramming of the pacemaker because of the test results was not needed in any of the patients. The long-term follow-up data revealed no serious events. This study indicates that bipolar SCS and PPM can be safely combined in patients with refractory angina pectoris. However, individual testing is mandatory to ascertain safety in each patient. A testing procedure for patients in need of SCS and PPM is suggested in this article. PMID:14622316

  6. Recurrent Muscle Weakness with Rhabdomyolysis, Metabolic Crises, and Cardiac Arrhythmia Due to Bi-allelic TANGO2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Watkin, Levi B.; Chiang, Theodore; Leduc, Magalie S.; Zhu, Wenmiao; Ding, Yan; Pan, Shujuan; Vetrini, Francesco; Miyake, Christina Y.; Shinawi, Marwan; Gambin, Tomasz; Eldomery, Mohammad K.; Akdemir, Zeynep Hande Coban; Emrick, Lisa; Wilnai, Yael; Schelley, Susan; Koenig, Mary Kay; Memon, Nada; Farach, Laura S.; Coe, Bradley P.; Azamian, Mahshid; Hernandez, Patricia; Zapata, Gladys; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Lotze, Timothy; Clark, Gary; Wilfong, Angus; Northrup, Hope; Adesina, Adekunle; Bacino, Carlos A.; Scaglia, Fernando; Bonnen, Penelope E.; Crosson, Jane; Duis, Jessica; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.; Coman, David; Inwood, Anita; McGill, Jim; Boerwinkle, Eric; Graham, Brett; Beaudet, Art; Eng, Christine M.; Hanchard, Neil A.; Xia, Fan; Orange, Jordan S.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Yang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    The underlying genetic etiology of rhabdomyolysis remains elusive in a significant fraction of individuals presenting with recurrent metabolic crises and muscle weakness. Using exome sequencing, we identified bi-allelic mutations in TANGO2 encoding transport and Golgi organization 2 homolog (Drosophila) in 12 subjects with episodic rhabdomyolysis, hypoglycemia, hyperammonemia, and susceptibility to life-threatening cardiac tachyarrhythmias. A recurrent homozygous c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation was found in four unrelated individuals of Hispanic/Latino origin, and a homozygous ∼34 kb deletion affecting exons 3–9 was observed in two families of European ancestry. One individual of mixed Hispanic/European descent was found to be compound heterozygous for c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) and the deletion of exons 3–9. Additionally, a homozygous exons 4–6 deletion was identified in a consanguineous Middle Eastern Arab family. No homozygotes have been reported for these changes in control databases. Fibroblasts derived from a subject with the recurrent c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation showed evidence of increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and a reduction in Golgi volume density in comparison to control. Our results show that the c.460G>A (p.Gly154Arg) mutation and the exons 3–9 heterozygous deletion in TANGO2 are recurrent pathogenic alleles present in the Latino/Hispanic and European populations, respectively, causing considerable morbidity in the homozygotes in these populations. PMID:26805781

  7. [Rational management of arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    González-Hermosillo, J A; Colín, L; Iturralde, P; Romero, L

    1990-01-01

    Despite the development of better diagnostic techniques and new modes of therapy, management of cardiac arrhythmias is still difficult. The lack of standardization in the indications of each technique has increased the risk of overtreatment and unnecessary cost. This paper describes the minimal requirements necessary for the different techniques and the appropriate information that should be collected from each. A well taken clinical history and a 12-lead EKG give very important information for the decision on when and how to treat. PMID:2091549

  8. In vivo and in vitro models to test the hypothesis of particle-induced effects on cardiac function and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Wold, Loren E; Simkhovich, Boris Z; Kleinman, Michael T; Nordlie, Margaret A; Dow, Joan S; Sioutas, Constantinos; Kloner, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFPs) by inhalation increases the number and severity of cardiac events. The specific mechanism(s) of action are unknown. This study was designed to examine whether UFPs could exert a direct effect on the cardiovascular system without dependence upon lung-mediated responses. The direct effects of UFPs were determined in normal rats (infused intravenously with UFPs), and in the isolated Langendorff perfused rat heart. UFPs from either ambient air (UFAAs) or diesel engine exhaust (UFDGs) were studied. Infusion of UFDGs prepared in our laboratory caused ventricular premature beats (VPBs) in 2 of 3 rats in vivo. Ejection fraction increased slightly (approximately 4.5%) in rats receiving UFPAA and was unchanged in the UFDG and saline groups in vivo. In the isolated rat heart, perfused according to Langendorff, UFDGs caused a marked increase in left-ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP; from 12.0 +/- 4.6 mmHg to 24.8 +/- 11.2 mmHg, p < 0.05) after 30 min of exposure. UFPs isolated from industrial diesel particulate matter (UFIDs), obtained from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, caused a significant decrease in left-ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP; from 85.7 +/- 4.0 mmHg to 37.9 +/- 20.3 mmHg, p < 0.05) and +/- dP/dt (from 2,365 +/- 158 mmHg/s to 1,188 +/- 858 mmHg/s, p < 0.05) at 30 min after the start of infusion. This effect was absent when the soluble fraction (containing no particles) isolated from the UFIDs was studied. These findings indicate that UFPs can have direct effects on the cardiovascular system that are independent of effects of particles on the lungs. PMID:16845184

  9. Antipsychotic Drugs and the Risk of Ventricular Arrhythmia and/or Sudden Cardiac Death: A Nation‐wide Case‐Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chi‐Shin; Tsai, Yu‐Ting; Tsai, Hui‐Ju

    2015-01-01

    Background Antipsychotics have been linked to prolongation of the QT interval. However, little is known about the risk of ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and/or sudden cardiac death (SCD) associated with individual antipsychotic drug use. This study was designed to investigate the association between specific antipsychotic drugs and the risk of VA and/or SCD. Methods and Results We conducted a case‐crossover study using a nation‐wide population‐based sample obtained from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 17 718 patients with incident VA and/or SCD were enrolled. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to examine the effects of antipsychotic drug use on the risk of VA/SCD during various case and control time windows of 7, 14, and 28 days. The effect of the potency of a human ether‐à‐go‐go‐related gene (hERG) potassium channel blockade was also assessed. Antipsychotic drug use was associated with a 1.53‐fold increased risk of VA and/or SCD. Antipsychotic drugs with increased risk included clothiapine, haloperidol, prochlorperazine, thioridazine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, and sulpiride. The association was significantly higher among those with short‐term use. Antipsychotics with a high potency of the hERG potassium channel blockade had the highest risk of VA and/or SCD. Conclusion Use of antipsychotic drugs is associated with an increased risk of VA and/or SCD. Careful evaluations of the risks and benefits of antipsychotic treatment are highly recommended. PMID:25713294

  10. The Comparison of the Effects of Epidural Bupivacaine and Levobupivacaine on the Autonomic Nervous System and Cardiac Arrhythmia Parameters in Inguinal Hernia Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Aynur; Kaya, Ayşe Günay; Yavuz, Bünyamin; Kantekin, Çiğdem Ünal; Başar, Hülya

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of bupivacaine and levobupivacaine, used to create epidural anaesthesia in inguinal hernia operations, on heart rate variability and cardiac arrhythmia parameters. Methods Sixty male patients of the American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) I–II group, scheduled to be operated on for inguinal hernia surgery with epidural anaesthesia, were randomly divided into two groups. The patients, with a 12-channel Holter recorder (Rozinn RZ153+12-USA) attached 1 hour before the operation to record until the end of the surgery, were taken into the preparation room and anaesthetised. In group L (n=30), 17 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine (Chirocain 0.5%-Abbot, El-verum, Norway) was given into the epidural space within 10 minutes, versus 17 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine in (Marcain 0.5%, Astra Zeneca, İstanbul, Turkey) group B (n=30). After 30 minutes, when there was enough block, the operation had been started. Holter recordings, starting 1 hour before the anaesthetic procedure and completed by the end of the operations, were transferred to the computer. The records were evaluated by the cardiologists. Results When analysing the frequency effect measurement results of the heart rate variability, it was seen that neither of the medications created any statistically significant change in or among the groups in total, very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), high-frequency (HF) and LF/HF ratio levels. Only normalised low-frequency band was significantly lower in Group L (p=0.013). Conclusion In the volumes and concentrations that were used in our study, levobupivacaine and bupivacaine created sensory blockade at the same level on average and did not reduce heart rate variability at the levels of these blockages. PMID:27366472

  11. Arrhythmias in the muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J

    2015-06-01

    In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occurs with variable prevalence, mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The noncardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms, affect the decision to implant a prophylactic device, and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  12. Non-Invasive Assessment of Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias During Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Alterations Team is currently conducting studies to determine what alterations in hemodynamic regulation result from sixteen days of simulated microgravity exposure in normal human subjects. In this project we make additional measurements on these same study subjects in order to determine whether there is an increase in susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias resulting from simulated microgravity exposure. Numerous anecdotal and documented reports from the past 30 years suggest that the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias among astronauts is increased during space flight. For example, documented runs of ventricular tachycardia have been recorded from crew members of Skylab and Mir, there was much attention given by the lay press to Mir Commander Vasily Tslbliyev's complaints of heart rhythm irregularities in July of 1997, and cardiovascular mechanisms may have been causal in the recent death of an experimental primate shortly after return from space. In 1986, a Mir cosmonaut, Alexander Laveikin, was brought home and replaced with an alternate cosmonaut as a result of cardiac dysrhythmias that began during extravehicular activity. Furthermore, at a joint NASA/NSBRI workshop held in January 1998, cardiac arrhythmias were identified as the highest priority cardiovascular risk to a human Mars mission. Despite the evidence for the risk of a potentially lethal arrhythmia resulting from microgravity exposure, the effects of space flight and the associated physiologic stresses on cardiac conduction processes are not known, and an increase in cardiac susceptibility to arrhythmias has never been quantified. In this project, we are determining whether simulated space flight increases the risk of developing life-threatening heart rhythm disturbances such as sustained ventricular tachycardia (defined as ventricular tachycardia lasting at least 30 seconds or resulting in hemodynamic collapse) and ventricular fibrillation. We are obtaining measures of

  13. Living with an Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With an Arrhythmia Many arrhythmias are harmless. It's common to have an occasional ... heartbeat or mild palpitations . People who have harmless arrhythmias can live healthy lives. They usually don't ...

  14. The Utility of Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring for Detecting Silent Arrhythmias and Clarifying Symptom Mechanism in an Urban Elderly Population with Heart Failure and Hypertension: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Kathleen T; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial and ventriclar tachyarrhythmias, as well as bradyarrhythmias, in the elderly with heart failure (HF) and/or hypertension (HTN) have been well documented. However, the frequency of these arrhythmias, whether silent or symptomatic, and their association with subsequent cardiac events has not been well defined in patients 65 years or older with HF and other cardiovascular risk factors. OBJECTIVE: To assess the value of 2 weeks of remote, transtelephonic cardiac monitoring for detecting arrhythmias in an elderly, urban population living with HF. METHODS: Fifty-four patients with a history of systolic HF and/or HTN were consented and enrolled. All wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor for 2 weeks that captures EKG data and both silent and symptomatic arrhythmias were recorded. RESULTS: Mean age was 73 ± 6 years with 59% of subjects were females, 74% Hispanic, 22% black, and 4% white/other. All patients had HF and 94% had HTN. From the cardiac monitoring, 72% demonstrated ectopic atrial and ventricular activity, and 1 paroxysmal episode of atrial fibrillation was documented. In addition, 3 subjects had significant non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, and 4 individuals had severe bradycardia recorded on cardiac monitoring. These 7 individuals underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker based on the documented arrhythmias which may have otherwise gone undetected. CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of patients exhibited cardiac arrhythmias. Future morbidity was prevented because of the detection of arrhythmias on monitoring that led to specific therapies such as pacemaker or ICD implantation which otherwise may not have been implemented. PMID:20798788

  15. The Utility of Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring for Detecting Silent Arrhythmias and Clarifying Symptom Mechanism in an Urban Elderly Population with Heart Failure and Hypertension: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Kathleen T.; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R.; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Background Atrial and ventriclar tachyarrhythmias, as well as bradyarrhythmias, in the elderly with heart failure (HF) and/or hypertension (HTN) have been well documented. However, the frequency of these arrhythmias, whether silent or symptomatic, and their association with subsequent cardiac events has not been well defined in patients 65 years or older with HF and other cardiovascular risk factors. Objective To assess the value of 2 weeks of remote, transtelephonic cardiac monitoring for detecting arrhythmias in an elderly, urban population living with HF. Methods Fifty-four patients with a history of systolic HF and/or HTN were consented and enrolled. All wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor for 2 weeks that captures EKG data and both silent and symptomatic arrhythmias were recorded. Results Mean age was 73 ± 6 years with 59% of subjects were females, 74% Hispanic, 22% black, and 4% white/other. All patients had HF and 94% had HTN. From the cardiac monitoring, 72% demonstrated ectopic atrial and ventricular activity, and 1 paroxysmal episode of atrial fibrillation was documented. In addition, 3 subjects had significant non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, and 4 individuals had severe bradycardia recorded on cardiac monitoring. These 7 individuals underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker based on the documented arrhythmias which may have otherwise gone undetected. Conclusion A substantial proportion of patients exhibited cardiac arrhythmias. Future morbidity was prevented because of the detection of arrhythmias on monitoring that led to specific therapies such as pacemaker or ICD implantation which otherwise may not have been implemented. PMID:20798788

  16. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heart beats ( ... due to medication) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  17. Arrhythmia risk in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mozos, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between the functioning of the heart and the liver have been described, with heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions that simultaneously affect both. The heart is one of the most adversely affected organs in patients with liver cirrhosis. For example, arrhythmias and electrocardiographic changes are observed in patients with liver cirrhosis. The risk for arrhythmia is influenced by factors such as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, cardiac ion channel remodeling, electrolyte imbalances, impaired autonomic function, hepatorenal syndrome, metabolic abnormalities, advanced age, inflammatory syndrome, stressful events, impaired drug metabolism and comorbidities. Close monitoring of cirrhotic patients is needed for arrhythmias, particularly when QT interval-prolonging drugs are given, or if electrolyte imbalances or hepatorenal syndrome appear. Arrhythmia risk may persist after liver transplantation due to possible QT interval prolongation, persistence of the parasympathetic impairment, post-transplant reperfusion and chronic immunosuppression, as well as consideration of the fact that the transplant itself is a stressful event for the cardiovascular system. The aims of the present article were to provide a review of the most important data regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and biomarkers of arrhythmia risk in patients with liver cirrhosis, to elucidate the association with long-term outcome, and to propose future research directions. PMID:25866603

  18. Spectrum of Fascicular Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Sung, Raphael; Scheinman, Melvin

    2016-09-01

    Fascicular arrhythmias encompass a wide spectrum of ventricular arrhythmias that depend on the specialized conduction system of the right and left ventricles. These arrhythmias include premature ventricular complexes, monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation. These arrhythmias may be organized by mechanism, including intrafascicular reentry, interfascicular reentry, and focal. Mapping and ablation of the fascicular system can result in high cure rates of debilitating and potentially life-threatening arrhythmias. When approaching these arrhythmias, careful consideration of the structure of the His Purkinje system as well as their electrophysiologic properties may help guide even the most complex of arrhythmias. PMID:27521090

  19. Device-Based Autonomic Modulation in Arrhythmia Patients: the Role of Vagal Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, William A.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Vaseghi, Marmar

    2015-01-01

    Opinion statement Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) has shown promise as an adjunctive therapy for management of cardiac arrhythmias by targeting the cardiac parasympathetic nervous system. VNS has been evaluated in the setting of ischemia-driven ventricular arrhythmias and atrial arrhythmias, as well as a treatment option for heart failure. As better understanding of the complexities of the cardiac autonomic nervous system is obtained, vagal nerve stimulation will likely become a powerful tool in the current cardiovascular therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25894588

  20. The effects of chronic lead treatment and hypertension on the severity of cardiac arrhythmias induced by coronary artery occlusion or by noradrenaline in anaesthetised rats.

    PubMed

    Evis, M J; Dhaliwal, K; Kane, K A; Moore, M R; Parratt, J R

    1987-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether chronic (3 months) lead (250 or 1000 ppm), administered as lead acetate in the drinking water, commencing either after weaning (in normotensive or spontaneously hypertensive male rats) or from conception (normotensive rats only) altered the susceptibility of the heart to arrhythmias induced either by coronary artery occlusion or by noradrenaline. Treatment with lead alone had no marked effect on the arrhythmias elicited by either method. Spontaneously hypertensive rats treated with either dose of lead exhibited more ectopic beats following coronary artery occlusion than normotensive rats but not more than those observed in control spontaneously hypertensive rats. An enhanced arrhythmogenic effect of noradrenaline was observed only in hypertensive rats administered 250 ppm lead. Both doses of lead accelerated the development of high blood pressure and in normotensive rats the higher dose also resulted in an elevated pressure. Following administration of lead, blood lead concentrations were elevated to 0.96 and 2.11 mumol l-1 after 250 and 1000 ppm, respectively. Accumulation of lead in heart and bone was also observed. We conclude that chronic exposure to these concentrations of lead, when combined with high blood pressure, slightly enhances the susceptibility of the heart to arrhythmias induced by myocardial ischaemia. PMID:3579598

  1. Outcomes among athletes with arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities: implications for ECG interpretation.

    PubMed

    McClaskey, David; Lee, Daniel; Buch, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) aberrations and arrhythmias occur frequently among athletes due to normal variants, subclinical cardiac disease or structural and electrical remodeling in response to training. It is unclear whether these changes are associated with adverse clinical outcomes over time among otherwise asymptomatic, healthy athletes. Consensus guidelines have been developed to guide the clinician regarding further management of these arrhythmias. The purpose of this review is to summarize prospective data regarding cardiovascular outcomes related to ECG changes among athletes and compare these findings with current guidelines. A review of the literature was conducted using the PubMed database (1966--present). Outcomes of interest included documented cardiac symptoms or events, such as episodes of cardiac or cerebral hypoperfusion, sudden death or prophylactic procedural interventions. Studies were included for analysis if they involved (1) athletes with documented, baseline arrhythmias and/or abnormal ECG variations; (2) a study design with longitudinal follow-up (designated as >1 month, to exclude short-term Holter studies); and (3) outcomes that include documented cardiac symptoms or events. A total of 33 studies met the above criteria, encompassing over 4,200 athletes, with follow-up ranging from 2 months to 14.6 years. There were few adverse outcomes among cases of sinus bradycardia >30 bpm, sinus pauses <3 s, first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block, second-degree type I AV block and incomplete right bundle branch block. Results among these studies are concordant with guidelines that recommend work-up in the setting of cardiac symptoms, history or physical examination indicative of cardiac disease, severe sinus bradycardia or AV block that does not resolve with exercise or hyperventilation. Outcomes among prospective studies also support guidelines that recommend further evaluation for repolarization abnormalities and supraventricular tachycardias

  2. Role of respiratory sleep disorders in the pathogenesis of nocturnal angina and arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Liston, R.; Deegan, P. C.; McCreery, C.; McNicholas, W. T.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents how respiratory sleep disorders can adversely effect ischaemic heart disease. Three male patients (aged 60-67 years) with proven ischaemic heart disease are described. They illustrate a spectrum of nocturnal cardiac dysfunction, two with nocturnal angina and one with nocturnal arrhythmias. Full sleep studies were performed in a dedicated sleep laboratory on all patients, and one patient had 48 hours of continuous Holter monitoring. Two patients were found to have obstructive sleep apnoea with apnoea/hypopnoea indices of 57 and 36 per hour, respectively, the former with nocturnal arrhythmias and the latter with nocturnal angina. In both cases, nasal continuous positive airways pressure successfully treated the sleep apnoea, with an associated improvement in nocturnal arrhythmias and angina. The third patient who presented with nocturnal angina, did not demonstrate obstructive sleep apnoea (apnoea/hypopnoea index = 7.2) but had significant oxygen desaturation during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. This patient responded to a combination of nocturnal oxygen and protriptyline, an agent known to suppress REM sleep, and had no further nocturnal angina. All patients were considered to be an optimum cardiac medication and successful symptom resolution only occurred with the addition of specific therapy aimed at their sleep-related respiratory problem. We conclude that all patients with nocturnal angina or arrhythmias should have respiratory sleep abnormalities considered in their assessment. PMID:8183772

  3. Prevention and Treatment of Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Prevention & Treatment of Arrhythmia Updated:Sep 2,2016 Do ... Risk for Arrhythmia • Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of Arrhythmia • Prevention & Treatment of Arrhythmia Introduction Medications Ablation Devices for ...

  4. How Are Arrhythmias Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some arrhythmias are treated with a jolt of electricity to the heart. This type of treatment is ... senses a dangerous ventricular arrhythmia, it sends an electric shock to the heart to restore a normal ...

  5. Radiofrequency catheter ablation in pediatric patients with supraventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L A; Lobban, J H; Schmidt, S B

    1995-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of foci leading to abnormal cardiac rhythms is rapidly becoming the procedure of choice in the management of arrhythmias in adults. This report reviews our initial experience with RF ablation in the pediatric population. PMID:8533398

  6. Mechanisms of Arrhythmias and Conduction Disorders in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Mahek; Strunets, Anton; Shen, Win-Kuang; Jahangir, Arshad

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Aging is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias, which contribute to higher morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The frequency of cardiac arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachyarrhythmia, is projected to increase as the population ages, greatly impacting health care resource utilization. Several clinical factors associated with the risk of arrhythmias have been identified in the population, yet the molecular bases for the increased predisposition to arrhythmogenesis in the elderly are not fully understood. Therefore, only limited therapeutic strategies directed at pathophysiological processes that enhance cardiac vulnerability to arrhythmias are available. This is further compounded by the paucity of outcome studies providing evidence on which optimal management guidelines can be formulated for the very elderly. This review highlights the epidemiology of cardiac dysrhythmias, changes incardiac structure and function associated with aging, and the basis for arrhythmogenesis in the elderly, the understanding of which is critical to formulate preventive strategies. PMID:23101571

  7. Arrhythmias: Opening Pandora's Box -- incidental genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Behr, Elijah R; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    A major goal of precision medicine is to improve disease prevention and therapy by using big data provided by genomic technology and electronic health records. In a new study, assessment of a patient population without a history of cardiac disease revealed that genetic variants putatively associated with a risk of sudden death were not linked with arrhythmia phenotypes. PMID:26935036

  8. Psychological Distress and Arrhythmia: Risk Prediction and Potential Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, James; Whang, William

    2014-01-01

    The connection between the heart and the brain has long been anecdotally recognized but systematically studied only relatively recently. Cardiac arrhythmias, especially sudden cardiac death, remain a major public health concern and there is mounting evidence that psychological distress plays a critical role as both a predictor of high-risk cardiac substrate and as an inciting trigger. The transient, unpredictable nature of emotions and cardiac arrhythmias have made their study challenging, but evolving technologies in monitoring and imaging along with larger epidemiological data sets have encouraged more sophisticated studies examining this relationship. Here we review the research on psychological distress including anger, depression and anxiety on cardiac arrhythmias, insights into proposed mechanisms, and potential avenues for future research. PMID:23621968

  9. Systems Pharmacology of Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Seth I.; Ma’ayan, Avi; Iyengar, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is a congenital or drug-induced change in electrical activity of the heart that can lead to fatal arrhythmias. Mutations in 12 genes encoding ion channels and associated proteins are linked with congenital LQTS. With a computational systems biology approach, we found that gene products involved in LQTS formed a distinct functional neighborhood within the human interactome. Other diseases form similarly selective neighborhoods, and comparison of the LQTS neighborhood with other disease-centered neighborhoods suggested a molecular basis for associations between seemingly unrelated diseases that have increased risk of cardiac complications. By combining the LQTS neighborhood with published genome-wide association study data, we identified previously unknown single-nucleotide polymorphisms likely to affect the QT interval. We found that targets of U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs that cause LQTS as an adverse event were enriched in the LQTS neighborhood. With the LQTS neighborhood as a classifier, we predicted drugs likely to have risks for QT effects and we validated these predictions with the FDA’s Adverse Events Reporting System, illustrating how network analysis can enhance the detection of adverse drug effects associated with drugs in clinical use. Thus, the identification of disease-selective neighborhoods within the human interactome can be useful for predicting new gene variants involved in disease, explaining the complexity underlying adverse drug side effects, and predicting adverse event susceptibility for new drugs. PMID:20407125

  10. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Arrhythmia by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sovari, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    Current therapies for arrhythmia using ion channel blockade, catheter ablation, or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator have limitations, and it is important to search for new antiarrhythmic therapeutic targets. Both atrial fibrillation and heart failure, a condition with increased arrhythmic risk, are associated with excess amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS). There are several possible ways for ROS to induce arrhythmia. ROS can cause focal activity and reentry. ROS alter multiple cardiac ionic currents. ROS promote cardiac fibrosis and impair gap junction function, resulting in reduced myocyte coupling and facilitation of reentry. In order to design effective antioxidant drugs for treatment of arrhythmia, it is essential to explore the molecular mechanisms by which ROS exert these arrhythmic effects. Activation of Ca2+/CaM-dependent kinase II, c-Src tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, and abnormal splicing of cardiac sodium channels are among the recently discovered molecular mechanisms of ROS-induced arrhythmia. PMID:26981310

  11. EFFECTS OF 4% AND 5% CARBOXYHEMOGLOBIN ON ARRHYTHMIA PRODUCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sudden death frequently occurs from coronary artery disease. t almost always results from cardiac arrhythmias and is often the first and only clinically recognizable manifestation of the disease process (1). ecause of the relations among cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death, and cor...

  12. Remote Arrhythmia Monitoring System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, David W.; Mackin, Michael A.; Liszka, Kathy J.; Lichter, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Telemedicine is taking a step forward with the efforts of team members from the NASA Glenn Research Center, the MetroHealth campus of Case Western University, and the University of Akron. The Arrhythmia Monitoring System is a completed, working test bed developed at Glenn that collects real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) signals from a mobile or homebound patient, combines these signals with global positioning system (GPS) location data, and transmits them to a remote station for display and monitoring. Approximately 300,000 Americans die every year from sudden heart attacks, which are arrhythmia cases. However, not all patients identified at risk for arrhythmias can be monitored continuously because of technological and economical limitations. Such patients, who are at moderate risk of arrhythmias, would benefit from technology that would permit long-term continuous monitoring of electrical cardiac rhythms outside the hospital environment. Embedded Web Technology developed at Glenn to remotely command and collect data from embedded systems using Web technology is the catalyst for this new telemetry system (ref. 1). In the end-to-end system architecture, ECG signals are collected from a patient using an event recorder and are transmitted to a handheld personal digital assistant (PDA) using Bluetooth, a short-range wireless technology. The PDA concurrently tracks the patient's location via a connection to a GPS receiver. A long distance link is established via a standard Internet connection over a 2.5-generation Global System for Mobile Communications/General Packet Radio Service (GSM/GPRS)1 cellular, wireless infrastructure. Then, the digital signal is transmitted to a call center for monitoring by medical professionals.

  13. Teaching Cardiac Electrophysiology Modeling to Undergraduate Students: Laboratory Exercises and GPU Programming for the Study of Arrhythmias and Spiral Wave Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartocci, Ezio; Singh, Rupinder; von Stein, Frederick B.; Amedome, Avessie; Caceres, Alan Joseph J.; Castillo, Juan; Closser, Evan; Deards, Gabriel; Goltsev, Andriy; Ines, Roumwelle Sta.; Isbilir, Cem; Marc, Joan K.; Moore, Diquan; Pardi, Dana; Sadhu, Sandeep; Sanchez, Samuel; Sharma, Pooja; Singh, Anoopa; Rogers, Joshua; Wolinetz, Aron; Grosso-Applewhite, Terri; Zhao, Kai; Filipski, Andrew B.; Gilmour, Robert F., Jr.; Grosu, Radu; Glimm, James; Smolka, Scott A.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Clarke, Edmund M.; Griffeth, Nancy; Fenton, Flavio H.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a 3-wk intersession workshop funded by a National Science Foundation Expeditions in Computing award, 15 undergraduate students from the City University of New York collaborated on a study aimed at characterizing the voltage dynamics and arrhythmogenic behavior of cardiac cells for a broad range of physiologically relevant conditions…

  14. Evidence Based Review: Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Phillips, Tiffany R.; Brown, Angela K.; Arzeno, Natalia M.; Levine, Benjamin; Summers, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Very little research has systematically evaluated the prevalence (or potential risk) of cardiac arrhythmias during space flight. There are several observational reports of non life-threatening but potentially concerning arrhythmias. At least two potential risk factors for arrhythmias have been reported either during or immediately after space flight: cardiac atrophy and a prolonged QTc interval. The potential severity of the mission impact of a serious arrhythmia requires that a systematic evaluation be conducted of the risk of arrhythmia due to space flight.

  15. [Electrophysiologic study in arrhythmia surgery].

    PubMed

    Nitta, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    The traditional paradigm in surgery for cardiac arrhythmias has been the electrophysiological assessment of the arrhythmia followed by the determination of a specific lesion set for the ablation or a definitive procedure based on the results of the analysis in each patient. The maze procedure was developed as a definitive procedure for atrial fibrillation (AF) and was not guided by electrophysiologic findings in individual patients. The rationale behind the maze procedure is to create a line of conduction block to prevent the propagation of repetitive activations from the pulmonary veins toward the left atrium and to block the reentrant activations occurring on the atrial wall. The cut-and-sew technique is the most reliable method to accomplish conduction block. However, it extends the cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary times and increases the risk of bleeding. During the past decade, a number of ablation devices have been developed and tested in animals and humans for their ability to create complete conduction block. The use of ablation devices enables less invasive AF surgery. However, the non-transmural or non-contiguous necrosis caused by an incomplete ablation can permit conduction across the ablation line and impair the efficacy of the surgery. Intraoperative verification of conduction block is mandatory to assure the transmurality and contiguity of the lesions created by the ablation devices. PMID:17763669

  16. “Reading Between the Lines” of Flowsheet Data: Nurses' Optional Documentation Associated with Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sarah A.; Vawdrey, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, short ‘comments’ on paper-based flowsheets conveyed the patient's overall clinical state. We analyzed the content and documentation patterns of electronic health record flowsheets for 201 cardiac arrest patients. Free-text comments were associated with the abnormality of clinical measurements (p<0.05). The documentation of 3 or more comments for acute care patients was associated with a greater likelihood of dying by discharge (p<0.01). Documentation of ICU vital signs greater than the minimum hourly requirement was associated with increased survival of a cardiac arrest (p<0.05). Further analysis of such patterns may be useful for the measurement of nursing knowledge and surveillance activities, interdisciplinary communication tools, and clinical decision making. PMID:22079746

  17. Congenital giant cardiac tumor with severe left-ventricular inflow and outflow obstruction and arrhythmia treated with pulmonary artery banding and long-term amiodarone infusion

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Daiji; Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    We report a congenital giant cardiac tumor that occupied the majority of left ventricular cavity with severe left ventricular inflow and outflow obstruction. The hemodynamics were similar to univentricular physiology. He was treated with prostaglandins and bilateral pulmonary artery banding. He had frequent supraventricular tachycardia associated with ventricular pre-excitation that was controlled by long-term administration of intravenous amiodarone. The patient died due to sepsis after 3 months. PMID:22529609

  18. Anger and ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Although anecdotal evidence has long suggested links between emotion and ventricular arrhythmia, more recent studies have prospectively demonstrated the arrhythmogenic effects of anger, as well as mechanisms underlying these effects. Recent findings Epidemiological studies reveal that psychological stress increases sudden death, as well as arrhythmias, in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, in populations during emotionally devastating disasters such as earthquake or war. Diary-based studies confirm that anger and other negative emotions can trigger potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmias. Anger alters electrophysiological properties of the myocardium, including T-wave alternans, a measure of heterogeneity of repolarization, suggesting one mechanistic link between emotion and arrhythmia. Pilot studies of behavioral interventions have shown promise in decreasing arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Summary Anger and other strong emotions can trigger polymorphic, potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in vulnerable patients. Through autonomic changes including increased sympathetic activity and vagal withdrawal, anger leads to increases in heterogeneity of repolarization as measured by T-wave alternans, known to be associated with arrhythmogenesis, as well as increasing inducibility of arrhythmia. Further delineation of mechanisms linking anger and arrhythmia, and of approaches to decrease the detrimental effects of anger and other negative emotions on arrhythmogenesis, are important areas of future investigation. PMID:19864944

  19. Neural defects and cardiac arrhythmia in fish larvae following embryonic exposure to 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE 47).

    PubMed

    Lema, Sean C; Schultz, Irvin R; Scholz, Nathaniel L; Incardona, John P; Swanson, Penny

    2007-05-31

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are added to plastics, polyurethane foam, and textiles as a flame retardant. While PBDEs play a key role in reducing loss of human life and property from fires, these flame retardants have become pervasive organic contaminants in the environment and in the tissues of fish, birds, marine mammals, and humans. Levels of PBDEs in wildlife and humans continue to rise, raising concerns about potential ecological and health risks associated with exposure to these chemicals. Nevertheless, there is little currently known about the toxicological effects of PBDE exposure. Here, we examined the developmental toxicity of the PBDE congener 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE 47) using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an ontogenetic model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed continuously to dissolved phase PBDE 47 (100-5000 microg/l) beginning 3-5 h post-fertilization (hpf). Fish treated with the highest concentrations of PBDE 47 delayed hatching, had reduced growth post-hatching, and displayed an abnormal dorsal curvature of the body with flexion at the hindbrain. By 96h post-fertilization larvae exposed to PBDE 47 had significant tachycardia, which progressed into atrioventricular block arrhythmias. Microinjection of fluorescent dye into the hindbrain ventricle revealed that cerebrospinal fluid in the neural tube and brain ventricles flowed more slowly in fish larvae exposed to PBDE 47, a likely etiology for the dorsal curvature. Similar, though much less pronounced, developmental toxicity also occurred in larvae exposed to PBDE 47 only for a 20h period during early embryogenesis (3-23 hpf), suggesting that PBDEs incorporated in lipid of the egg are bioavailable and cause toxicity later in life. Taken together, this work indicates that exposure to PBDE 47 can cause morphological abnormalities, impair cardiovascular function and cerebrospinal fluid flow, and provides a tractable starting point for using the zebrafish model to explore

  20. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and careful stratification of fetal heart rate (FHR) is extremely important in all pregnancies. The most lethal cardiac rhythm disturbances occur during apparently normal pregnancies where FHR and rhythmare regular and within normal or low-normal ranges. These hidden depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, associated with genetic ion channelopathies cannot be detected by echocardiography, and may be responsible for up to 10% of unexplained fetal demise, prompting a need for newer and better fetal diagnostic techniques. Other manifest fetal arrhythmias such as premature beats, tachycardia, and bradycardia are commonly recognized. Heart rhythm diagnosis in obstetrical practice is usually made by M-mode and pulsed Doppler fetal echocardiography, but not all fetal cardiac time intervals are captured by echocardiographic methods. This article reviews different types of fetal arrhythmias, their presentation and treatment strategies, and gives an overview of the present and future diagnostic techniques. PMID:24858320

  2. Mutation in Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase 1–Like Gene (GPD1-L) Decreases Cardiac Na+ Current and Causes Inherited Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    London, Barry; Michalec, Michael; Mehdi, Haider; Zhu, Xiaodong; Kerchner, Laurie; Sanyal, Shamarendra; Viswanathan, Prakash C.; Pfahnl, Arnold E.; Shang, Lijuan L.; Madhusudanan, Mohan; Baty, Catherine J.; Lagana, Stephen; Aleong, Ryan; Gutmann, Rebecca; Ackerman, Michael J.; McNamara, Dennis M.; Weiss, Raul; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Brugada syndrome is a rare, autosomal-dominant, male-predominant form of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation characterized by a right bundle-branch block and ST elevation in the right precordial leads of the surface ECG. Mutations in the cardiac Na+ channel SCN5A on chromosome 3p21 cause ≈20% of the cases of Brugada syndrome; most mutations decrease inward Na+ current, some by preventing trafficking of the channels to the surface membrane. We previously used positional cloning to identify a new locus on chromosome 3p24 in a large family with Brugada syndrome and excluded SCN5A as a candidate gene. Methods and Results We used direct sequencing to identify a mutation (A280V) in a conserved amino acid of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1–like (GPD1-L) gene. The mutation was present in all affected individuals and absent in >500 control subjects. GPD1-L RNA and protein are abundant in the heart. Compared with wild-type GPD1-L, coexpression of A280V GPD1-L with SCN5A in HEK cells reduced inward Na+ currents by ≈50% (P<0.005). Wild-type GPD1-L localized near the cell surface to a greater extent than A280V GPD1-L. Coexpression of A280V GPD1-L with SCN5A reduced SCN5A cell surface expression by 31±5% (P=0.01). Conclusions GPD1-L is a novel gene that may affect trafficking of the cardiac Na+ channel to the cell surface. A GPD1-L mutation decreases SCN5A surface membrane expression, reduces inward Na+ current, and causes Brugada syndrome. PMID:17967977

  3. Catheter Ablation of Arrhythmia During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Driver, Kevin; Chisholm, Christian A; Darby, Andrew E; Malhotra, Rohit; Dimarco, John P; Ferguson, John D

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia as a complication of pregnancy can be problematic to maternal health and fetal life and development. Catheter ablation of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy has been successfully performed in selected patients with limited experience. Techniques to limit maternal and fetal radiation exposure, including intracardiac echo and electroanatomic mapping systems, are particularly important in this setting. Specific accommodations are necessary in the care of the gravid patient during catheter ablation. PMID:25828853

  4. Carbon monoxide and lethal arrhythmias

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, J.P.; Schwartz, P.J.; Vanoli, E.; Stramba-Badiale, M.; De Ferrari, G.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of acute exposure to carbon monoxide on ventricular arrhythmias was studied in a previously described chronically maintained animal model of sudden cardiac death. In 60 percent of dogs with a healed anterior myocardial infarction, the combination of mild exercise and acute myocardial ischemia induces ventricular fibrillation. The events in this model are highly reproducible, thus allowing study by internal control analysis. Dogs that develop ventricular fibrillation during the test of exercise and acute myocardial ischemia are considered at high risk for sudden death and are defined as 'susceptible'; dogs that survive the test without a fatal arrhythmia are considered at low risk for sudden death and are defined as 'resistant.' In the current study, the effects of carboxyhemoglobin levels ranging from 5 to 15 percent were tested in resistant and susceptible dogs. A trend toward higher heart rates was observed at all levels of carboxyhemoglobin, although significant differences were observed only with 15 percent carboxyhemoglobin. This trend was observed at rest and during exercise in both resistant and susceptible dogs. In resistant animals, in which acute myocardial ischemia is typically associated with bradycardia even under the control condition, this reflex response occurred earlier and was augmented after exposure to carbon monoxide. This effect may depend on the increased hypoxic challenge caused by carbon monoxide, and thus on an augmentation of the neural reflex activation or a sensitization of the sinus node to acetylcholine induced by hypoxia. In both resistant and susceptible dogs, carbon monoxide exposure induced a worsening of ventricular arrhythmias in a minority of cases. This worsening was not reproducible in subsequent trials. These data indicate that acute exposure to carbon monoxide is seldom arrhythmogenic in dogs that have survived myocardial infarction. (Abstract Truncated)

  5. Understand Your Risk for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Understand Your Risk for Arrhythmia Updated:Apr 6,2016 Expected changes in heart ... content was last reviewed on 10/23/2014. Arrhythmia • Home • About Arrhythmia • Why Arrhythmia Matters • Understand Your ...

  6. Electromechanical wave imaging for arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Thanh-Hieu Nguyen, Vu; Legrand, Diégo; Okrasinski, Stan; Costet, Alexandre; Gambhir, Alok; Garan, Hasan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2011-11-01

    Electromechanical wave imaging (EWI) is a novel ultrasound-based imaging modality for mapping of the electromechanical wave (EW), i.e. the transient deformations occurring in immediate response to the electrical activation. The correlation between the EW and the electrical activation has been established in prior studies. However, the methods used previously to map the EW required the reconstruction of images over multiple cardiac cycles, precluding the application of EWI for non-periodic arrhythmias such as fibrillation. In this study, new imaging sequences are developed and applied based on flash- and wide-beam emissions to image the entire heart at very high frame rates (2000 fps) during free breathing in a single heartbeat. The methods are first validated by imaging the heart of an open-chest canine while simultaneously mapping the electrical activation using a 64-electrode basket catheter. Feasibility is then assessed by imaging the atria and ventricles of closed-chest, conscious canines during sinus rhythm and during right-ventricular pacing following atrio-ventricular dissociation, i.e., during a non-periodic rhythm. The EW was validated against electrode measurements in the open-chest case, and followed the expected electrical propagation pattern in the closed-chest setting. These results indicate that EWI can be used for the characterization of non-periodic arrhythmias in conditions similar to the clinical setting, in a single heartbeat, and during free breathing.

  7. Electromechanical Wave Imaging for Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Nguyen, Vu Thanh-Hieu; Legrand, Diégo; Okrasinski, Stan; Costet, Alexandre; Gambhir, Alok; Garan, Hasan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Electromechanical Wave Imaging (EWI) is a novel ultrasound-based imaging modality for the mapping of the electromechanical wave (EW), i.e., the transient deformations occurring in immediate response to the electrical activation. The correlation between the EW and the electrical activation has been established in previous studies. However, the methods used previously to map the EW required the reconstruction of images over multiple cardiac cycle, precluding the application of EWI for non-periodic arrhythmia such as fibrillation. In this study, we develop new imaging sequences based on flash and wide-beam emissions to image the entire heart at very high frame rate (2000 fps) during free breathing in a single heartbeat. The methods are first validated by imaging the heart of an open-chest canine while simultaneously mapping the electrical activation using a 64-electrode basket catheter. Feasibility is then assessed by imaging the atria and ventricles of closed-chest, conscious canines during sinus rhythm and during right-ventricular pacing following atrioventricular dissociation, i.e., a non-periodic rhythm. The EW was validated against electrode measurements in the open-chest case, and followed the expected electrical propagation pattern in the closed-chest setting. These results indicate that EWI can be used for the characterization of non-periodic arrhythmia in conditions close to the clinical setting, in a single heartbeat, and during free-breathing. PMID:22024555

  8. Electromechanical wave imaging for arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Nguyen, Vu Thanh-Hieu; Legrand, Diégo; Okrasinski, Stan; Costet, Alexandre; Gambhir, Alok; Garan, Hasan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2011-11-21

    Electromechanical wave imaging (EWI) is a novel ultrasound-based imaging modality for mapping of the electromechanical wave (EW), i.e. the transient deformations occurring in immediate response to the electrical activation. The correlation between the EW and the electrical activation has been established in prior studies. However, the methods used previously to map the EW required the reconstruction of images over multiple cardiac cycles, precluding the application of EWI for non-periodic arrhythmias such as fibrillation. In this study, new imaging sequences are developed and applied based on flash- and wide-beam emissions to image the entire heart at very high frame rates (2000 fps) during free breathing in a single heartbeat. The methods are first validated by imaging the heart of an open-chest canine while simultaneously mapping the electrical activation using a 64-electrode basket catheter. Feasibility is then assessed by imaging the atria and ventricles of closed-chest, conscious canines during sinus rhythm and during right-ventricular pacing following atrio-ventricular dissociation, i.e., during a non-periodic rhythm. The EW was validated against electrode measurements in the open-chest case, and followed the expected electrical propagation pattern in the closed-chest setting. These results indicate that EWI can be used for the characterization of non-periodic arrhythmias in conditions similar to the clinical setting, in a single heartbeat, and during free breathing. PMID:22024555

  9. Sinus Node and Atrial Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    John, Roy M; Kumar, Saurabh

    2016-05-10

    Although sinus node dysfunction (SND) and atrial arrhythmias frequently coexist and interact, the putative mechanism linking the 2 remain unclear. Although SND is accompanied by atrial myocardial structural changes in the right atrium, atrial fibrillation (AF) is a disease of variable interactions between left atrial triggers and substrate most commonly of left atrial origin. Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the genetic and pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the development and progression of SND and AF. Although some patients manifest SND as a result of electric remodeling induced by periods of AF, others develop progressive atrial structural remodeling that gives rise to both conditions together. The treatment strategy will thus vary according to the predominant disease phenotype. Although catheter ablation will benefit patients with predominantly AF and secondary SND, cardiac pacing may be the mainstay of therapy for patients with predominant fibrotic atrial cardiomyopathy. This contemporary review summarizes current knowledge on sinus node pathophysiology with the broader goal of yielding insights into the complex relationship between sinus node disease and atrial arrhythmias. PMID:27166347

  10. Devices for Arrhythmia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart an electric shock (as with a defibrillator ). For people with recurrent arrhythmias, medical devices such as a pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) can help by continuously monitoring the heart's ...

  11. Laboratory Markers of Ventricular Arrhythmia Risk in Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death continues to be a major public health problem. Ventricular arrhythmia is a main cause of sudden cardiac death. The present review addresses the links between renal function tests, several laboratory markers, and ventricular arrhythmia risk in patients with renal disease, undergoing or not hemodialysis or renal transplant, focusing on recent clinical studies. Therapy of hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia should be an emergency and performed simultaneously under electrocardiographic monitoring in patients with renal failure. Serum phosphates and iron, PTH level, renal function, hemoglobin and hematocrit, pH, inflammatory markers, proteinuria and microalbuminuria, and osmolarity should be monitored, besides standard 12-lead ECG, in order to prevent ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. PMID:24982887

  12. Clinical management of arrhythmias in elderly patients: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Hocini, Mélèze; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Proclemer, Alessandro; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess clinical practice in management of cardiac arrhythmias in elderly patients (age ≥75 years) in the European countries. The data are based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network members. Responses were received from 50 centres in 20 countries. The results of the survey have shown that management of cardiac arrhythmias is generally in accordance with the guidelines and consensus recommendations on management of cardiac arrhythmias, although there are some areas of variation, especially on age limit and exclusion of elderly patients for anticoagulation, ablation, and device therapy. PMID:25634939

  13. Chronic Arrhythmias in the Setting of Heterotaxy: Differences between Right and Left Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Willes, Richard J; Kovach, Joshua R; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    So-called heterotaxy affects lateralization of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Congenital malformations may be present in one of several organ systems. Cardiac involvement includes both structural and conduction abnormalities. Data regarding arrhythmias in heterotaxy come from case reports and small case series. We pooled available data to further characterize arrhythmias in heterotaxy. A systematic review of the literature for manuscripts describing arrhythmias in heterotaxy patients was conducted. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Ovid were searched. Studies describing arrhythmias in patients with heterotaxy were included if they were in English and presented characteristics of the arrhythmias. Arrhythmia characteristics were abstracted and are presented as pooled data. Freedom from arrhythmia by age was then analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. A total of 19 studies with 121 patients were included in the pooled analysis. Those with right isomerism were found to be more likely to have atrial flutter, atrial tachycardia, junctional tachycardia, and ventricular tachycardia. Those with left isomerism were more likely to have atrioventricular block, intraventricular conduction delay, sick sinus syndrome, and atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia. Median age of onset for all arrhythmias was 4 years with no difference by specific arrhythmia or isomerism. Those with right and left isomerism are at risk for different arrhythmias but are likely to develop arrhythmias at the same age. Those with left isomerism are more likely to require pacemaker placement due to atrioventricular block. Understanding these differences allows for focused surveillance of development of these arrhythmias. PMID:26219620

  14. Loperamide Induced Life Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Bodar, Vijaykumar; Singh, Sharanjit; Frumkin, William; Mangla, Aditya; Doshi, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Loperamide is over-the-counter antidiarrheal agent acting on peripherally located μ opioid receptors. It is gaining popularity among drug abusers as opioid substitute. We report a case of a 46-year-old male that was presented after cardiac arrest. After ruling out ischemia, cardiomyopathy, pulmonary embolism, central nervous system pathology, sepsis, and other drug toxicity, we found out that patient was using around 100 mg of Loperamide to control his chronic diarrhea presumably because of irritable bowel syndrome for last five years and consumed up to 200 mg of Loperamide daily for last two days before the cardiac arrest. We hypothesize that the patient's QTc prolongation and subsequent cardiac arrest are due to Loperamide toxicity. Patient experienced gradual resolution of tachyarrhythmia and gradual decrease in QTc interval during hospitalization which supports the evidence of causal relationship between Loperamide overdose and potentially fatal arrhythmias. It also provided the clue that patient may have congenital long QT syndrome which was unmasked by Loperamide causing ventricular arrhythmias. This case adds one more pearl in the literature to support that Loperamide overdose related cardiac toxicity does exist and it raises concerns over Loperamide abuse in the community. PMID:27547470

  15. Loperamide Induced Life Threatening Ventricular Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Ankit; Bodar, Vijaykumar; Malekzadegan, Mohammad; Singh, Sharanjit; Frumkin, William; Mangla, Aditya; Doshi, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Loperamide is over-the-counter antidiarrheal agent acting on peripherally located μ opioid receptors. It is gaining popularity among drug abusers as opioid substitute. We report a case of a 46-year-old male that was presented after cardiac arrest. After ruling out ischemia, cardiomyopathy, pulmonary embolism, central nervous system pathology, sepsis, and other drug toxicity, we found out that patient was using around 100 mg of Loperamide to control his chronic diarrhea presumably because of irritable bowel syndrome for last five years and consumed up to 200 mg of Loperamide daily for last two days before the cardiac arrest. We hypothesize that the patient's QTc prolongation and subsequent cardiac arrest are due to Loperamide toxicity. Patient experienced gradual resolution of tachyarrhythmia and gradual decrease in QTc interval during hospitalization which supports the evidence of causal relationship between Loperamide overdose and potentially fatal arrhythmias. It also provided the clue that patient may have congenital long QT syndrome which was unmasked by Loperamide causing ventricular arrhythmias. This case adds one more pearl in the literature to support that Loperamide overdose related cardiac toxicity does exist and it raises concerns over Loperamide abuse in the community. PMID:27547470

  16. Arrhythmia in Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Shone O.; Skelton, Rhys J.; Adigopula, Sasikanth; Ardehali, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Stem cell regenerative therapies hold promise for treating diseases across the spectrum of medicine. Recent clinical trials have confirmed the safety of stem cell delivery to the heart with promising but variable results. While significant progress has been made in the preclinical stages, the clinical application of cardiac cell therapy is limited by technical challenges, including inability to isolate a pure population of cardiac-specific progenitors capable of robust engraftment and regeneration, lack of appropriate pre-clinical animal models, uncertainty about the best mode of delivery, paucity of adequate imaging modalities, and lack of knowledge about the fate of transplanted cells. The inability of transplanted cells to structurally and functionally integrate into the host myocardium may pose arrhythmogenic risk to patients. This is in part dependent on the type of cell transplanted, where the expression of gap junctions such as connexin-43 is essential not only for electromechanical integration, but has also been found to be protective against electrical instability post-transplant. Additionally, certain methods of cell delivery, such as intramyocardial injection, carry a higher rate of arrhythmias. Other potential contributors to the arrhythmogenicity of cell transplantation include re-entrant pathways due to heterogeneity in conduction velocities between graft and host as well as graft automaticity. In this paper, we discuss the arrhythmogenic potential of cell delivery to the heart. PMID:26002399

  17. Perspective: A Dynamics-Based Classification of Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, James N.; Garfinkel, Alan; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S.; Nguyen, Thao P.; Olcese, Riccardo; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-01-01

    Despite key advances in the clinical management of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, culminating with the development of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and catheter ablation techniques, pharmacologic/biologic therapeutics have lagged behind. The fundamental issue is that biological targets are molecular factors. Diseases, however, represent emergent properties at the scale of the organism that result from dynamic interactions between multiple constantly changing molecular factors. For a pharmacologic/biologic therapy to be effective, it must target the dynamic processes that underlie the disease. Here we propose a classification of ventricular arrhythmias that is based on our current understanding of the dynamics occurring at the subcellular, cellular, tissue and organism scales, which cause arrhythmias by simultaneously generating arrhythmia triggers and exacerbating tissue vulnerability. The goal is to create a framework that systematically links these key dynamic factors together with fixed factors (structural and electrophysiological heterogeneity) synergistically promoting electrical dispersion and increased arrhythmia risk to molecular factors that can serve as biological targets. We classify ventricular arrhythmias into three primary dynamic categories related generally to unstable Ca cycling, reduced repolarization, and excess repolarization, respectively. The clinical syndromes, arrhythmia mechanisms, dynamic factors and what is known about their molecular counterparts are discussed. Based on this framework, we propose a computational-experimental strategy for exploring the links between molecular factors, fixed factors and dynamic factors that underlie life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The ultimate objective is to facilitate drug development by creating an in silico platform to evaluate and predict comprehensively how molecular interventions affect not only a single targeted arrhythmia, but all primary arrhythmia dynamics

  18. Effects of Heterogeneous Diffuse Fibrosis on Arrhythmia Dynamics and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kazbanov, Ivan V.; ten Tusscher, Kirsten H. W. J.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is an important risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias. Previous experimental and numerical studies have shown that the texture and spatial distribution of fibrosis may play an important role in arrhythmia onset. Here, we investigate how spatial heterogeneity of fibrosis affects arrhythmia onset using numerical methods. We generate various tissue textures that differ by the mean amount of fibrosis, the degree of heterogeneity and the characteristic size of heterogeneity. We study the onset of arrhythmias using a burst pacing protocol. We confirm that spatial heterogeneity of fibrosis increases the probability of arrhythmia induction. This effect is more pronounced with the increase of both the spatial size and the degree of heterogeneity. The induced arrhythmias have a regular structure with the period being mostly determined by the maximal local fibrosis level. We perform ablations of the induced fibrillatory patterns to classify their type. We show that in fibrotic tissue fibrillation is usually of the mother rotor type but becomes of the multiple wavelet type with increase in tissue size. Overall, we conclude that the most important factor determining the formation and dynamics of arrhythmia in heterogeneous fibrotic tissue is the value of maximal local fibrosis. PMID:26861111

  19. Effects of Heterogeneous Diffuse Fibrosis on Arrhythmia Dynamics and Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kazbanov, Ivan V; ten Tusscher, Kirsten H W J; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is an important risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias. Previous experimental and numerical studies have shown that the texture and spatial distribution of fibrosis may play an important role in arrhythmia onset. Here, we investigate how spatial heterogeneity of fibrosis affects arrhythmia onset using numerical methods. We generate various tissue textures that differ by the mean amount of fibrosis, the degree of heterogeneity and the characteristic size of heterogeneity. We study the onset of arrhythmias using a burst pacing protocol. We confirm that spatial heterogeneity of fibrosis increases the probability of arrhythmia induction. This effect is more pronounced with the increase of both the spatial size and the degree of heterogeneity. The induced arrhythmias have a regular structure with the period being mostly determined by the maximal local fibrosis level. We perform ablations of the induced fibrillatory patterns to classify their type. We show that in fibrotic tissue fibrillation is usually of the mother rotor type but becomes of the multiple wavelet type with increase in tissue size. Overall, we conclude that the most important factor determining the formation and dynamics of arrhythmia in heterogeneous fibrotic tissue is the value of maximal local fibrosis. PMID:26861111

  20. Arrhythmia diagnosis and management throughout life in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Bradley C; Berul, Charles I

    2016-03-01

    Arrhythmias, covering bradycardia and tachycardia, occur in association with congenital heart disease (CHD) and as a consequence of surgical repair. Symptomatic bradycardia can occur due to sinus node dysfunction or atrioventricular block secondary to either unrepaired CHD or surgical repair in the area of the conduction system. Tachyarrhythmias are common in repaired CHD due to scar formation, chamber distension or increased chamber pressure, all potentially leading to abnormal automaticity and heterogeneous conduction properties as a substrate for re-entry. Atrial arrhythmias occur more frequently, but ventricular tachyarrhythmias may be associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, notably in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot or aortic stenosis. Defibrillator implantation provides life-saving electrical therapy for hemodynamically unstable arrhythmias. Ablation procedures with 3D electroanatomic mapping technology offer a viable alternative to pharmacologic or device therapy. Advances in electrophysiology have allowed for successful management of arrhythmias in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:26642231

  1. Human cardiac systems electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis: iteration of experiment and computation

    PubMed Central

    Holzem, Katherine M.; Madden, Eli J.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2014-01-01

    Human cardiac electrophysiology (EP) is a unique system for computational modelling at multiple scales. Due to the complexity of the cardiac excitation sequence, coordinated activity must occur from the single channel to the entire myocardial syncytium. Thus, sophisticated computational algorithms have been developed to investigate cardiac EP at the level of ion channels, cardiomyocytes, multicellular tissues, and the whole heart. Although understanding of each functional level will ultimately be important to thoroughly understand mechanisms of physiology and disease, cardiac arrhythmias are expressly the product of cardiac tissue—containing enough cardiomyocytes to sustain a reentrant loop of activation. In addition, several properties of cardiac cellular EP, that are critical for arrhythmogenesis, are significantly altered by cell-to-cell coupling. However, relevant human cardiac EP data, upon which to develop or validate models at all scales, has been lacking. Thus, over several years, we have developed a paradigm for multiscale human heart physiology investigation and have recovered and studied over 300 human hearts. We have generated a rich experimental dataset, from which we better understand mechanisms of arrhythmia in human and can improve models of human cardiac EP. In addition, in collaboration with computational physiologists, we are developing a database for the deposition of human heart experimental data, including thorough experimental documentation. We anticipate that accessibility to this human heart dataset will further human EP computational investigations, as well as encourage greater data transparency within the field of cardiac EP. PMID:25362174

  2. Potentially fatal arrhythmias in two cases of adult Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Kato, Masataka; Ayusawa, Mamoru

    2016-03-01

    Fatal arrhythmias in asymptomatic Kawasaki disease patients with normal left ventricular function have rarely been reported. In this study, we report the cases of two adult patients with largely unpredictable sudden cardiac arrest, despite almost-normal left ventricular function even after the diagnosis of presumed Kawasaki disease, as well as consider the mechanisms involved with reference to the literature. PMID:26424562

  3. Evaluating the Safety of Intraoperative Antiarrhythmics in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Rachel S; Moffett, Brady S; Hall, Stuart; Kim, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias occurring during the intraoperative period for cardiac surgery have been associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Several antiarrhythmics have been utilized for the management of intraoperative arrhythmias. These antiarrhythmic medications can cause undesirable adverse outcomes in the intensive care setting. The incidence and treatment of adult intraoperative arrhythmias have been studied. In addition, the prevalence, risk factors, and optimal treatment of pediatric postoperative arrhythmias have also been studied. However, the literature has not been published on intraoperative antiarrhythmia treatment during pediatric cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of intraoperative antiarrhythmic medications utilized in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. This was a retrospective review of all patients who received an intraoperative antiarrhythmic in the cardiovascular operating room at Texas Children's Hospital. Patients were included if they underwent cardiovascular surgery from November 2008 to July 2013 and were excluded if antiarrhythmics were given intraoperatively for other indications (i.e., esmolol for hypertension) or if patients were older than 18 years of age. Safety of antiarrhythmic treatment was determined by the absence or presence of adverse events. Control or recurrence of the arrhythmia was analyzed as a secondary measure to help determine antiarrhythmic efficacy. A total of 45 patients were identified (53.3 % male). Patients were a median of 0.52 years at the time of surgery. Primary surgery types were tetralogy of Fallot repair (n = 6; 13.3 %) and ventricular septal defect closure (n = 5, 11.1 %). Thirty-one patients (68.9 %) had documented adverse events after the administration of antiarrhythmics. Most of these adverse events occurred after the administration of amiodarone (n = 16; 51.6 %) followed by esmolol (n = 15; 48.4 %). Fifty-one percent of the arrhythmias resolved in the operating

  4. Arrhythmia analysis with an expert system.

    PubMed

    Redman, T C; Hahn, A W

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a rule based expert system which was designed to diagnose electrocardiographic arrhythmias in several species. The program, called ECG-X, is written in OPS5 and runs under MS-DOS 2.1 and higher on an IBM-PC or AT type machine. The program uses the paper speed, the species, the temporal relationships between the P waves and the QRS complexes as well as basic information about the P and QRS morphology, and provides the user with a rhythm diagnosis consistent with rules provided by contemporary cardiac electrophysiologic knowledge. PMID:2742969

  5. Risk assessment of ventricular arrhythmia using new parameters based on high resolution body surface potential mapping

    PubMed Central

    Fereniec, Malgorzata; Stix, Gunter; Kania, Michal; Mroczka, Tomasz; Janusek, Dariusz; Maniewski, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The effective screening of myocardial infarction (MI) patients threatened by ventricular tachycardia (VT) is an important issue in clinical practice, especially in the process of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapy recommendation. This study proposes new parameters describing depolarization and repolarization inhomogeneity in high resolution body surface potential maps (HR BSPM) to identify MI patients threatened by VT. Material/Methods High resolution ECGs were recorded from 64 surface leads. Time-averaged HR BSPMs were used. Several parameters for arrhythmia risk assessment were calculated in 2 groups of MI patients: those with and without documented VT. Additionally, a control group of healthy subjects was studied. To assess the risk of VT, the following parameters were proposed: correlation coefficient between STT and QRST integral maps (STT_QRST_CORR), departure index of absolute value of STT integral map (STT_DI), and departure index of absolute value of T-wave shape index (TSI_DI). These new parameters were compared to known parameters: QRS width, QT interval, QT dispersion, Tpeak-Tend interval, total cosines between QRS complex and T wave, and non-dipolar content of QRST integral maps. Results STT_DI, TSI_DI, STT_QRST_CORR, QRS width, and QT interval parameters were statistically significant (p≤0.05) in arrhythmia risk assessment. The highest sensitivity was found for the STT_DI parameter (0.77) and the highest specificity for TSI_DI (0.79). Conclusions Arrhythmia risk is demonstrated by both abnormal spatial distribution of the repolarization phase and changed relationship between depolarization and repolarization phases, as well as their prolongation. The proposed new parameters might be applied for risk stratification of cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:21358612

  6. Imaging modalities in cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Reema; Clifford, Sarah M; Ghanbari, Hamid; Schmidt, Martin; Segerson, Nathan M; Daccarett, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac imaging, both noninvasive and invasive, has become a crucial part of evaluating patients during the electrophysiology procedure experience. These anatomical data allow electrophysiologists to not only assess who is an appropriate candidate for each procedure, but also to determine the rate of success from these procedures. This article incorporates a review of the various cardiac imaging techniques available today, with a focus on atrial arrhythmias, ventricular arrhythmias and device therapy. PMID:20014991

  7. [Arrhythmias during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Trappe, H-J

    2008-09-01

    Cardiovascular emergencies are rare during pregnancy with an incidence of 0,2-4,0%. Emergencies include arrhythmias, acute coronary syndrome, peripartum cardiomyopathy and hypertensive disorders. Electrical DC-cardioversion with 50-100 Joules is indicated in the acute treatment of arrhythmias in all patients in an unstable hemodynamic state. If 100 J fails higher energies (up to 360 J) will be necessary. In stable supraventricular tachycardia intravenous adenosine is the first choice drug and may safely terminate the arrhythmia. Ventricular premature beats are frequently present during pregnancy and benign in most patients. However, life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias (sustained ventricular tachycardia [VT], ventricular flutter [VFlt], ventricular fibrillation [VF]) were observed less frequently. Electrical DC-cardioversion is necessary in all pregnant women who are in a hemodynamically unstable state and have a life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In hemodynamically stable pregnant women the initial therapy with ajmaline, procainamide or lidocaine is indicated. Implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator is indicated in patients with syncope caused by VT, VF, VFlt or aborted sudden death. PMID:18767007

  8. [Arrhythmias in athlets (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, H; Jungmann, H

    1978-10-20

    380 athletes in optimal performance were examinated within 10 years between 2 and 13 times (average: 4 times): ECG were taken at rest, during breathing tests and under maximal physical load by ergometry. 88 (23.2%) of them showed arrhythmias, 32 in the same examination different forms of premature beats. All kinds of arrhythmias were seen except atrial flatter, total av-block and paroxysmal tachycardias. Breathing tests provoked most of arrhythmias followed by the recovery after maximal physical load. Follow-up studies and clinical examinations proved that in 86 sportsmen these arrhythmias were not a symptom of heart disease. Only in 2 athletes heart injury could not be excluded. But in nearly 50% extracardial inflammations, like tonsillitis, bronchitis etc., were found. It is discussed that bradycardia and vagotonia of the highly trained sportsmen cause the arrhythmias. This vagotonia is intensified by breathing tests. But arrhythmias found in athletes should cause an examination for other chronical sicknesses. PMID:703672

  9. Discriminative sparse coding of ECG during ventricular arrhythmias using LC-K-SVD approach.

    PubMed

    Kalaji, I; Balasundaram, K; Umapathy, K

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) are two major types of ventricular arrhythmias that results due to abnormalities in the electrical activation in the ventricles of the heart. VF is the lethal of the two arrhythmias, which may lead to sudden cardiac death. The treatment options for the two arrhythmias are different. Therefore, detection and characterization of the two arrhythmias is critical to choose appropriate therapy options. Due to the time-varying nature of the signal content during cardiac arrhythmias, modeling and extracting information from them using time and frequency localized functions would be ideal. To this effect, in this work, we perform discriminative sparse coding of the ECG during ventricular arrhythmia with hybrid time-frequency dictionaries using the recently introduced Label consistent K-SVD (LC-K-SVD) approach. Using 944 segments of ventricular arrhythmias extracted from 23 patients in the Malignant Ventricular Ectopy and Creighton University Tachy-Arrhythmia databases, an overall classification accuracy of 71.55% was attained with a hybrid dictionary of Gabor and symlet4 atoms. In comparison, for the same database and non-trained dictionary (i.e the original dictionary) the classification accuracy was found to be 62.71%. In addition, the modeling error using the trained dictionary from LC-K-SVD approach was found to be significantly lower to the one using the non-trained dictionary. PMID:26737466

  10. Why Arrhythmia Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosed heart disease. The time and mode of death are unexpected. It occurs instantly or shortly after symptoms appear. The term "massive heart attack" is often mistakenly used to describe sudden cardiac arrest. While a heart attack may cause ...

  11. Who Is at Risk for Arrhythmia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for an Arrhythmia? Arrhythmias are very common in older adults. Atrial fibrillation (a common type of arrhythmia that can cause problems) affects millions of people, ...

  12. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David H; Nery, Pablo B; Ha, Andrew C; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-07-26

    Clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in perhaps 5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The 3 principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. An estimated 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic cardiac involvement (clinically silent disease). In 2014, the first international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS was published. In patients with clinically manifest CS, the extent of left ventricular dysfunction seems to be the most important predictor of prognosis. There is controversy in published reports as to the outcome of patients with clinically silent CS. Despite a paucity of data, immunosuppression therapy (primarily with corticosteroids) has been advocated for the treatment of clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, primarily with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, is often recommended for patients with clinically manifest disease. PMID:27443438

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation to Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Atoui, Moustapha; Gunda, Sampath; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Mahapatra, Srijoy

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation may prevent or treat atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since some of these arrhythmias are associated with sudden cardiac death, it has been hypothesized that ablation may prevent sudden death in certain cases. We performed a literature search to better understand under which circumstances ablation may prevent sudden death and found little randomized data demonstrating the long-term effects of ablation. Current literature shows that ablation clearly prevents symptoms of arrhythmia and may reduce the incidence of sudden cardiac death in select patients, although data does not indicate improved mortality. Ongoing clinical trials are needed to better define the role of ablation in preventing sudden cardiac death. PMID:26306130

  14. Dysfunction in the βII Spectrin-Dependent Cytoskeleton Underlies Human Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sakima A.; Sturm, Amy C.; Curran, Jerry; Kline, Crystal F.; Little, Sean C.; Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Long, Victor P.; Makara, Michael; Polina, Iuliia; Hughes, Langston D.; Webb, Tyler R.; Wei, Zhiyi; Wright, Patrick; Voigt, Niels; Bhakta, Deepak; Spoonamore, Katherine G.; Zhang, Chuansheng; Weiss, Raul; Binkley, Philip F.; Janssen, Paul M.; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert S.; Sun, Mingzhai; Ma, Jianjie; Dobrev, Dobromir; Zhang, Mingjie; Carnes, Cynthia A.; Vatta, Matteo; Rasband, Matthew N.; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The cardiac cytoskeleton plays key roles in maintaining myocyte structural integrity in health and disease. In fact, human mutations in cardiac cytoskeletal elements are tightly linked with cardiac pathologies including myopathies, aortopathies, and dystrophies. Conversely, the link between cytoskeletal protein dysfunction in cardiac electrical activity is not well understood, and often overlooked in the cardiac arrhythmia field. Methods and Results Here, we uncover a new mechanism for the regulation of cardiac membrane excitability. We report that βII spectrin, an actin-associated molecule, is essential for the post-translational targeting and localization of critical membrane proteins in heart. βII spectrin recruits ankyrin-B to the cardiac dyad, and a novel human mutation in the ankyrin-B gene disrupts the ankyrin-B/βII spectrin interaction leading to severe human arrhythmia phenotypes. Mice lacking cardiac βII spectrin display lethal arrhythmias, aberrant electrical and calcium handling phenotypes, and abnormal expression/localization of cardiac membrane proteins. Mechanistically, βII spectrin regulates the localization of cytoskeletal and plasma membrane/sarcoplasmic reticulum protein complexes that include the Na/Ca exchanger, RyR2, ankyrin-B, actin, and αII spectrin. Finally, we observe accelerated heart failure phenotypes in βII spectrin-deficient mice. Conclusions Our findings identify βII spectrin as critical for normal myocyte electrical activity, link this molecule to human disease, and provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying cardiac myocyte biology. PMID:25632041

  15. [Arrhythmias in pregnancy. How and when to treat?].

    PubMed

    Flores, Jorge R Gómez; Márquez, Manlio F

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias can develop during pregnancy. The risk of arrhythmias is relatively higher during labor and delivery. Potential factors that can promote arrhythmias in pregnancy or during labor and delivery, include the direct cardiac electrophysiological effects of hormones, changes in autonomic tone, hemodynamic perturbations, hypokalemia, and underlying heart disease. In this review, the basis for treatment of supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias are described. No drug therapy is usually needed for the management of supraventricular or ventricular premature beats, but potential stimulants, such as smoking, caffeine, and alcohol should be eliminated. In paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, vagal stimulation maneuvers should be attempted first. In pregnant women with atrial fibrillation, the goal of treatment is conversion to sinus rhythm by electrical cardioversion. Rate control can be achieved by a cardioselective beta-adrenergic blocker drug and/ or digoxin. Ventricular arrhythmias may occur in the pregnant women, specially when cardiomyopathy, congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, or mitral valve prolapse exists. Electrical cardioversion or treatment with sotalol may be used (amiodarone is not safe for the fetus). Finally, in women with congenital long QT syndrome, beta-blocker therapy must be continued during pregnancy and postpartum period. PMID:17972373

  16. [PREVALENCE OF ATRIAL RHYTHM DISTURBANCES IN CARDIAC PATIENTS WITH COMORBIDITIES].

    PubMed

    Velichko, V L; Naychuk, O V; Lagoda, D O; Amirova, G U

    2015-01-01

    Atrial arrhythmias are the most common among all cardiac arrhythmias. The prevalence of atrial arrhythmias is increasing worldwide and has an impact on health indicators such as the loss of ability to work and mortality and increases the overall cardiovascular risk and/or heart disease occurence. This study indicates a high prevalence of atrial arthythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease and requires more detailed study in order to develop methods of preventing the onset of cardiac rhythm disorders. PMID:26118041

  17. Biomarkers in electrophysiology: role in arrhythmias and resynchronization therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Abhishek; Truong, Quynh A.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating biomarkers related to inflammation, neurohormones, myocardial stress, and necrosis have been associated with commonly encountered arrhythmic disorders such as atrial fibrillation (AF) and more malignant processes including ventricular arrhythmias (VA) and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Both direct and indirect biomarkers implicated in the heart failure cascade have potential prognostic value in patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). This review will focus on the role of biomarkers in AF, history of SCD, and CRT with an emphasis to improve clinical risk assessment for arrhythmias and patient selection for device therapy. Notably, information obtained from biomarkers may supplement traditional diagnostic and imaging techniques, thus providing an additional benefit in the management of patients. PMID:25715916

  18. Defining a new paradigm for human arrhythmia syndromes: Phenotypic manifestations of gene mutations in ion channel- and transporter-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Michael J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, gene mutations in cardiac ion channels have been linked with a host of potentially fatal human arrhythmias including long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. More recently, a new paradigm for human arrhythmia has emerged based on gene mutations that affect the activity of cardiac ion channel- and transporter- associated proteins. As part of the Circulation Research thematic series on Inherited Arrhythmias, this review will focus on the emerging field of human arrhythmias due to dysfunction in cytosolic gene products (including ankyrins, yotiao, syntrophin, and caveolin-3) that regulate the activities of key membrane ion channels and transporters. PMID:20724725

  19. Treatment of depression in an adolescent with cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Tanidir, Canan; Tanidir, Ibrahim C; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2015-10-01

    Patients with cardiomyopathy have a higher incidence of mood and anxiety disorders, resulting in greater probability for hospitalisation and increased risk for arrhythmia and death. We report a case of a 16-year-old boy with Danon disease, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, who later developed depression and significant weight loss. The patient was successfully treated for his anxiety and depression with mirtazapine without any adverse cardiac effects. PMID:25400066

  20. Ventricular repolarization markers for predicting malignant arrhythmias in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Torres, Yaniel; Carmona-Puerta, Raimundo; Katholi, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Malignant cardiac arrhythmias which result in sudden cardiac death may be present in individuals apparently healthy or be associated with other medical conditions. The way to predict their appearance represents a challenge for the medical community due to the tragic outcomes in most cases. In the last two decades some ventricular repolarization (VR) markers have been found to be useful to predict malignant cardiac arrhythmias in several clinical conditions. The corrected QT, QT dispersion, Tpeak-Tend, Tpeak-Tend dispersion and Tp-e/QT have been studied and implemented in clinical practice for this purpose. These markers are obtained from 12 lead surface electrocardiogram. In this review we discuss how these markers have demonstrated to be effective to predict malignant arrhythmias in medical conditions such as long and short QT syndromes, Brugada syndrome, early repolarization syndrome, acute myocardial ischemia, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity and highly trained athletes. Also the main pathophysiological mechanisms that explain the arrhythmogenic predisposition in these diseases and the basis for the VR markers are discussed. However, the same results have not been found in all conditions. Further studies are needed to reach a global consensus in order to incorporate these VR parameters in risk stratification of these patients. PMID:26301231

  1. Defining new insight into atypical arrhythmia: a computational model of ankyrin-B syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Roseanne M.; Mitchell, Colleen C.; Christensen, Matthew D.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Normal cardiac excitability depends on the coordinated activity of specific ion channels and transporters within specialized domains at the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Ion channel dysfunction due to congenital or acquired defects has been linked to human cardiac arrhythmia. More recently, defects in ion channel-associated proteins have been associated with arrhythmia. Ankyrin-B is a multifunctional adapter protein responsible for targeting select ion channels, transporters, cytoskeletal proteins, and signaling molecules in excitable cells, including neurons, pancreatic β-cells, and cardiomyocytes. Ankyrin-B dysfunction has been linked to cardiac arrhythmia in human patients and ankyrin-B heterozygous (ankyrin-B+/−) mice with a phenotype characterized by sinus node dysfunction, susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death (“ankyrin-B syndrome”). At the cellular level, ankyrin-B+/− cells have defects in the expression and membrane localization of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+-K+-ATPase, Ca2+ overload, and frequent afterdepolarizations, which likely serve as triggers for lethal cardiac arrhythmias. Despite knowledge gathered from mouse models and human patients, the molecular mechanism responsible for cardiac arrhythmias in the setting of ankyrin-B dysfunction remains unclear. Here, we use mathematical modeling to provide new insights into the cellular pathways responsible for Ca2+ overload and afterdepolarizations in ankyrin-B+/− cells. We show that the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+-K+-ATPase play related, yet distinct, roles in intracellular Ca2+ accumulation, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ overload, and afterdepolarization generation in ankyrin-B+/− cells. These findings provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying a human disease and are relevant for acquired human arrhythmia, where ankyrin-B dysfunction has recently been identified. PMID:20729400

  2. Understand Your Risk for Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The first six months after a heart attack is a particularly high-risk period for sudden cardiac arrest in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease . ...

  3. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety. PMID:24782478

  4. Mechanisms of Sudden Cardiac Death: Oxidants and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Kyle, John W.; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmia is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Deranged cardiac metabolism and abnormal redox state during cardiac diseases foment arrhythmogenic substrates through direct or indirect modulation of cardiac ion channel/transporter function. This review presents current evidence on the mechanisms linking metabolic derangement and excessive oxidative stress to ion channel/transporter dysfunction that predisposes to ventricular arrhythmias and SCD. As conventional anti-arrhythmic agents aiming at ion channels have proven challenging to use, targeting arrhythmogenic metabolic changes and redox imbalance may provide novel therapeutics to treat or prevent life-threatening arrhythmias and SCD. PMID:26044249

  5. High prevalence of arrhythmias in elderly male athletes with a lifelong history of regular strenuous exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jensen-Urstad, K; Bouvier, F; Saltin, B; Jensen-Urstad, M

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To characterise cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac autonomic function in 11 elderly men (mean (SD) age 73.2 (2.8) years) with a lifelong history of regular very strenuous exercise. A control group of 12 healthy sedentary or moderately physically active men (74.5 (2.7) years) was also studied.
Design—48 hour ambulatory electrocardiograms were recorded. Cardiac autonomic function was estimated from power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Maximal oxygen uptake during treadmill exercise testing was 2.91 (0.52) l (41 (7) ml/kg).
Results—Nine of 11 athletes had complex ventricular arrhythmias compared with five of 12 controls. Seven athletes but none of the controls had episodes of heart rate below 40 beats/min and two athletes had RR intervals longer than two seconds. Heart rate variability in the athletes was higher than in the controls. 
Conclusions—Elderly athletes with a lifelong training history seem to have more complex arrhythmias and profound bradyarrhythmias than do healthy elderly controls, which may increase the risk of sudden cardiac death. In contrast, the age related decrease in heart rate variability seems to be retarded, which has a positive prognostic value and may decrease the risk of life threatening ventricular arrhythmias.

 Keywords: arrhythmias;  heart rate variability;  athletes;  exercise;  elderly men PMID:9538309

  6. Use of an Implantable Loop Recorder in the Investigation of Arrhythmias in Adult Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Lammey, Michael L; Jackson, Raven; Ely, John J; Lee, D Rick; Sleeper, Meg M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general, and cardiac arrhythmias specifically, is common in great apes. However, the clinical significance of arrhythmias detected on short-duration electrocardiograms is often unclear. Here we describe the use of an implantable loop recorder to evaluate cardiac rhythms in 4 unanesthetized adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), 1 with a history of possible syncope and 3 with the diagnosis of multiform ventricular ectopy (ventricular premature complexes) and cardiomyopathy. The clinical significance of ventricular ectopy was defined further by using the implantable loop recorder. Arrhythmia was ruled out as a cause of collapse in the chimpanzee that presented with possible syncope because the implantable loop recorder demonstrated normal sinus rhythm during a so-called syncopal event. This description is the first report of the use of an implantable loop recorder to diagnose cardiac arrhythmias in an unanesthetized great ape species. PMID:21819684

  7. Computational rabbit models to investigate the initiation, perpetuation, and termination of ventricular arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J; Boyle, Patrick M; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-07-01

    Current understanding of cardiac electrophysiology has been greatly aided by computational work performed using rabbit ventricular models. This article reviews the contributions of multiscale models of rabbit ventricles in understanding cardiac arrhythmia mechanisms. This review will provide an overview of multiscale modeling of the rabbit ventricles. It will then highlight works that provide insights into the role of the conduction system, complex geometric structures, and heterogeneous cellular electrophysiology in diseased and healthy rabbit hearts to the initiation and maintenance of ventricular arrhythmia. Finally, it will provide an overview on the contributions of rabbit ventricular modeling on understanding the mechanisms underlying shock-induced defibrillation. PMID:27334789

  8. Analysis of electrolyte abnormalities and the mechanisms leading to arrhythmias in heart failure. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Urso, C; Canino, B; Brucculeri, S; Firenze, A; Caimi, G

    2016-01-01

    About 50% of deaths from heart failure (HF) are sudden, presumably referable to arrhythmias. Electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities are a frequent and potentially dangerous complication in HF patients. Their incidence is almost always correlated with the severity of cardiac dysfunction; furthermore leading to arrhythmias, these imbalances are associated with a poor prognosis. The frequency of ventricular ectopic beats and sudden cardiac death correlate with both plasma and whole body levels of potassium, especially in alkalemia. The early recognition of these alterations and the knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms are useful for the management of these HF patients. PMID:27598028

  9. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  10. Channelopathies - emerging trends in the management of inherited arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Chockalingam, Priya; Mizusawa, Yuka; Wilde, Arthur Am

    2015-01-01

    In spite of their relative rarity, inheritable arrhythmias have come to the forefront as a group of potentially fatal but preventable cause of sudden cardiac death in children and (young) adults. Comprehensive management of inherited arrhythmias includes diagnosing and treating the proband and identifying and protecting affected family members. This has been made possible by the vast advances in the field of molecular biology enabling better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of some of these disease groups, namely congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and Brugada syndrome. The ensuing knowledge of the genotype-phenotype correlations enables us to risk-stratify, prognosticate and treat based on the genetic test results. The various diagnostic modalities currently available to us, including clinical tools and genetic technologies, have to be applied judiciously in order to promptly identify those affected and to spare the emotional burden of a potentially lethal disease in the unaffected individuals. The therapeutic armamentarium of inherited arrhythmias includes pharmacological agents, device therapies and surgical interventions. A treatment strategy keeping in mind the risk profile of the patients, the local availability of drugs and the expertise of the treating personnel is proving effective. While opportunities for research are numerous in this expanding field of medicine, there is also tremendous scope for incorporating the emerging trends in managing patients and families with inherited arrhythmias in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:25852242

  11. Channelopathies - Emerging Trends in The Management of Inherited Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Priya; Mizusawa, Yuka; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their relative rarity, inheritable arrhythmias have come to the forefront as a group of potentially fatal but preventable cause of sudden cardiac death in children and (young) adults. Comprehensive management of inherited arrhythmias includes diagnosing and treating the proband and identifying and protecting affected family members. This has been made possible by the vast advances in the field of molecular biology enabling better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of some of these disease groups, namely congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and Brugada syndrome. The ensuing knowledge of the genotype-phenotype correlations enables us to risk-stratify, prognosticate and treat based on the genetic test results. The various diagnostic modalities currently available to us, including clinical tools and genetic technologies, have to be applied judiciously in order to promptly identify those affected and to spare the emotional burden of a potentially lethal disease in the unaffected individuals. The therapeutic armamentarium of inherited arrhythmias includes pharmacological agents, device therapies and surgical interventions. A treatment strategy keeping in mind the risk profile of the patients, the local availability of drugs and the expertise of the treating personnel is proving effective. While opportunities for research are numerous in this expanding field of medicine, there is also tremendous scope for incorporating the emerging trends in managing patients and families with inherited arrhythmias in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:25852242

  12. Ventricular arrhythmias and the His-Purkinje system.

    PubMed

    Haissaguerre, Michel; Vigmond, Edward; Stuyvers, Bruno; Hocini, Meleze; Bernus, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias are a major cause of sudden death, which accounts for approximately half of cardiac mortality. The His-Purkinje system is composed of specialized cells responsible for the synchronous activation of the ventricles. However, experimental studies show that the Purkinje system can be arrhythmogenic during electrolyte imbalance, after exposure to various drugs, and in myocardial ischaemia, during which Purkinje cells can survive in anaerobic conditions. Purkinje cells can generate both automatic and triggered focal rhythms, and their network configuration can accommodate re-entrant circuits. In humans, a variety of monomorphic ventricular tachycardias can be sustained within the architecture of the Purkinje branches. Furthermore, discrete Purkinje sources can serve as critical triggers of ventricular fibrillation in a wide spectrum of patients with structural heart disease or with an apparently normal heart. In drug-resistant cases of monomorphic and polymorphic Purkinje-related ventricular tachycardias, catheter ablation is a very effective treatment. The specific transcriptional signatures and functional properties of Purkinje cells, including their intracellular calcium dynamics, underlie their extreme arrhythmogenicity. However, the identification of vulnerable individuals remains challenging, and the molecular mechanisms of Purkinje-related arrhythmias have to be characterized further to enable the development of interventions to prevent lethal cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26727298

  13. A single exposure to particulate or gaseous air pollution increases the risk of aconitine-induced cardiac arrythmia in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electrical dysfunction. In this study, ...

  14. Correlating perceived arrhythmia symptoms and QoL in the elderly with Heart Failure in an urban clinic: A prospective, single center study

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Kathleen T.; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R.; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Aim To determine the relationship between quality of life (QoL) and perceived self reported symptoms in an elderly, ambulatory, urban population living with heart failure (HF). Background While arrhythmias in the elderly with HF are well documented, the association between perceived arrhythmia symptoms and QoL is not well defined. Design Prospective, cross sectional single center study. Methods A single-center, prospective study was conducted with HF patients recruited from an urban outpatient cardiology clinic in the United States. Fifty-seven patients completed a baseline QoL survey with 42 of these completing the 6-month follow-up survey. QoL was evaluated with the SF-36v2™ and frequency of symptoms with the Atrial Fibrillation Severity Scale. Subjects wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor (LifeStar AF Express®) for 2-weeks to document arrhythmias. Data analysis utilized Spearman’s rank correlation and logistic regression. Results Baseline and 6-month QoL measures did not correlate with recorded arrhythmias. However, perceptions of diminished general health correlated significantly with symptoms of exercise intolerance, lightheadedness/dizziness, palpitations, and chest pain/pressure. By multivariable logistic regression, more severe perceived arrhythmic, symptoms of exercise intolerance, and lightheadedness/dizziness were independently associated with diminished QoL. Conclusion QoL was significantly worse in patients with perceptions of severe arrhythmic episodes and in those whose symptoms of dizziness and exercise intolerance. Relevance to clinical practice The findings of this study indicate that symptomatic HF patients suffer from poor QoL and that interventions are needed to improve QoL and decrease symptom severity. Nurses who care for HF patients play an essential role in symptom evaluation and management and could significantly improve overall QoL in these patients by carefully evaluating symptomatology and testing interventions and

  15. Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes (SADS) Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... all proceeds benefiting the SADS Foundation (Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndrome). Each year 4,000 young Americans die ... Investigator Awardees 5/19/2016 The Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndromes (SADS) Foundation announces the winners for the ...

  16. Arrhythmia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arrhythmia URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arrhythmia.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  17. Arrhythmia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arrhythmia URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/arrhythmia.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  18. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: boutique science or valuable arrhythmia model?

    PubMed

    Knollmann, Björn C

    2013-03-15

    This article reviews the strengths and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) as models of cardiac arrhythmias. Specifically, the article attempts to answer the following questions: Which clinical arrhythmias can be modeled by iPSC-CM? How well can iPSC-CM model adult ventricular myocytes? What are the strengths and limitations of published iPSC-CM arrhythmia models? What new mechanistic insight has been gained? What is the evidence that would support using iPSC-CM to personalize antiarrhythmic drug therapy? The review also discusses the pros and cons of using the iPSC-CM technology for modeling specific genetic arrhythmia disorders, such as long QT syndrome, Brugada Syndrome, or Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia. PMID:23569106

  19. REM sleep-related brady-arrhythmia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Wim; Willems, Rik; Pevernagie, Dirk; Buyse, Bertien

    2007-09-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep-related brady-arrhythmia syndrome is a cardiac rhythm disorder characterised by asystoles lasting several seconds during REM sleep in otherwise healthy individuals. In contrast to arrhythmias associated with obstructive sleep apnea, REM sleep-related sinus arrests and atrioventricular (AV) blocks are not associated with episodes of apnea or hypopnea. In literature, only few cases have been published, suggesting that the prevalence of this nighttime rhythm disorder is very rare. In this paper, we report two new cases of REM sleep-related sinus arrests and one case of REM sleep-related total AV block. To explore the underlying mechanism, an analysis of heart rate variability was performed. In a matched control population, we observed a significant lower low-to-high frequency (LF/HF) ratio in slow wave sleep as compared to REM sleep (2.04 +/- 1.2 vs 4.55 +/- 1.82, respectively [Mann-Whitney U test p < 0.01]), demonstrating a global increase in sympathetic activity during REM. When using the same technique in two of three patients with REM-related arrhythmias, the shift to an increased LF/HF ratio from slow wave sleep to REM sleep tended to be lower. This may reflect an increased vagal activity (HF component) during REM sleep in these subjects. We, therefore, hypothesise that, in our patients with REM sleep-related arrhythmias, the overall dominance of sympathetic activity during REM is present but to a lesser extent and temporarily switches into vagal dominance when the bursts of REMs occur. As it was still unclear whether these REM sleep-related asystoles needed to be paced, we compared our treatment and these of previously reported cases with the current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for implantation of cardiac pacemakers. PMID:17375344

  20. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Prystowsky, E N; Fananapazir, L; Packer, D L; Thompson, K A; German, L D

    1987-01-01

    Every year, individuals with no history of heart disease succumb to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Pathologic examination of the hearts usually reveals various forms of heart disease as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or coronary artery disease. In other cases, however, there is no obvious structural heart disease, and it is possible that some of these individuals died because of a cardiac arrhythmia involving an accessory pathway. If this were the case, the most likely scenario would be onset of atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT), degeneration of the AVRT into atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response over the accessory pathway, and subsequent death caused by the development of ventricular fibrillation. Although these events have been documented, albeit rarely, during intracardiac electrophysiologic studies, in reality very little is known about the natural history of asymptomatic and untreated patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. In fact, SCD in a previously asymptomatic patient with WPW syndrome is probably relatively rare. Whether asymptomatic WPW patients should undergo electrophysiologic or pharmacologic testing to determine their 'potential' to develop serious cardiac arrhythmias is controversial. The present paucity of data concerning the natural history of WPW syndrome in asymptomatic patients militates against successful identification of those patients who are at risk for sudden death. Long-term prospective studies are necessary to clarify which asymptomatic patients with WPW syndrome require treatment. PMID:3621280

  1. Cardiac involvement in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Papavasiliou, Antigoni; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) are X-linked muscular diseases responsible for over 80% of all muscular dystrophies. Cardiac disease is a common manifestation, not necessarily related to the degree of skeletal myopathy; it may be the predominant manifestation with or without any other evidence of muscular disease. Death is usually due to ventricular dysfunction, heart block or malignant arrhythmias. Not only DMD/BMD patients, but also female carriers may present cardiac involvement. Clinically overt heart failure in dystrophinopathies may be delayed or absent, due to relative physical inactivity. The commonest electrocardiographic findings include conduction defects, arrhythmias (supraventricular or ventricular), hypertrophy and evidence of myocardial necrosis. Echocardiography can assess a marked variability of left ventricular dysfunction, independently of age of onset or mutation groups. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has documented a pattern of epicardial fibrosis in both dystrophinopathies’ patients and carriers that can be observed even if overt muscular disease is absent. Recently, new CMR techniques, such as postcontrast myocardial T1 mapping, have been used in Duchenne muscular dystrophy to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis. A combined approach using clinical assessment and CMR evaluation may motivate early cardioprotective treatment in both patients and asymptomatic carriers and delay the development of serious cardiac complications. PMID:26225202

  2. Atrial Arrhythmias in Astronauts - Summary of a NASA Summit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael R.; Watkins, Sharmila D.; Polk, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Problem Definition: To evaluate NASA s current standards and practices related to atrial arrhythmias in astronauts, Space Medicine s Advanced Projects Section at the Johnson Space Center was tasked with organizing a summit to discuss the approach to atrial arrhythmias in the astronaut cohort. Since 1959, 11 cases of atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, or supraventricular tachycardia have been recorded among active corps crewmembers. Most of the cases were paroxysmal, although a few were sustained. While most of the affected crewmembers were asymptomatic, those slated for long-duration space flight underwent radiofrequency ablation treatment to prevent further episodes of the arrhythmia. The summit was convened to solicit expert opinion on screening, diagnosis, and treatment options, to identify gaps in knowledge, and to propose relevant research initiatives. Summit Meeting Objectives: The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together a panel of six cardiologists, including nationally and internationally renowned leaders in cardiac electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space flight cardiovascular physiology. The primary objectives of the summit discussions were to evaluate cases of atrial arrhythmia in the astronaut population, to understand the factors that may predispose an individual to this condition, to understand NASA s current capabilities for screening, diagnosis, and treatment, to discuss the risks associated with treatment of crewmembers assigned to long-duration missions or extravehicular activities, and to discuss recommendations for prevention or management of future cases. Summary of Recommendations: The summit panel s recommendations were grouped into seven categories: Epidemiology, Screening, Standards and Selection, Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation Manifesting Preflight, Atrial Fibrillation during Flight, Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation, and Future Research

  3. Inhibition of Rac1 reduces store overload-induced calcium release and protects against ventricular arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Lu, Xiangru; Gui, Le; Wu, Yan; Sims, Stephen M; Wang, Guoping; Feng, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Rac1 is a small GTPase and plays key roles in multiple cellular processes including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether Rac1 activation during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) contributes to arrhythmogenesis is not fully understood. We aimed to study the effects of Rac1 inhibition on store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) and ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Adult Rac1(f/f) and cardiac-specific Rac1 knockdown (Rac1(ckd) ) mice were subjected to myocardial I/R and their electrocardiograms (ECGs) were monitored for ventricular arrhythmia. Myocardial Rac1 activity was increased and ventricular arrhythmia was induced during I/R in Rac1(f/f) mice. Remarkably, I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia was significantly decreased in Rac1(ckd) compared to Rac1(f/f) mice. Furthermore, treatment with Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 decreased I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Ca(2+) imaging analysis showed that in response to a 6 mM external Ca(2+) concentration challenge, SOICR was induced with characteristic spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) waves in Rac1(f/f) cardiomyocytes. Notably, SOICR was diminished by pharmacological and genetic inhibition of Rac1 in adult cardiomyocytes. Moreover, I/R-induced ROS production and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) oxidation were significantly inhibited in the myocardium of Rac1(ckd) mice. We conclude that Rac1 activation induces ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Inhibition of Rac1 suppresses SOICR and protects against ventricular arrhythmia. Blockade of Rac1 activation may represent a new paradigm for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia in ischaemic heart disease. PMID:27222313

  4. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  5. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J.; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C.; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  6. Method and apparatus for the guided ablative therapy of fast ventricular arrhythmia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Barley, Maya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and apparatus for guiding ablative therapy of abnormal biological electrical excitation. The excitation from the previous excitatory wave is significant at the beginning of the next excitation. In particular, it is designed for treatment of fast cardiac arrhythmias. Electrical signals are acquired from recording electrodes, and an inverse dipole method is used to identify the site of origin of an arrhythmia. The location of the tip of an ablation catheter is similarly localized from signals acquired from the recording electrodes while electrical pacing energy is delivered to the tip of the catheter close to or in contact with the cardiac tissue. The catheter tip is then guided to the site of origin of the arrhythmia, and ablative radio frequency energy is delivered to its tip to ablate the site.

  7. A Novel Alpha Cardiac Actin (ACTC1) Mutation Mapping to a Domain in Close Contact with Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to a Variety of Congenital Heart Defects, Arrhythmia and Possibly Midline Defects

    PubMed Central

    Augière, Céline; Mégy, Simon; El Malti, Rajae; Boland, Anne; El Zein, Loubna; Verrier, Bernard; Mégarbané, André; Deleuze, Jean-François; Bouvagnet, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background A Lebanese Maronite family presented with 13 relatives affected by various congenital heart defects (mainly atrial septal defects), conduction tissue anomalies and midline defects. No mutations were found in GATA4 and NKX2-5. Methods and Results A set of 399 poly(AC) markers was used to perform a linkage analysis which peaked at a 2.98 lod score on the long arm of chromosome 15. The haplotype analysis delineated a 7.7 meganucleotides genomic interval which included the alpha-cardiac actin gene (ACTC1) among 36 other protein coding genes. A heterozygous missense mutation was found (c.251T>C, p.(Met84Thr)) in the ACTC1 gene which changed a methionine residue conserved up to yeast. This mutation was absent from 1000 genomes and exome variant server database but segregated perfectly in this family with the affection status. This mutation and 2 other ACTC1 mutations (p.(Glu101Lys) and p.(Met125Val)) which result also in congenital heart defects are located in a region in close apposition to a myosin heavy chain head region by contrast to 3 other alpha-cardiac actin mutations (p.(Ala297Ser),p.(Asp313His) and p.(Arg314His)) which result in diverse cardiomyopathies and are located in a totally different interaction surface. Conclusions Alpha-cardiac actin mutations lead to congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathies and eventually midline defects. The consequence of an ACTC1 mutation may in part be dependent on the interaction surface between actin and myosin. PMID:26061005

  8. Cardiac Conduction System Anomalies and Sudden Cardiac Death: Insights from Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Aránega, Amelia; De La Rosa, Angel J.; Franco, Diego

    2012-01-01

    The cardiac conduction system (CCS) is composed of a group of myocardial tissues that control and coordinate the heart. Alterations in the CCS – especially in the His–Purkinje system, have been identified as a major cause of lethal arrhythmias. Unstable arrhythmias secondary to channelopathies significantly increase the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD). SCD is a major contributor to mortality in industrialized countries, and most cases of SCD in the young are related to inherited ion channel diseases. In this paper, we review a series of studies with murine transgenic models that revealed that some arrhythmias are associated with the CCS and may lead to SCD PMID:22783196

  9. Cardiac electrophysiology in mice: a matter of size

    PubMed Central

    Kaese, Sven; Verheule, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, mouse models have become a popular instrument for studying cardiac arrhythmias. This review assesses in which respects a mouse heart is a miniature human heart, a suitable model for studying mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in humans and in which respects human and murine hearts differ. Section I considers the issue of scaling of mammalian cardiac (electro) physiology to body mass. Then, we summarize differences between mice and humans in cardiac activation (section II) and the currents underlying the action potential in the murine working myocardium (section III). Changes in cardiac electrophysiology in mouse models of heart disease are briefly outlined in section IV, while section V discusses technical considerations pertaining to recording cardiac electrical activity in mice. Finally, section VI offers general considerations on the influence of cardiac size on the mechanisms of tachy-arrhythmias. PMID:22973235

  10. Behavioral Inhibition, Heart Period, and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia: An Attachment Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson-Hinde, Joan; Marshall, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Examined interrelations among behavioral inhibition (BI), cardiac activity, and attachment status in 4.5-year olds. Found that only Secure children showed predicted relationship between low BI and high heart period (HP) or respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Increases in HP from assessment during separation from mother to assessment three minutes after…

  11. Relationship of ventricular arrhythmias to the angiographically and scintigraphically estimated extent of ventricular damage late after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Huikuri, H.V.; Korhonen, U.R.; Linnaluoto, M.K.; Takkunen, J.T.

    1987-03-01

    In order to study the quantitative relationship of ventricular arrhythmias to myocardial damage and ischemia, 61 patients with a previous myocardial infarction (at least 6 months previously) were studied by 24-hour ambulatory ECG monitoring, cardiac catheterization, and thallium-201 scintigraphy. Thirty-five patients (57%) had no ectopic beats or only infrequent, unifocal ones and 26 patients (43%) had complex ventricular arrhythmias. Left ventricular function was lower in the latter, but the number of diseased vessels did not differ in the two groups. The reduction of thallium activity in the infarct area was more marked in patients with complex arrhythmias. Multiple thallium defects were not more common in arrhythmia patients, however. These data support the view that complex ventricular arrhythmias are more closely related to the severity of ventricular damage than the presence of myocardial ischemia remote to the area of previous infarction.

  12. [Cardiac potassium channels: molecular structure, physiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Mironov, N Iu; Golitsyn, S P

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels and currents play essential roles in cardiac repolarization. Potassium channel blockade by class III antiarrhythmic drugs prolongs cardiac repolarization and results in termination and prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. Excessive inhomogeneous repolarization prolongation may lead to electrical instability and proarrhythmia (Torsade de Pointes tachycardia). This review focuses on molecular structure, physiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic potential of potassium channels of cardiac conduction system and myocardium providing information on recent findings in pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias, including inherited genetic abnormalities, and future perspectives. PMID:24654438

  13. Proposition of novel classification approach and features for improved real-time arrhythmia monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Jae; Heo, Jeong; Park, Kwang Suk; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmia refers to a group of conditions in which the heartbeat is irregular, fast, or slow due to abnormal electrical activity in the heart. Some types of arrhythmia such as ventricular fibrillation may result in cardiac arrest or death. Thus, arrhythmia detection becomes an important issue, and various studies have been conducted. Additionally, an arrhythmia detection algorithm for portable devices such as mobile phones has recently been developed because of increasing interest in e-health care. This paper proposes a novel classification approach and features, which are validated for improved real-time arrhythmia monitoring. The classification approach that was employed for arrhythmia detection is based on the concept of ensemble learning and the Taguchi method and has the advantage of being accurate and computationally efficient. The electrocardiography (ECG) data for arrhythmia detection was obtained from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database (n=48). A novel feature, namely the heart rate variability calculated from 5s segments of ECG, which was not considered previously, was used. The novel classification approach and feature demonstrated arrhythmia detection accuracy of 89.13%. When the same data was classified using the conventional support vector machine (SVM), the obtained accuracy was 91.69%, 88.14%, and 88.74% for Gaussian, linear, and polynomial kernels, respectively. In terms of computation time, the proposed classifier was 5821.7 times faster than conventional SVM. In conclusion, the proposed classifier and feature showed performance comparable to those of previous studies, while the computational complexity and update interval were highly reduced. PMID:27318329

  14. Sudden cardiac death secondary to antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sicouri, Serge; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A number of antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs are known to increase the risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Based largely on a concern over QT prolongation and the development of life-threatening arrhythmias, a number of antipsychotic drugs have been temporarily or permanently withdrawn from the market or their use restricted. Some antidepressants and antipsychotics have been linked to QT prolongation and the development of Torsade de pointes arrhythmias, whereas others have been associated with a Brugada syndrome phenotype and the development of polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias. This review examines the mechanisms and predisposing factors underlying the development of cardiac arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death, associated with antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs in clinical use. PMID:18324881

  15. Cardiac Vagal Regulation and Early Peer Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Keane, Susan P.; Calkins, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 341 5 1/2-year-old children participating in an ongoing longitudinal study was the focus of a study on the relation between cardiac vagal regulation and peer status. To assess cardiac vagal regulation, resting measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA change (suppression) to 3 cognitively and emotionally challenging tasks…

  16. Diagnosis of traumatic cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, K.; Soliman, M.H.; Braunstein, P.; Formosa, P.; Cohen, A.J.; Matsuura, P.; Mason, G.R.

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma remains a diagnostic problem because of a lack of sensitive diagnostic tests. This study evaluated thallous chloride Tl 201 single-photon-emission computed tomography in a series of 48 patients following blunt chest trauma. Of the 48 patients, 23 had normal scans. None of these patients proved to have serious arrhythmias during three days of continuous monitoring. Of 25 patients with abnormal or ambiguous studies, five (20%) developed serious arrhythmias requiring therapy. Single-photon-emission computed tomography scanning thus was sensitive in indicating that group of patients at risk of serious arrhythmias, and may therefore prove to be a useful screening test to determine the need for hospitalization and arrhythmia monitoring following blunt chest trauma.

  17. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  18. Effect of fish oil on arrhythmias and mortality: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    León, Hernando; Shibata, Marcelo C; Sivakumaran, Soori; Dorgan, Marlene; Chatterley, Trish

    2008-01-01

    Objective To synthesise the literature on the effects of fish oil—docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)—on mortality and arrhythmias and to explore dose response and formulation effects. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, PubMed, CINAHL, IPA, Web of Science, Scopus, Pascal, Allied and Complementary Medicine, Academic OneFile, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Evidence-Based Complementary Medicine, and LILACS. Studies reviewed Randomised controlled trials of fish oil as dietary supplements in humans. Data extraction The primary outcomes of interest were the arrhythmic end points of appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator intervention and sudden cardiac death. The secondary outcomes were all cause mortality and death from cardiac causes. Subgroup analyses included the effect of formulations of EPA and DHA on death from cardiac causes and effects of fish oil in patients with coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction. Data synthesis 12 studies totalling 32 779 patients met the inclusion criteria. A neutral effect was reported in three studies (n=1148) for appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator intervention (odds ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.55 to 1.46) and in six studies (n=31 111) for sudden cardiac death (0.81, 0.52 to 1.25). 11 studies (n=32 439 and n=32 519) provided data on the effects of fish oil on all cause mortality (0.92, 0.82 to 1.03) and a reduction in deaths from cardiac causes (0.80, 0.69 to 0.92). The dose-response relation for DHA and EPA on reduction in deaths from cardiac causes was not significant. Conclusions Fish oil supplementation was associated with a significant reduction in deaths from cardiac causes but had no effect on arrhythmias or all cause mortality. Evidence to recommend an optimal formulation of EPA or DHA to reduce these outcomes is insufficient. Fish oils are a heterogeneous product, and the optimal formulations

  19. Arrhythmias presenting in neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Brucato, A; Previtali, E; Ramoni, V; Ghidoni, S

    2010-09-01

    Perfusion of human foetal heart with anti-Ro/SSA antibodies induces transient heart block. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may cross-react with T- and L-type calcium channels, and anti-p200 antibodies may cause calcium to accumulate in rat heart cells. These actions may explain a direct electrophysiological effect of these antibodies. Congenital complete heart block is the more severe manifestation of so-called "Neonatal Lupus". In clinical practice, it is important to distinguish in utero complete versus incomplete atrioventricular (AV) block, as complete AV block to date is irreversible, while incomplete AV block has been shown to be potentially reversible after fluorinated steroid therapy. Another issue is the definition of congenital AV block, as cardiologists have considered congenital blocks detected months or years after birth. We propose as congenital blocks detected in utero or within the neonatal period (0-27 days after birth). The possible detection of first degree AV block in utero, with different techniques, might be a promising tool to assess the effects of these antibodies. Other arrhythmias have been described in NL or have been linked to anti-Ro/SSA antibodies: first degree AV block, in utero and after birth, second degree (i.e. incomplete block), sinus bradycardia and QT prolongation, both in infants and in adults, ventricular arrhythmias (in adults). Overall, these arrhythmias have not a clinical relevance, but are important for research purposes. PMID:20696016

  20. Electrical injury causing ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, P J; Thomsen, P E; Bagger, J P; Nørgaard, A; Baandrup, U

    1987-01-01

    Dangerous or long lasting ventricular arrhythmias developed in three patients who had sustained an electrical injury in which current passed through the thorax. In all three cases there was a delay of 8-12 hours between the injury and the onset of symptoms. The ventricular arrhythmias were severe and long lasting. In two of the three patients, ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation or both occurred and in one patient ventricular parasystole developed. No enzymatic evidence of myocardial necrosis was found but the results of an endomyocardial biopsy carried out in two of the three patients showed focal myocardial fibrosis and increased numbers of Na, K-pumps. The two patients with ventricular tachycardia became symptom free after appropriate antiarrhythmic treatment and in the third patient ventricular parasystole disappeared spontaneously within two years. Patients sustaining electrical injury in which current passes through the thorax should be monitored electrocardiographically for at least 24 hours, and patients with unexpected arrhythmias should be questioned about previous electrical injury. Images Fig 2 PMID:3566986

  1. Arrhythmia Management in the Elderly-Implanted Cardioverter Defibrillators and Prevention of Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Manian, Usha; Gula, Lorne J

    2016-09-01

    We present an overview of arrhythmia management in elderly patients as it pertains to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy and prevention of sudden death. Treatment of arrhythmia in elderly patients is fraught with challenges pertaining to goals of care and patient frailty. With an ever increasing amount of technology available, realistic expectations of therapy need to balance quality and quantity of life. The ICD is an important treatment option for selected patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. However, the incidence of sudden death as a percentage of all-cause mortality decreases with age. Studies have reported that 20% of elderly patients might die within 1 year of an episode of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, but most because of nonarrhythmic causes. This illustrates the 'sudden cardiac death paradox,' with a great proportion of death in elderly patients, even those at risk for ventricular arrhythmias, attributable to medical conditions that cannot be addressed by an ICD. We discuss current practices in ICD therapy in elderly patients, existing evidence from registries and clinical trials, approaches to risk stratification, and important ethical considerations. Although the decision on whether ICD insertion is appropriate in the elderly population remains an area of uncertainty from an evidence-based and ethical perspective, we offer insight on potential clinical and research strategies for this growing population. PMID:27568872

  2. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  3. Pattern of arrhythmias among Nigerians with congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Olufemi E; Abiodun, Olugbenga O; Akintomide, Anthony O; Adebayo, Rasaaq A; Ogunyemi, Suraj A; Balogun, Michael O; Bamikole, Olaniyi J; Ajibare, Adeola O; Ajayi, Adesuyi A

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with heart failure, death is often sudden due to life-threatening arrhythmias. This work was carried out to evaluate the pattern of arrhythmias in Nigerians with heart failure. Materials and methods Thirty subjects with congestive heart failure (CHF), 30 subjects with hypertensive heart disease, and 15 normal subjects with no obvious features of heart disease were evaluated with resting and 24-hour electrocardiographic monitoring and transthoracic echocardiography. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance with post hoc Duncan’s analysis, Fisher’s exact test, and linear regression analysis using SPSS version 16. Results CHF subjects had more instances of supraventricular tachycardia (P=0.005), ventricular extrasystoles (P<0.001), bigeminy (P<0.001), trigeminy (P<0.001), couplets (P<0.001), triplets (P<0.001), and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) (P=0.003) than the other two control groups. They also showed a significantly longer VT duration (4.6±5.6 seconds) compared with the other groups (P<0.001). Linear regression analysis showed a significant direct relationship between VT and the maximum number of ventricular extrasystoles per hour (P=0.001). Conclusion Cardiac arrhythmias are common in subjects with CHF and are more frequent when compared with patients with hypertensive heart disease and normal subjects. PMID:25870514

  4. Detection of Shockable Ventricular Arrhythmia using Variational Mode Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, R K; Sharma, L N; Dandapat, S

    2016-04-01

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) are shockable ventricular cardiac ailments. Detection of VT/VF is one of the important step in both automated external defibrillator (AED) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy. In this paper, we propose a new method for detection and classification of shockable ventricular arrhythmia (VT/VF) and non-shockable ventricular arrhythmia (normal sinus rhythm, ventricular bigeminy, ventricular ectopic beats, and ventricular escape rhythm) episodes from Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. The variational mode decomposition (VMD) is used to decompose the ECG signal into number of modes or sub-signals. The energy, the renyi entropy and the permutation entropy of first three modes are evaluated and these values are used as diagnostic features. The mutual information based feature scoring is employed to select optimal set of diagnostic features. The performance of the diagnostic features is evaluated using random forest (RF) classifier. Experimental results reveal that, the feature subset derived from mutual information based scoring and the RF classifier produces accuracy, sensitivity and specificity values of 97.23 %, 96.54 %, and 97.97 %, respectively. The proposed method is compared with some of the existing techniques for detection of shockable ventricular arrhythmia episodes from ECG. PMID:26798076

  5. Tiaogan Qingxin Granule treatment increases myocardial connexin 43 expression in a rat model of arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Yao, J H; Qu, C H; Ma, L; Chang, X Z

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-induced arrhythmia, especially ventricular arrhythmia, is the main reason for sudden cardiac death. Therefore, ischemic ventricular arrhythmia-targeted treatments are urgently needed. The mechanism of Tiaogan Qingxin Granule in premature ventricular beat (PVB) treatment was explored in arrhythmic rats pretreated with Tiaogan Qingxin Granule. Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 40) were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham-operated, arrhythmia model, Wenxin Granule, and Tiaogan Qingxin Granule. The ischemic arrhythmia model was established by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. The Tiaogan Qingxin Granule group was treated intragastrically for 7 days before surgery. Sham-operated rats underwent thoracotomy without coronary artery ligation. Myocardial infarction rate was measured using the triphenyltetrazolium chloride method and Cx43 expression was quantified by western blotting. Compared to the arrhythmia model group, the Tiaogan Qingxin Granule group showed a significant reduction in the myocardial infarct size and myocardial infarction rate (P < 0.01). Cx43 expression in the left ventricular myocardial tissues was significantly lower in the arrhythmia model group than in the sham-operated group (P < 0.01), but significantly higher in the Tiaogan Qingxin Granule group (P < 0.01). Intergroup difference in the relative Cx43 expression between the Tiaogan Qingxin Granule and Wenxin Granule groups was not significant (P > 0.05). Thus, Tiaogan Qingxin Granule reduced the myocardial infarct size, lowered the myocardial infarction rate, and increased Cx43 expression, possibly by increasing blood supply to the cardiac muscles. In conclusion, Tiaogan Qingxin Granule may be useful for treating ischemic PVB. PMID:27323125

  6. Facts about Sudden Cardiac Death in the Young

    MedlinePlus

    ... sports. Any young person who has experienced unexplained fainting should be tested. It is extremely important that ... arrhythmias (like LQTS) are frequently misdiagnosed as vasovagal syncope, asthma or epilepsy without any cardiac evaluation. Thus, ...

  7. [A case of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias probably due to psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Kondou, N; Hiasa, Y; Kishi, K; Fujinaga, H; Ohishi, Y; Ohtani, R; Wada, T; Aihara, T

    1993-11-01

    We present a case provoked life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias probably due to psychotropic drugs. The patient was a 55-year-old man who had previously twice operations of aortic valve replacement (AVR). The signs of cardiac failure were recurrently appeared from the end of 1991, and he had received promethazine and sulpiride for his depressive state. From cardiac catheterization, we planned his third AVR. The electrocardiographic (ECG) QTc interval was prolonged to 0.48 seconds on this admission. In March 1992 syncopal attack appeared suddenly, and his monitor ECG revealed frequent polymorphous ventricular tachycardia (VT) and Torsade de Pointes (Tdp). These arrhythmias stopped by emergent cardiac pacing. After discontinuing these psychotropic drugs, no ventricular arrhythmias appeared. Since the patient complained severe insomnia one month before operation, the diminished dose of psychotropic drugs (promethazine and levomepromazine) was readministered. Ten days after the operation, syncopal attack reappeared and his ECG recorded frequent VT and Tdp. During both syncopal attacks his serum potassium and magnesium were within normal limits. Two days later, he died from multi-organ failure. We concluded that life-threatening arrhythmias such as VT and Tdp might develop under the administration of mild psychotropic drugs (promethazine or levomepromazine), therefore, must better take a care of ECG changes in cases of using any psychotropic drugs. PMID:8256055

  8. Nitric oxide and the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability. The G.L. Brown Prize Lecture.

    PubMed

    Paterson, D

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic imbalance and arrhythmia; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the cholinergic modulation of cardiac excitability; Nitric oxide-cGMP pathway and the sympathetic modulation of cardiac excitability; Functional significance of nitric oxide in the autonomic regulation of cardiac excitability; Summary; References. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 1-12. PMID:11429613

  9. The Expression of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide After CaCl2-Induced Arrhythmias in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhi-Peng; Zhang, Yuan; Mi, Li; Luo, Xin-Yi; Tian, Mei-Hui; Zhu, Bao-Li

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the patterns of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) expression after arrhythmia, BNP was assessed at different time points (0 minute, 10 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 3 hours, and 6 hours) in CaCl2-induced arrhythmia in rats through various methods such as immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immunohistochemistry results showed that the expression of BNP in the endocardium was higher than that in the epicardium in rats undergoing sustained arrhythmias. The BNP-to-GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) ratios determined by Western blotting analysis revealed no change at 0 minute but increased at 10 minutes and reached the first peak (0.48 [0.03]) at 30 minutes. After a brief decline, the second peak was observed at 6 hours (0.54 [0.03]). Similar patterns of BNP messenger RNA expression were also observed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The plasma BNP concentrations did not change after initial bouts of cardiac arrhythmias but significantly increased 30 minutes after CaCl2 injections. The results demonstrate that arrhythmia causes an elevation of BNP in the myocardium and blood, and BNP messenger RNA increases in initial arrhythmia while its protein in myocardium and plasma does not; however, both of them were elevated after sustained arrhythmia. Such an elevated BNP expression, which is directly related to the severity and duration of the arrhythmias, may suggest the existence of fatal arrhythmia in sudden cardiac death. PMID:27258852

  10. The involvement of TRPC3 channels in sinoatrial arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yue-Kun; Lee, Bon Hyang; Trajanovska, Sofie; Hao, Gouliang; Allen, David G.; Lei, Ming; Cannell, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a significant contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The currently available treatments are limited and AF continues to be a major clinical challenge. Clinical studies have shown that AF is frequently associated with dysfunction in the sino-atrial node (SAN). The association between AF and SAN dysfunction is probably related to the communication between the SAN and the surrounding atrial cells that form the SAN-atrial pacemaker complex and/or pathological processes that affect both the SAN and atrial simultaneously. Recent evidence suggests that Ca2+ entry through TRPC3 (Transient Receptor Potential Canonical-3) channels may underlie several pathophysiological conditions -including cardiac arrhythmias. However, it is still not known if atrial and sinoatrial node cells are also involved. In this article we will first briefly review TRPC3 and IP3R signaling that relate to store/receptor-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE/ROCE) mechanisms and cardiac arrhythmias. We will then present some of our recent research progress in this field. Our experiments results suggest that pacing-induced AF in angiotensin II (Ang II) treated mice are significantly reduced in mice lacking the TRPC3 gene (TRPC3−/− mice) compared to wild type controls. We also show that pacemaker cells express TRPC3 and several other molecular components related to SOCE/ROCE signaling, including STIM1 and IP3R. Activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling that is able to modulate SOCE/ROCE and Ang II induced Ca2+ homeostasis changes in sinoatrial complex being linked to TRPC3. The results provide new evidence that TRPC3 may play a role in sinoatrial and atrial arrhythmias that are caused by GPCRs activation. PMID:25859221

  11. Natural history of cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a 13-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Mammarella, A; Paradiso, M; Antonini, G; Paoletti, V; De Matteis, A; Basili, S; Donnarumma, L; Labbadia, G; Di Franco, M; Musca, A

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is associated with a wide spectrum of cardiac abnormalities, but only a few longitudinal studies have investigated the natural course of heart disease in MD. To assess whether neuromuscular involvement significantly predicts cardiac disorders in MD, 83 patients with various grades of disease severity were enrolled in a 13-year follow-up study (mean, 60.6 +/- 37.8 months) that included periodic physical and instrumental cardiac examinations (standard and Holter electrocardiography, echocardiography). During follow-up, muscular disease worsened clinically in 9 patients (11%) whose baseline severity grade changed accordingly; only 3 of them demonstrated parallel worsening of cardiac disturbance, however, compared with a large number of patients who showed additional cardiac abnormalities. These included further worsening of pre-existing pathologic features (19/83) and the appearance de novo of serious arrhythmias and/or conduction defects (23/83). Pacemaker implantation was necessary in 11 of 83 patients (13.2%) who had symptomatic bradyarrhythmias, bifascicular block, and P-R prolongation with a His-to-ventricle interval exceeding 55 ms, as documented by electrophysiologic study. Eight (9.6%) patients died: 2 from noncardiac and 1 from unknown causes, 1 from heart failure, and 4 from sudden death closely related to documented ventricular tachycardia. The incidence and seriousness of arrhythmic and conduction disturbances correlated with the severity of the muscular involvement. Nevertheless, cardiac and muscular disease did not show a linear progression. Cardiac involvement generally worsened more rapidly than did skeletal muscle disease. PMID:11186144

  12. Noninvasive mapping of ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok J; Lim, Han S; Yamashita, Seigo; Zellerhoff, Stephan; Berte, Benjamin; Mahida, Saagar; Hooks, Darren; Aljefairi, Nora; Derval, Nicolas; Denis, Arnaud; Sacher, Frédéric; Jais, Pierre; Dubois, Rémi; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead electrocardiogram-based three-dimensional imaging modality to refine noninvasive diagnosis and improve the management of heart rhythm disorders. This article reviews the clinical potential of this noninvasive mapping technique in identifying the sources of electrical disorders and guiding the catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats and ventricular tachycardia). The article also briefly refers to the noninvasive electrical imaging of the arrhythmogenic ventricular substrate based on the electrophysiologic characteristics of postinfarction ventricular myocardium. PMID:25784026

  13. Modulation of Cardiac Potassium Current by Neural Tone and Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Tomson, Todd T; Arora, Rishi

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac action potential is generated by intricate flows of ions across myocyte cell membranes in a coordinated fashion to control myocardial contraction and the heart rhythm. Modulation of the flow of these ions in response to a variety of stimuli results in changes to the action potential. Abnormal or altered ion currents can result in cardiac arrhythmias. Abnormalities of autonomic regulation of potassium current play a role in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias, and alterations in acetylcholine-activated potassium channels may play a key role in atrial fibrillation. Ischemia is another important modulator of cardiac cellular electrophysiology. PMID:27261826

  14. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  15. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    ... travels through the heart along a set electrical pathway. Different nerve messages signal your heart to beat ... slowed. Electrical signals travel in new or different pathways through the heart. Some common causes of abnormal ...

  16. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    ... done to look at heart function: Coronary angiography ECG (electrocardiogram) Echocardiogram A special test, called an electrophysiology ... through the middle Heart, front view Atrioventricular block, ECG tracing Normal heart rhythm Bradycardia Ventricular tachycardia Conduction ...

  17. Arrhythmias

    MedlinePlus

    ... a heart function test, like an electrocardiogram (ECG/EKG) . continue What's a Normal Heart Rate? Heart rate ... suspected, the doctor will probably recommend an ECG/EKG to measure the heart's electrical activity. There's nothing ...

  18. Cibenzoline versus flecainide in the prevention of paroxysmal atrial arrhythmias: a double-blind randomized study.

    PubMed

    Babuty, D; D'Hautefeuille, B; Scheck, F; Mycinsky, C; Pruvost, P; Peraudeau, P

    1995-05-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, parallel clinical trial, the authors tested and compared flecainide and cibenzoline, a new antiarrhythmic drug, on atrial arrhythmias. Sixty-eight patients (36 men, 32 women, mean age 62.5 +/- 1.6 years) with documented symptomatic paroxysmal atrial arrhythmias (fibrillation in 56, flutter in 12) were recruited and received either cibenzoline 260 mg/day (n = 33) or flecainide 200 mg/day (n = 35). Patients were assessed with physical examination, resting ECG, 24-hour ambulatory ECG recording, two-dimensional echocardiography, and standard biologic titrations before the inclusion day, and 3 months and 6 months after the randomization day. Sixteen patients were withdrawn (7 were lost to follow-up, 7 had side effects, 2 had another medical event). Seventeen patients had documented recurrence of atrial arrhythmia (9 in the cibenzoline group, 8 in the flecainide group) during the study. The efficacy of cibenzoline and flecainide for preventing recurrence of atrial arrhythmias was not significantly different (62.5% versus 71.4%). Eleven patients complained of one or more side effects (cibenzoline, n = 6; flecainide, n = 5), justifying leaving the trial in 6 cases (cibenzoline, n = 3; flecainide, n = 3). Two ventricular proarrhythmic effects were observed. No atrial proarrhythmic effects were reported. The efficacy of cibenzoline and flecainide for preventing atrial arrhythmia is good and similar during a follow-up period of 6 months. In view of these results, cibenzoline may be administered first to prevent atrial arrhythmia. PMID:7657846

  19. The effect of uraemia on the duration of arrhythmias in the context of cardioprotective ischaemic conditioning strategies

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, Kieran; Byrne, Conor J; Kieswich, Julius; Raftery, Martin; Thiemermann, Christoph; Yaqoob, Muhammad M

    2014-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac death is a leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. Ischaemic conditioning strategies confer profound myocardial protection and, in the absence of uraemia, have been reported to reduce myocardial dysrhythmias. Recent data confirms that ischaemic conditioning can protect the uraemic heart. However, the effect of uraemia on myocardial arrhythmogenesis in the context of ischaemia-reperfusion injury and whether ischaemic conditioning can modulate this is unknown. Objective We investigated the effect of underling chronic uraemia on the duration of arrhythmias in the context of cardioprotective ischaemic conditioning strategies. Methods We examined the effect of chronic uraemia on arrhythmias occurring in the context of myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury and the ability of ischaemic preconditioning (IPC), remote ischaemic preconditioning (RIPC) and ischaemic postconditioning (iPOST) to suppress arrhythmogenesis in uraemic and non-uraemic animals. Results IPC led to a reduction in the frequency and duration of arrhythmias occurring during ischaemia and reperfusion. Neither RIPC nor iPOST affected the duration or frequency of ischaemic or reperfusion arrhythmias. Underlying uraemia did not alter the frequency or duration of ischaemic arrhythmias in any of the experiments however it was associated with a reduction in reperfusion arrhythmia duration in the IPC and iPOST experiments. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that underlying chronic uraemia does not reduce the threshold for arrhythmia timing or duration resulting from myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion and underlying uraemia did not alter the effects of these cardioprotective ischaemic conditioning strategies in the context of arrhythmia duration. Summary This novel work in a rodent model of chronic uraemia establishes that underlying uraemia does not increase the susceptibility to myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion induced arrhythmias

  20. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Scheller, RoseAnn L; Johnson, Laurie; Lorts, Angela; Ryan, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the pediatric population is a rare and potentially devastating occurrence. An understanding of the differential diagnosis for the etiology of the cardiac arrest allows for the most effective emergency care and provides the patient with the best possible outcome. Pediatric SCA can occur with or without prodromal symptoms and may occur during exercise or rest. The most common cause is arrhythmia secondary to an underlying channelopathy, cardiomyopathy, or myocarditis. After stabilization, evaluation should include electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, and echocardiogram. Management should focus on decreasing the potential for recurring arrhythmia, maintaining cardiac preload, and thoughtful medication use to prevent exacerbation of the underlying condition. The purpose of this review was to provide the emergency physician with a concise and current review of the incidence, differential diagnosis, and management of pediatric patients presenting with SCA. PMID:27585126

  1. Incidence of cardiac events in burned patients.

    PubMed

    Meyers, David G; Hoestje, Sara M; Korentager, Richard A

    2003-06-01

    Given the increased level of adrenergic stimulation in burn patients, it would be expected that they would experience an increased incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and other cardiac events. We performed a retrospective chart review of 56 acute burn patients matched by age, length of hospital stay, and sex to 56 trauma patients, all of whom had been continuously monitored electrocardiographically. Burn and trauma patients were similar in injury severity, admission laboratory values, and prior history of cardiopulmonary diseases. Arrhythmias were noted in 34% of burn patients and 28% of trauma patients. One myocardial infarction and six deaths occurred in burn patients. No myocardial infarctions or deaths were observed in trauma patients. A past history of cardiopulmonary disease increased the risk of myocardial infarction or death by 6.6 times. Cardiac arrhythmias and other events are relatively infrequent and benign in burn patients and are similar to those experienced by other patients with acute injuries. PMID:12781616

  2. The developmental basis of adult arrhythmia: atrial fibrillation as a paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Sunil; MacRae, Calum A.

    2013-01-01

    Normal cardiac rhythm is one of the most fundamental physiologic phenomena, emerging early in the establishment of the vertebrate body plan. The developmental pathways underlying the patterning and maintenance of stable cardiac electrophysiology must be extremely robust, but are only now beginning to be unraveled. The step-wise emergence of automaticity, AV delay and sequential conduction are each tightly regulated and perturbations of these patterning events is now known to play an integral role in pediatric and adult cardiac arrhythmias. Electrophysiologic patterning within individual cardiac chambers is subject to exquisite control and is influenced by early physiology superimposed on the underlying gene networks that regulate cardiogenesis. As additional cell populations migrate to the developing heart these too bring further complexity to the organ, as it adapts to the dynamic requirements of a growing organism. A comprehensive understanding of the developmental basis of normal rhythm will inform not only the mechanisms of inherited arrhythmias, but also the differential regional propensities of the adult heart to acquired arrhythmias. In this review we use atrial fibrillation as a generalizable example where the various factors are perhaps best understood. PMID:24062689

  3. Atrial Arrhythmia Summit: Post Summit Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The Atrial Arrhythmia Summit brought together nationally and internationally recognized experts in cardiology, electrophysiology, exercise physiology, and space medicine in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms, risk factors, and management of atrial arrhythmias in the unique occupational cohort of the U.S. astronaut corps.

  4. Cardiac advanced life support-surgical guideline: overview and implementation.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the immediate postoperative recovery period in a patient who underwent cardiac surgery is typically related to reversible causes-tamponade, bleeding, ventricular arrhythmias, or heart blocks associated with conduction problems. When treated promptly, 17% to 79% of patients who experience cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery survive to discharge. The Cardiac Advanced Life Support-Surgical (CALS-S) guideline provides a standardized algorithm approach to resuscitation of patients who experience cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery. The purpose of this article is to discuss the CALS-S guideline and how to implement it. PMID:24752025

  5. Comparative efficacy of stellate ganglion block with bupivacaine vs pulsed radiofrequency in a patient with refractory ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Justin; Vampola, Stephen; Ahadian, Farshad; Narayan, Sanjiv M; Krummen, David E

    2016-06-01

    There is increasing interest in interventional therapies targeting the cardiac sympathetic nervous system to suppress ventricular arrhythmias. In this case report, we describe an 80-year-old patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy and multiple implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks due to refractory ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation who was unable to continue biweekly stellate ganglion block procedures using bupivacaine 0.25% for suppression of his arrhythmias. He had previously failed antiarrhythmic drug therapy with amiodarone, catheter ablation, and attempted surgical autonomic denervation. He underwent pulsed radiofrequency treatment (3 lesions, 2 minutes each, temperature 42°C, 2-Hz frequency, 20-millisecond pulse width) of the left stellate ganglion resulting in persistent arrhythmia suppression for more than 12 months duration. This represents the first report of a pulsed radiofrequency stellate ganglion lesion providing long-term suppression of ventricular arrhythmias. Further study of this technique in patients with refractory ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation is warranted. PMID:27185701

  6. Controversies in Cardiovascular Research: Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes – boutique science or valuable arrhythmia model?

    PubMed Central

    Knollmann, Björn C

    2013-01-01

    As part of the series on Controversies in Cardiovascular Research, the article reviews the strengths and limitations of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) as models of cardiac arrhythmias. Specifically, the article attempts to answer the following questions: Which clinical arrhythmias can be modeled by iPSC-CM? How well can iPSC-CM model adult ventricular myocytes? What are the strengths and limitations of published iPSC-CM arrhythmia models? What new mechanistic insight has been gained? What is the evidence that would support using iPSC-CM to personalize anti-arrhythmic drug therapy? The review also discusses the pros and cons of using the iPSC-CM technology for modeling specific genetic arrhythmia disorders such as long QT syndrome, Brugada Syndrome or Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia. PMID:23569106

  7. Ventricular arrhythmias in dilated cardiomyopathy as an independent prognostic hallmark. Italian Multicenter Cardiomyopathy Study (SPIC) Group.

    PubMed

    De Maria, R; Gavazzi, A; Caroli, A; Ometto, R; Biagini, A; Camerini, F

    1992-06-01

    Prevalence and characteristics of ventricular arrhythmias (VA) on Holter monitoring were evaluated in 218 patients with invasively documented idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy to clarify their relation to pump dysfunction, and their prognostic role. VA were observed in 205 patients (94%) and were high grade (ventricular pairs or tachycardia) in 130 (60%). No simple or multiform ventricular premature complexes were present in 88 patients (group 1; 41%), ventricular pairs in 63 (group 2; 32%), and ventricular tachycardia in 67 (group 3; 27%). Only echocardiographic right ventricular dimensions (p less than 0.05) and prevalence of VA during effort (8% in group 1, 15% in group 2, and 14% in group 3; p = 0.0005) differed significantly between groups. VA severity, and number of ventricular premature beats and tachycardia episodes were not correlated to right/left ventricular dimensions and pump function indexes. During a mean follow-up of 29 +/- 16 months, 27 patients died from cardiac events, and 16 received transplants. Three-year survival probability was lower in groups 2 (0.82) and 3 (0.81) than in group 1 (0.94). By Cox multivariate analysis, VA severity (p less than 0.01) was a major independent predictor of prognosis after markers of ventricular dysfunction such as left ventricular ejection fraction (p less than 0.001) and stroke work index (p less than 0.001). PMID:1590236

  8. Clinical observations of supraventricular arrhythmias in patients with brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing; Guo, Chengjun; Fang, Dongping; Guo, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study various types of supraventricular arrhythmias in patients with Brugada Syndrome. Methods: Forty six patients with ECG of spontaneous type Brugada and with ventricular and/or supraventricular tachyarrhythmia, without structural heart diseases which were excluded by echocardiography, underwent 24 h-Holter recording, electrophysiological study and/or radiofrequency ablation. Results: There were thirty-nine male and seven female (mean age 37.44 years) among total forty-six patients. Twenty one patients had family histories of tachycardia, twentythree patients experienced episodes of syncope, and three patients were resuscitated from cardiac arrest. One patient had ventricular fibrillation and third degree atrioventricular block, eleven patients had polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and five patients had monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. Fourteen patients had atrial tachyarrhythmia, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia was found in five patients including four Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome, two patients hadventricular tachycardia and third degree atrioventricular block, one of them had atrial fibrillation, two patients had both supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia, three patients had both atrial tachyarrhythmia and supraventricular tachycardia, two third degree atrioventricular block patients had atrial flutter, one patienthad both atrial tachyrhythmia and ventricular tachycardia. Radiofrequency blation was performed in thirty-nine patients and succeed in thirty-two, four patients were implanted with pacemakers, and four patients had implantable cardioverter defibrillators. Conclusion: In addition to ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, patients with Brugada syndrome exhibit various supraventricular tachyarrhythmia and third degree atrioventricular block. In patients with Brugada syndrome, the dysfunction of the cardiac ion channel, which related to mutation of cardiac sodium channelgene, is not limited in

  9. Considerations of current methods for drug selection in treating malignant ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Lown, B; Podrid, P J; Graboys, T B; Lampert, S; Blatt, C

    1987-10-16

    The current burgeoning interest in antiarrhythmic drugs derives in large measure from a growing concern with the enormous problem of sudden cardiac death. Until the latter half of the twentieth century, beyond a nodding acknowledgment of its massive prevalence, this syndrome received but scant attention from the medical profession. In the early 1960s a number of insights changed perceptions as well as practice. These related to 4 postulates: (1) sudden cardiac death, in the majority of victims, was due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias either initiated by or culminating rapidly in ventricular fibrillation; (2) the lethal arrhythmia was not the consequence of irreversible pathomorphologic impairment of the contractile apparatus, but rather the expression of an electrophysiologic derangement; (3) the triggering of ventricular fibrillation was the result of an electrical accident both reversible as well as preventable; (4) the potential victim was identifiable either by the presence of certain grades of ventricular ectopic activity or by exposure of repetitive ectopic activity or by exposure of repetitive ventricular arrhythmias by electrophysiologic techniques. The innovations that have led to these insights and their consequences have been numerous and continuous. Among these are direct current defibrillation, cardioversion, coronary care units, bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation, ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring and exercise stress testing for exposing ventricular arrhythmias, electrophysiologic provocative testing and mapping techniques, overdrive programmable pacemakers as well as implantable defibrillators and cardioverters, and surgical, electrical and laser techniques for ablating the nidus or interrupting the pathways of the arrhythmias. PMID:3661427

  10. Torsade de pointes as a reperfusion arrhythmia following intravenous thrombolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    Tekur, Venkatesh

    2013-12-01

    Many types of cardiac arrhythmias have been noted following acute myocardial infarction. Polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias (polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation) related to an acute myocardial infarction generally strike during the hyperacute phase, are clearly related to ischaemia and are not associated with a long QT interval time. Pause-dependent Torsade de pointes has been reported following acute myocardial infarction and this arrhythmia generally occurs 3-11 days after the onset of acute myocardial infarction and none has been reported during the hyperacute phase. Torsade de pointes - a specific ventricular tachycardia with specific characteristics has been described in hypokalemia, hypomagnesaemia, during Quinidine therapy, and while using phenothiazines and tricyclic antidepressants. It is reported following liquid protein diet, brady-arrhythmias [especially III° AV Block], sick-sinus syndromes. Torsade de pointes either pause-dependent or pause-independent occurring directly as a reperfusion arrhythmia during intravenous thrombolytic therapy has not been reported in the literature to the best of the authors knowledge. Here, an episode of Torsade de pointes as a direct consequence of reperfusion following thrombolytic therapy in a patient of acute myocardial infarction is described. PMID:24653589

  11. Resolution of abnormal cardiac MRI T2 signal following immune suppression for cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Crouser, Elliott D; Ruden, Emily; Julian, Mark W; Raman, Subha V

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac MR (CMR) with late gadolinium enhancement is commonly used to detect cardiac damage in the setting of cardiac sarcoidosis. The addition of T2 mapping to CMR was recently shown to enhance cardiac sarcoidosis detection and correlates with increased cardiac arrhythmia risk. This study was conducted to determine if CMR T2 abnormalities and related arrhythmias are reversible following immune suppression therapy. A retrospective study of subjects with cardiac sarcoidosis with abnormal T2 signal on baseline CMR and a follow-up CMR study at least 4 months later was conducted at The Ohio State University from 2011 to 2015. Immune suppression treated participants had a significant reduction in peak myocardial T2 value (70.0±5.5 vs 59.2±6.1 ms, pretreatment vs post-treatment; p=0.017), and 83% of immune suppression treated subjects had objective improvement in cardiac arrhythmias. Two subjects who had received inadequate immune suppression treatment experienced progression of cardiac sarcoidosis. This report indicates that abnormal CMR T2 signal represents an acute inflammatory manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis that is potentially reversible with adequate immune suppression therapy. PMID:27354042

  12. Arrhythmia management after device removal.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Nobuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Arrhythmic management is needed after removal of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Patients completely dependent on CIEDs need temporary device back-up until new CIEDs are implanted. Various methods are available for device back-up, and the appropriate management varies among patients. The duration from CIED removal to implantation of a new CIED also differs among patients. Temporary pacing is needed for patients with bradycardia, a wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD) or catheter ablation is needed for patients with tachyarrhythmia, and sequential pacing is needed for patients dependent on cardiac resynchronization therapy. The present review focuses on arrhythmic management after CIED removal. PMID:27588151

  13. [Verification of therapeutic levels of procainamide and N-acetyl- procainamide in ventricular arrhythmia].

    PubMed

    Sinkiewicz, W; Marzec, A; Jankowski, A; Hoffmann, A; Makuch, K; Romański, B

    Therapeutical efficacy was clinically evaluated in 21 patients with ventricular cardiac arrhythmias. The drug was given orally with preceded intramuscular dose. Therapeutic effect was verified by the measurements of procainamide and N-acetylprocainamide concentrations in blood serum to determine the minimal effective concentration of the drug required to obtain satisfactory antiarrhythmic effect. Procainamide proved effective in cardiac arrhythmias in 14 patients (66.7%) with statistical significance in the acute myocardial infarctions; blood serum procainamide plus N-acetylprocainamide levels being were below the therapeutical range. The poor correlation of the dose of the drug and respective procainamide, N-acetylprocainamide concentrations in blood was observed. Relationship of the therapeutical effects blood serum level of the drug should be estimated basing of the assays of both procainamide and N-acetylprocainamide . PMID:1703654

  14. Effects of Flecainide on Exercise-Induced Ventricular Arrhythmias and Recurrences in Genotype-Negative Patients with Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; van der Werf, Christian; Roses-Noguer, Ferran; Adler, Arnon; Sumitomo, Naokata; Veltmann, Christian; Rosso, Raphael; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Bikker, Hennie; Kannankeril, Prince J.; Horie, Minoru; Minamino, Tohru; Viskin, Sami; Knollmann, Björn C.; Till, Jan; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional therapy with β-blockers is incompletely effective in preventing arrhythmic events in patients with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). We have previously discovered that flecainide in addition to conventional drug therapy prevents ventricular arrhythmias in genotype-positive CPVT patients. Objective To study the efficacy of flecainide in genotype-negative CPVT patients. Methods We studied the efficacy of flecainide for reducing ventricular arrhythmias during exercise testing and preventing arrhythmia events during long-term follow-up. Results Twelve genotype-negative CPVT patients were treated with flecainide. Conventional therapy failed to control ventricular arrhythmias in all patients. Flecainide was initiated because of significant ventricular arrhythmias (n=8), syncope (n=3), or cardiac arrest (n=1). At the baseline exercise test before flecainide, 6 patients had ventricular tachycardia and 5 patients had bigeminal or frequent ventricular premature beats. Flecainide reduced ventricular arrhythmias at the exercise test in 8 patients compared to conventional therapy, similarly to genotype-positive patients in our previous report. Notably, flecainide completely prevented ventricular arrhythmias in 7 of the patients. Flecainide was continued in all patients except for one who had ventricular tachycardia at the exercise test on flecainide. During a follow-up of 48±94 months, arrhythmia events (sudden cardiac death and aborted cardiac arrest) associated with noncompliance occurred in two patients. Flecainide was not discontinued due to side effects in any of the patients. Conclusion Flecainide was effective in genotype-negative CPVT patients, suggesting that spontaneous Ca2+ release from ryanodine channels plays a role in arrhythmia susceptibility, similarly to genotype-positive patients. PMID:23286974

  15. Severe arrhythmia induced by orally disintegrating aripiprazole tablets (Bosiqing(®)): a case report.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qing; Quan, Wei; Jia, Xiaoni; Chen, Jianbo; Ma, Shanbo; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Psychotropic medications have been known to cause cardiac conduction disturbances. Not much is known about the cardiovascular side effects of newer atypical antipsychotics such as aripiprazole. A case of a 13-year-old girl with schizophrenia is presented. An analysis of the presented patient's clinical history indicates the need for a detailed analysis of the severe arrhythmia induced by aripiprazole. This presented case report contains valuable guidelines that can be of assistance in the treatment of patients with aripiprazole. PMID:26677328

  16. Transgenic Insights Linking Pitx2 and Atrial Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Diego; Chinchilla, Ana; Aránega, Amelia E.

    2012-01-01

    Pitx2 is a homeobox transcription factor involved in left–right signaling during embryogenesis. Disruption of left–right signaling in mice within its core nodal/lefty cascade, results in impaired expression of the last effector of the left–right cascade, Pitx2, leading in many cases to absence or bilateral expression of Pitx2 in lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). Loss of Pitx2 expression in LPM results in severe cardiac malformations, including right cardiac isomerism. Pitx2 is firstly expressed asymmetrically in the left but not right LPM, before the cardiac crescent forms, and subsequently, as the heart develops, becomes confined to the left side of the linear heart tube. Expression of Pitx2 is remodeled during cardiac looping, becoming localized to the ventral portion of the developing ventricular chambers, while maintaining a distinct left-sided atrial expression. The importance of Pitx2 during cardiogenesis has been illustrated by the complex and robust cardiac defects observed on systemic deletion of Pitx2 in mice. Lack of Pitx2 expression leads to embryonic lethality at mid-term, and Pitx2-deficient embryos display isomeric hearts with incomplete closure of the body wall. However, whereas the pivotal role of Pitx2 during cardiogenesis is well sustained, its putative role in the fetal and adult heart is largely unexplored. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several genetic variants highly associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). Among them are genetic variants located on chromosome 4q25 adjacent to PITX2. Since then several transgenic approaches have provided evidences of the role of the homeobox transcription factor PITX2 and atrial arrhythmias. Here, we review new insights into the cellular and molecular links between PITX2 and AF. PMID:22701438

  17. Convulsive Syncope Induced by Ventricular Arrhythmia Masquerading as Epileptic Seizures: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sabu, John; Regeti, Kalyani; Mallappallil, Mary; Kassotis, John; Islam, Hamidul; Zafar, Shoaib; Khan, Rafay; Ibrahim, Hiyam; Kanta, Romana; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla; Nai, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    It is important but difficult to distinguish convulsive syncope from epileptic seizure in many patients. We report a case of a man who presented to emergency department after several witnessed seizure-like episodes. He had a previous medical history of systolic heart failure and automated implantable converter defibrillator (AICD) in situ. The differential diagnoses raised were epileptic seizures and convulsive syncope secondary to cardiac arrhythmia. Subsequent AICD interrogation revealed ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (v-tach/fib). Since convulsive syncope and epileptic seizure share many similar clinical features, early diagnosis is critical for choosing the appropriate management and preventing sudden cardiac death in patients with presumed epileptic seizure. PMID:27429683

  18. Convulsive Syncope Induced by Ventricular Arrhythmia Masquerading as Epileptic Seizures: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sabu, John; Regeti, Kalyani; Mallappallil, Mary; Kassotis, John; Islam, Hamidul; Zafar, Shoaib; Khan, Rafay; Ibrahim, Hiyam; Kanta, Romana; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla; Nai, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    It is important but difficult to distinguish convulsive syncope from epileptic seizure in many patients. We report a case of a man who presented to emergency department after several witnessed seizure-like episodes. He had a previous medical history of systolic heart failure and automated implantable converter defibrillator (AICD) in situ. The differential diagnoses raised were epileptic seizures and convulsive syncope secondary to cardiac arrhythmia. Subsequent AICD interrogation revealed ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (v-tach/fib). Since convulsive syncope and epileptic seizure share many similar clinical features, early diagnosis is critical for choosing the appropriate management and preventing sudden cardiac death in patients with presumed epileptic seizure. PMID:27429683

  19. High level of oxygen treatment causes cardiotoxicity with arrhythmias and redox modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C.; Panguluri, Siva K.; Bennett, Eric S.; Kolliputi, Narasaiah; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia exposure in mice leads to cardiac hypertrophy and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel remodeling. Because redox balance of pyridine nucleotides affects Kv function and hyperoxia alters cellular redox potential, we hypothesized that hyperoxia exposure leads to cardiac ion channel disturbances and redox changes resulting in arrhythmias. In the present study, we investigated the electrical changes and redox abnormalities caused by 72 h hyperoxia treatment in mice. Cardiac repolarization changes were assessed by acquiring electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac action potentials (AP). Biochemical assays were employed to identify the pyridine nucleotide changes, Kv1.5 expression and myocardial injury. Hyperoxia treatment caused marked bradycardia, arrhythmia and significantly prolonged (ms) the, RR (186.2 ± 10.7 vs. 146.4 ± 6.2), PR (46.8 ± 3.1 vs. 39.3 ± 1.6), QRS (10.8 ± 0.6 vs. 8.5 ± 0.2), QTc (57.1 ± 3.5 vs. 40 ± 1.4) and JT (13.4 ± 2.1 vs. 7.0 ± 0.5) intervals, when compared with normoxia group. Hyperoxia treatment also induced significant increase in cardiac action potential duration (APD) (ex-APD{sub 90}; 73.8 ± 9.5 vs. 50.9 ± 3.1 ms) and elevated levels of serum markers of myocardial injury; cardiac troponin I (TnI) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Hyperoxia exposure altered cardiac levels of mRNA/protein expression of; Kv1.5, Kvβ subunits and SiRT1, and increased ratios of reduced pyridine nucleotides (NADH/NAD and NADPH/NADP). Inhibition of SiRT1 in H9C2 cells using Splitomicin resulted in decreased SiRT1 and Kv1.5 expression, suggesting that SiRT1 may mediate Kv1.5 downregulation. In conclusion, the cardiotoxic effects of hyperoxia exposure involve ion channel disturbances and redox changes resulting in arrhythmias. - Highlights: • Hyperoxia treatment leads to arrhythmia with prolonged QTc and action potential duration. • Hyperoxia treatment alters cardiac pyridine nucleotide [NAD(P)H/NAD(P)] levels. • SiRT1 and Kv1.5 are co

  20. Management of cardiac emergencies in small animals.

    PubMed

    DeFrancesco, Teresa C

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac emergencies are life-threatening conditions that must be diagnosed quickly to avoid delays in therapy. A timely and accurate diagnosis leads to early relief of symptoms and improved survival. This article provides both a comprehensive review and updated management recommendations for common cardiac emergencies in dogs and cats. Specifically, the article confers updates for the efficient clinical recognition of decompensated cardiac patients, including focused echocardiography, cardiac biomarkers, and electrocardiogram interpretation. This article also reviews the latest recommendations for the treatment of heart failure (including the use of pimobendan) and the management of arrhythmias, pericardial effusion, and aortic thromboembolism. PMID:23747262

  1. Update: Arrhythmias (V). Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias and preexcitation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Castellanos, Eduardo; Ortiz, Mercedes

    2012-05-01

    Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias are fast and usually regular rhythms that require some structure above the bifurcation of the His bundle to be continued. The 3 most common types are atrial tachycardias, atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardias, and tachycardias mediated by an accessory pathway. The last two varieties are discussed in the present manuscript. Their prognosis is benign regarding life expectancy but typically they are symptomatic and chronically recurrent, producing a certain disability. They usually occur in people without structural heart disease. Pharmacologic therapy is possible, but given the high efficacy of catheter ablation, these procedures are frequently chosen. Ventricular preexcitation is due to the presence of an accessory pathway, usually atrioventricular. The clinical course can be asymptomatic, generating a characteristic electrocardiographic pattern, produce paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, or facilitate other types of arrhythmias. Very rarely, they can cause sudden cardiac death. The treatment of choice for symptomatic patients is catheter ablation of the accessory pathway. The therapeutic attitude towards asymptomatic preexcitation remains controversial. PMID:22459483

  2. [Research progress of quantitative analysis for respiratory sinus arrhythmia].

    PubMed

    Sun, Congcong; Zhang, Zhengbo; Wang, Buqing; Liu, Hongyun; Ang, Qing; Wang, Weidong

    2011-12-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is known as fluctuations of heart rate associated with breathing. It has been increasingly used as a noninvasive index of cardiac vagal tone in psychophysiological research recently. Its analysis is often influenced or distorted by respiratory parameters, posture and action, etc. This paper reviews five methods of quantification, including the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), peak valley RSA (pvRSA), cosinor fitting, spectral analysis, and joint timing-frequency analysis (JTFA). Paced breathing, analysis of covariance, residua method and msRSA per liter tidal volume are adjustment strategies of measurement and analysis of RSA in this article as well. At last, some prospects of solutions of the problems of RSA research are given. PMID:22295719

  3. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  4. The association between cardiac and gastrointestinal disorders: causal or casual link?

    PubMed

    Gesualdo, Michele; Scicchitano, Pietro; Carbonara, Santa; Ricci, Gabriella; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Ierardi, Enzo; Di Leo, Alfredo; Cortese, Francesca; Ciccone, Marco M

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide: among them, coronary artery disease and arrhythmias represent the most frequent pathological conditions. Similarly, the gastrointestinal disorders, that is, gastroesophageal reflux and inflammatory bowel diseases, have a high incidence in the general population.Several pieces of evidence have documented a link between cardiac and gastrointestinal disorders as they often share similar risk factors and symptoms. Furthermore, both can simultaneously occur in the same patient, thus creating problems in the correct clinical diagnosis.It is well known that gastrointestinal disorders may present with chest pain and mimic angina pectoris. In contrast, they can also unmask heart disease, such as in the case of the angina-linked ischemia.The aim of this review was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the relationship between cardiac and gastrointestinal diseases to better understand the causal or casual character of such a linkage. PMID:26702598

  5. Cardiac Na Channels: Structure to Function.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, K R; Clancy, C E

    2016-01-01

    Heart rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. Opening of the primary cardiac voltage-gated sodium (NaV1.5) channel initiates cellular depolarization and the propagation of an electrical action potential that promotes coordinated contraction of the heart. The regularity of these contractile waves is critically important since it drives the primary function of the heart: to act as a pump that delivers blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. Perturbations to NaV1.5 may alter the structure, and hence the function, of the ion channel and are associated downstream with a wide variety of cardiac conduction pathologies, such as arrhythmias. PMID:27586288

  6. Intermittent short ECG recording is more effective than 24-hour Holter ECG in detection of arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients report symptoms of palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. These patients are often referred for 24-hour Holter ECG, although the sensitivity for detecting relevant arrhythmias is comparatively low. Intermittent short ECG recording over a longer time period might be a convenient and more sensitive alternative. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of 24-hour Holter ECG with intermittent short ECG recording over four weeks to detect relevant arrhythmias in patients with palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. Methods Design: prospective, observational, cross-sectional study. Setting: Clinical Physiology, University Hospital. Patients: 108 consecutive patients referred for ambiguous palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. Interventions: All individuals underwent a 24-hour Holter ECG and additionally registered 30-second handheld ECG (Zenicor EKG® thumb) recordings at home, twice daily and when having cardiac symptoms, during 28 days. Main outcome measures: Significant arrhythmias: atrial fibrillation (AF), paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), atrioventricular (AV) block II–III, sinus arrest (SA), wide complex tachycardia (WCT). Results 95 patients, 42 men and 53 women with a mean age of 54.1 years, completed registrations. Analysis of Holter registrations showed atrial fibrillation (AF) in two patients and atrioventricular (AV) block II in one patient (= 3.2% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 1.1–8.9]). Intermittent handheld ECG detected nine patients with AF, three with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and one with AV-block-II (= 13.7% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 8.2–22.0]). There was a significant difference between the two methods in favour of intermittent ECG with regard to the ability to detect relevant arrhythmias (P = 0.0094). With Holter ECG, no symptoms were registered during any of the detected arrhythmias. With intermittent ECG, symptoms were registered during half of the arrhythmia

  7. Arrhythmias Seen in Baseline 24-Hour Holter ECG Recordings in Healthy Normal Volunteers During Phase 1 Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Pooja; Karnad, Dilip R; Rohekar, Prashant; Kerkar, Vaibhav; Lokhandwala, Yash Y; Kothari, Snehal

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory agencies encourage sponsors to submit 24-hour ambulatory ECG data for assessing cardiac safety of new drugs, and some arrhythmias, hitherto considered rare, have been observed in some early-phase studies. Interpretation of these observations is difficult given the dearth of published data on the prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias seen during 24-hour continuous ECG monitoring in healthy volunteers (HV) from clinical trials. We analyzed drug-free ambulatory ECG recordings from 1273 HV (1000 males, 273 females; age 18-65 years) from 22 phase 1 studies that were analyzed in a core ECG laboratory; all subjects had normal screening ECGs. Supraventricular arrhythmias such as supraventricular premature complexes were observed in 60.8% of healthy volunteers, supraventricular tachycardia in 2.2%, and atrial fibrillation in 0.1%. Ventricular arrhythmias included premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) in 43.4%, >200 PVCs per 24 hours in 3.3%, multifocal PVCs in 5.3%, nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in 0.7%, and accelerated idioventricular rhythm in 0.3%. Bradyarrhythmias included sinus pause >3 seconds in 0.3%, and second-degree AV block in 2.4%. Complete heart block and torsades de pointes were not seen in any subject. Based on the observed incidence, we estimated the maximum number of healthy subjects in whom these arrhythmias may be seen as a matter of chance in studies with smaller sample sizes if the study drug has no arrhythmogenic effect. Our results and these estimates could help interpret whether cardiac arrhythmias observed in early-phase studies are due to chance or possibly are a drug effect. PMID:26626443

  8. Arrhythmia recognition and classification using combined linear and nonlinear features of ECG signals.

    PubMed

    Elhaj, Fatin A; Salim, Naomie; Harris, Arief R; Swee, Tan Tian; Ahmed, Taqwa

    2016-04-01

    Arrhythmia is a cardiac condition caused by abnormal electrical activity of the heart, and an electrocardiogram (ECG) is the non-invasive method used to detect arrhythmias or heart abnormalities. Due to the presence of noise, the non-stationary nature of the ECG signal (i.e. the changing morphology of the ECG signal with respect to time) and the irregularity of the heartbeat, physicians face difficulties in the diagnosis of arrhythmias. The computer-aided analysis of ECG results assists physicians to detect cardiovascular diseases. The development of many existing arrhythmia systems has depended on the findings from linear experiments on ECG data which achieve high performance on noise-free data. However, nonlinear experiments characterize the ECG signal more effectively sense, extract hidden information in the ECG signal, and achieve good performance under noisy conditions. This paper investigates the representation ability of linear and nonlinear features and proposes a combination of such features in order to improve the classification of ECG data. In this study, five types of beat classes of arrhythmia as recommended by the Association for Advancement of Medical Instrumentation are analyzed: non-ectopic beats (N), supra-ventricular ectopic beats (S), ventricular ectopic beats (V), fusion beats (F) and unclassifiable and paced beats (U). The characterization ability of nonlinear features such as high order statistics and cumulants and nonlinear feature reduction methods such as independent component analysis are combined with linear features, namely, the principal component analysis of discrete wavelet transform coefficients. The features are tested for their ability to differentiate different classes of data using different classifiers, namely, the support vector machine and neural network methods with tenfold cross-validation. Our proposed method is able to classify the N, S, V, F and U arrhythmia classes with high accuracy (98.91%) using a combined support

  9. Historical perspectives of cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Lüderitz, Berndt

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of clinical electrophysiology has a long and fascinating history. From earliest times, no clinical symptom impressed the patient (and the physician) more than an irregular heart beat. Although ancient Chinese pulse theory laid the foundation for the study of arrhythmias and clinical electrophysiology in the 5th century BC, the most significant breakthrough in the identification and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias first occurred in this century. In the last decades, our knowledge of electrophysiology and pharmacology has increased exponentially. The enormous clinical significance of cardiac rhythm disturbances has favored these advances. On the one hand, patients live longer and thus are more likely to experience arrhythmias. On the other hand, circulatory problems of the cardiac vessels have increased enormously, and this has been identified as the primary cause of cardiac rhythm disorders. Coronary heart disease has become not just the most significant disease of all, based on the statistics for cause of death. Arrhythmias are the main complication of ischemic heart disease, and they have been directly linked to the frequently arrhythmogenic sudden death syndrome, which is now presumed to be an avoidable "electrical accident" of the heart. A retrospective look--often charming in its own right--may not only make it easier to sort through the copious details of this field and so become oriented in this universe of important and less important facts: it may also provide the observer with a chronological vantage point from which to view the subject. The study of clinical electrophysiology is no dry compendium of facts and figures, but rather a dynamic field of study evolving out of the competition between various ideas, intentions and theories. PMID:19196616

  10. Noninvasive low-frequency electromagnetic stimulation of the left stellate ganglion reduces myocardial infarction-induced ventricular arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Songyun; Zhou, Xiaoya; Huang, Bing; Wang, Zhuo; Zhou, Liping; Wang, Menglong; Yu, Lilei; Jiang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive magnetic stimulation has been widely used in autonomic disorders in the past few decades, but few studies has been done in cardiac diseases. Recently, studies showed that low-frequency electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) might suppress atrial fibrillation by mediating the cardiac autonomic nervous system. In the present study, the effect of LF-EMF stimulation of left stellate ganglion (LSG) on LSG neural activity and ventricular arrhythmia has been studied in an acute myocardium infarction canine model. It is shown that LF-EMF stimulation leads to a reduction both in the neural activity of LSG and in the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia. The obtained results suggested that inhibition of the LSG neural activity might be the causal of the reduction of ventricular arrhythmia since previous studies have shown that LSG hyperactivity may facilitate the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia. LF-EMF stimulation might be a novel noninvasive substitute for the existing implant device-based electrical stimulation or sympathectomy in the treatment of cardiac disorders. PMID:27470078

  11. VANADIUM EXPOSURE ALTERS SPONTANEOUS BEAT RATE AND GENE EXPRESSION OF CULTURED CARDIAC MYOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recent toxicological studies report PM-induced changes in a number of cardiac parameters, including heart rate variability, arrhythmias, repolarization, and internal defib...

  12. Genetic etiology and evaluation of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Dolmatova, Elena; Mahida, Saagar; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A

    2013-08-01

    A wide range of inherited syndromes can result in ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD). The natural histories of inherited arrhythmia syndromes are highly variable and current risk stratification techniques are limited. Thus, the management of these conditions can be difficult and often involves a combination of risk assessment, lifestyle modification, cardiac interventions, counselling, and family screening. Recent advances in high throughput sequencing have enabled routine testing in patients with a high clinical index of suspicion for an inherited arrhythmia condition, and cascade screening in relatives of mutation carriers. Given the complexity in screening and data interpretation that has been introduced by recent genomic advances, individuals with inherited arrhythmia syndromes are encouraged to seek care at specialized centers with cardiovascular genetics expertise. In this review, we discuss the etiologies of SCD syndromes and discuss strategies for the evaluation of patients at risk for SCD with a focus on the role of genetic testing and family screening. PMID:23812838

  13. Cardiac involvement in hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vinay; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Aronow, Wilbert S; Jain, Diwakar; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hemochromatosis or primary iron-overload cardiomyopathy is an important and potentially preventable cause of heart failure. This is initially characterized by diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias and in later stages by dilated cardiomyopathy. Diagnosis of iron overload is established by elevated transferrin saturation (>55%) and elevated serum ferritin (>300 ng/mL). Genetic testing for mutations in the HFE (high iron) gene and other proteins, such as hemojuvelin, transferrin receptor, and ferroportin, should be performed if secondary causes of iron overload are ruled out. Patients should undergo comprehensive 2D and Doppler echocardiography to evaluate their systolic and diastolic function. Newer modalities like strain imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography hold promise for earlier detection of cardiac involvement. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with measurement of T2* relaxation times can help quantify myocardial iron overload. In addition to its value in diagnosis of cardiac iron overload, response to iron reduction therapy can be assessed by serial imaging. Therapeutic phlebotomy and iron chelation are the cornerstones of therapy. The average survival is less than a year in untreated patients with severe cardiac impairment. However, if treated early and aggressively, the survival rate approaches that of the regular heart failure population. PMID:24503941

  14. Weather and triggering of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer L; Laden, Francine; Link, Mark S; Schwartz, Joel; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Dockery, Douglas W

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor ambient weather has been hypothesized to be responsible for the seasonal distribution of cardiac arrhythmias. Because people spend most of their time indoors, we hypothesized that weather-related arrhythmia risk would be better estimated using an indoor measure or an outdoor measure that correlates well with indoor conditions, such as absolute humidity. The clinical records of 203 patients in eastern Massachusetts, USA, with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator were abstracted for arrhythmias between 1995 and 2002. We used case-crossover methods to examine the association between weather and ventricular arrhythmia (VA). Among 84 patients who experienced 787 VAs, lower estimated indoor temperature (odds ratio (OR)=1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.27 for a 1 °C decrease in the 24-h average) and lower absolute humidity (OR=1.06, 95% CI 1.03-1.08 for a 0.5 g/m(3) decrease in the 96-h average) were associated with increased risk. Lower outdoor temperature increased risk only in warmer months, likely attributable to the poor correlation between outdoor and indoor temperature during cooler months. These results suggest that lower temperature and drier air are associated with increased risk of VA onset among implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients. PMID:24169878

  15. Use of Whole Exome Sequencing for the Identification of Ito-Based Arrhythmia Mechanism and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Amy C; Kline, Crystal F; Glynn, Patric; Johnson, Benjamin L; Curran, Jerry; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert S D; Binkley, Philip F; Janssen, Paul M L; Weiss, Raul; Raman, Subha V; Fowler, Steven J; Priori, Silvia G; Hund, Thomas J; Carnes, Cynthia A; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Background Identified genetic variants are insufficient to explain all cases of inherited arrhythmia. We tested whether the integration of whole exome sequencing with well-established clinical, translational, and basic science platforms could provide rapid and novel insight into human arrhythmia pathophysiology and disease treatment. Methods and Results We report a proband with recurrent ventricular fibrillation, resistant to standard therapeutic interventions. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a variant in a previously unidentified exon of the dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-like protein-6 (DPP6) gene. This variant is the first identified coding mutation in DPP6 and augments cardiac repolarizing current (Ito) causing pathological changes in Ito and action potential morphology. We designed a therapeutic regimen incorporating dalfampridine to target Ito. Dalfampridine, approved for multiple sclerosis, normalized the ECG and reduced arrhythmia burden in the proband by >90-fold. This was combined with cilostazol to accelerate the heart rate to minimize the reverse-rate dependence of augmented Ito. Conclusions We describe a novel arrhythmia mechanism and therapeutic approach to ameliorate the disease. Specifically, we identify the first coding variant of DPP6 in human ventricular fibrillation. These findings illustrate the power of genetic approaches for the elucidation and treatment of disease when carefully integrated with clinical and basic/translational research teams. PMID:26015324

  16. Arrhythmias and Other Electrophysiology Issues in Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy or Radiation.

    PubMed

    Viganego, Federico; Singh, Robin; Fradley, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced understanding of cancer biology has significantly increased treatment options and dramatically improved outcomes for patients with malignancies. Despite these advances, many therapies have cardiovascular toxicities which can affect morbidity and mortality independent of the oncologic prognosis. Arrhythmias and other electrophysiology issues are increasingly identified as common complications of cancer therapy. Atrial fibrillation and other supraventricular arrhythmias are frequently observed in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, often due to their effects on intracellular signaling pathways. Similarly, many oncologic pharmaceuticals can lead to QT prolongation and possible ventricular arrhythmias including torsades do pointes. Management of these arrhythmias can be challenging as typical treatment strategies may not be feasible in cancer patients. Finally, a proportion of individuals with cancer will present with an implantable cardiac device (pacemaker or defibrillator) which poses unique challenges should radiation be necessary in the region of the device. Given the frequency of electrophysiology complications in cancer patients, it is essential for cardio-oncologists to possess knowledge of these issues in order to provide optimal care. PMID:27108362

  17. Weather and triggering of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Laden, Francine; Link, Mark S.; Schwartz, Joel; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Dockery, Douglas W.

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor ambient weather has been hypothesized to be responsible for the seasonal distribution of cardiac arrhythmias. Because people spend most of their time indoors, we hypothesized that weather-related arrhythmia risk would be better estimated using an indoor measure or an outdoor measure that correlates well with indoor conditions, such as absolute humidity. The clinical records of 203 patients in eastern Massachusetts, USA, with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator were abstracted for arrhythmias between 1995 and 2002. We used case-crossover methods to examine the association between weather and ventricular arrhythmia (VA). Among 84 patients who experienced 787 VAs, lower estimated indoor temperature (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–1.27 for a 1 °C decrease in the 24-h average) and lower absolute humidity (OR = 1.06, 95% CI 1.03–1.08 for a 0.5 g/m3 decrease in the 96-h average) were associated with increased risk. Lower outdoor temperature increased risk only in warmer months, likely attributable to the poor correlation between outdoor and indoor temperature during cooler months. These results suggest that lower temperature and drier air are associated with increased risk of VA onset among implantable cardioverter-defibrillator patients. PMID:24169878

  18. Symmetrical compression distance for arrhythmia discrimination in cloud-based big-data services.

    PubMed

    Lillo-Castellano, J M; Mora-Jiménez, I; Santiago-Mozos, R; Chavarría-Asso, F; Cano-González, A; García-Alberola, A; Rojo-Álvarez, J L

    2015-07-01

    The current development of cloud computing is completely changing the paradigm of data knowledge extraction in huge databases. An example of this technology in the cardiac arrhythmia field is the SCOOP platform, a national-level scientific cloud-based big data service for implantable cardioverter defibrillators. In this scenario, we here propose a new methodology for automatic classification of intracardiac electrograms (EGMs) in a cloud computing system, designed for minimal signal preprocessing. A new compression-based similarity measure (CSM) is created for low computational burden, so-called weighted fast compression distance, which provides better performance when compared with other CSMs in the literature. Using simple machine learning techniques, a set of 6848 EGMs extracted from SCOOP platform were classified into seven cardiac arrhythmia classes and one noise class, reaching near to 90% accuracy when previous patient arrhythmia information was available and 63% otherwise, hence overcoming in all cases the classification provided by the majority class. Results show that this methodology can be used as a high-quality service of cloud computing, providing support to physicians for improving the knowledge on patient diagnosis. PMID:25823046

  19. [On evaluating occupational fitness in railway workers with ventricular arrhythmias after coronary arteries stenting].

    PubMed

    Muraseyeva, E V; Gorokhova, S G; Prigorovskaya, T S; Pfaf, V F

    2016-01-01

    The authors studied prospects of work capacity preserving after coronary stenting in IHD and cardiac arrhythmias. Examination covered 158 railway workers underwent complete endovascular revascularization of myocardium for coronary stenosis; all of them had ventricular arrhythmias before coronary surgery. Findings are that in long-term period (in 16 months in average) after coronary stenting, grade I and III ventricular extrasystoles disappeared in 77.8 and 54.5% of cases respectively, but only in 11.9% of grade IV ventricular extrasystoles cases. Ventricular extrasystoles remained unchanged in 44.3% of cases. Reliable relationships were seen between unchanged grade IV ventricular extrasystoles and body weight index (OR = 5.49, 95% CI: 0.87-34.67), general cholesterol level (OR = 1.69; 95% CI: 1.06-2.69), low density lipoproteins (OR = 1.66; 95% CI: 1.00-2.76) and left ventricular ejection function lower 45% (OR = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.14-2.27), exertion ventricular extrasystoles before myocardium revascularization (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.78-5.41). That necessitates correction of the mentioned risk factors of cardiac arrhythmias for restored work capacity. PMID:27396143

  20. Cardiac sarcoidosis - silent destroyer.

    PubMed

    Martusewicz-Boros, Magdalena M; Piotrowska-Kownacka, Dorota; Wiatr, Elżbieta; Roszkowski-Śliż, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of histologically proven pulmonary sarcoidosis and cardiac involvement in a 53-year old woman with progression leading to the heart failure documented in cardiovascular magnetic resonsnce studies. PMID:27537722

  1. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  2. Utility of noninvasive, mobile, continuous outpatient rhythm monitoring to diagnose seizure-related arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Driver, Kevin; Gilliam, Frank; Dizon, Jose; Whang, William; Ehlert, Frederick; Hickey, Kathleen; Garan, Hasan; Biviano, Angelo B

    2009-07-01

    The identification of patients with a diagnosis of seizure disorder who are also at risk for clinically significant bradycardia and/or tachycardia may require long-term cardiac rhythm monitoring. Noninvasive, continuous, outpatient cardiac rhythm monitoring may be useful for such clinical scenarios. The study group consisted of two male patients with a history of seizure disorder involving loss of consciousness. Clinical data and results of electrocardiography, echocardiography, electroencephalography, and continuous, mobile, outpatient cardiac rhythm monitoring are described. In the first patient, while cardiac bradyarrhythmias were secondary to seizures, sinus arrest most likely complicated the episodes by leading to more prolonged states of unconsciousness. In the second patient, permanent pacemaker implantation for AV block averted all clinical events previously attributed to seizures. Despite the different causal relationships between seizures and bradyarrhythmias in these two patients, mobile, cardiac outpatient telemetry was successful in diagnosing the contribution of cardiac dysrhythmia, leading to permanent pacemaker implantation. A diagnostic strategy that incorporates mobile, noninvasive, continuous, outpatient cardiac rhythm monitoring can effectively be utilized to diagnose significant seizure-related arrhythmias. PMID:19572879

  3. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Complex congenital cardiac lesions

    PubMed Central

    Silversides, Candice K; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part III of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with complete transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, Fontan operations and single ventricles, Eisenmenger’s syndrome, and cyanotic heart disease. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352139

  4. Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channels conduct outward potassium currents during the plateau phase of action potentials and play pivotal roles in cardiac repolarization. These include IKs, IKr and the atrial specific IKur channels. In this article, we will review their molecular identities and biophysical properties. Mutations in the genes encoding delayed rectifiers lead to loss- or gain-of-function phenotypes, disrupt normal cardiac repolarization and result in various cardiac rhythm disorders, including congenital Long QT Syndrome, Short QT Syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation. We will also discuss the prospect of using delayed rectifier channels as therapeutic targets to manage cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:27261823

  5. Noninvasive diagnostic mapping of supraventricular arrhythmias (Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome and atrial arrhythmias).

    PubMed

    Cakulev, Ivan; Sahadevan, Jayakumar; Waldo, Albert L

    2015-03-01

    The 12-lead electrocardiogram has limited value in precisely identifying the origin of focal or critical component of reentrant arrhythmias during supraventricular arrhythmias, as well as precisely locating accessory atrioventricular conduction pathways. Because of these limitations, efforts have been made to reconstruct epicardial activation sequences from body surface measurements obtained noninvasively. The last decade has registered significant progress in obtaining clinically useful data from the attempts to noninvasively map the epicardial electrical activity. This article summarizes the recent advances made in this area, specifically addressing the clinical outcomes of such efforts relating to atrial arrhythmias and Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome. PMID:25784024

  6. Evaluation of Known or Suspected Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Blankstein, Ron; Waller, Alfonso H

    2016-03-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown cause, and cardiac sarcoidosis affects at least 25% of patients and accounts for substantial mortality and morbidity from this disease. Cardiac sarcoidosis may present with heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, AV block, atrial or ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Cardiac involvement can be challenging to detect and diagnose because of the focal nature of the disease, as well as the fact that clinical criteria have limited diagnostic accuracy. Nevertheless, the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be enhanced by integrating both clinical and imaging findings. This article reviews the various roles that different imaging modalities provide in the evaluation and management of patients with known or suspected cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:26926267

  7. Ventricular arrhythmias in competitive athletes: risk stratification with T-wave alternans

    PubMed Central

    INAMA, GIUSEPPE; PEDRINAZZI, CLAUDIO; DURIN, ORNELLA; NANETTI, MASSIMILIANO; DONATO, GIORGIO; PIZZI, RITA

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Aim of our study is to evaluate the role of TWA to stratify the risk of sudden cardiac death in athletes (Ath) with complex ventricular arrhythmias (VA), and to document a possible correlation between TWA and electrophysiological testing (EES) results. Methods: We studied 43 Ath with VA (31 M, mean age 34 ± 12 years). In all cases a cardiological evaluation was performed, including TWA and EES. The patients were evaluated during a follow-up of 25 ± 22 months. The end-point was the occurrence of sudden death or malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT). Results: TWA was negative in 28 Ath (65%), positive in 8 (19%) and indeterminate in 7 (16%). All subjects with negative TWA did not show induction of VT at EES, with significant correlation between negative TWA and negative EES (p<0.001). All Ath with positive TWA also had VT induced by a EES, but without significant correlation between positive TWA and positive EES. In 2 Ath with undetermined TWA (29%) VT were induced at EES. Our data did not show significant correlation between indeterminate TWA and positive or negative EES. However, logistic regression analysis showed significant correlation between abnormal TWA test (positive or indeterminate) and inducibility of VT at EES (p<0.001). During follow-up we observed a significant difference in end-point occurrence between Ath with negative or positive TWA and between Ath with negative or positive EES. Conclusion: TWA confirm its role as a simple and non-invasive test, and it seems useful for prognostic stratification of Ath with VA. PMID:21977276

  8. An m-Health monitoring system for children with suspected arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Kyriacou, E; Pattichis, C; Pattichis, M; Jossif, A; Paraskeva, L; Konstantinides, A; Vogiatzis, D

    2007-01-01

    Advances in wireless communications and networking technologies as well as computer and medical technologies, enable the development of small size, power efficient and more reliable medical multi-parameter recording systems, which can be used for continuous monitoring of patients. Through this paper we present the basic architecture and initial development steps of an m-Health monitoring system that will be used in order to monitor children with suspected cardiac arrhythmias. The proposed system will be based on sensor networks, in order to monitor a subject while being in a predefined area like his/her house; while a module based on PDAs and wearable ECG recorders will be used in order to extent the coverage outside the patient's house. The system will be based on a variable sampling rate to conserve power for the possible arrhythmia episode. The system design has been completed, the hardware specifications have been decided and currently the system is going through the development phase. PMID:18002326

  9. Cardiac Monitoring in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Zègre-Hemsey, Jessica K; Garvey, J Lee; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Patients present to the emergency department (ED) with a wide range of complaints and ED clinicians are responsible for identifying which conditions are life threatening. Cardiac monitoring strategies in the ED include, but are not limited to, 12-lead electrocardiography and bedside cardiac monitoring for arrhythmia and ischemia detection as well as QT-interval monitoring. ED nurses are in a unique position to incorporate cardiac monitoring into the early triage and risk stratification of patients with cardiovascular emergencies to optimize patient management and outcomes. PMID:27484661

  10. [Sudden cardiac death in individuals with normal hearts: an update].

    PubMed

    González-Melchor, Laila; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia

    2014-01-01

    Sudden death (SD) is a tragic event and a world-wide health problem. Every year, near 4-5 million people experience SD. SD is defined as the death occurred in 1h after the onset of symptoms in a person without previous signs of fatality. It can be named "recovered SD" when the case received medical attention, cardiac reanimation effective defibrillation or both, surviving the fatal arrhythmia. Cardiac channelopathies are a group of diseases characterized by abnormal ion channel function due to genetic mutations in ion channel genes, providing increased susceptibility to develop cardiac arrhythmias and SD. Usually the death occurs before 40 years of age and in the autopsy the heart is normal. In this review we discuss the main cardiac channelopathies involved in sudden cardiac death along with current management of cases and family members that have experienced such tragic event. PMID:25128006

  11. Inherited Arrhythmias - Where do we Stand?

    PubMed

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Gersh, Bernard J; Camm, A John

    2014-08-01

    This review discusses inherited arrhythmias and conduction disturbances due to genetic disorders. Known channel mutations that are responsible for these conditions are presented, the indications and value of genetic testing are discussed, and a glossary of terms related to the discipline of genetic cardiology has been compiled. PMID:26835071

  12. Low-Dose Bisphenol A and Estrogen Increase Ventricular Arrhythmias Following Ischemia-Reperfusion in Female Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sujuan; Song, Weizhong; Chen, Yamei; Hong, Kui; Rubinstein, Jack; Wang, Hong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental estrogenic endocrine disruptor that may have adverse health impacts on a range of tissue/systems. In previous studies, we reported that BPA rapidly promoted arrhythmias in female rodent hearts through alteration of myocyte calcium handling. In the present study we investigated the acute effects of BPA on ventricular arrhythmias and infarction following ischemia-reperfusion in rat hearts. Rat hearts were subjected to 20 minutes of global ischemia followed by reperfusion. In female, but not male hearts, acute exposure to 1 nM BPA, either alone or combined with 1 nM 17β-estradiol (E2), during reperfusion resulted in a marked increase in the duration of sustained ventricular arrhythmias. BPA plus E2 increased the duration ventricular fibrillation, and the duration of VF as a fraction of total duration of sustained ventricular arrhythmia. The pro-arrhythmic effects of estrogens were abolished by MPP combined with PHTPP, suggesting the involvements of both ERα and ERβ signaling. In contrast to their pro-arrhythmic effects, BPA and E2 reduced infarction size, agreeing with previously described protective effect of estrogen against cardiac infarction. In conclusion, rapid exposure to low dose BPA, particularly when combined with E2, exacerbates ventricular arrhythmia following IR injury in female rat hearts. PMID:23429042

  13. Hemodynamic effects of encainide in patients with ventricular arrhythmia and poor ventricular function

    SciTech Connect

    Sami, M.H.; Derbekyan, V.A.; Lisbona, R.

    1983-09-01

    Gated cardiac scanning was used to evaluate the hemodynamic effects of encainide in 19 patients (1 woman) with complex ventricular arrhythmia and depressed left ventricular (LV) function (ejection fraction less than 45%). Patients were 36 to 80 years old (average 61). All were candidates for long-term encainide therapy after having failed with currently available antiarrhythmics. Sixty-three percent had congestive heart failure before they received encainide. All were evaluated in the hospital before encainide therapy by a gated cardiac scan performed at least 3 days after discontinuing all antiarrhythmic drugs. Patients received oral encainide in doses of 75 to 200 mg. Gated cardiac scans were repeated 1 to 2 weeks later when an 80% reduction in frequency of premature ventricular complexes was observed on a 24-hour Holter recording. No patient had worsening of congestive heart failure during encainide therapy. Encainide did not significantly affect ejection fraction, which averaged 22 +/- 10% before and 25 +/- 14% (SD) after encainide (difference not significant (NS)). Other hemodynamic variables, including heart rate, blood pressure, stroke volume and end-diastolic volume, remained unchanged during encainide therapy. Digoxin blood levels in 10 patients averaged 1.04 +/- 0.43 before and 1.22 +/- 0.47 mg/ml (NS) during encainide therapy. Thus, encainide given orally in clinically effective doses does not appear to have significant hemodynamic effects in patients with ventricular arrhythmia and depressed LV function.

  14. Genetically engineered SCN5A mutant pig hearts exhibit conduction defects and arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Park, David S.; Cerrone, Marina; Morley, Gregory; Vasquez, Carolina; Fowler, Steven; Liu, Nian; Bernstein, Scott A.; Liu, Fang-Yu; Zhang, Jie; Rogers, Christopher S.; Priori, Silvia G.; Chinitz, Larry A.; Fishman, Glenn I.

    2014-01-01

    SCN5A encodes the α subunit of the major cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5. Mutations in SCN5A are associated with conduction disease and ventricular fibrillation (VF); however, the mechanisms that link loss of sodium channel function to arrhythmic instability remain unresolved. Here, we generated a large-animal model of a human cardiac sodium channelopathy in pigs, which have cardiac structure and function similar to humans, to better define the arrhythmic substrate. We introduced a nonsense mutation originally identified in a child with Brugada syndrome into the orthologous position (E558X) in the pig SCN5A gene. SCN5AE558X/+ pigs exhibited conduction abnormalities in the absence of cardiac structural defects. Sudden cardiac death was not observed in young pigs; however, Langendorff-perfused SCN5AE558X/+ hearts had an increased propensity for pacing-induced or spontaneous VF initiated by short-coupled ventricular premature beats. Optical mapping during VF showed that activity often began as an organized focal source or broad wavefront on the right ventricular (RV) free wall. Together, the results from this study demonstrate that the SCN5AE558X/+ pig model accurately phenocopies many aspects of human cardiac sodium channelopathy, including conduction slowing and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:25500882

  15. Genetically engineered SCN5A mutant pig hearts exhibit conduction defects and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Park, David S; Cerrone, Marina; Morley, Gregory; Vasquez, Carolina; Fowler, Steven; Liu, Nian; Bernstein, Scott A; Liu, Fang-Yu; Zhang, Jie; Rogers, Christopher S; Priori, Silvia G; Chinitz, Larry A; Fishman, Glenn I

    2015-01-01

    SCN5A encodes the α subunit of the major cardiac sodium channel Na(V)1.5. Mutations in SCN5A are associated with conduction disease and ventricular fibrillation (VF); however, the mechanisms that link loss of sodium channel function to arrhythmic instability remain unresolved. Here, we generated a large-animal model of a human cardiac sodium channelopathy in pigs, which have cardiac structure and function similar to humans, to better define the arrhythmic substrate. We introduced a nonsense mutation originally identified in a child with Brugada syndrome into the orthologous position (E558X) in the pig SCN5A gene. SCN5A(E558X/+) pigs exhibited conduction abnormalities in the absence of cardiac structural defects. Sudden cardiac death was not observed in young pigs; however, Langendorff-perfused SCN5A(E558X/+) hearts had an increased propensity for pacing-induced or spontaneous VF initiated by short-coupled ventricular premature beats. Optical mapping during VF showed that activity often began as an organized focal source or broad wavefront on the right ventricular (RV) free wall. Together, the results from this study demonstrate that the SCN5A(E558X/+) pig model accurately phenocopies many aspects of human cardiac sodium channelopathy, including conduction slowing and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:25500882

  16. Strain echocardiography is related to fibrosis and ventricular arrhythmias in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Haland, Trine F.; Almaas, Vibeke M.; Hasselberg, Nina E.; Saberniak, Jørg; Leren, Ida S.; Hopp, Einar; Edvardsen, Thor; Haugaa, Kristina H.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias (VAs). We aimed to explore whether systolic function by strain echocardiography is related to VAs and to the extent of fibrosis by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Methods and results We included 150 HCM patients and 50 healthy individuals. VAs were defined as non-sustained and sustained ventricular tachycardia and aborted cardiac arrest. Left ventricular function was assessed by ejection fraction (EF) and by global longitudinal strain (GLS) assessed by speckle tracking echocardiography. Mechanical dispersion was calculated as standard deviation (SD) of time from Q/R on ECG to peak longitudinal strain in 16 left ventricular segments. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was assessed by CMR. HCM patients had similar EF (61 ± 5% vs. 61 ± 8%, P = 0.77), but worse GLS (−15.7 ± 3.6% vs. −21.1 ± 1.9%, P < 0.001) and more pronounced mechanical dispersion (64 ± 22 vs. 36 ± 13 ms, P < 0.001) compared with healthy individuals. VAs were documented in 37 (25%) HCM patients. Patients with VAs had worse GLS (−14.1 ± 3.6% vs. −16.3 ± 3.4%, P < 0.01), more pronounced mechanical dispersion (79 ± 27 vs. 59 ± 16 ms, P < 0.001), and higher %LGE (6.1 ± 7.8% vs. 0.5 ± 1.4%, P < 0.001) than patients without VAs. Mechanical dispersion correlated with %LGE (R = 0.52, P < 0.001) and was independently associated with VAs (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.3, P = 0.02) and improved risk stratification for VAs. Conclusion GLS, mechanical dispersion, and LGE were markers of VAs in HCM patients. Mechanical dispersion was a strong independent predictor of VAs and related to the extent of fibrosis. Strain echocardiography may improve risk stratification of VAs in HCM. PMID:26873460

  17. Recommendations and cardiological evaluation of athletes with arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Hoogsteen, J.; Bennekers, J.H.; van der Wall, E.E.; van Hemel, N.M.; Wilde, A.A.M.; Crijns, H.J.G.M.; Gorgels, A.P.M.; Smeets, J.L.R.M.; Hauer, R.N.W.; Jordaens, J.L.M.; Schalij, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Confronted with a competitive or recreational athlete, the physician has to discriminate between benign, paraphysiological and pathological arrhythmias. Benign arrhythmias do not represent a risk for SCD, nor do they induce haemodynamic consequences during athletic activities. These arrhythmias are not markers for heart disease. Paraphysiological arrhythmias are related to athletic performance. Long periods of endurance training induce changes in rhythm, conduction and repolarisation. These changes are fully reversible and disappear when the sport is terminated. Pathological arrhythmias have haemodynamic consequences and express disease, such as sick sinus syndrome, cardiomyopathy or inverse consequences of physical training. Arrhythmias can be classified as bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias. Conduction disorders can be seen in fast as well as in slow arrhythmias. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:25696329

  18. Increased Nonconducted P-Wave Arrhythmias after a Single Oil Fly Ash Inhalation Exposure in Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Farraj, Aimen K.; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Winsett, Darrell W.; Hazari, Mehdi S.; Carll, Alex P.; Rowan, William H.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Cascio, Wayne E.; Costa, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Exposure to combustion-derived fine particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality especially in individuals with cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. PM inhalation causes several adverse changes in cardiac function that are reflected in the electrocardiogram (ECG), including altered cardiac rhythm, myocardial ischemia, and reduced heart rate variability (HRV). The sensitivity and reliability of ECG-derived parameters as indicators of the cardiovascular toxicity of PM in rats are unclear. Objective We hypothesized that spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats are more susceptible to the development of PM-induced arrhythmia, altered ECG morphology, and reduced HRV than are Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, a related strain with normal blood pressure. Methods We exposed rats once by nose-only inhalation for 4 hr to residual oil fly ash (ROFA), an emission source particle rich in transition metals, or to air and then sacrificed them 1 or 48 hr later. Results ROFA-exposed SH rats developed nonconducted P-wave arrhythmias but no changes in ECG morphology or HRV. We found no ECG effects in ROFA-exposed WKY rats. ROFA-exposed SH rats also had greater pulmonary injury, neutrophil infiltration, and serum C-reactive protein than did ROFA-exposed WKY rats. Conclusions These results suggest that cardiac arrhythmias may be an early sensitive indicator of the propensity for PM inhalation to modify cardiovascular function. PMID:19479011

  19. Early right coronary vasospasm presenting with malignant arrhythmias in a heart transplantation recipient without allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Pistono, M; Brentana, L; Gnemmi, M; Imparato, A; Temporelli, P L; Zingarelli, E; Patané, F; Giannuzzi, P

    2009-01-24

    In heart transplant recipients, the aetiology of coronary vasospasm is largely unknown but it has been reported to be related to coronary vasculopathy or allograft rejection. We report a case of acute, reversible coronary vasospasm which caused malignant arrhythmias in a cardiac transplant recipient one month after transplantation without evidence of coronary vasculopathy or allograft rejection. The patient had a normal post-operative course with no other complications; this case supports the hypothesis that coronary vasospasm is not necessarily related to epicardial coronary artery disease or allograft rejection, but rather may be due to an abnormal reversible vasoreactivity. PMID:17950482

  20. Role of Genetic Testing in Patients with Ventricular Arrhythmias in Apparently Normal Hearts.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2016-09-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias without structural heart disease are responsible for ∼35% of patients who have sudden cardiac death before the age of 40 years. Molecular autopsy and/or cardiological investigation of nearby family members often reveals the diagnosis and genetic testing can be helpful in family screening and risk stratification in disease carriers. Extended gene panels can be screened in a short period of time at low cost. A multidisciplinary team of (genetically) specialized clinicians is necessary to judge all the available details and to decide on the significance of the variant and further strategies. PMID:27521086

  1. Effectiveness of morphological and spectral heartbeat characterization on arrhythmia clustering for Holter recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Hoyos, Cristian; Peluffo-Ordóñez, Diego Hernán.; Rodríguez-Sotelo, Jose Luis; Castellanos-Domínguez, Germán.

    2015-01-01

    Heartbeat characterization is an important issue in cardiac assistance diagnosis systems. In particular, wide sets of features are commonly used in long term electrocardiographic signals. Then, if such a feature space does not represent properly the arrhythmias to be grouped, classification or clustering process may fail. In this work a suitable feature set for different heartbeat types is studied, involving morphology, representation and time-frequency features. To determine what kind of features generate better clusters, feature selection procedure is used and assessed by means clustering validity measures. Then the feature subset is shown to produce fine clustering that yields into high sensitivity and specificity values for a broad range of heartbeat types.

  2. POPDC1(S201F) causes muscular dystrophy and arrhythmia by affecting protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Roland F R; Scotton, Chiara; Zhang, Jianguo; Passarelli, Chiara; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Simrick, Subreena; Schwerte, Thorsten; Poon, Kar-Lai; Fang, Mingyan; Rinné, Susanne; Froese, Alexander; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Grunert, Christiane; Müller, Thomas; Tasca, Giorgio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Drago, Fabrizio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Di Raimo, Francesca Romana; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Gualandi, Francesca; Fattori, Fabiana; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Li, Wenyan; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Xun; Bertini, Enrico; Decher, Niels; Wang, Jun; Brand, Thomas; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The Popeye domain-containing 1 (POPDC1) gene encodes a plasma membrane-localized cAMP-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in striated muscle. In animal models, POPDC1 is an essential regulator of structure and function of cardiac and skeletal muscle; however, POPDC1 mutations have not been associated with human cardiac and muscular diseases. Here, we have described a homozygous missense variant (c.602C>T, p.S201F) in POPDC1, identified by whole-exome sequencing, in a family of 4 with cardiac arrhythmia and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). This allele was absent in known databases and segregated with the pathological phenotype in this family. We did not find the allele in a further screen of 104 patients with a similar phenotype, suggesting this mutation to be family specific. Compared with WT protein, POPDC1(S201F) displayed a 50% reduction in cAMP affinity, and in skeletal muscle from patients, both POPDC1(S201F) and WT POPDC2 displayed impaired membrane trafficking. Forced expression of POPDC1(S201F) in a murine cardiac muscle cell line (HL-1) increased hyperpolarization and upstroke velocity of the action potential. In zebrafish, expression of the homologous mutation (popdc1(S191F)) caused heart and skeletal muscle phenotypes that resembled those observed in patients. Our study therefore identifies POPDC1 as a disease gene causing a very rare autosomal recessive cardiac arrhythmia and LGMD, expanding the genetic causes of this heterogeneous group of inherited rare diseases. PMID:26642364

  3. POPDC1S201F causes muscular dystrophy and arrhythmia by affecting protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Roland F.R.; Scotton, Chiara; Zhang, Jianguo; Passarelli, Chiara; Ortiz-Bonnin, Beatriz; Simrick, Subreena; Schwerte, Thorsten; Poon, Kar-Lai; Fang, Mingyan; Rinné, Susanne; Froese, Alexander; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Grunert, Christiane; Müller, Thomas; Tasca, Giorgio; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Drago, Fabrizio; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Rapezzi, Claudio; Arbustini, Eloisa; Di Raimo, Francesca Romana; Neri, Marcella; Selvatici, Rita; Gualandi, Francesca; Fattori, Fabiana; Pietrangelo, Antonello; Li, Wenyan; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Xun; Bertini, Enrico; Decher, Niels; Wang, Jun; Brand, Thomas; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The Popeye domain–containing 1 (POPDC1) gene encodes a plasma membrane–localized cAMP-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in striated muscle. In animal models, POPDC1 is an essential regulator of structure and function of cardiac and skeletal muscle; however, POPDC1 mutations have not been associated with human cardiac and muscular diseases. Here, we have described a homozygous missense variant (c.602C>T, p.S201F) in POPDC1, identified by whole-exome sequencing, in a family of 4 with cardiac arrhythmia and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). This allele was absent in known databases and segregated with the pathological phenotype in this family. We did not find the allele in a further screen of 104 patients with a similar phenotype, suggesting this mutation to be family specific. Compared with WT protein, POPDC1S201F displayed a 50% reduction in cAMP affinity, and in skeletal muscle from patients, both POPDC1S201F and WT POPDC2 displayed impaired membrane trafficking. Forced expression of POPDC1S201F in a murine cardiac muscle cell line (HL-1) increased hyperpolarization and upstroke velocity of the action potential. In zebrafish, expression of the homologous mutation (popdc1S191F) caused heart and skeletal muscle phenotypes that resembled those observed in patients. Our study therefore identifies POPDC1 as a disease gene causing a very rare autosomal recessive cardiac arrhythmia and LGMD, expanding the genetic causes of this heterogeneous group of inherited rare diseases. PMID:26642364

  4. Progressive interatrial block and supraventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Andres; Conde, Diego; Redfearn, Damian P; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Interatrial conduction disorders are frequent in patients with structural heart diseases, including hypertension, coronary disease, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and they are strongly associated with atrial tachyarrhythmias, especially atrial fibrillation and flutter. Conduction delays lead to dispersion of refractory periods and participate in initiating and maintaining reentry circuits, facilitating atrial arrhythmias. In this case, the changing pattern over time is a manifestation of progressive atrial remodeling and conduction delay. The terminal negative component of the P wave in the inferior leads suggests block of the electrical impulse in the Bachman bundle zone, with retrograde activation of the left atria via muscular connections at the coronary sinus. This has been reproduced in experimental models and confirmed by endocardial mapping. Physicians should be aware of the association between advanced interatrial block and development of atrial arrhythmias as its recognition could prompt early and aggressive antiarrhythmic treatment. PMID:25201217

  5. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27591449

  6. [Cardiac sarcoidosis - clinical manifestation and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Podolec, Piotr; Olszowska, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease defined histologically by the formation of noncaseating granulomas. The etiology of sarcoidosis remains unknown. Heart involvement in the course of sarcoidosis concerns about 5% of patients. The most common manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis are conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias and heart failure. The diagnostic algorithm includes performing a clinical history, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and an echocardiogram. If any of the initial screening investigations yields an abnormality, diagnostics should be continue using advanced imaging techniques: cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) or fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nowadays endomyocardial biopsy is not performed routinely.The clinical picture of cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable. Screening for cardiac sarcoidosis should be performed in all patients diagnosed with extracardiac sarcoidosis. Cardiac sarcoidosis should also be suspected in young patients without a diagnosis of sarcoidosis who present with conduction abnormalities of unknown etiology, because cardiac sarcoidosis may be the first or the only manifestation of the disease. PMID:27590654

  7. Primary Cardiac Lymphoma: Diagnosis and the Impact of Chemotherapy on Cardiac Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Pagé, Maude; Grasso, Agata E; Carpenter, John-Paul; Sheppard, Mary N; Karwatowski, Stefan P; Mohiaddin, Raad H

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of primary cardiac lymphoma presenting as myopericarditis and rapidly deteriorating into biventricular heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias. Computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging showed extensive myocardial infiltration with typical patterns on tissue characterization CMR images, raising clinical suspicion. Diagnosis was confirmed by myocardial histologic examination. Marked regression of tumor burden was apparent after 6 cycles of anthracycline-based chemotherapy. This case illustrates that a high degree of suspicion for this rare entity is mandated to institute timely treatment. Rapid tumor lysis may induce life-threatening acute cardiac decompensation that requires intensive monitoring and support therapy. PMID:26755242

  8. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  9. [Managing acute supraventricular arrhythmia in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Manzo-Silberman, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Palpitations: frequent reason for referral to a cardiologist. Arrythmia: rare, mostly benign. Premature extra-beats and sustained tachy-arrhythmias: more frequent or revealed during pregnancy. Hemodynamic changes in expectant women favor an environment conducive to arrhythmogenesis. AF and flutter: very rare unless structural heart disease or hyperthyroidism. Drugs: careful monitoring of the patient and dose adjustments. Cardioversion: only in case of severe symptoms or hemodynamically unstable. PMID:26277779

  10. Arrhythmia discrimination using a smart phone.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jo Woon; Esa, Nada; McManus, David D; Chon, Ki H

    2015-05-01

    We hypothesize that our smartphone-based arrhythmia discrimination algorithm with data acquisition approach reliably differentiates between normal sinus rhythm (NSR), atrial fibrillation (AF), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) and premature atrial contraction (PACs) in a diverse group of patients having these common arrhythmias. We combine root mean square of successive RR differences and Shannon entropy with Poincare plot (or turning point ratio method) and pulse rise and fall times to increase the sensitivity of AF discrimination and add new capabilities of PVC and PAC identification. To investigate the capability of the smartphone-based algorithm for arrhythmia discrimination, 99 subjects, including 88 study participants with AF at baseline and in NSR after electrical cardioversion, as well as seven participants with PACs and four with PVCs were recruited. Using a smartphone, we collected 2-min pulsatile time series from each recruited subject. This clinical application results show that the proposed method detects NSR with specificity of 0.9886, and discriminates PVCs and PACs from AF with sensitivities of 0.9684 and 0.9783, respectively. PMID:25838530

  11. Iatrogenic QT Abnormalities and Fatal Arrhythmias: Mechanisms and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Cubeddu, Luigi X

    2009-01-01

    Severe and occasionally fatal arrhythmias, commonly presenting as Torsade de Pointes [TdP] have been reported with Class III-antiarrhythmics, but also with non-antiarrhythmic drugs. Most cases result from an action on K+ channels encoded by the HERG gene responsible for the IKr repolarizing current, leading to a long QT and repolarization abnormalities. The hydrophobic central cavity of the HERG-K+ channels, allows a large number of structurally unrelated drugs to bind and cause direct channel inhibition. Some examples are dofetilide, quinidine, sotalol, erythromycin, grepafloxacin, cisapride, dolasetron, thioridazine, haloperidol, droperidol and pimozide. Other drugs achieve channel inhibition indirectly by impairing channel traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing channel membrane density (pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol). Whereas, ketoconazole, fluoxetine and norfluoxetine induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Congenital long QT syndrome, subclinical ion-channel mutations, subjects and relatives of subjects with previous history of drug-induced long QT or TdP, dual drug effects on cardiac repolarization [long QT plus increased QT dispersion], increased transmural dispersion of repolarization and T wave abnormalities, use of high doses, metabolism inhibitors and/or combinations of QT prolonging drugs, hypokalemia, structural cardiac disease, sympathomimetics, bradycardia, women and older age, have been shown to increase the risk for developing drug-induced TdP. Because most of these reactions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drugs use associated with repolarization abnormalities is strongly recommended. Future genetic testing and development of practical and simple provocation tests are in route to prevent iatrogenic TdP. PMID:20676275

  12. Ranolazine reduces remodeling of the right ventricle and provoked arrhythmias in rats with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liles, John T; Hoyer, Kirsten; Oliver, Jason; Chi, Liguo; Dhalla, Arvinder K; Belardinelli, Luiz

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease that often results in right ventricular (RV) failure and death. During disease progression, structural and electrical remodeling of the right ventricle impairs pump function, creates proarrhythmic substrates, and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in patients with PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an antianginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects in experimental and clinical settings of left-sided heart dysfunction. RAN also has antiarrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. We therefore hypothesized that RAN could reduce the maladaptive structural and electrical remodeling of the right ventricle and could prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline rat model of PAH. Indeed, in both in vivo and ex vivo experimental settings, chronic RAN treatment reduced electrical heterogeneity (right ventricular-left ventricular action potential duration dispersion), shortened heart-rate corrected QT intervals in the right ventricle, and normalized RV dysfunction. Chronic RAN treatment also dose-dependently reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced circulating levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrotic markers. In addition, the acute administration of RAN prevented isoproterenol-induced ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation and subsequent cardiovascular death in rats with established PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the electrical and functional properties of the right ventricle, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of RV impairment. PMID:25770134

  13. The Brugada Syndrome: A Rare Arrhythmia Disorder with Complex Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Barc, Julien; Thollet, Aurélie; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Le Marec, Hervé; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Redon, Richard; Probst, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    For the last 10 years, applying new sequencing technologies to thousands of whole exomes has revealed the high variability of the human genome. Extreme caution should thus be taken to avoid misinterpretation when associating rare genetic variants to disease susceptibility. The Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a rare inherited arrhythmia disease associated with high risk of sudden cardiac death in the young adult. Familial inheritance has long been described as Mendelian, with autosomal dominant mode of transmission and incomplete penetrance. However, all except 1 of the 23 genes previously associated with the disease have been identified through a candidate gene approach. To date, only rare coding variants in the SCN5A gene have been significantly associated with the syndrome. However, the genotype/phenotype studies conducted in families with SCN5A mutations illustrate the complex mode of inheritance of BrS. This genetic complexity has recently been confirmed by the identification of common polymorphic alleles strongly associated with disease risk. The implication of both rare and common variants in BrS susceptibility implies that one should first define a proper genetic model for BrS predisposition prior to applying molecular diagnosis. Although long remains the way to personalized medicine against BrS, the high phenotype variability encountered in familial forms of the disease may partly find an explanation into this specific genetic architecture. PMID:27200363

  14. The U-shaped relationship between exercise and cardiac morbidity.

    PubMed

    Merghani, Ahmed; Malhotra, Aneil; Sharma, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    Exercise confers a plethora of health benefits that are well documented, whereas physical inactivity is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The dose of physical activity required to achieve these benefits is relatively modest and equates to jogging at a pace of 15min per mile for 20-30min daily. In the current era, most athletes engage in a volume and intensity of exercise that is at least 5-10-fold greater than the general recommendations for physical activity. Such practice is evidenced by the fact that many sportsmen have achieved athletic feats that were considered impossible only 2 decades ago. Numerous studies in retired athletes have consistently shown a reduced incidence of heart disease and an increased longevity of life. Occasionally, however, intense exercise is associated with sudden deaths in athletes harboring quiescent yet potentially sinister cardiac diseases. Despite the visibility afforded by such catastrophes, the reputation of exercise remains unscathed because most deaths can be accounted for by an underlying cardiac abnormality where exercise is a mere trigger for a fatal arrhythmia rather than the actual cause of death. More recently, there have been an emerging number of reports suggesting that intense exercise may have an adverse impact on an otherwise normal heart. This article will review the morbidity and mortality associated with sport and pose the question whether one can have "too much of a good thing." PMID:26187713

  15. Deficiency of cyclase-associated protein 2 promotes arrhythmias associated with connexin43 maldistribution and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Peche, Vivek Shahaji; Linhart, Markus; Nickenig, Georg; Noegel, Angelika Anna; Schrickel, Jan Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cyclase-associated protein 2 (CAP2) plays a major role in regulating the actin cytoskeleton. Since inactivation of CAP2 in a mouse model by a gene trap approach (Cap2gt/gt) results in cardiomyopathy and increased mortality, we hypothesized that CAP2 has a major impact on arrhythmias and electrophysiological parameters. Material and methods We performed long-term-ECG recordings in transgenic CAP2 deficient mice (C57BL/6) to detect spontaneous arrhythmias. In vivo electrophysiological studies by right heart catheterization and ex vivo epicardial mapping were used to analyze electrophysiological parameters, the inducibility of arrhythmias, and conduction velocities. Expression and distribution of cardiac connexins and the amount of cardiac fibrosis were evaluated. Results Spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias could be detected in Cap2gt/gt during the long-term-ECG recording. Cap2gt/gt showed marked conduction delays at atrial and ventricular levels, including a reduced heart rate (421.0 ±40.6 bpm vs. 450.8 ±27.9 bpm; p < 0.01), and prolongations of PQ (46.3 ±4.1 ms vs. 38.6 ±6.5 ms; p < 0.01), QRS (16.2 ±2.6 ms vs. 12.6 ±1.4 ms; p < 0.01), and QTc interval (55.8 ±6.0 ms vs. 45.2 ±3.3 ms; p = 0.02) in comparison to wild type mice. The PQ prolongation was due to an infra-Hisian conduction delay (HV: 9.7 ±2.1 ms vs. 6.5 ±3.1 ms; p = 0.02). The inducibility of ventricular tachycardias during the electrophysiological studies was significantly elevated in the mutant mice (inducible animals: 88% vs. 33%; p = 0.04). Cap2gt/gt showed more abnormal distribution of connexin43 compared to WT (23.0 ±4.7% vs. 2.9 ±0.8%; p < 0.01). Myocardial fibrosis was elevated in Cap2gt/gt hearts (9.1 ±6.7% vs. 5.5 ±3.3%; p < 0.01). Conclusions Loss of CAP2 results in marked electrophysiological disturbances including impaired sinus node function, conduction delays, and susceptibility to malignant arrhythmias. Structural changes in Cap2gt/gt are associated with

  16. Use of cardiac glycosides and risk of glioma.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Corinna; Meier, Christoph R; Jick, Susan S; Uhl, Martin; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Hau, Peter; Leitzmann, M F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac glycosides induce apoptotic effects on glioma cells, but whether cardiac glycosides protect against risk for glioma is unknown. We therefore explored the relation between glycoside use and glioma risk using a large and validated database. We performed a case-control analysis using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink involving 2005 glioma cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2012 that were individually matched to 20,050 controls on age, gender, general practice, and number of years of active history in the database. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between cardiac glycosides and the risk of glioma adjusting for body mass index and smoking. We also examined use of common heart failure and arrhythmia medications to differentiate between a specific glycoside effect and a generic effect of treatment for congestive heart failure or arrhythmia. Cardiac glycoside use was inversely related to glioma incidence. After adjustment for congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, diabetes, and common medications used to treat those conditions, the OR of glioma was 0.47 (95 % CI 0.27-0.81, Bonferroni-corrected p value = 0.024) for use versus non-use of cardiac glycosides, based on 17 exposed cases. In contrast, no associations were noted for other medications used to treat congestive heart failure or arrhythmias. The OR of glioma in people with congestive heart failure was 0.65 (95 % CI 0.40-1.04), and for arrhythmia it was 1.01 (95 % CI 0.78-1.31). These data indicate that cardiac glycoside use is independently associated with reduced glioma risk. PMID:26721242

  17. CaMKII regulation of cardiac K channels

    PubMed Central

    Mustroph, Julian; Maier, Lars S.; Wagner, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac K channels are critical determinants of cardiac excitability. In hypertrophied and failing myocardium, alterations in the expression and activity of voltage-gated K channels are frequently observed and contribute to the increased propensity for life-threatening arrhythmias. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of disturbed K channel regulation in heart failure (HF) is of critical importance. Amongst others, Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has been identified as an important regulator of K channel activity. In human HF but also various animal models, increased CaMKII expression and activity has been linked to deteriorated contractile function and arrhythmias. This review will discuss the current knowledge about CaMKII regulation of several K channels, its influence on action potential properties, dispersion of repolarization, and arrhythmias with special focus on HF. PMID:24600393

  18. Physics of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2013-04-01

    A normal heartbeat is orchestrated by the stable propagation of an excitation wave that produces an orderly contraction. In contrast, wave turbulence in the ventricles, clinically known as ventricular fibrillation (VF), stops the heart from pumping and is lethal without prompt defibrillation. I review experimental, computational, and theoretical studies that have shed light on complex dynamical phenomena linked to the initiation, maintenance, and control of wave turbulence. I first discuss advances made to understand the precursor state to a reentrant arrhythmia where the refractory period of cardiac tissue becomes spatiotemporally disordered; this is known as an arrhythmogenic tissue substrate. I describe observed patterns of transmembrane voltage and intracellular calcium signaling that can contribute to this substrate, and symmetry breaking instabilities to explain their formation. I then survey mechanisms of wave turbulence and discuss novel methods that exploit electrical pacing stimuli to control precursor patterns and low-energy pulsed electric fields to control turbulence.

  19. Arrhythmias following spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery - Is Wenckebach common?

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Seema; Hayaran, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    Arrhythmias in pregnancy are common and may cause concern for the well-being of both mother and fetus. Generally, no previous history of heart disease is elicited and majority of the arrhythmias are benign. Bradycardia is commonly seen following subarachnoid block for cesarean section. However, the incidence of subsequent heart block is low. This case report highlights the occurrence of perioperative arrhythmias following sympathetic blockade in pregnant patients and their early detection by vigilant monitoring. PMID:22096293

  20. SCN5A variant that blocks fibroblast growth factor homologous factor regulation causes human arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F; Sturm, Amy C; Murphy, Nathaniel; Adelman, Sara; Wang, Chaojian; Yan, Haidun; Johnson, Benjamin L; Csepe, Thomas A; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert S D; Janssen, Paul M L; Fedorov, Vadim V; Weiss, Raul; Salazar, Christina; Hund, Thomas J; Pitt, Geoffrey S; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Nav channels are essential for metazoan membrane depolarization, and Nav channel dysfunction is directly linked with epilepsy, ataxia, pain, arrhythmia, myotonia, and irritable bowel syndrome. Human Nav channelopathies are primarily caused by variants that directly affect Nav channel permeability or gating. However, a new class of human Nav channelopathies has emerged based on channel variants that alter regulation by intracellular signaling or cytoskeletal proteins. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) are a family of intracellular signaling proteins linked with Nav channel regulation in neurons and myocytes. However, to date, there is surprisingly little evidence linking Nav channel gene variants with FHFs and human disease. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that mutations in SCN5A (encodes primary cardiac Nav channel Nav1.5) that alter FHF binding result in human cardiovascular disease. We describe a five*generation kindred with a history of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, and sudden cardiac death. Affected family members harbor a novel SCN5A variant resulting in p.H1849R. p.H1849R is localized in the central binding core on Nav1.5 for FHFs. Consistent with these data, Nav1.5 p.H1849R affected interaction with FHFs. Further, electrophysiological analysis identified Nav1.5 p.H1849R as a gain-of-function for INa by altering steady-state inactivation and slowing the rate of Nav1.5 inactivation. In line with these data and consistent with human cardiac phenotypes, myocytes expressing Nav1.5 p.H1849R displayed prolonged action potential duration and arrhythmogenic afterdepolarizations. Together, these findings identify a previously unexplored mechanism for human Nav channelopathy based on altered Nav1.5 association with FHF proteins. PMID:26392562

  1. [Long-term outcome of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment for ventricular arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, S; Kasanuki, H

    2000-03-01

    Recent advances of nonpharmacological therapy such as catheter ablation and implantable cardioverter defibrillator and lessons from the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial(CAST) have changed the strategy for ventricular arrhythmias. The safety and efficacy of radiofrequency catheter ablation of symptomatic sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia without structural heart disease has made ablation the firstline curative therapy. In idiopathic ventricular fibrillation such as Brugada syndrome, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the most effective treatment to prevent sudden cardiac death. In patients with asymptomatic ventricular tachyarrhythmias in heart failure, class I antiarrhythmic drugs should be avoided due to proarrhythmic and negative inotropic effects that may be responsible for increased mortality in some trials. In such patients, amiodarone and beta-blocker may reduce sudden cardiac death. For patients with sustained ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation in heart failure, amiodarone or implantable cardioverter defibrillator should be considered. In comparison with amiodarone, implantable cardioverter defibrillator markedly reduced sudden death in ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation survivors in Antiarrhythmics Versus Implantable Defibriltors(AVID). Although better patient selection and clarification of mapping criteria improved the successful ablation rate in patients with structural heart disease, candidates of ablation are few. In patients with extensive structural heart disease, multiple ventricular tachycardias are often present. Catheter ablation of a single ventricular tachycardia may be only palliative. Therefore, implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the most effective treatment to prevent sudden cardiac death, with amiodarone and ablation as the adjunctive therapy to prevent frequent ventricular tachycardia. Furthermore, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator improved survival in selected

  2. SCN5A variant that blocks fibroblast growth factor homologous factor regulation causes human arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Sturm, Amy C.; Murphy, Nathaniel; Adelman, Sara; Wang, Chaojian; Yan, Haidun; Johnson, Benjamin L.; Csepe, Thomas A.; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert S. D.; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Weiss, Raul; Salazar, Christina; Hund, Thomas J.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Nav channels are essential for metazoan membrane depolarization, and Nav channel dysfunction is directly linked with epilepsy, ataxia, pain, arrhythmia, myotonia, and irritable bowel syndrome. Human Nav channelopathies are primarily caused by variants that directly affect Nav channel permeability or gating. However, a new class of human Nav channelopathies has emerged based on channel variants that alter regulation by intracellular signaling or cytoskeletal proteins. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) are a family of intracellular signaling proteins linked with Nav channel regulation in neurons and myocytes. However, to date, there is surprisingly little evidence linking Nav channel gene variants with FHFs and human disease. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that mutations in SCN5A (encodes primary cardiac Nav channel Nav1.5) that alter FHF binding result in human cardiovascular disease. We describe a five*generation kindred with a history of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, and sudden cardiac death. Affected family members harbor a novel SCN5A variant resulting in p.H1849R. p.H1849R is localized in the central binding core on Nav1.5 for FHFs. Consistent with these data, Nav1.5 p.H1849R affected interaction with FHFs. Further, electrophysiological analysis identified Nav1.5 p.H1849R as a gain-of-function for INa by altering steady-state inactivation and slowing the rate of Nav1.5 inactivation. In line with these data and consistent with human cardiac phenotypes, myocytes expressing Nav1.5 p.H1849R displayed prolonged action potential duration and arrhythmogenic afterdepolarizations. Together, these findings identify a previously unexplored mechanism for human Nav channelopathy based on altered Nav1.5 association with FHF proteins. PMID:26392562

  3. Cardiac Radiofrequency Ablation: A Clinical Update for Nurses.

    PubMed

    Shoulders, Bridget; Mauriello, Jillian; Shellman, Tamika; Follett, Corrinne

    2016-01-01

    The field of electrophysiology (EP) has rapidly evolved from a focus on diagnostic procedures to an emphasis on interventions. Many cardiac arrhythmias traditionally treated with antiarrhythmic agents, cardioversion, or cardiac surgery are now routinely cured with cardiac ablation. To optimally manage the care of cardiac ablation patients, it is essential that nurses have an understanding of the EP procedures and related nursing implications. There are extensive evidence-based resources available in the medical literature; however, there are limited publications geared toward nurses caring for cardiac ablation patients.This article provides an overview of EP diagnostic and cardiac radio-frequency ablation procedures for select atrial and ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Evidence-based nursing practices related to postprocedure care will be addressed. The objective of this article is to increase nurses' knowledge of common cardiac ablation procedures and the nursing management of the patient postprocedure. PMID:27487751

  4. Sudden chest pain and cardiac emergencies in the obstetric patient.

    PubMed

    Mabie, W C; Freire, C M

    1995-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and work-up of a patient with chest pain during pregnancy is presented in this article. This is followed by discussions of cardiac emergencies including hypertensive crisis, pulmonary edema, arrhythmias, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, myocardial infarction, and aortic dissection. PMID:7784039

  5. Exercise-induced protection against reperfusion arrhythmia involves stabilization of mitochondrial energetics.

    PubMed

    Alleman, Rick J; Tsang, Alvin M; Ryan, Terence E; Patteson, Daniel J; McClung, Joseph M; Spangenburg, Espen E; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Neufer, P Darrell; Brown, David A

    2016-05-15

    Mitochondria influence cardiac electrophysiology through energy- and redox-sensitive ion channels in the sarcolemma, with the collapse of energetics believed to be centrally involved in arrhythmogenesis. This study was conducted to determine if preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) contributes to the antiarrhythmic effect of exercise. We utilized perfused hearts, isolated myocytes, and isolated mitochondria exposed to metabolic challenge to determine the effects of exercise on cardiac mitochondria. Hearts from sedentary (Sed) and exercised (Ex; 10 days of treadmill running) Sprague-Dawley rats were perfused on a two-photon microscope stage for simultaneous measurement of ΔΨm and ECG. After ischemia-reperfusion, the collapse of ΔΨm was commensurate with the onset of arrhythmia. Exercise preserved ΔΨm and decreased the incidence of fibrillation/tachycardia (P < 0.05). Our findings in intact hearts were corroborated in isolated myocytes exposed to in vitro hypoxia-reoxygenation, with Ex rats demonstrating enhanced redox control and sustained ΔΨm during reoxygenation. Finally, we induced anoxia-reoxygenation in isolated mitochondria using high-resolution respirometry with simultaneous measurement of respiration and H2O2 Mitochondria from Ex rats sustained respiration with lower rates of H2O2 emission than Sed rats. Exercise helps sustain postischemic mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox homeostasis, which is associated with preserved ΔΨm and protection against reperfusion arrhythmia. The reduction of fatal ventricular arrhythmias through exercise-induced mitochondrial adaptations indicates that mitochondrial therapeutics may be an effective target for the treatment of heart disease. PMID:26945082

  6. Association of Bartonella spp bacteremia with Chagas cardiomyopathy, endocarditis and arrhythmias in patients from South America.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, F G; Pontes, C L S; Verzola, R M M; Mateos, J C P; Velho, P E N F; Schijman, A G; Selistre-de-Araujo, H S

    2012-07-01

    Infection with Bartonella spp may cause cardiac arrhythmias, myocarditis and endocarditis in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible association between Bartonella spp bacteremia and endocarditis, arrhythmia and Chagas cardiomyopathy in patients from Brazil and Argentina. We screened for the presence of bacterial 16S rRNA in human blood by PCR using oligonucleotides to amplify a 185-bp bacterial DNA fragment. Blood samples were taken from four groups of subjects in Brazil and Argentina: i) control patients without clinical disease, ii) patients with negative blood-culture endocarditis, iii) patients with arrhythmias, and iv) patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. PCR products were analyzed on 1.5% agarose gel to visualize the 185-bp fragment and then sequenced to confirm the identity of DNA. Sixty of 148 patients (40.5%) with cardiac disease and 1 of 56 subjects (1.8%) from the control group presented positive PCR amplification for Bartonella spp, suggesting a positive association of the bacteria with these diseases. Separate analysis of the four groups showed that the risk of a Brazilian patient with endocarditis being infected with Bartonella was 22 times higher than in the controls. In arrhythmic patients, the prevalence of infection was 45 times higher when compared to the same controls and 40 times higher for patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of the association between Bartonella spp bacteremia and Chagas disease. The present data may be useful for epidemiological and prevention studies in Brazil and Argentina. PMID:22584639

  7. Drug Resistant Fetal Arrhythmia in Obstetric Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Altug, Nahide; Kirbas, Ayse; Daglar, Korkut; Biberoglu, Ebru; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Obstetric cholestasis (OC) is a pregnancy specific liver disease characterized by increased levels of bile acid (BA) and pruritus. Raised maternal BA levels could be associated with intrauterine death, fetal distress, and preterm labor and also alter the rate and rhythm of cardiomyocyte contraction and may cause fetal arrhythmic events. We report a case of drug resistant fetal supraventricular tachycardia and concomitant OC. Conclusion. If there are maternal OC and concomitant fetal arrhythmia, possibility of the resistance to antiarrhythmic treatment should be kept in mind. PMID:25821617

  8. Difficulties with Ablation for Arrhythmias in Children

    PubMed Central

    Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation procedures in children present unique challenges for the electrophysiologist. At times, obtaining vascular access to reach the heart is a problem. If this first step is accomplished, the small size of the child's heart, arrhythmias relatively unique to the pediatric population, and the presence of congenital heart disease add to the complexity. In this manuscript, a review of commonly encountered problems and suggested solutions based on practice are presented. Precise mapping of the arrhythmogenic substrate, techniques to access excluded portions of the atrium from prior surgery, and the basis for electrophysiology maneuvers important in pediatric ablation are highlighted. PMID:18478062

  9. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Neves, Victor Ribeiro; Peltola, Mirja; Huikuri, Heikki; Rocha, Manoel Otávio da Costa; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz

    2014-10-01

    We applied the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) quantification algorithm to 24-hour ECG recordings of Chagas disease (ChD) patients with (G1, n=148) and without left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) (G2, n=33), and in control subjects (G0, n=28). Both ChD groups displayed a reduced RSA index; G1=299 (144-812); G2=335 (162-667), p=0.011, which was correlated with vagal indexes of heart rate variability analysis. RSA index is a marker of vagal modulation in ChD patients. PMID:25130950

  10. A smartphone based cardiac coherence biofeedback system.

    PubMed

    De Jonckheere, J; Ibarissene, I; Flocteil, M; Logier, R

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac coherence biofeedback training consist on slowing one's breathing to 0.1 Hz in order to simulate the baroreflex sensitivity and increase the respiratory sinus arrhythmia efficiency. Several studies have shown that these breathing exercises can constitute an efficient therapy in many clinical contexts like cardiovascular diseases, asthma, fibromyalgia or post-traumatic stress. Such a non-intrusive therapeutic solution needs to be performed on an 8 to 10 weeks period. Even if some heart rate variability based solutions exist, they presented some mobility constrain rendering these cardiac / respiratory control technologies more difficult to perform on a daily used. In this paper, we present a new simplified smartphone based solution allowing people to process efficient cardiac coherence biofeedback exercises. Based on photo-plethysmographic imaging through the smartphone camera, this sensor-less technology allows controlling cardiac coherence biofeedback exercises through a simplified heart rate variability algorithm. PMID:25571063

  11. Pathophysiology and prevention of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Vineet; Jassal, Davinder S; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2016-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is known to occur in individuals with diverse diseases. Each disease state has a specific etiology and pathophysiology, and is diagnosed and treated differently. Etiologies for SCD include cardiac arrhythmias, coronary artery disease, congenital coronary artery anomalies, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, dilated cardiomyopathy, and aortic valve stenosis. A potential unifying mechanism of SCD in these diseases involves a massive stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system's stress response and the subsequent elevation of circulating catecholamines. The diagnosis of cardiac diseases that contribute to an increased risk for SCD is accomplished by a combination of different techniques including electrocardiography, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and invasive cardiac catheterization. Several therapies including anti-arrhythmic drugs, β-blockers, and antiplatelet agents may be used as medical treatment in patients for the prevention of SCD. Invasive therapies including percutaneous angioplasty, coronary artery bypass surgery, and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators are also used in the clinical management of SCD. PMID:26651385

  12. Three Dimension Filamentous Human Cardiac Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Koo, Sangmo; Finnegan, Micaela A.; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Marks, Natalie C.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    A human in vitro cardiac tissue model would be a significant advancement for understanding, studying, and developing new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias and related cardiovascular diseases. We developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3D) human cardiac tissue by populating synthetic filamentous matrices with cardiomyocytes derived from healthy wild-type volunteer (WT) and patient-specific long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CMs) to mimic the condensed and aligned human ventricular myocardium. Using such a highly controllable cardiac model, we studied the contractility malfunctions associated with the electrophysiological consequences of LQT3 and their response to a panel of drugs. By varying the stiffness of filamentous matrices, LQT3 iPS-CMs exhibited different level of contractility abnormality and susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24268663

  13. Clinical significance of automatic warning function of cardiac remote monitoring systems in preventing acute cardiac episodes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shou-Qiang; Xing, Shan-Shan; Gao, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In addition to ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic recording and transtelephonic electrocardiographic monitoring (TTM), a cardiac remote monitoring system can provide an automatic warning function through the general packet radio service (GPRS) network, enabling earlier diagnosis, treatment and improved outcome of cardiac diseases. The purpose of this study was to estimate its clinical significance in preventing acute cardiac episodes. Methods: Using 2 leads (V1 and V5 leads) and the automatic warning mode, 7160 patients were tested with a cardiac remote monitoring system from October 2004 to September 2007. If malignant arrhythmias or obvious ST-T changes appeared in the electrocardiogram records was automatically transferred to the monitoring center, the patient and his family members were informed, and the corresponding precautionary or therapeutic measures were implemented immediately. Results: In our study, 274 cases of malignant arrhythmia, including sinus standstill and ventricular tachycardia, and 43 cases of obvious ST-segment elevation were detected and treated. Because of early detection, there was no death or deformity. Conclusions: A cardiac remote monitoring system providing an automatic warning function can play an important role in preventing acute cardiac episodes. PMID:25674124

  14. [Recurrent ventricular tachycardia as a late complication of a cardiac stab wound].

    PubMed

    Niedziela, Justyna; Wozakowska-Kapłon, Beata; Dziubek, Katarzyna; Jaskulska-Niedziela, Elzbieta; Włosowicz, Monika

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a 55-year-old male who suffered from a cardiac stab wound in his youth and 38 years later developed unstable sustained ventricular tachycardia. Imaging showed presence of a scarf of myocardium which probably caused the arrhythmia. Arrhythmia was successfully controlled using combined treatment with pharmacotherapy and cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. Relapses of ventricular tachycardia treated by appropriate interventions of cardioverter-defibrillator occurred when the patient stopped pharmacotherapy and experienced great psychic stress. PMID:20131201

  15. Atrial Arrhythmias and Their Implications for Space Flight - Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, J. D.; Barr, Y. R.; Bauer, P.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kerstman, E.; Tarver, B.

    2010-01-01

    This panel will discuss the implications of atrial arrhythmias in astronauts from a variety of perspectives; including historical data, current practices, and future challenges for exploration class missions. The panelists will present case histories, outline the evolution of current NASA medical standards for atrial arrhythmias, discuss the use of predictive tools, and consider potential challenges for current and future missions.

  16. Specification of the Cardiac Conduction System by Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Cathy J.; Basson, Craig T.

    2009-01-01

    Diseases of the cardiovascular system that cause sudden cardiac deaths are often caused by lethal arrhythmias that originate from defects in the cardiac conduction system. Development of the cardiac conduction system is a complex biological process that can be wrought with problems. Although several genes involved in mature conduction system function have been identified, their association with development of specific subcomponents of the cardiac conduction system remains challenging. Several transcription factors, including homeodomain proteins and T-box proteins, are essential for cardiac conduction system morphogenesis and activation or repression of key regulatory genes. In addition, several transcription factors modify expression of genes encoding the ion channel proteins that contribute to the electrophysiological properties of the conduction system and govern contraction of the surrounding myocardium. Loss of transcriptional regulation during cardiac development has detrimental effects on cardiogenesis that may lead to arrhythmias. Human genetic mutations in some of these transcription factors have been identified and are known to cause congenital heart diseases that include cardiac conduction system malformations. In this review, we summarize the contributions of several key transcription factors to specification, patterning, maturation and function of the cardiac conduction system. Further analysis of the molecular programs involved in this process should lead to improved diagnosis and therapy of conduction system disease. PMID:19797194

  17. Cardiac amyloidosis: updates in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Mohty, Dania; Damy, Thibaud; Cosnay, Pierre; Echahidi, Najmeddine; Casset-Senon, Danielle; Virot, Patrice; Jaccard, Arnaud

    2013-10-01

    Amyloidosis is a severe systemic disease. Cardiac involvement may occur in the three main types of amyloidosis (acquired monoclonal light-chain, hereditary transthyretin and senile amyloidosis) and has a major impact on prognosis. Imaging the heart to characterize and detect early cardiac involvement is one of the major aims in the assessment of this disease. Electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography are important diagnostic and prognostic tools in patients with cardiac involvement. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging better characterizes myocardial involvement, functional abnormalities and amyloid deposition due to its high spatial resolution. Nuclear imaging has a role in the diagnosis of transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy. Cardiac biomarkers are now used for risk stratification and staging of patients with light-chain systemic amyloidosis. Different types of cardiac complications may occur, including diastolic followed by systolic heart failure, atrial and/or ventricular arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, embolic events and sometimes sudden death. Senile amyloid and hereditary transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy have better prognoses than light-chain amyloidosis. Cardiac treatment of heart failure is usually ineffective and is often poorly tolerated because of its hypotensive and bradycardiac effects. The three main types of amyloid disease, despite their similar cardiac appearance, have specific new aetiological treatments that may change the prognosis of this disease. Cardiologists should be aware of this disease to allow early treatment. PMID:24070600

  18. The role of EP-guided therapy in ventricular arrhythmias: beta-blockers, sotalol, and ICD's.

    PubMed

    Capucci, A; Aschieri, D; Villani, G Q

    2000-01-01

    Arrhythmic death can be reduced by antiarrhythmic drugs to a range of 24%. Electrophysiologic study by testing noninducibility of ventricular arrhythmia represents the classic method for evaluating the effectiveness of drug therapy. Several clinical studies have shown thaat sotalol suppresses VT induction and prevents arrhythmias recurrences at long term follow-up in 23% to 67% of patients. The efficacy of sotalol EP guided therapy in preventing VT/VF is not necessarily related to prevention of sudden death. In the ESVEM study the superiority of d,l-sotalol to other antiarrhythmic drugs was confirmed. The response to programmed ventricular stimulation was found to be strongly predictive for arrhythmia free state while the failure of sotalol therapy to suppress VT at the EP study was associated with an high recurrence rate (40%). However, EP study failes to predict freedom from sudden death. The beta-blocking activity of racemic sotalol may account for some of the observed survival benefit.Beta-blockers therapy reduces mortality in patients after myocardial infarction primarily by a reduction of sudden death. A reduction of death, worsening heart failure and life threatening ventricular arrhythmias was shown in a recent study on carvedilol. In the prospective study of Steinbeck the EP guided-therapy did not improve the overall outcome when compared to metoprolol. Suppression of inducible arrhythmias by antiarrhythmic drugs was associated with a better outcome. The effectiveness of defibrillator therapy in reducing overall mortality, has been uncertain since great clinical trials have been concluded. MADIT, AVID and CASH trials confirmed the superiority of ICD therapy over antiarrhythmic drugs therapy: ICD should be considered the first choice therapy in post-cardiac arrest patients. The ongoing BEST Trial will give us further responses about the interaction between EP study and metoprolol effect compared to ICD in patients post myocardial infarction also focusing on

  19. [Cardioprotective, inotropic, and anti-arrhythmia properties of a complex adaptogen "Tonizid"].

    PubMed

    Lishmanov, Iu B; Maslov, L N; Arbuzov, A G; Krylatov, A V; Platonov, A A; Burkova, V N; Kaiumova, E A

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the new complex plant adaptogen preparation tonizid containing dry extracts of Aralia mandshurica, Panax ginseng, Rhodiola rosea, and Eleutherococcus senticosus. The course administration (5 days) of tonizid led to a decrease in the ratio of necrotic zone size/risk area during a 45-min local ischemia and a 2-hr reperfusion in artificially ventilated chloralose anaesthetized rats. This compound decreased the necrotic zone but did not change the size of the risk area. Tonizid also prevented an appearance of ventricular fibrillation during a 45-min coronary artery occlusion, but did not affect the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias during a brief ischemia and reperfusion. In a separate series of experiments, tonizid was administered during 5 days to rats with postinfarction cardiac sclerosis, which was formed 45 days after coronary artery occlusion. In this case, tonizid dose-dependently elevated the ventricular fibrillation threshold. The experiments in vitro were performed on a model of 35-min total ischemia and 30-min reperfusion of isolated rat heart using the Langendorff technique. The course administration of tonizid attenuated the reperfusion-induced decrease in the left ventricular pressure and the rate of contraction. However, tonizid did not prevent a reperfusion-induced reduction in the heart rate, a decrease in the rate of relaxation, and an increase in the final diastolic pressure. Tonizid decreased the creatine kinase levels in the venous effluent from isolated rat heart during reperfusion. At the same time, the plant adaptogen did not affect the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias and coronary flow. It is suggested that tonizid can be used as an adaptogen drug attenuating the contractility dysfunction and preventing an appearance of irreversible cardiomyocyte damage during ischemia and reperfusion. Tonizid exhibits cardioprotective and antifibrillatory properties during acute cardiac ischemia/reperfusion and postinfarction cardiac

  20. Effect of Different Pranayamas on Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Jeneth Berlin; Ramanathan, Meena; Trakroo, Madanmohan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) is the differential change of Heart Rate (HR) in response to inspiration and expiration. This is a noninvasive sensitive index of parasympathetic cardiac control. Aim To evaluate changes in RSA by utilizing a simple and cost-effective analysis of electrocardiographic (ECG) tracings obtained during performance of four pranayama techniques. Materials and Methods Fifty two trained volunteers performed the following pranayamas with different ratios for inspiration and expiration: sukha (1:1), traditional (1:2), pranava (1:3) and savitri (2:1:2:1) and ECG was recorded while performing the techniques with rest period of 5 minutes in-between. HR was calculated and maximum HR during inspiration (Imax), minimum HR during expiration (Emin), differences between Imax and Emin (Δ), percentage differences between Imax and Emin (Δ%) and expiration: inspiration ratio (E:I) calculated by respective formulae. Statistical analysis was carried out using repeated measures of ANOVA with Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons test. Results There were significant differences between groups in all five aspects namely: p= 0.0093 for mean Imax, p = 0.0009 for mean Emin, and p < 0.0001 for Δ HR (I-E), Δ% HR (I-E) and E:I ratio. Pranava pranayama produced the greatest changes in all five comparisons. Conclusion We suggest that further short and long term studies be undertaken with pranava pranayama in patients to further qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate inherent mechanisms of this simple technique. Addition of these cost-effective techniques to the medical armory will help patients of rhythm disorders and other cardiovascular conditions. PMID:27134863

  1. The year in review of clinical cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Gregory M; Keung, Edmund; Scheinman, Melvin M

    2013-02-19

    This past year saw multiple important advances in the field clinical cardiac electrophysiology. Seminal articles describing new anticoagulant drugs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation were published. New results that raise questions regarding the safety of dronedarone and several new promising techniques in AF ablation were described. Important articles that refine our understanding of the risk of sudden death among Wolff-Parkinson-White patients were published. In the basic and translational sciences, the application of gene therapy to the study and potential treatment of arrhythmias was described, whereas genetic determinants important to the optimal treatment of inherited arrhythmia syndromes were further elucidated. Issues relevant to cardiac rhythm device therapy included investigations into the St. Jude Riata lead, new applications of device monitoring, predicting response to cardiac resynchronization therapy, and the use of pacemakers for vasovagal syncope. PMID:23312706

  2. Usefulness of an Implantable Loop Recorder to Detect Clinically Relevant Arrhythmias in Patients With Advanced Fabry Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Frank; Maier, Sebastian K G; Störk, Stefan; Brunner, Thomas; Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Seydelmann, Nora; Schneider, Andreas; Becher, Jan; Canan-Kühl, Sima; Blaschke, Daniela; Bijnens, Bart; Ertl, Georg; Wanner, Christoph; Nordbeck, Peter

    2016-07-15

    Patients with genetic cardiomyopathy that involves myocardial hypertrophy often develop clinically relevant arrhythmias that increase the risk of sudden death. Consequently, guidelines for medical device therapy were established for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but not for conditions with only anecdotal evidence of arrhythmias, like Fabry cardiomyopathy. Patients with Fabry cardiomyopathy progressively develop myocardial fibrosis, and sudden cardiac death occurs regularly. Because 24-hour Holter electrocardiograms (ECGs) might not detect clinically important arrhythmias, we tested an implanted loop recorder for continuous heart rhythm surveillance and determined its impact on therapy. This prospective study included 16 patients (12 men) with advanced Fabry cardiomyopathy, relevant hypertrophy, and replacement fibrosis in "loco typico." No patients previously exhibited clinically relevant arrhythmias on Holter ECGs. Patients received an implantable loop recorder and were prospectively followed with telemedicine for a median of 1.2 years (range 0.3 to 2.0 years). The primary end point was a clinically meaningful event, which required a therapy change, captured with the loop recorder. Patients submitted data regularly (14 ± 11 times per month). During follow-up, 21 events were detected (including 4 asystole, i.e., ECG pauses ≥3 seconds) and 7 bradycardia events; 5 episodes of intermittent atrial fibrillation (>3 minutes) and 5 episodes of ventricular tachycardia (3 sustained and 2 nonsustained). Subsequently, as defined in the primary end point, 15 events leaded to a change of therapy. These patients required therapy with a pacemaker or cardioverter-defibrillator implantation and/or anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation. In conclusion, clinically relevant arrhythmias that require further device and/or medical therapy are often missed with Holter ECGs in patients with advanced stage Fabry cardiomyopathy, but they can be detected by telemonitoring with

  3. [Silent myocardial ischemia and exercise-induced arrhythmia detected by the exercise test in the total health promotion plan (THP)].

    PubMed

    Iwane, M; Shibe, Y; Itoh, K; Kinoshita, F; Kanagawa, Y; Kobayashi, M; Mugitani, K; Ohta, M; Ohata, H; Yoshikawa, A; Ikuta, Z; Nakamura, Y; Mohara, O

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the prevalence and characteristics of ischemic heart disease especially silent myocardial ischemia (SMI) and arrhythmia in need of careful observation in the exercise stress tests in the Total Health Promotion Plan (THP), which was conducted between 1994-96 for the purpose of measuring cardiopulmonary function. All workers (n = 4,918, 4,426 males) aged 18-60 yr old in an occupational field were studied. Exercise tests with an ergometer were performed by the LOPS protocol, in which the maximal workload was set up as a presumed 70-80% maximal oxygen intake, or STEP (original multistage protocol). ECG changes were evaluated with a CC5 lead. Two hundred and fifteen people refused the study because of a common cold, lumbago and so on. Of 4,703 subjects, 17 with abnormal rest ECG and 19 with probable anginal pain were excluded from the exercise tests. Of 4,667 who underwent the exercise test, 37 (0.79%) had ischemic ECG change, and 155 (3.32%) had striking arrhythmia. These 228 subjects then did a treadmill exercise test with Bruce protocol. Twenty-two (0.47% of 4,703) showed positive ECG change, 9 (0.19%) of 22 had abnormal findings on a 201Tl scan. 8 (0.17%) were diagnosed as SMI (Cohn I), in which the prevalence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoker and positive familial history of ischemic heart disease was greater than that of all subjects. In a 15-30 month follow up, none has developed cardiac accidents. Exercise-induced arrhythmia was detected in 11 (0.23%) subjects. Four were non-sustained ventricular tachycardia without any organic disease, 4 were ventricular arrhythmia based on cardiomyopathy detected by echocardiography, 2 were atrial fibrillation and another was WPW syndrome. It is therefore likely that the ergometer exercise test in THP was effective in preventing sudden death caused by ischemic heart disease or striking arrhythmia. PMID:11329953

  4. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  5. Weighing the adverse cardiac effects of fluoroquinolones: A risk perspective.

    PubMed

    Mehrzad, Raman; Barza, Michael

    2015-11-01

    A rare side effect of fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics is QT prolongation, which may result in serious arrhythmias. Most published comparative trials describe the relative risks among the drug class but do not focus on the incidence of serious arrhythmias. It is important for the prescriber to have a sense not only of relative risk but also of incidence to balance the risks against the other attributes of the individual members of the drug class. A review of English-language literature was performed to identify trials that provide data on the relative risk and, when able to be calculated, the incidence of adverse cardiac events among the commonly used FQs. Moxifloxacin had a several-fold higher risk of cardiac arrhythmias than levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin in randomized trials. However, the actual event rate was low in 2 of 3 studies. Given inconsistencies among the studies and the relative rarity of the events, the clinician need not base the choice of drug primarily on concern for a cardiac arrhythmia except in patients at the highest risk of such an event. PMID:26011799

  6. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. PMID:12966640

  7. Isolated Tricuspid Regurgitation: Initial Manifestation of Cardiac Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dong Woog; Park, Byung-Jo; Kim, In Sook; Jeong, Dong Seop

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid deposits in the heart are not exceptional in systemic amyloidosis. The clinical manifestations of cardiac amyloidosis may include restrictive cardiomyopathy, characterized by progressive diastolic and eventually systolic bi-ventricular dysfunction; arrhythmia; and conduction defects. To the best of our knowledge, no previous cases of isolated tricuspid regurgitation as the initial manifestation of cardiac amyloidosis have been reported. We describe a rare case of cardiac amyloidosis that initially presented with severe tricuspid regurgitation in a 42-year-old woman who was successfully treated with tricuspid valve replacement. Unusual surgical findings prompted additional evaluation that established a diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma. PMID:26665112

  8. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  9. Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia in 1.1 million young Swedish men: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Finn; Held, Claes; Neovius, Martin; Tynelius, Per; Sundström, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations of exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence with risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia. Design Cohort study. Setting General population in Sweden. Participants 1.1 million men who participated in mandatory military conscription between 1 August 1972 and 31 December 1995, at a median age of 18.2 years. Participants were followed until 31 December 2010. Main outcomes Associations between exercise capacity and muscle strength with risk of vascular disease and subgroups (ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and cardiovascular death) and risk of arrhythmia and subgroups (atrial fibrillation or flutter, bradyarrhythmia, supraventricular tachycardia, and ventricular arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death). Maximum exercise capacity was estimated by the ergometer bicycle test, and muscle strength was measured as handgrip strength by a hand dynamometer. High exercise capacity or muscle strength was deemed as above the median level. Results During a median follow-up of 26.3 years, 26 088 vascular disease events and 17 312 arrhythmia events were recorded. Exercise capacity was inversely associated with risk of vascular disease and its subgroups. Muscle strength was also inversely associated with vascular disease risk, driven by associations of higher muscle strength with lower risk of heart failure and cardiovascular death. Exercise capacity had a U shaped association with risk of arrhythmia, driven by a direct association with risk of atrial fibrillation and a U shaped association with bradyarrhythmia. Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of arrhythmia (specifically, lower risk of bradyarrhythmia and ventricular arrhythmia). The combination of high exercise capacity and high muscle strength was associated with a hazard ratio of 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.70) for vascular events and 0.92 (0.88 to 0.97) for arrhythmia compared with the combination of low exercise capacity and

  10. CaMKII-Based Regulation of Voltage-Gated Na+ Channel in Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Olha M.; Snyder, Jedidiah S.; Wolf, Roseanne M.; Pavlovicz, Ryan E.; Glynn, Patric; Curran, Jerry; Leymaster, Nicholas D.; Dun, Wen; Wright, Patrick J.; Cardona, Natalia; Qian, Lan; Mitchell, Colleen C.; Boyden, Penelope A.; Binkley, Philip F.; Li, Chenglong; Anderson, Mark E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Hund, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Human gene variants affecting ion channel biophysical activity and/or membrane localization are linked with potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias. However, the mechanism for many human arrhythmia variants remains undefined despite over a decade of investigation. Post-translational modulation of membrane proteins is essential for normal cardiac function. Importantly, aberrant myocyte signaling has been linked to defects in cardiac ion channel post-translational modifications and disease. We recently identified a novel pathway for post-translational regulation of the primary cardiac voltage-gated Na+ channel (Nav1.5) by CaMKII. However, a role for this pathway in cardiac disease has not been evaluated. Methods and Results We evaluated the role of CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation in human genetic and acquired disease. We report an unexpected link between a short motif in the Nav1.5 DI-DII loop, recently shown to be critical for CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation, and Nav1.5 function in monogenic arrhythmia and common heart disease. Experiments in heterologous cells and primary ventricular cardiomyocytes demonstrate that human arrhythmia susceptibility variants (A572D and Q573E) alter CaMKII-dependent regulation of Nav1.5 resulting in abnormal channel activity and cell excitability. In silico analysis reveals that these variants functionally mimic the phosphorylated channel resulting in increased susceptibility to arrhythmia-triggering afterdepolarizations. Finally, we report that this same motif is aberrantly regulated in a large animal model of acquired heart disease and in failing human myocardium. Conclusions We identify the mechanism for two human arrhythmia variants that affect Nav1.5 channel activity through direct effects on channel post-translational modification. We propose that the CaMKII phosphorylation motif in the Nav1.5 DI-DII cytoplasmic loop is a critical nodal point for pro-arrhythmic changes to Nav1.5 in congenital and acquired cardiac

  11. Cardiac loop ECG recording: a new noninvasive diagnostic test in recurrent syncope.

    PubMed

    Cumbee, S R; Pryor, R E; Linzer, M

    1990-01-01

    The most crucial step in diagnosing syncope is determining whether or not an arrhythmia is the cause. A new recording device, the continuous cardiac loop ECG recorder, affords prolonged ambulatory monitoring and can capture the rhythm at the time of syncope. To determine the impact of cardiac loop ECG recorders in diagnosing syncope, we reviewed the records of the first 48 patients referred for cardiac loop recording because of unexplained syncope or presyncope. Previous cardiac studies were nondiagnostic in all patients. In 36% of these patients, loop recording definitively determined whether an arrhythmia was the cause of symptoms. Median duration of monitoring was 28 days, with an average charge of $180 per month. Cardiac loop ECG recording is a convenient, safe, inexpensive, and potentially highly effective means of diagnosing unexplained syncope. PMID:2300833

  12. Exercise Compliance. A Data Documentation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherf, Joanne; Franklin, Barry A.

    1987-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Fitness and Rehabilitation Program of Sinai Hospital of Detroit implemented an exercise compliance data documentation system in 1984 which is used in its outpatient gymnasium cardiac fitness and rehabilitation program. This documentation system is described. (MT)

  13. Favourable outcome in idiopathic ventricular fibrillation with treatment aimed at prevention of high sympathetic tone and suppression of inducible arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Crijns, H. J.; Wiesfeld, A. C.; Posma, J. L.; Lie, K. I.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--In the absence of an obvious cause for cardiac arrest, patients with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation are difficult to manage. A subset of patients has inducible arrhythmias. In others sympathetic excitation plays a role in the onset of the cardiac arrest. This study evaluates a prospective stepped care approach in the management of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation, with therapy first directed at induced arrhythmias and secondly at adrenergic trigger events. SETTING--University Hospital. PATIENTS--10 consecutive patients successfully resuscitated from idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. INTERVENTIONS--Programmed electrical stimulation to determine inducibility, followed by serial drug treatment. Assessment of pre-arrest physical activity and mental stress status by interview, followed by beta blockade. Cardioverter-defibrillator implantation in non-inducible patients not showing significant arrest related sympathetic excitation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Recurrent cardiac arrest or ventricular tachycardia. RESULTS--Five patients were managed with serial drug treatment and four with beta blockade. In one patient a defibrillator was implanted. During a median follow up of 2.8 years (range 6 to 112 months) no patient died or experienced defibrillator shocks. One patient had a recurrence of a well tolerated ventricular tachycardia on disopyramide. CONCLUSIONS--Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation may be related to enhanced sympathetic activation. Prognosis may be favourable irrespective of the method of treatment. Whether the present approach enhances prognosis of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation remains to be determined. However, it may help to avoid potentially hazardous antiarrhythmic drugs or obviate the need for implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators. PMID:7488456

  14. Extreme respiratory sinus arrhythmia enables overwintering black bear survival--physiological insights and applications to human medicine.

    PubMed

    Laske, Timothy G; Harlow, Henry J; Garshelis, David L; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2010-10-01

    American black bears survive winter months without food and water while in a mildly hypothermic, hypometabolic, and inactive state, yet they appear to be able to return to near-normal systemic function within minutes of arousal. This study's goal was to characterize the cardiovascular performance of overwintering black bears and elicit the underlying mechanisms enabling survival. Mid-winter cardiac electrophysiology was assessed in four wild black bears using implanted data recorders. Paired data from early and late winter were collected from 37 wild bears, which were anesthetized and temporarily removed from their dens to record cardiac electrophysiological parameters (12-lead electrocardiograms) and cardiac dimensional changes (echocardiography). Left ventricular thickness, primary cardiac electrophysiological parameters, and cardiovascular response to threats ("fight or flight" response) were preserved throughout winter. Dramatic respiratory sinus arrhythmias were recorded (cardiac cycle length variations up to 865%) with long sinus pauses between breaths (up to 13 s). The accelerated heart rate during breathing efficiently transports oxygen, with the heart "resting" between breaths to minimize energy usage. This adaptive cardiac physiology may have broad implications for human medicine. PMID:20559779

  15. Cardiac sarcoidosis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, S W; Sharma, R; Underwood, R; Mittal, T

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is one of the most serious and unpredictable aspects of this disease state. Heart involvement frequently presents with arrhythmias or conduction disease, although myocardial infiltration resulting in congestive heart failure may also occur. The prognosis in cardiac sarcoidosis is highly variable, which relates to the heterogeneous nature of heart involvement and marked differences between racial groups. Electrocardiography and echocardiography often provide the first clue to the diagnosis, but advanced imaging studies using positron emission tomography and MRI, in combination with nuclear isotope perfusion scanning are now essential to the diagnosis and management of this condition. The identification of clinically occult cardiac sarcoidosis and the management of isolated and/or asymptomatic heart involvement remain both challenging and contentious. Corticosteroids remain the first treatment choice with the later substitution of immunosuppressive and steroid-sparing therapies. Heart transplantation is an unusual outcome, but when performed, the results are comparable or better than heart transplantation for other disease states. We review the epidemiology, developments in diagnostic techniques and the management of cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:26130811

  16. Production of arrhythmias by elevated carboxyhemoglobin in patients with coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sheps, D.S.; Herbst, M.C.; Hinderliter, A.L.; Adams, K.F.; Ekelund, L.G.; O'Neil, J.J.; Goldstein, G.M.; Bromberg, P.A.; Dalton, J.L.; Ballenger, M.N. )

    1990-09-01

    The object of this study was to assess the effects of exposure to 4% and 6% carboxyhemoglobin on ventricular arrhythmias in patients with coronary artery disease. This was a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. Forty-one nonsmokers with documented coronary artery disease were tested. On day 1, a training session with no exposure, the baseline carboxyhemoglobin level was measured, and a supine bicycle exercise test was done. On days 2 to 4, patients were exposed to room air, 100 ppm carbon monoxide (target, 4% carboxyhemoglobin) or 200 ppm carbon monoxide (target, 6% carboxyhemoglobin), and they then did supine bicycle exercise with radionuclide ventriculography. Ambulatory electrocardiogram recordings were made during the 4 consecutive days to determine the frequency of ventricular premature depolarization (VPD) at various intervals. The frequency of single VPD/h was significantly greater on the 6% carboxyhemoglobin day than on the room air day during the exercise period (167.72 +/- 37.99 for 6% carboxyhemoglobin compared with 127.32 +/- 28.22 for room air, P = 0.03). During exercise, the frequency of multiple VPD/h was greater on the 6% carboxyhemoglobin day compared with room air (9.59 +/- 3.70 on the 6% carboxyhemoglobin compared with 3.18 +/- 1.67 on room air, P = 0.02). Patients who developed increased single VPD during exercise on the 6% carboxyhemoglobin day were significantly older than those who had no increased arrhythmia, whereas patients who developed complex arrhythmias were also older and, in addition, exercised longer and had a higher peak workload during exercise. The number and complexity of ventricular arrhythmias increases significantly during exercise after carbon monoxide exposure producing 6% carboxyhemoglobin compared with room air but not after exposure producing 4% carboxyhemoglobin.

  17. Mechanisms of Ventricular Arrhythmias: From Molecular Fluctuations to Electrical Turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias have complex causes and mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation involving many clinical, experimental, and computational studies, effective biological therapeutics are still very limited. In this article, we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias by summarizing the state of knowledge spanning from the molecular scale to electrical wave behavior at the tissue and organ scales and how the complex nonlinear interactions integrate into the dynamics of arrhythmias in the heart. We discuss the challenges that we face in synthesizing these dynamics to develop safe and effective novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25340965

  18. Mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias: from molecular fluctuations to electrical turbulence.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias have complex causes and mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation involving many clinical, experimental, and computational studies, effective biological therapeutics are still very limited. In this article, we review our current understanding of the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmias by summarizing the state of knowledge spanning from the molecular scale to electrical wave behavior at the tissue and organ scales and how the complex nonlinear interactions integrate into the dynamics of arrhythmias in the heart. We discuss the challenges that we face in synthesizing these dynamics to develop safe and effective novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25340965

  19. An integrated circuit for wireless ambulatory arrhythmia monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyejung; Yazicioglu, Refet Firat; Torfs, Tom; Merken, Patrick; Van Hoof, Chris; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2009-01-01

    An ECG signal processor (ESP) is proposed for the low energy wireless ambulatory arrhythmia monitoring system. The ECG processor mainly performs filtering, compression, classification and encryption. The data compression flow consisting of skeleton and modified Huffman coding is the essential function to reduce the transmission energy consumption and the memory capacity, which are the most energy consuming part. The classification flow performs the arrhythmia analysis to alert the abnormality. The proposed ESP IC is implemented in 0.18-microm CMOS process and integrated into the wireless arrhythmia monitoring sensor platform. By integration of the ESP, the total system energy reduction is evaluated by 95.6%. PMID:19963908

  20. Absence of SOCS3 in the cardiomyocyte increases mortality in a gp130 dependent manner accompanied by contractile dysfunction and ventricular arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, Toshitaka; Murofushi, Yoshiteru; Zhou, Hanbing; Park, Stanley; Housman, Jonathan; Zhong, Zhao-Hua; Nakamura, Michinari; Machida, Mitsuyo; Hwang, Kyung-Kuk; Gu, Yusu; Dalton, Nancy D.; Yajima, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Hideo; Peterson, Kirk L; Knowlton, Kirk U.

    2011-01-01

    Background Suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) is a key negative-feedback regulator of gp130 receptor that provides crucial signaling for cardiac hypertrophy and survival; however, an in vivo role of SOCS3 regulation on cardiac gp130 signaling remains obscure. Methods and Results We generated cardiac-specific SOCS3 knockout (SOCS3 cKO) mice. These mice showed increased activation of gp130 downstream signaling targets (STAT3, ERK1/2, AKT and p38) from 15 weeks of age and developed cardiac dysfunction from around 25 weeks of age with signs of heart failure. Surprisingly, SOCS3 cKO failing hearts had minimal histological abnormalities with intact myofibril ultrastructure. In addition, Ca2+ transients were significantly increased in SOCS3 cKO failing hearts compared to wild-type (WT) hearts. We also found that Ser23/24 residues of troponin I were hypophosphorylated in SOCS3 cKO hearts before the manifestation of cardiac dysfunction. These data suggested the presence of abnormalities in myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity in SOCS3 cKO mice. In addition to the contractile dysfunction, we found various ventricular arrhythmias in SOCS3 cKO non-failing hearts accompanied by a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ overload. To determine the contribution of gp130 signaling to the cardiac phenotype that occurs with SOCS3 deficiency, we generated cardiac-specific gp130 and SOCS3 double knockout mice. Double KO mice lived significantly longer and had different histological abnormalities when compared to SOCS3 cKO mice; thus, demonstrating the importance of gp130 signaling in the SOCS3 cKO cardiac phenotype. Conclusions Our results demonstrate an important role of SOCS3 regulation on cardiac gp130 signaling in the pathogenesis of contractile dysfunction and ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:22082679