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Sample records for doe environmental audits

  1. Performance objectives and criteria for conducting DOE environmental audits

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    This document contains the Performance Objectives and Criteria (POC) that have been developed for environmental audits and assessments conducted by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The Environmental POC can serve multiple purposes. Primarily, they are to serve as guidelines for the technical specialists conducted the audits and assessments, and for the team management. The POC can also serve as supporting documents for training of technical discipline specialists and Team Leaders and as bases for DOE programs and field offices and contractors conducting audit or assessment activities or improving environmental protection programs. It must be recognized that not all of the POC will necessarily apply to all DOE facilities. The users of this document must rely upon their knowledge of the facility and their professional judgment, or the judgment of qualified environmental professionals to determine the applicability of each POC. The POC cover eleven technical disciplines: air; surface water and drinking water quality; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; radiation; quality assurance; inactive waste sites and releases; ecological and cultural resources; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); and environmental management systems.

  2. Environmental Management Audit: Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Audit completed for the Southwestern Power Administration. During this Audit, activities and records were reviewed and personnel interviewed. The onsite portion of the Southwestern Audit was conducted from November 30 through December 11, 1992, by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and activities as part of the Assistant Secretary`s Environmental Audit Program. This program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities/activities regarding compliance with laws, regulations, DOE Orders, formal written procedures, compliance agreements, and Best Management Practices (BMPs). This internal oversight function plays an important role in improving the compliance status of DOE operations. The Environmental Management Audit stresses DOE`s policy that it is the responsibility of line management to conduct operations in an environmentally sound and safe manner. The Environmental Management Audit focuses on management systems and programs, whereas the Environmental Baseline Audit conducted in March 1991 focused on specific compliance issues. The scope of the Southwestern Environmental Management Audit included a review of all systems and functions necessary for effective environmental management. Specific areas of review included: Organizational Structure; Environmental Commitment; Environmental Protection Programs; Formality of Environmental Programs; Internal and External Communication; Staff Resources, Training, and Development; and Program Evaluation, Reporting, and Corrective Action.

  3. Environmental Management Audit: Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Audit completed for the Southwestern Power Administration. During this Audit, activities and records were reviewed and personnel interviewed. The onsite portion of the Southwestern Audit was conducted from November 30 through December 11, 1992, by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and activities as part of the Assistant Secretary's Environmental Audit Program. This program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities/activities regarding compliance with laws, regulations, DOE Orders, formal written procedures, compliance agreements, and Best Management Practices (BMPs). This internal oversight function plays an important role in improving the compliance status of DOE operations. The Environmental Management Audit stresses DOE's policy that it is the responsibility of line management to conduct operations in an environmentally sound and safe manner. The Environmental Management Audit focuses on management systems and programs, whereas the Environmental Baseline Audit conducted in March 1991 focused on specific compliance issues. The scope of the Southwestern Environmental Management Audit included a review of all systems and functions necessary for effective environmental management. Specific areas of review included: Organizational Structure; Environmental Commitment; Environmental Protection Programs; Formality of Environmental Programs; Internal and External Communication; Staff Resources, Training, and Development; and Program Evaluation, Reporting, and Corrective Action.

  4. Routine environmental audit of the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Hanford Site (Hanford), Richland, Washington. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents an reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Washington regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted May 2--13, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  5. Environmental auditing: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Dixon; Wilson, Melvin J.

    1994-07-01

    The environmental audit has become a regular part of corporate environmental management in Canada and is also gaining recognition in the public sector. A 1991 survey of 75 private sector companies across Canada revealed that 76% (57/75) had established environmental auditing programs. A similar survey of 19 federal, provincial, and municipal government departments revealed that 11% (2/19) had established such programs. The information gained from environmental audits can be used to facilitate and enhance environmental management from the single facility level to the national and international levels. This paper is divided into two sections: section one examines environmental audits at the facility/company level and discusses environmental audit characteristics, trends, and driving forces not commonly found in the available literature. Important conclusions are: that wherever possible, an action plan to correct the identified problems should be an integral part of an audit, and therefore there should be a close working relationship between auditors, managers, and employees, and that the first audits will generally be more difficult, time consuming, and expensive than subsequent audits. Section two looks at environmental audits in the broader context and discusses the relationship between environmental audits and three other environmental information gathering/analysis tools: environmental impact assessments, state of the environment reports, and new systems of national accounts. The argument is made that the information collected by environmental audits and environmental impact assessments at the facility/company level can be used as the bases for regional and national state of the environment reports and new systems of national accounts.

  6. Environmental audits: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, P; Atkinson, S F

    1987-05-01

    This paper presents a literature review focused on predictive technique audits, one of the types of audit considered to have the greatest potential role in improving environmental impact assessment practice. The literature review is limited to US literature with the exception of a few UK audits, one undertaken by Tomlinson at the University of Aberdeen. The authors are, however, aware that literature from other countries exists on this subject, for example from Canada and South Africa.In the review, predictive technique audits performed for or by the US Bureau of Land Management, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the US Corps of Engineers, together with the Wisconsin Power Plant Impact Study are described. In addition, articles describing the auditing of models designed to predict environmental change are reviewed, before details of auditing activity in the UK are presented. PMID:24253996

  7. Technical support services to assist the Office of Environmental Audit in conducting the DOE Environmental Survey and to provide technical assistance on Environmental Compliance issues. Technical progress report, February 16, 1991--August 16, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    HALLIBURTON NUS received authorization from DOE on August 14, 1987 to provide technical support to assist the Office of Environmental Audit (OEV) in conducting the DOE Environmental Survey and to provide technical assistance on environmental compliance issues. The overall contract is to accomplish a one-time, no-fault baseline Survey of all DOE operating facilities, and to provide technical assistance and support for the resolution of environmental compliance issues. NUS has completed the Preliminary Reports and continues to support DOE on the Prioritization and Tiger Team Assessment efforts. The project requires a broad range of environmental protection expertise, necessitating senior-level personnel as the primary project staff. Many of the tasks assigned by DOE require quick startup and performance, and several tasks may be active at any one time. The objective of the DOE Environmental Survey Program is to identify and prioritize areas of existing environmental risk at 36 DOE facilities. NUS`role is to technically assist the Office of Environmental Audit in the implementation of the Surveys.

  8. Environmental Compliance Audit& Assessment Program Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Thorson, Patrick; Baskin, David; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Wahl, Linnea; Hatayama, Howard; Pauer, Ronald

    2009-03-13

    This document describes the elements, schedule, roles, and responsibilities of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program (ECAAP). The ECAAP has been developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 450.1A,1 and Executive Order 13423.2 These referenced Orders stipulate that government agencies must develop environmental compliance audit programs to monitor and improve compliance with environmental regulations. As stated specifically in the DOE Order, as a part of a DOE facility's Environmental Management System (EMS), 'An environmental compliance audit and review program that identifies compliance deficiencies and root causes of non-compliance' shall be developed and implemented. The ECAAP has also been developed to satisfy LBNL's institutional technical assurance assessment requirements promulgated in the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program (LBNL/PUB-5344) and described by the ES&H Technical Assurance Program (TAP) Manual (LBNL/PUB-913E). The ES&H TAP Manual provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs with the intent to provide assurance that these programs comply with their guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented. As required by the DOE and Executive Orders and by LBNL's TAP, the goal of the ECAAP is to identify environmental regulatory compliance deficiencies and to determine their respective causes. The ECAAP then provides a means of correcting any deficiencies identified, and leads to continually improving environmental compliance performance.

  9. EPA clarifies its environmental auditing policy

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, L.L.

    1994-10-01

    EPA's audit policy is entitled ''Environmental Auditing Policy Statement.'' EPA's current policy is intended to encourage regulated entities to develop, implement and periodically upgrade environmental auditing programs. The policy outlines the elements EPA believes must be included in an audit program if it is to be effective. These include: Explicit top management support for environmental auditing and commitment to follow up on audit findings; An environmental auditing function independent of auditing activities; Adequate team staffing and auditor training; Explicit audit program objectives, scope, resources and frequency; A process that collects, analyzes, interprets and documents information sufficient to achieve audit objectives. A process that includes specific procedure to prepare promptly candid, clear and appropriate written reports on audit findings, corrective actions and schedules for implementation; and A process that includes quality assurance procedures.

  10. Routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This document contains the findings identified during the routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, conducted September 12--23, 1994. The audit included a review of all Ames Laboratory operations and facilities supporting DOE-sponsored activities. The audit`s objective is to advise the Secretary of Energy, through the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, as to the adequacy of the environmental protection programs established at Ames Laboratory to ensure the protection of the environment, and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE requirements.

  11. Environmental audits -- Defining measurable value and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P.

    1998-07-01

    It is well accepted that historically traditional find and fix environmental audits are at best, short-term solutions. Such reactive thinking does not effectively identify the cause(s), are often short-lived and when facilities are re-evaluated, tend to frustrate any serious environmental stewardship program. More proactive thinking embraces the identifying and aggressive follow-up toward closure of causes. In any organization where audits are a part of proactive environmental company policies, even the latter progressive approach may not be a high enough plateau. Progressive audit programs include also, the essential ingredient to evaluate program strengths, avoiding the disastrous perceptions that audit is an evaluation of job performances. Establishment of baseline trust emphasizing the positive as well as deficiencies reinforces cooperation and builds winning relationships. Assurances of the sustainability of compliance through employee efforts though, cannot be guaranteed no matter what the regulation or how strong the company policy. Guarantees are few, but a more assured reinforcement of sustained buy-in can be through the identification and communication of audit value and benefits. Value and benefits are often thought of in terms of helping facilities achieve and maintain compliance while avoiding notices of violation and fines. While these among other objectives are the foundation reasons for assessing, a deeper, big picture analysis of employee effort and measurable value is required. Skillful audit teams use their perspective to identify opportunities and take on non-traditional roles to assist facilities transcend corrective action toward and maintenance of compliance. A measurable value and benefits driven approach in association with compliance objectives, enhanced by strong communication, reinforces the very foundation of trust and stewardship within the organization.

  12. Environmental audit, Bonneville Power Administration, lower Columbia area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Audit conducted by the DOE Headquarters Office of Environmental Audit within the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) Lower Columbia Area. The BPA facilities included in the Audit are the Ross Complex in Vancouver, Washington; the substations of North Bonneville, North Bonneville Annex, Camas, and Longview within the state of Washington; and the Acton and Troutdale Substations within the state of Oregon. The independent Audit was conducted by a team of professionals from DOE and contractors. The purpose of the Audit is to provide the Secretary of Energy, Admiral James D. Watkins, Ret., with the status of environmental programs within BPA's Lower Columbia Area. The Environmental Audit team identified 25 findings dealing with the lack of conformance with federal and state laws and regulations and DOE Orders, and 7 findings in which BMPs were not attained. Although all findings require corrective action, none required cessation of operations or reflect situations that present an immediate risk to public health or the environment. The Audit team noted inadequacies in PCB management included storage, labeling, reporting, and spill control. The most significant causal factors for the findings include lack of policy implementation throughout the Lower Columbia Area, inadequate training of personnel charged with environmental protection, lack of standard operating procedures for many programs, lack of reviews and appraisals, and an inaccurate perception of low risk for environmental concerns.

  13. Watchdog Audits Environmental Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Recent reorganization of the General Accounting Office is reviewed. With regard to environmental concerns it is aiming to see if federal environmental programs are meeting the congressionally mandated objectives of laws. Surveys and reviews are explained. (BL)

  14. Environmental audit of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), principally in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. The audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s), Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), beginning September 13, 1993, and ending September 23, 1993. The scope of the audit at SREL was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater/soil, sediment, and biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive Waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of SREL operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices.

  15. Evolution of an environmental audit program

    SciTech Connect

    Maday, J.H.; Kuusinen, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    Environmental audits are discussed. Within todays corporate culture, auditors and auditees alike, have been assigned stewardship over the environment. Audits provide a quality assurance check to contribute to the verification process, helping to ensure the management practices associated with the environmental management system are in place, functioning, and adequate. The objective of the audit is to help improve the effectiveness of that basic management system while at the same time determining compliance with the environmental requirements. Performing the audit in a well documented manner, using technique knowledgeable teams, will provide defendable benefits should the audit be challenged and will enhance the credibility of the existing environmental management system.

  16. Software Assists in Extensive Environmental Auditing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Matherne, Charlie; Selinsky, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Base Environmental Management System (BEMS) is a Web-based application program for managing and tracking audits by the Environmental Office of Stennis Space Center in conformity with standard 14001 of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 14001). (This standard specifies requirements for an environmental-management system.) BEMS saves time by partly automating what were previously manual processes for creating audit checklists; recording and tracking audit results; issuing, tracking, and implementing corrective-action requests (CARs); tracking continuous improvements (CIs); and tracking audit results and statistics. BEMS consists of an administration module and an auditor module. As its name suggests, the administration module is used to administer the audit. It helps administrators to edit the list of audit questions; edit the list of audit locations; assign mandatory questions to locations; track, approve, and edit CARs; and edit completed audits. The auditor module is used by auditors to perform audits and record audit results: it helps the auditors to create audit checklists, complete audits, view completed audits, create CARs, record and acknowledge CIs, and generate reports from audit results.

  17. Software Assists in Extensive Environmental Auditing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Matherne, Charlie

    2003-01-01

    The Base Environmental Management System (BEMS) is a Web-based application program for managing and tracking audits by the Environmental Office of Stennis Space Center in conformity with standard 14001 of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 14001). (This standard specifies requirements for an environmental-management system.) BEMS saves time by partly automating what were previously manual processes for creating audit checklists; recording and tracking audit results; issuing, tracking, and implementing corrective-action requests (CARs); tracking continuous improvements (CIs); and tracking audit results and statistics. BEMS consists of an administration module and an auditor module. As its name suggests, the administration module is used to administer the audit. It helps administrators to edit the list of audit questions; edit the list of audit locations; assign mandatory questions to locations; track, approve, and edit CARs; and edit completed audits. The auditor module is used by auditors to perform audits and record audit results: it helps the auditors to create audit checklists, complete audits, view completed audits, create CARs, record and acknowledge CIs, and generate reports from audit results.

  18. Software Assists in Extensive Environmental Auditing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Matherne, Charlie

    2002-01-01

    The Base Enivronmental Management System (BEMS) is a Web-based application program for managing and tracking audits by the Environmental Office of Stennis Space Center in conformity with standard 14001 of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 14001). (This standard specifies requirements for an environmental-management system.) BEMS saves time by partly automating what were previously manual processes for creating audit checklists; recording and tracking audit results; issuing, tracking, and implementing corrective-action requests (CARs); tracking continuous improvements (CIs); and tracking audit results and statistics. BEMS consists on an administration module and an auditor module. As its name suggests, the administration module is used to administer the audit. It helps administrators to edit the list of audit questions; edit the list of audit locations; assign manditory questions to locations; track, approve, and edit CARs; and edit completed audits. The auditor module is used by auditors to perform audits and record audit results: It helps the auditors to create audit checklists, complete audits, view completed audits, create CARs, record and acknowledge CIs, and generate reports from audit results.

  19. Environmental audit experiences in China

    SciTech Connect

    Anwar, H.A.; Stover, J.

    1999-07-01

    As part of the massive government reforms announced at the meeting of the Ninth National People's Congress (NPC) in March 1998, the State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA) was elevated to a new type of government entity. The new status, described as ministry-level, represents a substantial strengthening of SEPA's authority, however, significant questions remain as to whether or not this will translate into more effective environmental policies. Previously SEPA lacked authority and backing within the government to advance and support personnel and policy decisions down through its own administrative hierarchy from central to regional to local levels. This paper will use these issues to present a proper background when examining Environmental Audit (EA) case studies in China, and examining what future EA experiences may be like. It will include discussions of regional differences in enforcement standards and methods, the implications of the new Land Management Law, and elaboration on environmental liability issues and potential Superfund-type legislation in China.

  20. Elements of an effective environmental auditing program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Significant advances have been made the last few years in the approach to and role of environmental compliance auditing in industry. Expectations of stakeholders, the public and governmental agencies continue to grow regarding assurance of compliance and environmental protection. These growing expectations have been drivers for improved auditing programs. This paper will provide a discussion of an effective environmental auditing program from industry`s point of view. It will identify and discuss the key elements needed for auditing environmental compliance, discuss how these elements are incorporated into industry programs and how these elements have been used to evaluate compliance in Conoco. In addition, a discussion of a method to tie compliance auditing to management system elements in order to facilitate systematic improvement in environmental performance will be presented.

  1. Elements of an effective environmental auditing program

    SciTech Connect

    McLemore, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Significant advances have been made the last few years in the approach to and role of environmental compliance auditing in the petroleum industry. Expectations of stakeholders, the public and governmental agencies continue to grow regarding assurance of compliance and environmental protection. These growing expectations have been drivers for improved auditing programs. This paper will provide a discussion of an effective environmental auditing program from industry`s point of view. It will identify and discuss the key elements needed for auditing environmental compliance, discuss how these elements are incorporated into industry programs and how these elements have been used to evaluate compliance in Conoco. In addition, a discussion of a method to tie compliance auditing to management system elements in order to facilitate systematic improvement in environmental performance will be presented.

  2. General Motors plant environmental auditing program

    SciTech Connect

    Barzotti, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses General Motors environmental audit activities in the stationary source area. From the late 1960s through the 1970s, a wide range of environmental and safety legislation was enacted. As a result, GM expanded its environmental staff to ensure compliance and increase employee awareness of regulatory requirements. This report traces the development and operation of the GM Industrial Environmental Performance Review or Plant Environmental Audit, as it is most often called. The Plant Environmental Audit Group was established in 1972 to provide corporate, divisional, and local management with accurate, periodic engineering evaluations of the environmental conditions at each manufacturing facility. The scope of the plant audit includes the environmental categories of air and water quality, waste materials handling and disposal, energy conservation, and certain OSHA-related functions that are considered plant engineering responsibilities (noise abatement, maintenance records, etc.).

  3. Performing environmental audits: An engineer's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Morelli, J.A. )

    1994-02-01

    Today, environmental auditing is both a technical exercise and a legal art. To perform a comprehensive and effective environmental audit requires a team of individuals who combined have broad engineering skills, a knowledge of chemistry, and specialized legal experience with all the relevant environmental regulations. Because the audit involves such highly qualified individuals, it is typically quite expensive. Nonetheless, the cost is well worth the investment, because of the high stakes involved in environmental legislation and litigation. Simply put, the cost of non-compliance can far outweigh the costs associated with a comprehensive audit. The paper describes starting the audit, the ideal team, a standard method, doing a compliance audit, data analysis after the audit, advantages and disadvantages, and policies on auditing. The paper briefly describes the four factors that the Department of Justice considers in deciding whether to bring criminal prosecution for violation of an environmental statute. The four factors are: voluntary disclosure; cooperation; preventive measures and compliance program; and pervasiveness of non-compliance.

  4. Routine environmental audit of the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12 Plant), Anderson County, Tennessee. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), State of Tennessee regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted August 22-September 2, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of DOE environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  5. Environmental projects. Volume 3: Environmental compliance audit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex is part of NASA's Deep Space Network, one of the world's largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation networks. Activities at Goldstone are carried out in support of six large parabolic dish antennas. In support of the national goal of the preservation of the environment and the protection of human health and safety, NASA, JPL and Goldstone have adopted a position that their operating installations shall maintain a high level of compliance with Federal, state, and local laws governing the management of hazardous substances, abestos, and underground storage tanks. A JPL version of a document prepared as an environmental audit of Goldstone operations is presented. Both general and specific items of noncompliance at Goldstone are identified and recommendations are provided for corrective actions.

  6. Regulatory compliance, management assurance drive environmental audits

    SciTech Connect

    Diberto, M. )

    1994-07-01

    As environmental protection takes on greater priority, more companies are developing environmental auditing programs. Details of these programs vary, but they share a basic goal--to verify that environmental, health and safety activities comply with company policies, and federal, state and local regulations. The growth of environmental auditing has been driven by the same forces that since 1970 have changed many aspects the business-environment relationship. In addition, regulations, court case precedents and public expectations are forcing companies to disclose much more about their environmental performance than in the past. The handful of companies that developed auditing programs considered them internal tools for evaluating environmental performance in their facilities and operations. As the discipline has spread and environmental regulations have proliferated, auditing increasingly has been driven by a need to assure senior management that their companies are in compliance and sound environmental procedures are being used. To achieve these goals, companies systematically design and conduct environmental audits to address relevant concerns, and appropriately document and report all findings.

  7. Routine environmental audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, California, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California (SNL/CA). During this audit the activities the Audit Team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from preview audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of California regulators, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from February 22 through March 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The audit`s functional scope was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management and a programmatic evaluation of NEPA and inactive waste sites.

  8. EPA to reassess environmental auditing policy statement

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, L.L.

    1994-08-01

    In a memorandum issued May 13, 1994, Assistant Administrator for Enforcement and Compliance Assurance Steven Herman announced EPA's plans to reassess its current policy regarding environmental auditing and self-evaluation by the regulated community. The memorandum provides encouraging news to industry, which has long asserted that EPA's current auditing policy frustrates, not fosters, critical self-evaluation. EPA states in the memorandum its intention to base its reevaluation of its environmental auditing policies on an empirical approach to ensure that any decision either to reinforce or change existing policies is informed by fact. By the end of this summer, EPA intends to take four actions it believes will be consistent with this general approach.

  9. Comprehensive baseline environmental audit of former underground test areas in Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of Former Underground Test Areas (FUTAS) in the States of Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico. DOE and contractor systems for management of environmental protection activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were not within the scope of the audit. The audit was conducted May 16-May 26, 1994, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program{close_quotes}, establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is to enhance environmental protection and minimize risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission using systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE`s environmental programs within line organizations and supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. These evaluations function as a vehicle through which the Secretary and program managers are apprised of the status and vulnerabilities of Departmental environmental activities and environmental management systems. Several types of evaluations are conducted, including: (1) comprehensive baseline environmental audits; (2) routine environmental audits; (3) environmental management assessments; and (4) special issue reviews.

  10. ISO 14000 - the International Environmental Management Standard: Potential impacts on environmental management and auditing in the electric power generation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntlett, S.B.; Pierce, J.L.; Pierce, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    In the framework of environmental management, the concept of voluntary environmental compliance auditing is not in itself a new development. Environmentally conscious firms have for more than a decade, undertaken voluntary audits to help achieve and maintain compliance with environmental regulations and to help identify and correct unregulated or poorly regulated environmental hazard. The firms undertaking the audits were motivated by a desire to mitigate legal and financial risks and/or the desire to be a highly responsible member of the corporate community. Much of the early attention to environmental auditing was in the chemical process industries. Today, there are four current trends affecting environmental auditing: (1) the practice is becoming widespread in all industry groups in both large and small firms; (2) environmental management and audit methodolgies and approaches are being codified in the form of written national and International standards; (3) environmental management programs and in-house audits are increasingly being certified by independent auditors (who are not associated with regulatory agencies); and (4) the certifications are being viewed as marketing and public relations tools. The adoption of ISO 14000 is destined to become the most significant development in international environmental management and auditing. International standards for the development of Environmental Management Systems and the execution of environmental audits do not currently exist. Individual countries, such as England and France, have national standards. One multi-national standard currently exists--the European Economic Community`s Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS). The United States does not have a national environmental management and auditing standard.

  11. United States sentencing guidelines: Implications for environmental auditing

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, P.S.

    1997-06-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the US Department of Justice (USDOJ), the US Sentencing Commission and state environmental protection agencies have all issued guidelines, policy statements or proposals which are supposed to encourage companies to conduct environmental audits and to disclose the results of those audits to environmental agencies. Audits and more focused investigations resulting from questions raised by the audits are often conducted in such a way as to protect the audits or investigations from disclosure to USEPA, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) or the public. By meeting the confidentiality and other requirements of attorney-client privilege, the work product privilege or other criteria, companies preserve the opportunity to keep audit information confidential. The purpose of this presentation is to review the draft US Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations Convicted of Environmental Crimes (guidelines) and determine under what circumstances it would be beneficial to disclose privileged audit information in light of the guidelines.

  12. Routine environmental audit of the K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted February 14 through February 25, 1994, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The Routine Environmental Audit for the K-25 site was conducted as an environmental management assessment, supported through reviews of the Waste Management Program and the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. The assessment was conducted jointly with, and built upon, the results provided by the ``DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office Environment, Safety, health and Quality Assurance Appraisal at the K-25 Site.`` DOE 5482.1B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The purpose of this assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy and senior DOE managers with concise independent information as part of DOE`s continuing effort to improve environmental program performance. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and the minimization of risk to public health and the environment. The routine environmental audit is one method by which EH-24 accomplishes its mission, utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations.

  13. DOE environmental assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment on the proposed downhole steam generator field test in Kern County, California. Based on these findings DOE has determined that the proposed action does not

  14. Environmental Audit of the Grand Junction Projects Office

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is located in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately south and west of the Grand Junction city limits. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Colorado Raw Materials Office at the present-day Grand Junction Projects Office in 1947, to aid in the development of a viable domestic uranium industry. Activities at the site included sampling uranium concentrate; pilot-plant milling research, including testing and processing of uranium ores; and operation of a uranium mill pilot plant from 1954 to 1958. The last shipment of uranium concentrate was sent from GJPO in January, 1975. Since that time the site has been utilized to support various DOE programs, such as the former National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), and the Technical Measurements Center (TMC). All known contamination at GJPO is believed to be the result of the past uranium milling, analyses, and storage activities. Hazards associated with the wastes impounded at GJPO include surface and ground-water contamination and potential radon and gamma-radiation exposure. This report documents the results of the Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Grand Junction Baseline Environmental Audit was conducted from May 28 to June 12, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at GJPO, as well as GJPO activities at the State-Owned Temporary Repository. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Environmental program audit, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The environmental monitoring program, environmental control equipment and its use, and the facility's compliance with DOE orders, Federal and State laws and regulations were evaluated in this audit. No imminent threat to public health and safety was discovered. A needed quality assurance program is being added. Recommendations are given. (PSB)

  16. Environmental audit of the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Environmental Restoration (LEHR-ER) Project at University of California-Davis (UCD), Davis, California. The scope of the audit at the LEHR-ER was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater and soils/sediment/biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of LEHR-ER operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices (BMPs).

  17. Facing corporate America`s environmental auditing dilemma

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, M.M.; Holloway, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    American corporations are currently facing a dilemma over environmental auditing: are the potential benefits of auditing, such as assurance that compliance efforts are successful and awareness of any problem areas, outweighed by the risk of creating a road map for agency enforcement or litigation? Although this is a question that cannot be easily answered, the answer may lie, in large part, in attaining some reasonable level of protection for information uncovered in audits. Recognizing this, there is a growing movement to create a ``safe environment`` for corporate environmental auditing. The push, which includes efforts to alter agency policy regarding disclosure of audit materials and to pass state privilege legislation protecting such materials, has gained momentum as agency enforcement activities have increased. The government`s increased use of criminal sanctions and promotion of auditing by groups such as the International Standards Organization have added to the urgency of the situation.

  18. Environmental auditing of the Kamojang Geothermal Power Plant - Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Radja, V.T.; SulasdI, D.

    1996-12-31

    Environmental Auditing of the Kamojang Geothermal Power Station is based on a monitoring programme which focuses on those potential adverse environmental impacts identified in the Environmental Impact Analysis. Information gained from environmental monitoring with regard to the environmental quality shows that an adverse impact do not occur.

  19. Auditing environmental, health and safety management systems in E&P companies: A second generation auditing program

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.J.; Guckian, W.M.; Moore, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the development of a method of performing Management Systems Audits of Environmental, Health and Safety (EH&S) programs in upstream oil and gas companies. It describes how the results from the compliance auditing system presented in SPE Paper 25955, {open_quotes}Initiating an Audit Program: A Case History{close_quotes} were combined with a system Categorizing EH&S activities into several management systems defined by regulations and good operational practices, and used to perform short term {open_quotes}Pareto-style{close_quotes} audits (e.g., 80% of the value from 20% of the time). A comparison is made of this type of audit model with the classic accounting audit model. Examples from Management System Audits of ARCO`s foreign and domestic operations are used. Included are discussions of the economic benefit of performing EH&S Audits and the benefit of developing a method of auditing considering the new ISO 14000 standard for environmental auditing and the proposed ISO safety auditing standard. The conclusions presented are that auditing by experienced personnel using an auditing template developed exclusively for upstream operations provides benefits to the company in the areas of compliance, management systems development and education of first line operations personnel as well as resulting in an overall reduction in the cost of an audit. A further conclusion will be that trends in international standardization appear to be mandating an EH&S auditing program for those companies planning to do business outside the United States.

  20. Internal environmental protection audits: a suggested guide for US Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barisas, S.; Polich, J.; Habegger, L.; Surles, T.

    1983-08-01

    This manual has been prepared for use by any DOE facility as an aid for conducting an internal environmental-protection audit. The manual is organized in modular format, with each module covering a separate area of environmental protection. The questions within each module were developed from existing DOE orders, executive orders, federal statutes, and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations issued pursuant to specific environmental legislation. A bibliography of such legislation is included at the end of this section. Each module also includes questions about a facility's use of industrial standards of practice.

  1. 41 CFR 102-118.300 - How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? 102-118.300 Section 102-118.300 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.300 How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? Your...

  2. 41 CFR 102-118.300 - How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? 102-118.300 Section 102-118.300 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.300 How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? Your...

  3. 41 CFR 102-118.280 - What advantages does the prepayment audit offer my agency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What advantages does the prepayment audit offer my agency? 102-118.280 Section 102-118.280 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.280 What advantages does the prepayment audit offer my...

  4. 41 CFR 102-118.300 - How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? 102-118.300 Section 102-118.300 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.300 How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? Your...

  5. 41 CFR 102-118.300 - How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? 102-118.300 Section 102-118.300 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.300 How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? Your...

  6. 41 CFR 102-118.300 - How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? 102-118.300 Section 102-118.300 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.300 How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? Your...

  7. The School Curriculum and Environmental Education: A School Environmental Audit Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conde, Maria del Carmen; Sanchez, J. Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Thirteen primary and pre-primary schools in Extremadura (Spain) were participants in an educational research project, "Ecocentros", based on school environmental audits (eco-audits). To understand the contribution these experiences can make to achieving the objectives of environmental education, it is essential to know what is actually…

  8. Environmental Audit, Rifle, Gunnison and Grand Junction UMTRA Project Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the results of the comprehensive baseline Environmental Audit completed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites at Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. Included in the Audit were the actual abandoned mill sites, associated transportation and disposal cell facilities, and representative examples of the more than 4,000 known vicinity properties. Sites investigated include: Climax Mill Site, Truck/Train Haul Route, Cotter Transfer Station, Cheney Disposal Cell, Rifle Mill Sites (Old and New Rifle), Gunnison Mill Site, Vicinity Properties, and Estes Gulch and Proposed Landfill Site No. 1 Disposal Cells. The UMTRA Audit was a comprehensive baseline audit which considered all environmental programs and the activities associated with ongoing and planned remediation at the UMTRA sites listed above. Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was not considered during this investigation. The Audit Team looked at the following technical disciplines: air, surface water/drinking water, groundwater, soil/sediment/biota, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, quality assurance, radiation, inactive waste sites, and environmental management. 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Contingency view of corporate environmental auditing and implications for public policy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Corporate environmental auditing refers to management practices instituted within private sector corporations for monitoring the performance of internal environmental quality control systems and assuring internal compliance with standards established by government environmental laws and corporate environmental policies. Common characteristics that help to define corporate environmental auditing as a management control program include periodic and systematic review of company facilities and operations by a designated audit team functionally independent of the activities being audited, use of detailed checklists or questionnaires in the audit, development of special audit reports for management, and establishment of procedures for ensuring correction of environmental problems or deficiencies found in the audit. Contingency theory was employed to identify organizational factors of potential importance in corporate decisions related to institutional of environmental auditing programs. An interview survey was conducted among chief environmental managers at sixteen corporations having environmental audit programs and eight corporations without audit programs. The cases studied suggest corporate environmental auditing is more likely to be undertaken by corporations with more complex environmental organizations and diversified environmental activities, and corporations which rely on more informal systems of internal communication. Companies with environmental auditing programs had been more affected by environmental compliance problems.

  10. Environmental auditing and the role of the accountancy profession: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Moor, Philippe; de Beelde, Ignace

    2005-08-01

    This review of the literature on environmental auditing and the potential role of accountants distinguishes between compliance audits and audits of the environmental management system. After an extensive introduction to the concept, this review focuses on the similarities and differences between an environmental audit and a financial statement audit. The general approach to both types of audits is similar, except that environmental audits are largely unregulated. Both audits place an emphasis on the evaluation of control systems, which is an argument in favor of external auditors playing a role in environmental audits. Another argument for including external accountants is their code of ethics. However, these professionals seem to be reluctant to enter the field of environmental auditing. It is argued that this reluctance is because of a lack of generally accepted principles for conducting environmental audits. If external accountants are engaged in environmental auditing, they should be part of multidisciplinary teams that also include scientists and engineers to avoid a too strong focus on procedures. Rather than treating these audits as totally different, it is proposed that there be a move towards integrated, or even universal, audits. PMID:15995890

  11. DOE`s project-oriented SAVEnergy audit program

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, K.

    1995-10-01

    The SAVEnergy program was developed as a result of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 which mandated that the Secretary of Energy establish audit teams. The SAVEnergy program complies with Federal legislation that requires government agencies to function with slightly different parameters than the private commercial sector. This program has proven enormously popular and successful with Federal agencies. This paper addresses those components considered during program development that were built in to ensure program success. This paper will discuss how this program was successful in leading to project implementation and how SAVEnergy can serve as a model to other Federal, utility, and private sector programs.

  12. Give commitment, audits top priority in safety, environmental matters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-20

    Business and industry need to adhere to safety and environmental regulations more than ever to survive today. As the number of standards multiplies and fines and penalties grow more severe, careful auditing and reporting procedures and management systems that ensure corrections and compliance are critical. Plant management must take steps to ensure compliance. Failure to meet standards incurs risks in both safety and environmental matters. In some cases, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Department of Justice pursue criminal sanctions on offenders. Justice Department guidelines identify two elements necessary for an effective program: an effective management system to enforce internal standards and an audit program to verify the standards are being met. A plant must go beyond legal requirements and integrate the management of safety and environmental issues into the fabric and culture of its organization. An effective management system should be composed of several key elements: management commitment, written policy, goals and objectives, line organization responsibility, training and resources, and auditing. This paper concentrates on this last element, the auditing procedures.

  13. Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scope of the audit at the ITRI was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; soils, sediments, and biota; surface water/drinking water; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; quality assurance; radiation; inactive waste sites; environmental management; and environmental monitoring programs. Specifically assessed was the compliance of ITRI operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; internal operating standards; and best management practices. Onsite activities included inspection of ITRI facilities and operations; review of site documents; interviews with DOE and contractor personnel, as well as representatives from state regulatory agencies; and reviews of previous appraisals. Using these sources of information, the environmental audit team developed findings, which fell into two general categories: compliance findings and best management practice findings. Each finding also identifies apparent causal factor(s) that contributed to the finding and will assist line management in developing ``root causes`` for implementing corrective actions.

  14. 25 CFR 1000.21 - When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When does a Tribe/Consortium have a âmaterial audit...-Governance Eligibility § 1000.21 When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”? A Tribe/Consortium has a material audit exception if any of the audits that it submitted under §...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.21 - When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When does a Tribe/Consortium have a âmaterial audit...-Governance Eligibility § 1000.21 When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”? A Tribe/Consortium has a material audit exception if any of the audits that it submitted under §...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.21 - When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When does a Tribe/Consortium have a âmaterial audit...-Governance Eligibility § 1000.21 When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”? A Tribe/Consortium has a material audit exception if any of the audits that it submitted under §...

  17. 41 CFR 102-118.285 - What options for performing a prepayment audit does my agency have?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... does my agency have? Your agency may perform a prepayment audit by: (a) Creating an internal prepayment... performing a prepayment audit does my agency have? 102-118.285 Section 102-118.285 Public Contracts and... REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Prepayment Audits of Transportation...

  18. Enhancing compliance at Department of Defense facilities: comparison of three environmental audit tools.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Jeff A; Neumann, Cathy

    2003-04-01

    To enhance environmental compliance, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) recently developed and implemented a standardized environmental audit tool called The Environmental Assessment and Management (TEAM) Guide. Utilization of a common audit tool (TEAM Guide) throughout DOD agencies could be an effective agent of positive change. If, however, the audit tool is inappropriate, environmental compliance at DOD facilities could worsen. Furthermore, existing audit systems such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) Generic Protocol for Conducting Environmental Audits of Federal Facilities and the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO's) Standard 14001, "Environmental Management System Audits," may be abandoned even if they offer significant advantages over TEAM Guide audit tool. Widespread use of TEAM Guide should not take place until thorough and independent evaluation has been performed. The purpose of this paper is to compare DOD's TEAM Guide audit tool with U.S. EPA's Generic Protocol for Conducting Environmental Audits of Federal Facilities and ISO 14001, in order to assess which is most appropriate and effective for DOD facilities, and in particular those operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). USACE was selected as a result of one author's recent experience as a district environmental compliance coordinator responsible for the audit mission at this agency. Specific recommendations for enhancing the quality of environmental audits at all DOD facilities also are given. PMID:12690821

  19. Implementation of UMTRA Project Environmental Audit Action Plan status report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report provides the status of implementation of corrective actions for findings made in an Environmental Audit conducted by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environmental Audit, in June 1991. An Action Plan, dated December 1991, was developed to address the findings. The Action Plan was approved by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, in July 1992. This report provides status for each activity listed in the approved Action Plan. Of 48 findings identified in the August 1991 Environmental Audit Report, 4 required no action, 5 were combined with others and actions to correct 19 are complete. Although it appears no progress has been made since the last status report was issued, UMTRA has completed 89% of the findings identified, compared to 72% identified in the last status report. The table below lists the 20 findings where actions are still underway, the current projected completion date, the organization(s) responsible for taking action on the finding, and the UMTRA Project Off ice staff member assigned responsibility for the finding.

  20. Campus Environmental Audits: The UCLA Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, April A.; Gottlieb, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The nation's first comprehensive analysis of a university's environmental impact, at the University of California at Los Angeles, has become a blueprint for prompting environmental change on campuses nationwide. The study documented conditions in the workplace, wastes and hazards, air quality, water and energy use, and procurement practices.…

  1. The Brazilian Audit Tribunal's role in improving the federal environmental licensing process

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Luiz Henrique; Magrini, Alessandra

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the role played by the Brazilian Audit Tribunal (Tribunal de Contas da Uniao - TCU) in the external auditing of environmental management in Brazil, highlighting the findings of an operational audit conducted in 2007 of the federal environmental licensing process. Initially, it records the constitutional and legal framework of Brazilian environmental licensing, describing the powers and duties granted to federal, state and municipal institutions. In addition, it presents the responsibilities of the TCU in the environmental area, comparing these with those of other Supreme Audit Institutions (SAI) that are members of the International Organization of Supreme Audit Institutions (INTOSAI). It also describes the work carried out in the operational audit of the Brazilian environmental licensing process and its main conclusions and recommendations. Finally, it draws a parallel between the findings and recommendations made in Brazil with those of academic studies and audits conducted in other countries.

  2. THE U.S. EPA NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY'S APPROACH TO AUDITING HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is an abstract of a proposed presentation and does not necessarily reflect EPA policy.

    The Health Divisions of the US EPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory have a guideline for conducting technical systems audits. As part of the guideline ...

  3. Corporate restructuring in Duke Power: Its effect on environmental management systems and facility environmental auditing

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Duke Power`s environmental management system (EMS) before was disjointed and lacking full effectiveness. Downsizing itself was brought on in part by having better EMS processes. Restructuring and downsizing brought both greater focus and effectiveness. They accomplished this by (1) centralizing corporate-level functions such as policy making, regulatory interpretation, obtaining permits, influencing legislation and rule-making, and auditing, and (2) decentralizing business unit functions such as routine site support, self-inspections, and pollution prevention. Duke`s facility environmental auditing process profited from downsizing by focusing on cost/benefit. Auditing clearly provided a desired benefit. However, they were able to improve the process by incorporating risk management into the selection of facilities and environmental activities to audit. Duke Power developed a risk selection matrix that accounted for major factors influencing liabilities to the company from its facilities. The matrix includes such risks as ongoing construction activities, public sensitivity to the facility, and relative risk of regulatory inspection. They evaluated each risk using criteria to define the relative degree of risk. For example, relative risk of regulatory inspection was evaluated as low risk for facilities that had no permits and no substantial environmental activities. Facilities that had four or more permits, or were large quantity hazardous waste generators, or operated landfills or treatment, storage, or disposal facilities (TSDF), were evaluated as higher risk. They then weighted the degrees of risk using a multiplier to adjust for the importance of the risks. Finally, Duke Power summed the products to represent the relative risk for each facility. They considered this risk factor in conjunction with other factors, such as time since last audit, in determining which company facilities to audit.

  4. Generic protocol for conducting environmental audits of federal facilities. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this protocol manual is to provide the Federal environmental auditing community with a set of protocols which can be used as a basis to implement, upgrade or benchmark environmental auditing activities. The protocols, contained in this manual, can be used by auditors to assist them in the preparation for and conduct of environmental compliance audits and assessments of the environmental management systems developed to support compliance activities. In addition, this document can be used to assist Federal agencies and facilities in benchmarking their approach to environmental management.

  5. Auditing chronic disease care: Does it make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    van Vuuren, Unita; De Sa, Angela; Govender, Srini; Murie, Katie; Schlemmer, Arina; Gunst, Colette; Namane, Mosedi; Boulle, Andrew; de Vries, Elma

    2015-01-01

    Background An integrated audit tool was developed for five chronic diseases, namely diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and epilepsy. Annual audits have been done in the Western Cape Metro district since 2009. The year 2012 was the first year that all six districts in South Africa's Western Cape Province participated in the audit process. Aim To determine whether clinical audits improve chronic disease care in health districts over time. Setting Western Cape Province, South Africa. Methods Internal audits were conducted of primary healthcare facility processes and equipment availability as well as a folder review of 10 folders per chronic condition per facility. Random systematic sampling was used to select the 10 folders for the folder review. Combined data for all facilities gave a provincial overview and allowed for comparison between districts. Analysis was done comparing districts that have been participating in the audit process from 2009 to 2010 (‘2012 old’) to districts that started auditing recently (‘2012 new’). Results The number of facilities audited has steadily increased from 29 in 2009 to 129 in 2012. Improvements between different years have been modest, and the overall provincial average seemed worse in 2012 compared to 2011. However, there was an improvement in the ‘2012 old’ districts compared to the ‘2012 new’ districts for both the facility audit and the folder review, including for eight clinical indicators, with ‘2012 new’ districts being less likely to record clinical processes (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.21–0.31). Conclusion These findings are an indication of the value of audits to improve care processes over the long term. It is hoped that this improvement will lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:26245615

  6. Student audit and evaluation of a university's environmental management system

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, J.W.; Gowda, R.; Trachtenberg, Z.

    1999-07-01

    Environmental problems are often complex and multifaceted, and cannot be adequately understood from within any single academic discipline. The Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Environment (IPE) minor at the University of Oklahoma trains students to see how different intellectual perspectives from the humanities and sciences can be integrated into a rich conception of the environment. To complete the minor, students must take a Practicum course in which they work in teams on an open-ended, multidisciplinary project. In the Spring of 1998 students conducted an audit of the environmental management system of the University of Oklahoma. Environmental Management Systems (EMS) are the combination of procedures, facilities, and personnel that an organization uses to meet its environmental goals. In this paper, the authors discuss the mechanics of the Practicum and the results generated by the students. Three student teams focused on inputs, operations, and outputs. The Inputs team investigated the University's procurement of resources. The Operations team focused on the use of resources at the University, such as heating and lighting. The Outputs group explored waste management, including solid and hazardous waste, wastewater, and air pollution. Each group interviewed appropriate personnel and accessed relevant documents, and explored environmental data and programs associated with other universities. Students presented their findings to a diverse panel of adjudicators and submitted reports, which have been combined and placed on a web-site (http://www.ou.edu/cas/ipe/envaud.htm). The major findings pertained to education, documentation, and coordination. Students suggested that environmental education programs on campus should be improved, both to ensure proper operation of the EMS and to provide students with sufficient environmental knowledge to lead environmentally responsible lives after college.

  7. Environmental audit of the Maywood Site: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Maywood Interim Storage Site vicinity properties

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Environmental Audit of the Maywood Site managed by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The Audit was carried out from November 7 through 16, 1990. The Audit Team found overall technical competence and knowledge of management and staff to be excellent. This applies to DOE as well as to Bechtel National, Incorporated (BNI). In particular, there was excellent knowledge of federal, state, and local environmental regulations, as well as analysis for applicability of these regulations to FUSRAP. Project management of the Maywood Site is also excellent. BNI and DOE project staff have made frequent contact with members of the community, and all removal actions and remedial investigation activities have been planned, scheduled, and accomplished with competence and attention to total quality principles. To date, all actions taken for the Maywood Site cleanup have been completed ahead of schedule and on or under budget. Weakness noted include self-assessment efforts by DOE, failure to fully implement DOE Order requirements throughout the program, and some discrepancies in formally documenting and reviewing procedures. 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Iso 19011:2002--a combined auditing standard for quality and environmental management systems.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G L

    2000-01-01

    In a precedent-setting decision in 1998, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) directed ISO Technical Committee (TC) 176 on Quality Management and ISO TC 207 on Environmental Management to develop jointly a single guideline standard for auditing quality and environmental management systems. When approved, this standard would replace ISO 10011-1, ISO 10011-2, and ISO 10011-3 on quality auditing and ISO 14010, ISO 14011, and ISO 14012 on environmental auditing. A Joint Working Group (JWG) was established comprising experts from both TC 176 and TC 207 to develop the new standard, ISO 19011, Guidelines on Quality and/or Environmental Management Systems Auditing, and to incorporate lessons learned from efforts to improve compatibility between ISO 9001/9004 and ISO 14001/14004, the standards for quality and environmental management systems, respectively. Work is proceeding on the development of ISO 19011 with an expected completion in early 2002. PMID:12008882

  9. 41 CFR 102-118.435 - What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit? 102-118.435 Section 102-118.435 Public Contracts and Property... cites applicable tariff or tender along with other data relied on to support the overcharge. A...

  10. 41 CFR 102-118.435 - What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit? 102-118.435 Section 102-118.435 Public Contracts and Property... cites applicable tariff or tender along with other data relied on to support the overcharge. A...

  11. 41 CFR 102-118.435 - What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit? 102-118.435 Section 102-118.435 Public Contracts and Property... cites applicable tariff or tender along with other data relied on to support the overcharge. A...

  12. 41 CFR 102-118.435 - What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit? 102-118.435 Section 102-118.435 Public Contracts and Property... cites applicable tariff or tender along with other data relied on to support the overcharge. A...

  13. 41 CFR 102-118.435 - What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit? 102-118.435 Section 102-118.435 Public Contracts and Property... cites applicable tariff or tender along with other data relied on to support the overcharge. A...

  14. Followup on audit of depleted uranium metal production at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-23

    On November 29, 1989, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Inspector General issued audit report No. DOE/IG-0277, Depleted Uranium Metal Production at Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio.'' The audit concluded that DOE could save about $101 million by (1) completing a program to qualify commercial vendors to produce depleted uranium metal, (2) preproducing depleted uranium for future years, and (3) cancelling planned capital expenditures for projects not required for preproduction. The purpose of the current audit was to follow up on the previous audit report recommendations to determine whether corrective actions were taken and the intended results were achieved. Management adequately addressed most of the prior audit report recommendations that resulted in cost avoidances of $119.3 million. However, all planned capital expenditures for production processes were not cancelled, and a Fernald site development plan was not completed. This was attributed to not developing an action plan to implement prior audit report recommendations. As a result, $17.5 million was spent during Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 for the purchase and installation of production equipment that will never be used for production at Fernald. Management concurred with the findings and recommendations. Details of the findings are the subject of Part II of the report. Management and auditor comments are in Part III.

  15. Followup on audit of depleted uranium metal production at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-23

    On November 29, 1989, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Inspector General issued audit report No. DOE/IG-0277, ``Depleted Uranium Metal Production at Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio.`` The audit concluded that DOE could save about $101 million by (1) completing a program to qualify commercial vendors to produce depleted uranium metal, (2) preproducing depleted uranium for future years, and (3) cancelling planned capital expenditures for projects not required for preproduction. The purpose of the current audit was to follow up on the previous audit report recommendations to determine whether corrective actions were taken and the intended results were achieved. Management adequately addressed most of the prior audit report recommendations that resulted in cost avoidances of $119.3 million. However, all planned capital expenditures for production processes were not cancelled, and a Fernald site development plan was not completed. This was attributed to not developing an action plan to implement prior audit report recommendations. As a result, $17.5 million was spent during Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 for the purchase and installation of production equipment that will never be used for production at Fernald. Management concurred with the findings and recommendations. Details of the findings are the subject of Part II of the report. Management and auditor comments are in Part III.

  16. Making the audit work for you

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczynski, E.J.

    1991-10-01

    These slides presented at an Environmental Auditing Conference, focus on one aspect of environmental auditing: its important role in the even broader practice of Environmental Management. The use of audits by the Department of Energy will be examined within the context of sound environmental management to illustrate the delicate practice of Making the Audit Work for You.'' A summary of the main points to be covered follows. (1) Brief description of DOE Environmental Audit process; disciplines covered, DOE Orders reviewed, management/operations evaluated. (2) Brief discussion of DOE/Secretary Watkin's Tiger Team initiative as the cornerstone of his plan to strengthen the Department's Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) programs. (3) Examples given of the types of findings presented in each of these areas, along with brief examples of root causes, lessons learned, trends, and noteworthy practices. (4) Discussion of the relationships between environmental audits, safety and health assessments, and management and organization assessments. (5) Discussion of Environmental Auditing/Assessment and its recurring role in the Environmental Management continuum. (6) DOE is cited as an example of an organization that uses audits as a powerful environmental management tool to help achieve its objectives and multiple goals.

  17. The Environmental Self-Audit for Campus-Based Organizations: A Quick and Easy Guide to Environmental Compliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Albany.

    This guide is intended to help public and not-for-profit campus-based organizations in New York State to comply with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. The environmental self-audit serves as a basic diagnostic tool for campus-based organizations (centralized schools, colleges/universities, correctional facilities, mental health…

  18. Determinants of environmental audit frequency: the role of firm organizational structure.

    PubMed

    Earnhart, Dietrich; Leonard, J Mark

    2013-10-15

    This study empirically examines the extent of environmental management practiced by US chemical manufacturing facilities, as reflected in the number of environmental internal audits conducted annually. As its focus, this study analyzes the effects of firm-level organizational structure on facility-level environmental management practices. For this empirical analysis, the study exploits unique data from a survey distributed to all U.S. chemical manufacturing permitted to discharge wastewater in 2001; the data reflect internal audits conducted during the years 1999-2001. Empirical results reveal differences in auditing behavior based on whether facilities are owned by publicly held or non-publicly held firms, owned by U.S.-based or non-U.S.-based firms, and owned by larger or smaller firms. PMID:23827510

  19. Environmental, health, and safety management systems and auditing programs: part I--The evolution.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Patricia B

    2003-04-01

    Early auditing began as an effort to avoid fines or other action from governmental agencies, without being based on accepted standards. However, for EHS auditing to be accepted as credible in the business world, established standards were necessary. As companies expanded globally, the need for international EHS standards grew, international standards for quality management and environmental program management have now been universally accepted (ISO, 2002). Occupational health nurses increasingly are becoming involved in efforts to help their employers or clients develop management systems to handle EHS issues--whether ISO 9000 (or the automotive equivalent, QS-9000), ISO 14000, or other models are used as the basis for the management system. Many nurses are actively involved in ISO certification efforts. As an extension of those efforts, occupational health nurses are increasingly involved in EHS audits, whether audits are conducted by third parties, by company employees, or as part of a self audit. The next column in this series will focus on strategies to improve the management of occupational health programs so the programs will stand up to rigorous EHS audits. PMID:12729027

  20. An audit of a diverse community for safe routes to age in place: environmental policy implications.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adriana; Garces, Anamarie; Hunter, Rebecca H; Marquez, David X

    2015-03-01

    Physical and cognitive limitations often accompany aging, increasing the importance of a safe and supportive environment to help older adults maintain mobility. Neighborhood design and maintenance must be evaluated to promote physical activity, mobility, and safety. Audit tools, geographic information system data, and resident interviews are used for this purpose, but often fail to provide information that can be translated to practice. The current project is part of a larger Miami-Dade Age-Friendly Initiative to create a metropolitan area that fosters a healthy environment for diverse adults of all ages and abilities. Safe Routes uses a toolkit based on the 5-E model providing practical resources to guide stakeholders in meeting the needs of the community. Findings include the Centers for Disease Control Healthy Aging Research Network Audit Tool assessment for environmental walkability factors. Results from street segment audits along with input from residents can be used to inform sound environmental policies. PMID:25710264

  1. The Integrative Role of the Campus Environmental Audit: Experiences at Bishop's University, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardati, Darren R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to suggest that the campus environmental audit can become an important tool that synergizes active learning and operations planning and management approaches to promote sustainability on university campuses. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents the author's experiences at Bishop's University with the evolution…

  2. [Blood transfusion audit methodology: the auditors, reference systems and audit guidelines].

    PubMed

    Chevrolle, F; Hadzlik, E; Arnold, J; Hergon, E

    2000-12-01

    The audit has become an essential aspect of the blood transfusion sector, and is a management tool that should be used judiciously. The main types of audit that can be envisaged in blood transfusion are the following: operational audit concerning a predetermined activity; systems quality audit; competence audit, combining the operational audit on a specific activity with quality management, e.g., laboratory accreditation; audit of the environmental management system; and social audit involving the organization of an activity and the management of human resources. However, the main type of audit considered in this article is the conformity audit, which in this context does not refer to internal control but to conformity with an internal guideline issued by the French National Blood Service. All audits are carried out on the basis of a predescribed method (contained in ISO 10 011). The audit is a system of investigation, evaluation and measurement, and also a means of continuous assessment and therefore improvement. The audit is based on set guidelines, but in fact consists of determining the difference between the directions given and what has actually been done. Auditing requires operational rigor and integrity, and has now become a profession in its own right. PMID:11204842

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Department of Energy (DOE) activities at Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories Site (DOE/SSFL), conducted May 16 through 26, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by an private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with DOE activities at SSFL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at SSFL, and interviews with site personnel. 90 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

  4. Analysis of DOE international environmental management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaini, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategic Plan (April 1994) states that DOE`s long-term vision includes world leadership in environmental restoration and waste management activities. The activities of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) can play a key role in DOE`s goals of maintaining U.S. global competitiveness and ensuring the continuation of a world class science and technology community. DOE`s interest in attaining these goals stems partly from its participation in organizations like the Trade Policy Coordinating Committee (TPCC), with its National Environmental Export Promotion Strategy, which seeks to strengthen U.S. competitiveness and the building of public-private partnerships as part of U.S. industrial policy. The International Interactions Field Office task will build a communication network which will facilitate the efficient and effective communication between DOE Headquarters, Field Offices, and contractors. Under this network, Headquarters will provide the Field Offices with information on the Administration`s policies and activities (such as the DOE Strategic Plan), interagency activities, as well as relevant information from other field offices. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will, in turn, provide Headquarters with information on various international activities which, when appropriate, will be included in reports to groups like the TPCC and the EM Focus Areas. This task provides for the collection, review, and analysis of information on the more significant international environmental restoration and waste management initiatives and activities which have been used or are being considered at LLNL. Information gathering will focus on efforts and accomplishments in meeting the challenges of providing timely and cost effective cleanup of its environmentally damaged sites and facilities, especially through international technical exchanges and/or the implementation of foreign-development technologies.

  5. Implementation of UMTRA Project Environmental Audit Action Plan status report for period ending September 30, 1992. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report provides the status of implementation of corrective actions for findings made in an Environmental Audit conducted by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environmental Audit, in June 1991. An Action Plan, dated December 1991, was developed to address the findings. The Action Plan was approved by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, in July 1992. This report provides status for each activity listed in the approved Action Plan. Of 48 findings identified in the August 1991 Environmental Audit Report, 4 required no action, 5 were combined with others and actions to correct 19 are complete. Although it appears no progress has been made since the last status report was issued, UMTRA has completed 89% of the findings identified, compared to 72% identified in the last status report. The table below lists the 20 findings where actions are still underway, the current projected completion date, the organization(s) responsible for taking action on the finding, and the UMTRA Project Off ice staff member assigned responsibility for the finding.

  6. Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  7. The DOE/DOD Environmental Data Bank

    SciTech Connect

    C de Baca, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The DOE/DOD Environmental Data Bank was established in 1959 as a central location for storing weapons and equipment environments information from a variety of DOE, DOD, and industrial sources and continues to be maintained by Sandia National Laboratories. The Environmental Data Bank contains approximately 2,900 documents regarding normal and abnormal environments that describe the handling, storage, transportation, use, and general phases, which occur during the life of a weapon system. The Environmental Data Bank contains a vast assortment of resources that document crash, fire, and chemical environments resulting from aircraft, rail, ship, and truck accidents, as well as crash and thermal tests conducted on shipping containers. Also included are studies on the hazards of exposure to liquid natural gas fireballs, chemical fireballs, and hydrogen fireballs. This paper describes the DOE/DOD Environmental Data Bank system, its structure, data sources, and usage, with particular emphasis on its use for safety assessments at Sandia National Laboratories.

  8. HSE auditing

    SciTech Connect

    Herwaarden, A.J.F. van; Sykes, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Shell International Exploration and Production (SIEP) commenced a programme of Health Safety and Environmental (HSE) auditing in its Operating Companies (Opcos) in the late 1970s. Audits in the initial years focused on safety aspects with environmental and occupational aspects being introduced as the process matured. Part of the audit programme is performed by SIEP auditors, external to the Opcos. The level of SIEP-led audit activity increased linearly until the late 1980s, since when a level of around 40 Audits per year has been maintained in roughly as many companies. For the last 15 years each annual programme has included structured audits of all facets of EP operations. The frequency and duration of these audits have the principle objective of auditing all HSE critical processes of each Opco`s activity, within each five-year cycle. Durations vary from 8-10 days with a 4 person team to 18-20 days with a 6-8 person team. Each audit returns a satisfactory or unsatisfactory rating based on analysis of the effectiveness of the so-called eleven principles of Enhanced Safety Management (ESM) required to be applied throughout the Group. Independence is maintained by the SIEP audit leader, who carries ultimate responsibility for the content and wording of each report, where necessary backed-up by senior management in SIEP. These SIEP-led audits have been successful in the following areas: (1) Provision of early warning in areas where facilities integrity or HSE management was likely to be compromised. (2) Aiding the establishment of an internal HSE auditing process in many Opcos. (3) Training, through participation in audits, not only auditors, but also prospective line managers in the effective management of HSE. With the recent introduction of HSE Management Systems (HSE-MS) in many Opcos, auditing is now in the process of controlled evolution from ESM to HSE-MS based.

  9. Environmental site assessments and audits: Building inspection requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, John H.; Kaiser, Genevieve; Thomulka, Kenneth W.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental site assessment criteria were originally developed by organizations that focused, almost exclusively, on surface, subsurface, and pollution source contamination. Many of the hazards associated with indoor environments and building structures were traditionally not considered when evaluating sources and entities of environmental pollution. Since a large number of building materials are potentially hazardous, careful evaluation is necessary. Until recently, little information on building inspection requirements of environmental problems has been published. Traditionally, asbestos has been the main component of concern. The ever-changing environmental standards have dramatically expanded the scope of building surveys. Indoor environmental concerns, for example, currently include formaldehyde, lead-based paint, polychlorinated biphenyls, radon, and indoor air pollution. Environmental regulations are being expanded and developed that specifically include building structures. These regulatory standards are being triggered by an increased awareness of health effects from indoor exposure, fires, spills, and other accidents that have resulted in injury, death, and financial loss. This article discusses various aspects of assessments for building structures.

  10. EarthScore: Your Personal Environmental Audit & Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotter, Donald W.

    This book is designed to permit environmentally-conscious individuals to quantify the impact on the biosphere of their actions in the following areas: Home/household energy use; water use; transportation; consumerism (durable goods, foods and agricultural products, paper and forest products); toxics; waste, packaging, single-use items, and…

  11. The DOE/NREL Environmental Science Program

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

    2001-05-14

    This paper summarizes the several of the studies in the Environmental Science Program being sponsored by DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The goal of the Environmental Science Program is to understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources. The Program is regulatory-driven, and focuses on ozone, airborne particles, visibility and regional haze, air toxics, and health effects of air pollutants. Each project in the Program is designed to address policy-relevant objectives. Current projects in the Environmental Science Program have four areas of focus: improving technology for emissions measurements; vehicle emissions measurements; emission inventory development/improvement; ambient impacts, including health effects.

  12. Internal Audit: Does it Enhance Governance in the Australian Public University Sector?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopher, Joe

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to confirm if internal audit, a corporate control process, is functioning effectively in Australian public universities. The study draws on agency theory, published literature and best-practice guidelines to develop an internal audit evaluation framework. A survey instrument is thereafter developed from the framework and used as a…

  13. Routine environment audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri. During this audit the activities the audit team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted October 24-November 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  14. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S C; McCulloch, M; Thomas, B L; Riley, R G; Sklarew, D S; Mong, G M; Fadeff, S K

    1994-04-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) provides applicable methods in use by. the US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories for sampling and analyzing constituents of waste and environmental samples. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division (LMD) of the DOE. This document contains chapters and methods that are proposed for use in evaluating components of DOE environmental and waste management samples. DOE Methods is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities that will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), or others.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE U.S. MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of today's environmental problems are regional in scope and their effects overlap and interact. We developed a simple method to provide an integrated assessment of environmental conditions and estimate cumulative impacts across a large region, by combining data on land-cove...

  16. ANALYSIS OF EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) PROTOCOL GASES USED FOR CALIBRATION AND AUDITS OF CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEMS AND AMBIENT AIR ANALYZERS - RESULTS OF AUDIT 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    A performance audit was conducted on EPA Protocol Gases used for calibration and audits of continuous emission monitoring systems and ambient air analyzers. Fifty gaseous pollutant calibraton standards were purchased from eleven specialty gas producers. These standards contained ...

  17. SUMMARY OF THE 1986 EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM ON SOURCE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1986, the Quality Assurance Division conducted the National Audits for Stationary Source Test Methods. The audit materials consisted of: a disposable gas cylinder for Method 3 (Orsat analyzer), a calibrated orifice for Method 5 (DGM only), five simulated liquid samples each fo...

  18. SUMMARY OF THE 1983 EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM ON SOURCE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the spring and fall of 1983, the Quality Assurance Division conducted the National Audits for Stationary Source Test Methods. The audit materials consisted of: a calibrated orifice for Method 5 (dry gas meter only), five simulated liquid samples each for Method 6 (SO2) and Met...

  19. SUMMARY OF THE 1984 EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM ON SOURCE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1984, the Quality Assurance Division conducted the National Audits for Stationary Source Test Methods. The audit materials consisted of: a calibrated orifice for Method 5 (DGM only), five simulated liquid samples each for Method 6 (SO2) and Method 7 (NOx), two coal samples for...

  20. Audit of work force restructuring at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-23

    The Department of Energy (Department) restructured its work force at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (Fernald Project) to reduce staffing levels and to modify the mix of workers` skills in response to budget cuts, facility closures, and changes in the Fernald Project`s mission. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the work force restructurings were effective in reducing staffing levels and in changing the mix of workers` skills. As of September 30, 1995, the restructurings were not effective in reducing staffing levels or in improving the mix of workers` skills. The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) spent $2.9 million to separate 255 employees in October 1993. However, by September 30, 1994, all but 14 of the employees separated were either rehired or replaced by new employees with similar skills. The second restructuring began in October 1994 and is not expected to be completed until May 1996. The Department expects the second restructuring to reduce FERMCO`s work force by 476 employees at a cost of $12.9 million. However, since the second restructuring began, FERMCO has hired 265 new employees and at September 30, 1995, had open job announcements seeking 82 additional employees. Many of these new employees have essentially the same skills as employees who separated under the two restructurings. The Department`s objectives were not met because the Fernald Area Office did not (1) require FERMCO to perform the skills analysis necessary to identify which employees were needed to perform the Fernald Project`s current mission, and (2) effectively monitor FERMCO`s restructuring efforts to ensure that the Department`s objectives were met.

  1. Auditing Orthopaedic Audit

    PubMed Central

    Guryel, E; Acton, K; Patel, S

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Clinical audit plays an important role in the drive to improve the quality of patient care and thus forms a cornerstone of clinical governance. Assurance that the quality of patient care has improved requires completion of the audit cycle. A considerable sum of money and time has been spent establishing audit activity in the UK. Failure to close the loop undermines the effectiveness of the audit process and wastes resources. PATIENTS AND METHODS We analysed the effectiveness of audit in trauma and orthopaedics at a local hospital by comparing audit projects completed over a 6-year period to criteria set out in the NHS National Audit and Governance report. RESULTS Of the 25 audits performed since 1999, half were presented to the relevant parties and only 20% completed the audit cycle. Only two of these were audits against national standards and 28% were not based on any standards at all. Only a third of the audits led by junior doctors resulted in implementation of their action plan compared to 75% implementation for consultant-led and 67% for nurse-led audits. CONCLUSIONS A remarkably large proportion of audits included in this analysis failed to meet accepted criteria for effective audit. Audits completed by junior doctors were found to be the least likely to complete the cycle. This may relate to the lack of continuity in modern medical training and little incentive to complete the cycle. Supervision by permanent medical staff, principally consultants, and involvement of the audit department may play the biggest role in improving implementation of change. PMID:18828963

  2. Audits Made Simple

    SciTech Connect

    Belangia, David Warren

    2015-04-09

    A company just got notified there is a big external audit coming in 3 months. Getting ready for an audit can be challenging, scary, and full of surprises. This Gold Paper describes a typical audit from notification of the intent to audit through disposition of the final report including Best Practices, Opportunities for Improvement (OFI), and issues that must be fixed. Good preparation can improve the chances of success. Ensuring the auditors understand the environment and requirements is paramount to success. It helps the auditors understand that the enterprise really does think that security is important. Understanding and following a structured process ensures a smooth audit process. Ensuring follow-up on OFIs and issues in a structured fashion will also make the next audit easier. It is important to keep in mind that the auditors will use the previous report as a starting point. Now the only worry is the actual audit and subsequent report and how well the company has done.

  3. DOE Chair Excellence Professorship Environmental Disciplines

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Reginald

    2014-10-08

    The DECM Team worked closely with other academic institutions, industrial companies and government laboratories to do research and educate engineers in “cutting edge” environmentally conscious manufacturing practices and instrumentation. The participating universities also worked individually with local companies on research projects in their specialty areas. Together, they were charged with research application, integration and education in environmentally conscious manufacturing.

  4. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Thomas, B.L.; Riley, R.G.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mong, G.M.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1994-10-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities for the evaluation of environmental and waste management samples from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. DOE Methods is the result of extensive cooperation from all DOE analytical laboratories. All of these laboratories have contributed key information and provided technical reviews as well as significant moral support leading to the success of this document. DOE Methods is designed to encompass methods for collecting representative samples and for determining the radioisotope activity and organic and inorganic composition of a sample. These determinations will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or others. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Analytical Services Division of DOE. Unique methods or methods consolidated from similar procedures in the DOE Procedures Database are selected for potential inclusion in this document. Initial selection is based largely on DOE needs and procedure applicability and completeness. Methods appearing in this document are one of two types, {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes}. {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} methods that have been reviewed internally and show potential for eventual verification are included in this document, but they have not been reviewed externally, and their precision and bias may not be known. {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes} methods in DOE Methods have been reviewed by volunteers from various DOE sites and private corporations. These methods have delineated measures of precision and accuracy.

  5. Audit of construction of an environmental, safety, and health analytical laboratory at the Pantex Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This document is a report from the Office of the Inspector General, US DOE. The report evaluates the need for the construction of an Environmental, Safety, and Health Laboratory at the Pantex Plant and if this project is the most cost effective manner in which to meet mission needs. It was found that: (1) mission needs were being met with existing facilities, (2) required evaluations of alternatives were not performed, (3) decisions were made based on out-dated justifications, and (4) the expenditure of $8.4M was unnecessary. As a result, it was recommended that funded be suspended until the need is clearly established.

  6. Does Environmental Knowledge Inhibit Hominin Dispersal?

    PubMed

    Wren, Colin D; Costopoulos, Andre

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between the dispersal potential of a hominin population, its local-scale foraging strategies, and the characteristics of the resource environment using an agent-based modeling approach. In previous work we demonstrated that natural selection can favor a relatively low capacity for assessing and predicting the quality of the resource environment, especially when the distribution of resources is highly clustered. That work also suggested that the more knowledge foraging populations had about their environment, the less likely they were to abandon the landscape they know and disperse into novel territory. The present study gives agents new individual and social strategies for learning about their environment. For both individual and social learning, natural selection favors decreased levels of environmental knowledge, particularly in low-heterogeneity environments. Social acquisition of detailed environmental knowledge results in crowding of agents, which reduces available reproductive space and relative fitness. Agents with less environmental knowledge move away from resource clusters and into areas with more space available for reproduction. These results suggest that, rather than being a requirement for successful dispersal, environmental knowledge strengthens the ties to particular locations and significantly reduces the dispersal potential as a result. The evolved level of environmental knowledge in a population depends on the characteristics of the resource environment and affects the dispersal capacity of the population. PMID:26932570

  7. Site Acquisition and Related Environmental Concerns. Report of the Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Legislature, Sacramento. Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    A public hearing of California's Joint Legislative Audit Committee examined land acquisition policy and practice in relation to new school construction projects during which the following two areas of concern were identified: (1) acquiring land for new schools in congested urban settings; and (2) managing the conflict that may arise from local,…

  8. NEW AUDIT METHOD FOR EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) REFERENCE METHOD 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple, inexpensive, accurate method for evaluating and/or auditing sampling and analytical phases of the EPA Source Reference Method 6 was developed. The method uses a known amount of a chemical compound in the form of a tablet or pill (or placed in a capsule) to generate sulf...

  9. The direct environmental impact of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a surgical waste audit of five cases

    PubMed Central

    de SA, Darren; Stephens, Kellee; Kuang, Michelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R.

    2016-01-01

    Health care facilities produce significant waste (2200 kg/bed/year) creating 2% of greenhouse gas emissions and 1% total solid waste nationwide, with 20–70% of waste coming from operating rooms. We performed a waste audit of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) to understand its environmental impact and identify areas for greening practices. A waste audit of five hip arthroscopy procedures for FAI was performed. All waste was collected and separated into six waste streams in real time: (i) normal/landfill waste; (ii) recyclable cardboards and plastics; (iii) biohazard waste; (iv) sharp items; (v) linens and (vi) sterile wrapping. The surgical waste (except laundered linens) from five FAI surgeries totaled 47.4 kg, including 21.7 kg (45.7%) of biohazard waste, 11.7 kg (24.6%) of sterile wrap, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of normal/landfill waste, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of recyclable plastics and 1.2 kg (2.6%) of sharp items. An average of 9.4 kg (excluding laundered linens) of waste was produced per procedure. Given the considerable biohazard waste produced by FAI procedures, additional recycling programs, continued adherence to proper waste segregation and an emphasis on ‘green outcomes’ is encouraged to demonstrate environmental responsibility and effectively manage and allocate finite resources. PMID:27583149

  10. The direct environmental impact of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a surgical waste audit of five cases.

    PubMed

    de Sa, Darren; Stephens, Kellee; Kuang, Michelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-07-01

    Health care facilities produce significant waste (2200 kg/bed/year) creating 2% of greenhouse gas emissions and 1% total solid waste nationwide, with 20-70% of waste coming from operating rooms. We performed a waste audit of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) to understand its environmental impact and identify areas for greening practices. A waste audit of five hip arthroscopy procedures for FAI was performed. All waste was collected and separated into six waste streams in real time: (i) normal/landfill waste; (ii) recyclable cardboards and plastics; (iii) biohazard waste; (iv) sharp items; (v) linens and (vi) sterile wrapping. The surgical waste (except laundered linens) from five FAI surgeries totaled 47.4 kg, including 21.7 kg (45.7%) of biohazard waste, 11.7 kg (24.6%) of sterile wrap, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of normal/landfill waste, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of recyclable plastics and 1.2 kg (2.6%) of sharp items. An average of 9.4 kg (excluding laundered linens) of waste was produced per procedure. Given the considerable biohazard waste produced by FAI procedures, additional recycling programs, continued adherence to proper waste segregation and an emphasis on 'green outcomes' is encouraged to demonstrate environmental responsibility and effectively manage and allocate finite resources. PMID:27583149

  11. Does environmental stability stimulate species renovation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casellato, C.; Erba, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Tithonian-Berriasian time interval is characterized by a major calcareous nannoplankton speciation episode: several coccolith and nannolith genera and species first appear and rapidly evolve, reaching a high diversity, abundance, and calcification degree. The history of calcareous nannoplankton indicates that times of accelerated rates of radiations (or extinctions) generally correlate with global changes in the geosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere suggesting that evolutionary patterns are intimately linked to environmental modifications (Roth, 1989; Bown et al., 2004; Erba, 2006). Nevertheless, the Tithonian-Berriasian interval provides examples of intra- and intergeneric accelerated evolutionary rates (an origination event) during a time period of general environmental stability, in absence of coeval environmental change evidence. The Tithonian - Early Berriasian can be regarded as a "quiet" interval as far as the C cycle is concerned; the _13C curve shows a gradual minor decline after the Oxfordian anomalies and prior to the Valanginian event. The Tithonian-Berriasian speciation episode provides an excellent opportunity to study modo and tempo of calcareous nannoplankton evolution relative to absent environmental change, which is believed to be instrumental for driving biological evolution. Nannofossils have been investigated in sections from the Tethys and Atlantic oceans in order to discriminate among local, regional or global causes, and to verify possible diachroneity in calcareous phytoplankton evolution and/or in response to global changes. Calcareous nannofossil species richness, first and last occurrences and relative abundance were achieved. Different evolution modes have been proposed since Darwin's Evolutionary Theory: Phyletic Gradualism (Darwin, 1859), Punctuated Equilibrium (Gould & Eldredge, 1977) and Punctuated Gradualism (Malmgren et al., 1984). Phyletic gradualism holds that new species arise from slow, steady transformation of populations

  12. Does Environmental Heterogeneity Promote Cognitive Abilities?

    PubMed

    González-Gómez, Paulina L; Razeto-Barry, Pablo; Araya-Salas, Marcelo; Estades, Cristian F

    2015-09-01

    In the context of global change the possible loss of biodiversity has been identified as a major concern. Biodiversity could be seriously threatened as a direct consequence of changes in availability of food, changing thermal conditions, and loss and fragmentation of habitat. Considering the magnitude of global change, an understanding of the mechanisms involved in coping with a changing environment is urgent. We explore the hypothesis that species and individuals experiencing highly variable environments are more likely to develop a wider range of responses to handle the different and unpredictable conditions imposed by global change. In the case of vertebrates, the responses to the challenges imposed by unpredictable perturbations ultimately are linked to cognitive abilities allowing the solving of problems, and the maximization of energy intake. Our models were hummingbirds, which offer a particularly compelling group in which to examine the functional and mechanistic links between behavioral and energetic strategies in individuals experiencing different degrees of social and environmental heterogeneity. PMID:26082484

  13. Environmental Impact Assessment and Environmental Audit in Large-Scale Public Infrastructure Construction: The Case of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guizhen; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Yonglong

    2009-09-01

    Large-scale public infrastructure projects have featured in China’s modernization course since the early 1980s. During the early stages of China’s rapid economic development, public attention focused on the economic and social impact of high-profile construction projects. In recent years, however, we have seen a shift in public concern toward the environmental and ecological effects of such projects, and today governments are required to provide valid environmental impact assessments prior to allowing large-scale construction. The official requirement for the monitoring of environmental conditions has led to an increased number of debates in recent years regarding the effectiveness of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) and Governmental Environmental Audits (GEAs) as environmental safeguards in instances of large-scale construction. Although EIA and GEA are conducted by different institutions and have different goals and enforcement potential, these two practices can be closely related in terms of methodology. This article cites the construction of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway as an instance in which EIA and GEA offer complementary approaches to environmental impact management. This study concludes that the GEA approach can serve as an effective follow-up to the EIA and establishes that the EIA lays a base for conducting future GEAs. The relationship that emerges through a study of the Railway’s construction calls for more deliberate institutional arrangements and cooperation if the two practices are to be used in concert to optimal effect.

  14. [DOE method for evaluating environmental and waste management samples: Revision 1, Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    The US Dapartment of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental and waste management (EM) sampling and analysis activities require that large numbers of samples be analyzed for materials characterization, environmental surveillance, and site-remediation programs. The present document, DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods), is a supplemental resource for analyzing many of these samples.

  15. Does audit improve diabetes care in a primary care setting? A management tool to address health system gaps

    PubMed Central

    Pruthu, T. K.; Majella, Marie Gilbert; Nair, Divya; Ramaswamy, Gomathi; Palanivel, C.; Subitha, L.; Kumar, S. Ganesh; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is one of the emerging epidemics. Regular clinical and biochemical monitoring of patients, adherence to treatment and counseling are cornerstones for prevention of complications. Clinical audits as a process of improving quality of patient care and outcomes by reviewing care against specific criteria and then reviewing the change can help in optimizing care. Objective: We aimed to audit the process of diabetes care using patient records and also to assess the effect of audit on process of care indicators among patients availing diabetes care from a rural health and training center in Puducherry, South India. Materials and Methods: A record based study was conducted to audit diabetes care among patients attending noncommunicable disease clinic in a rural health center of South India. Monitoring of blood pressure (BP), blood glucose, lipid profile and renal function test were considered for auditing in accordance with standard guidelines. Clinical audit cycle (CAC), a simple management tool was applied and re-audit was done after 1-year. Results: We reviewed 156 and 180 patients records during year-1 and year-2, respectively. In the audit year-1, out of 156 patients, 78 (50%), 70 (44.9%), 49 (31.4%) and 19 (12.2%) had got their BP, blood glucose, lipid profile and renal function tests done. Monitoring of blood glucose, BP, lipid profile and renal function improved significantly by 35%, 20.7%, 36.4% and 56.1% over 1-year. Conclusion: CAC improves process of diabetes care in a primary care setting with existing resources. PMID:26604621

  16. Environmental Management Performance Report to DOE-RL November 2001

    SciTech Connect

    EDER, D.M.

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management (EM) performance by: Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) through Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) and its subcontractors, Environmental Restoration Contract through Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), and its subcontractors, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) for Science and Technology support to the EM Mission. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes EM Site performance under RL Operations Office. It is organized by the three sections listed above, with each section containing an Executive Summary and Area Performance Summaries. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes.

  17. Environmental Management Performance Report to DOE-RL February 2001

    SciTech Connect

    EDER, D.M.

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management (EM) performance by: Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) through Fluor Hanford. Inc. (FH) and its subcontractors; Environmental Restoration Contract through Bechtel Hanford. Inc. (BHI), and its subcontractors; and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) for Science and Technology support to the EM Mission. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes EM Site performance under RL, Operations Office. It is organized by the three sections listed above, with each section containing an Executive Summary and Area Performance Summaries. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes.

  18. Environmental Management Performance Report to DOE-RL August 2001

    SciTech Connect

    EDER, D.M.

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management (EM) performance by: Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) through Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) and its subcontractors, Environmental Restoration Contract through Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), and its subcontractors, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) for Science and Technology support to the EM Mission. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes EM Site performance under RL Operations Office. It is organized by the three sections listed above, with each section containing an Executive Summary and Area Performance Summaries. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes.

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on audit of selected aspects of the unclassified computer security program at a DOE headquarters computing facility

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-31

    The purpose of this audit was to evaluate the effectiveness of the unclassified computer security program at the Germantown Headquarters Administrative Computer Center (Center). The Department of Energy (DOE) relies on the application systems at the Germantown Headquarters Administrative Computer Center to support its financial, payroll and personnel, security, and procurement functions. The review was limited to an evaluation of the administrative, technical, and physical safeguards governing utilization of the unclassified computer system which hosts many of the Department`s major application systems. The audit identified weaknesses in the Center`s computer security program that increased the risk of unauthorized disclosure or loss of sensitive data. Specifically, the authors found that (1) access to sensitive data was not limited to individuals who had a need for the information, and (2) accurate and complete information was not maintained on the inventory of tapes at the Center. Furthermore, the risk of unauthorized disclosure and loss of sensitive data was increased because other controls, such as physical security, had not been adequately implemented at the Center. Management generally agreed with the audit conclusions and recommendations, and initiated a number of actions to improve computer security at the Center.

  20. Office of Inspector General audit report on credit card usage at the Ohio Field Office and the Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    In 1994 the Department of Energy (Department) obtained the services of Rocky Mountain BankCard System, through the use of a General Services Administration contract, as a means for the Department and its contractors to make small purchases. The use of credit cards was expected to simplify small purchase procedures and improve cash management. The Ohio Field Office (Field Office) uses the credit card system and oversees usage by its area offices. Contractors under the Field Office also use the credit card system to make small purchases. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has issued one audit report concerning the use of credit cards. In April 1996, the OIG issued Report WR-B-96-06, Audit of Bonneville Power Administration`s Management of Information Resources. The audit concluded that improvements could be made in implementing credit card and property procedures in Bonneville`s management of computer-related equipment. Specifically, many credit card purchases were made by employees whose authority to buy was not properly documented, and the purchasing files often lacked invoices that would show what was purchased. Additionally, some cardholders split purchases to avoid credit card limits. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Field Office, Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects, Fluor Daniel, and B and W were using credit cards for the appropriate purposes and within the limitations established by Federal and Departmental regulations.

  1. TECHNICAL RISK RATING OF DOE ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS - 9153

    SciTech Connect

    Cercy, M; Ronald Fayfich, R; Steven P Schneider, S

    2008-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. The scope of work is diverse, with projects ranging from single acquisitions to collections of projects and operations that span several decades and costs from hundreds of millions to billions US$. The need to be able to manage and understand the technical risks from the project to senior management level has been recognized as an enabler to successfully completing the mission. In 2008, DOE-EM developed the Technical Risk Rating as a new method to assist in managing technical risk based on specific criteria. The Technical Risk Rating, and the criteria used to determine the rating, provides a mechanism to foster open, meaningful communication between the Federal Project Directors and DOE-EM management concerning project technical risks. Four indicators (technical maturity, risk urgency, handling difficulty and resolution path) are used to focus attention on the issues and key aspects related to the risks. Pressing risk issues are brought to the forefront, keeping DOE-EM management informed and engaged such that they fully understand risk impact. Use of the Technical Risk Rating and criteria during reviews provides the Federal Project Directors the opportunity to openly discuss the most significant risks and assists in the management of technical risks across the portfolio of DOE-EM projects. Technical Risk Ratings can be applied to all projects in government and private industry. This paper will present the methodology and criteria for Technical Risk Ratings, and provide specific examples from DOE-EM projects.

  2. Technical Risk Rating of DOE Environmental Projects - 9153

    SciTech Connect

    Cercy, Michael; Fayfich, Ronald; Schneider, Steven

    2009-02-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. The scope of work is diverse, with projects ranging from single acquisitions to collections of projects and operations that span several decades and costs from hundreds of millions to billions US$. The need to be able to manage and understand the technical risks from the project to senior management level has been recognized as an enabler to successfully completing the mission. In 2008, DOE-EM developed the Technical Risk Rating as a new method to assist in managing technical risk based on specific criteria. The Technical Risk Rating, and the criteria used to determine the rating, provides a mechanism to foster open, meaningful communication between the Federal Project Directors and DOE-EM management concerning project technical risks. Four indicators (technical maturity, risk urgency, handling difficulty and resolution path) are used to focus attention on the issues and key aspects related to the risks. Pressing risk issues are brought to the forefront, keeping DOE-EM management informed and engaged such that they fully understand risk impact. Use of the Technical Risk Rating and criteria during reviews provides the Federal Project Directors the opportunity to openly discuss the most significant risks and assists in the management of technical risks across the portfolio of DOE-EM projects. Technical Risk Ratings can be applied to all projects in government and private industry. This paper will present the methodology and criteria for Technical Risk Ratings, and provide specific examples from DOE-EM projects.

  3. Brockhill Park School: An Environmental Education Audit in a Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Dawn

    1994-01-01

    Evaluates Brockhill Park School's efforts to incorporate environmental education into the school's curriculum. Describes the integration of features of the school site into science, history, English, travel and tourism, and art courses. (MDH)

  4. 40 CFR 68.58 - Compliance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... are being followed. (b) The compliance audit shall be conducted by at least one person knowledgeable... the compliance audit and document that deficiencies have been corrected. (e) The owner or operator shall retain the two (2) most recent compliance audit reports. This requirement does not apply to...

  5. Human health and wellbeing in environmental impact assessment in New South Wales, Australia: Auditing health impacts within environmental assessments of major projects

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Patrick J.; Harris, Elizabeth; Thompson, Susan; Harris-Roxas, Ben; Kemp, Lynn

    2009-09-15

    Internationally the inclusion of health within environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been shown to be limited. While Australian EIA documentation has not been studied empirically to date, deficiencies in practice have been documented. This research developed an audit tool to undertake a qualitative descriptive analysis of 22 Major Project EAs in New South Wales, Australia. Results showed that health and wellbeing impacts were not considered explicitly. They were, however, included indirectly in the identification of traditional public health exposures associated with the physical environment and to a lesser extent the inclusion of social and economic impacts. However, no health data was used to inform any of the assessments, there was no reference to causal pathways between exposures or determinants and physical or mental health effects, and there was no inclusion of the differential distribution of exposures or health impacts on different populations. The results add conceptually and practically to the long standing integration debate, showing that health is in a position to add value to the EIA process as an explicit part of standard environmental, social and economic considerations. However, to overcome the consistently documented barriers to integrating health in EIA, capacity must be developed amongst EIA professionals, led by the health sector, to progress health related knowledge and tools.

  6. Nuclear Materials Stewardship Within the DOE Environmental Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bilyeu, J. D.; Kiess, T. E.; Gates, M. L.

    2002-02-26

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program has made significant progress in planning disposition of its excess nuclear materials and has recently completed several noteworthy studies. Since establishment in 1997, the EM Nuclear Material Stewardship Program has developed disposition plans for excess nuclear materials to support facility deactivation. All nuclear materials have been removed from the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (Mound), and disposition planning is nearing completion for the Fernald Environmental Management Project and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Only a few issues remain for materials at the Hanford and Idaho sites. Recent trade studies include the Savannah River Site Canyons Nuclear Materials Identification Study, a Cesium/Strontium Management Alternatives Trade Study, a Liquid Technical Standards Trade Study, an Irradiated Beryllium Reflectors with Tritium study, a Special Performance Assessment Required Trade Study, a Neutron Source Trade Study, and development of discard criteria for uranium. A Small Sites Workshop was also held. Potential and planned future activities include updating the Plutonium-239 storage study, developing additional packaging standards, developing a Nuclear Material Disposition Handbook, determining how to recover or dispose of Pu-244 and U-233, and working with additional sites to define disposition plans for their nuclear materials.

  7. National Energy Audit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-12-30

    A user-friendly, advanced computer energy audit, the National Energy Audit (NEAT) has been developed by the Existing Buildings Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory''s (ORNL''s) Building Technology Center for the U.S. Department of Energy''s (DOE''s) Weatherization Assistance and Existing Buildings Program. The computer program is designed for use by State agencies and utilities to determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for single-family homes to increase the energy efficiency and comfort level. NEAT7.1.3 contains minormore » changes and improvements in NEAT7.1.« less

  8. QUALITY ASSURANCE AUDITS OF THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) STATE-OPERATED PRECIPITATION COLLECTION NETWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a summary report of the findings from quality assurance and technical assistance visits made in 1985-86 to the 27 sites that comprise the State-Operated Precipitation Network. The network is staffed mainly by state environmental agencies and forestry commissions. ...

  9. Relative risk impacts of facility accidents in DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.

    1994-12-31

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is formulating an integrated national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of existing and future wastes at DOE sites. As part of this process, a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) is being prepared. A principal focus of the EM PEIS is the evaluation of strategies for remediating DOE sites and facilities to ensure the protection of human health and environment. A specific objective of DOE in implementing an integrated waste management program is to {open_quotes}reduce or eliminate risks to human health and safety and to the environment for environmental restoration and waste operation activities.{close_quotes} The EM PEIS calls for separate evaluations of the risk impacts for managing six different waste types: greater-than-Class-C low-level, hazardous, high-level, low-level mixed, low-level, and transuranic. For each waste type, four categorical strategies have been devised for consolidating wastes for treatment and storage: (a) no action, where existing sites will generally store and treat their own wastes consistent with approved plans, (b) decentralization, (c) regionalization, and (d) centralization. The last three alternatives refer to the degree of consolidation and affect the number of sites that will be used to treat, store, and dispose of a given waste type. Each consolidation strategy has associated siting options, and each option involves existing facilities, facilities in the design phase, and new facilities. Each siting option also implies unique inventories of waste to be stored and treated at each site and associated facilities. Finally, a number of treatment technologies and storage and disposal options for each waste type are to be evaluated for each alternative.

  10. Environmental Management Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio. During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included review of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and FEMP contractor personnel; and inspection and observation of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 15 through April 1, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of DOE facilities and activities as part of the EH-1 Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight Audit Program. The EH-24 program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities and activities with respect to compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, Guidance and Directives; conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance; and the status and adequacy of management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The Environmental Management Assessment of FEMP focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems. Further, in response to requests by the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and Fernald Field Office (FN), Quality Assurance and Environmental Radiation activities at FEMP were evaluated from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section in this report.

  11. DOE Chair of Excellence Professorship in Environmental Disciplines

    SciTech Connect

    Shoou-Yuh Chang

    2013-01-31

    The United States (US) nuclear weapons program during the Cold War left a legacy of radioactive, hazardous, chemical wastes and facilities that may seriously harm the environment and people even today. Widespread public concern about the environmental pollution has created an extraordinary demand for the treatment and disposal of wastes in a manner to protect the public health and safety. The pollution abatement and environmental protection require an understanding of technical, regulatory, economic, permitting, institutional, and public policy issues. Scientists and engineers have a major role in this national effort to clean our environment, especially in developing alternative solutions and evaluation criteria and designing the necessary facilities to implement the solutions. The objective of the DOE Chair of Excellence project is to develop a high quality educational and research program in environmental engineering at North Carolina A&T State University (A&T). This project aims to increase the number of graduate and undergraduate students trained in environmental areas while developing a faculty concentrated in environmental education and research. Although A&T had a well developed environmental program prior to the Massie Chair grant, A&T's goal is to become a model of excellence in environmental engineering through the program's support. The program will provide a catalyst to enhance collaboration of faculty and students among various engineering departments to work together in a focus research area. The collaboration will be expanded to other programs at A&T. The past research focus areas include: hazardous and radioactive waste treatment and disposal fate and transport of hazardous chemicals in the environment innovative technologies for hazardous waste site remediation pollution prevention Starting from 2005, the new research focus was in the improvement of accuracy for radioactive contaminant transport models by ensemble based data assimilation. The

  12. 14 CFR 331.17 - How will the Department verify and audit claims under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS PROCEDURES FOR REIMBURSEMENT OF... Department of Justice. If an audit is necessary, a ceiling amount reached, and the audit does not support...

  13. Walkability Audit Tool.

    PubMed

    Smith, Letha

    2015-09-01

    Walking is one of the simplest lifestyle changes workers can make to improve their health. Research shows a wealth of health benefits. Often, occupational and environmental health nurses are in charge of implementing walking programs. A tool is needed to continuously improve a company's walking program whether in the beginning stages or to an already established program. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Walkability Audit Tool for a healthier worksite is an easy seven-step audit tool that occupational and environmental health nurses can easily implement. PMID:26215975

  14. Opportunities for industry participation in DOE`s environmental management technology development program

    SciTech Connect

    Bedick, R.C.; Walker, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    METC has managed about 85 research, development, and demonstration projects on behalf of DOE-EM`s Office of Science and Technology that include those in each of the four major environmental remediation and waste management problem areas: subsurface contaminants (radionuclides, heavy metals, dense nonaqueous phase liquids); decontamination and decommissioning of facilities; high-level waste tank remediation; and mixed waste characterization/treament/disposal. All projects within the Industry Programs are phased or have optional tasks at specific go/no-go decision points, allowing DOE to make investment decisions at various points in the technology development cycle to ensure that we are meeting the technology development goals and the needs of the customer or end-user. This decision making process is formalized in a Technology Investment Decision Model. A brief summary is given of R&D requirements (technology needs) in each of the above-mentioned 4 problem areas.

  15. Integrated wastewater management planning for DOE`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, J.; Barthel, J.; Wheeler, M.; Conroy, K.

    1996-02-01

    Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, L.L.C. (RMRS), jointly formed by Morrison Knudsen Corporation and BNFL Inc., provides international experience in the nuclear, environmental, waste management, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) , and project management industry. The company is currently the environmental restoration, waste management, and D&D subcontractor for Kaiser-Hill Company at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). RMRS offers unique solutions and state-of-the-art technology to assist in resolving the issues that face industries today. RMRS has been working on methods to improve cost savings recognized at RFETS, through application of unique technologies and process engineering. RMRS prepared and is implementing a strategy that focused on identifying an approach to improve cost savings in current wastewater treatment systems and to define a low-cost, safe and versatile wastewater treatment system for the future. Development of this strategy, was targeted by Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, DOE Rocky Flats Field Office and Kaiser-Hill as a ``Project Breakthrough`` where old concepts were thrown out the door and the project goals and objectives were developed from the groundup. The objectives of the strategy developed in a project break through session with DOE included lower lifecycle costs, shutdown of one of two buildings at RFETS, Building 374 or Building 774, reduced government capital investment, and support of site closure program goals, identified as the site`s Accelerated Site Action Plan (ASAP). The recommended option allows for removal of water treatment functions from Building 374, the existing process wastewater treatment facility. This option affords the lowest capital cost, lowest unit operating cost, lowest technical management risk, greatest support of ASAP phasing and provides the greatest flexibility for design with unforeseen future needs.

  16. 75 FR 34445 - Audit Program for Texas Flexible Permit Holders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... AGENCY Audit Program for Texas Flexible Permit Holders AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Clean Air Act voluntary compliance audit program for flexible permit holders in the... permits an opportunity to participate in a voluntary compliance audit program (hereinafter ``Audit...

  17. Office of Inspector General report on audit of proposal to acquire land at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-05

    The US Department of Energy (Department) obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate to acquire 78 to 100 acres of privately-held land adjoining the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) as an additional buffer for a waste disposal facility. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the proposed purchase of land was essential to support the site`s mission. The Department obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate to acquire the additional land without confirming that av lid need for the land existed. If the land is acquired, the Department could spend between $655,000 and $2.2 million unnecessarily. Additionally, the Department could incur unnecessary maintenance and security costs to maintain the land after acquisition. It was recommended that the Manager, Ohio Field Office, dismiss the proposal to acquire the additional land. Management agreed with the recommendation, stating that the acquisition could not be justified at this time. However, management did not agree with the finding that the Department obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate without confirming that a valid need for the land existed. Management stated that the appraisal and cost estimate were principal and necessary to determining whether a need for the land existed. It was concluded that the appraisal and cost estimate should not have been performed because a valid need for the land was never established. Also, it was concluded that it would be inappropriate to reconsider the proposal to acquire the land at a later date if additional funds become available, unless a valid need for the land is first established.

  18. IOGCC/DOE oil and gas environmental workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-16

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) in cooperation with US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a workshop format to allow state regulatory officials and industry representatives the opportunity to participate in frank and open discussions on issues of environmental regulatory compliance. The purpose in providing this forum is to assist both groups in identifying the key barriers to the economic recoverability of domestic oil and gas resources while adequately protecting human health and the environment. The following topics were discussed, groundwater protection; temporarily abandoned and idle wells; effluent discharges; storm water runoff; monitoring and compliance; wetlands; naturally occurring radioactive materials; RCRA reauthorization and oil pollution prevention regulation. At the conclusion, all of the participants were asked to complete a questionnaire which critiqued the day activities. A discussion of each of the issues is made a part of this report as is a summary of the critique questionnaire which were received.

  19. Environmental auditing: An approach for characterizing tropospheric ozone risk to forests

    SciTech Connect

    Hogsett, W.E.; Weber, J.E.; Tingey, D.; Herstrom, A.; Lee, E.H.; Laurence, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The risk tropospheric ozone poses to forests in the United States dependents on the variation in ozone exposure across the forests and the various environmental and climate factors predominant in the region. All these factors have a spatial nature; an approach to characterization of ozone risk is presented that places ozone exposure-response functions for species as seedlings and model-simulated tree and stand responses in a spatial context using a geographical information systems (GIS). The GIS is used to aggregate factors considered important in a risk characterization: (1) estimated ozone exposures over forested regions, (2) measures of ozone effects on species` and stand growth, and (3) spatially distributed environmental, genetic, and exposure influences on species` response to ozone. The GIS-based risk characterization provides an estimation the extent and magnitude of the potential ozone impact on forests. A preliminary risk characterization demonstrating this considered only the eastern United States and only the limited empirical data quantifying the effect of ozone exposures on forest tree species as seedlings. The area-weighted response of the annual seedling biomass loss formed the basis for a sensitivity ranking: sensitive-aspen and black cherry (14%-33% biomass loss over 50% of their distribution); moderately sensitive-tulip popular, loblolly pine, eastern white pine, and sugar maple (5%-13% biomass loss); insensitive-Virginia pine and red maple (0%-1% loss). Future GIS-based risk characterizations will include process-based model simulations of the three- to 5-year growth response of individual species as large trees. The interactive nature of GIS provides a tool to explore consequences of the range of climate conditions across a species` distribution, forest management practices, changing ozone precursors, regulatory control strategies, and other factors influencing the spatial distribution of ozone over time. 43 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Developing and testing a street audit tool using Google Street View to measure environmental supportiveness for physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Walking for physical activity is associated with substantial health benefits for adults. Increasingly research has focused on associations between walking behaviours and neighbourhood environments including street characteristics such as pavement availability and aesthetics. Nevertheless, objective assessment of street-level data is challenging. This research investigates the reliability of a new street characteristic audit tool designed for use with Google Street View, and assesses levels of agreement between computer-based and on-site auditing. Methods The Forty Area STudy street VIEW (FASTVIEW) tool, a Google Street View based audit tool, was developed incorporating nine categories of street characteristics. Using the tool, desk-based audits were conducted by trained researchers across one large UK town during 2011. Both inter and intra-rater reliability were assessed. On-site street audits were also completed to test the criterion validity of the method. All reliability scores were assessed by percentage agreement and the kappa statistic. Results Within-rater agreement was high for each category of street characteristic (range: 66.7%-90.0%) and good to high between raters (range: 51.3%-89.1%). A high level of agreement was found between the Google Street View audits and those conducted in-person across the nine categories examined (range: 75.0%-96.7%). Conclusion The audit tool was found to provide a reliable and valid measure of street characteristics. The use of Google Street View to capture street characteristic data is recommended as an efficient method that could substantially increase potential for large-scale objective data collection. PMID:23972205

  1. Application of safeguards technology in DOE's environmental restoration program

    SciTech Connect

    Eccleston, G.W.; Baker, M.P.; Hansen, W.R.; Lucas, M.C.; Markin, J.T.; Phillips, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the last two decades, the Department of Energy's Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) has supported the research and development of safeguards systems analysis methodologies and nondestructive assay (NDS) technology for characterizing, monitoring, and accounting nuclear materials. This paper discusses methodologies and NDA instrumentation developed by the DOE/OSS program that could be applied in the Environmental Restoration Program. NDA instrumentation could be used for field measurements during site characterization and to monitor nuclear materials, heavy metals, and other hazardous materials during site remediation. Systems methodologies can minimize the expenditure of resources and help specify appropriate combinations of NDA instrumentation and chemical analyses to characterize a variety of materials quickly and reduce personnel exposure in hazardous environments. A training program is available to teach fundamental and advanced principles and approaches to characterize and quantify nuclear materials properly and to organize and analyze measurement information for decision making. The ability to characterize the overall volume and distribution of materials at a waste site is difficult because of the inhomogeneous distribution of materials, the requirement for extreme sensitivity, and the lack of resources to collect and chemically analyze a sufficient number of samples. Using a systems study approach based on statistical sampling, the resources necessary to characterize a site can be enhanced by appropriately combining in situ and field NDA measurements with laboratory analyses. 35 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. IOGCC/DOE oil and gas environmental workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) in cooperation with US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a workshop format to allow state regulatory officials and industry representatives the opportunity to participate in frank and open discussions on issues of environmental regulatory compliance. The purpose of providing this forum is to assist both groups in identifying the key barriers to the economic recoverability of domestic oil and gas resources while adequately protecting human health and the environment. The IOGCC and DOE staff worked with key state and industry representatives to develop a list of appropriate regulatory and industry representatives to be invited to participate. These same industry and regulatory representatives also provided a prioritized list of topics to be discussed at this workshop. After the topic leader set out the issue, views of those present were solicited. In almost every case, both the industry representatives and the regulatory personnel spoke with candor in discussing the problems. Common points of discussion for each topic were: (1) conflicting state and federal regulations; (2) conflicting regulations or permit requirements established by different state agencies; (3) increasing compliance costs; and (4) regulatory constraints that will result in ``no net growth`` in California oil and gas production and more likely a net decrease. This report contains a copy of the written presentation for each topic as well as a summary of the participants discussion.

  3. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing sites Mexican Hat, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Audit date: May 3--7, 1993, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing sites in Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona. This audit was conducted May 3--7, 1993, by Bill James and Gerry Simiele of the TAC. Three site-specific findings and four observations were identified during the audit and are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the audit is that the majority of the radiological aspects of the Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona, remedial action programs are performed adequately. However, the findings identify that there is some inconsistency in following procedures and meeting requirements for contamination control, and a lack of communication between the RAC and the DOE on variances from the published remedial action plan (RAP).

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: Regional Lake Trophic Patterns in the Northeastern United States: Three Approaches

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    / During the summers of 1991-1994, the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) conducted variable probability sampling on 344 lakes throughout the northeastern United States. Trophic state data were analyzed for the Northeast as a whole and for each of its three major ecoregions-the Adirondacks (ADI), the New England Uplands (NEU), and the Coastal Lowland and Plateau (CLP)-and inferred to the entire population of lakes >/=1 ha (N = 11,076). Results were compared to a large, nonrandomly sampled data set for the same area compiled by Rohm and others and contrasted with lake trophic state information published in the National Water Quality Inventory: 1994 Report to Congress [305(b) report. Lakes across the entire Northeast were identified by EMAP data as 37.9% (+/-8.4%) oligotrophic, 40.1% (+/-9.7%) mesotrophic, 12.6% (+/-7.9%) eutrophic, and 9.3% (+/-6.3%) hypereutrophic. Lakes in the ADI and NEU generally are at a low, nearly identical trophic state (96% oligotrophic/mesotrophic), while those in the CLP are much richer (45% eutrophic). EMAP results are similar to results of the Rohm data set across the entire region. In the CLP, however, EMAP identified approximately 45% of the lakes as eutrophic/hypereutrophic, while the Rohm data set identified only 21% in these categories. Across the entire Northeast, the 305(b) report identified a much higher proportion (32.2%) of lakes in eutrophic condition and a much smaller proportion (19.8%) in oligotrophic condition than did the EMAP survey data (12.5% +/- 7.9% and 37.9% +/- 8.5%, respectively). Probability sampling has several advantages over nonrandom sampling when regional resource condition assessment is the goal.KEY WORDS: Lake trophic state; Phosphorus; Probability survey; Regional condition PMID:9680546

  5. The GETE approach to facilitating the commercialization and use of DOE-developed environmental technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, T.N.

    1995-10-01

    The Global Environmental Technology Enterprise (GETE) was conceived to develop and implement strategies to facilitate the commercialization of innovative, cost-effective Department of Energy (DOE)-developed environmental technologies. These strategies are needed to aid DOE`s clean-up mission; to break down barriers to commercialization; and to build partnerships between the federal government and private industry in order to facilitate the development and use of innovative environmental technologies.

  6. COMPARISON OF AUDIT TECHNIQUES AND PERFORMANCE AUDIT RESULTS FOR EPA METHOD 25 FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic audit materials have been developed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate quality of measurements made by federal, state, and local agencies or their contractors during compliance source tests. Among audit materials are materials for auditing EPA Method 25, ...

  7. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFICIENCY - 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1984 National Audit Program by pollutant and by analytical method. Semiannual audits were conducted for Pb, NO3 and SO4 (filter strips) and one audit was conducted for SO2 (bubbler), NO2 (bubbler), CO a...

  8. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM: AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFICIENCY, 1986

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1986 National Audit Program by pollutant and by analytical method. Semiannual audits were conducted for Pb, NO3 and SO4 (filter strips) and acid rain, and annual audits were conducted for CO and high vo...

  9. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM--AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFICIENCY--1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1987 National Ambient Air Audit Program by pollutant and by analytical method. Semiannual audits were conducted for CO, Pb, NO3 and S04 (filter strips) and acid rain, and an annual audit was conducted ...

  10. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFEICIENCY--1988

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the U.S Environmental Protection Agencys 1988 National Ambient Air Performance Audit Program, Semiannual audits were conducted for lead, nitrate and sulfate on filter strips. ne audit was Conducted for high volume/PM10 size Selective inlet (ssi...

  11. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC).

  12. Energy Auditing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Energy Engineers, Atlanta, GA.

    Presented is a discussion of various aspects of policy and implementation of energy auditing at various levels of government. Included are 11 chapters dealing with: (1) a national energy plan, (2) state certification for energy auditors, (3) survey instrumentation, (4) energy management economics, (5) Maine school energy auditing, (6) energy…

  13. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  14. 40 CFR 205.160 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.160 Section 205.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements....

  15. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  16. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  17. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  18. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  19. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  20. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  1. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  2. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  3. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  4. Office of Inspector General audit report on vehicle fleet management at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    In a prior report, Audit of Light Vehicle Fleet Management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, WR-B-93-7, September 29, 1993, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) concluded that vehicle fleet operations might be done more cost effectively by the General Services Administration (GSA) than by Idaho Operations Office (Idaho) and its contractor. The report also concluded that a significant number of vehicles were underused and the fleet was too large. Accordingly, the report contained recommendations that a cost comparison study be conducted to ascertain the most economical and efficient method of managing fleet operations and that vehicle usage data be reviewed periodically by the contractor, with prompt reassignment or disposal of significantly underused vehicles. Thus, the purpose of this audit was to determine if action has been taken to implement recommendations in the prior report. Specifically, the objectives of the current audit were to determine whether a cost comparison had been performed and whether the fleet was still too large. In this report, the authors recommend that Idaho annually review individual vehicle use against mileage standards and promptly dispose of or reassign vehicles not meeting the standards. The authors also recommend that the Idaho Deputy Manager be provided a vehicle assignment report for review and approval.

  5. Progress toward maturity of DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    SciTech Connect

    Cosby, W.C.; Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.

    1994-07-01

    The document DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) has been in circulation since October 1992. DOE Methods is a living document, being updated twice each year. It contains both sampling and analytical methods in support of US Department of Energy/environmental restoration and waste management (DOE/EM) activities. Guidance on how to carry out sampling and analysis activities, focusing of EM needs, is also included in DOE Methods. This guidance applies to all aspects of sampling and analysis for EM. Methods from traditional standard methods documents often cannot provide needed characterization data because of radioactivity or complexity of the matrix. The intent of DOE Methods is to provide an alternative source of methods to meet this need. Efforts are underway to expand the use of DOE Methods throughout all DOE/EM programs. Copies of DOE Methods are available free of charge. The April 1994 update of the document includes 42 methods, of which 13 are new. In October 1994, Revision 2 of DOE Methods will be distributed. It will include additional guidance on how to plan sampling and analysis activities and will also include several new methods. DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division of DOE. It is a vehicle for transgressing new technology for characterization capability within the environmental restoration (ER) and/or waste management (WM) community. As DOE Methods continues to evolve, its use and application will continue to grow.

  6. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site Grand Junction, Colorado: Audit date, August 9--11, 1993. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site in Grand Junction, Colorado. Jim Hylko and Bill James of the TAC conducted this audit August 9 through 11, 1993. Bob Cornish and Frank Bosiljevec represented the US Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents one programmatic finding, eleven site-specific observations, one good practice, and four programmatic observations.

  7. Scholastic Audits. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2009-01-01

    What is a scholastic audit? The purpose of the audit is to assist individual schools and districts improve. The focus is on gathering data and preparing recommendations that can be used to guide school improvement initiatives. Scholastic audits use a multi-step approach and include: (1) Preparing for the Audit; (2) Audit process; (3) Audit report;…

  8. Inquiry-Based Instruction: Does School Environmental Context Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pea, Celestine H.

    2012-01-01

    In a larger study on teachers' beliefs about science teaching, one component looks at how school environmental context factors influence inquiry-based science instruction. Research shows that three broad categories of school environmental factors (human, sociocultural, design) impact inquiry-based teaching in some way. A mixed-method, sequential,…

  9. Does More Federal Environmental Funding Increase or Decrease States' Efforts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Benjamin Y.; Whitford, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the flow of federal grants-in-aid from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the states. We simultaneously model two dependent variables (the flow of EPA funds, and state environmental and natural resource budgets) to identify the independent roles of state political institutions, political preferences, economic and…

  10. Routine environmental reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), Idaho Falls, Idaho. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), State of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW), and DOE contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from October 11 to October 22, 1993, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.113, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by utilizing supplemental activities that serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  11. 41 CFR 102-37.350 - Does coverage under the single audit process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... single audit process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other reviews of its program? 102-37.350... process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other reviews of its program? No, although SASPs are covered under the single audit process in OMB Circular A-133, from time to time the...

  12. 41 CFR 102-37.350 - Does coverage under the single audit process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... single audit process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other reviews of its program? 102-37.350... process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other reviews of its program? No, although SASPs are covered under the single audit process in OMB Circular A-133, from time to time the...

  13. 10 CFR 603.1115 - Single audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Single audits. 603.1115 Section 603.1115 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Post-Award... regarding single audits of nonprofit participant's systems are identified in the DOE “Guide to...

  14. Audit Manual release 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This manual consolidates into one document the policies, procedures, standards, technical guidance and other techniques to be followed by the Assistant Inspector General for Audits and staff in planning and conducting audit work within DOE and in preparing related reports on behalf of the Office of Inspector General.

  15. DOE model conference on waste management and environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Reports dealing with current topics in waste management and environmental restoration were presented at this conference in six sessions. Session 1 covered the Hot Topics'' including regulations and risk assessment. Session 2 dealt with waste reduction and minimization; session 3 dealt with waste treatment and disposal. Session 4 covered site characterization and analysis. Environmental restoration and associated technologies wee discussed in session 5 and 6. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  16. Safety Auditing and Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, James Ronald (Ronnie)

    2005-01-01

    Safety professionals typically do not engage in audits and independent assessments with the vigor as do our quality brethren. Taking advantage of industry and government experience conducting value added Independent Assessments or Audits benefits a safety program. Most other organizations simply call this process "internal audits." Sources of audit training are presented and compared. A relation of logic between audit techniques and mishap investigation is discussed. An example of an audit process is offered. Shortcomings and pitfalls of auditing are covered.

  17. Report on review of management and operating contractor internal audit functions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    DOE uses management and operating contractors to carry out the majority of its missions. Internal audits performed by these contractors are an integral part of DOE`s control structure designed to ensure that contractor costs are reasonable and allowable and that contractor operations are economical and efficient. The purpose of our audit was to determine whether contractor internal audit performance was in accordance with Department audit policy and was therefore satisfactory to DOE. Further, we wanted to determine if the internal audit coverage could be relied upon as part of DOE`s overall internal control structure.

  18. ``Clean`` fuels: Does the new direction make environmental sense?

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C.L.; Wang, M.Q.

    1996-05-01

    This paper examines the ramifications of this a three-pronged energy philosophy, with special reference to its expected environmental impact if it is fully implemented as policy. To recapitulate, the three prongs are to rely on a free energy market to determine winners and losers, which could certainly include Reformulated Gasoline (RFG) if it remains relatively cheap and clean; refocus the bulk of government-sponsored transportation energy research toward a ``great leap ahead`` to fully renewable and essentially pollution-free fuels such as hydrogen and fuel cells; and discontinue AFV pump priming. Of special interest is a premise that appears common to all prongs--that none of these measures represents a retreat from environmental goals or accomplishments on record since the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 was passed.

  19. 42 CFR 137.308 - Does the Secretary have any enforcement authority for Federal environmental responsibilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for Federal environmental responsibilities assumed by Tribes under section 509 of the Act ? 137.308... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.308 Does the Secretary have any enforcement authority for Federal environmental...

  20. Benefits of improved environmental cooperation on a joint DoD/DOE facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, G.K.; Gibson, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    Numerous Federal facilities within the US involve multiple government agencies that face overlapping environmental concerns. This paper highlights the benefits of looking beyond the strict letter of environmental regulations that might affect a single tenant or environmental site to cooperative environmental efforts that focus on the entire facility, consistent with the missions of participating agencies. Using Kirtland Air Force Base (AFB) as a model, seven areas of Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cooperation are discussed that span technical, regulatory compliance, and administrative issues.

  1. The Training Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Roger; Caple, Jim

    1984-01-01

    This article discusses the role of the auditor and describes a seven-stage training audit model currently being employed by a multinational United Kingdom bank. Stages include familiarization, auditing the client, auditing the program, auditing the program organizer, auditing the consumer, presenting the report, and tasking action agencies. (CT)

  2. Does ecohydrological connectivity affect sensitivity to environmental change?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal is to understand the influences of complex terrain on the sensitivity of carbon and water cycle processes to environmental drivers at different scales. Gravity-driven flowpaths of air and water transport material and energy across and through landscapes, creating connec...

  3. Characterization of hazardous waste residuals from Environmental Restoration Program activities at DOE installations: Waste management implications

    SciTech Connect

    Lazaro, M.A.; Esposito, M.P.

    1995-06-01

    Investigators at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), with support from associates at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), have assembled an inventory of the types and volumes of radioactive, toxic or hazardous, and mixed waste likely to be generated over the next 30 years as the US Department of Energy (DOE) implements its nationwide Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The inventory and related analyses are being considered for integration into DOE`s Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) covering the potential environmental impacts and risks associated with alternative management practices and programs for wastes generated from routine operations. If this happens, the ER-generated waste could be managed under a set of alternatives considered under the PEIS and selected at the end of the current National Environmental Policy Act process.

  4. Does WEEE recycling make sense from an environmental perspective?

    SciTech Connect

    Hischier, R. . E-mail: johannes.gauglhofer@empa.ch

    2005-07-15

    The production of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) is one of the fastest growing markets in the world. At the same time this also means that the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) will continue to increase in the coming decades. As it is crucial to obtain more knowledge about the environmental consequences of the different WEEE treatment options, a study examining the two Swiss take-back and recycling systems of SWICO (for computers, consumer electronics and telecommunication equipment) and S.EN.S (household appliances) has been conducted. The two systems, which are based on an advanced recycling fee, are well established within Switzerland. With a combined approach of material flow analysis (MFA) and life cycle assessment (LCA), the environmental impacts of these two systems have been estimated, including all further treatment steps, which transform the fractions either into secondary materials or into waste for final disposal. As a baseline, we have used a scenario assuming that no WEEE is recycled and hence only primary production for the similar amount of raw materials. The impact assessment is based on characterization factors according to the Dutch CML methodology. The results show that throughout the complete recycling chain the sorting and dismantling activities of companies are of minor interest; instead the main impact occurs during the treatment applied further downstream to turn the waste into secondary raw materials. Within the two systems in Switzerland, the collection of WEEE seems much more relevant than the sorting and dismantling activities. When comparing the environmental impact of WEEE recycling with that derived from the baseline scenario (incineration of all WEEE and primary production of the raw materials), WEEE recycling proves to be clearly advantageous from an environmental perspective.

  5. Final Draft of RACER Audit

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, Karen Schultz; Gomez, Penelope E.

    2011-01-01

    This document describes the approach Waste and Environmental Services - Environmental Data and Analysis plans to take to resolve the issues presented in a recent audit of the WES-EDA Environmental Database relative to the RACER database. A majority of the issues discovered in the audit will be resolved in May 2011 when the WES-EDA Environmental Database, along with other LANL databases, are integrated and moved to a new vendor providing an Environmental Information Management (EIM) system that allows reporting capabilities for all users directly from the database. The EIM system will reside in a publicly accessible LANL cloud-based software system. When this transition occurs, the data quality, completeness, and access will change significantly. In the remainder of this document, this new structure will be referred to as the LANL Cloud System In general, our plan is to address the issues brought up in this audit in three ways: (1) Data quality issues such as units and detection status, which impinge upon data usability, will be resolved as soon possible so that data quality is maintained. (2) Issues requiring data cleanup, such as look up tables, legacy data, locations, codes, and significant data discrepancies, will be addressed as resources permit. (3) Issues associated with data feed problems will be eliminated by the LANL Cloud System, because there will be no data feed. As discussed in the paragraph above, in the future the data will reside in a publicly accessible system. Note that report writers may choose to convert, adapt, or simplify the information they receive officially through our data base, thereby introducing data discrepancies between the data base and the public report. It is not always possible to incorporate and/or correct these errors when they occur. Issues in the audit will be discussed in the order in which they are presented in the audit report. Clarifications will also be noted as the audit report was a draft document, at the time of this

  6. Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Edelson; Samuel C. Morris; Joan M. Daisey

    2001-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today.

  7. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Auditing A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Auditing Pt. 1068, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068—Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing The following tables describe sampling plans for selective enforcement audits, as described...

  8. Environmental dose assessment methods for normal operations at DOE nuclear sites

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Corley, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. The report includes a discussion of environmental doses to be calculated, a review of currently available environmental pathway models and a set of recommended models for use when environmental pathway modeling is necessary. Currently available models reviewed include those used by DOE contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other organizations involved in environmental assessments. General modeling areas considered for routine releases are atmospheric transport, airborne pathways, waterborne pathways, direct exposure to penetrating radiation, and internal dosimetry. The pathway models discussed in this report are applicable to long-term (annual) uniform releases to the environment: they do not apply to acute releases resulting from accidents or emergency situations.

  9. DOE Nevada Field Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1992--November 9, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Y.E. ); Allen, G.C. ); Latham, A.R.; Black, S.C. )

    1992-11-01

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program,'' established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter III of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV) has prepared this third annual update of its Environmental Protection implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Operations (AMO), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions.

  10. DOE Nevada Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1993--November 9, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Elle, D.R.; Townsend, Y.E.; Latham, A.R.; Black, S.C.

    1993-11-01

    DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter III of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has prepared this fourth annual update of its Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Environment, Safety, Security, & Health (AMESSH), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions.

  11. DOE Nevada Field Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1992--November 9, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Y.E.; Allen, G.C.; Latham, A.R.; Black, S.C.

    1992-11-01

    DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter III of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV) has prepared this third annual update of its Environmental Protection implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Operations (AMO), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions.

  12. Environmental impact assessment of pharmaceutical prescriptions: Does location matter?

    PubMed

    Oldenkamp, Rik; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Hollander, Anne; Ragas, Ad M J

    2014-11-01

    A methodology was developed for the assessment and comparison of the environmental impact of two alternative pharmaceutical prescriptions. This methodology provides physicians with the opportunity to include environmental considerations in their choice of prescription. A case study with the two antibiotics ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin at three locations throughout Europe showed that the preference for a pharmaceutical might show spatial variation, i.e. comparison of two pharmaceuticals might yield different results when prescribed at different locations. This holds when the comparison is based on both the impact on the aquatic environment and the impact on human health. The relative impacts of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin on human health were largely determined by the local handling of secondary sludge, agricultural disposal practices, the extent of secondary sewage treatment, and local food consumption patterns. The relative impacts of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin on the aquatic environment were mostly explained by the presence of specific sewage treatment techniques, as effluents from sewage treatment plants (STPs) are the most relevant emission pathway for the aquatic environment. PMID:24508156

  13. Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R. J.

    1997-11-10

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power of Boeing North American. Inc. (formerly Rockwell International Corporation). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL and the De Soto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing; R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to ensure protection of the environment.

  14. LABORATORY AND FIELD AUDITS AS PART OF THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) HAZARDOUS WASTE ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY (HWERL) QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Audits are an important and integral part of the EPA Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory (HWERL) Quality Assurance (QA) Program. As part of the overall QA program, audits are used to determine contractor compliance with quality assurance plans and to assess the overal...

  15. DOE/EA-1493: Environmental Assessment for Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project (August 2004)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-08-10

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1493, titled ''Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project'', to analyze the potential environmental consequences of providing cost-shared funding support for the design, construction, and demonstration of an integrated multipollutant control system at AES's Greenidge Station in Dresden, New York. The system, expected to control emissions of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HF, HCl, and Hg, would be installed on the existing, coal-fired, 107-MW Unit 4 at Greenidge. The results of the analyses provided in the EA are summarized in this Finding of No Significant Impact. The proposed action is for DOE to provide about $14.5 million for this project, while CONSOL Energy Inc. and its project partners would be responsible for the remaining $21 million. The proposed project will result in technical, environmental, and financial data from the design, operation and construction of the multi-pollutant control system. This 4.5-year, commercial-scale demonstration project would allow utilities, particularly those with units less than 300-MW in capacity, to make decisions regarding the integrated multi-pollutant control system as a viable commercial option. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has concluded that the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project would result in minimal and insignificant consequences to the human environment. Thus, DOE considers that the proposed action, providing cost-shared funding for the project, is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 United States Code 4321, et seq. Therefore, in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1021.322, DOE has concluded that preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this FONSI.

  16. Audit Report "Department of Energy Efforts to Manage Information Technology Resources in an Energy-Efficient and Environmentally Responsible Manner"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 emphasizes energy efficiency and conservation as critical to the Nation's economic vitality; its goal of reducing dependence on foreign energy sources; and, related efforts to improve the environment. The Act highlights the significant use of various forms of energy in the Federal sector and promotes efforts to improve the energy efficiency of Federal operations. One specific area of interest is the increasing demand for Federal sector computing resources and the corresponding increase in energy use, with both cost and environmental implications. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reported that, without aggressive conservation measures, data center energy consumption alone is expected to double over the next five years. In our report on Management of the Department's Data Centers at Contractor Sites (DOE/IG-0803, October 2008) we concluded that the Department of Energy had not always improved the efficiency of its contractor data centers even when such modifications were possible and practical. Despite its recognized energy conservation leadership role, the Department had not always taken advantage of opportunities to reduce energy consumption associated with its information technology resources. Nor, had it ensured that resources were managed in a way that minimized impact on the environment. In particular: (1) The seven Federal and contractor sites included in our review had not fully reduced energy consumption through implementation of power management settings on their desktop and laptop computers; and, as a consequence, spent $1.6 million more on energy costs than necessary in Fiscal Year 2008; (2) None of the sites reviewed had taken advantage of opportunities to reduce energy consumption, enhance cyber security, and reduce costs available through the use of techniques, such as 'thin-client computing' in their unclassified environments; and, (3) Sites had not always taken the necessary steps to reduce

  17. PARTNERING WITH DOE TO APPLY ADVANCED BIOLOGICAL, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    On February 18, 2004, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Energy signed a Memorandum of Understanding to expand the research collaboration of both agencies to advance biological, environmental, and computational sciences for protecting human health and the ...

  18. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFICIENCY - 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1983 National Audit Program by pollutant and by analytical method. Semiannual audits were conducted for SO2 and NO2 (bubbler methods), Pb, NO3(-) and SO4(=) (filter strips) and CO (continuous monitors)...

  19. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM. AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFICIENCY, 1981

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1981 National Audit Program, which are summarized by pollutant and by analytical method. Semiannual audits were conducted for SO2 and NO2 (bubbler methods), Pb, NO3(negative 2) and SO4(negative 2) (fil...

  20. Assessment of the environmental aspects of the DOE phosphoric acid fuel cell program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, H. L.; Cavagrotti, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The likely facets of a nationwide phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plant commercial system are described. The beneficial and adverse environmental impacts produced by the system are assessed. Eleven specific system activities are characterized and evaluated. Also included is a review of fuel cell technology and a description of DOE's National Fuel Cell Program. Based on current and reasonably foreseeable PAFC characteristics, no environmental or energy impact factor was identified that would significantly inhibit the commercialization of PAFC power plant technology.

  1. Graduate student theses supported by DOE`s Environmental Sciences Division

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Parra, B.M.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides complete bibliographic citations, abstracts, and keywords for 212 doctoral and master`s theses supported fully or partly by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Sciences Division (and its predecessors) in the following areas: Atmospheric Sciences; Marine Transport; Terrestrial Transport; Ecosystems Function and Response; Carbon, Climate, and Vegetation; Information; Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP); Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM); Oceans; National Institute for Global Environmental Change (NIGEC); Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV); Integrated Assessment; Graduate Fellowships for Global Change; and Quantitative Links. Information on the major professor, department, principal investigator, and program area is given for each abstract. Indexes are provided for major professor, university, principal investigator, program area, and keywords. This bibliography is also available in various machine-readable formats (ASCII text file, WordPerfect{reg_sign} files, and PAPYRUS{trademark} files).

  2. The US DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) at Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaglo, T.; Oates, L.; Short, S.

    1994-12-31

    The U.S. DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) is intended to provide an evaluation of the potential and likely impacts of the alternative remediation strategies that could be implemented by DOE across the complex. This paper will discuss the goals and objectives of the DOE PEIS project using Rocky Flats as an example. This paper will discuss the source term data collected for Rocky Flats Plant. Each individual hazardous substance site (IHSS) was allocated to one or more of the following six source term categories: (1) contaminated soils; (2) solid waste; (3) liquid containment; (4) surface water; (5) ground water; (6) facilities.

  3. Low-level waste management alternatives and analysis in DOE`s programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstein, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy is preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The PEIS has been divided into an Environmental Restoration section and a Waste Management section. Each section has a unique set of alternatives. This paper will focus on the waste management alternatives and analysis. The set of alternatives for waste management has been divided into waste categories. These categories are: high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, greater-than-class C and low-level waste from commercial sources, hazardous waste, and spent nuclear fuel. This paper will discuss the alternatives and analytical approach that will be used to evaluate these alternatives for the low-level waste section. Although the same alternatives will be considered for all waste types, the analysis will be performed separately for each waste type. In the sections that follow, information will be provided on waste management configurations, the analysis of waste management alternatives, waste types and locations, facility and transportation activities, the facility and transportation impacts assessment, and the compilation of impacts.

  4. Ideas That Work! The Midnight Audit

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Steven A.

    2015-06-01

    The midnight audit provides valuable insight toward identifying opportunities to reduce energy consumption—insight that can be easily overlooked during the normal (daytime) energy auditing process. The purpose of the midnight audit is to observe after-hour operation with the mindset of seeking ways to further minimize energy consumption during the unoccupied mode and minimize energy waste by reducing unnecessary operation. The midnight audit should be used to verify that equipment is off when it is supposed to be, or operating in set-back mode when applicable. Even a facility that operates 2 shifts per day, 5 days per week experiences fewer annual hours in occupied mode than it does during unoccupied mode. Minimizing energy loads during unoccupied hours can save significant energy, which is why the midnight audit is an Idea That Works.

  5. Report on review of management and operating contractor internal audit functions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    DOE uses management and operating contractors to carry out the majority of its missions. Internal audits performed by these contractors are an integral part of DOE's control structure designed to ensure that contractor costs are reasonable and allowable and that contractor operations are economical and efficient. The purpose of our audit was to determine whether contractor internal audit performance was in accordance with Department audit policy and was therefore satisfactory to DOE. Further, we wanted to determine if the internal audit coverage could be relied upon as part of DOE's overall internal control structure.

  6. Environmental Science and Research Foundation annual technical report to DOE-ID, January , 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The foundation conducts an environmental monitoring and surveillance program over an area covering much of the upper Snake River Plain and provide environmental education and support services related to INEL natural resource issues. Also, the foundation, with its university affiliates, conducts ecological and radioecological research on the Idaho National Environmental Research Park. This research benefits major DOE-ID programs including waste management, environmental restoration, spent nuclear fuels, and land management issues. Major accomplishments during CY1995 can be divided into five categories: environmental surveillance program, environmental education, environmental services and support, ecological risk assessment, and research benefitting the DOE-ID mission.

  7. Does the selection of ISO 14001 registrars matter? Registrar reputation and environmental policy statements in China.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, Gerald E; Chung, Shan Shan; Lo, Carlos W H

    2004-05-01

    This study investigates the relationship between characteristics of environmental policy statements and the reputations of ISO 14001 registrars who had performed certification audits of firms operating in mainland China. Three characteristics of environmental policy statements were examined: (1) The conformance of the policy to strict interpretations of the international standard; (2) The policy statement's adherence to the good practice guidelines specified in ISO 14004; and, (3) Self-reported evaluations of the policy statement's effectiveness as implemented. Data from 106 facilities in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou reveal that registrar quality has a relatively weak, positive relationship with conformance to both ISO 14001 standards and to ISO 14004 guidelines, but no relationship was observed with the self-reported data. Additional findings are that the use of foreign registrars is significantly associated with the adoption of ISO 14004 guidelines and that conformance with ISO 14001 standards is somewhat higher for international joint ventures and foreign-owned firms than for state-owned enterprises. PMID:15084359

  8. Environmental Management Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental management assessment performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from September 14 through September 27, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The environmental management assessment of NREL focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems and assessed the formality of programs employing an approach that recognizes the level of formality implementing environmental programs may vary commensurate with non-nuclear research and development operations. The Assessment Team evaluated environmental monitoring, waste management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities at NREL, from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section of this report. The scope of the NREL Environmental Management Assessment was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management. At the same time, environmental monitoring, waste management, and NEPA activities were evaluated to develop a programmatic understanding of these environmental disciplines, building upon the results of previous appraisals, audits, and reviews performed at the NREL.

  9. The Obesogenic Environment of Commercial Trucking: A Worksite Environmental Audit and Implications for Systems-Based Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Lemke, Michael; Sönmez, Sevil; Hege, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Commercial trucker health is a vital public health concern. Enhanced understanding of the multiplicity, diversity, interdependence, and complexity of policies, resources, and stakeholders relevant to healthful living in trucking worksites can guide future interventions. Purpose: This article examines how the environmental attributes of…

  10. Implementation of the DOE Office of Technology Development Strategic Program Plan for Environmental Education and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, S.M.; Chee, T.C.; Middleman, L.I.

    1992-12-31

    With the November 1989 formation of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) came the responsibility to develop programs to ensurethat enough trained and educated people would be available to support the achievement of EM`s 30-year goal. This mission responsibility derives from public policy and Departmental environmental management requirements. Within DOE, urgency to move forward resulted from the assumptions (1) that the current workforce was insufficiently prepared for the transition from a production mission to a mission of environmental compliance and cleanup; and (2) that, given current trends and forecasts, the national education infrastructure was unlikely to yield the scientists, engineers, and technicians to meet future DOE workforce needs, especially in the case of women and minorities who, projected to make up two-thirds of the net entering workforce by the year 2000, have traditionally been least prepared for and inclined to enter scientific and technical fields. This paper displays DOE`s environmental education and development mission, goals, and strategy, and describes progress in and plans for implementing this strategy.

  11. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bascietto, J.J.; Sharples, F.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1993-06-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at several sites owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120(a) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act also subjects DOE to liability under Section 107 of CERCLA for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. The Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process, by which natural resource injuries are determined and compensatory monetary damages are calculated, is not well known or understood by DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. Nevertheless, natural resource liabilities are potentially a significant source of additional monetary claims for CERCLA hazardous substance releases. This paper describes the requirements of NRDA and explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, in order to more quickly restore environmental services at the lowest total cost to the public. The first section of the paper explains the statutory and regulatory mandates for the NRDA process. The second section briefly describes the four phases of the NRDA process, while the third section examines the three steps in the assessment phase in considerable detail. Finally, the last section focuses on the integration of the CERCLA and NRDA processes.

  12. Integrating natural resource damage assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  13. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many US Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  14. Hassle-free audit trails: Automated audits

    SciTech Connect

    Manatt, D.R.

    1989-04-01

    The origin and history of data in databases are often as important as the data itself. A full audit trail of database operations is the best record of a database's history. INGRES provides an audit facility to format journal file entries into audit records. This facility is cumbersome and difficult to use. I describe two INGRES Report Writer reports that take all the effort out of maintaining a complete audit trail. To maintain an audit trail of changes to INGRES tables it is necessary to run AUDITDB individually on each table and store a record of the AUDITDB output. The INGRES manuals suggest how the audit records can be copied into INGRES tables for storage. Thus the maintenance of an audit trail consists of: creating tables to receive audit records, running AUDITDB, and storing the audit records into the tables. All this must be done for each table to be audited. My approach to this drudgery is to give it all to the INGRES system. Therefore, I present reports that generate command files to create the tables and run the audits. The only job left for a human is to submit the generated command files to the batch queue.

  15. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. )

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

  16. Big Field, Small Potatoes: An Empirical Assessment of EPA's Self-Audit Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Alexander; Sanchirico, Chris William

    2004-01-01

    Environmental self-auditing is said to deserve and require encouragement. Although firms can audit themselves more cheaply and effectively than regulators, they are deterred for fear that information they uncover will be used against them. To reduce this disincentive, the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Audit Policy lowers punitive fines…

  17. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.; Contos, L.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. These data were collected by implementing the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the DOE LIMB Demonstration Project Extension, dated August 1988. This document is the fifth EMP status report to be published and presents the data generated during November and December 1990, and January 1991. These reports review a three or four month period and have been published since the project's start in October 1989. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Implementation of the DOE Office of Technology Development Strategic Program Plan for Environmental Education and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, S.M.; Chee, T.C. ); Middleman, L.I. )

    1992-01-01

    With the November 1989 formation of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) came the responsibility to develop programs to ensurethat enough trained and educated people would be available to support the achievement of EM's 30-year goal. This mission responsibility derives from public policy and Departmental environmental management requirements. Within DOE, urgency to move forward resulted from the assumptions (1) that the current workforce was insufficiently prepared for the transition from a production mission to a mission of environmental compliance and cleanup; and (2) that, given current trends and forecasts, the national education infrastructure was unlikely to yield the scientists, engineers, and technicians to meet future DOE workforce needs, especially in the case of women and minorities who, projected to make up two-thirds of the net entering workforce by the year 2000, have traditionally been least prepared for and inclined to enter scientific and technical fields. This paper displays DOE's environmental education and development mission, goals, and strategy, and describes progress in and plans for implementing this strategy.

  19. Does the Manitoba science curriculum help teach teens to be more environmentally-minded?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraljevic, Gabriel M.

    Manitoba does not have a specific course in environmental education (EE) but has related outcomes within the current science and social studies curricula. Has the curriculum created a populace with the knowledge, attitudes and skills to begin to act for environmental change? Do students and teachers perceive science to be the course that should teach EE? This mixed-method study used surveys, student focus groups, observations of recycling habits and teacher interviews to determine if grade 10 students (last year of required science) are acting in positive ways toward the environment. Students from grades nine and ten exhibited almost the same environmental knowledge and attitudes, but the grade tens were more alarmed about the state of the environment and less naive about their abilities to have individual impact. While both groups reported pro-environmental behaviours, neither recycled materials after a luncheon. Where EE should be taught differed between all groups studied.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: The Functional Unit in the Life Cycle Inventory Analysis of Degreasing Processes in the Metal-Processing Industry

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner; Hoffmann; Kreisel

    1997-07-01

    / In 1986 degreasing processes in the German metal-processing industry contributed about 70,000 t to the emission of chlorinated C1 and C2 hydrocarbons (trichloroethane, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, dichloromethane). Measures aiming at the reduction of toxic emissions and ozone depletion potential (ODP) may possibly lead to a shift of environmental impacts towards higher energy consumption, emission of waste water, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) with photochemical oxidant creation potential (POCP). The present article concerns itself with a life cycle assessment of the three main degreasing processes in order to compare their integral environmental impacts with one another. This is supplemented by presenting the methodology of the life cycle inventory life cycle inventory analysis (LCI). Generally, the applicability of the established LCI method can be shown quite clearly. However, some difficulties arise, especially at the stage of the goal definition, as the use of the process and the functional unit cannot be pinned down as easily and neatly as for most other products. The definition of the use of the process and the functional unit is not as straightforward as for most products. Among the potential functional units identified are the mass of removed impurities, cleaning time, cleaning work, percentage of purity, throughput of parts, loads, mass or surface and virtual coefficients. The mass of removed impurities turned out to be the most suitable parameter for measuring the technical performance of degreasing processes. The article discusses background, purpose, scope, system boundaries, target group, process tree and representativeness of the present study.KEY WORDS: Functional unit; Life cycle assessment; Life cycle inventory analysis; Degreasing processes; Metal processing PMID:9175550

  1. Financial auditing and fraud detection: Implications for scientific data audit.

    PubMed

    Pincus, K V

    1989-09-01

    This paper discusses some current issues and methods related to the detection of fraudulent financial reporting and draws potential implications for audit detection of fradulent scientific reporting. First, a brief history of auditor concern with fraud detection is presented. Then four issues are addressed: (1) How often does fraud occur? (2) What is fraud? (3) What are the general types of fraud? (4) How can auditors assess fraud risk and detect fraud? PMID:26859056

  2. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR CONDUCTING SAMPLING AND SAMPLE BANK AUDITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV) is responsible for preparing Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for auditing sampling and sample bank activities performed under the Resource Conservation and Reco...

  3. EPRI-DOE Conference on Environmentally- Enhanced Hydropower Turbines: Technical Papers

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    The EPRI-DOE Conference on Environmentally-Enhanced Hydropower Turbines was a component of a larger project. The goal of the overall project was to conduct the final developmental engineering required to advance the commercialization of the Alden turbine. As part of this effort, the conference provided a venue to disseminate information on the status of the Alden turbine technology as well as the status of other advanced turbines and research on environmentally-friendly hydropower turbines. The conference was also a product of a federal Memorandum of Understanding among DOE, USBR, and USACE to share technical information on hydropower. The conference was held in Washington, DC on May 19 and 20, 2011 and welcomed over 100 attendees. The Conference Organizing Committee included the federal agencies with a vested interest in hydropower in the U.S. The Committee collaboratively assembled this conference, including topics from each facet of the environmentally-friendly conventional hydropower research community. The conference was successful in illustrating the readiness of environmentally-enhanced hydropower technologies. Furthermore, the topics presented illustrated the need for additional deployment and field testing of these technologies in an effort to promote the growth of environmentally sustainable hydropower in the U.S. and around the world

  4. GREEDI---The computerization of the DOE/DOD environmental data bank

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C R; Kephart, E M

    1988-01-01

    One of the major responsibilities of Sandia National Laboratories is to develop shock and vibration specifications for system mechanical, electrical, and pyrotechnic components. The data required to generate these specifications are collected from finite element analyses, from laboratory simulation experiments with hardware, and from environmental tests. The production of the component specifications requires the analysis, comparison, and continual updating of these data. Sandia National Laboratories has also maintained the DOE/DOD Environmental Data Bank for over 25 years to assist in its shock and vibration efforts as well as to maintain data for several other types of environments. A means of facilitating shared access to engineering analysis data and providing an integrated environment to perform shock and vibration data analysis tasks was required. An interactive computer code and database system named GREEDI (a Graphical Resource for an Engineering Environmental Database Implementation) was developed and implemented. This transformed the DOE/DOD Environmental Data Bank from a card index system into an easily accessed computerized engineering database tool that can manage data in digitized form. GREEDI was created by interconnecting the SPEEDI (Sandia Partitioned Engineering Environmental Database Implementation) code, and the GRAFAID code, an interactive X-Y data analysis tool. An overview of the GREEDI software system is presented. 10 refs.

  5. Strategy for conducting environmental surveillance of groundwater to comply with DOE orders

    SciTech Connect

    Forstrom, J.M.

    1990-12-01

    This document defines the strategy for conducting environmental surveillance of groundwater quality at Department of Energy (DOE) installations as it will be implemented by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The primary objectives of defining this generic strategy prior to developing site-specific plans are to: clearly differentiate between effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance as they apply to groundwater, describe the principles and concepts of groundwater flow that must be considered when establishing a groundwater surveillance program, and provide for a consistent approach to developing plant-specific groundwater surveillance plans. 18 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Audit of selected aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant cost structure, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-22

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a research and development facility intended to demonstrate that transuranic waste from the Government`s defense activities can be safely disposed of in a deep geologic formation. The Fiscal Year 1994 budget for WIPP is about $185 million and includes funding for the operation of WIPP and for experiments being done by other DOE facilities. DOE`s current plan is for WIPP to begin receiving transuranic waste in June 1998. This audit was requested by the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management because two recent reports, one issues by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), were critical of the staffing and cost-effectiveness of WIPP, and because of recent mission changes at WIPP. The audit team consisted of representatives from the DOE, auditors from the OIG, and technical specialists hired by the OIG to assist in the audit. The purpose of the audit was to determine whether WIPP was appropriately staffed to meet programmatic requirements in the most cost-effective manner. The Secretary of Energy expected DOE facilities to benchmark their performance against other facilities to strive for best in class status, and the Westinghouse management and operating contract for WIPP required the facility to be operated in a cost-effective manner. However, the authors determined that Westinghouse did not use benchmarks and that WIPP could be managed more cost-effectively, with fewer personnel, while maintaining its current level of excellence. They concluded that the WIPP staffing level could be significantly reduced with a decrease in costs at WIPP of about $11.4 million per year.

  7. Bonneville Power Administration Site Environmental Report, 1991.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-06-01

    In 1991, in order to provide BPA`s management with environmental information for decision making, and to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, BPA completed 15 environmental impact evaluations and decision documents, with many more in progress. BPA received the results of two US Department of Energy (DOE) environmental management audits, which noted areas for improvement in our operations. We completed Action Plans in response to each DOE report. We received one administrative complaint from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerning a 1990 spill in Arlington, Oregon, caused by a BPA subcontractor. BPA responded promptly to EPA`s findings and concerns. There were 32 new spill/release incidents, most involving failure of Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) capacitors. Cleanup of these spills/releases has proceeded satisfactorily. BPA continued vigorous efforts to clean up substations contaminated with residuals of oil and PCB from past spills. BPA took several actions to improve our environmental performance with respect to water quality. The BPA environmental team developed a long-term schedule for environmental appraisals and audits, identifying facilities and projects that will receive audits through 1996.

  8. Bonneville Power Administration 1991 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    In 1991, in order to provide BPA's management with environmental information for decision making, and to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, BPA completed 15 environmental impact evaluations and decision documents, with many more in progress. BPA received the results of two US Department of Energy (DOE) environmental management audits, which noted areas for improvement in our operations. We completed Action Plans in response to each DOE report. We received one administrative complaint from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerning a 1990 spill in Arlington, Oregon, caused by a BPA subcontractor. BPA responded promptly to EPA's findings and concerns. There were 32 new spill/release incidents, most involving failure of Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) capacitors. Cleanup of these spills/releases has proceeded satisfactorily. BPA continued vigorous efforts to clean up substations contaminated with residuals of oil and PCB from past spills. BPA took several actions to improve our environmental performance with respect to water quality. The BPA environmental team developed a long-term schedule for environmental appraisals and audits, identifying facilities and projects that will receive audits through 1996.

  9. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. . Progress Center)

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US DOE Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators. (VC)

  10. 2 CFR 1536.225 - Whom in the Environmental Protection Agency does a recipient other than an individual notify...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Whom in the Environmental Protection Agency... Other Than Individuals § 1536.225 Whom in the Environmental Protection Agency does a recipient other... criminal drug offense must notify the EPA award official from each Environmental Protection Agency...

  11. Summary of the environmental dose models used at DOE nuclear sites in 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Mueller, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. This review includes a summary of the methods used in 1979 as described in annual environmental reports submitted by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors. The methods used ranged from estimating public doses based on environmental measurements and comparison to the DOE concentration guides, to complex methods using environmental pathway modeling and estimated radionuclide releases. No two sites used the same combination of measurements and pathway models in their analysis. While most sites used an atmospheric dispersion model to predict air concentrations of radioactive material, only about half of the sites provided enough information about the model used to permit proper model evaluation. The waterborne pathways related to drinking water or ingestion of fish were generally well described, while the external exposure or terrestrial food pathways were often not considered. The major recommendation resulting from this review was that complete documentations of the models used should be included either within the annual reports or as separate readily available documents. In addition, most sites could make better use of graphics (i.e., tables and figures) to better communicate the findings of their analyses.

  12. Implementation Plan for the Hawaii Geothermal Project Environmental Impact Statement (DOE Review Draft:)

    SciTech Connect

    1992-09-18

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that identifies and evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP), as defined by the State of Hawaii in its 1990 proposal to Congress (DBED 1990). The location of the proposed project is shown in Figure 1.1. The EIS is being prepared pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as implemented by the President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021), effective May 26, 1992. The State's proposal for the four-phase HGP consists of (1) exploration and testing of the geothermal resource beneath the slopes of the active Kilauea volcano on the Island of Hawaii (Big Island), (2) demonstration of deep-water power cable technology in the Alenuihaha Channel between the Big Island and Mau, (3) verification and characterization of the geothermal resource on the Big Island, and (4) construction and operation of commercial geothermal power production facilities on the Big Island, with overland and submarine transmission of electricity from the Big Island to Oahu and possibly other islands. DOE prepared appropriate NEPA documentation for separate federal actions related to Phase 1 and 2 research projects, which have been completed. This EIS will consider Phases 3 and 4, as well as reasonable alternatives to the HGP. Such alternatives include biomass coal, solar photovoltaic, wind energy, and construction and operation of commercial geothermal power production facilities on the Island of Hawaii (for exclusive use on the Big Island). In addition, the EIs will consider the reasonable alternatives among submarine cable technologies, geothermal extraction, production, and power generating technologies; pollution control technologies; overland and submarine power transmission routes; sites reasonably suited to support

  13. Computerizing Audit Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lahey, Joanna N.; Beasley, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the history, benefits, and shortcomings of traditional audit field experiments to study market discrimination. Specifically it identifies template bias and experimenter bias as major concerns in the traditional audit method, and demonstrates through an empirical example that computerization of a resume or correspondence audit can efficiently increase sample size and greatly mitigate these concerns. Finally, it presents a useful meta-tool that future researchers can use to create their own resume audits. PMID:24904189

  14. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment.

  15. Contracting for Audit Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heifetz, Harry S.

    1987-01-01

    The Single Audit Act of 1984 requires most school districts receiving over $25,000 in federal funds to undergo financial audits. This article highlights requirements for selecting certified public accountants to perform the audit and suggests factors to be considered before drafting a contract or letter of engagement. A sample letter is included.…

  16. 34 CFR 76.910 - Cooperation with audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cooperation with audits. 76.910 Section 76.910 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STATE-ADMINISTERED PROGRAMS What Procedures Does the Secretary Use To Get Compliance? § 76.910 Cooperation with audits. A grantee or subgrantee...

  17. 34 CFR 75.910 - Cooperation with audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cooperation with audits. 75.910 Section 75.910 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Procedures Does the Department Use To Get Compliance? § 75.910 Cooperation with audits. A grantee shall cooperate with...

  18. Current Progress and Future Plans for the DOE Office of Environmental Management International Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, K.D.; Marra, J. C.; Peeler, D.K.; Harbour, M.J.J.R.; Fox, K.M.; Vienna, J.D.; Aloy, A.S.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Bondarkov, M.D.

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has collaborated with various international institutes for many years on radioactive waste management challenges of mutual concern. Currently, DOE-EM is performing collaborative work with researchers at the Khlopin Radium Institute and the SIA Radon Institute in Russia and the Ukraine's International Radioecology Laboratory to explore issues related to high-level waste and to investigate experience and technologies that could support DOE-EM site cleanup needs. Specific initiatives include: - Application of the Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter to DOE Wastes - SIA Radon and Savannah River National Laboratory; - Improved Solubility and Retention of Troublesome Components in SRS and Hanford Waste Glasses - Khlopin Radium Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory; - Long-term Impacts from Radiation/Contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, International Radioecology Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper provides an overview of the status of the current International Program task activities. The paper will also provide insight into the future direction for the program. Specific ties to the current DOE-EM technology development multi-year planning effort will be highlighted as well as opportunities for future international collaborations. (authors)

  19. CURRENT PROGRESS AND FUTURE PLANS FOR THE DOE OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J; Kurt D Gerdes, K; David Peeler, D; John Harbour, J; Kevin Fox, K

    2007-11-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has collaborated with various international institutes for many years on radioactive waste management challenges of mutual concern. Currently, DOE-EM is performing collaborative work with researchers at the Khlopin Radium Institute and the SIA Radon Institute in Russia and the Ukraine's International Radioecology Laboratory to explore issues related to high-level waste and to investigate experience and technologies that could support DOE-EM site cleanup needs. Specific initiatives include: (1) Application of the Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter to DOE Wastes--SIA Radon and Savannah River National Laboratory; (2) Improved Solubility and Retention of Troublesome Components in SRS and Hanford Waste Glasses--Khlopin Radium Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory; and (3) Long-term Impacts from Radiation/Contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone--International Radioecology Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper provides an overview of the status of the current International Program task activities. The paper will also provide insight into the future direction for the program. Specific ties to the current DOE-EM technology development multi-year planning effort will be highlighted as well as opportunities for future international collaborations.

  20. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  1. The Environmental Quality Act and the Belmont Learning Complex: A Breakdown in Process. A Special Report of the Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Legislature, Sacramento. Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    The California legislature's Joint Legislative Audit Committee has issued a report concerning the Belmont Learning Complex (BLC) and the Los Angeles Unified School District's (LAUSD's) propensity for engaging in a series of school construction projects on contaminated land. The analysis suggests that the LAUSD was made aware of the BLC site's…

  2. Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1998, DOE operations at Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.D.

    1999-09-22

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1998 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D and D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 1998 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, and direct radiation. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

  3. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Leee, Majelle

    2002-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2001 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Boeing Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Closure of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 2001 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway. No structural debris from buildings, released for unrestricted use, was transferred to municipal landfills or recycled in 2001.

  4. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Lee, Majelle

    2001-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2000 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the former Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 2000 continue to indicate no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Auditing A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... PROGRAMS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 1068, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068—Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing The following tables describe sampling plans for...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Auditing A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... PROGRAMS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 1068, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068—Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing The following tables describe sampling plans for...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Auditing A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... PROGRAMS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 1068, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068... enforcement audits, as described in § 1068.420: Table A-1—Sampling Plan Code Letter Projected family...

  8. 40 CFR 205.171 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.171 Section 205.171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... § 205.171 Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements....

  9. 40 CFR 211.212 - Compliance audit testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance audit testing. 211.212 Section 211.212 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.212 Compliance audit testing....

  10. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF 40 CFR 60 COMPLIANCE TEST AUDIT DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides audit materials to organizations conducting compliance tests using EPA Test Methods 6 (SO2), 7 (NOx), 18 (organics by GC/FID), 25 (organics as ppm C), and 26 (HCl). hese audit samples must be analyzed and the results reporte...