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Sample records for doe environmental audits

  1. Performance objectives and criteria for conducting DOE environmental audits

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    This document contains the Performance Objectives and Criteria (POC) that have been developed for environmental audits and assessments conducted by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. The Environmental POC can serve multiple purposes. Primarily, they are to serve as guidelines for the technical specialists conducted the audits and assessments, and for the team management. The POC can also serve as supporting documents for training of technical discipline specialists and Team Leaders and as bases for DOE programs and field offices and contractors conducting audit or assessment activities or improving environmental protection programs. It must be recognized that not all of the POC will necessarily apply to all DOE facilities. The users of this document must rely upon their knowledge of the facility and their professional judgment, or the judgment of qualified environmental professionals to determine the applicability of each POC. The POC cover eleven technical disciplines: air; surface water and drinking water quality; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; radiation; quality assurance; inactive waste sites and releases; ecological and cultural resources; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); and environmental management systems.

  2. Environmental Management Audit: Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Audit completed for the Southwestern Power Administration. During this Audit, activities and records were reviewed and personnel interviewed. The onsite portion of the Southwestern Audit was conducted from November 30 through December 11, 1992, by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and activities as part of the Assistant Secretary`s Environmental Audit Program. This program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities/activities regarding compliance with laws, regulations, DOE Orders, formal written procedures, compliance agreements, and Best Management Practices (BMPs). This internal oversight function plays an important role in improving the compliance status of DOE operations. The Environmental Management Audit stresses DOE`s policy that it is the responsibility of line management to conduct operations in an environmentally sound and safe manner. The Environmental Management Audit focuses on management systems and programs, whereas the Environmental Baseline Audit conducted in March 1991 focused on specific compliance issues. The scope of the Southwestern Environmental Management Audit included a review of all systems and functions necessary for effective environmental management. Specific areas of review included: Organizational Structure; Environmental Commitment; Environmental Protection Programs; Formality of Environmental Programs; Internal and External Communication; Staff Resources, Training, and Development; and Program Evaluation, Reporting, and Corrective Action.

  3. Environmental Management Audit: Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Audit completed for the Southwestern Power Administration. During this Audit, activities and records were reviewed and personnel interviewed. The onsite portion of the Southwestern Audit was conducted from November 30 through December 11, 1992, by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and activities as part of the Assistant Secretary's Environmental Audit Program. This program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities/activities regarding compliance with laws, regulations, DOE Orders, formal written procedures, compliance agreements, and Best Management Practices (BMPs). This internal oversight function plays an important role in improving the compliance status of DOE operations. The Environmental Management Audit stresses DOE's policy that it is the responsibility of line management to conduct operations in an environmentally sound and safe manner. The Environmental Management Audit focuses on management systems and programs, whereas the Environmental Baseline Audit conducted in March 1991 focused on specific compliance issues. The scope of the Southwestern Environmental Management Audit included a review of all systems and functions necessary for effective environmental management. Specific areas of review included: Organizational Structure; Environmental Commitment; Environmental Protection Programs; Formality of Environmental Programs; Internal and External Communication; Staff Resources, Training, and Development; and Program Evaluation, Reporting, and Corrective Action.

  4. Routine environmental audit of the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Hanford Site (Hanford), Richland, Washington. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents an reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Washington regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted May 2--13, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  5. Environmental auditing: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Dixon; Wilson, Melvin J.

    1994-07-01

    The environmental audit has become a regular part of corporate environmental management in Canada and is also gaining recognition in the public sector. A 1991 survey of 75 private sector companies across Canada revealed that 76% (57/75) had established environmental auditing programs. A similar survey of 19 federal, provincial, and municipal government departments revealed that 11% (2/19) had established such programs. The information gained from environmental audits can be used to facilitate and enhance environmental management from the single facility level to the national and international levels. This paper is divided into two sections: section one examines environmental audits at the facility/company level and discusses environmental audit characteristics, trends, and driving forces not commonly found in the available literature. Important conclusions are: that wherever possible, an action plan to correct the identified problems should be an integral part of an audit, and therefore there should be a close working relationship between auditors, managers, and employees, and that the first audits will generally be more difficult, time consuming, and expensive than subsequent audits. Section two looks at environmental audits in the broader context and discusses the relationship between environmental audits and three other environmental information gathering/analysis tools: environmental impact assessments, state of the environment reports, and new systems of national accounts. The argument is made that the information collected by environmental audits and environmental impact assessments at the facility/company level can be used as the bases for regional and national state of the environment reports and new systems of national accounts.

  6. Environmental audits: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, P; Atkinson, S F

    1987-05-01

    This paper presents a literature review focused on predictive technique audits, one of the types of audit considered to have the greatest potential role in improving environmental impact assessment practice. The literature review is limited to US literature with the exception of a few UK audits, one undertaken by Tomlinson at the University of Aberdeen. The authors are, however, aware that literature from other countries exists on this subject, for example from Canada and South Africa.In the review, predictive technique audits performed for or by the US Bureau of Land Management, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the US Corps of Engineers, together with the Wisconsin Power Plant Impact Study are described. In addition, articles describing the auditing of models designed to predict environmental change are reviewed, before details of auditing activity in the UK are presented. PMID:24253996

  7. Technical support services to assist the Office of Environmental Audit in conducting the DOE Environmental Survey and to provide technical assistance on Environmental Compliance issues. Technical progress report, February 16, 1991--August 16, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    HALLIBURTON NUS received authorization from DOE on August 14, 1987 to provide technical support to assist the Office of Environmental Audit (OEV) in conducting the DOE Environmental Survey and to provide technical assistance on environmental compliance issues. The overall contract is to accomplish a one-time, no-fault baseline Survey of all DOE operating facilities, and to provide technical assistance and support for the resolution of environmental compliance issues. NUS has completed the Preliminary Reports and continues to support DOE on the Prioritization and Tiger Team Assessment efforts. The project requires a broad range of environmental protection expertise, necessitating senior-level personnel as the primary project staff. Many of the tasks assigned by DOE require quick startup and performance, and several tasks may be active at any one time. The objective of the DOE Environmental Survey Program is to identify and prioritize areas of existing environmental risk at 36 DOE facilities. NUS`role is to technically assist the Office of Environmental Audit in the implementation of the Surveys.

  8. Environmental Compliance Audit& Assessment Program Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Thorson, Patrick; Baskin, David; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Wahl, Linnea; Hatayama, Howard; Pauer, Ronald

    2009-03-13

    This document describes the elements, schedule, roles, and responsibilities of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Compliance Audit & Assessment Program (ECAAP). The ECAAP has been developed to meet the requirements of DOE Order 450.1A,1 and Executive Order 13423.2 These referenced Orders stipulate that government agencies must develop environmental compliance audit programs to monitor and improve compliance with environmental regulations. As stated specifically in the DOE Order, as a part of a DOE facility's Environmental Management System (EMS), 'An environmental compliance audit and review program that identifies compliance deficiencies and root causes of non-compliance' shall be developed and implemented. The ECAAP has also been developed to satisfy LBNL's institutional technical assurance assessment requirements promulgated in the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Self-Assessment Program (LBNL/PUB-5344) and described by the ES&H Technical Assurance Program (TAP) Manual (LBNL/PUB-913E). The ES&H TAP Manual provides the framework for systematic reviews of ES&H programs with the intent to provide assurance that these programs comply with their guiding regulations, are effective, and are properly implemented. As required by the DOE and Executive Orders and by LBNL's TAP, the goal of the ECAAP is to identify environmental regulatory compliance deficiencies and to determine their respective causes. The ECAAP then provides a means of correcting any deficiencies identified, and leads to continually improving environmental compliance performance.

  9. EPA clarifies its environmental auditing policy

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, L.L.

    1994-10-01

    EPA's audit policy is entitled ''Environmental Auditing Policy Statement.'' EPA's current policy is intended to encourage regulated entities to develop, implement and periodically upgrade environmental auditing programs. The policy outlines the elements EPA believes must be included in an audit program if it is to be effective. These include: Explicit top management support for environmental auditing and commitment to follow up on audit findings; An environmental auditing function independent of auditing activities; Adequate team staffing and auditor training; Explicit audit program objectives, scope, resources and frequency; A process that collects, analyzes, interprets and documents information sufficient to achieve audit objectives. A process that includes specific procedure to prepare promptly candid, clear and appropriate written reports on audit findings, corrective actions and schedules for implementation; and A process that includes quality assurance procedures.

  10. Routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This document contains the findings identified during the routine environmental audit of Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa, conducted September 12--23, 1994. The audit included a review of all Ames Laboratory operations and facilities supporting DOE-sponsored activities. The audit`s objective is to advise the Secretary of Energy, through the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, as to the adequacy of the environmental protection programs established at Ames Laboratory to ensure the protection of the environment, and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE requirements.

  11. Environmental audits -- Defining measurable value and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P.

    1998-07-01

    It is well accepted that historically traditional find and fix environmental audits are at best, short-term solutions. Such reactive thinking does not effectively identify the cause(s), are often short-lived and when facilities are re-evaluated, tend to frustrate any serious environmental stewardship program. More proactive thinking embraces the identifying and aggressive follow-up toward closure of causes. In any organization where audits are a part of proactive environmental company policies, even the latter progressive approach may not be a high enough plateau. Progressive audit programs include also, the essential ingredient to evaluate program strengths, avoiding the disastrous perceptions that audit is an evaluation of job performances. Establishment of baseline trust emphasizing the positive as well as deficiencies reinforces cooperation and builds winning relationships. Assurances of the sustainability of compliance through employee efforts though, cannot be guaranteed no matter what the regulation or how strong the company policy. Guarantees are few, but a more assured reinforcement of sustained buy-in can be through the identification and communication of audit value and benefits. Value and benefits are often thought of in terms of helping facilities achieve and maintain compliance while avoiding notices of violation and fines. While these among other objectives are the foundation reasons for assessing, a deeper, big picture analysis of employee effort and measurable value is required. Skillful audit teams use their perspective to identify opportunities and take on non-traditional roles to assist facilities transcend corrective action toward and maintenance of compliance. A measurable value and benefits driven approach in association with compliance objectives, enhanced by strong communication, reinforces the very foundation of trust and stewardship within the organization.

  12. Environmental audit, Bonneville Power Administration, lower Columbia area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Audit conducted by the DOE Headquarters Office of Environmental Audit within the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) Lower Columbia Area. The BPA facilities included in the Audit are the Ross Complex in Vancouver, Washington; the substations of North Bonneville, North Bonneville Annex, Camas, and Longview within the state of Washington; and the Acton and Troutdale Substations within the state of Oregon. The independent Audit was conducted by a team of professionals from DOE and contractors. The purpose of the Audit is to provide the Secretary of Energy, Admiral James D. Watkins, Ret., with the status of environmental programs within BPA's Lower Columbia Area. The Environmental Audit team identified 25 findings dealing with the lack of conformance with federal and state laws and regulations and DOE Orders, and 7 findings in which BMPs were not attained. Although all findings require corrective action, none required cessation of operations or reflect situations that present an immediate risk to public health or the environment. The Audit team noted inadequacies in PCB management included storage, labeling, reporting, and spill control. The most significant causal factors for the findings include lack of policy implementation throughout the Lower Columbia Area, inadequate training of personnel charged with environmental protection, lack of standard operating procedures for many programs, lack of reviews and appraisals, and an inaccurate perception of low risk for environmental concerns.

  13. Watchdog Audits Environmental Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Recent reorganization of the General Accounting Office is reviewed. With regard to environmental concerns it is aiming to see if federal environmental programs are meeting the congressionally mandated objectives of laws. Surveys and reviews are explained. (BL)

  14. Environmental audit of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), principally in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. The audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s), Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), beginning September 13, 1993, and ending September 23, 1993. The scope of the audit at SREL was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater/soil, sediment, and biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive Waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of SREL operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices.

  15. Evolution of an environmental audit program

    SciTech Connect

    Maday, J.H.; Kuusinen, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    Environmental audits are discussed. Within todays corporate culture, auditors and auditees alike, have been assigned stewardship over the environment. Audits provide a quality assurance check to contribute to the verification process, helping to ensure the management practices associated with the environmental management system are in place, functioning, and adequate. The objective of the audit is to help improve the effectiveness of that basic management system while at the same time determining compliance with the environmental requirements. Performing the audit in a well documented manner, using technique knowledgeable teams, will provide defendable benefits should the audit be challenged and will enhance the credibility of the existing environmental management system.

  16. Software Assists in Extensive Environmental Auditing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Matherne, Charlie

    2003-01-01

    The Base Environmental Management System (BEMS) is a Web-based application program for managing and tracking audits by the Environmental Office of Stennis Space Center in conformity with standard 14001 of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 14001). (This standard specifies requirements for an environmental-management system.) BEMS saves time by partly automating what were previously manual processes for creating audit checklists; recording and tracking audit results; issuing, tracking, and implementing corrective-action requests (CARs); tracking continuous improvements (CIs); and tracking audit results and statistics. BEMS consists of an administration module and an auditor module. As its name suggests, the administration module is used to administer the audit. It helps administrators to edit the list of audit questions; edit the list of audit locations; assign mandatory questions to locations; track, approve, and edit CARs; and edit completed audits. The auditor module is used by auditors to perform audits and record audit results: it helps the auditors to create audit checklists, complete audits, view completed audits, create CARs, record and acknowledge CIs, and generate reports from audit results.

  17. Software Assists in Extensive Environmental Auditing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Matherne, Charlie; Selinsky, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Base Environmental Management System (BEMS) is a Web-based application program for managing and tracking audits by the Environmental Office of Stennis Space Center in conformity with standard 14001 of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 14001). (This standard specifies requirements for an environmental-management system.) BEMS saves time by partly automating what were previously manual processes for creating audit checklists; recording and tracking audit results; issuing, tracking, and implementing corrective-action requests (CARs); tracking continuous improvements (CIs); and tracking audit results and statistics. BEMS consists of an administration module and an auditor module. As its name suggests, the administration module is used to administer the audit. It helps administrators to edit the list of audit questions; edit the list of audit locations; assign mandatory questions to locations; track, approve, and edit CARs; and edit completed audits. The auditor module is used by auditors to perform audits and record audit results: it helps the auditors to create audit checklists, complete audits, view completed audits, create CARs, record and acknowledge CIs, and generate reports from audit results.

  18. Software Assists in Extensive Environmental Auditing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callac, Christopher; Matherne, Charlie

    2002-01-01

    The Base Enivronmental Management System (BEMS) is a Web-based application program for managing and tracking audits by the Environmental Office of Stennis Space Center in conformity with standard 14001 of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 14001). (This standard specifies requirements for an environmental-management system.) BEMS saves time by partly automating what were previously manual processes for creating audit checklists; recording and tracking audit results; issuing, tracking, and implementing corrective-action requests (CARs); tracking continuous improvements (CIs); and tracking audit results and statistics. BEMS consists on an administration module and an auditor module. As its name suggests, the administration module is used to administer the audit. It helps administrators to edit the list of audit questions; edit the list of audit locations; assign manditory questions to locations; track, approve, and edit CARs; and edit completed audits. The auditor module is used by auditors to perform audits and record audit results: It helps the auditors to create audit checklists, complete audits, view completed audits, create CARs, record and acknowledge CIs, and generate reports from audit results.

  19. Environmental audit experiences in China

    SciTech Connect

    Anwar, H.A.; Stover, J.

    1999-07-01

    As part of the massive government reforms announced at the meeting of the Ninth National People's Congress (NPC) in March 1998, the State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA) was elevated to a new type of government entity. The new status, described as ministry-level, represents a substantial strengthening of SEPA's authority, however, significant questions remain as to whether or not this will translate into more effective environmental policies. Previously SEPA lacked authority and backing within the government to advance and support personnel and policy decisions down through its own administrative hierarchy from central to regional to local levels. This paper will use these issues to present a proper background when examining Environmental Audit (EA) case studies in China, and examining what future EA experiences may be like. It will include discussions of regional differences in enforcement standards and methods, the implications of the new Land Management Law, and elaboration on environmental liability issues and potential Superfund-type legislation in China.

  20. Elements of an effective environmental auditing program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Significant advances have been made the last few years in the approach to and role of environmental compliance auditing in industry. Expectations of stakeholders, the public and governmental agencies continue to grow regarding assurance of compliance and environmental protection. These growing expectations have been drivers for improved auditing programs. This paper will provide a discussion of an effective environmental auditing program from industry`s point of view. It will identify and discuss the key elements needed for auditing environmental compliance, discuss how these elements are incorporated into industry programs and how these elements have been used to evaluate compliance in Conoco. In addition, a discussion of a method to tie compliance auditing to management system elements in order to facilitate systematic improvement in environmental performance will be presented.

  1. Elements of an effective environmental auditing program

    SciTech Connect

    McLemore, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Significant advances have been made the last few years in the approach to and role of environmental compliance auditing in the petroleum industry. Expectations of stakeholders, the public and governmental agencies continue to grow regarding assurance of compliance and environmental protection. These growing expectations have been drivers for improved auditing programs. This paper will provide a discussion of an effective environmental auditing program from industry`s point of view. It will identify and discuss the key elements needed for auditing environmental compliance, discuss how these elements are incorporated into industry programs and how these elements have been used to evaluate compliance in Conoco. In addition, a discussion of a method to tie compliance auditing to management system elements in order to facilitate systematic improvement in environmental performance will be presented.

  2. General Motors plant environmental auditing program

    SciTech Connect

    Barzotti, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses General Motors environmental audit activities in the stationary source area. From the late 1960s through the 1970s, a wide range of environmental and safety legislation was enacted. As a result, GM expanded its environmental staff to ensure compliance and increase employee awareness of regulatory requirements. This report traces the development and operation of the GM Industrial Environmental Performance Review or Plant Environmental Audit, as it is most often called. The Plant Environmental Audit Group was established in 1972 to provide corporate, divisional, and local management with accurate, periodic engineering evaluations of the environmental conditions at each manufacturing facility. The scope of the plant audit includes the environmental categories of air and water quality, waste materials handling and disposal, energy conservation, and certain OSHA-related functions that are considered plant engineering responsibilities (noise abatement, maintenance records, etc.).

  3. Performing environmental audits: An engineer's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Morelli, J.A. )

    1994-02-01

    Today, environmental auditing is both a technical exercise and a legal art. To perform a comprehensive and effective environmental audit requires a team of individuals who combined have broad engineering skills, a knowledge of chemistry, and specialized legal experience with all the relevant environmental regulations. Because the audit involves such highly qualified individuals, it is typically quite expensive. Nonetheless, the cost is well worth the investment, because of the high stakes involved in environmental legislation and litigation. Simply put, the cost of non-compliance can far outweigh the costs associated with a comprehensive audit. The paper describes starting the audit, the ideal team, a standard method, doing a compliance audit, data analysis after the audit, advantages and disadvantages, and policies on auditing. The paper briefly describes the four factors that the Department of Justice considers in deciding whether to bring criminal prosecution for violation of an environmental statute. The four factors are: voluntary disclosure; cooperation; preventive measures and compliance program; and pervasiveness of non-compliance.

  4. Routine environmental audit of the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12 Plant), Anderson County, Tennessee. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), State of Tennessee regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted August 22-September 2, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of DOE environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  5. Environmental projects. Volume 3: Environmental compliance audit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex is part of NASA's Deep Space Network, one of the world's largest and most sensitive scientific telecommunications and radio navigation networks. Activities at Goldstone are carried out in support of six large parabolic dish antennas. In support of the national goal of the preservation of the environment and the protection of human health and safety, NASA, JPL and Goldstone have adopted a position that their operating installations shall maintain a high level of compliance with Federal, state, and local laws governing the management of hazardous substances, abestos, and underground storage tanks. A JPL version of a document prepared as an environmental audit of Goldstone operations is presented. Both general and specific items of noncompliance at Goldstone are identified and recommendations are provided for corrective actions.

  6. Regulatory compliance, management assurance drive environmental audits

    SciTech Connect

    Diberto, M. )

    1994-07-01

    As environmental protection takes on greater priority, more companies are developing environmental auditing programs. Details of these programs vary, but they share a basic goal--to verify that environmental, health and safety activities comply with company policies, and federal, state and local regulations. The growth of environmental auditing has been driven by the same forces that since 1970 have changed many aspects the business-environment relationship. In addition, regulations, court case precedents and public expectations are forcing companies to disclose much more about their environmental performance than in the past. The handful of companies that developed auditing programs considered them internal tools for evaluating environmental performance in their facilities and operations. As the discipline has spread and environmental regulations have proliferated, auditing increasingly has been driven by a need to assure senior management that their companies are in compliance and sound environmental procedures are being used. To achieve these goals, companies systematically design and conduct environmental audits to address relevant concerns, and appropriately document and report all findings.

  7. Routine environmental audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, California, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California (SNL/CA). During this audit the activities the Audit Team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from preview audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of California regulators, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from February 22 through March 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The audit`s functional scope was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management and a programmatic evaluation of NEPA and inactive waste sites.

  8. EPA to reassess environmental auditing policy statement

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, L.L.

    1994-08-01

    In a memorandum issued May 13, 1994, Assistant Administrator for Enforcement and Compliance Assurance Steven Herman announced EPA's plans to reassess its current policy regarding environmental auditing and self-evaluation by the regulated community. The memorandum provides encouraging news to industry, which has long asserted that EPA's current auditing policy frustrates, not fosters, critical self-evaluation. EPA states in the memorandum its intention to base its reevaluation of its environmental auditing policies on an empirical approach to ensure that any decision either to reinforce or change existing policies is informed by fact. By the end of this summer, EPA intends to take four actions it believes will be consistent with this general approach.

  9. Comprehensive baseline environmental audit of former underground test areas in Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of Former Underground Test Areas (FUTAS) in the States of Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico. DOE and contractor systems for management of environmental protection activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were not within the scope of the audit. The audit was conducted May 16-May 26, 1994, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program{close_quotes}, establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is to enhance environmental protection and minimize risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission using systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE`s environmental programs within line organizations and supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. These evaluations function as a vehicle through which the Secretary and program managers are apprised of the status and vulnerabilities of Departmental environmental activities and environmental management systems. Several types of evaluations are conducted, including: (1) comprehensive baseline environmental audits; (2) routine environmental audits; (3) environmental management assessments; and (4) special issue reviews.

  10. ISO 14000 - the International Environmental Management Standard: Potential impacts on environmental management and auditing in the electric power generation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntlett, S.B.; Pierce, J.L.; Pierce, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    In the framework of environmental management, the concept of voluntary environmental compliance auditing is not in itself a new development. Environmentally conscious firms have for more than a decade, undertaken voluntary audits to help achieve and maintain compliance with environmental regulations and to help identify and correct unregulated or poorly regulated environmental hazard. The firms undertaking the audits were motivated by a desire to mitigate legal and financial risks and/or the desire to be a highly responsible member of the corporate community. Much of the early attention to environmental auditing was in the chemical process industries. Today, there are four current trends affecting environmental auditing: (1) the practice is becoming widespread in all industry groups in both large and small firms; (2) environmental management and audit methodolgies and approaches are being codified in the form of written national and International standards; (3) environmental management programs and in-house audits are increasingly being certified by independent auditors (who are not associated with regulatory agencies); and (4) the certifications are being viewed as marketing and public relations tools. The adoption of ISO 14000 is destined to become the most significant development in international environmental management and auditing. International standards for the development of Environmental Management Systems and the execution of environmental audits do not currently exist. Individual countries, such as England and France, have national standards. One multi-national standard currently exists--the European Economic Community`s Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS). The United States does not have a national environmental management and auditing standard.

  11. United States sentencing guidelines: Implications for environmental auditing

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, P.S.

    1997-06-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the US Department of Justice (USDOJ), the US Sentencing Commission and state environmental protection agencies have all issued guidelines, policy statements or proposals which are supposed to encourage companies to conduct environmental audits and to disclose the results of those audits to environmental agencies. Audits and more focused investigations resulting from questions raised by the audits are often conducted in such a way as to protect the audits or investigations from disclosure to USEPA, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) or the public. By meeting the confidentiality and other requirements of attorney-client privilege, the work product privilege or other criteria, companies preserve the opportunity to keep audit information confidential. The purpose of this presentation is to review the draft US Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations Convicted of Environmental Crimes (guidelines) and determine under what circumstances it would be beneficial to disclose privileged audit information in light of the guidelines.

  12. DOE environmental assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment on the proposed downhole steam generator field test in Kern County, California. Based on these findings DOE has determined that the proposed action does not

  13. Routine environmental audit of the K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Audit of the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted February 14 through February 25, 1994, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The Routine Environmental Audit for the K-25 site was conducted as an environmental management assessment, supported through reviews of the Waste Management Program and the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. The assessment was conducted jointly with, and built upon, the results provided by the ``DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office Environment, Safety, health and Quality Assurance Appraisal at the K-25 Site.`` DOE 5482.1B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The purpose of this assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy and senior DOE managers with concise independent information as part of DOE`s continuing effort to improve environmental program performance. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and the minimization of risk to public health and the environment. The routine environmental audit is one method by which EH-24 accomplishes its mission, utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations.

  14. Environmental Audit of the Grand Junction Projects Office

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is located in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately south and west of the Grand Junction city limits. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Colorado Raw Materials Office at the present-day Grand Junction Projects Office in 1947, to aid in the development of a viable domestic uranium industry. Activities at the site included sampling uranium concentrate; pilot-plant milling research, including testing and processing of uranium ores; and operation of a uranium mill pilot plant from 1954 to 1958. The last shipment of uranium concentrate was sent from GJPO in January, 1975. Since that time the site has been utilized to support various DOE programs, such as the former National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), and the Technical Measurements Center (TMC). All known contamination at GJPO is believed to be the result of the past uranium milling, analyses, and storage activities. Hazards associated with the wastes impounded at GJPO include surface and ground-water contamination and potential radon and gamma-radiation exposure. This report documents the results of the Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Grand Junction Baseline Environmental Audit was conducted from May 28 to June 12, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at GJPO, as well as GJPO activities at the State-Owned Temporary Repository. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Environmental program audit, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The environmental monitoring program, environmental control equipment and its use, and the facility's compliance with DOE orders, Federal and State laws and regulations were evaluated in this audit. No imminent threat to public health and safety was discovered. A needed quality assurance program is being added. Recommendations are given. (PSB)

  16. Environmental audit of the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Environmental Restoration (LEHR-ER) Project at University of California-Davis (UCD), Davis, California. The scope of the audit at the LEHR-ER was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater and soils/sediment/biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of LEHR-ER operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices (BMPs).

  17. Facing corporate America`s environmental auditing dilemma

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, M.M.; Holloway, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    American corporations are currently facing a dilemma over environmental auditing: are the potential benefits of auditing, such as assurance that compliance efforts are successful and awareness of any problem areas, outweighed by the risk of creating a road map for agency enforcement or litigation? Although this is a question that cannot be easily answered, the answer may lie, in large part, in attaining some reasonable level of protection for information uncovered in audits. Recognizing this, there is a growing movement to create a ``safe environment`` for corporate environmental auditing. The push, which includes efforts to alter agency policy regarding disclosure of audit materials and to pass state privilege legislation protecting such materials, has gained momentum as agency enforcement activities have increased. The government`s increased use of criminal sanctions and promotion of auditing by groups such as the International Standards Organization have added to the urgency of the situation.

  18. Environmental auditing of the Kamojang Geothermal Power Plant - Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Radja, V.T.; SulasdI, D.

    1996-12-31

    Environmental Auditing of the Kamojang Geothermal Power Station is based on a monitoring programme which focuses on those potential adverse environmental impacts identified in the Environmental Impact Analysis. Information gained from environmental monitoring with regard to the environmental quality shows that an adverse impact do not occur.

  19. Auditing environmental, health and safety management systems in E&P companies: A second generation auditing program

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.J.; Guckian, W.M.; Moore, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the development of a method of performing Management Systems Audits of Environmental, Health and Safety (EH&S) programs in upstream oil and gas companies. It describes how the results from the compliance auditing system presented in SPE Paper 25955, {open_quotes}Initiating an Audit Program: A Case History{close_quotes} were combined with a system Categorizing EH&S activities into several management systems defined by regulations and good operational practices, and used to perform short term {open_quotes}Pareto-style{close_quotes} audits (e.g., 80% of the value from 20% of the time). A comparison is made of this type of audit model with the classic accounting audit model. Examples from Management System Audits of ARCO`s foreign and domestic operations are used. Included are discussions of the economic benefit of performing EH&S Audits and the benefit of developing a method of auditing considering the new ISO 14000 standard for environmental auditing and the proposed ISO safety auditing standard. The conclusions presented are that auditing by experienced personnel using an auditing template developed exclusively for upstream operations provides benefits to the company in the areas of compliance, management systems development and education of first line operations personnel as well as resulting in an overall reduction in the cost of an audit. A further conclusion will be that trends in international standardization appear to be mandating an EH&S auditing program for those companies planning to do business outside the United States.

  20. Internal environmental protection audits: a suggested guide for US Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barisas, S.; Polich, J.; Habegger, L.; Surles, T.

    1983-08-01

    This manual has been prepared for use by any DOE facility as an aid for conducting an internal environmental-protection audit. The manual is organized in modular format, with each module covering a separate area of environmental protection. The questions within each module were developed from existing DOE orders, executive orders, federal statutes, and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations issued pursuant to specific environmental legislation. A bibliography of such legislation is included at the end of this section. Each module also includes questions about a facility's use of industrial standards of practice.

  1. 41 CFR 102-118.300 - How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? 102-118.300 Section 102-118.300 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.300 How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? Your...

  2. 41 CFR 102-118.300 - How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? 102-118.300 Section 102-118.300 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.300 How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? Your...

  3. 41 CFR 102-118.280 - What advantages does the prepayment audit offer my agency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What advantages does the prepayment audit offer my agency? 102-118.280 Section 102-118.280 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.280 What advantages does the prepayment audit offer my...

  4. 41 CFR 102-118.300 - How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? 102-118.300 Section 102-118.300 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.300 How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? Your...

  5. 41 CFR 102-118.300 - How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? 102-118.300 Section 102-118.300 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.300 How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? Your...

  6. 41 CFR 102-118.300 - How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? 102-118.300 Section 102-118.300 Public Contracts and Property Management... for Prepayment Audits § 102-118.300 How does my agency fund its prepayment audit program? Your...

  7. The School Curriculum and Environmental Education: A School Environmental Audit Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conde, Maria del Carmen; Sanchez, J. Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Thirteen primary and pre-primary schools in Extremadura (Spain) were participants in an educational research project, "Ecocentros", based on school environmental audits (eco-audits). To understand the contribution these experiences can make to achieving the objectives of environmental education, it is essential to know what is actually…

  8. Environmental Audit, Rifle, Gunnison and Grand Junction UMTRA Project Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the results of the comprehensive baseline Environmental Audit completed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites at Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. Included in the Audit were the actual abandoned mill sites, associated transportation and disposal cell facilities, and representative examples of the more than 4,000 known vicinity properties. Sites investigated include: Climax Mill Site, Truck/Train Haul Route, Cotter Transfer Station, Cheney Disposal Cell, Rifle Mill Sites (Old and New Rifle), Gunnison Mill Site, Vicinity Properties, and Estes Gulch and Proposed Landfill Site No. 1 Disposal Cells. The UMTRA Audit was a comprehensive baseline audit which considered all environmental programs and the activities associated with ongoing and planned remediation at the UMTRA sites listed above. Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was not considered during this investigation. The Audit Team looked at the following technical disciplines: air, surface water/drinking water, groundwater, soil/sediment/biota, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, quality assurance, radiation, inactive waste sites, and environmental management. 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. DOE`s project-oriented SAVEnergy audit program

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, K.

    1995-10-01

    The SAVEnergy program was developed as a result of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 which mandated that the Secretary of Energy establish audit teams. The SAVEnergy program complies with Federal legislation that requires government agencies to function with slightly different parameters than the private commercial sector. This program has proven enormously popular and successful with Federal agencies. This paper addresses those components considered during program development that were built in to ensure program success. This paper will discuss how this program was successful in leading to project implementation and how SAVEnergy can serve as a model to other Federal, utility, and private sector programs.

  10. Contingency view of corporate environmental auditing and implications for public policy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Corporate environmental auditing refers to management practices instituted within private sector corporations for monitoring the performance of internal environmental quality control systems and assuring internal compliance with standards established by government environmental laws and corporate environmental policies. Common characteristics that help to define corporate environmental auditing as a management control program include periodic and systematic review of company facilities and operations by a designated audit team functionally independent of the activities being audited, use of detailed checklists or questionnaires in the audit, development of special audit reports for management, and establishment of procedures for ensuring correction of environmental problems or deficiencies found in the audit. Contingency theory was employed to identify organizational factors of potential importance in corporate decisions related to institutional of environmental auditing programs. An interview survey was conducted among chief environmental managers at sixteen corporations having environmental audit programs and eight corporations without audit programs. The cases studied suggest corporate environmental auditing is more likely to be undertaken by corporations with more complex environmental organizations and diversified environmental activities, and corporations which rely on more informal systems of internal communication. Companies with environmental auditing programs had been more affected by environmental compliance problems.

  11. Environmental auditing and the role of the accountancy profession: a literature review.

    PubMed

    de Moor, Philippe; de Beelde, Ignace

    2005-08-01

    This review of the literature on environmental auditing and the potential role of accountants distinguishes between compliance audits and audits of the environmental management system. After an extensive introduction to the concept, this review focuses on the similarities and differences between an environmental audit and a financial statement audit. The general approach to both types of audits is similar, except that environmental audits are largely unregulated. Both audits place an emphasis on the evaluation of control systems, which is an argument in favor of external auditors playing a role in environmental audits. Another argument for including external accountants is their code of ethics. However, these professionals seem to be reluctant to enter the field of environmental auditing. It is argued that this reluctance is because of a lack of generally accepted principles for conducting environmental audits. If external accountants are engaged in environmental auditing, they should be part of multidisciplinary teams that also include scientists and engineers to avoid a too strong focus on procedures. Rather than treating these audits as totally different, it is proposed that there be a move towards integrated, or even universal, audits. PMID:15995890

  12. Give commitment, audits top priority in safety, environmental matters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-20

    Business and industry need to adhere to safety and environmental regulations more than ever to survive today. As the number of standards multiplies and fines and penalties grow more severe, careful auditing and reporting procedures and management systems that ensure corrections and compliance are critical. Plant management must take steps to ensure compliance. Failure to meet standards incurs risks in both safety and environmental matters. In some cases, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Department of Justice pursue criminal sanctions on offenders. Justice Department guidelines identify two elements necessary for an effective program: an effective management system to enforce internal standards and an audit program to verify the standards are being met. A plant must go beyond legal requirements and integrate the management of safety and environmental issues into the fabric and culture of its organization. An effective management system should be composed of several key elements: management commitment, written policy, goals and objectives, line organization responsibility, training and resources, and auditing. This paper concentrates on this last element, the auditing procedures.

  13. Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scope of the audit at the ITRI was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; soils, sediments, and biota; surface water/drinking water; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; quality assurance; radiation; inactive waste sites; environmental management; and environmental monitoring programs. Specifically assessed was the compliance of ITRI operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; internal operating standards; and best management practices. Onsite activities included inspection of ITRI facilities and operations; review of site documents; interviews with DOE and contractor personnel, as well as representatives from state regulatory agencies; and reviews of previous appraisals. Using these sources of information, the environmental audit team developed findings, which fell into two general categories: compliance findings and best management practice findings. Each finding also identifies apparent causal factor(s) that contributed to the finding and will assist line management in developing ``root causes`` for implementing corrective actions.

  14. 41 CFR 102-118.285 - What options for performing a prepayment audit does my agency have?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... does my agency have? Your agency may perform a prepayment audit by: (a) Creating an internal prepayment... performing a prepayment audit does my agency have? 102-118.285 Section 102-118.285 Public Contracts and... REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Prepayment Audits of Transportation...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.21 - When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When does a Tribe/Consortium have a âmaterial audit...-Governance Eligibility § 1000.21 When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”? A Tribe/Consortium has a material audit exception if any of the audits that it submitted under §...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.21 - When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When does a Tribe/Consortium have a âmaterial audit...-Governance Eligibility § 1000.21 When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”? A Tribe/Consortium has a material audit exception if any of the audits that it submitted under §...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.21 - When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When does a Tribe/Consortium have a âmaterial audit...-Governance Eligibility § 1000.21 When does a Tribe/Consortium have a “material audit exception”? A Tribe/Consortium has a material audit exception if any of the audits that it submitted under §...

  18. Enhancing compliance at Department of Defense facilities: comparison of three environmental audit tools.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Jeff A; Neumann, Cathy

    2003-04-01

    To enhance environmental compliance, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) recently developed and implemented a standardized environmental audit tool called The Environmental Assessment and Management (TEAM) Guide. Utilization of a common audit tool (TEAM Guide) throughout DOD agencies could be an effective agent of positive change. If, however, the audit tool is inappropriate, environmental compliance at DOD facilities could worsen. Furthermore, existing audit systems such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) Generic Protocol for Conducting Environmental Audits of Federal Facilities and the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO's) Standard 14001, "Environmental Management System Audits," may be abandoned even if they offer significant advantages over TEAM Guide audit tool. Widespread use of TEAM Guide should not take place until thorough and independent evaluation has been performed. The purpose of this paper is to compare DOD's TEAM Guide audit tool with U.S. EPA's Generic Protocol for Conducting Environmental Audits of Federal Facilities and ISO 14001, in order to assess which is most appropriate and effective for DOD facilities, and in particular those operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). USACE was selected as a result of one author's recent experience as a district environmental compliance coordinator responsible for the audit mission at this agency. Specific recommendations for enhancing the quality of environmental audits at all DOD facilities also are given. PMID:12690821

  19. Implementation of UMTRA Project Environmental Audit Action Plan status report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report provides the status of implementation of corrective actions for findings made in an Environmental Audit conducted by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environmental Audit, in June 1991. An Action Plan, dated December 1991, was developed to address the findings. The Action Plan was approved by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, in July 1992. This report provides status for each activity listed in the approved Action Plan. Of 48 findings identified in the August 1991 Environmental Audit Report, 4 required no action, 5 were combined with others and actions to correct 19 are complete. Although it appears no progress has been made since the last status report was issued, UMTRA has completed 89% of the findings identified, compared to 72% identified in the last status report. The table below lists the 20 findings where actions are still underway, the current projected completion date, the organization(s) responsible for taking action on the finding, and the UMTRA Project Off ice staff member assigned responsibility for the finding.

  20. Campus Environmental Audits: The UCLA Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, April A.; Gottlieb, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The nation's first comprehensive analysis of a university's environmental impact, at the University of California at Los Angeles, has become a blueprint for prompting environmental change on campuses nationwide. The study documented conditions in the workplace, wastes and hazards, air quality, water and energy use, and procurement practices.…

  1. The Brazilian Audit Tribunal's role in improving the federal environmental licensing process

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Luiz Henrique; Magrini, Alessandra

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the role played by the Brazilian Audit Tribunal (Tribunal de Contas da Uniao - TCU) in the external auditing of environmental management in Brazil, highlighting the findings of an operational audit conducted in 2007 of the federal environmental licensing process. Initially, it records the constitutional and legal framework of Brazilian environmental licensing, describing the powers and duties granted to federal, state and municipal institutions. In addition, it presents the responsibilities of the TCU in the environmental area, comparing these with those of other Supreme Audit Institutions (SAI) that are members of the International Organization of Supreme Audit Institutions (INTOSAI). It also describes the work carried out in the operational audit of the Brazilian environmental licensing process and its main conclusions and recommendations. Finally, it draws a parallel between the findings and recommendations made in Brazil with those of academic studies and audits conducted in other countries.

  2. THE U.S. EPA NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY'S APPROACH TO AUDITING HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is an abstract of a proposed presentation and does not necessarily reflect EPA policy.

    The Health Divisions of the US EPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory have a guideline for conducting technical systems audits. As part of the guideline ...

  3. Auditing chronic disease care: Does it make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    van Vuuren, Unita; De Sa, Angela; Govender, Srini; Murie, Katie; Schlemmer, Arina; Gunst, Colette; Namane, Mosedi; Boulle, Andrew; de Vries, Elma

    2015-01-01

    Background An integrated audit tool was developed for five chronic diseases, namely diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and epilepsy. Annual audits have been done in the Western Cape Metro district since 2009. The year 2012 was the first year that all six districts in South Africa's Western Cape Province participated in the audit process. Aim To determine whether clinical audits improve chronic disease care in health districts over time. Setting Western Cape Province, South Africa. Methods Internal audits were conducted of primary healthcare facility processes and equipment availability as well as a folder review of 10 folders per chronic condition per facility. Random systematic sampling was used to select the 10 folders for the folder review. Combined data for all facilities gave a provincial overview and allowed for comparison between districts. Analysis was done comparing districts that have been participating in the audit process from 2009 to 2010 (‘2012 old’) to districts that started auditing recently (‘2012 new’). Results The number of facilities audited has steadily increased from 29 in 2009 to 129 in 2012. Improvements between different years have been modest, and the overall provincial average seemed worse in 2012 compared to 2011. However, there was an improvement in the ‘2012 old’ districts compared to the ‘2012 new’ districts for both the facility audit and the folder review, including for eight clinical indicators, with ‘2012 new’ districts being less likely to record clinical processes (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.21–0.31). Conclusion These findings are an indication of the value of audits to improve care processes over the long term. It is hoped that this improvement will lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:26245615

  4. Corporate restructuring in Duke Power: Its effect on environmental management systems and facility environmental auditing

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Duke Power`s environmental management system (EMS) before was disjointed and lacking full effectiveness. Downsizing itself was brought on in part by having better EMS processes. Restructuring and downsizing brought both greater focus and effectiveness. They accomplished this by (1) centralizing corporate-level functions such as policy making, regulatory interpretation, obtaining permits, influencing legislation and rule-making, and auditing, and (2) decentralizing business unit functions such as routine site support, self-inspections, and pollution prevention. Duke`s facility environmental auditing process profited from downsizing by focusing on cost/benefit. Auditing clearly provided a desired benefit. However, they were able to improve the process by incorporating risk management into the selection of facilities and environmental activities to audit. Duke Power developed a risk selection matrix that accounted for major factors influencing liabilities to the company from its facilities. The matrix includes such risks as ongoing construction activities, public sensitivity to the facility, and relative risk of regulatory inspection. They evaluated each risk using criteria to define the relative degree of risk. For example, relative risk of regulatory inspection was evaluated as low risk for facilities that had no permits and no substantial environmental activities. Facilities that had four or more permits, or were large quantity hazardous waste generators, or operated landfills or treatment, storage, or disposal facilities (TSDF), were evaluated as higher risk. They then weighted the degrees of risk using a multiplier to adjust for the importance of the risks. Finally, Duke Power summed the products to represent the relative risk for each facility. They considered this risk factor in conjunction with other factors, such as time since last audit, in determining which company facilities to audit.

  5. Generic protocol for conducting environmental audits of federal facilities. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this protocol manual is to provide the Federal environmental auditing community with a set of protocols which can be used as a basis to implement, upgrade or benchmark environmental auditing activities. The protocols, contained in this manual, can be used by auditors to assist them in the preparation for and conduct of environmental compliance audits and assessments of the environmental management systems developed to support compliance activities. In addition, this document can be used to assist Federal agencies and facilities in benchmarking their approach to environmental management.

  6. Student audit and evaluation of a university's environmental management system

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, J.W.; Gowda, R.; Trachtenberg, Z.

    1999-07-01

    Environmental problems are often complex and multifaceted, and cannot be adequately understood from within any single academic discipline. The Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Environment (IPE) minor at the University of Oklahoma trains students to see how different intellectual perspectives from the humanities and sciences can be integrated into a rich conception of the environment. To complete the minor, students must take a Practicum course in which they work in teams on an open-ended, multidisciplinary project. In the Spring of 1998 students conducted an audit of the environmental management system of the University of Oklahoma. Environmental Management Systems (EMS) are the combination of procedures, facilities, and personnel that an organization uses to meet its environmental goals. In this paper, the authors discuss the mechanics of the Practicum and the results generated by the students. Three student teams focused on inputs, operations, and outputs. The Inputs team investigated the University's procurement of resources. The Operations team focused on the use of resources at the University, such as heating and lighting. The Outputs group explored waste management, including solid and hazardous waste, wastewater, and air pollution. Each group interviewed appropriate personnel and accessed relevant documents, and explored environmental data and programs associated with other universities. Students presented their findings to a diverse panel of adjudicators and submitted reports, which have been combined and placed on a web-site (http://www.ou.edu/cas/ipe/envaud.htm). The major findings pertained to education, documentation, and coordination. Students suggested that environmental education programs on campus should be improved, both to ensure proper operation of the EMS and to provide students with sufficient environmental knowledge to lead environmentally responsible lives after college.

  7. Environmental audit of the Maywood Site: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Maywood Interim Storage Site vicinity properties

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Environmental Audit of the Maywood Site managed by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The Audit was carried out from November 7 through 16, 1990. The Audit Team found overall technical competence and knowledge of management and staff to be excellent. This applies to DOE as well as to Bechtel National, Incorporated (BNI). In particular, there was excellent knowledge of federal, state, and local environmental regulations, as well as analysis for applicability of these regulations to FUSRAP. Project management of the Maywood Site is also excellent. BNI and DOE project staff have made frequent contact with members of the community, and all removal actions and remedial investigation activities have been planned, scheduled, and accomplished with competence and attention to total quality principles. To date, all actions taken for the Maywood Site cleanup have been completed ahead of schedule and on or under budget. Weakness noted include self-assessment efforts by DOE, failure to fully implement DOE Order requirements throughout the program, and some discrepancies in formally documenting and reviewing procedures. 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Iso 19011:2002--a combined auditing standard for quality and environmental management systems.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G L

    2000-01-01

    In a precedent-setting decision in 1998, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) directed ISO Technical Committee (TC) 176 on Quality Management and ISO TC 207 on Environmental Management to develop jointly a single guideline standard for auditing quality and environmental management systems. When approved, this standard would replace ISO 10011-1, ISO 10011-2, and ISO 10011-3 on quality auditing and ISO 14010, ISO 14011, and ISO 14012 on environmental auditing. A Joint Working Group (JWG) was established comprising experts from both TC 176 and TC 207 to develop the new standard, ISO 19011, Guidelines on Quality and/or Environmental Management Systems Auditing, and to incorporate lessons learned from efforts to improve compatibility between ISO 9001/9004 and ISO 14001/14004, the standards for quality and environmental management systems, respectively. Work is proceeding on the development of ISO 19011 with an expected completion in early 2002. PMID:12008882

  9. 41 CFR 102-118.435 - What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit? 102-118.435 Section 102-118.435 Public Contracts and Property... cites applicable tariff or tender along with other data relied on to support the overcharge. A...

  10. 41 CFR 102-118.435 - What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit? 102-118.435 Section 102-118.435 Public Contracts and Property... cites applicable tariff or tender along with other data relied on to support the overcharge. A...

  11. 41 CFR 102-118.435 - What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit? 102-118.435 Section 102-118.435 Public Contracts and Property... cites applicable tariff or tender along with other data relied on to support the overcharge. A...

  12. 41 CFR 102-118.435 - What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit? 102-118.435 Section 102-118.435 Public Contracts and Property... cites applicable tariff or tender along with other data relied on to support the overcharge. A...

  13. 41 CFR 102-118.435 - What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What procedures does GSA use to perform a postpayment audit? 102-118.435 Section 102-118.435 Public Contracts and Property... cites applicable tariff or tender along with other data relied on to support the overcharge. A...

  14. Followup on audit of depleted uranium metal production at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-23

    On November 29, 1989, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Inspector General issued audit report No. DOE/IG-0277, Depleted Uranium Metal Production at Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio.'' The audit concluded that DOE could save about $101 million by (1) completing a program to qualify commercial vendors to produce depleted uranium metal, (2) preproducing depleted uranium for future years, and (3) cancelling planned capital expenditures for projects not required for preproduction. The purpose of the current audit was to follow up on the previous audit report recommendations to determine whether corrective actions were taken and the intended results were achieved. Management adequately addressed most of the prior audit report recommendations that resulted in cost avoidances of $119.3 million. However, all planned capital expenditures for production processes were not cancelled, and a Fernald site development plan was not completed. This was attributed to not developing an action plan to implement prior audit report recommendations. As a result, $17.5 million was spent during Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 for the purchase and installation of production equipment that will never be used for production at Fernald. Management concurred with the findings and recommendations. Details of the findings are the subject of Part II of the report. Management and auditor comments are in Part III.

  15. Followup on audit of depleted uranium metal production at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-23

    On November 29, 1989, the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Inspector General issued audit report No. DOE/IG-0277, ``Depleted Uranium Metal Production at Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio.`` The audit concluded that DOE could save about $101 million by (1) completing a program to qualify commercial vendors to produce depleted uranium metal, (2) preproducing depleted uranium for future years, and (3) cancelling planned capital expenditures for projects not required for preproduction. The purpose of the current audit was to follow up on the previous audit report recommendations to determine whether corrective actions were taken and the intended results were achieved. Management adequately addressed most of the prior audit report recommendations that resulted in cost avoidances of $119.3 million. However, all planned capital expenditures for production processes were not cancelled, and a Fernald site development plan was not completed. This was attributed to not developing an action plan to implement prior audit report recommendations. As a result, $17.5 million was spent during Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 for the purchase and installation of production equipment that will never be used for production at Fernald. Management concurred with the findings and recommendations. Details of the findings are the subject of Part II of the report. Management and auditor comments are in Part III.

  16. Making the audit work for you

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczynski, E.J.

    1991-10-01

    These slides presented at an Environmental Auditing Conference, focus on one aspect of environmental auditing: its important role in the even broader practice of Environmental Management. The use of audits by the Department of Energy will be examined within the context of sound environmental management to illustrate the delicate practice of Making the Audit Work for You.'' A summary of the main points to be covered follows. (1) Brief description of DOE Environmental Audit process; disciplines covered, DOE Orders reviewed, management/operations evaluated. (2) Brief discussion of DOE/Secretary Watkin's Tiger Team initiative as the cornerstone of his plan to strengthen the Department's Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) programs. (3) Examples given of the types of findings presented in each of these areas, along with brief examples of root causes, lessons learned, trends, and noteworthy practices. (4) Discussion of the relationships between environmental audits, safety and health assessments, and management and organization assessments. (5) Discussion of Environmental Auditing/Assessment and its recurring role in the Environmental Management continuum. (6) DOE is cited as an example of an organization that uses audits as a powerful environmental management tool to help achieve its objectives and multiple goals.

  17. The Environmental Self-Audit for Campus-Based Organizations: A Quick and Easy Guide to Environmental Compliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Albany.

    This guide is intended to help public and not-for-profit campus-based organizations in New York State to comply with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. The environmental self-audit serves as a basic diagnostic tool for campus-based organizations (centralized schools, colleges/universities, correctional facilities, mental health…

  18. Determinants of environmental audit frequency: the role of firm organizational structure.

    PubMed

    Earnhart, Dietrich; Leonard, J Mark

    2013-10-15

    This study empirically examines the extent of environmental management practiced by US chemical manufacturing facilities, as reflected in the number of environmental internal audits conducted annually. As its focus, this study analyzes the effects of firm-level organizational structure on facility-level environmental management practices. For this empirical analysis, the study exploits unique data from a survey distributed to all U.S. chemical manufacturing permitted to discharge wastewater in 2001; the data reflect internal audits conducted during the years 1999-2001. Empirical results reveal differences in auditing behavior based on whether facilities are owned by publicly held or non-publicly held firms, owned by U.S.-based or non-U.S.-based firms, and owned by larger or smaller firms. PMID:23827510

  19. Environmental, health, and safety management systems and auditing programs: part I--The evolution.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Patricia B

    2003-04-01

    Early auditing began as an effort to avoid fines or other action from governmental agencies, without being based on accepted standards. However, for EHS auditing to be accepted as credible in the business world, established standards were necessary. As companies expanded globally, the need for international EHS standards grew, international standards for quality management and environmental program management have now been universally accepted (ISO, 2002). Occupational health nurses increasingly are becoming involved in efforts to help their employers or clients develop management systems to handle EHS issues--whether ISO 9000 (or the automotive equivalent, QS-9000), ISO 14000, or other models are used as the basis for the management system. Many nurses are actively involved in ISO certification efforts. As an extension of those efforts, occupational health nurses are increasingly involved in EHS audits, whether audits are conducted by third parties, by company employees, or as part of a self audit. The next column in this series will focus on strategies to improve the management of occupational health programs so the programs will stand up to rigorous EHS audits. PMID:12729027

  20. An audit of a diverse community for safe routes to age in place: environmental policy implications.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adriana; Garces, Anamarie; Hunter, Rebecca H; Marquez, David X

    2015-03-01

    Physical and cognitive limitations often accompany aging, increasing the importance of a safe and supportive environment to help older adults maintain mobility. Neighborhood design and maintenance must be evaluated to promote physical activity, mobility, and safety. Audit tools, geographic information system data, and resident interviews are used for this purpose, but often fail to provide information that can be translated to practice. The current project is part of a larger Miami-Dade Age-Friendly Initiative to create a metropolitan area that fosters a healthy environment for diverse adults of all ages and abilities. Safe Routes uses a toolkit based on the 5-E model providing practical resources to guide stakeholders in meeting the needs of the community. Findings include the Centers for Disease Control Healthy Aging Research Network Audit Tool assessment for environmental walkability factors. Results from street segment audits along with input from residents can be used to inform sound environmental policies. PMID:25710264

  1. The Integrative Role of the Campus Environmental Audit: Experiences at Bishop's University, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardati, Darren R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to suggest that the campus environmental audit can become an important tool that synergizes active learning and operations planning and management approaches to promote sustainability on university campuses. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents the author's experiences at Bishop's University with the evolution…

  2. [Blood transfusion audit methodology: the auditors, reference systems and audit guidelines].

    PubMed

    Chevrolle, F; Hadzlik, E; Arnold, J; Hergon, E

    2000-12-01

    The audit has become an essential aspect of the blood transfusion sector, and is a management tool that should be used judiciously. The main types of audit that can be envisaged in blood transfusion are the following: operational audit concerning a predetermined activity; systems quality audit; competence audit, combining the operational audit on a specific activity with quality management, e.g., laboratory accreditation; audit of the environmental management system; and social audit involving the organization of an activity and the management of human resources. However, the main type of audit considered in this article is the conformity audit, which in this context does not refer to internal control but to conformity with an internal guideline issued by the French National Blood Service. All audits are carried out on the basis of a predescribed method (contained in ISO 10 011). The audit is a system of investigation, evaluation and measurement, and also a means of continuous assessment and therefore improvement. The audit is based on set guidelines, but in fact consists of determining the difference between the directions given and what has actually been done. Auditing requires operational rigor and integrity, and has now become a profession in its own right. PMID:11204842

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Department of Energy (DOE) activities at Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories Site (DOE/SSFL), conducted May 16 through 26, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by an private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with DOE activities at SSFL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at SSFL, and interviews with site personnel. 90 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

  4. Analysis of DOE international environmental management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaini, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategic Plan (April 1994) states that DOE`s long-term vision includes world leadership in environmental restoration and waste management activities. The activities of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) can play a key role in DOE`s goals of maintaining U.S. global competitiveness and ensuring the continuation of a world class science and technology community. DOE`s interest in attaining these goals stems partly from its participation in organizations like the Trade Policy Coordinating Committee (TPCC), with its National Environmental Export Promotion Strategy, which seeks to strengthen U.S. competitiveness and the building of public-private partnerships as part of U.S. industrial policy. The International Interactions Field Office task will build a communication network which will facilitate the efficient and effective communication between DOE Headquarters, Field Offices, and contractors. Under this network, Headquarters will provide the Field Offices with information on the Administration`s policies and activities (such as the DOE Strategic Plan), interagency activities, as well as relevant information from other field offices. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will, in turn, provide Headquarters with information on various international activities which, when appropriate, will be included in reports to groups like the TPCC and the EM Focus Areas. This task provides for the collection, review, and analysis of information on the more significant international environmental restoration and waste management initiatives and activities which have been used or are being considered at LLNL. Information gathering will focus on efforts and accomplishments in meeting the challenges of providing timely and cost effective cleanup of its environmentally damaged sites and facilities, especially through international technical exchanges and/or the implementation of foreign-development technologies.

  5. Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  6. The DOE/DOD Environmental Data Bank

    SciTech Connect

    C de Baca, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The DOE/DOD Environmental Data Bank was established in 1959 as a central location for storing weapons and equipment environments information from a variety of DOE, DOD, and industrial sources and continues to be maintained by Sandia National Laboratories. The Environmental Data Bank contains approximately 2,900 documents regarding normal and abnormal environments that describe the handling, storage, transportation, use, and general phases, which occur during the life of a weapon system. The Environmental Data Bank contains a vast assortment of resources that document crash, fire, and chemical environments resulting from aircraft, rail, ship, and truck accidents, as well as crash and thermal tests conducted on shipping containers. Also included are studies on the hazards of exposure to liquid natural gas fireballs, chemical fireballs, and hydrogen fireballs. This paper describes the DOE/DOD Environmental Data Bank system, its structure, data sources, and usage, with particular emphasis on its use for safety assessments at Sandia National Laboratories.

  7. Implementation of UMTRA Project Environmental Audit Action Plan status report for period ending September 30, 1992. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report provides the status of implementation of corrective actions for findings made in an Environmental Audit conducted by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environmental Audit, in June 1991. An Action Plan, dated December 1991, was developed to address the findings. The Action Plan was approved by DOE Headquarters, Office of Environment, Safety and Health, in July 1992. This report provides status for each activity listed in the approved Action Plan. Of 48 findings identified in the August 1991 Environmental Audit Report, 4 required no action, 5 were combined with others and actions to correct 19 are complete. Although it appears no progress has been made since the last status report was issued, UMTRA has completed 89% of the findings identified, compared to 72% identified in the last status report. The table below lists the 20 findings where actions are still underway, the current projected completion date, the organization(s) responsible for taking action on the finding, and the UMTRA Project Off ice staff member assigned responsibility for the finding.

  8. HSE auditing

    SciTech Connect

    Herwaarden, A.J.F. van; Sykes, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Shell International Exploration and Production (SIEP) commenced a programme of Health Safety and Environmental (HSE) auditing in its Operating Companies (Opcos) in the late 1970s. Audits in the initial years focused on safety aspects with environmental and occupational aspects being introduced as the process matured. Part of the audit programme is performed by SIEP auditors, external to the Opcos. The level of SIEP-led audit activity increased linearly until the late 1980s, since when a level of around 40 Audits per year has been maintained in roughly as many companies. For the last 15 years each annual programme has included structured audits of all facets of EP operations. The frequency and duration of these audits have the principle objective of auditing all HSE critical processes of each Opco`s activity, within each five-year cycle. Durations vary from 8-10 days with a 4 person team to 18-20 days with a 6-8 person team. Each audit returns a satisfactory or unsatisfactory rating based on analysis of the effectiveness of the so-called eleven principles of Enhanced Safety Management (ESM) required to be applied throughout the Group. Independence is maintained by the SIEP audit leader, who carries ultimate responsibility for the content and wording of each report, where necessary backed-up by senior management in SIEP. These SIEP-led audits have been successful in the following areas: (1) Provision of early warning in areas where facilities integrity or HSE management was likely to be compromised. (2) Aiding the establishment of an internal HSE auditing process in many Opcos. (3) Training, through participation in audits, not only auditors, but also prospective line managers in the effective management of HSE. With the recent introduction of HSE Management Systems (HSE-MS) in many Opcos, auditing is now in the process of controlled evolution from ESM to HSE-MS based.

  9. Environmental site assessments and audits: Building inspection requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, John H.; Kaiser, Genevieve; Thomulka, Kenneth W.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental site assessment criteria were originally developed by organizations that focused, almost exclusively, on surface, subsurface, and pollution source contamination. Many of the hazards associated with indoor environments and building structures were traditionally not considered when evaluating sources and entities of environmental pollution. Since a large number of building materials are potentially hazardous, careful evaluation is necessary. Until recently, little information on building inspection requirements of environmental problems has been published. Traditionally, asbestos has been the main component of concern. The ever-changing environmental standards have dramatically expanded the scope of building surveys. Indoor environmental concerns, for example, currently include formaldehyde, lead-based paint, polychlorinated biphenyls, radon, and indoor air pollution. Environmental regulations are being expanded and developed that specifically include building structures. These regulatory standards are being triggered by an increased awareness of health effects from indoor exposure, fires, spills, and other accidents that have resulted in injury, death, and financial loss. This article discusses various aspects of assessments for building structures.

  10. EarthScore: Your Personal Environmental Audit & Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotter, Donald W.

    This book is designed to permit environmentally-conscious individuals to quantify the impact on the biosphere of their actions in the following areas: Home/household energy use; water use; transportation; consumerism (durable goods, foods and agricultural products, paper and forest products); toxics; waste, packaging, single-use items, and…

  11. The DOE/NREL Environmental Science Program

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

    2001-05-14

    This paper summarizes the several of the studies in the Environmental Science Program being sponsored by DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The goal of the Environmental Science Program is to understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources. The Program is regulatory-driven, and focuses on ozone, airborne particles, visibility and regional haze, air toxics, and health effects of air pollutants. Each project in the Program is designed to address policy-relevant objectives. Current projects in the Environmental Science Program have four areas of focus: improving technology for emissions measurements; vehicle emissions measurements; emission inventory development/improvement; ambient impacts, including health effects.

  12. Internal Audit: Does it Enhance Governance in the Australian Public University Sector?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopher, Joe

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to confirm if internal audit, a corporate control process, is functioning effectively in Australian public universities. The study draws on agency theory, published literature and best-practice guidelines to develop an internal audit evaluation framework. A survey instrument is thereafter developed from the framework and used as a…

  13. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S C; McCulloch, M; Thomas, B L; Riley, R G; Sklarew, D S; Mong, G M; Fadeff, S K

    1994-04-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) provides applicable methods in use by. the US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories for sampling and analyzing constituents of waste and environmental samples. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division (LMD) of the DOE. This document contains chapters and methods that are proposed for use in evaluating components of DOE environmental and waste management samples. DOE Methods is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities that will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), or others.

  14. Routine environment audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri. During this audit the activities the audit team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted October 24-November 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: AN INTEGRATED ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE U.S. MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of today's environmental problems are regional in scope and their effects overlap and interact. We developed a simple method to provide an integrated assessment of environmental conditions and estimate cumulative impacts across a large region, by combining data on land-cove...

  16. ANALYSIS OF EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) PROTOCOL GASES USED FOR CALIBRATION AND AUDITS OF CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEMS AND AMBIENT AIR ANALYZERS - RESULTS OF AUDIT 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    A performance audit was conducted on EPA Protocol Gases used for calibration and audits of continuous emission monitoring systems and ambient air analyzers. Fifty gaseous pollutant calibraton standards were purchased from eleven specialty gas producers. These standards contained ...

  17. SUMMARY OF THE 1986 EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM ON SOURCE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1986, the Quality Assurance Division conducted the National Audits for Stationary Source Test Methods. The audit materials consisted of: a disposable gas cylinder for Method 3 (Orsat analyzer), a calibrated orifice for Method 5 (DGM only), five simulated liquid samples each fo...

  18. SUMMARY OF THE 1983 EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM ON SOURCE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the spring and fall of 1983, the Quality Assurance Division conducted the National Audits for Stationary Source Test Methods. The audit materials consisted of: a calibrated orifice for Method 5 (dry gas meter only), five simulated liquid samples each for Method 6 (SO2) and Met...

  19. SUMMARY OF THE 1984 EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM ON SOURCE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1984, the Quality Assurance Division conducted the National Audits for Stationary Source Test Methods. The audit materials consisted of: a calibrated orifice for Method 5 (DGM only), five simulated liquid samples each for Method 6 (SO2) and Method 7 (NOx), two coal samples for...

  20. Audit of work force restructuring at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-23

    The Department of Energy (Department) restructured its work force at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (Fernald Project) to reduce staffing levels and to modify the mix of workers` skills in response to budget cuts, facility closures, and changes in the Fernald Project`s mission. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the work force restructurings were effective in reducing staffing levels and in changing the mix of workers` skills. As of September 30, 1995, the restructurings were not effective in reducing staffing levels or in improving the mix of workers` skills. The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) spent $2.9 million to separate 255 employees in October 1993. However, by September 30, 1994, all but 14 of the employees separated were either rehired or replaced by new employees with similar skills. The second restructuring began in October 1994 and is not expected to be completed until May 1996. The Department expects the second restructuring to reduce FERMCO`s work force by 476 employees at a cost of $12.9 million. However, since the second restructuring began, FERMCO has hired 265 new employees and at September 30, 1995, had open job announcements seeking 82 additional employees. Many of these new employees have essentially the same skills as employees who separated under the two restructurings. The Department`s objectives were not met because the Fernald Area Office did not (1) require FERMCO to perform the skills analysis necessary to identify which employees were needed to perform the Fernald Project`s current mission, and (2) effectively monitor FERMCO`s restructuring efforts to ensure that the Department`s objectives were met.

  1. Auditing Orthopaedic Audit

    PubMed Central

    Guryel, E; Acton, K; Patel, S

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Clinical audit plays an important role in the drive to improve the quality of patient care and thus forms a cornerstone of clinical governance. Assurance that the quality of patient care has improved requires completion of the audit cycle. A considerable sum of money and time has been spent establishing audit activity in the UK. Failure to close the loop undermines the effectiveness of the audit process and wastes resources. PATIENTS AND METHODS We analysed the effectiveness of audit in trauma and orthopaedics at a local hospital by comparing audit projects completed over a 6-year period to criteria set out in the NHS National Audit and Governance report. RESULTS Of the 25 audits performed since 1999, half were presented to the relevant parties and only 20% completed the audit cycle. Only two of these were audits against national standards and 28% were not based on any standards at all. Only a third of the audits led by junior doctors resulted in implementation of their action plan compared to 75% implementation for consultant-led and 67% for nurse-led audits. CONCLUSIONS A remarkably large proportion of audits included in this analysis failed to meet accepted criteria for effective audit. Audits completed by junior doctors were found to be the least likely to complete the cycle. This may relate to the lack of continuity in modern medical training and little incentive to complete the cycle. Supervision by permanent medical staff, principally consultants, and involvement of the audit department may play the biggest role in improving implementation of change. PMID:18828963

  2. DOE Chair Excellence Professorship Environmental Disciplines

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Reginald

    2014-10-08

    The DECM Team worked closely with other academic institutions, industrial companies and government laboratories to do research and educate engineers in “cutting edge” environmentally conscious manufacturing practices and instrumentation. The participating universities also worked individually with local companies on research projects in their specialty areas. Together, they were charged with research application, integration and education in environmentally conscious manufacturing.

  3. Audits Made Simple

    SciTech Connect

    Belangia, David Warren

    2015-04-09

    A company just got notified there is a big external audit coming in 3 months. Getting ready for an audit can be challenging, scary, and full of surprises. This Gold Paper describes a typical audit from notification of the intent to audit through disposition of the final report including Best Practices, Opportunities for Improvement (OFI), and issues that must be fixed. Good preparation can improve the chances of success. Ensuring the auditors understand the environment and requirements is paramount to success. It helps the auditors understand that the enterprise really does think that security is important. Understanding and following a structured process ensures a smooth audit process. Ensuring follow-up on OFIs and issues in a structured fashion will also make the next audit easier. It is important to keep in mind that the auditors will use the previous report as a starting point. Now the only worry is the actual audit and subsequent report and how well the company has done.

  4. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Thomas, B.L.; Riley, R.G.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mong, G.M.; Fadeff, S.K.

    1994-10-01

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities for the evaluation of environmental and waste management samples from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. DOE Methods is the result of extensive cooperation from all DOE analytical laboratories. All of these laboratories have contributed key information and provided technical reviews as well as significant moral support leading to the success of this document. DOE Methods is designed to encompass methods for collecting representative samples and for determining the radioisotope activity and organic and inorganic composition of a sample. These determinations will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or others. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Analytical Services Division of DOE. Unique methods or methods consolidated from similar procedures in the DOE Procedures Database are selected for potential inclusion in this document. Initial selection is based largely on DOE needs and procedure applicability and completeness. Methods appearing in this document are one of two types, {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes}. {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} methods that have been reviewed internally and show potential for eventual verification are included in this document, but they have not been reviewed externally, and their precision and bias may not be known. {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes} methods in DOE Methods have been reviewed by volunteers from various DOE sites and private corporations. These methods have delineated measures of precision and accuracy.

  5. Does Environmental Knowledge Inhibit Hominin Dispersal?

    PubMed

    Wren, Colin D; Costopoulos, Andre

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between the dispersal potential of a hominin population, its local-scale foraging strategies, and the characteristics of the resource environment using an agent-based modeling approach. In previous work we demonstrated that natural selection can favor a relatively low capacity for assessing and predicting the quality of the resource environment, especially when the distribution of resources is highly clustered. That work also suggested that the more knowledge foraging populations had about their environment, the less likely they were to abandon the landscape they know and disperse into novel territory. The present study gives agents new individual and social strategies for learning about their environment. For both individual and social learning, natural selection favors decreased levels of environmental knowledge, particularly in low-heterogeneity environments. Social acquisition of detailed environmental knowledge results in crowding of agents, which reduces available reproductive space and relative fitness. Agents with less environmental knowledge move away from resource clusters and into areas with more space available for reproduction. These results suggest that, rather than being a requirement for successful dispersal, environmental knowledge strengthens the ties to particular locations and significantly reduces the dispersal potential as a result. The evolved level of environmental knowledge in a population depends on the characteristics of the resource environment and affects the dispersal capacity of the population. PMID:26932570

  6. Audit of construction of an environmental, safety, and health analytical laboratory at the Pantex Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This document is a report from the Office of the Inspector General, US DOE. The report evaluates the need for the construction of an Environmental, Safety, and Health Laboratory at the Pantex Plant and if this project is the most cost effective manner in which to meet mission needs. It was found that: (1) mission needs were being met with existing facilities, (2) required evaluations of alternatives were not performed, (3) decisions were made based on out-dated justifications, and (4) the expenditure of $8.4M was unnecessary. As a result, it was recommended that funded be suspended until the need is clearly established.

  7. Does environmental stability stimulate species renovation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casellato, C.; Erba, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Tithonian-Berriasian time interval is characterized by a major calcareous nannoplankton speciation episode: several coccolith and nannolith genera and species first appear and rapidly evolve, reaching a high diversity, abundance, and calcification degree. The history of calcareous nannoplankton indicates that times of accelerated rates of radiations (or extinctions) generally correlate with global changes in the geosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere suggesting that evolutionary patterns are intimately linked to environmental modifications (Roth, 1989; Bown et al., 2004; Erba, 2006). Nevertheless, the Tithonian-Berriasian interval provides examples of intra- and intergeneric accelerated evolutionary rates (an origination event) during a time period of general environmental stability, in absence of coeval environmental change evidence. The Tithonian - Early Berriasian can be regarded as a "quiet" interval as far as the C cycle is concerned; the _13C curve shows a gradual minor decline after the Oxfordian anomalies and prior to the Valanginian event. The Tithonian-Berriasian speciation episode provides an excellent opportunity to study modo and tempo of calcareous nannoplankton evolution relative to absent environmental change, which is believed to be instrumental for driving biological evolution. Nannofossils have been investigated in sections from the Tethys and Atlantic oceans in order to discriminate among local, regional or global causes, and to verify possible diachroneity in calcareous phytoplankton evolution and/or in response to global changes. Calcareous nannofossil species richness, first and last occurrences and relative abundance were achieved. Different evolution modes have been proposed since Darwin's Evolutionary Theory: Phyletic Gradualism (Darwin, 1859), Punctuated Equilibrium (Gould & Eldredge, 1977) and Punctuated Gradualism (Malmgren et al., 1984). Phyletic gradualism holds that new species arise from slow, steady transformation of populations

  8. Site Acquisition and Related Environmental Concerns. Report of the Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Legislature, Sacramento. Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    A public hearing of California's Joint Legislative Audit Committee examined land acquisition policy and practice in relation to new school construction projects during which the following two areas of concern were identified: (1) acquiring land for new schools in congested urban settings; and (2) managing the conflict that may arise from local,…

  9. NEW AUDIT METHOD FOR EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) REFERENCE METHOD 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple, inexpensive, accurate method for evaluating and/or auditing sampling and analytical phases of the EPA Source Reference Method 6 was developed. The method uses a known amount of a chemical compound in the form of a tablet or pill (or placed in a capsule) to generate sulf...

  10. Does Environmental Heterogeneity Promote Cognitive Abilities?

    PubMed

    González-Gómez, Paulina L; Razeto-Barry, Pablo; Araya-Salas, Marcelo; Estades, Cristian F

    2015-09-01

    In the context of global change the possible loss of biodiversity has been identified as a major concern. Biodiversity could be seriously threatened as a direct consequence of changes in availability of food, changing thermal conditions, and loss and fragmentation of habitat. Considering the magnitude of global change, an understanding of the mechanisms involved in coping with a changing environment is urgent. We explore the hypothesis that species and individuals experiencing highly variable environments are more likely to develop a wider range of responses to handle the different and unpredictable conditions imposed by global change. In the case of vertebrates, the responses to the challenges imposed by unpredictable perturbations ultimately are linked to cognitive abilities allowing the solving of problems, and the maximization of energy intake. Our models were hummingbirds, which offer a particularly compelling group in which to examine the functional and mechanistic links between behavioral and energetic strategies in individuals experiencing different degrees of social and environmental heterogeneity. PMID:26082484

  11. The direct environmental impact of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a surgical waste audit of five cases.

    PubMed

    de Sa, Darren; Stephens, Kellee; Kuang, Michelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-07-01

    Health care facilities produce significant waste (2200 kg/bed/year) creating 2% of greenhouse gas emissions and 1% total solid waste nationwide, with 20-70% of waste coming from operating rooms. We performed a waste audit of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) to understand its environmental impact and identify areas for greening practices. A waste audit of five hip arthroscopy procedures for FAI was performed. All waste was collected and separated into six waste streams in real time: (i) normal/landfill waste; (ii) recyclable cardboards and plastics; (iii) biohazard waste; (iv) sharp items; (v) linens and (vi) sterile wrapping. The surgical waste (except laundered linens) from five FAI surgeries totaled 47.4 kg, including 21.7 kg (45.7%) of biohazard waste, 11.7 kg (24.6%) of sterile wrap, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of normal/landfill waste, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of recyclable plastics and 1.2 kg (2.6%) of sharp items. An average of 9.4 kg (excluding laundered linens) of waste was produced per procedure. Given the considerable biohazard waste produced by FAI procedures, additional recycling programs, continued adherence to proper waste segregation and an emphasis on 'green outcomes' is encouraged to demonstrate environmental responsibility and effectively manage and allocate finite resources. PMID:27583149

  12. The direct environmental impact of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a surgical waste audit of five cases

    PubMed Central

    de SA, Darren; Stephens, Kellee; Kuang, Michelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R.

    2016-01-01

    Health care facilities produce significant waste (2200 kg/bed/year) creating 2% of greenhouse gas emissions and 1% total solid waste nationwide, with 20–70% of waste coming from operating rooms. We performed a waste audit of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) to understand its environmental impact and identify areas for greening practices. A waste audit of five hip arthroscopy procedures for FAI was performed. All waste was collected and separated into six waste streams in real time: (i) normal/landfill waste; (ii) recyclable cardboards and plastics; (iii) biohazard waste; (iv) sharp items; (v) linens and (vi) sterile wrapping. The surgical waste (except laundered linens) from five FAI surgeries totaled 47.4 kg, including 21.7 kg (45.7%) of biohazard waste, 11.7 kg (24.6%) of sterile wrap, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of normal/landfill waste, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of recyclable plastics and 1.2 kg (2.6%) of sharp items. An average of 9.4 kg (excluding laundered linens) of waste was produced per procedure. Given the considerable biohazard waste produced by FAI procedures, additional recycling programs, continued adherence to proper waste segregation and an emphasis on ‘green outcomes’ is encouraged to demonstrate environmental responsibility and effectively manage and allocate finite resources. PMID:27583149

  13. Environmental Impact Assessment and Environmental Audit in Large-Scale Public Infrastructure Construction: The Case of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guizhen; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Yonglong

    2009-09-01

    Large-scale public infrastructure projects have featured in China’s modernization course since the early 1980s. During the early stages of China’s rapid economic development, public attention focused on the economic and social impact of high-profile construction projects. In recent years, however, we have seen a shift in public concern toward the environmental and ecological effects of such projects, and today governments are required to provide valid environmental impact assessments prior to allowing large-scale construction. The official requirement for the monitoring of environmental conditions has led to an increased number of debates in recent years regarding the effectiveness of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) and Governmental Environmental Audits (GEAs) as environmental safeguards in instances of large-scale construction. Although EIA and GEA are conducted by different institutions and have different goals and enforcement potential, these two practices can be closely related in terms of methodology. This article cites the construction of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway as an instance in which EIA and GEA offer complementary approaches to environmental impact management. This study concludes that the GEA approach can serve as an effective follow-up to the EIA and establishes that the EIA lays a base for conducting future GEAs. The relationship that emerges through a study of the Railway’s construction calls for more deliberate institutional arrangements and cooperation if the two practices are to be used in concert to optimal effect.

  14. [DOE method for evaluating environmental and waste management samples: Revision 1, Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    The US Dapartment of Energy`s (DOE`s) environmental and waste management (EM) sampling and analysis activities require that large numbers of samples be analyzed for materials characterization, environmental surveillance, and site-remediation programs. The present document, DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods), is a supplemental resource for analyzing many of these samples.

  15. Does audit improve diabetes care in a primary care setting? A management tool to address health system gaps

    PubMed Central

    Pruthu, T. K.; Majella, Marie Gilbert; Nair, Divya; Ramaswamy, Gomathi; Palanivel, C.; Subitha, L.; Kumar, S. Ganesh; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is one of the emerging epidemics. Regular clinical and biochemical monitoring of patients, adherence to treatment and counseling are cornerstones for prevention of complications. Clinical audits as a process of improving quality of patient care and outcomes by reviewing care against specific criteria and then reviewing the change can help in optimizing care. Objective: We aimed to audit the process of diabetes care using patient records and also to assess the effect of audit on process of care indicators among patients availing diabetes care from a rural health and training center in Puducherry, South India. Materials and Methods: A record based study was conducted to audit diabetes care among patients attending noncommunicable disease clinic in a rural health center of South India. Monitoring of blood pressure (BP), blood glucose, lipid profile and renal function test were considered for auditing in accordance with standard guidelines. Clinical audit cycle (CAC), a simple management tool was applied and re-audit was done after 1-year. Results: We reviewed 156 and 180 patients records during year-1 and year-2, respectively. In the audit year-1, out of 156 patients, 78 (50%), 70 (44.9%), 49 (31.4%) and 19 (12.2%) had got their BP, blood glucose, lipid profile and renal function tests done. Monitoring of blood glucose, BP, lipid profile and renal function improved significantly by 35%, 20.7%, 36.4% and 56.1% over 1-year. Conclusion: CAC improves process of diabetes care in a primary care setting with existing resources. PMID:26604621

  16. Environmental Management Performance Report to DOE-RL November 2001

    SciTech Connect

    EDER, D.M.

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management (EM) performance by: Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) through Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) and its subcontractors, Environmental Restoration Contract through Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), and its subcontractors, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) for Science and Technology support to the EM Mission. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes EM Site performance under RL Operations Office. It is organized by the three sections listed above, with each section containing an Executive Summary and Area Performance Summaries. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes.

  17. Environmental Management Performance Report to DOE-RL February 2001

    SciTech Connect

    EDER, D.M.

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management (EM) performance by: Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) through Fluor Hanford. Inc. (FH) and its subcontractors; Environmental Restoration Contract through Bechtel Hanford. Inc. (BHI), and its subcontractors; and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) for Science and Technology support to the EM Mission. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes EM Site performance under RL, Operations Office. It is organized by the three sections listed above, with each section containing an Executive Summary and Area Performance Summaries. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes.

  18. Environmental Management Performance Report to DOE-RL August 2001

    SciTech Connect

    EDER, D.M.

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management (EM) performance by: Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) through Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) and its subcontractors, Environmental Restoration Contract through Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI), and its subcontractors, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) for Science and Technology support to the EM Mission. This report is a monthly publication that summarizes EM Site performance under RL Operations Office. It is organized by the three sections listed above, with each section containing an Executive Summary and Area Performance Summaries. A glossary of terms is provided at the end of this report for reference purposes.

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on audit of selected aspects of the unclassified computer security program at a DOE headquarters computing facility

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-31

    The purpose of this audit was to evaluate the effectiveness of the unclassified computer security program at the Germantown Headquarters Administrative Computer Center (Center). The Department of Energy (DOE) relies on the application systems at the Germantown Headquarters Administrative Computer Center to support its financial, payroll and personnel, security, and procurement functions. The review was limited to an evaluation of the administrative, technical, and physical safeguards governing utilization of the unclassified computer system which hosts many of the Department`s major application systems. The audit identified weaknesses in the Center`s computer security program that increased the risk of unauthorized disclosure or loss of sensitive data. Specifically, the authors found that (1) access to sensitive data was not limited to individuals who had a need for the information, and (2) accurate and complete information was not maintained on the inventory of tapes at the Center. Furthermore, the risk of unauthorized disclosure and loss of sensitive data was increased because other controls, such as physical security, had not been adequately implemented at the Center. Management generally agreed with the audit conclusions and recommendations, and initiated a number of actions to improve computer security at the Center.

  20. TECHNICAL RISK RATING OF DOE ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS - 9153

    SciTech Connect

    Cercy, M; Ronald Fayfich, R; Steven P Schneider, S

    2008-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. The scope of work is diverse, with projects ranging from single acquisitions to collections of projects and operations that span several decades and costs from hundreds of millions to billions US$. The need to be able to manage and understand the technical risks from the project to senior management level has been recognized as an enabler to successfully completing the mission. In 2008, DOE-EM developed the Technical Risk Rating as a new method to assist in managing technical risk based on specific criteria. The Technical Risk Rating, and the criteria used to determine the rating, provides a mechanism to foster open, meaningful communication between the Federal Project Directors and DOE-EM management concerning project technical risks. Four indicators (technical maturity, risk urgency, handling difficulty and resolution path) are used to focus attention on the issues and key aspects related to the risks. Pressing risk issues are brought to the forefront, keeping DOE-EM management informed and engaged such that they fully understand risk impact. Use of the Technical Risk Rating and criteria during reviews provides the Federal Project Directors the opportunity to openly discuss the most significant risks and assists in the management of technical risks across the portfolio of DOE-EM projects. Technical Risk Ratings can be applied to all projects in government and private industry. This paper will present the methodology and criteria for Technical Risk Ratings, and provide specific examples from DOE-EM projects.

  1. Technical Risk Rating of DOE Environmental Projects - 9153

    SciTech Connect

    Cercy, Michael; Fayfich, Ronald; Schneider, Steven

    2009-02-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) was established to achieve the safe and compliant disposition of legacy wastes and facilities from defense nuclear applications. The scope of work is diverse, with projects ranging from single acquisitions to collections of projects and operations that span several decades and costs from hundreds of millions to billions US$. The need to be able to manage and understand the technical risks from the project to senior management level has been recognized as an enabler to successfully completing the mission. In 2008, DOE-EM developed the Technical Risk Rating as a new method to assist in managing technical risk based on specific criteria. The Technical Risk Rating, and the criteria used to determine the rating, provides a mechanism to foster open, meaningful communication between the Federal Project Directors and DOE-EM management concerning project technical risks. Four indicators (technical maturity, risk urgency, handling difficulty and resolution path) are used to focus attention on the issues and key aspects related to the risks. Pressing risk issues are brought to the forefront, keeping DOE-EM management informed and engaged such that they fully understand risk impact. Use of the Technical Risk Rating and criteria during reviews provides the Federal Project Directors the opportunity to openly discuss the most significant risks and assists in the management of technical risks across the portfolio of DOE-EM projects. Technical Risk Ratings can be applied to all projects in government and private industry. This paper will present the methodology and criteria for Technical Risk Ratings, and provide specific examples from DOE-EM projects.

  2. Office of Inspector General audit report on credit card usage at the Ohio Field Office and the Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    In 1994 the Department of Energy (Department) obtained the services of Rocky Mountain BankCard System, through the use of a General Services Administration contract, as a means for the Department and its contractors to make small purchases. The use of credit cards was expected to simplify small purchase procedures and improve cash management. The Ohio Field Office (Field Office) uses the credit card system and oversees usage by its area offices. Contractors under the Field Office also use the credit card system to make small purchases. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has issued one audit report concerning the use of credit cards. In April 1996, the OIG issued Report WR-B-96-06, Audit of Bonneville Power Administration`s Management of Information Resources. The audit concluded that improvements could be made in implementing credit card and property procedures in Bonneville`s management of computer-related equipment. Specifically, many credit card purchases were made by employees whose authority to buy was not properly documented, and the purchasing files often lacked invoices that would show what was purchased. Additionally, some cardholders split purchases to avoid credit card limits. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Field Office, Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects, Fluor Daniel, and B and W were using credit cards for the appropriate purposes and within the limitations established by Federal and Departmental regulations.

  3. Nuclear Materials Stewardship Within the DOE Environmental Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bilyeu, J. D.; Kiess, T. E.; Gates, M. L.

    2002-02-26

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program has made significant progress in planning disposition of its excess nuclear materials and has recently completed several noteworthy studies. Since establishment in 1997, the EM Nuclear Material Stewardship Program has developed disposition plans for excess nuclear materials to support facility deactivation. All nuclear materials have been removed from the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (Mound), and disposition planning is nearing completion for the Fernald Environmental Management Project and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Only a few issues remain for materials at the Hanford and Idaho sites. Recent trade studies include the Savannah River Site Canyons Nuclear Materials Identification Study, a Cesium/Strontium Management Alternatives Trade Study, a Liquid Technical Standards Trade Study, an Irradiated Beryllium Reflectors with Tritium study, a Special Performance Assessment Required Trade Study, a Neutron Source Trade Study, and development of discard criteria for uranium. A Small Sites Workshop was also held. Potential and planned future activities include updating the Plutonium-239 storage study, developing additional packaging standards, developing a Nuclear Material Disposition Handbook, determining how to recover or dispose of Pu-244 and U-233, and working with additional sites to define disposition plans for their nuclear materials.

  4. Brockhill Park School: An Environmental Education Audit in a Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Dawn

    1994-01-01

    Evaluates Brockhill Park School's efforts to incorporate environmental education into the school's curriculum. Describes the integration of features of the school site into science, history, English, travel and tourism, and art courses. (MDH)

  5. Relative risk impacts of facility accidents in DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.

    1994-12-31

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is formulating an integrated national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of existing and future wastes at DOE sites. As part of this process, a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) is being prepared. A principal focus of the EM PEIS is the evaluation of strategies for remediating DOE sites and facilities to ensure the protection of human health and environment. A specific objective of DOE in implementing an integrated waste management program is to {open_quotes}reduce or eliminate risks to human health and safety and to the environment for environmental restoration and waste operation activities.{close_quotes} The EM PEIS calls for separate evaluations of the risk impacts for managing six different waste types: greater-than-Class-C low-level, hazardous, high-level, low-level mixed, low-level, and transuranic. For each waste type, four categorical strategies have been devised for consolidating wastes for treatment and storage: (a) no action, where existing sites will generally store and treat their own wastes consistent with approved plans, (b) decentralization, (c) regionalization, and (d) centralization. The last three alternatives refer to the degree of consolidation and affect the number of sites that will be used to treat, store, and dispose of a given waste type. Each consolidation strategy has associated siting options, and each option involves existing facilities, facilities in the design phase, and new facilities. Each siting option also implies unique inventories of waste to be stored and treated at each site and associated facilities. Finally, a number of treatment technologies and storage and disposal options for each waste type are to be evaluated for each alternative.

  6. 40 CFR 68.58 - Compliance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... are being followed. (b) The compliance audit shall be conducted by at least one person knowledgeable... the compliance audit and document that deficiencies have been corrected. (e) The owner or operator shall retain the two (2) most recent compliance audit reports. This requirement does not apply to...

  7. DOE Chair of Excellence Professorship in Environmental Disciplines

    SciTech Connect

    Shoou-Yuh Chang

    2013-01-31

    The United States (US) nuclear weapons program during the Cold War left a legacy of radioactive, hazardous, chemical wastes and facilities that may seriously harm the environment and people even today. Widespread public concern about the environmental pollution has created an extraordinary demand for the treatment and disposal of wastes in a manner to protect the public health and safety. The pollution abatement and environmental protection require an understanding of technical, regulatory, economic, permitting, institutional, and public policy issues. Scientists and engineers have a major role in this national effort to clean our environment, especially in developing alternative solutions and evaluation criteria and designing the necessary facilities to implement the solutions. The objective of the DOE Chair of Excellence project is to develop a high quality educational and research program in environmental engineering at North Carolina A&T State University (A&T). This project aims to increase the number of graduate and undergraduate students trained in environmental areas while developing a faculty concentrated in environmental education and research. Although A&T had a well developed environmental program prior to the Massie Chair grant, A&T's goal is to become a model of excellence in environmental engineering through the program's support. The program will provide a catalyst to enhance collaboration of faculty and students among various engineering departments to work together in a focus research area. The collaboration will be expanded to other programs at A&T. The past research focus areas include: hazardous and radioactive waste treatment and disposal fate and transport of hazardous chemicals in the environment innovative technologies for hazardous waste site remediation pollution prevention Starting from 2005, the new research focus was in the improvement of accuracy for radioactive contaminant transport models by ensemble based data assimilation. The

  8. Human health and wellbeing in environmental impact assessment in New South Wales, Australia: Auditing health impacts within environmental assessments of major projects

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Patrick J.; Harris, Elizabeth; Thompson, Susan; Harris-Roxas, Ben; Kemp, Lynn

    2009-09-15

    Internationally the inclusion of health within environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been shown to be limited. While Australian EIA documentation has not been studied empirically to date, deficiencies in practice have been documented. This research developed an audit tool to undertake a qualitative descriptive analysis of 22 Major Project EAs in New South Wales, Australia. Results showed that health and wellbeing impacts were not considered explicitly. They were, however, included indirectly in the identification of traditional public health exposures associated with the physical environment and to a lesser extent the inclusion of social and economic impacts. However, no health data was used to inform any of the assessments, there was no reference to causal pathways between exposures or determinants and physical or mental health effects, and there was no inclusion of the differential distribution of exposures or health impacts on different populations. The results add conceptually and practically to the long standing integration debate, showing that health is in a position to add value to the EIA process as an explicit part of standard environmental, social and economic considerations. However, to overcome the consistently documented barriers to integrating health in EIA, capacity must be developed amongst EIA professionals, led by the health sector, to progress health related knowledge and tools.

  9. National Energy Audit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-12-30

    A user-friendly, advanced computer energy audit, the National Energy Audit (NEAT) has been developed by the Existing Buildings Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory''s (ORNL''s) Building Technology Center for the U.S. Department of Energy''s (DOE''s) Weatherization Assistance and Existing Buildings Program. The computer program is designed for use by State agencies and utilities to determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for single-family homes to increase the energy efficiency and comfort level. NEAT7.1.3 contains minormore » changes and improvements in NEAT7.1.« less

  10. QUALITY ASSURANCE AUDITS OF THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) STATE-OPERATED PRECIPITATION COLLECTION NETWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a summary report of the findings from quality assurance and technical assistance visits made in 1985-86 to the 27 sites that comprise the State-Operated Precipitation Network. The network is staffed mainly by state environmental agencies and forestry commissions. ...

  11. Opportunities for industry participation in DOE`s environmental management technology development program

    SciTech Connect

    Bedick, R.C.; Walker, J.S.

    1996-09-01

    METC has managed about 85 research, development, and demonstration projects on behalf of DOE-EM`s Office of Science and Technology that include those in each of the four major environmental remediation and waste management problem areas: subsurface contaminants (radionuclides, heavy metals, dense nonaqueous phase liquids); decontamination and decommissioning of facilities; high-level waste tank remediation; and mixed waste characterization/treament/disposal. All projects within the Industry Programs are phased or have optional tasks at specific go/no-go decision points, allowing DOE to make investment decisions at various points in the technology development cycle to ensure that we are meeting the technology development goals and the needs of the customer or end-user. This decision making process is formalized in a Technology Investment Decision Model. A brief summary is given of R&D requirements (technology needs) in each of the above-mentioned 4 problem areas.

  12. Integrated wastewater management planning for DOE`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, J.; Barthel, J.; Wheeler, M.; Conroy, K.

    1996-02-01

    Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, L.L.C. (RMRS), jointly formed by Morrison Knudsen Corporation and BNFL Inc., provides international experience in the nuclear, environmental, waste management, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) , and project management industry. The company is currently the environmental restoration, waste management, and D&D subcontractor for Kaiser-Hill Company at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). RMRS offers unique solutions and state-of-the-art technology to assist in resolving the issues that face industries today. RMRS has been working on methods to improve cost savings recognized at RFETS, through application of unique technologies and process engineering. RMRS prepared and is implementing a strategy that focused on identifying an approach to improve cost savings in current wastewater treatment systems and to define a low-cost, safe and versatile wastewater treatment system for the future. Development of this strategy, was targeted by Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, DOE Rocky Flats Field Office and Kaiser-Hill as a ``Project Breakthrough`` where old concepts were thrown out the door and the project goals and objectives were developed from the groundup. The objectives of the strategy developed in a project break through session with DOE included lower lifecycle costs, shutdown of one of two buildings at RFETS, Building 374 or Building 774, reduced government capital investment, and support of site closure program goals, identified as the site`s Accelerated Site Action Plan (ASAP). The recommended option allows for removal of water treatment functions from Building 374, the existing process wastewater treatment facility. This option affords the lowest capital cost, lowest unit operating cost, lowest technical management risk, greatest support of ASAP phasing and provides the greatest flexibility for design with unforeseen future needs.

  13. 14 CFR 331.17 - How will the Department verify and audit claims under this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS PROCEDURES FOR REIMBURSEMENT OF... Department of Justice. If an audit is necessary, a ceiling amount reached, and the audit does not support...

  14. Environmental Management Assessment of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald, Ohio. During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included review of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and FEMP contractor personnel; and inspection and observation of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 15 through April 1, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). EH-24 carries out independent assessments of DOE facilities and activities as part of the EH-1 Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight Audit Program. The EH-24 program is designed to evaluate the status of DOE facilities and activities with respect to compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, Guidance and Directives; conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance; and the status and adequacy of management systems developed to address environmental requirements. The Environmental Management Assessment of FEMP focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems. Further, in response to requests by the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and Fernald Field Office (FN), Quality Assurance and Environmental Radiation activities at FEMP were evaluated from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section in this report.

  15. Walkability Audit Tool.

    PubMed

    Smith, Letha

    2015-09-01

    Walking is one of the simplest lifestyle changes workers can make to improve their health. Research shows a wealth of health benefits. Often, occupational and environmental health nurses are in charge of implementing walking programs. A tool is needed to continuously improve a company's walking program whether in the beginning stages or to an already established program. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Walkability Audit Tool for a healthier worksite is an easy seven-step audit tool that occupational and environmental health nurses can easily implement. PMID:26215975

  16. IOGCC/DOE oil and gas environmental workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-16

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) in cooperation with US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a workshop format to allow state regulatory officials and industry representatives the opportunity to participate in frank and open discussions on issues of environmental regulatory compliance. The purpose in providing this forum is to assist both groups in identifying the key barriers to the economic recoverability of domestic oil and gas resources while adequately protecting human health and the environment. The following topics were discussed, groundwater protection; temporarily abandoned and idle wells; effluent discharges; storm water runoff; monitoring and compliance; wetlands; naturally occurring radioactive materials; RCRA reauthorization and oil pollution prevention regulation. At the conclusion, all of the participants were asked to complete a questionnaire which critiqued the day activities. A discussion of each of the issues is made a part of this report as is a summary of the critique questionnaire which were received.

  17. Application of safeguards technology in DOE's environmental restoration program

    SciTech Connect

    Eccleston, G.W.; Baker, M.P.; Hansen, W.R.; Lucas, M.C.; Markin, J.T.; Phillips, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the last two decades, the Department of Energy's Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) has supported the research and development of safeguards systems analysis methodologies and nondestructive assay (NDS) technology for characterizing, monitoring, and accounting nuclear materials. This paper discusses methodologies and NDA instrumentation developed by the DOE/OSS program that could be applied in the Environmental Restoration Program. NDA instrumentation could be used for field measurements during site characterization and to monitor nuclear materials, heavy metals, and other hazardous materials during site remediation. Systems methodologies can minimize the expenditure of resources and help specify appropriate combinations of NDA instrumentation and chemical analyses to characterize a variety of materials quickly and reduce personnel exposure in hazardous environments. A training program is available to teach fundamental and advanced principles and approaches to characterize and quantify nuclear materials properly and to organize and analyze measurement information for decision making. The ability to characterize the overall volume and distribution of materials at a waste site is difficult because of the inhomogeneous distribution of materials, the requirement for extreme sensitivity, and the lack of resources to collect and chemically analyze a sufficient number of samples. Using a systems study approach based on statistical sampling, the resources necessary to characterize a site can be enhanced by appropriately combining in situ and field NDA measurements with laboratory analyses. 35 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. IOGCC/DOE oil and gas environmental workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) in cooperation with US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a workshop format to allow state regulatory officials and industry representatives the opportunity to participate in frank and open discussions on issues of environmental regulatory compliance. The purpose of providing this forum is to assist both groups in identifying the key barriers to the economic recoverability of domestic oil and gas resources while adequately protecting human health and the environment. The IOGCC and DOE staff worked with key state and industry representatives to develop a list of appropriate regulatory and industry representatives to be invited to participate. These same industry and regulatory representatives also provided a prioritized list of topics to be discussed at this workshop. After the topic leader set out the issue, views of those present were solicited. In almost every case, both the industry representatives and the regulatory personnel spoke with candor in discussing the problems. Common points of discussion for each topic were: (1) conflicting state and federal regulations; (2) conflicting regulations or permit requirements established by different state agencies; (3) increasing compliance costs; and (4) regulatory constraints that will result in ``no net growth`` in California oil and gas production and more likely a net decrease. This report contains a copy of the written presentation for each topic as well as a summary of the participants discussion.

  19. 75 FR 34445 - Audit Program for Texas Flexible Permit Holders

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... AGENCY Audit Program for Texas Flexible Permit Holders AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of Clean Air Act voluntary compliance audit program for flexible permit holders in the... permits an opportunity to participate in a voluntary compliance audit program (hereinafter ``Audit...

  20. Office of Inspector General report on audit of proposal to acquire land at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-05

    The US Department of Energy (Department) obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate to acquire 78 to 100 acres of privately-held land adjoining the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) as an additional buffer for a waste disposal facility. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the proposed purchase of land was essential to support the site`s mission. The Department obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate to acquire the additional land without confirming that av lid need for the land existed. If the land is acquired, the Department could spend between $655,000 and $2.2 million unnecessarily. Additionally, the Department could incur unnecessary maintenance and security costs to maintain the land after acquisition. It was recommended that the Manager, Ohio Field Office, dismiss the proposal to acquire the additional land. Management agreed with the recommendation, stating that the acquisition could not be justified at this time. However, management did not agree with the finding that the Department obtained an appraisal and developed a cost estimate without confirming that a valid need for the land existed. Management stated that the appraisal and cost estimate were principal and necessary to determining whether a need for the land existed. It was concluded that the appraisal and cost estimate should not have been performed because a valid need for the land was never established. Also, it was concluded that it would be inappropriate to reconsider the proposal to acquire the land at a later date if additional funds become available, unless a valid need for the land is first established.

  1. Environmental auditing: An approach for characterizing tropospheric ozone risk to forests

    SciTech Connect

    Hogsett, W.E.; Weber, J.E.; Tingey, D.; Herstrom, A.; Lee, E.H.; Laurence, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The risk tropospheric ozone poses to forests in the United States dependents on the variation in ozone exposure across the forests and the various environmental and climate factors predominant in the region. All these factors have a spatial nature; an approach to characterization of ozone risk is presented that places ozone exposure-response functions for species as seedlings and model-simulated tree and stand responses in a spatial context using a geographical information systems (GIS). The GIS is used to aggregate factors considered important in a risk characterization: (1) estimated ozone exposures over forested regions, (2) measures of ozone effects on species` and stand growth, and (3) spatially distributed environmental, genetic, and exposure influences on species` response to ozone. The GIS-based risk characterization provides an estimation the extent and magnitude of the potential ozone impact on forests. A preliminary risk characterization demonstrating this considered only the eastern United States and only the limited empirical data quantifying the effect of ozone exposures on forest tree species as seedlings. The area-weighted response of the annual seedling biomass loss formed the basis for a sensitivity ranking: sensitive-aspen and black cherry (14%-33% biomass loss over 50% of their distribution); moderately sensitive-tulip popular, loblolly pine, eastern white pine, and sugar maple (5%-13% biomass loss); insensitive-Virginia pine and red maple (0%-1% loss). Future GIS-based risk characterizations will include process-based model simulations of the three- to 5-year growth response of individual species as large trees. The interactive nature of GIS provides a tool to explore consequences of the range of climate conditions across a species` distribution, forest management practices, changing ozone precursors, regulatory control strategies, and other factors influencing the spatial distribution of ozone over time. 43 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Developing and testing a street audit tool using Google Street View to measure environmental supportiveness for physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Walking for physical activity is associated with substantial health benefits for adults. Increasingly research has focused on associations between walking behaviours and neighbourhood environments including street characteristics such as pavement availability and aesthetics. Nevertheless, objective assessment of street-level data is challenging. This research investigates the reliability of a new street characteristic audit tool designed for use with Google Street View, and assesses levels of agreement between computer-based and on-site auditing. Methods The Forty Area STudy street VIEW (FASTVIEW) tool, a Google Street View based audit tool, was developed incorporating nine categories of street characteristics. Using the tool, desk-based audits were conducted by trained researchers across one large UK town during 2011. Both inter and intra-rater reliability were assessed. On-site street audits were also completed to test the criterion validity of the method. All reliability scores were assessed by percentage agreement and the kappa statistic. Results Within-rater agreement was high for each category of street characteristic (range: 66.7%-90.0%) and good to high between raters (range: 51.3%-89.1%). A high level of agreement was found between the Google Street View audits and those conducted in-person across the nine categories examined (range: 75.0%-96.7%). Conclusion The audit tool was found to provide a reliable and valid measure of street characteristics. The use of Google Street View to capture street characteristic data is recommended as an efficient method that could substantially increase potential for large-scale objective data collection. PMID:23972205

  3. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing sites Mexican Hat, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Audit date: May 3--7, 1993, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing sites in Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona. This audit was conducted May 3--7, 1993, by Bill James and Gerry Simiele of the TAC. Three site-specific findings and four observations were identified during the audit and are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the audit is that the majority of the radiological aspects of the Mexican Hat, Utah, and Monument Valley, Arizona, remedial action programs are performed adequately. However, the findings identify that there is some inconsistency in following procedures and meeting requirements for contamination control, and a lack of communication between the RAC and the DOE on variances from the published remedial action plan (RAP).

  4. The GETE approach to facilitating the commercialization and use of DOE-developed environmental technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, T.N.

    1995-10-01

    The Global Environmental Technology Enterprise (GETE) was conceived to develop and implement strategies to facilitate the commercialization of innovative, cost-effective Department of Energy (DOE)-developed environmental technologies. These strategies are needed to aid DOE`s clean-up mission; to break down barriers to commercialization; and to build partnerships between the federal government and private industry in order to facilitate the development and use of innovative environmental technologies.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: Regional Lake Trophic Patterns in the Northeastern United States: Three Approaches

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    / During the summers of 1991-1994, the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) conducted variable probability sampling on 344 lakes throughout the northeastern United States. Trophic state data were analyzed for the Northeast as a whole and for each of its three major ecoregions-the Adirondacks (ADI), the New England Uplands (NEU), and the Coastal Lowland and Plateau (CLP)-and inferred to the entire population of lakes >/=1 ha (N = 11,076). Results were compared to a large, nonrandomly sampled data set for the same area compiled by Rohm and others and contrasted with lake trophic state information published in the National Water Quality Inventory: 1994 Report to Congress [305(b) report. Lakes across the entire Northeast were identified by EMAP data as 37.9% (+/-8.4%) oligotrophic, 40.1% (+/-9.7%) mesotrophic, 12.6% (+/-7.9%) eutrophic, and 9.3% (+/-6.3%) hypereutrophic. Lakes in the ADI and NEU generally are at a low, nearly identical trophic state (96% oligotrophic/mesotrophic), while those in the CLP are much richer (45% eutrophic). EMAP results are similar to results of the Rohm data set across the entire region. In the CLP, however, EMAP identified approximately 45% of the lakes as eutrophic/hypereutrophic, while the Rohm data set identified only 21% in these categories. Across the entire Northeast, the 305(b) report identified a much higher proportion (32.2%) of lakes in eutrophic condition and a much smaller proportion (19.8%) in oligotrophic condition than did the EMAP survey data (12.5% +/- 7.9% and 37.9% +/- 8.5%, respectively). Probability sampling has several advantages over nonrandom sampling when regional resource condition assessment is the goal.KEY WORDS: Lake trophic state; Phosphorus; Probability survey; Regional condition PMID:9680546

  6. Energy Auditing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Energy Engineers, Atlanta, GA.

    Presented is a discussion of various aspects of policy and implementation of energy auditing at various levels of government. Included are 11 chapters dealing with: (1) a national energy plan, (2) state certification for energy auditors, (3) survey instrumentation, (4) energy management economics, (5) Maine school energy auditing, (6) energy…

  7. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFEICIENCY--1988

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the U.S Environmental Protection Agencys 1988 National Ambient Air Performance Audit Program, Semiannual audits were conducted for lead, nitrate and sulfate on filter strips. ne audit was Conducted for high volume/PM10 size Selective inlet (ssi...

  8. COMPARISON OF AUDIT TECHNIQUES AND PERFORMANCE AUDIT RESULTS FOR EPA METHOD 25 FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic audit materials have been developed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate quality of measurements made by federal, state, and local agencies or their contractors during compliance source tests. Among audit materials are materials for auditing EPA Method 25, ...

  9. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFICIENCY - 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1984 National Audit Program by pollutant and by analytical method. Semiannual audits were conducted for Pb, NO3 and SO4 (filter strips) and one audit was conducted for SO2 (bubbler), NO2 (bubbler), CO a...

  10. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM: AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFICIENCY, 1986

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1986 National Audit Program by pollutant and by analytical method. Semiannual audits were conducted for Pb, NO3 and SO4 (filter strips) and acid rain, and annual audits were conducted for CO and high vo...

  11. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM--AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFICIENCY--1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1987 National Ambient Air Audit Program by pollutant and by analytical method. Semiannual audits were conducted for CO, Pb, NO3 and S04 (filter strips) and acid rain, and an annual audit was conducted ...

  12. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC).

  13. Progress toward maturity of DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    SciTech Connect

    Cosby, W.C.; Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.

    1994-07-01

    The document DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) has been in circulation since October 1992. DOE Methods is a living document, being updated twice each year. It contains both sampling and analytical methods in support of US Department of Energy/environmental restoration and waste management (DOE/EM) activities. Guidance on how to carry out sampling and analysis activities, focusing of EM needs, is also included in DOE Methods. This guidance applies to all aspects of sampling and analysis for EM. Methods from traditional standard methods documents often cannot provide needed characterization data because of radioactivity or complexity of the matrix. The intent of DOE Methods is to provide an alternative source of methods to meet this need. Efforts are underway to expand the use of DOE Methods throughout all DOE/EM programs. Copies of DOE Methods are available free of charge. The April 1994 update of the document includes 42 methods, of which 13 are new. In October 1994, Revision 2 of DOE Methods will be distributed. It will include additional guidance on how to plan sampling and analysis activities and will also include several new methods. DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division of DOE. It is a vehicle for transgressing new technology for characterization capability within the environmental restoration (ER) and/or waste management (WM) community. As DOE Methods continues to evolve, its use and application will continue to grow.

  14. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  15. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  16. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  17. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  18. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  19. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  20. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  1. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  2. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  3. 40 CFR 205.160 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.160 Section 205.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements....

  4. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  5. Office of Inspector General audit report on vehicle fleet management at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    In a prior report, Audit of Light Vehicle Fleet Management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, WR-B-93-7, September 29, 1993, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) concluded that vehicle fleet operations might be done more cost effectively by the General Services Administration (GSA) than by Idaho Operations Office (Idaho) and its contractor. The report also concluded that a significant number of vehicles were underused and the fleet was too large. Accordingly, the report contained recommendations that a cost comparison study be conducted to ascertain the most economical and efficient method of managing fleet operations and that vehicle usage data be reviewed periodically by the contractor, with prompt reassignment or disposal of significantly underused vehicles. Thus, the purpose of this audit was to determine if action has been taken to implement recommendations in the prior report. Specifically, the objectives of the current audit were to determine whether a cost comparison had been performed and whether the fleet was still too large. In this report, the authors recommend that Idaho annually review individual vehicle use against mileage standards and promptly dispose of or reassign vehicles not meeting the standards. The authors also recommend that the Idaho Deputy Manager be provided a vehicle assignment report for review and approval.

  6. Radiological audit of remedial action activities at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site Grand Junction, Colorado: Audit date, August 9--11, 1993. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological audit of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site, transfer site, and Cheney disposal site in Grand Junction, Colorado. Jim Hylko and Bill James of the TAC conducted this audit August 9 through 11, 1993. Bob Cornish and Frank Bosiljevec represented the US Department of Energy (DOE). This report presents one programmatic finding, eleven site-specific observations, one good practice, and four programmatic observations.

  7. Scholastic Audits. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2009-01-01

    What is a scholastic audit? The purpose of the audit is to assist individual schools and districts improve. The focus is on gathering data and preparing recommendations that can be used to guide school improvement initiatives. Scholastic audits use a multi-step approach and include: (1) Preparing for the Audit; (2) Audit process; (3) Audit report;…

  8. Inquiry-Based Instruction: Does School Environmental Context Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pea, Celestine H.

    2012-01-01

    In a larger study on teachers' beliefs about science teaching, one component looks at how school environmental context factors influence inquiry-based science instruction. Research shows that three broad categories of school environmental factors (human, sociocultural, design) impact inquiry-based teaching in some way. A mixed-method, sequential,…

  9. Does More Federal Environmental Funding Increase or Decrease States' Efforts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Benjamin Y.; Whitford, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    We examine the flow of federal grants-in-aid from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to the states. We simultaneously model two dependent variables (the flow of EPA funds, and state environmental and natural resource budgets) to identify the independent roles of state political institutions, political preferences, economic and…

  10. 41 CFR 102-37.350 - Does coverage under the single audit process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... single audit process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other reviews of its program? 102-37.350... process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other reviews of its program? No, although SASPs are covered under the single audit process in OMB Circular A-133, from time to time the...

  11. 41 CFR 102-37.350 - Does coverage under the single audit process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... single audit process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other reviews of its program? 102-37.350... process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other reviews of its program? No, although SASPs are covered under the single audit process in OMB Circular A-133, from time to time the...

  12. DOE model conference on waste management and environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Reports dealing with current topics in waste management and environmental restoration were presented at this conference in six sessions. Session 1 covered the Hot Topics'' including regulations and risk assessment. Session 2 dealt with waste reduction and minimization; session 3 dealt with waste treatment and disposal. Session 4 covered site characterization and analysis. Environmental restoration and associated technologies wee discussed in session 5 and 6. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  13. 10 CFR 603.1115 - Single audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Single audits. 603.1115 Section 603.1115 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Post-Award... regarding single audits of nonprofit participant's systems are identified in the DOE “Guide to...

  14. Audit Manual release 3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This manual consolidates into one document the policies, procedures, standards, technical guidance and other techniques to be followed by the Assistant Inspector General for Audits and staff in planning and conducting audit work within DOE and in preparing related reports on behalf of the Office of Inspector General.

  15. Routine environmental reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), Idaho Falls, Idaho. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), State of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW), and DOE contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from October 11 to October 22, 1993, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.113, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by utilizing supplemental activities that serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  16. Safety Auditing and Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, James Ronald (Ronnie)

    2005-01-01

    Safety professionals typically do not engage in audits and independent assessments with the vigor as do our quality brethren. Taking advantage of industry and government experience conducting value added Independent Assessments or Audits benefits a safety program. Most other organizations simply call this process "internal audits." Sources of audit training are presented and compared. A relation of logic between audit techniques and mishap investigation is discussed. An example of an audit process is offered. Shortcomings and pitfalls of auditing are covered.

  17. ``Clean`` fuels: Does the new direction make environmental sense?

    SciTech Connect

    Saricks, C.L.; Wang, M.Q.

    1996-05-01

    This paper examines the ramifications of this a three-pronged energy philosophy, with special reference to its expected environmental impact if it is fully implemented as policy. To recapitulate, the three prongs are to rely on a free energy market to determine winners and losers, which could certainly include Reformulated Gasoline (RFG) if it remains relatively cheap and clean; refocus the bulk of government-sponsored transportation energy research toward a ``great leap ahead`` to fully renewable and essentially pollution-free fuels such as hydrogen and fuel cells; and discontinue AFV pump priming. Of special interest is a premise that appears common to all prongs--that none of these measures represents a retreat from environmental goals or accomplishments on record since the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 was passed.

  18. 42 CFR 137.308 - Does the Secretary have any enforcement authority for Federal environmental responsibilities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for Federal environmental responsibilities assumed by Tribes under section 509 of the Act ? 137.308... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Nepa Process § 137.308 Does the Secretary have any enforcement authority for Federal environmental...

  19. Does ecohydrological connectivity affect sensitivity to environmental change?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal is to understand the influences of complex terrain on the sensitivity of carbon and water cycle processes to environmental drivers at different scales. Gravity-driven flowpaths of air and water transport material and energy across and through landscapes, creating connec...

  20. Benefits of improved environmental cooperation on a joint DoD/DOE facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, G.K.; Gibson, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    Numerous Federal facilities within the US involve multiple government agencies that face overlapping environmental concerns. This paper highlights the benefits of looking beyond the strict letter of environmental regulations that might affect a single tenant or environmental site to cooperative environmental efforts that focus on the entire facility, consistent with the missions of participating agencies. Using Kirtland Air Force Base (AFB) as a model, seven areas of Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cooperation are discussed that span technical, regulatory compliance, and administrative issues.

  1. Report on review of management and operating contractor internal audit functions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    DOE uses management and operating contractors to carry out the majority of its missions. Internal audits performed by these contractors are an integral part of DOE`s control structure designed to ensure that contractor costs are reasonable and allowable and that contractor operations are economical and efficient. The purpose of our audit was to determine whether contractor internal audit performance was in accordance with Department audit policy and was therefore satisfactory to DOE. Further, we wanted to determine if the internal audit coverage could be relied upon as part of DOE`s overall internal control structure.

  2. The Training Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Roger; Caple, Jim

    1984-01-01

    This article discusses the role of the auditor and describes a seven-stage training audit model currently being employed by a multinational United Kingdom bank. Stages include familiarization, auditing the client, auditing the program, auditing the program organizer, auditing the consumer, presenting the report, and tasking action agencies. (CT)

  3. Does WEEE recycling make sense from an environmental perspective?

    SciTech Connect

    Hischier, R. . E-mail: johannes.gauglhofer@empa.ch

    2005-07-15

    The production of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) is one of the fastest growing markets in the world. At the same time this also means that the amount of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) will continue to increase in the coming decades. As it is crucial to obtain more knowledge about the environmental consequences of the different WEEE treatment options, a study examining the two Swiss take-back and recycling systems of SWICO (for computers, consumer electronics and telecommunication equipment) and S.EN.S (household appliances) has been conducted. The two systems, which are based on an advanced recycling fee, are well established within Switzerland. With a combined approach of material flow analysis (MFA) and life cycle assessment (LCA), the environmental impacts of these two systems have been estimated, including all further treatment steps, which transform the fractions either into secondary materials or into waste for final disposal. As a baseline, we have used a scenario assuming that no WEEE is recycled and hence only primary production for the similar amount of raw materials. The impact assessment is based on characterization factors according to the Dutch CML methodology. The results show that throughout the complete recycling chain the sorting and dismantling activities of companies are of minor interest; instead the main impact occurs during the treatment applied further downstream to turn the waste into secondary raw materials. Within the two systems in Switzerland, the collection of WEEE seems much more relevant than the sorting and dismantling activities. When comparing the environmental impact of WEEE recycling with that derived from the baseline scenario (incineration of all WEEE and primary production of the raw materials), WEEE recycling proves to be clearly advantageous from an environmental perspective.

  4. Characterization of hazardous waste residuals from Environmental Restoration Program activities at DOE installations: Waste management implications

    SciTech Connect

    Lazaro, M.A.; Esposito, M.P.

    1995-06-01

    Investigators at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), with support from associates at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), have assembled an inventory of the types and volumes of radioactive, toxic or hazardous, and mixed waste likely to be generated over the next 30 years as the US Department of Energy (DOE) implements its nationwide Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The inventory and related analyses are being considered for integration into DOE`s Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) covering the potential environmental impacts and risks associated with alternative management practices and programs for wastes generated from routine operations. If this happens, the ER-generated waste could be managed under a set of alternatives considered under the PEIS and selected at the end of the current National Environmental Policy Act process.

  5. Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Edelson; Samuel C. Morris; Joan M. Daisey

    2001-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today.

  6. Final Draft of RACER Audit

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, Karen Schultz; Gomez, Penelope E.

    2011-01-01

    This document describes the approach Waste and Environmental Services - Environmental Data and Analysis plans to take to resolve the issues presented in a recent audit of the WES-EDA Environmental Database relative to the RACER database. A majority of the issues discovered in the audit will be resolved in May 2011 when the WES-EDA Environmental Database, along with other LANL databases, are integrated and moved to a new vendor providing an Environmental Information Management (EIM) system that allows reporting capabilities for all users directly from the database. The EIM system will reside in a publicly accessible LANL cloud-based software system. When this transition occurs, the data quality, completeness, and access will change significantly. In the remainder of this document, this new structure will be referred to as the LANL Cloud System In general, our plan is to address the issues brought up in this audit in three ways: (1) Data quality issues such as units and detection status, which impinge upon data usability, will be resolved as soon possible so that data quality is maintained. (2) Issues requiring data cleanup, such as look up tables, legacy data, locations, codes, and significant data discrepancies, will be addressed as resources permit. (3) Issues associated with data feed problems will be eliminated by the LANL Cloud System, because there will be no data feed. As discussed in the paragraph above, in the future the data will reside in a publicly accessible system. Note that report writers may choose to convert, adapt, or simplify the information they receive officially through our data base, thereby introducing data discrepancies between the data base and the public report. It is not always possible to incorporate and/or correct these errors when they occur. Issues in the audit will be discussed in the order in which they are presented in the audit report. Clarifications will also be noted as the audit report was a draft document, at the time of this

  7. Environmental dose assessment methods for normal operations at DOE nuclear sites

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Corley, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. The report includes a discussion of environmental doses to be calculated, a review of currently available environmental pathway models and a set of recommended models for use when environmental pathway modeling is necessary. Currently available models reviewed include those used by DOE contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other organizations involved in environmental assessments. General modeling areas considered for routine releases are atmospheric transport, airborne pathways, waterborne pathways, direct exposure to penetrating radiation, and internal dosimetry. The pathway models discussed in this report are applicable to long-term (annual) uniform releases to the environment: they do not apply to acute releases resulting from accidents or emergency situations.

  8. Environmental impact assessment of pharmaceutical prescriptions: Does location matter?

    PubMed

    Oldenkamp, Rik; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Hollander, Anne; Ragas, Ad M J

    2014-11-01

    A methodology was developed for the assessment and comparison of the environmental impact of two alternative pharmaceutical prescriptions. This methodology provides physicians with the opportunity to include environmental considerations in their choice of prescription. A case study with the two antibiotics ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin at three locations throughout Europe showed that the preference for a pharmaceutical might show spatial variation, i.e. comparison of two pharmaceuticals might yield different results when prescribed at different locations. This holds when the comparison is based on both the impact on the aquatic environment and the impact on human health. The relative impacts of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin on human health were largely determined by the local handling of secondary sludge, agricultural disposal practices, the extent of secondary sewage treatment, and local food consumption patterns. The relative impacts of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin on the aquatic environment were mostly explained by the presence of specific sewage treatment techniques, as effluents from sewage treatment plants (STPs) are the most relevant emission pathway for the aquatic environment. PMID:24508156

  9. DOE Nevada Field Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1992--November 9, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Y.E. ); Allen, G.C. ); Latham, A.R.; Black, S.C. )

    1992-11-01

    DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program,'' established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter III of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV) has prepared this third annual update of its Environmental Protection implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Operations (AMO), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions.

  10. DOE Nevada Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1993--November 9, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Elle, D.R.; Townsend, Y.E.; Latham, A.R.; Black, S.C.

    1993-11-01

    DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter III of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has prepared this fourth annual update of its Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Environment, Safety, Security, & Health (AMESSH), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions.

  11. DOE Nevada Field Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1992--November 9, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Y.E.; Allen, G.C.; Latham, A.R.; Black, S.C.

    1992-11-01

    DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter III of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV) has prepared this third annual update of its Environmental Protection implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Operations (AMO), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions.

  12. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Auditing A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Auditing Pt. 1068, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068—Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing The following tables describe sampling plans for selective enforcement audits, as described...

  13. Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R. J.

    1997-11-10

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power of Boeing North American. Inc. (formerly Rockwell International Corporation). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL and the De Soto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing; R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to ensure protection of the environment.

  14. DOE/EA-1493: Environmental Assessment for Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project (August 2004)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-08-10

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1493, titled ''Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project'', to analyze the potential environmental consequences of providing cost-shared funding support for the design, construction, and demonstration of an integrated multipollutant control system at AES's Greenidge Station in Dresden, New York. The system, expected to control emissions of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HF, HCl, and Hg, would be installed on the existing, coal-fired, 107-MW Unit 4 at Greenidge. The results of the analyses provided in the EA are summarized in this Finding of No Significant Impact. The proposed action is for DOE to provide about $14.5 million for this project, while CONSOL Energy Inc. and its project partners would be responsible for the remaining $21 million. The proposed project will result in technical, environmental, and financial data from the design, operation and construction of the multi-pollutant control system. This 4.5-year, commercial-scale demonstration project would allow utilities, particularly those with units less than 300-MW in capacity, to make decisions regarding the integrated multi-pollutant control system as a viable commercial option. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has concluded that the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project would result in minimal and insignificant consequences to the human environment. Thus, DOE considers that the proposed action, providing cost-shared funding for the project, is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 United States Code 4321, et seq. Therefore, in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1021.322, DOE has concluded that preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this FONSI.

  15. Graduate student theses supported by DOE`s Environmental Sciences Division

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; Parra, B.M.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides complete bibliographic citations, abstracts, and keywords for 212 doctoral and master`s theses supported fully or partly by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Sciences Division (and its predecessors) in the following areas: Atmospheric Sciences; Marine Transport; Terrestrial Transport; Ecosystems Function and Response; Carbon, Climate, and Vegetation; Information; Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP); Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM); Oceans; National Institute for Global Environmental Change (NIGEC); Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV); Integrated Assessment; Graduate Fellowships for Global Change; and Quantitative Links. Information on the major professor, department, principal investigator, and program area is given for each abstract. Indexes are provided for major professor, university, principal investigator, program area, and keywords. This bibliography is also available in various machine-readable formats (ASCII text file, WordPerfect{reg_sign} files, and PAPYRUS{trademark} files).

  16. PARTNERING WITH DOE TO APPLY ADVANCED BIOLOGICAL, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    On February 18, 2004, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Energy signed a Memorandum of Understanding to expand the research collaboration of both agencies to advance biological, environmental, and computational sciences for protecting human health and the ...

  17. Low-level waste management alternatives and analysis in DOE`s programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstein, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy is preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The PEIS has been divided into an Environmental Restoration section and a Waste Management section. Each section has a unique set of alternatives. This paper will focus on the waste management alternatives and analysis. The set of alternatives for waste management has been divided into waste categories. These categories are: high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, greater-than-class C and low-level waste from commercial sources, hazardous waste, and spent nuclear fuel. This paper will discuss the alternatives and analytical approach that will be used to evaluate these alternatives for the low-level waste section. Although the same alternatives will be considered for all waste types, the analysis will be performed separately for each waste type. In the sections that follow, information will be provided on waste management configurations, the analysis of waste management alternatives, waste types and locations, facility and transportation activities, the facility and transportation impacts assessment, and the compilation of impacts.

  18. LABORATORY AND FIELD AUDITS AS PART OF THE EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) HAZARDOUS WASTE ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY (HWERL) QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Audits are an important and integral part of the EPA Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory (HWERL) Quality Assurance (QA) Program. As part of the overall QA program, audits are used to determine contractor compliance with quality assurance plans and to assess the overal...

  19. Assessment of the environmental aspects of the DOE phosphoric acid fuel cell program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, H. L.; Cavagrotti, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The likely facets of a nationwide phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plant commercial system are described. The beneficial and adverse environmental impacts produced by the system are assessed. Eleven specific system activities are characterized and evaluated. Also included is a review of fuel cell technology and a description of DOE's National Fuel Cell Program. Based on current and reasonably foreseeable PAFC characteristics, no environmental or energy impact factor was identified that would significantly inhibit the commercialization of PAFC power plant technology.

  20. The US DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) at Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaglo, T.; Oates, L.; Short, S.

    1994-12-31

    The U.S. DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) is intended to provide an evaluation of the potential and likely impacts of the alternative remediation strategies that could be implemented by DOE across the complex. This paper will discuss the goals and objectives of the DOE PEIS project using Rocky Flats as an example. This paper will discuss the source term data collected for Rocky Flats Plant. Each individual hazardous substance site (IHSS) was allocated to one or more of the following six source term categories: (1) contaminated soils; (2) solid waste; (3) liquid containment; (4) surface water; (5) ground water; (6) facilities.

  1. Audit Report "Department of Energy Efforts to Manage Information Technology Resources in an Energy-Efficient and Environmentally Responsible Manner"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 emphasizes energy efficiency and conservation as critical to the Nation's economic vitality; its goal of reducing dependence on foreign energy sources; and, related efforts to improve the environment. The Act highlights the significant use of various forms of energy in the Federal sector and promotes efforts to improve the energy efficiency of Federal operations. One specific area of interest is the increasing demand for Federal sector computing resources and the corresponding increase in energy use, with both cost and environmental implications. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reported that, without aggressive conservation measures, data center energy consumption alone is expected to double over the next five years. In our report on Management of the Department's Data Centers at Contractor Sites (DOE/IG-0803, October 2008) we concluded that the Department of Energy had not always improved the efficiency of its contractor data centers even when such modifications were possible and practical. Despite its recognized energy conservation leadership role, the Department had not always taken advantage of opportunities to reduce energy consumption associated with its information technology resources. Nor, had it ensured that resources were managed in a way that minimized impact on the environment. In particular: (1) The seven Federal and contractor sites included in our review had not fully reduced energy consumption through implementation of power management settings on their desktop and laptop computers; and, as a consequence, spent $1.6 million more on energy costs than necessary in Fiscal Year 2008; (2) None of the sites reviewed had taken advantage of opportunities to reduce energy consumption, enhance cyber security, and reduce costs available through the use of techniques, such as 'thin-client computing' in their unclassified environments; and, (3) Sites had not always taken the necessary steps to reduce

  2. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFICIENCY - 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1983 National Audit Program by pollutant and by analytical method. Semiannual audits were conducted for SO2 and NO2 (bubbler methods), Pb, NO3(-) and SO4(=) (filter strips) and CO (continuous monitors)...

  3. NATIONAL PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROGRAM. AMBIENT AIR AUDITS OF ANALYTICAL PROFICIENCY, 1981

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 1981 National Audit Program, which are summarized by pollutant and by analytical method. Semiannual audits were conducted for SO2 and NO2 (bubbler methods), Pb, NO3(negative 2) and SO4(negative 2) (fil...

  4. Does the selection of ISO 14001 registrars matter? Registrar reputation and environmental policy statements in China.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, Gerald E; Chung, Shan Shan; Lo, Carlos W H

    2004-05-01

    This study investigates the relationship between characteristics of environmental policy statements and the reputations of ISO 14001 registrars who had performed certification audits of firms operating in mainland China. Three characteristics of environmental policy statements were examined: (1) The conformance of the policy to strict interpretations of the international standard; (2) The policy statement's adherence to the good practice guidelines specified in ISO 14004; and, (3) Self-reported evaluations of the policy statement's effectiveness as implemented. Data from 106 facilities in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou reveal that registrar quality has a relatively weak, positive relationship with conformance to both ISO 14001 standards and to ISO 14004 guidelines, but no relationship was observed with the self-reported data. Additional findings are that the use of foreign registrars is significantly associated with the adoption of ISO 14004 guidelines and that conformance with ISO 14001 standards is somewhat higher for international joint ventures and foreign-owned firms than for state-owned enterprises. PMID:15084359

  5. Ideas That Work! The Midnight Audit

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Steven A.

    2015-06-01

    The midnight audit provides valuable insight toward identifying opportunities to reduce energy consumption—insight that can be easily overlooked during the normal (daytime) energy auditing process. The purpose of the midnight audit is to observe after-hour operation with the mindset of seeking ways to further minimize energy consumption during the unoccupied mode and minimize energy waste by reducing unnecessary operation. The midnight audit should be used to verify that equipment is off when it is supposed to be, or operating in set-back mode when applicable. Even a facility that operates 2 shifts per day, 5 days per week experiences fewer annual hours in occupied mode than it does during unoccupied mode. Minimizing energy loads during unoccupied hours can save significant energy, which is why the midnight audit is an Idea That Works.

  6. Environmental Science and Research Foundation annual technical report to DOE-ID, January , 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The foundation conducts an environmental monitoring and surveillance program over an area covering much of the upper Snake River Plain and provide environmental education and support services related to INEL natural resource issues. Also, the foundation, with its university affiliates, conducts ecological and radioecological research on the Idaho National Environmental Research Park. This research benefits major DOE-ID programs including waste management, environmental restoration, spent nuclear fuels, and land management issues. Major accomplishments during CY1995 can be divided into five categories: environmental surveillance program, environmental education, environmental services and support, ecological risk assessment, and research benefitting the DOE-ID mission.

  7. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bascietto, J.J.; Sharples, F.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1993-06-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at several sites owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120(a) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act also subjects DOE to liability under Section 107 of CERCLA for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. The Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process, by which natural resource injuries are determined and compensatory monetary damages are calculated, is not well known or understood by DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. Nevertheless, natural resource liabilities are potentially a significant source of additional monetary claims for CERCLA hazardous substance releases. This paper describes the requirements of NRDA and explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, in order to more quickly restore environmental services at the lowest total cost to the public. The first section of the paper explains the statutory and regulatory mandates for the NRDA process. The second section briefly describes the four phases of the NRDA process, while the third section examines the three steps in the assessment phase in considerable detail. Finally, the last section focuses on the integration of the CERCLA and NRDA processes.

  8. Implementation of the DOE Office of Technology Development Strategic Program Plan for Environmental Education and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, S.M.; Chee, T.C.; Middleman, L.I.

    1992-12-31

    With the November 1989 formation of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) came the responsibility to develop programs to ensurethat enough trained and educated people would be available to support the achievement of EM`s 30-year goal. This mission responsibility derives from public policy and Departmental environmental management requirements. Within DOE, urgency to move forward resulted from the assumptions (1) that the current workforce was insufficiently prepared for the transition from a production mission to a mission of environmental compliance and cleanup; and (2) that, given current trends and forecasts, the national education infrastructure was unlikely to yield the scientists, engineers, and technicians to meet future DOE workforce needs, especially in the case of women and minorities who, projected to make up two-thirds of the net entering workforce by the year 2000, have traditionally been least prepared for and inclined to enter scientific and technical fields. This paper displays DOE`s environmental education and development mission, goals, and strategy, and describes progress in and plans for implementing this strategy.

  9. Integrating natural resource damage assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  10. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many US Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  11. Report on review of management and operating contractor internal audit functions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    DOE uses management and operating contractors to carry out the majority of its missions. Internal audits performed by these contractors are an integral part of DOE's control structure designed to ensure that contractor costs are reasonable and allowable and that contractor operations are economical and efficient. The purpose of our audit was to determine whether contractor internal audit performance was in accordance with Department audit policy and was therefore satisfactory to DOE. Further, we wanted to determine if the internal audit coverage could be relied upon as part of DOE's overall internal control structure.

  12. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. )

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

  13. Hassle-free audit trails: Automated audits

    SciTech Connect

    Manatt, D.R.

    1989-04-01

    The origin and history of data in databases are often as important as the data itself. A full audit trail of database operations is the best record of a database's history. INGRES provides an audit facility to format journal file entries into audit records. This facility is cumbersome and difficult to use. I describe two INGRES Report Writer reports that take all the effort out of maintaining a complete audit trail. To maintain an audit trail of changes to INGRES tables it is necessary to run AUDITDB individually on each table and store a record of the AUDITDB output. The INGRES manuals suggest how the audit records can be copied into INGRES tables for storage. Thus the maintenance of an audit trail consists of: creating tables to receive audit records, running AUDITDB, and storing the audit records into the tables. All this must be done for each table to be audited. My approach to this drudgery is to give it all to the INGRES system. Therefore, I present reports that generate command files to create the tables and run the audits. The only job left for a human is to submit the generated command files to the batch queue.

  14. The Obesogenic Environment of Commercial Trucking: A Worksite Environmental Audit and Implications for Systems-Based Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Lemke, Michael; Sönmez, Sevil; Hege, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Commercial trucker health is a vital public health concern. Enhanced understanding of the multiplicity, diversity, interdependence, and complexity of policies, resources, and stakeholders relevant to healthful living in trucking worksites can guide future interventions. Purpose: This article examines how the environmental attributes of…

  15. Environmental Management Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental management assessment performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from September 14 through September 27, 1993, by DOE`s Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health (EH-1). During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The environmental management assessment of NREL focused on the adequacy of environmental management systems and assessed the formality of programs employing an approach that recognizes the level of formality implementing environmental programs may vary commensurate with non-nuclear research and development operations. The Assessment Team evaluated environmental monitoring, waste management and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities at NREL, from a programmatic standpoint. The results of the evaluation of these areas are contained in the Environmental Protection Programs section of this report. The scope of the NREL Environmental Management Assessment was comprehensive and included all areas of environmental management. At the same time, environmental monitoring, waste management, and NEPA activities were evaluated to develop a programmatic understanding of these environmental disciplines, building upon the results of previous appraisals, audits, and reviews performed at the NREL.

  16. Big Field, Small Potatoes: An Empirical Assessment of EPA's Self-Audit Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Alexander; Sanchirico, Chris William

    2004-01-01

    Environmental self-auditing is said to deserve and require encouragement. Although firms can audit themselves more cheaply and effectively than regulators, they are deterred for fear that information they uncover will be used against them. To reduce this disincentive, the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Audit Policy lowers punitive fines…

  17. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.; Contos, L.

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. These data were collected by implementing the Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the DOE LIMB Demonstration Project Extension, dated August 1988. This document is the fifth EMP status report to be published and presents the data generated during November and December 1990, and January 1991. These reports review a three or four month period and have been published since the project's start in October 1989. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated under DOE's Clean Coal Technology Program of emerging clean coal technologies'' under the categories of in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen'' as well as post-combustion clean-up.'' The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Implementation of the DOE Office of Technology Development Strategic Program Plan for Environmental Education and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, S.M.; Chee, T.C. ); Middleman, L.I. )

    1992-01-01

    With the November 1989 formation of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) came the responsibility to develop programs to ensurethat enough trained and educated people would be available to support the achievement of EM's 30-year goal. This mission responsibility derives from public policy and Departmental environmental management requirements. Within DOE, urgency to move forward resulted from the assumptions (1) that the current workforce was insufficiently prepared for the transition from a production mission to a mission of environmental compliance and cleanup; and (2) that, given current trends and forecasts, the national education infrastructure was unlikely to yield the scientists, engineers, and technicians to meet future DOE workforce needs, especially in the case of women and minorities who, projected to make up two-thirds of the net entering workforce by the year 2000, have traditionally been least prepared for and inclined to enter scientific and technical fields. This paper displays DOE's environmental education and development mission, goals, and strategy, and describes progress in and plans for implementing this strategy.

  19. Does the Manitoba science curriculum help teach teens to be more environmentally-minded?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraljevic, Gabriel M.

    Manitoba does not have a specific course in environmental education (EE) but has related outcomes within the current science and social studies curricula. Has the curriculum created a populace with the knowledge, attitudes and skills to begin to act for environmental change? Do students and teachers perceive science to be the course that should teach EE? This mixed-method study used surveys, student focus groups, observations of recycling habits and teacher interviews to determine if grade 10 students (last year of required science) are acting in positive ways toward the environment. Students from grades nine and ten exhibited almost the same environmental knowledge and attitudes, but the grade tens were more alarmed about the state of the environment and less naive about their abilities to have individual impact. While both groups reported pro-environmental behaviours, neither recycled materials after a luncheon. Where EE should be taught differed between all groups studied.

  20. GREEDI---The computerization of the DOE/DOD environmental data bank

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C R; Kephart, E M

    1988-01-01

    One of the major responsibilities of Sandia National Laboratories is to develop shock and vibration specifications for system mechanical, electrical, and pyrotechnic components. The data required to generate these specifications are collected from finite element analyses, from laboratory simulation experiments with hardware, and from environmental tests. The production of the component specifications requires the analysis, comparison, and continual updating of these data. Sandia National Laboratories has also maintained the DOE/DOD Environmental Data Bank for over 25 years to assist in its shock and vibration efforts as well as to maintain data for several other types of environments. A means of facilitating shared access to engineering analysis data and providing an integrated environment to perform shock and vibration data analysis tasks was required. An interactive computer code and database system named GREEDI (a Graphical Resource for an Engineering Environmental Database Implementation) was developed and implemented. This transformed the DOE/DOD Environmental Data Bank from a card index system into an easily accessed computerized engineering database tool that can manage data in digitized form. GREEDI was created by interconnecting the SPEEDI (Sandia Partitioned Engineering Environmental Database Implementation) code, and the GRAFAID code, an interactive X-Y data analysis tool. An overview of the GREEDI software system is presented. 10 refs.

  1. EPRI-DOE Conference on Environmentally- Enhanced Hydropower Turbines: Technical Papers

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    The EPRI-DOE Conference on Environmentally-Enhanced Hydropower Turbines was a component of a larger project. The goal of the overall project was to conduct the final developmental engineering required to advance the commercialization of the Alden turbine. As part of this effort, the conference provided a venue to disseminate information on the status of the Alden turbine technology as well as the status of other advanced turbines and research on environmentally-friendly hydropower turbines. The conference was also a product of a federal Memorandum of Understanding among DOE, USBR, and USACE to share technical information on hydropower. The conference was held in Washington, DC on May 19 and 20, 2011 and welcomed over 100 attendees. The Conference Organizing Committee included the federal agencies with a vested interest in hydropower in the U.S. The Committee collaboratively assembled this conference, including topics from each facet of the environmentally-friendly conventional hydropower research community. The conference was successful in illustrating the readiness of environmentally-enhanced hydropower technologies. Furthermore, the topics presented illustrated the need for additional deployment and field testing of these technologies in an effort to promote the growth of environmentally sustainable hydropower in the U.S. and around the world

  2. Strategy for conducting environmental surveillance of groundwater to comply with DOE orders

    SciTech Connect

    Forstrom, J.M.

    1990-12-01

    This document defines the strategy for conducting environmental surveillance of groundwater quality at Department of Energy (DOE) installations as it will be implemented by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. The primary objectives of defining this generic strategy prior to developing site-specific plans are to: clearly differentiate between effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance as they apply to groundwater, describe the principles and concepts of groundwater flow that must be considered when establishing a groundwater surveillance program, and provide for a consistent approach to developing plant-specific groundwater surveillance plans. 18 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Financial auditing and fraud detection: Implications for scientific data audit.

    PubMed

    Pincus, K V

    1989-09-01

    This paper discusses some current issues and methods related to the detection of fraudulent financial reporting and draws potential implications for audit detection of fradulent scientific reporting. First, a brief history of auditor concern with fraud detection is presented. Then four issues are addressed: (1) How often does fraud occur? (2) What is fraud? (3) What are the general types of fraud? (4) How can auditors assess fraud risk and detect fraud? PMID:26859056

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: The Functional Unit in the Life Cycle Inventory Analysis of Degreasing Processes in the Metal-Processing Industry

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner; Hoffmann; Kreisel

    1997-07-01

    / In 1986 degreasing processes in the German metal-processing industry contributed about 70,000 t to the emission of chlorinated C1 and C2 hydrocarbons (trichloroethane, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, dichloromethane). Measures aiming at the reduction of toxic emissions and ozone depletion potential (ODP) may possibly lead to a shift of environmental impacts towards higher energy consumption, emission of waste water, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) with photochemical oxidant creation potential (POCP). The present article concerns itself with a life cycle assessment of the three main degreasing processes in order to compare their integral environmental impacts with one another. This is supplemented by presenting the methodology of the life cycle inventory life cycle inventory analysis (LCI). Generally, the applicability of the established LCI method can be shown quite clearly. However, some difficulties arise, especially at the stage of the goal definition, as the use of the process and the functional unit cannot be pinned down as easily and neatly as for most other products. The definition of the use of the process and the functional unit is not as straightforward as for most products. Among the potential functional units identified are the mass of removed impurities, cleaning time, cleaning work, percentage of purity, throughput of parts, loads, mass or surface and virtual coefficients. The mass of removed impurities turned out to be the most suitable parameter for measuring the technical performance of degreasing processes. The article discusses background, purpose, scope, system boundaries, target group, process tree and representativeness of the present study.KEY WORDS: Functional unit; Life cycle assessment; Life cycle inventory analysis; Degreasing processes; Metal processing PMID:9175550

  5. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR CONDUCTING SAMPLING AND SAMPLE BANK AUDITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV) is responsible for preparing Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for auditing sampling and sample bank activities performed under the Resource Conservation and Reco...

  6. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L. . Progress Center)

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US DOE Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators. (VC)

  7. Summary of the environmental dose models used at DOE nuclear sites in 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Mueller, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. This review includes a summary of the methods used in 1979 as described in annual environmental reports submitted by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors. The methods used ranged from estimating public doses based on environmental measurements and comparison to the DOE concentration guides, to complex methods using environmental pathway modeling and estimated radionuclide releases. No two sites used the same combination of measurements and pathway models in their analysis. While most sites used an atmospheric dispersion model to predict air concentrations of radioactive material, only about half of the sites provided enough information about the model used to permit proper model evaluation. The waterborne pathways related to drinking water or ingestion of fish were generally well described, while the external exposure or terrestrial food pathways were often not considered. The major recommendation resulting from this review was that complete documentations of the models used should be included either within the annual reports or as separate readily available documents. In addition, most sites could make better use of graphics (i.e., tables and figures) to better communicate the findings of their analyses.

  8. 2 CFR 1536.225 - Whom in the Environmental Protection Agency does a recipient other than an individual notify...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Whom in the Environmental Protection Agency... Other Than Individuals § 1536.225 Whom in the Environmental Protection Agency does a recipient other... criminal drug offense must notify the EPA award official from each Environmental Protection Agency...

  9. Audit of selected aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant cost structure, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-22

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is a research and development facility intended to demonstrate that transuranic waste from the Government`s defense activities can be safely disposed of in a deep geologic formation. The Fiscal Year 1994 budget for WIPP is about $185 million and includes funding for the operation of WIPP and for experiments being done by other DOE facilities. DOE`s current plan is for WIPP to begin receiving transuranic waste in June 1998. This audit was requested by the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management because two recent reports, one issues by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), were critical of the staffing and cost-effectiveness of WIPP, and because of recent mission changes at WIPP. The audit team consisted of representatives from the DOE, auditors from the OIG, and technical specialists hired by the OIG to assist in the audit. The purpose of the audit was to determine whether WIPP was appropriately staffed to meet programmatic requirements in the most cost-effective manner. The Secretary of Energy expected DOE facilities to benchmark their performance against other facilities to strive for best in class status, and the Westinghouse management and operating contract for WIPP required the facility to be operated in a cost-effective manner. However, the authors determined that Westinghouse did not use benchmarks and that WIPP could be managed more cost-effectively, with fewer personnel, while maintaining its current level of excellence. They concluded that the WIPP staffing level could be significantly reduced with a decrease in costs at WIPP of about $11.4 million per year.

  10. Implementation Plan for the Hawaii Geothermal Project Environmental Impact Statement (DOE Review Draft:)

    SciTech Connect

    1992-09-18

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that identifies and evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP), as defined by the State of Hawaii in its 1990 proposal to Congress (DBED 1990). The location of the proposed project is shown in Figure 1.1. The EIS is being prepared pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as implemented by the President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021), effective May 26, 1992. The State's proposal for the four-phase HGP consists of (1) exploration and testing of the geothermal resource beneath the slopes of the active Kilauea volcano on the Island of Hawaii (Big Island), (2) demonstration of deep-water power cable technology in the Alenuihaha Channel between the Big Island and Mau, (3) verification and characterization of the geothermal resource on the Big Island, and (4) construction and operation of commercial geothermal power production facilities on the Big Island, with overland and submarine transmission of electricity from the Big Island to Oahu and possibly other islands. DOE prepared appropriate NEPA documentation for separate federal actions related to Phase 1 and 2 research projects, which have been completed. This EIS will consider Phases 3 and 4, as well as reasonable alternatives to the HGP. Such alternatives include biomass coal, solar photovoltaic, wind energy, and construction and operation of commercial geothermal power production facilities on the Island of Hawaii (for exclusive use on the Big Island). In addition, the EIs will consider the reasonable alternatives among submarine cable technologies, geothermal extraction, production, and power generating technologies; pollution control technologies; overland and submarine power transmission routes; sites reasonably suited to support

  11. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment.

  12. Bonneville Power Administration Site Environmental Report, 1991.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-06-01

    In 1991, in order to provide BPA`s management with environmental information for decision making, and to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, BPA completed 15 environmental impact evaluations and decision documents, with many more in progress. BPA received the results of two US Department of Energy (DOE) environmental management audits, which noted areas for improvement in our operations. We completed Action Plans in response to each DOE report. We received one administrative complaint from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerning a 1990 spill in Arlington, Oregon, caused by a BPA subcontractor. BPA responded promptly to EPA`s findings and concerns. There were 32 new spill/release incidents, most involving failure of Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) capacitors. Cleanup of these spills/releases has proceeded satisfactorily. BPA continued vigorous efforts to clean up substations contaminated with residuals of oil and PCB from past spills. BPA took several actions to improve our environmental performance with respect to water quality. The BPA environmental team developed a long-term schedule for environmental appraisals and audits, identifying facilities and projects that will receive audits through 1996.

  13. Bonneville Power Administration 1991 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    In 1991, in order to provide BPA's management with environmental information for decision making, and to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, BPA completed 15 environmental impact evaluations and decision documents, with many more in progress. BPA received the results of two US Department of Energy (DOE) environmental management audits, which noted areas for improvement in our operations. We completed Action Plans in response to each DOE report. We received one administrative complaint from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) concerning a 1990 spill in Arlington, Oregon, caused by a BPA subcontractor. BPA responded promptly to EPA's findings and concerns. There were 32 new spill/release incidents, most involving failure of Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) capacitors. Cleanup of these spills/releases has proceeded satisfactorily. BPA continued vigorous efforts to clean up substations contaminated with residuals of oil and PCB from past spills. BPA took several actions to improve our environmental performance with respect to water quality. The BPA environmental team developed a long-term schedule for environmental appraisals and audits, identifying facilities and projects that will receive audits through 1996.

  14. Computerizing Audit Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lahey, Joanna N.; Beasley, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the history, benefits, and shortcomings of traditional audit field experiments to study market discrimination. Specifically it identifies template bias and experimenter bias as major concerns in the traditional audit method, and demonstrates through an empirical example that computerization of a resume or correspondence audit can efficiently increase sample size and greatly mitigate these concerns. Finally, it presents a useful meta-tool that future researchers can use to create their own resume audits. PMID:24904189

  15. CURRENT PROGRESS AND FUTURE PLANS FOR THE DOE OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J; Kurt D Gerdes, K; David Peeler, D; John Harbour, J; Kevin Fox, K

    2007-11-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has collaborated with various international institutes for many years on radioactive waste management challenges of mutual concern. Currently, DOE-EM is performing collaborative work with researchers at the Khlopin Radium Institute and the SIA Radon Institute in Russia and the Ukraine's International Radioecology Laboratory to explore issues related to high-level waste and to investigate experience and technologies that could support DOE-EM site cleanup needs. Specific initiatives include: (1) Application of the Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter to DOE Wastes--SIA Radon and Savannah River National Laboratory; (2) Improved Solubility and Retention of Troublesome Components in SRS and Hanford Waste Glasses--Khlopin Radium Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory; and (3) Long-term Impacts from Radiation/Contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone--International Radioecology Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper provides an overview of the status of the current International Program task activities. The paper will also provide insight into the future direction for the program. Specific ties to the current DOE-EM technology development multi-year planning effort will be highlighted as well as opportunities for future international collaborations.

  16. Current Progress and Future Plans for the DOE Office of Environmental Management International Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, K.D.; Marra, J. C.; Peeler, D.K.; Harbour, M.J.J.R.; Fox, K.M.; Vienna, J.D.; Aloy, A.S.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Bondarkov, M.D.

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has collaborated with various international institutes for many years on radioactive waste management challenges of mutual concern. Currently, DOE-EM is performing collaborative work with researchers at the Khlopin Radium Institute and the SIA Radon Institute in Russia and the Ukraine's International Radioecology Laboratory to explore issues related to high-level waste and to investigate experience and technologies that could support DOE-EM site cleanup needs. Specific initiatives include: - Application of the Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter to DOE Wastes - SIA Radon and Savannah River National Laboratory; - Improved Solubility and Retention of Troublesome Components in SRS and Hanford Waste Glasses - Khlopin Radium Institute, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory; - Long-term Impacts from Radiation/Contamination within the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, International Radioecology Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper provides an overview of the status of the current International Program task activities. The paper will also provide insight into the future direction for the program. Specific ties to the current DOE-EM technology development multi-year planning effort will be highlighted as well as opportunities for future international collaborations. (authors)

  17. Contracting for Audit Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heifetz, Harry S.

    1987-01-01

    The Single Audit Act of 1984 requires most school districts receiving over $25,000 in federal funds to undergo financial audits. This article highlights requirements for selecting certified public accountants to perform the audit and suggests factors to be considered before drafting a contract or letter of engagement. A sample letter is included.…

  18. 34 CFR 76.910 - Cooperation with audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cooperation with audits. 76.910 Section 76.910 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education STATE-ADMINISTERED PROGRAMS What Procedures Does the Secretary Use To Get Compliance? § 76.910 Cooperation with audits. A grantee or subgrantee...

  19. 34 CFR 75.910 - Cooperation with audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cooperation with audits. 75.910 Section 75.910 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Procedures Does the Department Use To Get Compliance? § 75.910 Cooperation with audits. A grantee shall cooperate with...

  20. Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1998, DOE operations at Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.D.

    1999-09-22

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1998 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D and D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 1998 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, and direct radiation. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

  1. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Leee, Majelle

    2002-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2001 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Boeing Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Closure of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 2001 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway. No structural debris from buildings, released for unrestricted use, was transferred to municipal landfills or recycled in 2001.

  2. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Lee, Majelle

    2001-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2000 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the former Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 2000 continue to indicate no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  4. The Environmental Quality Act and the Belmont Learning Complex: A Breakdown in Process. A Special Report of the Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Legislature, Sacramento. Joint Legislative Audit Committee.

    The California legislature's Joint Legislative Audit Committee has issued a report concerning the Belmont Learning Complex (BLC) and the Los Angeles Unified School District's (LAUSD's) propensity for engaging in a series of school construction projects on contaminated land. The analysis suggests that the LAUSD was made aware of the BLC site's…

  5. Strategic planning model for achieving stakeholder involvement in environmental at DOE weapons complex sites

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, G.

    1994-12-31

    Within today`s reality a public manager often needs to develop cooperative relationships among a number of individual, program, and organizational stakeholders to accomplish particular projects, programs, or policies. A DOE site manager charged with accomplishing environmental restoration and conversion at former weapons production sites is no exception. Important reasons for this include the technical and political complexity of the clean-up problem; limits on the funding, authority, and other resources available to DOE; authority, responsibilities, and interests of other stakeholders; and the ever present potential for conflict among stakeholders, and power of any one to hinder, if not halt, the clean-up process if conflicts aren`t managed and cooperative relationships established and maintained.

  6. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  7. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Auditing A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... PROGRAMS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 1068, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068—Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing The following tables describe sampling plans for...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Auditing A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... PROGRAMS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 1068, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068—Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing The following tables describe sampling plans for...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Auditing A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... PROGRAMS Selective Enforcement Auditing Pt. 1068, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068... enforcement audits, as described in § 1068.420: Table A-1—Sampling Plan Code Letter Projected family...

  10. 40 CFR 211.212 - Compliance audit testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance audit testing. 211.212 Section 211.212 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.212 Compliance audit testing....

  11. 40 CFR 211.212 - Compliance audit testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compliance audit testing. 211.212 Section 211.212 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.212 Compliance audit testing....

  12. 40 CFR 211.212 - Compliance audit testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance audit testing. 211.212 Section 211.212 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.212 Compliance audit testing....

  13. 40 CFR 211.212 - Compliance audit testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Compliance audit testing. 211.212 Section 211.212 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.212 Compliance audit testing....

  14. 40 CFR 211.212 - Compliance audit testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance audit testing. 211.212 Section 211.212 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.212 Compliance audit testing....

  15. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF 40 CFR 60 COMPLIANCE TEST AUDIT DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides audit materials to organizations conducting compliance tests using EPA Test Methods 6 (SO2), 7 (NOx), 18 (organics by GC/FID), 25 (organics as ppm C), and 26 (HCl). hese audit samples must be analyzed and the results reporte...

  16. 40 CFR 205.171 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.171 Section 205.171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... § 205.171 Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements....

  17. 40 CFR 35.3165 - Reports and audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reports and audits. 35.3165 Section 35.3165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds § 35.3165 Reports and audits. (a) Annual report. The State must provide...

  18. 40 CFR 56.7 - State agency performance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State agency performance audits. 56.7 Section 56.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGIONAL CONSISTENCY § 56.7 State agency performance audits. (a) EPA will utilize the provisions of...

  19. 40 CFR 56.7 - State agency performance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State agency performance audits. 56.7 Section 56.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGIONAL CONSISTENCY § 56.7 State agency performance audits. (a) EPA will utilize the provisions of...

  20. 40 CFR 56.7 - State agency performance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State agency performance audits. 56.7 Section 56.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGIONAL CONSISTENCY § 56.7 State agency performance audits. (a) EPA will utilize the provisions of...

  1. 40 CFR 56.7 - State agency performance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State agency performance audits. 56.7 Section 56.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGIONAL CONSISTENCY § 56.7 State agency performance audits. (a) EPA will utilize the provisions of...

  2. 40 CFR 56.7 - State agency performance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State agency performance audits. 56.7 Section 56.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGIONAL CONSISTENCY § 56.7 State agency performance audits. (a) EPA will utilize the provisions of...

  3. Final Technical Report. Training in Building Audit Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brosemer, Kathleen

    2015-03-27

    In 2011, the Tribe proposed and was awarded the Training in Building Audit Technologies grant from the DOE in the amount of $55,748 to contract for training programs for infrared cameras, blower door technology applications and building systems. The coursework consisted of; Infrared Camera Training: Level I - Thermal Imaging for Energy Audits; Blower Door Analysis and Building-As-A-System Training, Building Performance Institute (BPI) Building Analyst; Building Envelope Training, Building Performance Institute (BPI) Envelope Professional; and Audit/JobFLEX Tablet Software. Competitive procurement of the training contractor resulted in lower costs, allowing the Tribe to request and receive DOE approval to additionally purchase energy audit equipment and contract for residential energy audits of 25 low-income Tribal Housing units. Sault Tribe personnel received field training to supplement the classroom instruction on proper use of the energy audit equipment. Field experience was provided through the second DOE energy audits grant, allowing Sault Tribe personnel to join the contractor, Building Science Academy, in conducting 25 residential energy audits of low-income Tribal Housing units.

  4. 46 CFR Sec. 12 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Audit. Sec. 12 Section 12 Shipping MARITIME... TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 12 Audit. (a) The owner will audit as currently as possible subsequent to audit by the agent, all documents relating to the activities, maintenance...

  5. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE Operations annual site environmental report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.S.

    1998-11-23

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power of Boeing North American, Inc. These are identified as Area 4 of the SSFL and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for research and development (R and D), engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields primarily in energy research and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site had research and development laboratories involved with nuclear research. This work was terminated in 1995 and only D and D activities will have potential for impact on the environment. Since 1956, Area 4 has been used for work with nuclear materials, including fabricating nuclear reactor fuels, testing nuclear reactors, and dissembling used fuel elements. This work ended in 1988 and subsequent efforts have been directed toward decommissioning and decontamination of the former nuclear facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies responsible for oversight. Information presented here concentrates on Area 4 at SSFL, which is the only area at SSFL where DOE operations were performed.

  6. Environmental surveillance and natural resource monitoring at the DOE Pantex plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R.H.; McGrath, D.A.

    1998-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pantex plant is located on the Southern High Plains of the Texas Panhandle. Principal plant activities include the assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons; surveillance, storage, maintenance, repair, and nonexplosive testing of nuclear weapons components; manufacturing of chemical explosive components; and environmental restoration. Environmental monitoring has been conducted for more than 25 yr to assess potential impacts of facility operations on air, surface and ground waters, soils, vegetation, and wildlife. Measured concentrations of airborne radionuclides and nonradiological constituents around the plant perimeter are in compliance with applicable regulations. Concentrations of radionuclides in soils and vegetation from both on-site and off-site locations are typical of those attributable to naturally occurring radioactivity and to worldwide fallout. The calculated dose potentially received by a maximally exposed individual in 1997 was 0.000034 mSv (0.0034 mrem). No contamination directly attributable to Pantex operations has been found in the Ogallala aquifer beneath the plant nor downgradient in the well field operated by the city of Amarillo. Some nonradiological contaminants have been found in the perched aquifer beneath the plant and off-site to the southeast. The extent of contamination is being investigated and the problem remediated.

  7. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE operations annual site environmental report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R.J.

    1997-11-10

    Rocketdyne currently operates several facilities in the San Fernando Valley/Simi Valley area, for manufacturing, testing, and research and development (R and D). These operations include manufacturing liquid-fueled rocket engines, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and engines used for expendable launch vehicles used to place artificial satellites into orbit. This work includes fabrication and testing of rocket engines, lasers, and heat-transfer systems; and R and D in a wide range of high-technology fields, such as the electrical power system for the Space Station. Previously, this work also included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International Division (AI). AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. This nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. The majority of this work is done for the Department of Energy (DOE). This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1996 concentrates on the environmental conditions related to DOE operations at Area IV of SSFL and at De Soto.

  8. The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative--Performance Monitoring for DOE Environmental Remediation and Contaminant Containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W. J.; Venedam, R. J.; Lohrstorfer, C. F.; Weeks, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Advanced Monitoring System Initiative (AMSI) is a new approach to accelerate the development and application of advanced sensors and monitoring systems in support of Department of Energy needs in monitoring the performance of environmental remediation and contaminant containment activities. The Nevada Site Office of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Bechtel Nevada manage AMSI, with funding provided by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM). AMSI has easy access to unique facilities and capabilities available at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), including the Hazardous Materials (HazMat) Spill Center, a one-of-a-kind facility built and permitted for releases of hazardous materials for training purposes, field-test detection, plume dispersion experimentation, and equipment and materials testing under controlled conditions. AMSI also has easy access to the facilities and considerable capabilities of the DOE and NNSA National Laboratories, the Special Technologies Laboratory, Remote Sensing Laboratory, Desert Research Institute, and Nevada Universities. AMSI provides rapid prototyping, systems integration, and field-testing, including assistance during initial site deployment. The emphasis is on application. Important features of the AMSI approach are: (1) customer investment, involvement and commitment to use - including definition of needs, desired mode of operation, and performance requirements; and (2) employment of a complete systems engineering approach, which allows the developer to focus maximum attention on the essential new sensing element or elements while AMSI assumes principal responsibility for infrastructure support elements such as power, packaging, and general data acquisition, control, communication, visualization and analysis software for support of decisions. This presentation describes: (1) the needs for sensors and performance monitoring for environmental systems as seen by the DOE Long Term Stewardship Science and

  9. Incineration of DOE offsite mixed waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.D.; Harvego, L.A.; Jacobs, A.M.; Willcox, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is one of three incinerators in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Complex capable of incinerating mixed low-level waste (MLLW). WERF has received MLLW from offsite generators and is scheduled to receive more. The State of Idaho supports receipt of offsite MLLW waste at the WERF incinerator within the requirements established in the (INEEL) Site Treatment Plan (STP). The incinerator is operating as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status Facility, with a RCRA Part B permit application currently being reviewed by the State of Idaho. Offsite MLLW received from other DOE facilities are currently being incinerated at WERF at no charge to the generator. Residues associated with the incineration of offsite MLLW waste that meet the Envirocare of Utah waste acceptance criteria are sent to that facility for treatment and/or disposal. WERF is contributing to the treatment and reduction of MLLW in the DOE Complex.

  10. Development of an auditable safety analysis in support of a radiological facility classification

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, M.D.; Young, B.

    1995-03-01

    In recent years, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities commonly have been classified as reactor, non-reactor nuclear, or nuclear facilities. Safety analysis documentation was prepared for these facilities, with few exceptions, using the requirements in either DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System; or DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. Traditionally, this has been accomplished by development of an extensive Safety Analysis Report (SAR), which identifies hazards, assesses risks of facility operation, describes and analyzes adequacy of measures taken to control hazards, and evaluates potential accidents and their associated risks. This process is complicated by analysis of secondary hazards and adequacy of backup (redundant) systems. The traditional SAR process is advantageous for DOE facilities with appreciable hazards or operational risks. SAR preparation for a low-risk facility or process can be cost-prohibitive and quite challenging because conventional safety analysis protocols may not readily be applied to a low-risk facility. The DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management recognized this potential disadvantage and issued an EM limited technical standard, No. 5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation. This standard can be used for developing documentation for a facility classified as radiological, including preparation of an auditable (defensible) safety analysis. In support of the radiological facility classification process, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has developed an auditable safety analysis document based upon the postulation criteria and hazards analysis techniques defined in DOE Order 5480.23.

  11. A DOE contractor`s perspective of environmental monitoring requirements at a low-level waste facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ferns, T.W.

    1989-11-01

    Environmental monitoring at a low-level waste disposal facility (LLWDF) should, (1) demonstrate compliance with environmental laws; (2) detect any spatial or temporal environmental changes; and (3) provide information on the potential or actual exposure of humans and/or the environment to disposed waste and/or waste by-products. Under the DOE Order system the LLWDF site manager has more freedom of implementation for a monitoring program than either the semi-prescriptive NRC, or the prescriptive EPA hazardous waste programs. This paper will attempt to compare and contrast environmental monitoring under the different systems (DOE, NRC, and EPA), and determine if the DOE might benefit from a more prescriptive system.

  12. Performance Measures for Evaluating Public Participation Activities in the Office of Environmental Management (DOE)

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, S.A.

    2001-02-15

    Public participation in Office of Environmental Management (EM) activities throughout the DOE complex is a critical component of the overall success of remediation and waste management efforts. The challenges facing EM and its stakeholders over the next decade or more are daunting (Nuclear Waste News 1996). Achieving a mission composed of such challenges will require innovation, dedication, and a significant degree of good will among all stakeholders. EM's efforts to date, including obtaining and using inputs offered by EM stakeholders, have been notable. Public participation specialists have accepted and met challenges and have consistently tried to improve their performance. They have reported their experiences both formally and informally (e.g., at professional conferences and EM Public Participation Network Workshops, other internal meetings of DOE and contractor public participation specialists, and one-on-one consultations) in order to advance the state of their practice. Our research, and our field research in particular (including our interactions with many representatives of numerous stakeholder groups at nine DOE sites with diverse EM problems), have shown that it, is possible to develop coherent results even in a problem domain as complex as that of EM. We conclude that performance-based evaluations of public participation appear possible, and we have recommended an approach, based on combined and integrated multi-stakeholder views on the attributes of successful public participation and associated performance indicators, that seems workable and should be acceptable to diverse stakeholders. Of course, as an untested recommendation, our approach needs the validation that can only be achieved by application (perhaps at a few DOE sites with ongoing EM activities). Such an application would serve to refine the proposed approach in terms of its clarity, its workability, and its potential for full-scale use by EM and, potentially, other government agencies and

  13. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  14. 40 CFR 141.808 - Audits and inspections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 141.808 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Aircraft Drinking Water Rule § 141.808 Audits and... delivery of safe drinking water....

  15. Science To Support DOE Site Cleanup: The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management Science Program Awards

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, Paul R. ); Brockman, Fred J. ); Camaioni, Donald M. ); Felmy, Andrew R. ); Grate, Jay W. ); Hay, Benjamin P.; Hess, Nancy J. ); Meyer, Philip D. ); Murray, Christopher J. ); Pfund, David M. ); Su, Yali ); Thornton, Edward C. ); Weber, William J. ); Zachara, John M. )

    2001-06-19

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was awarded ten Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in fiscal year 1996, six in fiscal year 1997, nine in fiscal year 1998, seven in fiscal year 1999, and five in fiscal year 2000. All of the fiscal year 1996 award projects have published final reports. The 1997 and 1998 award projects have been completed or are nearing completion. Final reports for these awards will be published, so their annual updates will not be included in this document. This section summarizes how each of the 1999 and 2000 grants address significant U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. The 1999 and 2000 EMSP awards at PNNL are focused primarily in two areas: Tank Waste Remediation, and Soil and Groundwater Cleanup.

  16. Robotic tooling for DOE environmental management. Annual report, September 29, 1995--September 28, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.L.

    1996-12-18

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has created nuclear weapons for defense for over forty years. During this time, hazardous and nuclear wastes have accumulated, and contamination of soils and groundwater have occurred throughout the US, as environmental stewardship was not fully appreciated until recent times. Thousands of sites require clean up, and hundreds of facilities require decontamination and decommissioning. The Office of Technology Development (OTD) assists this mission by developing new technology that is safer, more efficient, and less expensive than current processes. The OTD has focused upon five primary areas where robotics technology can help. These five areas are: Tank Waste Retrieval, Contaminant analysis Automation, Decontamination and Dismantlement, Mixed Waste Operations, and the Plutonium Focus Area. This report details work on the robotic opening of waste drums and end-effector design for non-destructive drum opening.

  17. Does accountability for reasonableness work? A protocol for a mixed methods study using an audit tool to evaluate the decision-making of clinical commissioning groups in England

    PubMed Central

    Kieslich, Katharina; Littlejohns, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England are tasked with making difficult decisions on which healthcare services to provide against the background of limited budgets. The question is how to ensure that these decisions are fair and legitimate. Accounts of what constitutes fair and legitimate priority setting in healthcare include Daniels’ and Sabin's accountability for reasonableness (A4R) and Clark's and Weale's framework for the identification of social values. This study combines these accounts and asks whether the decisions of those CCGs that adhere to elements of such accounts are perceived as fairer and more legitimate by key stakeholders. The study addresses the empirical gap arising from a lack of research on whether frameworks such as A4R hold what they promise. It aims to understand the criteria that feature in CCG decision-making. Finally, it examines the usefulness of a decision-making audit tool (DMAT) in identifying the process and content criteria that CCGs apply when making decisions. Methods and analysis The adherence of a sample of CCGs to criteria emerging from theories of fair priority setting will be examined using the DMAT developed by PL. The results will be triangulated with data from semistructured interviews with key stakeholders in the CCG sample to ascertain whether there is a correlation between those CCGs that performed well in the DMAT exercise and those whose decisions are perceived positively by interviewees. Descriptive statistical methods will be used to analyse the DMAT data. A combination of quantitative and qualitative content analysis methods will be used to analyse the interview transcripts. Ethics and dissemination Full ethics approval was received by the King's College London Biomedical Sciences, Dentistry, Medicine and Natural and Mathematical Sciences Research Ethics Subcommittee. The results of the study will be disseminated through publications in peer review journals. PMID:26163034

  18. 40 CFR 68.220 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audits. 68.220 Section 68.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL... issue the owner or operator of a stationary source a written preliminary determination of...

  19. 40 CFR 68.220 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audits. 68.220 Section 68.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL... history of the stationary source; (2) Accident history of other stationary sources in the same...

  20. 40 CFR 68.220 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audits. 68.220 Section 68.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL... history of the stationary source; (2) Accident history of other stationary sources in the same...

  1. 40 CFR 68.220 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Audits. 68.220 Section 68.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL... history of the stationary source; (2) Accident history of other stationary sources in the same...

  2. 40 CFR 68.220 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audits. 68.220 Section 68.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL... history of the stationary source; (2) Accident history of other stationary sources in the same...

  3. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  4. School Safety Audit Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMary, Jo Lynne; Owens, Marsha; Ramnarain, A. K. Vijay

    The 1997 Virginia General Assembly passed legislation directing school boards to require all schools to conduct safety audits. This audit is designed to assess the safety conditions in each public school to: (1) identify and, if necessary, develop solutions for physical safety concerns, including building security issues; and (2) identify and…

  5. Auditing Schools for Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Eric,

    2000-01-01

    Explores the issues involved in conducting effective safety audits for educational facilities. Areas covered include auditing for site characteristics, access control, lighting, building exterior, door types and locking mechanisms, key control, alarm system controls, security monitors, and vision panels in the doors. (GR)

  6. Environmental monitoring for the DOE coolside and LIMB demonstration extension projects. Final report, May--August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.; Contos, L.; Adams, L.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present environmental monitoring data collected during the US Department of Energy Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (DOE LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension at the Ohio Edison Edgewater Generating Station in Lorain, Ohio. The DOE project is an extension of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) original LIMB Demonstration. The program is operated nuclear DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program of ``emerging clean coal technologies`` under the categories of ``in boiler control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen`` as well as ``post-combustion clean-up.`` The objective of the LIMB program is to demonstrate the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emission reduction capabilities of the LIMB system. The LIMB system is a retrofit technology to be used for existing coal-fired boilers equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs).

  7. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power. DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K. S.

    1998-11-23

    This .Annual Site Environmental Report for 1997 concentrates on the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory) (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past. these operations included development. fabrication. and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International Division (AI). Other activities included the operation of large scale liquid metal facilities for the testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). a government owned company operated, test facility within Area IV. .AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1981 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently. all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996.

  8. Environmental Enrichments for a Group of Captive Macaws: Low Interaction Does Not Mean Low Behavioral Changes.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Jéssica; Maia, Caroline Marques; Santos, Eliana Ferraz

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment has been widely used to improve conditions for nonhuman animals in captivity. However, there is no consensus about the best way to evaluate the success of enrichments. This study evaluated whether the proportion of time spent interacting with enrichments indicated the proportion of overall behavioral changes. Six environmental enrichments were introduced in succession to 16 captive macaws, and interaction of the animals with them as well as the behaviors of the group were recorded before and during the enrichments. All of the enrichments affected the proportions of time spent in different behaviors. Macaws interacted more with certain items (hibiscus and food tree) than with others (a toy or swings and stairs), but introduction of the enrichments that invoked the least interaction caused as many behavioral changes as those that invoked the most. Moreover, feeding behavior was only affected by the enrichment that invoked the least interaction, a change not detected by a general analysis of enrichment effects. In conclusion, little interaction with enrichment does not mean little change in behavior, and the effects of enrichments are more complex than previously considered. PMID:27135378

  9. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2003 DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Lee, Majelle

    2004-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2003 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing Rocketdyne’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2003 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  10. 76 FR 79168 - U.S. Department of Energy Audit Guidance: For-Profit Recipients

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) seeks information and comments related to the requirements and guidance for independent audit organizations in conducting program compliance audits of for-profit recipients of federal financial assistance from DOE under its financial assistance...

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), conducted September 14 through 25, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Fermilab. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at Fermilab, and interviews with site personnel. 110 refs., 26 figs., 41 tabs.

  12. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), conducted December 14 through 18, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with SERI. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SERI, and interviews with site personnel. 33 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

  13. Report on DOE analytical laboratory capacity available to meet EM environmental sampling and analysis needs for FY 93-99

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-30

    The DOE Analytical Laboratory Capacity Study was conducted to give EM-263 current information about existing and future analytical capacities and capabilities of site laboratories within the DOE Complex. Each DOE site may have one or more analytical laboratories in operation. These facilities were established to support site missions such as production, research and development, and personnel and environmental monitoring. With changing site missions and the DOE directives for environmental monitoring and cleanup, these laboratories are either devoting or planning to devote resources to support EM activities. The DOE site laboratories represent a considerable amount of capital investment and analytical capability, capacity, and expertise that can be applied to support the EM mission. They not only provide cost-effective high-volume analytical laboratory services, but are also highly recognized analytical research and development centers. Several sites have already transferred their analytical capability from traditional production support to environmental monitoring and waste management support. A model was developed to determine the analytical capacity of all laboratories in the DOE Complex. The model was applied at nearly all the major laboratories and the results collected from these studies are summarized in this report.

  14. Internal Auditing for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles

    This book provides guidelines for conducting internal audits of school districts. The first five chapters provide an overview of internal auditing and describe techniques that can be used to improve or implement internal audits in school districts. They offer information on the definition and benefits of internal auditing, the role of internal…

  15. Hazardous Substance Release Reporting Under CERCLA, EPCR {section}304 and DOE Emergency Management System (EMS) and DOE Occurrence Reporting Requirements. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Traceski, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    Releases of various substances from DOE facilities may be subject to reporting requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), as well as DOE`s internal ``Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information`` and the ``Emergency Management System`` (EMS). CERCLA and EPCPA are Federal laws that require immediate reporting of a release of a Hazardous Substance (HS) and an Extremely Hazardous Substance (EHS), respectively, in a Reportable Quantity (RQ) or more within a 24-hour period. This guidance uses a flowchart, supplemental information, and tables to provide an overview of the process to be followed, and more detailed explanations of the actions that must be performed, when chemical releases of HSs, EHSs, pollutants, or contaminants occur at DOE facilities. This guidance should be used in conjunction with, rather than in lieu of, applicable laws, regulations, and DOE Orders. Relevant laws, regulations, and DOE Orders are referenced throughout this guidance.

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Director`s overview of research performed for DOE Office of Health And Environmental Research

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    A significant portion of the research undertaken at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on the strategic programs of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER). These programs, which include Environmental Processes (Subsurface Science, Ecosystem Function and Response, and Atmospheric Chemistry), Global Change (Climate Change, Environmental Vulnerability, and Integrated Assessments), Biotechnology (Human Genome and Structural Biology), and Health (Health Effects and Medical Applications), have been established by OHER to support DOE business areas in science and technology and environmental quality. PNL uses a set of critical capabilities based on the Laboratory`s research facilities and the scientific and technological expertise of its staff to help OHER achieve its programmatic research goals. Integration of these capabilities across the Laboratory enables PNL to assemble multidisciplinary research teams that are highly effective in addressing the complex scientific and technical issues associated with OHER-sponsored research. PNL research efforts increasingly are focused on complex environmental and health problems that require multidisciplinary teams to address the multitude of time and spatial scales found in health and environmental research. PNL is currently engaged in research in the following areas for these OHER Divisions: Environmental Sciences -- atmospheric radiation monitoring, climate modeling, carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry, ecological research, subsurface sciences, bioremediation, and environmental molecular sciences; Health Effects and Life Sciences -- cell/molecular biology, and biotechnology; Medical Applications and Biophysical Research -- analytical technology, and radiological and chemical physics. PNL`s contributions to OHER strategic research programs are described in this report.

  17. Surgical audit: a review. Proceedings of an audit symposium.

    PubMed

    1989-11-01

    The work of surgical departments involves varying proportions of investigation, diagnosis and treatment and the object of audit is to measure and monitor the outcome of this activity. It also serves as a secondary but important role in education, research and resource planning. The different methods of audit described in this symposium gave varying contributions to the definition of workload and outcome and to the education of the surgical staff. Irrespective of the audit system used, there is little doubt that weekly meetings specifically designed for the purpose are of prime importance, and the contributors used it in a variety of different ways. For Messrs. Eltringham and Espiner this meeting was seen much more as an educational exercise for the firm as a whole than a ritualistic method of collecting numerical information. Where other systems which rather more fastidiously collect numerical information are used, the weekly meeting becomes more important in ensuring the accuracy of the data collected. Some authors review the proforma on which the patient information is collected before it is entered into the computer, a point strongly made by Mr. Dunn and it does seem likely that as audit information is collected and challenged, then considerable efforts will have to be made to ensure the accuracy of the information being entered, for there is little point in defending an audit result by suggesting that the houseman who made the original entry did not do so very accurately. Many auditors used a lunch or coffee break as a convenient time to meet, but in some cases a lot of extra work was required for validation and if clinical audit is to represent a very accurate record of the work of a surgical department, this point requires careful consideration. If audit information is to be easily processed, then its means of collection is important.Most contributors used a single record card on which the information was recorded during the patient's stay and this record

  18. Audits of radiopharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Castronovo, F P

    1992-03-01

    A procedure for auditing radiopharmaceutical formulations is described. To meet FDA guidelines regarding the quality of radiopharmaceuticals, institutional radioactive drug research committees perform audits when such drugs are formulated away from an institutional pharmacy. All principal investigators who formulate drugs outside institutional pharmacies must pass these audits before they can obtain a radiopharmaceutical investigation permit. The audit team meets with the individual who performs the formulation at the site of drug preparation to verify that drug formulations meet identity, strength, quality, and purity standards; are uniform and reproducible; and are sterile and pyrogen free. This team must contain an expert knowledgeable in the preparation of radioactive drugs; a radiopharmacist is the most qualified person for this role. Problems that have been identified by audits include lack of sterility and apyrogenicity testing, formulations that are open to the laboratory environment, failure to use pharmaceutical-grade chemicals, inadequate quality control methods or records, inadequate training of the person preparing the drug, and improper unit dose preparation. Investigational radiopharmaceutical formulations, including nonradiolabeled drugs, must be audited before they are administered to humans. A properly trained pharmacist should be a member of the audit team. PMID:1598931

  19. Mercury audit at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.M.; Jensen, M.K.; Anderson, G.M.

    1994-02-01

    This report presents the results of an environmental compliance audit to identify potential mercury-containing equipment in 261 building and 197 tanks at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA). The RMA, located near Denver, Colorado, is undergoing clean up and decommissioning by the Department of the Army. Part of the decommissioning procedure is to ensure that all hazardous wastes are properly identified and disposed of. The purpose of the audit was to identify any mercury spills and mercury-containing instrumentation. The audit were conducted from April 7, 1992, through July 16, 1992, by a two-person team. The team interviewed personnel with knowledge of past uses of the buildings and tanks. Information concerning past mercury spills and the locations and types of instrumentation that contain mercury proved to be invaluable for an accurate survey of the arsenal. The team used a Jerome{reg_sign} 431-X{trademark} Mercury Vapor Analyzer to detect spills and confirm locations of mercury vapor. Twelve detections were recorded during the audit and varied from visible mercury spills to slightly elevated readings in the corners of rooms with past spills. The audit also identified instrumentation that contained mercury. All data have been incorporated into a computerized data base that is compatible with the RMA data base.

  20. The DOE Office of Environmental Management International Cooperative Program: Overview of Technical Tasks and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, James C.; Fox, Kevin M.; Jannik, Gerald T.; Farfan, Eduardo B.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Roach, Jay; Aloy, A. S.; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Lopukh, D. B.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Han, Ana M.

    2010-01-22

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Engineering and Technology is responsible for implementing EM’s International Cooperative Program. Over the past 15 years, collaborative work has been conducted through this program with researchers in Russia, Ukraine, France, United Kingdom and Republic of Korea. Currently, work is being conducted with researchers in Russia and Ukraine. Efforts aimed at evaluating and advancing technologies to support U.S. high-level waste (HLW) vitrification initiatives are being conducted in collaboration with Russian researchers. Work at Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) is targeted at improving the throughput of current vitrification processes by increasing melting rate. These efforts are specifically targeted at challenging waste types identified at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford Site. The objectives of current efforts at SIA Radon are to gain insight into vitrification process limits for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) technology. Previous demonstration testing has shown that the CCIM offers the potential for dramatic increases in waste loading and waste throughput. However, little information is known regarding operational limits that could affect long-term, efficient CCIM operations. Collaborative work with the Russian Electrotechnical University (ETU) “LETI” is aimed at advancing CCIM process monitoring, process control and design. The goal is to further mature the CCIM technology and to establish it as a viable HLW vitrification technology. The greater than two year effort conducted with the International Radioecology Laboratory in the Ukraine recently completed. The objectives of this study were: to assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ); and to provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ch

  1. THE DOE OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM: OVERVIEW OF TECHNICAL TASKS AND RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.; Fox, K.; Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2009-12-08

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Engineering and Technology is responsible for implementing EM's International Cooperative Program. Over the past 15 years, collaborative work has been conducted through this program with researchers in Russia, Ukraine, France, United Kingdom and Republic of Korea. Currently, work is being conducted with researchers in Russia and Ukraine. Efforts aimed at evaluating and advancing technologies to support U.S. high-level waste (HLW) vitrification initiatives are being conducted in collaboration with Russian researchers. Work at Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) is targeted at improving the throughput of current vitrification processes by increasing melting rate. These efforts are specifically targeted at challenging waste types identified at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford Site. The objectives of current efforts at SIA Radon are to gain insight into vitrification process limits for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) technology. Previous demonstration testing has shown that the CCIM offers the potential for dramatic increases in waste loading and waste throughput. However, little information is known regarding operational limits that could affect long-term, efficient CCIM operations. Collaborative work with the Russian Electrotechnical University (ETU) 'LETI' is aimed at advancing CCIM process monitoring, process control and design. The goal is to further mature the CCIM technology and to establish it as a viable HLW vitrification technology. The greater than two year effort conducted with the International Radioecology Laboratory in the Ukraine recently completed. The objectives of this study were: to assess the long-term impacts to the environment from radiation exposure in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ); and to provide information on remediation guidelines and ecological risk assessment within radioactively contaminated territories around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) based

  2. International technology catalogue: Foreign technologies to support the environmental restoration and waste management needs of the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect

    Matalucci, R.V.; Jimenez, R.D.; Esparza-Baca, C.

    1995-07-01

    This document represents a summary of 27 foreign-based environmental restoration and waste management technologies that have been screened and technically evaluated for application to the cleanup problems of the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex. The evaluation of these technologies was initiated in 1992 and completed in 1995 under the DOE`s International Technology Coordination Program of the Office of Technology Development. A methodology was developed for conducting a country-by-country survey of several regions of the world where specific environmental technology capabilities and market potential were investigated. The countries that were selected from a rank-ordering process for the survey included: then West Germany, the Netherlands, France, Japan, Taiwan, the Czech and Slovak Republics, and the Former Soviet Union. The notably innovative foreign technologies included in this document were screened initially from a list of several hundred, and then evaluated based on criteria that examined for level of maturity, suitability to the DOE needs, and for potential cost effective application at a DOE site. Each of the selected foreign technologies that were evaluated in this effort for DOE application were subsequently matched with site-specific environmental problem units across the DOE complex using the Technology Needs Assessment CROSSWALK Report. For ease of tracking these technologies to site problem units, and to facilitate their input into the DOE EnviroTRADE Information System, they were categorized into the following three areas: (1) characterization, monitoring and sensors, (2) waste treatment and separations, and (3) waste containment. Technical data profiles regarding these technologies include title and description, performance information, development status, key regulatory considerations, intellectual property rights, institute and contact personnel, and references.

  3. Auditor Independence: Beyond the Dilemma of Combining Auditing and Advisory Activities for the Development of Quality Assurance Systems in Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxime, Francoise; Maze, Armelle

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to study the design and the organization of auditing systems to develop environmental or quality assurance schemes at the farm level and the role that extension services could play in these processes. It starts by discussing the issue of combining auditing and advisory activities and developing auditing competences. Empirical…

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This 1993 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US DOE describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year (FY) 1993. The report is divided into four parts, each in a separate volume. This part, Volume 2, covers Environmental Sciences. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. There are sections on Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Technology Transfer, Interactions with Educational Institutions, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development.

  5. Vugraph presentations of the fourth DOE Industry/University/Lab Forum on Robotics for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document is a compilation of various presentations from the Fourth DOE Industry/University/Lab Forum on Robotics for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management held in Albuquerque, New Mexico July 19--21, 1993. Separate abstracts were prepared for each presentation of this report.

  6. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Lenox, Art; Blair, Lori; Amar, Ravnesh; Costa, Paul; Galvez, Lydia; Jameson, Blythe; Galvez, Lydia

    2008-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  7. 78 FR 17653 - Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0408)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Wind Energy Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0408) AGENCIES: Western Area... Service (Service), have, as joint lead agencies, prepared the Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Draft... wind energy development within Western's Upper Great Plains Customer Service Region (UGP Region),...

  8. Pilot job accounting and auditing in Open Science Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Sfiligoi, Igor; Green, Chris; Quinn, Greg; Thain, Greg; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-06-01

    The Grid accounting and auditing mechanisms were designed under the assumption that users would submit their jobs directly to the Grid gatekeepers. However, many groups are starting to use pilot-based systems, where users submit jobs to a centralized queue and are successively transferred to the Grid resources by the pilot infrastructure. While this approach greatly improves the user experience, it does disrupt the established accounting and auditing procedures. Open Science Grid deploys gLExec on the worker nodes to keep the pilot-related accounting and auditing information and centralizes the accounting collection with GRATIA.

  9. DOE Chair of Excellence in Environmental Disciplines-Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurunganty, Sastry; Loran, Roberto; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Hijazi, Yazan; Nieto, Santander; Gomez, Will A.; Duconge, Jose; Cotto, María del C.; Muniz, Carlos; Diaz, Francisco J.; Neira, Carlos F.; Marquez, Francisco; Del Valle, W.; Thommes, M.

    2014-02-19

    The report Massie Chair of Excellence Program at Universidad del Turabo, contract DE-FG02-95EW12610, during the period of 9/29/1995 to 9/29/2011. The initial program aims included development of academic programs in the Environmental Sciences and Engineering, and Research and Development focused initially on environmentally friendly processes and later revised also include: renewable energy and international cooperation. From 1995 -2005, the Program at UT lead the establishment of the new undergraduate program in electrical engineering at the School of Engineering (SoE), worked on requirements to achieve ABET accreditation of the SoE B.S. Mechanical Engineering and B.S. Electrical Engineering programs, mentored junior faculty, taught undergraduate courses in electrical engineering, and revised the electrical engineering curriculum. Engineering undergraduate laboratories were designed and developed. The following research sub-project was developed: Research and development of new perovskite-alumina hydrogen permeable asymmetrical nanostructured membranes for hydrogen purification, and extremely high specific surface area silica materials for hydrogen storage in the form of ammonia, Dr. Rolando Roque-Malherbe Subproject PI, Dr. Santander Nieto and Mr. Will Gómez Research Assistants. In 2006, the Massie Chair of Excellence Program was transferred to the National Nuclear Security Agency, NNSA and DNN. DoE required a revised proposal aligned with the priorities of the Administration. The revised approved program aims included: (1) Research (2) Student Development: promote the development of minority undergraduate and graduate students through research teams, internships, conferences, new courses; and, (3) Support: (a) Research administration and (b) Dissemination through international conferences, the UT Distinguished Lecturer Series in STEM fields and at the annual Universidad del Turabo (UT) Researchers Conference. Research included: Sub-Project 1: Synthesis and

  10. Communication of Audit Risk to Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderman, C. Wayne; Thompson, James H.

    1986-01-01

    This article focuses on audit risk by examining it in terms of its components: inherent risk, control risk, and detection risk. Discusses applying audit risk, a definition of audit risk, and components of audit risk. (CT)

  11. 7 CFR 1773.8 - Audit date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.8 Audit date. (a) The annual... change the as of audit date is obtained, in writing, from RUS. (1) A borrower may request a change in...

  12. PERFORMANCE AUDIT PROCEDURES FOR OPACITY MONITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual contains monitor-specific performance audit procedures and data forms for use in conducting audits of installed opacity continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS). General auditing procedures and acceptance limits for various audit criteria are discussed. Practical ...

  13. Auditing the auditors.

    PubMed

    Pallarito, K

    1998-09-21

    An independent auditor's opinion is supposed to be the gold standard in healthcare accounting. Such audits provide reasonable assurance that financial statements are accurate, which is particularly important in not-for-profit healthcare because most organizations don't have shareholder oversight. But the recent firing of a Big Five accounting firm by a major healthcare system in bankruptcy reorganization raises questions about the credibility of external audits. PMID:10185568

  14. Oneida Tribe Energy Audits

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Ray; Schubert, Eugene

    2014-08-15

    Project funding energy audits of 44 Tribally owned buildings operated by the Oneida Tribe of Indians of WI. Buildings were selected for their size, age, or known energy concerns and total over 1 million square feet. Audits include feasibility studies, lists of energy improvement opportunities, and a strategic energy plan to address cost effective ways to save energy via energy efficiency upgrades over the short and long term.

  15. Environmental Reality Check.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manicone, Santo

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of educational facilities conducting "reality check" self-audits to uncover the real truth behind underlying environmental problems. An environmental compliance multimedia checklist is included. (GR)

  16. Energy audits at 48 hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, E.

    1981-11-01

    Staff at the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted energy audits at 48 hospitals in four states (New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee) between 1978 and 1980. Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ORAU developed and organized a computerized data base containing information from these audits. This paper describes the ORAU audit process; summarizes the data collected from these audits on hospital characteristics annual energy use, and the audit recommendations; and analyzes the audit data in terms of cost effectiveness, type of recommendations, and the relationship between potential energy saving and characteristics of the individual hospital.

  17. Integrating NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) and CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) requirements during remedial responses at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, M.B.; Smith, E.D.; Sharples, F.E.; Eddlemon, G.K.

    1990-07-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.4, issued October 6, 1989, calls for integrating the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) with those of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. CERCLA requires that decisions on site remediation be made through a formal process called a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). According to the DOE order, integration is to be accomplished by conducting the NEPA and CERCLA environmental planning and review procedures concurrently. The primary instrument for integrating the processes is to be the RI/FS process, which will be supplemented as needed to meet the procedural and documentational requirements of NEPA. The final product of the integrated process will be a single, integrated set of documents; namely, an RI report and an FS-EIS that satisfy the requirements of both NEPA and CERCLA. The contents of the report include (1) an overview and comparison of the requirements of the two processes; (2) descriptions of the major tasks included in the integrated RI/FS-EIS process; (3) recommended contents for integrated RI/FS-EIS documents; and (4)a discussion of some potential problems in integrating NEPA and CERCLA that fall outisde the scope of the RI/FS-EIS process, with suggestions for resolving some of these problems. 15 refs.

  18. Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: FY 1994--FY 2001. Environmental Restoration Program, September 1993 Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO`s Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project. FY 1994--FY 2001 is the third in a series of documents that report current estimates of the waste volumes expected to be generated as a result of Environmental Restoration activities at Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), sites. Considered in the scope of this document are volumes of waste expected to be generated as a result of remedial action and decontamination and decommissioning activities taking place at these sites. Sites contributing to the total estimates make up the DOE-ORO Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the off-site contaminated areas adjacent to the Oak Ridge facilities (collectively referred to as the Oak Ridge Reservation Off-Site area). Estimates are available for the entire fife of all waste generating activities. This document summarizes waste estimates forecasted for the 8-year period of FY 1994-FY 2001. Updates with varying degrees of change are expected throughout the refinement of restoration strategies currently in progress at each of the sites. Waste forecast data are relatively fluid, and this document represents remediation plans only as reported through September 1993.

  19. Auditing for Veracity ``DUE-DILIGENCE" RIGOROUS-HONESTY!!!: Ethics??? Digits? For a Very-Long Time Giving us All the FINGER!!! does ``MEAN" Mean MEAN!!!???

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Brian; Siegel, E.

    2010-03-01

    BAD-scienceS UNethics FLOOD: Pilkey[UseLESS-Arithmetic(2007)]- Park[Vodoo Science(2006)]-Dewedny[Yes We Have NO Neutrons(1997)] -LeVay[When Science Goes WRONG(2008)-LBNL/DOE IMAGINARY-element -``118")]Bell-Labs/Alcatel-Lucent/Thales-Group/France: L'AffairS: Jan Hendrik Schoen; Giant-Magnetoresistance: ``Fert"-``Gruenberg" [PRL(1988;1989)]Kern(KFZ)/Reed-Elsevier/Wallenbergs/Enskilda- Bank/InvestorAB/Sweden:LONG-AFTER Siegel[flickr.com, search on ``Giant-Magnetoresistance": find: ICMAO,Haifa(1977); J.Mag.Mag. Mtls.(JMMM)7,312(1978): 1978<<<1988: (1988-1978)=10 years= one full decade!!!-SANS CRUCIAL last-2-R(H)-Figures MISSING-ONLY SCANNED online(7/2008)conveniently 1/2-year AFTER 2007-Physics: Wolf/Japan/Nobel-prizes(12/2007)]-Revkin[dot.earth,NYT(8/2009)] ``Sea-level-Rise Predictions HALVED"(=50%-error:by coin-toss Bern oulli ``super-computer"(SC)!!!)-McNeil[NY(8/2009]``H1N1-Flu (Langer-Carlson-Bak forest-fire SOC:Vespigniani-Germann)epidem- iology-models predicted cases: ˜1,000-3,000 max. VS. same-week CDC-data 100,000-300,000"(=100%-error: by drunk dart-throws New- ton F=ma``SC"(!!!)-Financials(2008)!!!: AD INFIN-ITUM AD NAUSEUM !!! Statistical-lawS[Biostatistics(1998)]:``TRUST, BUT VERIFY !!!": ABSOLUTELY MANDATORY!!!

  20. What does the public know about environmental health? A qualitative approach to refining an environmental health awareness instrument.

    PubMed

    Ratnapradipa, Dhitinut; Middleton, Wendi K; Wodika, Alicia B; Brown, Stephen L; Preihs, Kristin

    2015-04-01

    Despite an increased level of interest in environmental health concerns among the American public, awareness of the risks associated with environmental hazards is generally lacking. Assessing population awareness is typically performed through surveys, yet a comprehensive national environmental health questionnaire is currently unavailable. In 2009, a Delphi study using environmental health experts from federal, state, and local government and academia identified 11 core areas of environmental health (air, water, radiation, food safety, emergency preparedness, healthy housing, infectious disease and vector control, toxicology, injury prevention, waste and sanitation, and weather and climate change) and provided content validity for 443 questions covering 25 specific topics for possible inclusion on a national instrument. The authors' study described in this article used the qualitative approach of focus groups to refine the questions. Questions were divided into four sections and randomly assigned to a focus group location; 32 individuals participated. Results indicated that many perceptions are based on misinformation (or lack of information), which may lead to poor environmental health decision making. PMID:25876262

  1. 29 CFR 96.42 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit standards. 96.42 Section 96.42 Labor Office of the... Standards and Relation of Organization-wide Audits to Other Audit Requirements § 96.42 Audit standards. Surveys, audits, and examinations will conform to the Government auditing standards, issued by...

  2. Acid Rain Program CEM audit program

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, K.O.T.; Alexander, T.H.; Dupree, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    This presentation will give an overview of the Acid Rain Program CEM Audit Program: electronic and field audits. The presentation will include the reasons for audits, field audit types and levels the steps used in develop in the audit program and the audit procedures.

  3. 7 CFR 1773.7 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit standards. 1773.7 Section 1773.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.7 Audit standards. (a) The audit must be performed in accordance with GAGAS and this part. The audit must be performed in...

  4. 29 CFR 96.42 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit standards. 96.42 Section 96.42 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS, CONTRACTS, AND OTHER AGREEMENTS Access to Records, Audit Standards and Relation of Organization-wide Audits to Other Audit Requirements § 96.42 Audit...

  5. 7 CFR 1773.7 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit standards. 1773.7 Section 1773.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.7 Audit standards. (a) The audit must be performed in accordance with GAGAS and this part. The audit must be performed in...

  6. 7 CFR 1773.7 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Audit standards. 1773.7 Section 1773.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.7 Audit standards. (a) The audit must be performed in accordance with GAGAS and this part. The audit must be performed in...

  7. 7 CFR 1773.7 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit standards. 1773.7 Section 1773.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.7 Audit standards. (a) The audit must be performed in accordance with GAGAS and this part. The audit must be performed in...

  8. 7 CFR 1773.7 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Audit standards. 1773.7 Section 1773.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.7 Audit standards. (a) The audit must be performed in accordance with GAGAS and this part. The audit must be performed in...

  9. ANL technical support program for DOE Office of Environmental Management. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; DiSanto, T.; Ebert, W.L.

    1996-07-01

    A program was established for the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) to evaluate factors that are anticipated to affect waste glass reaction during repository disposal, especially in an unsaturated environment typical of what may be expected for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository site. This report covers progress in FY 1995 on the following tasks: (1) Tests are ongoing to evaluate and compare the reactivity of fully radioactive glasses with that of glasses having the same compositions except for the absence of radionuclides under conditions representative of a high-level waste repository environment. Data from these tests will be used to evaluate the effect of radionuclides on the glass corrosion behavior and to determine the disposition of the radionuclides as the glass corrodes. Static dissolution tests and unsaturated tests are being conducted with several Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) glasses. (2) A series of static dissolution tests is being performed to compare the corrosion behavior of nuclear waste glasses made with SRL 131 and SRL 202 frits at different S/V ratios. The S/V ratio affects the extent to which dissolved glass species are diluted; the solution chemistry then affects continued glass dissolution. The solutions generated in tests at high S/V ratios are conducive to the formation of alteration phases that may be deleterious to the glass. After long time periods, the glass dissolution rates of both glasses increase coincidentally with the formation of analcime and other alteration phases. However, the release of radionuclides from the glasses into solution is controlled by their individual solubilities.

  10. Office of Inspector General audit report on Hanford Site contractors` use of site services

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (Richland) is to safely manage legacy wastes, develop and deploy science and technology, and provide stewardship of the Hanford Site (Site). To accomplish its mission, Richland employs five prime contractors: Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (Fluor Daniel); Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (Bechtel); Battelle-Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Battelle); Hanford Environmental Health Foundation; and BNFL, Inc. Some of these contractors, in turn, have multiple subcontractors. To operate the Site, contractors need to use numerous services, such as telecommunications, copying, and photography. Richland directed certain contractors to provide these and other services, called site services, for the benefit of all contractors and assigned responsibility for optimal utilization of these services to its Site Infrastructure Division (SID). In the past, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) audited several site services, including groundwater monitoring, protective forces, personnel security clearances, railroad services, and fleet management. These audits disclosed that the services were not always efficiently and effectively coordinated. Therefore, the objective of this audit was to examine other site services, principally those provided at least in part by Fluor Daniel, to determine if contractors were acquiring services already available.

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC), Tupman, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserves 1 (NPR-1) and 2 (NPR-2) in California (NPRC), conducted May 9--20, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPRC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involved the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPRC, and interviews with site personnel. 120 refs., 28 figs., 40 tabs.

  12. The audit process: Part I. Pre-audit preparation.

    PubMed

    Bialachowski, Anne; Clinker, Karen; LeBlanc, Mary; McDonald, Shirley

    2010-01-01

    Infection prevention and control audits are an important element in the achievement of a health care setting's patient safety goals. The successful audit can result in enhanced partnerships between infection control professionals and other departments and services in the organization, implement change and lead to continuing improvement in outcomes for patients/residents and staff. In this first part of the audit process, the preparation leading up to the actual administration of the audit is described. PMID:20469658

  13. Computer Reduction Of Aerial Thermograms For Large Scale Energy Audits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazard, William R.

    1981-01-01

    A 32 kilobyte microcomputer is used for merging radiant (IR) temperatures of roof sections and building enclosures with meteorological data to produce per unit Energy Intensity Factors (EIFs) that are required for Comprehensive Energy planning. The EIFs can also be used as building blocks for a low cost RCS-type energy audit that has been shown to approximate the DOE model audit in terms of accuracy and completeness. The Type I or "Interactive Energy Audit" utilizes EIFs that are calculated from diffuse density levels of aerial IR recordings, supplemented by resident-supplied information concerning structural charac-teristics of a house and energy life-style of its occupants. Results of a statistical comparison between ASHRAE-based and IR audits of 175 single family homes in Garland, Texas show that, on the average, the aerial based heat loss estimates fall within a 10 percent error envelope around the true BTUH losses 90 percent of the time. The combination of an aerial infrared picture and an Interactive Energy Audit print-out have proven effective in (a) providing homeowners with the information they want from an energy audit; (b) persuading them to take appropriate remedial weatherization actions, and (c) screening out the homes that do not need a Class A audit, thereby eliminating the cost and bother of an on-site inspection.

  14. Final report of the UMTRA independent technical review of TAC audit programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report details the findings of an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of practices and procedures for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project audit program. The audit program is conducted by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the UMTRA Project. The purpose of the ITR was to ensure that the TAC audit program is effective and is conducted efficiently. The ITR was conducted from May 16-20, 1994. A review team observed audit practices in the field, reviewed the TAC audit program`s documentation, and discussed the program with TAC staff and management. The format of this report has been developed around EPA guidelines; they comprise most of the major section headings. Each section begins by identifying the criteria that the TAC program is measured against, then describing the approach used by the ITR team to measure each TAC audit program against the criteria. An assessment of each type of audit is then summarized for each component in the following order: Radiological audit summary; Health and safety audit summary; Environmental audit summary; Quality assurance audit summary.

  15. Decentralization Calls for Internal Audits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCello, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Outlines internal-auditing strategies necessitated by decentralization. Describes the following areas of concern: the student activities account, student attendance, and funding delegated to the site level. Guidelines for conducting an internal audit are also included. (LMI)

  16. Audits that Make a Difference

    SciTech Connect

    Malsbury, Judith

    1999-02-01

    This paper presents guidance on how to perform internal audits that get management's attention and result in effective corrective action. It assumes that the reader is already familiar with the basic constructs of auditing and knows how to perform them. Instead, it focuses on additional techniques that have proven to be effective in our internal auditing program. Examples using a theoretical audit of a calibration program are included.

  17. Environmental assessment. Downhole steam generator field test project DEEP STEAM: enhanced oil recovery project (DOE No. 16), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Church, H.W.; Zak, B.D.

    1980-02-01

    Objective of DEEP STEAM is to develop the technology to economically produce heavy oil from reservoirs greater than 760 m deep using steam injection. The proposed site is in the Kern River Oil Field in the San Joaquin Valley. This document describes the project, existing environment, and possible impact of the project. It is concluded that the proposed action does not significantly affect the quality of the environment, and therefore an environmental impact statement is not required. (DLC)

  18. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2013 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2013 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. Due to the suspension of D&D activities in Area IV, no effluents were released into the atmosphere during 2013. Therefore, the potential radiation dose to the general public through airborne release was zero. Similarly, the radiation dose to an offsite member of the public (maximally exposed individual) due to direct radiation from SSFL is indistinguishable from background. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste

  19. The Center for Environmental Kinetics Analysis: an NSF- and DOE-funded Environmental Molecular Science Institute (EMSI) at Penn State

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Brantley; William D. Burgos; Brian A. Dempsey; Peter J. Heaney; James D. Kubicki; Peter C. Lichtner; Bruce E. Logan; Carmen E. Martinez; Karl T. Mueller; Kwadwo A. Osseo-Asare; Ming Tien; Carl I. Steefel, Glenn A. Waychunas; and John M. Zachara

    2007-04-19

    Physicochemical and microbiological processes taking place at environmental interfaces influence natural processes as well as the transport and fate of environmental contaminants, the remediation of toxic chemicals, and the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. A team of scientists and engineers has been assembled to develop and apply new experimental and computational techniques to expand our knowledge of environmental kinetics. We are also training a cohort of talented and diverse students to work on these complex problems at multiple length scales and to compile and synthesize the kinetic data. Development of the human resources capable of translating molecular-scale information into parameters that are applicable in real world, field-scale problems of environmental kinetics is a major and relatively unique objective of the Institute's efforts. The EMSI team is a partnership among 10 faculty at The Pennsylvania State University (funded by the National Science Foundation Divisions of Chemistry and Earth Sciences), one faculty member at Juniata College, one faculty member at the University of Florida, and four researchers drawn from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (funded by the Department of Energy Division of Environmental Remediation Sciences). Interactions among the applied and academic scientists drives research approaches aimed toward solving important problems of national interest. The Institute is organized into three interest groups (IGs) focusing on the processes of dissolution (DIG), precipitation (PIG), and microbial reactions at surfaces (BIG). Some of the research activity from each IG is highlighted to the right. The IGs interact with each other as each interest group studies reactions across the molecular, microscopic, mesoscopic and, in most cases, field scales. For example, abiotic dissolution and precipitation reactions of Fe oxides as studied in the Dissolution IG

  20. Internal Audit in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Alison, Ed.; Brown, Sally, Ed.

    This book describes a range of examples of internal audit in higher education as part of a process of the exchange of good practice. The book recognizes well-established links with audit theory from other contexts and makes use of theoretical perspectives explored in the financial sector. The chapters are: (1) "Quality Audit Issues" (Sally Brown…

  1. Preparing for the Annual Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuehring, Bert

    2002-01-01

    Proposes several key questions that school district business officials should answer to prepare for an annual financial audit involving auditor information and resource needs, district and auditor monitoring and reporting on the audit progress, and reporting the results of the audit to the board of education. (PKP)

  2. Developmental Audits with Challenging Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; du Toit, Lesley; Bath, Howard; Van Bockern, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The Developmental Audit[R] is a new strength-based assessment model for youth who are in conflict in home, school, or community. Developmental Audits involve collaboration with young persons who are seen as experts on themselves. Discussing challenging life events provides a window to the young person's private logic and goals. The audit scans…

  3. 2 CFR 1536.300 - Whom in the Environmental Protection Agency does a recipient who is an individual notify about a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Whom in the Environmental Protection Agency... Are Individuals § 1536.300 Whom in the Environmental Protection Agency does a recipient who is an... the EPA award official from each Environmental Protection Agency office from which it currently has...

  4. Guidelines for performance-based supplier audits (NCIG-16)

    SciTech Connect

    Lauderdale, J.R.; Mattu, R.K.; Roman, W.S. )

    1990-06-01

    This document provides guidelines for planning and conducting performance-based audits of suppliers of items used in nuclear power plants. A common purpose of audits is to provide a basis for confidence in the supplier's controls to ensure that products received will perform their intended functions satisfactorily. Performance-based audits offer means of raising the level of confidence. This confidence comes from evaluation of important features of the product and the processes and activities that produce it. This document does not add requirements to those in existing codes, standards, or regulations. The guidance herein is intended to complement the information in existing industry standards and practices. Performance-based audits are one element of an effective procurement program. A companion EPRI/NCIG document, EPRI NP-6629, Guidelines for the Procurement and Receipt of Items for Nuclear Power Plants (NCIG-15), provides guidance for other elements of an effective procurement program.

  5. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: the approach adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, K; Järvinen, H; Butler, P; McLean, I D; Pentecost, M; Rickard, M; Abdullah, B

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  6. Assessment of Nonnative Invasive Plants in the DOE Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, S.J.

    2002-11-05

    The Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Research Park at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is composed of second-growth forest stands characteristic of much of the eastern deciduous forest of the Ridge and Valley Province of Tennessee. Human use of natural ecosystems in this region has facilitated the establishment of at least 167 nonnative, invasive plant species on the Research Park. Our objective was to assess the distribution, abundance, impact, and potential for control of the 18 most abundant invasive species on the Research Park. In 2000, field surveys were conducted of 16 management areas on the Research Park (14 Natural Areas, 1 Reference Area, and Walker Branch Watershed) and the Research Park as a whole to acquire qualitative and quantitative data on the distribution and abundance of these taxa. Data from the surveys were used to rank the relative importance of these species using the ''Alien Plant Ranking System, Version 5.1'' developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Microstegium (Microstegium vimineum) was ranked highest, or most problematic, for the entire Research Park because of its potential impact on natural systems, its tendency to become a management problem, and how difficult it is to control. Microstegium was present in 12 of the 16 individual sites surveyed; when present, it consistently ranked as the most problematic invasive species, particularly in terms of its potential impact on natural systems. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) and Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense) were the second- and third-most problematic plant species on the Research Park; these two species were present in 12 and 9 of the 16 sites surveyed, respectively, and often ranked second- or third-most problematic. Other nonnative, invasive species, in decreasing rank order, included kudzu (Pueraria montma), multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), Chinese lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneara), and other species representing a variety of life forms and growth forms. Results of

  7. Ras does not contribute to the facilitation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity enabled by environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Novkovic, T; Heumann, R; Manahan-Vaughan, D

    2015-11-19

    Environmental enrichment (EE), which mimics the wealth of sensory, motor and cognitive stimuli that arise through intense interactions with the ambient environment, results in enhanced hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and spatial learning. A key molecular factor in the mediation of these changes is the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). One of the downstream cascades that is activated by BDNF is the cascade linked to the small GTPase, Ras, that triggers mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and is part of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway that can lead to synaptic restructuring to support LTP. Here, we explored whether persistent activation of Ras in neurons further enhances LTP following EE of rodents. Immediately following weaning, transgenic mice that expressed constitutively activated neuronal Ras, or their wildtype (Wt) littermates, underwent 3weeks of constant EE. In the absence of EE, theta burst stimulation (TBS) evoked LTP in the CA1 region of transgenic mice that was not significantly different from LTP in Wts. After 3weeks of EE, hippocampal LTP was improved in Wt mice. Enriched transgenic mice showed an equivalent level of LTP to enriched Wts, but it was not significantly different from non-enriched synRas controls. Western blot analysis performed after a pull-down assay showed that non-enriched transgenic mice expressed higher Ras activity compared to non-enriched Wts. Following EE, Ras activity was reduced in transgenics to levels detected in Wts. These results show that constitutive activation of Ras does not mimic the effects of EE on LTP. In addition, EE results in an equivalent enhancement of LTP transgenics and Wts, coupled with a decrease in Ras activity to Wt levels. This suggests that permanent activation of Ras in neurons of synRas animals following EE results in an altered feedback regulation of endogenous Ras activity that is not a key factor in LTP enhancements. The maintenance of Ras within

  8. 10 CFR 1015.103 - Antitrust, fraud, tax, interagency, transportation account audit, acquisition contract, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Antitrust, fraud, tax, interagency, transportation account... General § 1015.103 Antitrust, fraud, tax, interagency, transportation account audit, acquisition contract... 12146 (3 CFR, 1980 Comp., pp. 409-412). (d) Part 1015 does not apply to claims arising from the audit...

  9. simuwatt - A Tablet Based Electronic Auditing Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Macumber, Daniel; Parker, Andrew; Lisell, Lars; Metzger, Ian; Brown, Matthew

    2014-05-08

    'simuwatt Energy Auditor' (TM) is a new tablet-based electronic auditing tool that is designed to dramatically reduce the time and cost to perform investment-grade audits and improve quality and consistency. The tool uses the U.S. Department of Energy's OpenStudio modeling platform and integrated Building Component Library to automate modeling and analysis. simuwatt's software-guided workflow helps users gather required data, and provides the data in a standard electronic format that is automatically converted to a baseline OpenStudio model for energy analysis. The baseline energy model is calibrated against actual monthly energy use to ASHRAE Standard 14 guidelines. Energy conservation measures from the Building Component Library are then evaluated using OpenStudio's parametric analysis capability. Automated reporting creates audit documents that describe recommended packages of energy conservation measures. The development of this tool was partially funded by the U.S. Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. As part of this program, the tool is being tested at 13 buildings on 5 Department of Defense sites across the United States. Results of the first simuwatt audit tool demonstration are presented in this paper.

  10. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and a QA final closeout inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). One radiological surveillance and three radiological audits were performed at the Ambrosia Lake site. The surveillance was performed on 12--16 April 1993 (DOE, 1993d). The audits were performed on 26--29 July 1993 (DOE, 1993b); 21--23 March 1994 (DOE, 1994d); and 1--2 August 1994 (DOE, 1994d). The surveillance and audits resulted in 47 observations. Twelve of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were satisfactorily closed out on 28 December 1994. The radiological surveillance and audits are discussed in this report. A total of seven QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Ambrosia Lake UMTRA site are discussed. The DOE/TAC Ambrosia Lake final remedial action close-out inspection was conducted on 26 July 1995 (DOE, 1995a). To summarize, a total of 155 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. Follow-up to responses required from the RAC for the DOE/TAC surveillance and audit observations indicated that all issues related to the Ambrosia Lake site were resolved and closed to the satisfaction of the DOE.

  11. Auditing audits: use and development of the Oxfordshire Medical Audit Advisory Group rating system.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, M.; Griew, K.; Derry, J.; Anderson, J.; Humphreys, J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the value of the Oxfordshire Medical Audit Advisory Group rating system in monitoring and stimulating audit activity, and to implement a development of the system. DESIGN--Use of the rating system for assessment of practice audits on three annual visits in Oxfordshire; development and use of an "audit grid" as a refinement of the system; questionnaire to all medical audit advisory groups in England and Wales. SETTING--All 85 general practices in Oxfordshire; all 95 medical audit advisory groups in England and Wales. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Level of practices' audit activity as measured by rating scale and grid. Use of scale nationally together with perceptions of strengths and weaknesses as perceived by chairs of medical audit advisory groups. RESULTS--After one year Oxfordshire practices more than attained the target standards set in 1991, with 72% doing audit involving setting target standards or implementing change; by 1993 this had risen to 78%. Most audits were confined to chronic disease management, preventive care, and appointments. 38 of 92 medical audit advisory groups used the Oxfordshire group's rating scale. Its main weaknesses were insensitivity in assessing the quality of audits and failure to measure team involvement. CONCLUSIONS--The rating system is effective educationally in helping practices improve and summatively for providing feedback to family health service authorities. The grid showed up weakness in the breadth of audit topics studied. IMPLICATIONS AND ACTION--Oxfordshire practices achieved targets set for 1991-2 but need to broaden the scope of their audits and the topics studied. The advisory group's targets for 1994-5 are for 50% of practices to achieve an audit in each of the areas of clinical care, access, communication, and professional values and for 80% of audits to include setting targets or implementing change. PMID:8086911

  12. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2012-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2011 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2011 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  13. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1991. Each project in the PNL research program is a component in an integrated laboratory, intermediate-scale, and field approach designed to examine multiple phenomena at increasing levels of complexity. Examples include definition of the role of fundamental geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in the deep subsurface, and determination of the controls on nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and their response to stress at the landscape scale. The Environmental Science Research Center has enable PNL to extend fundamental knowledge of subsurface science to develop emerging new concepts for use in natural systems and in environmental restoration of DOE sites. New PNL investments have been made in developing advanced concepts for addressing chemical desorption kinetics, enzyme transformations and redesign, the role of heterogeneity in contaminant transport, and modeling of fundamental ecological processes.

  14. Site Environmental Report For Calendar Year 2012. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2013-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2012 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2012 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  15. DOE/EA-1517: Environmental Assessment for the Design and Construction of a Fuel Ethanol Plant, Jasper County, Indiana (April 2005)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2005-04-29

    Based on action by the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funding available to support a proposal by the Iroquois Bio-energy Company (IBEC), an Indiana limited liability company, to construct a fuel ethanol plant in Jasper County, Indiana (the proposed plant). Congress has acknowledged the merit of this project by providing specific funding through DOE. Consequently, DOE proposes to provide partial funding to IBEC to subsidize the design and construction of the proposed plant (the Proposed Action). In accordance with DOE and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations, DOE is required to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of DOE facilities, operations, and related funding decisions. The proposal to use Federal funds to support the project requires DOE to address NEPA requirements and related environmental documentation and permitting requirements. In compliance with NEPA (42 U.S.C. {section} 4321 et seq.) and DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (10 CFR section 1021.330) and procedures, this environmental assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental impacts of DOE's Proposed Action and a No Action Alternative.

  16. Innovative remote monitoring of plant health for environmental applications: A joint effort between EPCOT{reg_sign} and the DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Robitaille, H.; Capelle, G.; Di Benedetto, J.

    1996-12-31

    In September of 1994, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology for (OST) and Epcot{reg_sign} in the WALT DISNEY WORLD{reg_sign} Resort (Epcot) signed an agreement to cooperate on the research, development, and public communication and display of environmental technologies. Although Epcot and OST have distinctive missions, certain areas of their respective research and development efforts are common, including the integration of remote sensors with robotics platforms, airborne surveys for environmental characterization and monitoring, and ground based measurements of vegetation stress. The first area of cooperative R&D pursued under the agreement is the evaluation of laser-induced fluorescence imaging (LIFI), a technology developed by OST and proven effective for uranium detection. This paper describes the efforts being conducted under the Epcot-OST agreement and presents initial results. An appendix describing LIFI technology is also included.

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Team members are being provided by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NIPER. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NIPER and interviews with site personnel. 35 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, L.K.; Wildung, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    The 1992 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year 1992. This report consists of four volumes oriented to particular segments of the PNL program, describing research performed for the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in the Office of Energy Research. The parts of the 1992 Annual Report are: Biomedical Sciences; Environmental Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences; and Physical Sciences. This Report is Part 2: Environmental Sciences. Included in this report are developments in Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development, Interactions with Educational Institutions, Technology Transfer, Publications, and Presentations. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. The Technology Transfer section of this report describes a number of examples in which fundamental research is laying the groundwork for the technology needed to resolve important environmental problems. The Interactions with Educational Institutions section of the report illustrates the results of a long-term, proactive program to make PNL facilities available for university and preuniversity education and to involve educational institutions in research programs. The areas under investigation include the effect of geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in deep subsurface environments, ways to address subsurface heterogeneity, and ways to determine the key biochemical and physiological pathways (and DNA markers) that control nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and the response of these systems to disturbance and climatic change.

  19. A prototype Distributed Audit System

    SciTech Connect

    Banning, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    Security auditing systems are used to detect and assess unauthorized or abusive system usage. Historically, security audits were confined to a single computer system. Recent work examines ways of extending auditing to include heterogeneous groups of computers (distributed system). This paper describes the design and prototype development of a Distributed Audit System (DAS) which was developed with funding received from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and through the Master`s thesis effort performed by the author at California State University, Long Beach. The DAS is intended to provide collection, transfer, and control of audit data on distributed, heterogeneous hosts.

  20. [Nurses' practice in health audit].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Karina Araújo; de Melo, Cristina Maria Meira

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to identify nurses' practice in heath audit. The hermeneutic-dialectic method was used for the analysis. The study was performed in three loci: the internal audit service of a hospital; the external audit service of a private health service buyer, and the state audit service of the public health system (SUS, acronym in Portuguese for Sistema Unico de Saúde-Unique Health System), in Bahia. Nine audit nurses were interviewed. In the SUS audit, the nurses report being fulfilled with their practice and with the valorization of their professional role. In the private audit--both inside and outside of health organizations--the nurses' activities are focused on meeting the interests of their contractors, and do not get much involved with the care delivered by the nursing team and with the needs of service users. PMID:20964043

  1. What Difference Does It Make? Assessing Outcomes from Participation in a Residential Environmental Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Marc J.; Powell, Robert B.; Ardoin, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors explored the influences of 3- and 5-day residential environmental education programs at the Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont (TN) on participants' connections with nature, environmental stewardship, interest in learning and discovery, and awareness of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and biodiversity. The authors found…

  2. How Does Education Affect Environmental Knowledge: A Survey in Urban and Regional Planning Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ergen, Baris; Ergen, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at measuring of environmental knowledge of students who select environmental science course in Urban and Regional Planning Department at Bozok University. This article includes a survey research, with this survey, we can get information about knowledge of environment of students and where they learn them. First briefly, it provides…

  3. Short-Term Environmental Education--Does It Work?--An Evaluation of the "Green Classroom"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drissner, Jurgen; Haase, Hans-Martin; Hille, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The "Green Classroom" in Ulm is an experiential learning forum outside school. Its educational concept is based on experimental learning and is geared towards expanding biological knowledge and developing environmental attitudes regarding preservation and utilisation of nature. We assessed the environmental attitude of 92 students before and after…

  4. Does environmental friendliness equal healthiness? Swiss consumers' perception of protein products.

    PubMed

    Lazzarini, Gianna A; Zimmermann, Jasmin; Visschers, Vivianne H M; Siegrist, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Food production and consumption have major impacts on the environment. At the same time, changes in human diets worldwide are increasingly leading to health problems. Both issues are highly influenced by consumers' everyday food choices and could be addressed by reducing consumption of meat and other animal products. To promote sustainable food consumption, we need to know how consumers perceive the environmental friendliness and healthiness of food products, on which criteria they base their evaluations of environmental friendliness and healthiness, and how their estimations relate to life cycle assessments and nutrient profiling. We presented 30 protein products, which varied in provenance, production methods, and processing, to 85 participants from Switzerland. They were asked to sort the products once according to their perceived environmental friendliness and once according to their perceived healthiness. The mean distances between the products were compared to the products' life cycle assessments and nutrient profiles. The results showed that perceived environmental friendliness and healthiness are highly correlated. The main predictors of the products' perceived environmental friendliness were product category, presence of an organic label, and provenance; and for perceived healthiness, these predictors were product category, fat content, processing, and presence of an organic label. Environmental friendliness and healthiness estimations were significantly correlated to the life cycle assessments and the nutrient profiles of the products, respectively. Hence, to promote healthy and environmentally friendly food choices, motivators related to environmental friendliness and healthiness could be used in synergy. Awareness about meat's environmental impact should be increased and better information is needed for consumers to make an accurate environmental impact and healthiness assessments of protein products. PMID:27378749

  5. Going beyond Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Mike; Liss, Anne; Milner, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the work undertaken by a cluster of Resource Teachers: Learning and Behaviour (RTLB) to ensure that annual effectiveness reviews were more than a compliance exercise but a genuine attempt to improve their service to schools, hence the title of this article of "Going Beyond Audit". Historically, the cluster had met the…

  6. Energy Audit . . . Here's How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    After establishing building use patterns and complaints, a consulting engineer's walkthrough energy audit begins with the exterior. Then heating/cooling system efficiency is checked with a flue gases kit. Efficient use of water heaters, lighting, teacher lounges, and food preparation and eating areas saves energy. Most effective conservation…

  7. Conducting a Technology Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, William

    2011-01-01

    Technology is a critical component in the success of any high-functioning school district, thus it is important that education leaders should examine it closely. Simply put, the purpose of a technology audit is to assess the effectiveness of the technology for administrative or instructional use. Rogers Public Schools in Rogers, Arkansas, recently…

  8. Towards an Educational Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    Written in response to pressure for British colleges and local education authorities (LEAs) to be more businesslike, this document consists almost entirely of a working manual or guide (the Educational Audit Reference Inventory) and instructions for how managers can use it to carry out effective performance evaluation of any element of their…

  9. Site environmental report for calendar year 2002. DOE operations at the Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2002 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing' s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL)). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and, subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2002 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property ( land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive w astes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes are released into the environment, and no structural debris from buildings w as transferred to municipal landfills or recycled in 2002.

  10. 40 CFR 1068.401 - What is a selective enforcement audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is a selective enforcement audit? 1068.401 Section 1068.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROVISIONS FOR ENGINE PROGRAMS Selective Enforcement Auditing §...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Auditing A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Auditing Pt. 1068, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068—Plans for Selective Enforcement... § 1068.420: Table A-1—Sampling Plan Code Letter Projected family sales Code letter 1 Minimum number...

  12. 40 CFR 1068.401 - What is a selective enforcement audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is a selective enforcement audit? 1068.401 Section 1068.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROVISIONS FOR ENGINE PROGRAMS Selective Enforcement Auditing §...

  13. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2010. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2011-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2010 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2010 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  14. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2010-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2009 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2009 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  15. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2009-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2008 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended by the DOE. The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2008 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  16. 12 CFR 1274.2 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit requirements. 1274.2 Section 1274.2 Banks... § 1274.2 Audit requirements. (a) Each Bank, the OF, and the FICO shall obtain annually an independent external audit of and an audit report on its individual financial statement. (b) The OF audit...

  17. 38 CFR 41.200 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit requirements. 41.200 Section 41.200 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 41.200 Audit requirements. (a) Audit required. Non-Federal entities...

  18. 7 CFR 3052.200 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit requirements. 3052.200 Section 3052.200..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.200 Audit requirements. (a) Audit required. Non-Federal entities that expend $500,000 or more in a year...

  19. 7 CFR 1773.3 - Annual audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual audit. 1773.3 Section 1773.3 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.3 Annual audit. (a) Each borrower... RUS as set forth in § 1773.4. (b) Each borrower must establish an annual as of audit date...

  20. 30 CFR 735.22 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit. 735.22 Section 735.22 Mineral Resources... ENFORCEMENT § 735.22 Audit. The agency shall arrange for an independent audit no less frequently than once..., Attachment P. The audits will be performed in accordance with the “Standards for Audit of...

  1. 7 CFR 1773.3 - Annual audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Annual audit. 1773.3 Section 1773.3 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.3 Annual audit. (a) Each borrower... RUS as set forth in § 1773.4. (b) Each borrower must establish an annual as of audit date...

  2. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  3. 7 CFR 1773.3 - Annual audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Annual audit. 1773.3 Section 1773.3 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.3 Annual audit. (a) Each borrower... RUS as set forth in § 1773.4. (b) Each borrower must establish an annual as of audit date...

  4. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  5. 7 CFR 1773.3 - Annual audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Annual audit. 1773.3 Section 1773.3 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.3 Annual audit. (a) Each borrower... RUS as set forth in § 1773.4. (b) Each borrower must establish an annual as of audit date...

  6. 7 CFR 1773.3 - Annual audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Annual audit. 1773.3 Section 1773.3 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.3 Annual audit. (a) Each borrower... RUS as set forth in § 1773.4. (b) Each borrower must establish an annual as of audit date...

  7. 12 CFR 704.15 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... summary of the audit report to the membership at the next annual meeting. (b) Internal audit. A corporate... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit requirements. 704.15 Section 704.15 Banks... UNIONS § 704.15 Audit requirements. (a) External audit. The corporate credit union supervisory...

  8. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  9. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  10. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  11. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  12. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  13. 2 CFR 200.516 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit findings. 200.516 Section 200.516... MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GUIDANCE Reserved UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, COST PRINCIPLES, AND AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS Audit Requirements Auditors § 200.516 Audit findings. (a) Audit...

  14. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  15. 20 CFR 632.33 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Administrative Standards and Procedures § 632.33 Audits. (a) General. The audit provisions of 41 CFR part 29-70 shall apply to Native American grantees. Until unified or single audit... tribal governments. (b) Audit reports. Upon receipt of a final audit report the Inspector General...

  16. 13 CFR 120.490 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audits. 120.490 Section 120.490... Companies (sblc) § 120.490 Audits. Every SBLC is subject to periodic audits by SBA's Office of Inspector General, Auditing Division, and the cost of such audits will be assessed against the SBLC, except for...

  17. 7 CFR 1290.10 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit requirements. 1290.10 Section 1290.10... PROGRAM § 1290.10 Audit requirements. The State is accountable for conducting a financial audit of the... audit, a copy of the audit results....

  18. 20 CFR 655.1312 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Audits. 655.1312 Section 655.1312 Employees... United States (H-2A Workers) § 655.1312 Audits. (a) Discretion. The Department will conduct audits of... selected for audit will be chosen within the sole discretion of the Department. (b) Audit letter. Where...

  19. Environmental assessment: geothermal energy geopressure subprogram. DOE Sweet Lake No. 1, Cameron Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The following are described: the proposed action; existing environment; probable impacts, direct and indirect; probable cumulative and long-term environmental impacts; accidents; coordination with federal, state, and local agencies; and alternatives. (MHR)

  20. Urban Environmental Education: What It Is, Who Does It, Who Should Do It, What To Read.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jeanne

    1980-01-01

    Urban environmental education focuses on more than the natural environment. The built and social/political/ economic environments also demand constant observation, analysis, and evaluation. Educators should use urban-oriented professionals as sources of information and help. (BW)

  1. The Social Practice of Sustainable Agriculture under Audit Discipline: Initial Insights from the ARGOS Project in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Hugh; Rosin, Christopher; Hunt, Lesley; Fairweather, John

    2012-01-01

    One of the most interesting recent developments in global agri-food systems has been the rapid emergence and elaboration of market audit systems claiming environmental qualities or sustainability. In New Zealand, as a strongly export-oriented, high-value food producer, these environmental market audit systems have emerged as an important pathway…

  2. National Energy Audit (NEAT) Users Manual Version 7

    SciTech Connect

    Gettings, M.

    2001-05-10

    Welcome to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) energy auditing tool, called ''NEAT.'' NEAT, an acronym for National Energy Audit Tool, a program for personal computers that was designed for use by local agencies in the Weatherization Assistance Program. It is an approved alternative audit that meets all auditing requirements set forth by the Program. NEAT is easy to use. It applies engineering and economic calculations to evaluate energy conservation measures for single-family, detached houses or small multifamily buildings. You can use it to rank measures for each individual house, or to establish a priority list of conservation measures for nearly identical housing types. NEAT was written for the Weatherization Assistance Program by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Many building energy consumption algorithms are taken from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Computerized Instrumented Residential Audit (CIRA), published in 1982 for the Department of Energy. Equipment retrofit conservation measures are based on published reports on various heating retrofits. Heating and cooling system replacement conservation measures are based on the energy ratings of new heating and cooling equipment. The Weatherization Program anticipates that this computer-based energy audit will offer substantial performance improvements to many states who choose to incorporate it into their programs. When conservation measures are evaluated locally according to climate, fuel cost, measure cost, and existing house conditions, the Program will be closer to its goal of assuring the maximum return for every federal dollar spent.

  3. Dosimetry for audit and clinical trials: challenges and requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kron, T.; Haworth, A.; Williams, I.

    2013-06-01

    Many important dosimetry audit networks for radiotherapy have their roots in clinical trial quality assurance (QA). In both scenarios it is essential to test two issues: does the treatment plan conform with the clinical requirements and is the plan a reasonable representation of what is actually delivered to a patient throughout their course of treatment. Part of a sound quality program would be an external audit of these issues with verification of the equivalence of plan and treatment typically referred to as a dosimetry audit. The increasing complexity of radiotherapy planning and delivery makes audits challenging. While verification of absolute dose delivered at a reference point was the standard of external dosimetry audits two decades ago this is often deemed inadequate for verification of treatment approaches such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). As such, most dosimetry audit networks have successfully introduced more complex tests of dose delivery using anthropomorphic phantoms that can be imaged, planned and treated as a patient would. The new challenge is to adapt this approach to ever more diversified radiotherapy procedures with image guided/adaptive radiotherapy, motion management and brachytherapy being the focus of current research.

  4. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  5. The stationary source compliance audit program

    SciTech Connect

    Autry, L.P.

    1999-07-01

    On November 15, 1990, the Clean Air Act (CAA) was amended and a list of 189 compounds that are considered to be Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) was included. These pollutants are to be regulated through the development of Toxics Methods, which include Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Standards, and New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). In support of these Federal regulations, audit materials are developed, validated, and provided to State and local agencies to ensure high quality source emissions compliance data. These performance evaluation samples have traditionally been requested from the Stationary Source Compliance Test Coordinator of the Environmental Protection Agencies (EPA's) National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) by the regulatory agency for who the compliance test is being conducted. As of January 1, 1998, the Stationary Source Compliance Audit Program (SSCAP) was taken over by the EPA's Emission Measurement Center (EMC) and many changes instituted. These modifications to the program provide a more effective and efficient way to implement the performance evaluations.

  6. Training and Mentoring the Next Generation of Scientists and Engineers to Secure Continuity and Successes of the US DOE's Environmental Remediation Efforts - 13387

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, L.

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only five years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 85 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management Symposia since 2008 with a total of 68 student posters and 7 oral presentations given at WM. The DOE Fellows

  7. Environmental Restoration Program project management plan for the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office Major System Acquisition OR-1. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    In the early 1940s, the Manhattan Project was conducted in a regulatory and operational environment less sophisticated than today. Less was known of the measures needed to protect human health and safety and the environment from the dangers posed by radioactive and hazardous wastes, and experience in dealing with these hazardous materials has grown slowly. Certain hazards were recognized and dealt with from the beginning. However, the techniques used, though standard practices at the time, are now known to have been inadequate. Consequently, the DOE has committed to an aggressive program for cleaning up the environment and has initiated an Environmental Restoration Program involving all its field offices. The objective of this program is to ensure that inactive and surplus DOE facilities and sites meet current standards to protect human health and the environment. The objective of these activities is to ensure that risks posed to human health and safety and the environment by inactive sites and surplus facilities contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, and/or mixed wastes are either eliminated or reduced to prescribed safe levels. This Project Management Plan for Major System Acquisition OR-1 Project documents, communicates, and contributes to the evolution of, the management organizations, systems, and tools necessary to carry out effectively the long-range complex cleanup of the DOE sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and at the Paducah, Kentucky, and Piketon, Ohio, uranium enrichment plants managed by the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Office; the cleanup of off-site contamination resulting from past releases; and the Decontamination and Decommissioning of surplus DOE facilities at these installations.

  8. Phase II Audit Report - Energy & Water Audits of LLNL Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, B I; Jacobs, P C; Pierce, S M

    2005-08-03

    This report describes Phase II of a project conducted for the Mechanical Utilities Division (UTel), Energy Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The overall project covers energy efficiency and water conservation auditing services for 215 modular and prefabricated buildings at LLNL. The primary goal of this project is to demonstrate compliance with DOE Order 430.2A, Contractor Requirements Document section 2.d (2) Document, to demonstrate annual progress of at least 10 percent toward completing energy and water audits of all facilities. Although this project covers numerous buildings, they are all similar in design and use. The approach employed for completing audits for these facilities involves a ''model-similar building'' approach. In the model-similar building approach, similarities between groups of buildings are established and quantified. A model (or test case) building is selected and analyzed for each model-similar group using a detailed DOE-2 simulation. The results are extended to the group of similar buildings based on careful application of quantified similarities, or ''extension measures''. This approach leverages the relatively minor effort required to evaluate one building in some detail to a much larger population of similar buildings. The facility wide energy savings potential was calculated for a select set of measures that have reasonable payback based on the detailed building analysis and are otherwise desirable to the LLNL facilities staff. The selected measures are: (1) HVAC Tune-up. This is considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and the impact on thermal comfort. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be tuned up under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (2) HVAC system scheduling. This is also considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and

  9. 40 CFR 68.79 - Compliance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... are being followed. (b) The compliance audit shall be conducted by at least one person knowledgeable... compliance audit, and document that deficiencies have been corrected. (e) The owner or operator shall retain the two (2) most recent compliance audit reports....

  10. Auditing the Records of Student-Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Robert O.; Hedden, Carole R.

    1985-01-01

    A 1985 survey showed that NCAA members favored mandating annual audits of athletics budgets by institutional or independent auditors. Development of Tennessee's internal audit system is described, and its internal audit procedures is outlined. (MLW)

  11. 11 CFR 9007.4 - Additional audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... EXAMINATIONS AND AUDITS; REPAYMENTS § 9007.4 Additional audits. In accordance with 11 CFR 104.16(c), the Commission, pursuant to 11 CFR 111.10, may upon affirmative vote of four members conduct an audit and...

  12. The ICA Communication Audit: Process, Status, Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Gerald M.; Krivonos, Paul D.

    1977-01-01

    Explores the International Communication Association (ICA) Audit process including goals, products, instruments, audit logistics and timetable, feedback of results and follow-up, costs, current status and audits conducted to date. (ED.)

  13. A preliminary review of energy savings from EADC plant audits

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfert, G.L.; Kinzey, B.R.; Kaae, P.S.

    1993-03-01

    This paper reviews the long-term energy savings attributed to industrial plant energy audits conducted under the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) Program. By the end of FY91, this program is expected to have performed over 3600 plant energy audits since it began in late 1976. During FY91, 500 of the 3600 are expected to be completed. Currently, 18 universities participate in the program. DOE`s expansion plan, as specified in the National Energy Strategy, calls for adding three universities to the program during FY92. This review, requested by the OIT as part of their program planning effort, is preliminary and limited in scope. The primary purpose of this paper is to independently assess the accuracy of past energy savings reporting, specifically: whether a 2-year assessment horizon for identifying implemented ECOs captures all the ECOs implemented under the program whether the number of implemented ECOs and thus, the energy savings associated with program audits, significantly decrease in years 3 through 7 after the audit.

  14. Environmental assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of commercial low level nuclear waste across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This environmental assessment investigates the potential environmental and safety effects which could result from the land transport of low level radioactive wastes across the Savannah River Plant. Chem-Nuclear Systems operates a low level radioactive waste burial facility adjacent to the Savannah River Plant and is seeking permission from the DOE to transport the waste across Savannah River Plant.

  15. How Does Scale of Implementation Impact the Environmental Sustainability of Wastewater Treatment Integrated with Resource Recovery?

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Pablo K; Zhang, Qiong; Mihelcic, James R

    2016-07-01

    Energy and resource consumptions required to treat and transport wastewater have led to efforts to improve the environmental sustainability of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Resource recovery can reduce the environmental impact of these systems; however, limited research has considered how the scale of implementation impacts the sustainability of WWTPs integrated with resource recovery. Accordingly, this research uses life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate how the scale of implementation impacts the environmental sustainability of wastewater treatment integrated with water reuse, energy recovery, and nutrient recycling. Three systems were selected: a septic tank with aerobic treatment at the household scale, an advanced water reclamation facility at the community scale, and an advanced water reclamation facility at the city scale. Three sustainability indicators were considered: embodied energy, carbon footprint, and eutrophication potential. This study determined that as with economies of scale, there are benefits to centralization of WWTPs with resource recovery in terms of embodied energy and carbon footprint; however, the community scale was shown to have the lowest eutrophication potential. Additionally, technology selection, nutrient control practices, system layout, and topographical conditions may have a larger impact on environmental sustainability than the implementation scale in some cases. PMID:27001077

  16. How Does a One-Day Environmental Education Programme Support Individual Connectedness with Nature?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kossack, Alida; Bogner, Franz X.

    2012-01-01

    The "Inclusion of Nature in Self" scale (INS) was applied to monitor shifts in reported connectedness with nature within the framework of a school-based environmental education programme. One hundred and twenty-three German students (sixth-graders) participated in a one-day module, which included hands-on indoor (classroom) and outdoor (nearby…

  17. Use of dendrochronology and dendrochemistry in environmental forensics: Does it meet the Daubert criteria?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balouet, J.-C.; Smith, K.T.; Vroblesky, D.; Oudijk, G.

    2009-01-01

    Dendrochronological methods have been in use for more than 100 years, providing us a record of climate, human activities (archaeology), floods, fire, mudslides and other geological and biological events. More recently, dendrochemisty has been used to assess the time frames of the onset and existence of environmental contamination. This article assesses the scientific status of dendrochronology and dendrochemistry with respect to the admissibility of expert testimony and Daubert legal criteria. The purpose of this article is to identify the crucial scientific aspects of dendrochronology and dendrochemistry that address the Daubert criteria and Rule 702 as amended in 2000. To clarify terminology, dendrochronology is the precise and reliable assignment of the year of formation of tree rings. Dendroecology is the use of dendrochronology to understand ecological and environmental processes (Schweingruber, 1996). Dendrochemistry is a subdiscipline of dendrochronology that analyzes and interprets the wood chemistry of precisely dated tree rings. Forensic dendrochemistry applies dendrochemistry to resolve environmental disputes and generally deal with questions regarding the timing and/or the source of environmental incidents. One significant application of forensic dendrochemistry to expert testimony is to address issues of anthropogenic contamination. Forensic dendroecology is a similar term to forensic dendrochemistry, but forensic dendrochemistry will be used in this discussion as the latter term emphasizes the use of chemical detection methods. Because dendrochemistry is based on the foundation of dendrochronology, both the former specialty and the latter broader discipline will be discussed. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  18. The Australian-Ness of Curriculum Jigsaws: Where Does Environmental Education Fit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, Annette

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews Australian Government actions related to environmental education, particularly in the past decade, and examines the actions forthcoming from two national action plans (Environment Australia, 2000 and DEWHA, 2009), the implementation strategy for the Decade of ESD (DEWHA, 2006) and developments related to the Australian…

  19. Criteria for internal auditing.

    PubMed

    Holder, W W; Clay, R J

    1979-01-01

    An effective, inclusive internal auditing endeavor should help assure hospital managements that (1) an adequate system of internal control exists to assure the safeguarding of assets and the reliability of data produced by the financial information system, (2) uneconomic operating practices are detected promptly so they can be remedied, and (3) program results and effectiveness levels are of sufficiently high quality to demonstrate managerial competence. PMID:102583

  20. Does organic farming reduce environmental impacts?--a meta-analysis of European research.

    PubMed

    Tuomisto, H L; Hodge, I D; Riordan, P; Macdonald, D W

    2012-12-15

    Organic farming practices have been promoted as, inter alia, reducing the environmental impacts of agriculture. This meta-analysis systematically analyses published studies that compare environmental impacts of organic and conventional farming in Europe. The results show that organic farming practices generally have positive impacts on the environment per unit of area, but not necessarily per product unit. Organic farms tend to have higher soil organic matter content and lower nutrient losses (nitrogen leaching, nitrous oxide emissions and ammonia emissions) per unit of field area. However, ammonia emissions, nitrogen leaching and nitrous oxide emissions per product unit were higher from organic systems. Organic systems had lower energy requirements, but higher land use, eutrophication potential and acidification potential per product unit. The variation within the results across different studies was wide due to differences in the systems compared and research methods used. The only impacts that were found to differ significantly between the systems were soil organic matter content, nitrogen leaching, nitrous oxide emissions per unit of field area, energy use and land use. Most of the studies that compared biodiversity in organic and conventional farming demonstrated lower environmental impacts from organic farming. The key challenges in conventional farming are to improve soil quality (by versatile crop rotations and additions of organic material), recycle nutrients and enhance and protect biodiversity. In organic farming, the main challenges are to improve the nutrient management and increase yields. In order to reduce the environmental impacts of farming in Europe, research efforts and policies should be targeted to developing farming systems that produce high yields with low negative environmental impacts drawing on techniques from both organic and conventional systems. PMID:22947228

  1. Realization rates of the National Energy Audit

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, L.G.; Gettings, M.B.

    1998-11-01

    Engineering estimates of savings resulting from installation of energy conservation measures in homes are often greater than the savings actually realized. A brief review of prior studies of realization rates prefaces this study of rates from an engineering audit tool, NEAT, (developed for the Department of Energy`s Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program) used in a New York state utility`s low-income program. Estimates of metered and predicted savings are compared for 49 homes taken from a data base of homes that participated in the first year of the utility`s program. Average realization rates ranging from 57% to 69% result, depending on the data quality. Detailed examinations of two houses using an alternate engineering method, the DOE-2 computer program (considered an industry standard), seem to indicate that the low realization rates mainly result from factors other than inaccuracies in the audit`s internal algorithms. Causes of the low realization rates are examined, showing that the strongest single factor linked to the low rates in this study is the use of secondary heating fuels that supplement the primary heating fuel. This study, like the other similar studies, concludes that engineering estimates are valuable tools in determining ranked lists of cost-effective weatherization measures, but may not be accurate substitutes for measured results in evaluating program performance.

  2. MARSSIM vs. DOE Order 5400.5: the Final Status Survey plan at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sarah J; Stevens, Jeff

    2003-06-01

    A challenge unique to the decommissioning of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities involves the compromise between the existing and newly recommended standards for the unrestricted release of property and materials. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is currently decommissioning numerous plutonium contaminated facilities. The default DOE standard for unrestricted release, Order 5400.5, defines surface activity guidelines as averaged over a 1-square-meter area with a maximum value defined for any given 100-square-centimeter area. While the Order was initially developed to release property and materials from an operating site, it is restrictive in its use when performing Final Status Survey and, to date, no new complex wide standard has been developed. However, the RFETS stakeholders selected the MARSSIM, which provides a progressive method to demonstrate compliance with the defined "dose-based" limits for a specific site, as the governing document in developing a final survey method. The end result is a hybrid final status survey plan that incorporates the requirements of both documents. This plan represents several years of development and negotiation between the contractor, the DOE, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the Rocky Flats stakeholders, and other interested parties. PMID:12792399

  3. Environmental Assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), for the proposed granting of DOE permission of offloading activities to support the movement Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies (SGSAs) across the Savannah River Site (SRS). Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. On the basis of the floodplain/wetlands assessment in the EA, DOE has determined that there is no practicable alternative to the proposed activities and that the proposed action has been designed to minimize potential harm to or within the floodplain of the SRS boat ramp. No wetlands on SRS would be affected by the proposed action.

  4. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pinellas Plant, Largo, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, conducted May 11 through 22, 1987, at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida. As a Preliminary Report, the contents are subject to revisions, which will be made in a forthcoming Interim Report, based on Albuquerque Operations Office review and comments on technical accuracy, the results of the sampling and analyses, and other information that may come to the Survey team's attention prior to issuance of the Interim Report. The Pinellas Plant is currently operated for DOE by the General Electric Company-Neutron Devices Department (GENDD). The Pinellas Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey effort announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems are areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities and to rank them on a DOE-wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct these problems. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. 55 refs., 37 figs., 37 tabs.

  5. Does Genetic Variation Maintained by Environmental Heterogeneity Facilitate Adaptation to Novel Selection?

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuheng; Tran, Ivan; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2016-07-01

    Environmental heterogeneity helps maintain genetic variation in fitness. Therefore, one might predict that populations living in heterogeneous environments have higher adaptive potential than populations living in homogeneous environments. Such a prediction could be useful in guiding conservation priorities without requiring detailed genetic studies. However, this prediction will be true only if the additional genetic variation maintained by environmental heterogeneity can be used to respond to novel selection. Here we examine the effect of environmental heterogeneity on future adaptability using replicated experimental Drosophila melanogaster populations that had previously evolved for ∼100 generations under one of four selective regimes: constant salt-enriched larvae medium, constant cadmium-enriched larvae medium, and two heterogeneous regimes that vary either temporally or spatially between the two media. Replicates of these experimental populations were subjected to a novel heat stress while being maintained in their original larval diet selection regimes. Adaptation to increased temperature was measured with respect to female productivity and male siring success after ∼20 generations. For female productivity, there was evidence of adaptation overall and heterogeneous populations had a larger adaptive response than homogeneous populations. There was less evidence of adaptation overall for male siring success and no support for faster adaptation in heterogeneous populations. PMID:27322119

  6. Does financial development reduce environmental degradation? Evidence from a panel study of 129 countries.

    PubMed

    Al-Mulali, Usama; Tang, Chor Foon; Ozturk, Ilhan

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of financial development on CO2 emission in 129 countries classified by the income level. A panel CO2 emission model using urbanisation, GDP growth, trade openness, petroleum consumption and financial development variables that are major determinants of CO2 emission was constructed for the 1980-2011 period. The results revealed that the variables are cointegrated based on the Pedroni cointegration test. The dynamic ordinary least squares (OLS) and the Granger causality test results also show that financial development can improve environmental quality in the short run and long run due to its negative effect on CO2 emission. The rest of the determinants, especially petroleum consumption, are determined to be the major source of environmental damage in most of the income group countries. Based on the results obtained, the investigated countries should provide banking loans to projects and investments that can promote energy savings, energy efficiency and renewable energy to help these countries reduce environmental damage in both the short and long run. PMID:25994273

  7. Does capillary racetrack-based enrichment reflect the diversity of uncultivated magnetotactic cocci in environmental samples?

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Tian, Lanxiang; Li, Jinhua; Pan, Yongxin

    2008-02-01

    The racetrack-based PCR approach is widely used in phylogenetic analysis of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), which are isolated from environmental samples using the capillary racetrack method. To evaluate whether the capillary racetrack-based enrichment can truly reflect the diversity of MTB in the targeted environmental sample, phylogenetic diversity studies of MTB enriched from the Miyun lake near Beijing were carried out, using both the capillary racetrack-based PCR and a modified metagenome-based PCR approach. Magnetotactic cocci were identified in the studied sample using both approaches. Comparative studies showed that three clusters of magnetotactic cocci were revealed by the modified metagenome-based PCR approach, while only one of them (e.g. MYG-22 sequence) was detected by the racetrack-based PCR approach from the studied sample. This suggests that the result of capillary racetrack-based enrichment might have been biased by the magnetotaxis of magnetotactic bacteria. It appears that the metagenome-based PCR approach better reflects the original diversity of MTB in the environmental sample. PMID:18179585

  8. Captive coyotes compared to their counterparts in the wild: does environmental enrichment help?

    PubMed

    Shivik, John A; Palmer, Gemma L; Gese, Eric M; Osthaus, Britta

    2009-01-01

    This article attempts to determine the effects of environment (captive or wild) and a simple form of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of a nonhuman animal. Specifically, analyses first compared behavioral budgets and stereotypic behavior of captive coyotes (Canis latrans) in kennels and pens to their counterparts in the wild. Second, experiments examined the effect of a simple form of environmental enrichment for captive coyotes (food-filled bones) on behavioral budgets, stereotypies, and corticosteroid levels. Overall, behavioral budgets of captive coyotes in both kennels and pens were similar to those observed in the wild, but coyotes in captivity exhibited significantly more stereotypic behavior. Intermittently providing a bone generally lowered resting and increased foraging behaviors but did not significantly reduce stereotypic behavior or alter corticosteroid levels. Thus, coyote behavior in captivity can be similar to that exhibited in the wild; in addition, although enrichment can affect proportions of elicited behaviors, abnormal behaviors and corticosteroid levels may require more than a simple form of environmental enrichment for their reduction. PMID:20183476

  9. How Does an Environmental Educator Address Student Engagement in a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience (MWEE)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Char, Chelia

    Children represent the future and thus by providing them with effective environmental educational experiences, educators may be taking a critical step in preventing "the probable serious environmental problems in the future" (Gokhan, 2010, p. 56). The Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience (MWEE) is an excellent example of one such education program. MWEEs aim to educate and enhance the students' relationship with the Chesapeake Bay Watershed through an integration of classroom activities and fieldwork. As environmental educators and role models, field interpreters are a major component and significant influence on the local MWEE programs, however their perspective as to how they have impacted the programs has yet to be examined. Through a qualitative analysis and specific focus on the behavioral, emotional, and cognitive dimensions of student engagement, the researcher intended to address this void. The focus of the study was to examine how the local MWEE field interpreters understood and addressed student engagement in a field setting. This was measured via data collected from observations of and semi-structured, one-on-one interviews with each field interpreter involved with the local MWEE programs. Data analysis uncovered that field interpreters demonstrated a strong awareness of student engagement. Furthermore, they defined, recognized, and addressed student engagement within the constructs of the emotional, behavioral, and cognitive dimensions. Ultimately, the individual experiences of each MWEE field interpreter provides insight into the phenomenon, however further research is required to strengthen the awareness of how, if at all, their perspectives of student engagement directly impact student outcomes.

  10. PERFORMANCE AUDITING OF A HUMAN AIR POLLUTION EXPOSURE CHAMBER FOR PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Databases derived from human health effects research play a vital role in setting environmental standards. An underlying assumption in using these databases for standard setting purposes is that they are of adequate quality. The performance auditing program described provides n...

  11. NEVER AUDIT ALONE--THE CASE FOR AUDIT TEAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-site audits conducted by technical and quality assurance (QA) experts at the data-gathering location are the core of an effective QA program. However, inadequate resources for such audits are the bane of a QA program, and the proposed solution frequently is to send only one au...

  12. Followup audit of the cask development program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-15

    The Department of Energy is responsible for developing a system for the transportation and storage of spent nuclear fuel generated by utility companies. To carry out this responsibility, the Department of Energy established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (Waste Management Office). The Waste Management office began development of a series of new shipping casks to transport the spent fuel. The purpose of this audit was to review the current development status of the cask designs; compare the original milestone dates to current milestone dates; and review the program funds that have been used to date on the development of these casks. The Office of Inspector General audited the cask development program in 1987. The audit report (DOE/IG-0244), recommended that program management establish minimum criteria that each cask must meet to qualify for further development funding. Our followup audit found that this recommendation had not been adequately implemented. As a result, the Waste Management office will spend an estimated $143 million on the cask development program and receive only two cask designs that were originally scheduled to cost $26 million. Moreover, it is not certain, at this time, whether those two cask designs will eventually receive the Nuclear Regulatory Commission certification. Historically, the program has experienced slippage in milestone dates and steady increases in total cost. Management generally agreed with our current recommendations to establish formal contingency plans to counter further delays, develop current baselines and schedules in sufficient detail to adequately control cask development schedules and costs, and reevaluate the current status of the casks under development for the purpose of justifying further development. Management has proposed actions to correct the milestone date slippages and continued growth in the total cost of the program.

  13. Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Environmental Safety Health (ES and H) FY 2000 and FY 2001 Execution Commitment Summary

    SciTech Connect

    REEP, I.E.

    2000-12-01

    All sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex prepare this report annually for the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the previous and current year's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) execution commitments and the Safety and Health (S&H) resources that support these activities. The fiscal year (FY) 2000 and 2001 information and data contained in the Richland Operations Environment, Safefy and Health Fiscal Year 2002 Budget-Risk Management Summary (RL 2000a) were the basis for preparing this report. Fiscal year 2001 activities are based on the President's Amended Congressional Budget Request of $689.6 million for funding Ofice of Environmental Management (EM) $44.0 million for Fast Flux Test Facility standby less $7.0 million in anticipated DOE, Headquarters holdbacks for Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE); and $55.3 million for Safeguards and Security (SAS). Any funding changes as a result of the Congressional appropriation process will be reflected in the Fiscal Year 2003 ES&H Budget-Risk Management Summary to be issued in May 2001. This report provides the end-of-year status of FY 2000 ES&H execution commitments, including actual S&H expenditures, and describes planned FY 2001 ES&H execution commitments and the S&H resources needed to support those activities. This requirement is included in the ES&H guidance contained in the FY 2002 Field Budget Call (DOE 2000).

  14. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF STATIONARY SOURCE COMPLIANCE TEST AUDIT RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides audit materials to organizations conducting compliance tests using EPA Test Methods 6 (SO2), 7 (NOX), 18 (organics by GC/FID), 25 (organics as ppm C), 106 (vinyl chloride) and 26(HCl) and those organizations conducting trial...

  15. 40 CFR 205.160 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.160 Section 205.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles §...

  16. 40 CFR 205.171 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.171 Section 205.171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust...

  17. 40 CFR 205.160 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.160 Section 205.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles §...

  18. 40 CFR 205.160 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.160 Section 205.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles §...

  19. 40 CFR 205.171 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.171 Section 205.171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust...

  20. 40 CFR 205.160 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.160 Section 205.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles §...

  1. 40 CFR 205.171 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.171 Section 205.171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust...

  2. 40 CFR 205.171 - Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing (SEA) requirements. 205.171 Section 205.171 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust...

  3. 40 CFR 35.3165 - Reports and audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reports and audits. 35.3165 Section 35.3165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds § 35.3165 Reports and...

  4. 40 CFR 35.3165 - Reports and audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reports and audits. 35.3165 Section 35.3165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds § 35.3165 Reports and...

  5. 40 CFR 35.3165 - Reports and audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reports and audits. 35.3165 Section 35.3165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds § 35.3165 Reports and...

  6. 40 CFR 35.3165 - Reports and audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reports and audits. 35.3165 Section 35.3165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds § 35.3165 Reports and...

  7. Women's Campus Safety Audit Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This booklet is designed for those who want to make the college campus a safer environment for women. Specifically, it provides information to help make public and semi-public places safer and more comfortable for women, focusing on preventing sexual harassment and assault. The booklet introduces the safety audit and explains what the audit is…

  8. The Audit Committee. Board Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrom, John S.

    2004-01-01

    The Effective Committees set of booklets comprises publications on the following committees: investment, buildings and grounds, academic affairs, student affairs, finance, development, trustees, audit, compensation, and executive. It is part of the AGB Board Basics Series. This report describes the primary role of an audit committee. The primary…

  9. Safety Audit/Inspection Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    This guide provides guidelines and procedures for safety audits and inspections in work environments. Contents include: (1) Administrative Concepts, (2) Physical Concepts, (3) Protecting Your Audits, (4) Safety Inspections, and (5) Safety Inspection Checklist. The appendix features federal laws and regulations affecting laboratories. (YDS)

  10. Your Audit and Financial Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Mary B.; And Others

    Audits should be performed on school accounting systems because they are required by law and they provide independent reviews of school financial procedures and suggestions for improvement. A licensed certified public accountant, public accountant, or an accountant who has met the Continuation of Education requirement should perform the audit.…

  11. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Honeyman, Bruce D.; Francis, A.J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Chin-Chang Hung; Diaz, Angelique; Tinnacher, Ruth; Roberts, Kimberly; Schwehr, Kathy

    2006-04-05

    The overall objective of this research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation and immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this work is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  12. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Santschi, Peter H.; Honeyman, Bruce D.

    2005-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  13. Biogeochemical Cycling and Environmental Stability of Pu Relevant to Long-Term Stewardship of DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Santschi, Peter H.

    2006-06-01

    The overall objective of this proposed research is to understand the biogeochemical cycling of Pu in environments of interest to long-term DOE stewardship issues. Central to Pu cycling (transport initiation to immobilization) is the role of microorganisms. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that microbial activity is the causative agent in initiating the mobilization of Pu in near-surface environments: through the transformation of Pu associated with solid phases, production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) carrier phases, and the creation of microenvironments. Also, microbial processes are central to the immobilization of Pu species, through the metabolism of organically complexed Pu species and Pu associated with extracellular carrier phases and the creation of environments favorable for Pu transport retardation.

  14. Atrazine does not affect algal biomass or snail populations in microcosm communities at environmentally relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Leilan R; Moore, Dana L; Sibley, Paul K; Solomon, Keith R; Hanson, Mark L

    2011-07-01

    The herbicide atrazine is a photosynthetic inhibitor used around the world in agricultural applications. Contamination of surface waters adjacent to treated areas can directly reduce growth of nontarget aquatic autotrophs, but the severity of impacts is highly dependent on species sensitivity and exposure concentration. Secondary effects resulting from macrophyte or phytoplankton decline may include an expansion of the more tolerant periphyton community. Recently, this shift in the autotrophic community has been proposed as a mechanism for increased rates of parasite infections in amphibians via augmented populations of aquatic snails which act as intermediate hosts to larval trematodes. To further clarify this relationship, an outdoor microcosm study was conducted to examine the effects of atrazine on primary production and snail populations over a range of environmentally relevant concentrations. In July 2009, 15 experimental ponds were treated to achieve initial concentrations of 0, 1, 10, 30, and 100 µg/L atrazine. Over a period of 73 d, measures were taken of macrophyte, phytoplankton, and periphyton biomass, growth, and fecundity of caged snails (Physella spp. and Stagnicola elodes) and free-living snails (Physella spp.). Except for declines in macrophyte biomass at the highest treatment level, no consistent relationships were found between atrazine concentration and any measured parameter. Comparison of these results with previous findings highlights the variability of responses to atrazine exposure between similarly constructed freshwater communities, even at concentrations up to 20 times higher than sustained environmental levels. PMID:21567448

  15. Electron efficiency of nZVI does not change with variation of environmental parameters.

    PubMed

    Schöftner, Philipp; Waldner, Georg; Lottermoser, Werner; Stöger-Pollach, Michael; Freitag, Peter; Reichenauer, Thomas G

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (nZVI) are already applied for in-situ dechlorination of halogenated organic contaminants in the field. We performed batch experiments whereby trichloroethene (TCE) was dehalogenated by nZVI under different environmental conditions that are relevant in practice. The tested conditions include different ionic strengths, addition of polyelectrolytes (carboxymethylcellulose and ligninsulphonate), lowered temperature, dissolved oxygen and different particle contents. Particle properties were determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, SEM, AAS and laser obscuration time measurements. TCE dehalogenation and H2 evolution were decelerated by reduced ionic strength, addition of polyelectrolytes, temperature reduction, the presence of dissolved oxygen and reduced particle content. The partitioning of released electrons between reactions with the contaminant vs. with water (selectivity) was low, independent of the tested conditions. Basically out of hundred electrons that were released via nZVI oxidation only 3.1±1.4 were used for TCE dehalogenation. Even lower selectivities were observed at TCE concentrations below 3.5 mg l(-1), hence particle modifications and/or combination of nZVI with other remediation technologies seem to be necessary to reach target concentrations for remediation. Our results suggest that selectivity is particle intrinsic and not as much condition dependent, hence particle synthesis and potential particle modifications of nZVI particles may be more important for optimization of the pollutant degradation rate, than tested environmental conditions. PMID:26006053

  16. Does environmental enrichment reduce stress? An integrated measure of corticosterone from feathers provides a novel perspective.

    PubMed

    Fairhurst, Graham D; Frey, Matthew D; Reichert, James F; Szelest, Izabela; Kelly, Debbie M; Bortolotti, Gary R

    2011-01-01

    Enrichment is widely used as tool for managing fearfulness, undesirable behaviors, and stress in captive animals, and for studying exploration and personality. Inconsistencies in previous studies of physiological and behavioral responses to enrichment led us to hypothesize that enrichment and its removal are stressful environmental changes to which the hormone corticosterone and fearfulness, activity, and exploration behaviors ought to be sensitive. We conducted two experiments with a captive population of wild-caught Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) to assess responses to short- (10-d) and long-term (3-mo) enrichment, their removal, and the influence of novelty, within the same animal. Variation in an integrated measure of corticosterone from feathers, combined with video recordings of behaviors, suggests that how individuals perceive enrichment and its removal depends on the duration of exposure. Short- and long-term enrichment elicited different physiological responses, with the former acting as a stressor and birds exhibiting acclimation to the latter. Non-novel enrichment evoked the strongest corticosterone responses of all the treatments, suggesting that the second exposure to the same objects acted as a physiological cue, and that acclimation was overridden by negative past experience. Birds showed weak behavioral responses that were not related to corticosterone. By demonstrating that an integrated measure of glucocorticoid physiology varies significantly with changes to enrichment in the absence of agonistic interactions, our study sheds light on potential mechanisms driving physiological and behavioral responses to environmental change. PMID:21412426

  17. Environmental forcing does not lead to variation in carbon isotope content of forest soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, David; Egan, Jocelyn; Hall, Steven; Risk, David

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have highlighted fluctuations in the carbon isotope content (δ13C) of CO2 produced by soil respiration. These have been correlated with diel cycles of environmental forcing (e.g., soil temperature), or with synoptic weather events (e.g., rain events and pressure-induced ventilation). We used an extensive suite of observations to examine these phenomena over two months in a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site). Measurements included automated soil respiration chambers and automated measurements of the soil gas profile. We found 1) no diel change in the δ13C of the soil surface flux or the CO2 produced in the soil (despite strong diel change in surface flux rate), 2) no change in δ13C following wetting (despite a significant increase in soil flux rate), and 3) no evidence of pressure-induced ventilation of the soil. Measurements of the δ13C of surface CO2 flux agreed closely with the isotopic composition of soil CO2 production calculated using soil profile measurements. Temporal variation in the δ13C of surface flux was relatively minor and unrelated to measured environmental variables. Deep in the soil profile, results conform to established theory regarding diffusive soil gas transport and isotopic fractionation, and suggest that sampling soil gas at a depth of several tens of centimeters is a simple and effective way to assess the mean δ13C of the surface flux.

  18. Introducing students to clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Jacqueline; O'Dell, Cindy

    2015-11-01

    It is more than a decade since the UK Central Council for Nursing Midwifery and Health Visiting said that engaging with clinical audit is 'the business of every registered practitioner', yet there appears to be little evidence that nursing has embraced the process. To address this issue, Northampton General Hospital and the University of Northampton implemented a pilot project in which two third-year adult nursing students worked on a 'real life' audit. Supported by the hospital's audit department, and supervised by academic tutors with the relevant experience, the students worked on a pressure-ulcer care audit for their final year dissertation. This article describes the process undertaken by the hospital audit team and the university academic team to develop the pilot project and support the students. Based on the positive evaluations, the university has extended the project to a second phase, incorporating two new partner organisations. PMID:26508069

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the environmental survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), conducted June 16 through 27, 1986. The survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the FMPC. The survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at FMPC, and interviews with site personnel. The survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its onsite activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE national laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the FMPC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the FMPC survey. 41 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

  20. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), conducted August 11 through 22, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the RFP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations carried on at RFP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activates. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the RFP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the RFP Survey. 75 refs., 24 figs., 33 tabs.

  1. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), conducted December 1 through 19, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with LLNL. The Survey covers all environmental media all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at LLNL, and interviews with site personnel. A Sampling and Analysis Plan was developed to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during performance of on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LLNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LLNL Survey. 70 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.,

  2. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas City Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs.

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE), Y-12 Plant, conducted November 10 through 21 and December 9 through 11, 1986. This Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Y-12 Plant. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at Y-12, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Y-12 Plant Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Y-12 Plant Survey. 80 refs., 76 figs., 61 tabs.

  4. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

  5. Designing Academic Audit: Lessons Learned in Europe and Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, David D.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews lessons learned from early experiments with academic audits in the United Kingdom, Sweden, New Zealand, and Hong Kong in areas such as: focus of audits, selection and training of audit teams, nature of audit self-studies, conduct of audit visits, audit reports, and audit follow-up and enhancement activities. Suggests guidelines for design…

  6. 29 CFR 99.215 - Relation to other audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Relation to other audit requirements. 99.215 Section 99.215... Audits § 99.215 Relation to other audit requirements. (a) Audit under this part in lieu of other audits. An audit made in accordance with this part shall be in lieu of any financial audit required...

  7. 7 CFR 3052.215 - Relation to other audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Relation to other audit requirements. 3052.215... ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.215 Relation to other audit requirements. (a) Audit under this part in lieu of other audits. An audit made in accordance with this part shall be in lieu of any financial audit required...

  8. 29 CFR 99.215 - Relation to other audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Relation to other audit requirements. 99.215 Section 99.215... Audits § 99.215 Relation to other audit requirements. (a) Audit under this part in lieu of other audits. An audit made in accordance with this part shall be in lieu of any financial audit required...

  9. 29 CFR 99.215 - Relation to other audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Relation to other audit requirements. 99.215 Section 99.215... Audits § 99.215 Relation to other audit requirements. (a) Audit under this part in lieu of other audits. An audit made in accordance with this part shall be in lieu of any financial audit required...

  10. 7 CFR 3052.215 - Relation to other audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Relation to other audit requirements. 3052.215... ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.215 Relation to other audit requirements. (a) Audit under this part in lieu of other audits. An audit made in accordance with this part shall be in lieu of any financial audit required...

  11. 7 CFR 3052.215 - Relation to other audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relation to other audit requirements. 3052.215... ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.215 Relation to other audit requirements. (a) Audit under this part in lieu of other audits. An audit made in accordance with this part shall be in lieu of any financial audit required...

  12. 7 CFR 3052.215 - Relation to other audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Relation to other audit requirements. 3052.215... ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.215 Relation to other audit requirements. (a) Audit under this part in lieu of other audits. An audit made in accordance with this part shall be in lieu of any financial audit required...

  13. 29 CFR 99.215 - Relation to other audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Relation to other audit requirements. 99.215 Section 99.215... Audits § 99.215 Relation to other audit requirements. (a) Audit under this part in lieu of other audits. An audit made in accordance with this part shall be in lieu of any financial audit required...

  14. 29 CFR 99.215 - Relation to other audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Relation to other audit requirements. 99.215 Section 99.215... Audits § 99.215 Relation to other audit requirements. (a) Audit under this part in lieu of other audits. An audit made in accordance with this part shall be in lieu of any financial audit required...

  15. 7 CFR 3052.215 - Relation to other audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Relation to other audit requirements. 3052.215... ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.215 Relation to other audit requirements. (a) Audit under this part in lieu of other audits. An audit made in accordance with this part shall be in lieu of any financial audit required...

  16. ANL Technical Support Program for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management; Annual report, October 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Bourcier, W.L.; Bradley, C.R.

    1994-06-01

    This report is an overview of the progress during FY 1993 for the Technical Support Program that is part of the ANL Technology Support Activity for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose is to evaluate, before hot start-up of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), factors that are anticipated to affect glass reaction in an unsaturated environment typical of what may be expected for the candidate Yucca Mountain repository site. Specific goals for the testing program include the following: reviewing and evaluating available data on parameters that will be important in establishing the long-term performance of glass in a repository environment; performing tests to further quantify the effects of important variables where there are deficiencies in the available data; and initiating long-term tests to determine glass performance under a range of conditions applicable to repository disposal.

  17. ANL Technical Support Program for DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R.; Buck, E.C.; Cunnane, J.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Ebert, W.L.; Emery, J.W.; Feng, X.; Gerding, T.J.; Gong, M.; Hoh, J.C.; Mazer, J.J.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bourcier, W.L.; Morgan, L.E.; Nielsen, J.K.; Steward, S.A.; Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.; Han, W.T.; Tomozawa, M.

    1992-03-01

    This report provides an overview of progress during FY 1991 for the Technical Support Program that is part of the ANL Technology Support Activity for DOE, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose is to evaluate, before hot start-up of the Defenses Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), factors that are likely to affect glass reaction in an unsaturated environment typical of what may be expected for the candidate Yucca Mountain repository site. Specific goals for the testing program include the following: (1) to review and evaluate available information on parameters that will be important in establishing the long-term performance of glass in a repository environment; (2) to perform testing to further quantify the effects of important variables where there are deficiencies in the available data; and (3) to initiate long-term testing that will bound glass performance under a range of conditions applicable to repository disposal.

  18. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-30

    This annual report describes the environmental monitoring programs related to the Department of Energy’s (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) facility located in Ventura County, California during 2005. Part of the SSFL facility, known as Area IV, had been used for DOE’s activities since the 1950s. A broad range of energy related research and development (R&D) projects, including nuclear technologies projects, was conducted at the site. All the nuclear R&D operations in Area IV ceased in 1988. Current efforts are directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and closure of facilities used for liquid metal research.

  19. Does Forest Continuity Enhance the Resilience of Trees to Environmental Change?

    PubMed Central

    von Oheimb, Goddert; Härdtle, Werner; Eckstein, Dieter; Engelke, Hans-Hermann; Hehnke, Timo; Wagner, Bettina; Fichtner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    There is ample evidence that continuously existing forests and afforestations on previously agricultural land differ with regard to ecosystem functions and services such as carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling and biodiversity. However, no studies have so far been conducted on possible long-term (>100 years) impacts on tree growth caused by differences in the ecological continuity of forest stands. In the present study we analysed the variation in tree-ring width of sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) trees (mean age 115–136 years) due to different land-use histories (continuously existing forests, afforestations both on arable land and on heathland). We also analysed the relation of growth patterns to soil nutrient stores and to climatic parameters (temperature, precipitation). Tree rings formed between 1896 and 2005 were widest in trees afforested on arable land. This can be attributed to higher nitrogen and phosphorous availability and indicates that former fertilisation may continue to affect the nutritional status of forest soils for more than one century after those activities have ceased. Moreover, these trees responded more strongly to environmental changes – as shown by a higher mean sensitivity of the tree-ring widths – than trees of continuously existing forests. However, the impact of climatic parameters on the variability in tree-ring width was generally small, but trees on former arable land showed the highest susceptibility to annually changing climatic conditions. We assume that incompletely developed humus horizons as well as differences in the edaphon are responsible for the more sensitive response of oak trees of recent forests (former arable land and former heathland) to variation in environmental conditions. We conclude that forests characterised by a long ecological continuity may be better adapted to global change than recent forest ecosystems. PMID:25494042

  20. Does mechanistic modeling of filter strip pesticide mass balance and degradation processes affect environmental exposure assessments?

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Ritter, Amy; Fox, Garey A; Perez-Ovilla, Oscar

    2015-11-01

    Vegetative filter strips (VFS) are a widely adopted practice for limiting pesticide transport from adjacent fields to receiving waterbodies. The efficacy of VFS depends on site-specific input factors. To elucidate the complex and non-linear relationships among these factors requires a process-based modeling framework. Previous research proposed linking existing higher-tier environmental exposure models with a well-tested VFS model (VFSMOD). However, the framework assumed pesticide mass stored in the VFS was not available for transport in subsequent storm events. A new pesticide mass balance component was developed to estimate surface pesticide residue trapped in the VFS and its degradation between consecutive runoff events. The influence and necessity of the updated framework on acute and chronic estimated environmental concentrations (EECs) and percent reductions in EECs were investigated across three, 30-year U.S. EPA scenarios: Illinois corn, California tomato, and Oregon wheat. The updated framework with degradation predicted higher EECs than the existing framework without degradation for scenarios with greater sediment transport, longer VFS lengths, and highly sorbing and persistent pesticides. Global sensitivity analysis (GSA) assessed the relative importance of mass balance and degradation processes in the context of other input factors like VFS length (VL), organic-carbon sorption coefficient (Koc), and soil and water half-lives. Considering VFS pesticide residue and degradation was not important if single, large runoff events controlled transport, as is typical for higher percentiles considered in exposure assessments. Degradation processes become more important when considering percent reductions in acute or chronic EECs, especially under scenarios with lower pesticide losses. PMID:26218348

  1. Auditing urinary catheter care.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Sue

    Urinary catheters are the main cause of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections among inpatients. Healthcare staff can reduce the risk of patients developing an infection by ensuring they give evidence-based care and by removing the catheter as soon as it is no longer necessary. An audit conducted in a Hampshire hospital demonstrated there was poor documented evidence that best practice was being carried out. Therefore a urinary catheter assessment and monitoring tool was designed to promote best practice and produce clear evidence that care had been provided. PMID:22375340

  2. 32 CFR 34.16 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... awards shall have an audit made for that year by an independent auditor, in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section. The audit generally should be made a part of the regularly scheduled, annual audit... independent audit is intended to ascertain the adequacy of the recipient's internal financial...

  3. 21 CFR 820.22 - Quality audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Quality System Requirements § 820.22 Quality audit. Each manufacturer shall establish procedures for quality audits and conduct such audits to assure that the quality system is in... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Quality audit. 820.22 Section 820.22 Food...

  4. 29 CFR 96.12 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (b) The audit requirements contained in 29 CFR part 99 shall be followed for audits of all fiscal... of 29 CFR 99.320, which provides for submission of audit data collection forms and reporting packages... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit requirements. 96.12 Section 96.12 Labor Office of...

  5. 29 CFR 96.12 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (b) The audit requirements contained in 29 CFR part 99 shall be followed for audits of all fiscal... of 29 CFR 99.320, which provides for submission of audit data collection forms and reporting packages... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit requirements. 96.12 Section 96.12 Labor Office of...

  6. 12 CFR 363.5 - Audit committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit committees. 363.5 Section 363.5 Banks and... INDEPENDENT AUDITS AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS § 363.5 Audit committees. (a) Composition and duties. Each insured depository institution shall establish an audit committee of its board of directors,...

  7. 7 CFR 226.8 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... disregard may be made once per each management evaluation, review, or audit per Program within a fiscal year.... State agencies must establish audit policy for for-profit institutions. However, the audit policy... funds provided to an institution for an organization-wide audit must be determined in accordance...

  8. 7 CFR 250.18 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Fiscal matters shall continue to be reviewed in audits under the Single Audit Act (31 U.S.C. 7501-07) and the Department's Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations (7 CFR part 3015). (b) Independent CPA audits... auditing provisions set forth under the Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations (7 CFR part 3015, subpart...

  9. 7 CFR 285.4 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... such audit shall be reported to FNS no later than 120 days from the end of each fiscal year in which the audit is made. (b) Within 120 days of the end of each fiscal year, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico... PUERTO RICO § 285.4 Audits. (a) The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico shall provide an audit of expenditures...

  10. 7 CFR 285.4 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... such audit shall be reported to FNS no later than 120 days from the end of each fiscal year in which the audit is made. (b) Within 120 days of the end of each fiscal year, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico... PUERTO RICO § 285.4 Audits. (a) The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico shall provide an audit of expenditures...

  11. 7 CFR 250.18 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Fiscal matters shall continue to be reviewed in audits under the Single Audit Act (31 U.S.C. 7501-07) and the Department's Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations (7 CFR part 3015). (b) Independent CPA audits... auditing provisions set forth under the Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations (7 CFR part 3015, subpart...

  12. 29 CFR 96.12 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (b) The audit requirements contained in 29 CFR part 99 shall be followed for audits of all fiscal... of 29 CFR 99.320, which provides for submission of audit data collection forms and reporting packages... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit requirements. 96.12 Section 96.12 Labor Office of...

  13. 7 CFR 226.8 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... disregard may be made once per each management evaluation, review, or audit per Program within a fiscal year.... State agencies must establish audit policy for for-profit institutions. However, the audit policy... funds provided to an institution for an organization-wide audit must be determined in accordance...

  14. 12 CFR 363.5 - Audit committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit committees. 363.5 Section 363.5 Banks and... INDEPENDENT AUDITS AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS § 363.5 Audit committees. (a) Composition and duties. Each insured depository institution shall establish an audit committee of its board of directors,...

  15. 7 CFR 226.8 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... disregard may be made once per each management evaluation, review, or audit per Program within a fiscal year.... State agencies must establish audit policy for for-profit institutions. However, the audit policy... funds provided to an institution for an organization-wide audit must be determined in accordance...

  16. 7 CFR 226.8 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... made once per each management evaluation, review, or audit per Program within a fiscal year. However.... State agencies must establish audit policy for for-profit institutions. However, the audit policy... funds provided to an institution for an organization-wide audit must be determined in accordance...

  17. 12 CFR 363.5 - Audit committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit committees. 363.5 Section 363.5 Banks and... INDEPENDENT AUDITS AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS § 363.5 Audit committees. (a) Composition and duties. Each insured depository institution shall establish an audit committee of its board of directors,...

  18. 7 CFR 250.18 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Fiscal matters shall continue to be reviewed in audits under the Single Audit Act (31 U.S.C. 7501-07) and the Department's Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations (7 CFR part 3015). (b) Independent CPA audits... auditing provisions set forth under the Uniform Federal Assistance Regulations (7 CFR part 3015, subpart...

  19. 12 CFR 363.5 - Audit committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Audit committees. 363.5 Section 363.5 Banks and... INDEPENDENT AUDITS AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS § 363.5 Audit committees. (a) Composition and duties. Each insured depository institution shall establish an audit committee of its board of directors,...

  20. 29 CFR 96.12 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (b) The audit requirements contained in 29 CFR part 99 shall be followed for audits of all fiscal... of 29 CFR 99.320, which provides for submission of audit data collection forms and reporting packages... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audit requirements. 96.12 Section 96.12 Labor Office of...