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Sample records for doe exercises meet

  1. Youth Exercise Intention and Past Exercise Behavior: Examining the Moderating Influences of Sex and Meeting Exercise Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Danielle Symons; Graham, George M.; Yang, Stephen; Bargainnier, Sandra; Vasil, Jay

    2006-01-01

    The study purposes were to examine: (a) the determinants of exercise intention and past exercise behavior (PEB) using the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior, and (b) the moderating influences of sex and exercise group (meeting or not meeting exercise guidelines). Participants (n = 676 adolescents) completed self-reported measures of…

  2. Does Motivation for Exercise Influence Post-Exercise Snacking Behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Dimmock, James A.; Guelfi, Kym J.; West, Jessica S.; Masih, Tasmiah; Jackson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that regular exercise plays an important role in achieving a number of health and wellbeing outcomes. However, certain post-exercise behaviors, including the consumption of unhealthy high-calorie foods, can counteract some of the benefits of physical activity. There are at least three overlapping pathways through which exercise may increase the likelihood of consuming pleasurable but unhealthy foods: through impulsive cognitive processes, reflective cognitive processes, and/or physiological responses. It is argued in this paper that motivation toward exercise can influence each of these pathways. Drawing from literature from various domains, we postulate that controlled exercise motivation, as opposed to autonomous exercise motivation, is more likely to influence each of these pathways in a manner that leaves individuals susceptible to the post-exercise consumption of pleasurable but unhealthy foods. PMID:26083114

  3. Does Motivation for Exercise Influence Post-Exercise Snacking Behavior?

    PubMed

    Dimmock, James A; Guelfi, Kym J; West, Jessica S; Masih, Tasmiah; Jackson, Ben

    2015-06-01

    It is well established that regular exercise plays an important role in achieving a number of health and wellbeing outcomes. However, certain post-exercise behaviors, including the consumption of unhealthy high-calorie foods, can counteract some of the benefits of physical activity. There are at least three overlapping pathways through which exercise may increase the likelihood of consuming pleasurable but unhealthy foods: through impulsive cognitive processes, reflective cognitive processes, and/or physiological responses. It is argued in this paper that motivation toward exercise can influence each of these pathways. Drawing from literature from various domains, we postulate that controlled exercise motivation, as opposed to autonomous exercise motivation, is more likely to influence each of these pathways in a manner that leaves individuals susceptible to the post-exercise consumption of pleasurable but unhealthy foods. PMID:26083114

  4. Joint USDA/DOE meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This documents contains the details from the USDA/USDOE meeting on April 11--12, 1994. Topics discussed include: genetic research, environmental research, renewable energy sources, food supply, improved fertilizers, new pesticides, research programs combining the efforts of the two agencies to develop new products for use in the agriculture industry, environmentally safe products, getting more with less money, and various other subjects dealing with how cooperation among these agencies can improve the agriculture industry.

  5. The 1987 Federal field exercise: The DOE experience

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.

    1989-06-01

    The second full-scale field exercise of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) was held at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, Zion, Illinois, in June 1987. The exercise incorporated the annual compliance exercise for the Zion plant and involved the operating utility, Commonwealth Edison Company, the states of Illinois and Wisconsin, local governments, volunteer groups, and representatives from 12 federal agencies. The 3-day exercise was played from many locations in the Zion area; Springfield, Illinois; Madison, Wisconsin; and Washington, DC. Approximately 1000 people participated in the exercise, which used a scenario in which an accident at the plant resulted in the release of radioactive material outside the plant boundary. The US Department of Energy (DOE) had major responsibilities during the planning, playing, and critiquing of the exercise; these functions are outlined in the report. This document describes the DOE participation in the planning and response during the exercise. During a radiological emergency, the FRERP gives DOE the responsibility for coordinating the federal radiological monitoring and assessment activities in support of the states and the cognizant federal agency. At Zion, a self-sufficient Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center was established by DOE at a nearby fairground in which over 200 people from DOE, the two states, and other federal agencies participated. Before the field exercise, a tabletop exercise and a dry run were held for training purposes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Recommendations for exercise adherence measures in musculoskeletal settings: a systematic review and consensus meeting (protocol)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise programmes are frequently advocated for the management of musculoskeletal disorders; however, adherence is an important pre-requisite for their success. The assessment of exercise adherence requires the use of relevant and appropriate measures, but guidance for appropriate assessment does not exist. This research will identify and evaluate the quality and acceptability of all measures used to assess exercise adherence within a musculoskeletal setting, seeking to reach consensus for the most relevant and appropriate measures for application in research and/or clinical practice settings. Methods/design There are two key stages to the proposed research. First, a systematic review of the quality and acceptability of measures used to assess exercise adherence in musculoskeletal disorders; second, a consensus meeting. The systematic review will be conducted in two phases and reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines to ensure a robust methodology. Phase one will identify all measures that have been used to assess exercise adherence in a musculoskeletal setting. Phase two will seek to identify published and unpublished evidence of the measurement and practical properties of identified measures. Study quality will be assessed against the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) guidelines. A shortlist of best quality measures will be produced for consideration during stage two: a meeting of relevant stakeholders in the United Kingdom during which consensus on the most relevant and appropriate measures of exercise adherence for application in research and/or clinical practice settings will be sought. Discussion This study will benefit clinicians who seek to evaluate patients’ levels of exercise adherence and those intending to undertake research, service evaluation, or audit relating to exercise adherence in the musculoskeletal

  7. Virtual Team Meetings: Reflections on a Class Exercise Exploring Technology Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull Schaefer, Rebecca A.; Erskine, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Students find that choosing the appropriate technology for a virtual team meeting is not as simple as it first appears. The authors describe a class exercise used to demonstrate the benefits and drawbacks of using virtual team meetings by requiring students to replace a face-to-face meeting with a virtual meeting. The exercise challenged students'…

  8. 40 CFR 197.20 - What standard must DOE meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true What standard must DOE meet? 197.20... must DOE meet? (a) The DOE must demonstrate, using performance assessment, that there is a reasonable... millirems) after 10,000 years, but within the period of geologic stability. (b) The DOE's...

  9. 40 CFR 197.25 - What standard must DOE meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true What standard must DOE meet? 197.25... Health and Environmental Standards for Disposal Human-Intrusion Standard § 197.25 What standard must DOE meet? (a) The DOE must determine the earliest time after disposal that the waste package would...

  10. 40 CFR 197.4 - What standard must DOE meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... storage (as defined in 40 CFR 191.2) of radioactive material that: (1) Is subject to 40 CFR 191.3(a); and... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true What standard must DOE meet? 197.4... Health and Environmental Standards for Storage § 197.4 What standard must DOE meet? The DOE must...

  11. Does 'altitude training' increase exercise performance in elite athletes?

    PubMed

    Lundby, Carsten; Robach, Paul

    2016-07-01

    What is the topic of this review? The aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of various altitude training strategies as investigated within the last few years. What advances does it highlight? Based on the available literature, the foundation to recommend altitude training to athletes is weak. Athletes may use one of the various altitude training strategies to improve exercise performance. The scientific support for such strategies is, however, not as sound as one would perhaps imagine. The question addressed in this review is whether altitude training should be recommended to elite athletes or not. PMID:27173805

  12. Non-exercise Estimation of V02max Using a Dichotomy of Meeting or Not Meeting DHHS Physical Activity Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wier, Larry T.; Jackson, Allen W.; Jackson, Andrew S.

    2009-01-01

    The physical activity guidelines (PAG) established by the US Dept. of Health and Human Services in 2008 is consistent with a rating of >/= 6 on the 11-point NASA Physical Activity Status Scale (PASS). Wier, et. al. developed non-exercise models for estimating VO2(sub max) from a combination of PASS, age, gender and either waist girth (WG) (R = 0.810, SEE= 4.799 ml/kg/min), %Fat (R = 0. 817, SEE = 4.716 ml/kg/min) or BMI (R = 0.802, SEE = 4.900 ml . kg-1. min -1 ). PURPOSE: to develop non-exercise models to estimate VO2max from age, gender, body composition (WG, %Fat, BMI) and PASS dichotomized at meets or does not meet the PAG (PAG-PASS), and to compare the accuracy of the PAG-PASS models with the models using the 11-point PASS. METHODS: 2417 men and 384 women were measured for VO2max by indirect calorimetry (RER >1.1); age (yr), gender by M = 1, W = 0; WG at the umbilicus; %fat by skin-folds, BMI by weight (kg) divided by height squared (m 2 ) , and PAGPASS by PASS < 6 = 0 and =/> 6 = 1. RESULTS: Three models were developed by multiple regression to estimate VO2(sub max) from age, gender, PAG-PASS and either WG (R = 0.790, SEE=5.019 ml/kg/min), %FAT (R= 0.080, SEE = 4.915 ml/kg/min) or BMI (R = 0.777, SEE = 5.162ml/kg/min). Cross-validation by the PRESS technique confirmed these statistics. Simple correlations between measured VO2(sub max) and estimates from the PAG-PASS models with WG, %Fat and BMI were 0.790, 0.800 and 0.777, minimally different from the correlations obtained with the PASS models (0.810, 0.810, and 0.802). PAG-PASS and PASS model constant errors were also similar: < 1 ml/kg/min for subsamples of age, gender, PASS and for VO2(sub max) between 30 and 50 ml/kg/min (70% of the sample) but > 1 ml/kg/min for VO2(sub max) <30 and >50 ml/kg/min. CONCLUSIONS: Non-exercise models using the combined effects of age, gender, body composition and the dichotomized PAG-PASS provide estimates of VO2(sub max) that are accurate for most adults, and the accuracy of

  13. 43 CFR 30.261 - How does a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How does a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase? 30.261 Section 30.261 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase? (a) To exercise its option to purchase, the...

  14. 43 CFR 30.261 - How does a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase? 30.261 Section 30.261 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase? (a) To exercise its option to purchase, the...

  15. 43 CFR 30.261 - How does a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How does a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase? 30.261 Section 30.261 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase? (a) To exercise its option to purchase, the...

  16. 43 CFR 30.261 - How does a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true How does a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase? 30.261 Section 30.261 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase? (a) To exercise its option to purchase, the...

  17. 43 CFR 30.261 - How does a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How does a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase? 30.261 Section 30.261 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... a tribe exercise its statutory option to purchase? (a) To exercise its option to purchase, the...

  18. DOE contractor's meeting on chemical toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) is required to determine the potential health and environmental effects associated with energy production and use. To ensure appropriate communication among investigators and scientific disciplines that these research studies represent, OHER has sponsored workshops. This document provides a compilation of activities at the Third Annual DOE/OHER Workshop. This year's workshop was broadened to include all OHER activities identified as within the chemical effects area. The workshop consisted of eight sessions entitled Isolation and Detection of Toxic chemicals; Adduct Formation and Repair; Chemical Toxicity (Posters); Metabolism and Genotoxicity; Inhalation Toxicology; Gene Regulation; Metals Toxicity; and Biological Mechanisms. This document contains abstracts of the information presented by session.

  19. Prognosis: does exercise training reduce adverse events in heart failure?

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; Brawner, Clinton A; Haykowsky, Mark J F; Taylor, Rod S

    2015-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) were once discouraged from participating in exercise programs because of concerns regarding safety and the potential for harm to an already damaged myocardium. However, studies over the last 3 decades have provided extensive insights into both the health outcome benefits of exercise and the mechanisms underlying these benefits. Studies on the outcome benefits of exercise training, including mortality and hospitalization, have been convincing. This article reviews the physiologic benefits of exercise training in HF, studies on exercise training in women, results and implications of the HF-ACTION trial, and recent meta-analyses using the Cochrane data base. PMID:25432474

  20. COPD and exercise: does it make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Burtin, Chris; De Boever, Patrick; Langer, Daniël; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Franssen, Frits M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Physiological changes are observed following a structured exercise training programme in patients with COPD, without changes in resting lung function. Exercise training is the cornerstone of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation programme in patients with COPD. Most comorbidities in patients referred for pulmonary rehabilitation remain undiagnosed and untreated. After careful screening, it is safe for COPD patients with comorbidities to obtain significant and clinically relevant improvements in functional exercise capacity and health status after an exercise-based pulmonary rehabilitation programme. Educational aims To inform readers of the positive effects of exercise-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD, even with comorbid conditions. To inform readers of the importance of physical activity in patients with COPD. Exercise training is widely regarded as the cornerstone of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Indeed, exercise training has been identified as the best available means of improving muscle function and exercise tolerance in patients with COPD. So, exercise training truly makes a difference in the life of patients with COPD. In this review, an overview is provided on the history of exercise training (as standalone intervention or as part of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation programme), exercise training in comorbid patients with COPD, and the impact of physical activity counselling in a clean air environment. PMID:27408645

  1. 40 CFR 197.25 - What standard must DOE meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What standard must DOE meet? 197.25 Section 197.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS PUBLIC HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  2. 40 CFR 197.25 - What standard must DOE meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What standard must DOE meet? 197.25 Section 197.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS PUBLIC HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  3. 40 CFR 197.25 - What standard must DOE meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What standard must DOE meet? 197.25 Section 197.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS PUBLIC HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  4. 40 CFR 197.25 - What standard must DOE meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What standard must DOE meet? 197.25 Section 197.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS PUBLIC HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA...

  5. Psychophysiological Responses to Group Exercise Training Sessions: Does Exercise Intensity Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Vandoni, Matteo; Codrons, Erwan; Marin, Luca; Correale, Luca; Bigliassi, Marcelo; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklim

    2016-01-01

    Group exercise training programs were introduced as a strategy for improving health and fitness and potentially reducing dropout rates. This study examined the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions. Twenty-seven adults completed two group exercise training sessions of moderate and vigorous exercise intensities in a random and counterbalanced order. The %HRR and the exertional and arousal responses to vigorous session were higher than those during the moderate session (p<0.05). Consequently, the affective responses to vigorous session were less pleasant than those during moderate session (p<0.05). These results suggest that the psychophysiological responses to group exercise training sessions are intensity-dependent. From an adherence perspective, interventionists are encouraged to emphasize group exercise training sessions at a moderate intensity to maximize affective responses and to minimize exertional responses, which in turn may positively affect future exercise behavior. PMID:27490493

  6. 4th Annual DOE-ERSP PI Meeting: Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-03-01

    This contains abstracts from the 2009 Annual Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Principal Investigators (PI) Meeting. The ERSP seeks to advance fundamental science to understand, predict, and mitigate the impacts of environmental contamination from past nuclear weapons production and provide a scientific basis for the long-term stewardship of nuclear waste disposal. These ambitious goals cannot be achieved by any one project alone. Therefore, ERSP funds a combination of research programs at the DOE national laboratories, individual projects at universities and federal agencies, and large long(er)-term field site research. Integration of these activities to advance the ERSP goals is a constant challenge, but made significantly simpler by bringing together all funded ERSP researchers once a year to discuss the very latest research results. It is at these meetings where new ideas and/or scientific advancements in support of ERSP goals can be discussed and openly debated among all PIs in the program. The ERSP thrives, in part, on the new ideas, concepts, scientific connections, and collaborations generated as a result of these meetings. The annual PI Meeting is very much a working meeting with three major goals: (1) to provide opportunities for scientific interaction among the ERSP scientists, a critical element for the program; (2) to provide the ERSP program staff with an opportunity to evaluate the progress of each program and project; and (3) to showcase the ERSP to interested parties within DOE and within other federal agencies In addition to program managers from within OBER, there will be representatives from other offices within DOE and other federal agencies in attandance at the meeting.

  7. Personality Does not Influence Exercise-Induced Mood Enhancement Among Female Exercisers.

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrew M; Milton, Karen E; Terry, Peter C

    2005-09-01

    The present study investigated the influence of personality on exercise-induced mood changes. It was hypothesised that (a) exercise would be associated with significant mood enhancement across all personality types, (b) extroversion would be associated with positive mood and neuroticism with negative mood both pre- and post-exercise, and (c) personality measures would interact with exercise-induced mood changes. Participants were 90 female exercisers (M = 25.8 yr, SD = 9.0 yr) who completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) once and the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) before and after a 60-minute exercise session. Median splits were used to group participants into four personality types: stable introverts (n = 25), stable extroverts (n = 20), neurotic introverts (n = 26), and neurotic extroverts (n = 19). Repeated measures MANOVA showed significant mood enhancement following exercise across all personality types. Neuroticism was associated with negative mood scores pre- and post-exercise but the effect of extroversion on reported mood was relatively weak. There was no significant interaction effect between exercise-induced mood enhancement and personality. In conclusion, findings lend support to the notion that exercise is associated with improved mood. However, findings show that personality did not influence this effect, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood. Key PointsResearch in general psychology has found that stable personality trait are associated changes in mood states. Ninety females exercisers completed a personality test and mood scales before and after exercise. Results indicated mood changes were not associated with personality, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood. PMID:24453525

  8. 1992 DOE/Sandia crystalline photovoltaic technology project review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Maish, A.

    1992-07-01

    This document serves as the proceedings for the annual project review meeting held by Sandia National Laboratories` Photovoltaic Technology and Photovoltaic Evaluation Departments. It contains information supplied by organizations making presentations at the meeting, which was held July 14--15, 1992 at the Sheraton Old Town Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Overview sessions covered the Department of Energy (DOE) program, including those at Sandia and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and non-DOE programs, including the EPRI concentrator collector program, The Japanese crystalline silicon program, and some concentrating photovoltaic activities in Europe. Additional sessions included papers on Sandia`s Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory`s collaborative research, cell processing research, the activities of the participants in the Concentrator Initiative Program, and photovoltaic technology evaluation at Sandia and NREL.

  9. Does Stroke Volume Increase During an Incremental Exercise? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Stella S.; Lemes, Brunno; de T. C. de Carvalho, Paulo; N. de Lima, Rafael; S. Bocalini, Danilo; A. S. Junior, José; Arsa, Gisela; A. Casarin, Cezar; L. Andrade, Erinaldo; J. Serra, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac output increases during incremental-load exercise to meet metabolic skeletal muscle demand. This response requires a fast adjustment in heart rate and stroke volume. The heart rate is well known to increase linearly with exercise load; however, data for stroke volume during incremental-load exercise are unclear. Our objectives were to (a) review studies that have investigated stroke volume on incremental load exercise and (b) summarize the findings for stroke volume, primarily at maximal-exercise load. Methods: A comprehensive review of the Cochrane Library’s, Embase, Medline, SportDiscus, PubMed, and Web of Sci-ence databases was carried out for the years 1985 to the present. The search was performed between February and June 2014 to find studies evaluating changes in stroke volume during incremental-load exercise. Controlled and uncontrolled trials were evaluated for a quality score. Results: The stroke volume data in maximal-exercise load are inconsistent. There is evidence to hypothesis that stroke volume increases during maximal-exercise load, but other lines of evidence indicate that stroke volume reaches a plateau under these circumstances, or even decreases. Conclusion: The stroke volume are unclear, include contradictory evidence. Additional studies with standardized reporting for subjects (e.g., age, gender, physical fitness, and body position), exercise test protocols, and left ventricular function are required to clarify the characteristics of stroke volume during incremental maximal-exercise load. PMID:27347221

  10. Modulating exercise-induced hormesis: Does less equal more?

    PubMed

    Peake, Jonathan M; Markworth, James F; Nosaka, Kazunori; Raastad, Truls; Wadley, Glenn D; Coffey, Vernon G

    2015-08-01

    Hormesis encompasses the notion that low levels of stress stimulate or upregulate existing cellular and molecular pathways that improve the capacity of cells and organisms to withstand greater stress. This notion underlies much of what we know about how exercise conditions the body and induces long-term adaptations. During exercise, the body is exposed to various forms of stress, including thermal, metabolic, hypoxic, oxidative, and mechanical stress. These stressors activate biochemical messengers, which in turn activate various signaling pathways that regulate gene expression and adaptive responses. Historically, antioxidant supplements, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and cryotherapy have been favored to attenuate or counteract exercise-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. However, reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators are key signaling molecules in muscle, and such strategies may mitigate adaptations to exercise. Conversely, withholding dietary carbohydrate and restricting muscle blood flow during exercise may augment adaptations to exercise. In this review article, we combine, integrate, and apply knowledge about the fundamental mechanisms of exercise adaptation. We also critically evaluate the rationale for using interventions that target these mechanisms under the overarching concept of hormesis. There is currently insufficient evidence to establish whether these treatments exert dose-dependent effects on muscle adaptation. However, there appears to be some dissociation between the biochemical/molecular effects and functional/performance outcomes of some of these treatments. Although several of these treatments influence common kinases, transcription factors, and proteins, it remains to be determined if these interventions complement or negate each other, and whether such effects are strong enough to influence adaptations to exercise. PMID:25977451

  11. Does voluntary hypoventilation during exercise impact EMG activity?

    PubMed

    Kume, Daisuke; Akahoshi, Shogo; Yamagata, Takashi; Wakimoto, Toshihiro; Nagao, Noriki

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that exercise under hypoxic conditions induces reduced muscle oxygenation, which could be related to enhanced activity on electromyography (EMG). Although it has been demonstrated that exercise under conditions of voluntary hypoventilation (VH) evokes muscle deoxygenation, it is unclear whether VH during exercise impacts EMG. Seven men performed bicycle exercise for 5 min at 65 % of peak oxygen uptake with normal breathing (NB) and VH. Muscle oxygenation; concentration changes in oxyhemoglobin (Oxy-Hb), deoxyhemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) and total hemoglobin (Total-Hb); and surface EMG in the vastus lateralis muscle were simultaneously measured. In the VH condition, Oxy-Hb was significantly lower and Deoxy-Hb was significantly higher compared to those in the NB condition (P < 0.05 for both), whereas there was no significant difference in Total-Hb between the two conditions. We observed significantly higher values (P < 0.05) on integrated EMG during exercise under VH conditions compared to those under NB conditions. This study suggests that VH during exercise augments EMG activity. PMID:27026846

  12. 2nd Annual DOE-ERSP PI Meeting: Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2007-03-14

    Welcome to the annual 2007 Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Principal Investigators (PIs) meeting. The purpose of this meeting is to bring together all of the lead PIs and key Co-PIs in the program to share and review the results of funded research from the past year. This meeting allows program managers from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) to gauge the progress and significance of the funded research, and it is also an important venue to showcase ERSP research to interested parties within DOE and other invited federal agency representatives. Additionally, these meetings should serve as an opportunity for funded PIs to view their research in the context of the entire ERSP portfolio. Past ERSP meetings have been very important venues for detailed discussion of research results among PIs, development of new research ideas, fostering new collaborations and discussion with ERSD program managers on future research efforts and/or initiatives within the program. In short, these meetings are an important resource for both program managers and PIs. There will be only one ERSP PI meeting for 2007. In years past, ERSD has sponsored two PI meetings, one in the spring and a separate meeting in the fall that focused primarily on field research. However, this format tends to insulate laboratory-based research from the field research sponsored in the program and is incompatible with the ERSD view that laboratory-based research should progress towards understanding the relevant processes in natural environments at the field scale. Therefore the agenda for this year's PI meeting is well integrated with both lab-based and field-based projects, to allow for detailed discussion between PIs involved in each area. In the agenda, you will notice a more relaxed format than in years past. This year's meeting spans four days, but is less heavily regimented in terms of oral presentations

  13. Redox modulation of mitochondriogenesis in exercise. Does antioxidant supplementation blunt the benefits of exercise training?

    PubMed

    Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Cabo, Helena; Ferrando, Beatriz; Viña, Jose

    2015-09-01

    Physical exercise increases the cellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in muscle, liver, and other organs. This is unlikely due to increased mitochondrial production but rather to extramitochondrial sources such as NADPH oxidase or xanthine oxidase. We have reported a xanthine oxidase-mediated increase in ROS production in many experimental models from isolated cells to humans. Originally, ROS were considered as detrimental and thus as a likely cause of cell damage associated with exhaustion. In the past decade, evidence showing that ROS act as signals has been gathered and thus the idea that antioxidant supplementation in exercise is always recommendable has proved incorrect. In fact, we proposed that exercise itself can be considered as an antioxidant because training increases the expression of classical antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and, in general, lowering the endogenous antioxidant enzymes by administration of antioxidant supplements may not be a good strategy when training. Antioxidant enzymes are not the only ones to be activated by training. Mitochondriogenesis is an important process activated in exercise. Many redox-sensitive enzymes are involved in this process. Important signaling molecules like MAP kinases, NF-κB, PGC-1α, p53, heat shock factor, and others modulate muscle adaptation to exercise. Interventions aimed at modifying the production of ROS in exercise must be performed with care as they may be detrimental in that they may lower useful adaptations to exercise. PMID:25889822

  14. Does nebulized fentanyl relieve dyspnea during exercise in healthy man?

    PubMed

    Kotrach, Houssam G; Bourbeau, Jean; Jensen, Dennis

    2015-06-01

    Few therapies exist for the relief of dyspnea in restrictive lung disorders. Accumulating evidence suggests that nebulized opioids selective for the mu-receptor subtype may relieve dyspnea by modulating intrapulmonary opioid receptor activity. Our respective primary and secondary objectives were to test the hypothesis that nebulized fentanyl (a mu-opioid receptor agonist) relieves dyspnea during exercise in the presence of abnormal restrictive ventilatory constraints and to identify the physiological mechanisms of this improvement. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we examined the effect of 250 μg nebulized fentanyl, chest wall strapping (CWS), and their interaction on detailed physiological and perceptual responses to constant work rate cycle exercise (85% of maximum incremental work rate) in 14 healthy, fit young men. By design, CWS decreased vital capacity by ∼20% and mimicked the negative consequences of a mild restrictive lung disorder on exercise endurance time and on dyspnea, breathing pattern, dynamic operating lung volumes, and diaphragmatic electromyographic and respiratory muscle function during exercise. Compared with placebo under both unrestricted control and CWS conditions, nebulized fentanyl had no effect on exercise endurance time, integrated physiological response to exercise, sensory intensity, unpleasantness ratings of exertional dyspnea. Our results do not support a role for intrapulmonary opioids in the neuromodulation of exertional dyspnea in health nor do they provide a physiological rationale for the use of nebulized fentanyl in the management of dyspnea due to mild restrictive lung disorders, specifically those arising from abnormalities of the chest wall and not affiliated with airway inflammation. PMID:26031762

  15. Does nebulized fentanyl relieve dyspnea during exercise in healthy man?

    PubMed Central

    Kotrach, Houssam G.; Bourbeau, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Few therapies exist for the relief of dyspnea in restrictive lung disorders. Accumulating evidence suggests that nebulized opioids selective for the mu-receptor subtype may relieve dyspnea by modulating intrapulmonary opioid receptor activity. Our respective primary and secondary objectives were to test the hypothesis that nebulized fentanyl (a mu-opioid receptor agonist) relieves dyspnea during exercise in the presence of abnormal restrictive ventilatory constraints and to identify the physiological mechanisms of this improvement. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we examined the effect of 250 μg nebulized fentanyl, chest wall strapping (CWS), and their interaction on detailed physiological and perceptual responses to constant work rate cycle exercise (85% of maximum incremental work rate) in 14 healthy, fit young men. By design, CWS decreased vital capacity by ∼20% and mimicked the negative consequences of a mild restrictive lung disorder on exercise endurance time and on dyspnea, breathing pattern, dynamic operating lung volumes, and diaphragmatic electromyographic and respiratory muscle function during exercise. Compared with placebo under both unrestricted control and CWS conditions, nebulized fentanyl had no effect on exercise endurance time, integrated physiological response to exercise, sensory intensity, unpleasantness ratings of exertional dyspnea. Our results do not support a role for intrapulmonary opioids in the neuromodulation of exertional dyspnea in health nor do they provide a physiological rationale for the use of nebulized fentanyl in the management of dyspnea due to mild restrictive lung disorders, specifically those arising from abnormalities of the chest wall and not affiliated with airway inflammation. PMID:26031762

  16. Exercise-induced increase in core temperature does not disrupt a behavioral measure of sleep.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, P J; Breus, M J; Youngstedt, S D

    1998-06-01

    On separate nights 90 to 30 min before typical bedtime, eight physically active men completed three conditions: seated rest, low-intensity and moderate-intensity cycle exercise. Low-and moderate-intensity exercise had no significant effect on sleep onset latency, the number of awakenings, total sleep time or sleep efficiency as measured by the Sleep Assessment Device. Mean core body temperature was higher during sleep after moderate intensity (36.80+/-0.02 degrees C) exercise compared to both the low-intensity exercise (36.67+/-0.02 degrees C) and rest (36.51+/-0.02 degrees C) conditions. It is concluded that a 1-h bout of moderate-intensity exercise performed shortly before bed elevates core body temperature before and during sleep; however, this elevated temperature does not disrupt behavioral measures of sleep obtained in the home environment in physically active male college students who were somewhat sleep deprived. PMID:9748085

  17. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercises Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... riding a stationary bike. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use a metered-dose ...

  18. Carbohydrate mouth rinse: does it improve endurance exercise performance?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that carbohydrate (CHO) supplementation can improve performance in endurance exercises through several mechanisms such as maintenance of glycemia and sparing endogenous glycogen as well as the possibility of a central nervous-system action. Some studies have emerged in recent years in order to test the hypothesis of ergogenic action via central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated that CHO mouth rinse can lead to improved performance of cyclists, and this may be associated with the activation of brain areas linked to motivation and reward. These findings have already been replicated in other endurance modalities, such as running. This alternative seems to be an attractive nutritional tool to improve endurance exercise performance. PMID:20799963

  19. Policy Perspective: Meeting the Challenge of the DOE Order 436.1 Departmental Sustainability - 12527

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Jennifer C.

    2012-07-01

    DOE's Sustainability Performance Office is working to meet sustainability goals at DOE by implementing Executive Orders, Departmental policy, the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) and legislation related to sustainability. Through implementation of Executive Orders, Departmental policy, the SSPP, statutory requirements and regular reporting, analysis and communication, DOE's SPO is working to maintain and expand DOE's leadership in sustainability. (authors)

  20. Creatine supplementation does not decrease oxidative stress and inflammation in skeletal muscle after eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luciano A; Tromm, Camila B; Da Rosa, Guilherme; Bom, Karoliny; Luciano, Thais F; Tuon, Talita; De Souza, Cláudio T; Pinho, Ricardo A

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-six male rats were used; divided into 6 groups (n = 6): saline; creatine (Cr); eccentric exercise (EE) plus saline 24 h (saline + 24 h); eccentric exercise plus Cr 24 h (Cr + 24 h); eccentric exercise plus saline 48 h (saline + 48 h); and eccentric exercise plus Cr 48 h (Cr + 48 h). Cr supplementation was administered as a solution of 300 mg · kg body weight(-1) · day(-1) in 1 mL water, for two weeks, before the eccentric exercise. The animals were submitted to one downhill run session at 1.0 km · h(-1) until exhaustion. Twenty-four and forty-eight hours after the exercise, the animals were killed, and the quadriceps were removed. Creatine kinase levels, superoxide production, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, carbonyl content, total thiol content, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, interleukin-1b (IL-1β), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kb), and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) were analysed. Cr supplementation neither decreases Cr kinase, superoxide production, lipoperoxidation, carbonylation, total thiol, IL-1β, NF-kb, or TNF nor alters the enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxides in relation to the saline group, respectively (P < 0.05). There are positive correlations between Cr kinase and TBARS and TNF-α 48 hours after eccentric exercise. The present study suggests that Cr supplementation does not decrease oxidative stress and inflammation after eccentric contraction. PMID:23560674

  1. DOE-EDER international energy exercise March, 2009 event outline

    SciTech Connect

    Toole, Loren G

    2009-01-01

    The goals are to test and explore the DOE National Labs ability to quickly map, characterize and analyze an event involving Mexico's energy infrastructure system in the wake of a major disruption of energy supplies from Mexico to the US. Focus on the economic impacts and system interdependencies as well as analysis related to restoration and recovery issues.

  2. Exercise training does not increase muscle FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fain, John N.; Company, Joseph M.; Booth, Frank W.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.; Sacks, Harold S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Exercise training elevates circulating irisin and induces the expression of the FNDC5 gene in skeletal muscles of mice. Our objective was to determine whether exercise training also increases FNDC5 protein or mRNA expression in the skeletal muscles of pigs as well as plasma irisin. Methods Castrated male pigs of the Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic (FHM) strain and normal (Yucatan miniature) pigs were sacrificed after 16–20 weeks of exercise training. Samples of cardiac muscle, deltoid and triceps brachii muscle, subcutaneous and epicardial fat were obtained and FNDC5 mRNA, along with that of 6 other genes, was measured in all tissues of FHM pigs by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. FNDC protein in deltoid and triceps brachii was determined by Western blotting in both FHM and normal pigs. Citrate synthase activity was measured in the muscle samples of all pigs as an index of exercise training. Irisin was measured by an ELISA assay. Results There was no statistically significant effect of exercise training on FNDC5 gene expression in epicardial or subcutaneous fat, deltoid muscle, triceps brachii muscle or heart muscle. Exercise-training elevated circulating levels of irisin in the FHM pigs and citrate synthase activity in deltoid and triceps brachii muscle. A similar increase in citrate synthase activity was seen in muscle extracts of exercise-trained normal pigs but there was no alteration in circulating irisin. Conclusion Exercise training in pigs does not increase FNDC5 mRNA or protein in the deltoid or triceps brachii of FHM or normal pigs while increasing circulating irisin only in the FHM pigs. These data indicate that the response to exercise training in normal pigs is not comparable to that seen in mice. PMID:23831442

  3. High Intensity Exercise Countermeasures does not Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance Following Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.; Lee, Stuart M. C.

    2014-01-01

    differences (p=0.77) between groups. Plasma volume (absolute or relative to body mass index) decreased (p<0.001) from pre to post-BR, with no differences between groups. CONCLUSIONS These preliminary results corroborate previous reports that the performance of a vigorous exercise countermeasure protocol during BR, even with testosterone supplementation, does not protect against orthostatic intolerance or plasma volume loss. Preventing post-BR orthostatic intolerance may require additional countermeasures, such as orthostatic stress during BR or end-of-BR fluid infusion.

  4. Exerciser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lem, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Mark I exerciser which was added for the second and third Skylab missions, was used for a number of arm and leg exercises. This unit is a modified version of a commercial device. This is an iso-kinetic, or constant velocity, exerciser which retards the speed at which the user is allowed to move. The user applies a maximum effort and the device automatically varies the opposing resistance to maintain speed of translation at a constant preselected value.

  5. Building technology transfer meetings: A collaborative model for transferring DOE research results to potential users

    SciTech Connect

    Shankle, D.L.; Hawkins, D.M.; Love, P.M.; Wilde, G.M.

    1994-08-01

    Transferring the technology and results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored building energy research to potential users is a critical part of DOE`s successful research programs. To assist in this transfer of information and technologies, the DOE Office of Building Technologies (OBT) has established Building Technology Transfer Meetings that are held twice each year at one of the 10 DOE Regional Support Offices. Meeting participants include DOE personnel and representatives from each of the national laboratories involved in OBT buildings energy research as well as representatives from the DOE Regional Support Offices and other agencies involved in the buildings sector. Since 1991, OBT has held five meetings: Washington D.C., San Francisco, Denver, Oak Ridge, and Seattle. The purpose of these meetings is twofold: (1) for DOE to share information about such topics as new research results, new technologies, and new ways to collaborate with industry and universities to leverage resources; and (2) for the participants to use this information within their region to accelerate the transfer and deployment of new energy-efficient building technologies. The meetings include presentations, demonstrations, and tours. The meetings have provided an excellent opportunity for staff from the Regional Support Offices to learn about new technologies through their interactions with OBT and national laboratory program managers. Meeting tours and demonstrations have provided beneficial opportunities to get hands-on experience with new technologies and to see them in practice.

  6. Exercise Training during Normobaric Hypoxic Confinement Does Not Alter Hormonal Appetite Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Debevec, Tadej; Simpson, Elizabeth J.; Macdonald, Ian A.; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Both exposure to hypoxia and exercise training have the potential to modulate appetite and induce beneficial metabolic adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine whether daily moderate exercise training performed during a 10-day exposure to normobaric hypoxia alters hormonal appetite regulation and augments metabolic health. Methods Fourteen healthy, male participants underwent a 10-day hypoxic confinement at ∼4000 m simulated altitude (FIO2 = 0.139±0.003%) either combined with daily moderate intensity exercise (Exercise group; N = 8, Age = 25.8±2.4 yrs, BMI = 22.9±1.2 kg·m−2) or without any exercise (Sedentary group; N = 6 Age = 24.8±3.1 yrs, BMI = 22.3±2.5 kg·m−2). A meal tolerance test was performed before (Pre) and after the confinement (Post) to quantify fasting and postprandial concentrations of selected appetite-related hormones and metabolic risk markers. 13C-Glucose was dissolved in the test meal and 13CO2 determined in breath samples. Perceived appetite ratings were obtained throughout the meal tolerance tests. Results While body mass decreased in both groups (−1.4 kg; p = 0.01) following the confinement, whole body fat mass was only reduced in the Exercise group (−1.5 kg; p = 0.01). At Post, postprandial serum insulin was reduced in the Sedentary group (−49%; p = 0.01) and postprandial plasma glucose in the Exercise group (−19%; p = 0.03). Fasting serum total cholesterol levels were reduced (−12%; p = 0.01) at Post in the Exercise group only, secondary to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction (−16%; p = 0.01). No differences between groups or testing periods were noted in fasting and/or postprandial concentrations of total ghrelin, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide-1, leptin, adiponectin, expired 13CO2 as well as perceived appetite ratings (p>0.05). Conclusion These findings suggest that performing daily moderate intensity exercise training

  7. Localized β-adrenergic receptor blockade does not affect sweating during exercise.

    PubMed

    Buono, Michael J; Tabor, Brian; White, Ailish

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of a locally administered nonselective β-adrenergic antagonist on sweat gland function during exercise. Systemically administered propranolol has been reported to increase, decrease, or not alter sweat production during exercise. To eliminate the confounding systemic effects associated with orally administered propranolol, we used iontophoresis to deliver it to the eccrine sweat glands within a localized area on one forearm prior to exercise. This allowed for determination of the direct effect of β-adrenergic receptor blockade on sweating during exercise. Subjects (n = 14) reported to the laboratory (23 ± 1°C, 35 ± 3% relative humidity) after having refrained from exercise for ≥12 h. Propranolol (1% solution) was administered to a 5-cm(2) area of the flexor surface of one forearm via iontophoresis (1.5 mA) for 5 min. A saline solution was administered to the opposing arm via iontophoresis. Each subject then exercised on a motor-driven treadmill at 75% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate for 20 min, while sweat rate was measured simultaneously in both forearms. Immediately after cessation of exercise, the number of active sweat glands was measured by application of iodine-impregnated paper to each forearm. The sweat rate for the control and propranolol-treated forearm was 0.62 ± 41 and 0.60 ± 0.44 (SD) mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), respectively (P = 0.86). The density of active sweat glands for the control and propranolol-treated forearm was 130 ± 6 and 134 ± 5 (SD) glands/cm(2), respectively, (P = 0.33). End-exercise skin temperature was 32.9 ± 0.2 and 33.1 ± 0.3°C for the control and propranolol-treated forearm, respectively (P = 0.51). Results of the current study show that when propranolol is administered locally, thus eliminating the potential confounding systemic effects of the drug, it does not directly affect sweating during the initial stages of high-intensity exercise in young, healthy

  8. Carbohydrate supplementation during prolonged cycling exercise spares muscle glycogen but does not affect intramyocellular lipid use

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Hanneke; Gijsen, Annemie P.; Stegen, Jos H. C. H.; Kuipers, Harm; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2007-01-01

    Using contemporary stable-isotope methodology and fluorescence microscopy, we assessed the impact of carbohydrate supplementation on whole-body and fiber-type-specific intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG) and glycogen use during prolonged endurance exercise. Ten endurance-trained male subjects were studied twice during 3 h of cycling at 63 ± 4% of maximal O2 uptake with either glucose ingestion (CHO trial; 0.7 g CHO kg−1 h−1) or without (CON placebo trial; water only). Continuous infusions with [U-13C] palmitate and [6,6-2H2] glucose were applied to quantify plasma free fatty acids (FFA) and glucose oxidation rates and to estimate intramyocellular lipid and glycogen use. Before and after exercise, muscle biopsy samples were taken to quantify fiber-type-specific IMTG and glycogen content. Plasma glucose rate of appearance (Ra) and carbohydrate oxidation rates were substantially greater in the CHO vs CON trial. Carbohydrate supplementation resulted in a lower muscle glycogen use during the first hour of exercise in the CHO vs CON trial, resulting in a 38 ± 19 and 57 ± 22% decreased utilization in type I and II muscle-fiber glycogen content, respectively. In the CHO trial, both plasma FFA Ra and subsequent plasma FFA concentrations were lower, resulting in a 34 ± 12% reduction in plasma FFA oxidation rates during exercise (P < 0.05). Carbohydrate intake did not augment IMTG utilization, as fluorescence microscopy revealed a 76 ± 21 and 78 ± 22% reduction in type I muscle-fiber lipid content in the CHO and CON trial, respectively. We conclude that carbohydrate supplementation during prolonged cycling exercise does not modulate IMTG use but spares muscle glycogen use during the initial stages of exercise in endurance-trained men. PMID:17333244

  9. Acute moderate exercise does not attenuate cardiometabolic function associated with a bout of prolonged sitting.

    PubMed

    Younger, Amanda M; Pettitt, Robert W; Sexton, Patrick J; Maass, William J; Pettitt, Cherie D

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that prolonged sitting increases all-cause mortality; yet, physiological causes underpinning prolonged sitting remain elusive. We evaluated cardiometabolic function during prolonged sitting (5 h) in 10 adults with and without 30 min of moderate exercise leading up to the sitting. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and posterior tibial artery blood velocity were measured at baseline and every hour subsequently. Blood glucose was measured at baseline, 3 and 5 h, with consumption of a caloric beverage at 1 h. Seated MAP and HR values were ~17 mmHg (P < 0.001) and ~4 bpm (P < 0.05) higher for the moderate exercise versus sitting conditions. A ~ 4 cm·s(-1) (16%) (P < 0.05) decline in posterior tibial artery blood velocity from prolonged sitting was observed, with no benefit conferred from moderate exercise. Postprandial glucose metabolism was not different between conditions (P > 0.05). We conclude prolonged sitting may be related to decreased posterior tibial artery blood velocity. Moreover, an acute bout of moderate exercise does not seem to attenuate cardiometabolic function during prolonged sitting in healthy, young adults. PMID:26186044

  10. Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... article Exercise / physical activity with MS Judy Boone, physical therapist Lynn Williams, Dan Melfi and Dave Altman discuss ... adjusted as changes occur in MS symptoms. A physical therapist experienced with MS can be helpful in designing, ...

  11. 1990 DOE/SANDIA crystalline photovoltaic technology project review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, D.S.

    1990-07-01

    This document serves as the proceedings for the annual project review meeting held by Sandia's Photovoltaic Cell Research Division and Photovoltaic Technology Division. It contains information supplied by each organization making a presentation at the meeting, which was held August 7 through 9, 1990 at the Sheraton Hotel in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sessions were held to discuss national photovoltaic programs, one-sun crystalline silicon cell research, concentrator silicon cell research, concentrator 3-5 cell research, and concentrating collector development.

  12. 43 CFR 3137.88 - What happens when a well outside a participating area does not meet the productivity criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... participating area does not meet the productivity criteria? 3137.88 Section 3137.88 Public Lands: Interior... participating area does not meet the productivity criteria? If a well outside any of the established participating area(s) does not meet the productivity criteria, all operations on that well are...

  13. 43 CFR 3137.88 - What happens when a well outside a participating area does not meet the productivity criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... participating area does not meet the productivity criteria? 3137.88 Section 3137.88 Public Lands: Interior... participating area does not meet the productivity criteria? If a well outside any of the established participating area(s) does not meet the productivity criteria, all operations on that well are...

  14. 43 CFR 3137.88 - What happens when a well outside a participating area does not meet the productivity criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... participating area does not meet the productivity criteria? 3137.88 Section 3137.88 Public Lands: Interior... participating area does not meet the productivity criteria? If a well outside any of the established participating area(s) does not meet the productivity criteria, all operations on that well are...

  15. 43 CFR 3137.88 - What happens when a well outside a participating area does not meet the productivity criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... participating area does not meet the productivity criteria? 3137.88 Section 3137.88 Public Lands: Interior... participating area does not meet the productivity criteria? If a well outside any of the established participating area(s) does not meet the productivity criteria, all operations on that well are...

  16. Acute dietary nitrate supplementation does not augment submaximal forearm exercise hyperemia in healthy young men

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Kwang; Moore, David J.; Maurer, David G.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Basu, Swati; Flanagan, Michael P.; Skulas-Ray, Ann C.; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Proctor, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of dietary nitrate supplementation and the growing evidence base of its potential ergogenic and vascular health benefits, there is no direct information about its effects on exercising limb blood flow in humans. We hypothesized that acute dietary nitrate supplementation from beetroot juice would augment the increases in forearm blood flow, as well as the progressive dilation of the brachial artery, during graded handgrip exercise in healthy young men. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 12 young (22 ± 2 years) healthy men consumed a beetroot juice (140 mL Beet-It Sport, James White Juice Company) that provided 12.9 mmol (0.8 g) of nitrate or placebo (nitrate-depleted Beet-It Sport) on 2 study visits. At 3 h postconsumption, brachial artery diameter, flow, and blood velocity were measured (Doppler ultrasound) at rest and during 6 exercise intensities. Nitrate supplementation raised plasma nitrate (19.5-fold) and nitrite (1.6-fold) concentrations, and lowered resting arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) versus placebo (all p < 0.05) indicating absorption, conversion, and a biological effect of this supplement. The supplement-associated lowering of PWV was also negatively correlated with plasma nitrite (r = -0.72, p = 0.0127). Despite these systemic effects, nitrate supplementation had no effect on brachial artery diameter, flow, or shear rates at rest (all p ≥ 0.28) or during any exercise workload (all p ≥ 0.18). These findings suggest that acute dietary nitrate supplementation favorably modifies arterial PWV, but does not augment blood flow or brachial artery vasodilation during non-fatiguing forearm exercise in healthy young men. PMID:25536008

  17. Acute dietary nitrate supplementation does not augment submaximal forearm exercise hyperemia in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Kwang; Moore, David J; Maurer, David G; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Basu, Swati; Flanagan, Michael P; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Proctor, David N

    2015-02-01

    Despite the popularity of dietary nitrate supplementation and the growing evidence base of its potential ergogenic and vascular health benefits, there is no direct information about its effects on exercising limb blood flow in humans. We hypothesized that acute dietary nitrate supplementation from beetroot juice would augment the increases in forearm blood flow, as well as the progressive dilation of the brachial artery, during graded handgrip exercise in healthy young men. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, 12 young (22 ± 2 years) healthy men consumed a beetroot juice (140 mL Beet-It Sport, James White Juice Company) that provided 12.9 mmol (0.8 g) of nitrate or placebo (nitrate-depleted Beet-It Sport) on 2 study visits. At 3 h postconsumption, brachial artery diameter, flow, and blood velocity were measured (Doppler ultrasound) at rest and during 6 exercise intensities. Nitrate supplementation raised plasma nitrate (19.5-fold) and nitrite (1.6-fold) concentrations, and lowered resting arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) versus placebo (all p < 0.05), indicating absorption, conversion, and a biological effect of this supplement. The supplement-associated lowering of PWV was also negatively correlated with plasma nitrite (r = -0.72, p = 0.0127). Despite these systemic effects, nitrate supplementation had no effect on brachial artery diameter, flow, or shear rates at rest (all p ≥ 0.28) or during any exercise workload (all p ≥ 0.18). These findings suggest that acute dietary nitrate supplementation favorably modifies arterial PWV, but does not augment blood flow or brachial artery vasodilation during nonfatiguing forearm exercise in healthy young men. PMID:25536008

  18. Life-long spontaneous exercise does not prolong lifespan but improves health span in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Life expectancy at birth in the first world has increased from 35 years at the beginning of the 20th century to more than 80 years now. The increase in life expectancy has resulted in an increase in age-related diseases and larger numbers of frail and dependent people. The aim of our study was to determine whether life-long spontaneous aerobic exercise affects lifespan and healthspan in mice. Results Male C57Bl/6J mice, individually caged, were randomly assigned to one of two groups: sedentary (n = 72) or spontaneous wheel-runners (n = 72). We evaluated longevity and several health parameters including grip strength, motor coordination, exercise capacity (VO2max) and skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis. We also measured the cortical levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin associated with brain plasticity. In addition, we measured systemic oxidative stress (malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl plasma levels) and the expression and activity of two genes involved in antioxidant defense in the liver (that is, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD)). Genes that encode antioxidant enzymes are considered longevity genes because their over-expression may modulate lifespan. Aging was associated with an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers and in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, GPx and Mn-SOD, in the liver in mice. Life-long spontaneous exercise did not prolong longevity but prevented several signs of frailty (that is, decrease in strength, endurance and motor coordination). This improvement was accompanied by a significant increase in the mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and in the cortical BDNF levels. Conclusion Life-long spontaneous exercise does not prolong lifespan but improves healthspan in mice. Exercise is an intervention that delays age-associated frailty, enhances function and can be translated into the clinic. PMID:24472376

  19. Evaluating the effectiveness of public meetings and workshops: A new approach for improving DOE public involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.; Williams, G.; Goldberg, M.

    1993-07-01

    Although public participation in the environmental cleanup process has been ongoing in the US Department of Energy (DOE) for some time, little if any evaluation of these efforts to include the public has taken place. This report contains the results of an evaluation of six regional workshops and meetings. These meetings and workshops focused on the implementation plan for the programmatic environmental impact statement on DOE`s environmental cleanup efforts. The formats of the workshops and meetings differed from typical public meetings by offering more opportunity for interaction between agency personnel and the public, using impartial facilitators, and including more elaborate promotional strategies than notification in the Federal Register. Questionnaires and focus groups were used to solicit participants` perspectives on the meetings.

  20. 41 CFR 102-3.20 - How does this part meet the needs of its audience?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the needs of its audience? 102-3.20 Section 102-3.20 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...? § 102-3.20 How does this part meet the needs of its audience? This Federal Advisory Committee Management part meets the general and specific needs of its audience by addressing the following issues...

  1. 41 CFR 102-3.20 - How does this part meet the needs of its audience?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the needs of its audience? 102-3.20 Section 102-3.20 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...? § 102-3.20 How does this part meet the needs of its audience? This Federal Advisory Committee Management part meets the general and specific needs of its audience by addressing the following issues...

  2. 41 CFR 102-3.20 - How does this part meet the needs of its audience?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the needs of its audience? 102-3.20 Section 102-3.20 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...? § 102-3.20 How does this part meet the needs of its audience? This Federal Advisory Committee Management part meets the general and specific needs of its audience by addressing the following issues...

  3. 41 CFR 102-3.20 - How does this part meet the needs of its audience?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the needs of its audience? 102-3.20 Section 102-3.20 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...? § 102-3.20 How does this part meet the needs of its audience? This Federal Advisory Committee Management part meets the general and specific needs of its audience by addressing the following issues...

  4. 41 CFR 102-3.20 - How does this part meet the needs of its audience?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the needs of its audience? 102-3.20 Section 102-3.20 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...? § 102-3.20 How does this part meet the needs of its audience? This Federal Advisory Committee Management part meets the general and specific needs of its audience by addressing the following issues...

  5. Does it matter if I exercise? What can ``cardiophysics" tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gus; Wilson, Benjamin; Parcell, Allen

    2007-10-01

    Lower heart rates are often associated with better cardiovascular health. But there's a lot more to cardiac rhythms than just the average heart rate. Fractal analysis of inter-beat intervals shows a surprising ability to discriminate between healthy and unhealthy, young and old groups. Are the fluctuations in the heartbeat of a healthy heart random, small, periodic, or chaotic? Does exercise make a difference? We discuss our analysis of the cardiac data of two groups of individuals, those that were physically active and those that were sedentary.

  6. Exercise effects on lipids in persons with varying dietary patterns - Does diet matter if they exercise? Responses in STRRIDE I

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Kim M.; Hawk, Victoria H.; Henes, Sarah T.; Ocampo, Christine I.; Orenduff, Melissa C.; Slentz, Cris A.; Johnson, Johanna L.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Samsa, Gregory P.; Kraus, William E.; Bales, Connie W.

    2012-01-01

    Background The standard clinical approach for reducing cardiovascular disease risk due to dyslipidemia is to prescribe changes in diet and physical activity. The purpose of the current study was to determine if, across a range of dietary patterns, there were variable lipoprotein responses to an aerobic exercise training intervention. Methods Subjects were participants in the Studies of a Targeted Risk Reduction Intervention through Defined Exercise (STRRIDE I), a supervised exercise program in sedentary, overweight subjects randomized to 6 months of inactivity or one of 3 aerobic exercise programs. To characterize diet patterns observed during the study, we calculated a modified z-score that included intakes of total fat, saturated fat, trans fatty acids, cholesterol, omega-3 fatty acids and fiber as compared to the 2006 AHA diet recommendations. Linear models were used to evaluate relationships between diet patterns and exercise effects on lipoproteins/lipids. Results Independent of diet, exercise had beneficial effects on LDL-cholesterol particle number, LDL-cholesterol size, HDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol size, and triglycerides (P<0.05 for all). However, having a diet pattern that closely adhered to AHA recommendations was not related to changes in these or any other serum lipids or lipoproteins in any of the exercise groups. Conclusions We found that even in sedentary individuals whose habitual diets vary in the extent of adherence to AHA dietary recommendations, a rigorous, supervised exercise intervention can achieve significant beneficial lipid effects. PMID:22795291

  7. Does degree of alteration in effort sense caused by eccentric exercise significantly affect initial exercise hyperpnea in humans?

    PubMed

    Hotta, Norio; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Ogata, Hisayoshi; Maher, Patrick; Okumura, Naoya; Ishida, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown an exaggeration in exercise hyperpnea 2 days after eccentric exercise (ECC). Enhancement in central command has been suggested as one candidate to account for this effect given that ECC-induced neuromuscular dysfunction increases relative exercise intensity, thus resulting in reinforcement of effort sense. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to elucidate whether the degree of alteration in effort sense caused by ECC affects exercise hyperpnea. Ten subjects performed 20-s single-arm extension-flexion exercises with weight strapped to the wrist, and ventilatory response was measured before (Pre) and 2 days after ECC (D2). Relative exercise intensity at Pre was 5 % of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of Pre, whereas that at D2 was 9 % MVC of D2 because of decline in muscle strength. Ventilatory responses were significantly exaggerated at D2 with a significant increase in effort sense. Although effort sense was significantly reduced during exercise at D2 when wrist weight was subtracted to match relative exercise intensity at Pre (5 % MVC of D2), ventilatory responses were still significantly higher than those of Pre. After the disappearance of post-ECC muscle damage, subjects performed the same exercise with weight added (9 % MVC of Pre) so that effort was equalized to match that of D2; however, no significant increase in ventilatory response was detected. The fact that the extent of change in effort sense caused by ECC-induced neuromuscular dysfunction did not affect ventilatory response at the onset of exercise after ECC may suggest that the exaggeration of ventilatory response after ECC is caused by mechanisms other than alteration of the central command. PMID:27558395

  8. Energy deficit after exercise augments lipid mobilization but does not contribute to the exercise-induced increase in insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Newsom, Sean A.; Schenk, Simon; Thomas, Kristin M.; Harber, Matthew P.; Knuth, Nicolas D.; Goldenberg, Naila

    2010-01-01

    The content of meals consumed after exercise can impact metabolic responses for hours and even days after the exercise session. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of low dietary carbohydrate (CHO) vs. low energy intake in meals after exercise on insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism the next day. Nine healthy men participated in four randomized trials. During the control trial (CON) subjects remained sedentary. During the other three trials, subjects exercised [65% peak oxygen consumption (V̇o2peak); cycle ergometer and treadmill exercise] until they expended ∼800 kcal. Dietary intake during CON and one exercise trial (BAL) was designed to provide sufficient energy and carbohydrate to maintain nutrient balance. In contrast, the diets after the other two exercise trials were low in either CHO (LOW-CHO) or energy (LOW-EN). The morning after exercise we obtained a muscle biopsy, assessed insulin sensitivity (Si; intravenous glucose tolerance test) and measured lipid kinetics (isotope tracers). Although subjects were in energy balance during both LOW-CHO and CON, the lower muscle glycogen concentration during LOW-CHO vs. CON (402 ± 29 vs. 540 ± 33 mmol/kg dry wt, P < 0.01) coincided with a significant increase in Si [5.2 ± 0.7 vs. 3.8 ± 0.7 (mU/l)−1·min−1; P < 0.05]. Conversely, despite ingesting several hundred fewer kilocalories after exercise during LOW-EN compared with BAL, this energy deficit did not affect Si the next day [4.9 ± 0.9, and 5.0 ± 0.8 (mU/l)−1·min−1]. Maintaining an energy deficit after exercise had the most potent effect on lipid metabolism, as measured by a higher plasma triacylglycerol concentration, and increased plasma fatty acid mobilization and oxidation compared with when in nutrient balance. Carbohydrate deficit after exercise, but not energy deficit, contributed to the insulin-sensitizing effects of acute aerobic exercise, whereas maintaining an energy deficit after exercise augmented lipid

  9. Core outcome measures for exercise studies in people with multiple sclerosis: recommendations from a multidisciplinary consensus meeting.

    PubMed

    Paul, Lorna; Coote, Susan; Crosbie, Jean; Dixon, Diane; Hale, Leigh; Holloway, Ed; McCrone, Paul; Miller, Linda; Saxton, John; Sincock, Caroline; White, Lesley

    2014-10-01

    Evidence shows that exercise is beneficial for people with multiple sclerosis (MS); however, statistical pooling of data is difficult because of the diversity of outcome measures used. The objective of this review is to report the recommendations of an International Consensus Meeting for a core set of outcome measures for use in exercise studies in MS. From the 100 categories of the International Classification of Function Core Sets for MS, 57 categories were considered as likely/potentially likely to be affected by exercise and were clustered into seven core groups. Outcome measures to address each group were evaluated regarding, for example, psychometric properties. The following are recommended: Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) or Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) for energy and drive, 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) for exercise tolerance, Timed Up and Go (TUG) for muscle function and moving around, Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) or Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 Instrument (MSQoL54) for quality of life and body mass index (BMI) or waist-hip ratio (WHR) for the health risks associated with excess body fat. A cost effectiveness analysis and qualitative evaluation should be included where possible. Using these core measures ensures that future meta-analyses of exercise studies in MS are more robust and thus more effectively inform practice. PMID:24639480

  10. Meeting the Basic Needs of Children: Does Income Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Gennetian, Lisa A.; Castells, Nina; Morris, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    We review existing research and policy evidence about income as an essential component to meeting children’s basic needs—that is, income represented as the purest monetary transfer for increasing the purchasing power of low income families. Social scientists have made great methodological strides in establishing whether income has independent effects on the cognitive development of low-income children. Our review of that research suggests that a $1,000 increase in income has positive, but small, effects on children, rarely exceeding 1/10th of a standard deviation change in outcomes for children. We argue that researchers are well-positioned for more rigorous investigations about how and why income affects children, but only first with thoughtful and creative regard for conceptual clarity, and on understanding income’s potentially inter-related influences on socio-emotional development, mental, and physical health. We also argue for more focus on the effects of income transfers, including when conditional on employment, as compared to more targeted direct investments in children. We end with a description of two-generation and cafeteria-style programs as the frontiers of the next generation in income-enhancement policies, and with the promise of insights from behavioral economics. PMID:20689675

  11. INFOTECH `92: DOE Technical Information (TI) Meeting, October 21--23, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This proceedings contains papers presented at the 1992 Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Information Meeting held at the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 21--23, 1992. It is composed of written presentation given orally at the meeting in either large-group or break-out sessions. The proceedings is provided as a reference tool for those who attended the meeting as well as an information document for those unable to attend. The annual DOE Technical Information meeting is designed for information professionals involved in the management of the Department`s scientific and technical information (STI). Speakers include members of the OSTI staff as well as DOE and DOE contractors and other invited specialists in the field of information. The major objective of the meeting is to provide a forum within the Department for discussing current and future information policies, trends, and management techniques as well as the technologies and standards available for managing and accessing scientific and technical information.

  12. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  13. 34 CFR 30.70 - How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 103, to determine whether compromise of a debt is appropriate if— (1) The... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 104, to determine whether suspension or termination of collection action... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does the Secretary exercise discretion...

  14. 34 CFR 30.70 - How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 103, to determine whether compromise of a debt is appropriate if— (1) The... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 104, to determine whether suspension or termination of collection action... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How does the Secretary exercise discretion...

  15. 34 CFR 30.70 - How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 103, to determine whether compromise of a debt is appropriate if— (1) The... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 104, to determine whether suspension or termination of collection action... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Secretary exercise discretion...

  16. 34 CFR 30.70 - How does the Secretary exercise discretion to compromise a debt or to suspend or terminate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 103, to determine whether compromise of a debt is appropriate if— (1) The... standards in the FCCS, 4 CFR part 104, to determine whether suspension or termination of collection action... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How does the Secretary exercise discretion...

  17. 5 CFR 9901.410 - Addressing performance that does not meet expectations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Addressing performance that does not meet expectations. 9901.410 Section 9901.410 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCES... range of options available to address the performance deficiency, including remedial...

  18. Ischemic preconditioning does not improve peak exercise capacity at sea level or simulated high altitude in trained male cyclists.

    PubMed

    Hittinger, Elizabeth A; Maher, Jennifer L; Nash, Mark S; Perry, Arlette C; Signorile, Joseph F; Kressler, Jochen; Jacobs, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) may improve blood flow and oxygen delivery to tissues, including skeletal muscle, and has the potential to improve intense aerobic exercise performance, especially that which results in arterial hypoxemia. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of IPC of the legs on peak exercise capacity (W(peak)), submaximal and peak cardiovascular hemodynamics, and peripheral capillary oxygen saturation (SpO2) in trained males at sea level (SL) and simulated high altitude (HA; 13.3% FIO2, ∼ 3650 m). Fifteen highly trained male cyclists and triathletes completed 2 W(peak) tests (SL and HA) and 4 experimental exercise trials (10 min at 55% altitude-specific W(peak) then increasing by 30 W every 2 min until exhaustion) with and without IPC. HA resulted in significant arterial hypoxemia during exercise compared with SL (73% ± 6% vs. 93% ± 4% SpO2, p < 0.001) that was associated with 21% lower W(peak) values. IPC did not significantly improve W(peak) at SL or HA. Additionally, IPC failed to improve cardiovascular hemodynamics or SpO2 during submaximal exercise or at W(peak). In conclusion, IPC performed 45 min prior to exercise does not improve W(peak) or systemic oxygen delivery during submaximal or peak exercise at SL or HA. Future studies must examine the influence of IPC on local factors, such as working limb blood flow, oxygen delivery, and arteriovenous oxygen difference as well as whether the effectiveness of IPC is altered by the volume of muscle made ischemic, the timing prior to exercise, and high altitude acclimatization. PMID:25474566

  19. Does Body Mass Index Influence Behavioral Regulations, Dispositional Flow and Social Physique Anxiety in Exercise Setting?

    PubMed Central

    Ersöz, Gözde; Altiparmak, Ersin; Aşçı, F. Hülya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in behavioral regulations, dispositional flow, social physique anxiety of exercisers in terms of body mass index (BMI). 782 university students participated in this study. Dispositional Flow State Scale-2, Behavioral Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2, Social Physique Anxiety Scale and Physical Activity Stages of Change Questionnaire were administered to participants. After controlling for gender, analysis indicated significant differences in behavioral regulations, dispositional flow and social physique anxiety of exercise participants with regards to BMI. In summary, the findings demonstrate that normal weighted participants exercise for internal reasons while underweighted participants are amotivated for exercise participation. Additionally, participants who are underweight had higher dispositional flow and lower social physique anxiety scores than other BMI classification. Key points Normal weighted participants exercise for internal reasons. Underweighted participants are amotivated for exercise participation. Underweighted participants had higher dispositional flow. Underweighted participants have lower social physique anxiety scores than normal weighted, overweight and obese participants. PMID:27274667

  20. Acute supplementation of N-acetylcysteine does not affect muscle blood flow and oxygenation characteristics during handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua R; Broxterman, Ryan M; Ade, Carl J; Evans, Kara K; Kurti, Stephanie P; Hammer, Shane M; Barstow, Thomas J; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC; antioxidant and thiol donor) supplementation has improved exercise performance and delayed fatigue, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. One possibility isNACsupplementation increases limb blood flow during severe-intensity exercise. The purpose was to determine ifNACsupplementation affected exercising arm blood flow and muscle oxygenation characteristics. We hypothesized thatNACwould lead to higher limb blood flow and lower muscle deoxygenation characteristics during severe-intensity exercise. Eight healthy nonendurance trained men (21.8 ± 1.2 years) were recruited and completed two constant power handgrip exercise tests at 80% peak power until exhaustion. Subjects orally consumed either placebo (PLA) orNAC(70 mg/kg) 60 min prior to handgrip exercise. Immediately prior to exercise, venous blood samples were collected for determination of plasma redox balance. Brachial artery blood flow (BABF) was measured via Doppler ultrasound and flexor digitorum superficialis oxygenation characteristics were measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. FollowingNACsupplementaiton, plasma cysteine (NAC: 47.2 ± 20.3 μmol/L vs.PLA: 9.6 ± 1.2 μmol/L;P = 0.001) and total cysteine (NAC: 156.2 ± 33.9 μmol/L vs.PLA: 132.2 ± 16.3 μmol/L;P = 0.048) increased. Time to exhaustion was not significantly different (P = 0.55) betweenNAC(473.0 ± 62.1 sec) andPLA(438.7 ± 58.1 sec). RestingBABFwas not different (P = 0.79) withNAC(99.3 ± 31.1 mL/min) andPLA(108.3 ± 46.0 mL/min).BABFwas not different (P = 0.42) during exercise or at end-exercise (NAC: 413 ± 109 mL/min;PLA: 445 ± 147 mL/min). Deoxy-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] and total-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were not significantly different (P = 0.73 andP = 0.54, respectively) at rest or during exercise between conditions. We conclude that acuteNACsupplementation does not alter oxygen delivery during exercise in men. PMID:27044854

  1. Diet and Exercise Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health News & Publications Annual Meeting Calendar Diet and Exercise Tips Diet and Exercise Tips News media interested in covering the latest ... Health Statistics concludes that 35 percent of adults exercise regularly (more than 6 of 10 don’t), ...

  2. Uncertainty Exposed: A Field Lab Exercise Where GIS Meets the Real World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prisley, Stephen P.; Luebbering, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Students in natural resources programs commonly take courses in geospatial technologies. An awareness of the uncertainty of spatial data and algorithms can be an important outcome of such courses. This article describes a laboratory exercise in a graduate geographic information system (GIS) class that involves collection of data for the assessment…

  3. Why Does Exercise “Trigger” Adaptive Protective Responses in the Heart?

    PubMed Central

    Alleman, Rick J.; Stewart, Luke M.; Tsang, Alvin M.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies suggest that individuals who exercise have decreased cardiac morbidity and mortality. Pre-clinical studies in animal models also find clear cardioprotective phenotypes in animals that exercise, specifically characterized by lower myocardial infarction and arrhythmia. Despite the clear benefits, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that are responsible for exercise preconditioning are not fully understood. In particular, the adaptive signaling events that occur during exercise to “trigger” cardioprotection represent emerging paradigms. In this review, we discuss recent studies that have identified several different factors that appear to initiate exercise preconditioning. We summarize the evidence for and against specific cellular factors in triggering exercise adaptations and identify areas for future study. PMID:26674259

  4. Does exercise stimulate protein breakdown in humans. Isotopic approaches to the problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    Protein metabolism in exercise has been investigated for 100 yr, yet it is still unclear if exercise induces an increased rate of protein breakdown. We have recently addressed this general question in a series of experiments in human subjects using stable isotopic tracers. In this paper, the results of those studies are reviewed. We have found that in light exercise the de-carboxylation of leucine is increased. However, urea production is not increased correspondingly, nor is the rate of incorporation into urea of nitrogen from either leucine or lysine. Further complicating the picture is the fact that lysine de-carboxylation is not markedly elevated in exercise. From these studies, we must conclude that isotopic techniques which have achieved general acceptance in other circumstances cannot reliably be used to answer the question of whether exercise stimulates protein breakdown in humans. However, these methods do provide results which enable a better understanding of the metabolism of the individual amino acids in exercise.

  5. Ascorbic acid supplementation does not alter oxidative stress markers in healthy volunteers engaged in a supervised exercise program.

    PubMed

    Bunpo, Piyawan; Anthony, Tracy G

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of ascorbic acid (AA) consumption on the oxidative stress status of untrained volunteers participating in a supervised exercise program. The study included 46 young adults (average age, 23.5 ± 0.59 years; 37 females, 9 males) who remained sedentary (n = 16) or participated in 30 min of outdoor aerobic running (n = 30) at an intensity corresponding to 65%-75% of maximum heart rate for 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Exercised subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group without AA supplementation (control; n = 10) or received either 250 mg (n = 10) or 500 mg (n = 10) of AA supplementation previous to each exercise session. Blood samples were taken on day 0 and day 84 to evaluate metabolic profiles and antioxidant status. Sedentary subjects underwent in a single bout of aerobic running to determine total antioxidant status (TAS) and malondiadehyde (MDA) at pre- and postexercise with or without AA supplementation. No significant change in TAS was observed. Plasma MDA significantly increased at postexercise (P < 0.05), and AA supplementation decreased MDA level significantly (P < 0.05). After 3 months of exercise, there was no significant change in blood glucose, lipid profile, MDA, TAS, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase activities amongst groups. Supplementation of AA was associated with minor and inconsistent reductions in SOD, GPx, and catalase activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that pre-exercise supplementation of ascorbic acid does not alter oxidative stress markers in the plasma and erythrocytes of young adults engaged in a supervised exercise program. PMID:26789096

  6. Expiratory muscle fatigue does not regulate operating lung volumes during high-intensity exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bryan J; How, Stephen C; Romer, Lee M

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether expiratory muscle fatigue (EMF) is involved in regulating operating lung volumes during exercise, nine recreationally active subjects cycled at 90% of peak work rate to the limit of tolerance with prior induction of EMF (EMF-ex) and for a time equal to that achieved in EMF-ex without prior induction of EMF (ISO-ex). EMF was assessed by measuring changes in magnetically evoked gastric twitch pressure. Changes in end-expiratory and end-inspiratory lung volume (EELV and EILV) and the degree of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) were quantified using maximal expiratory flow-volume curves and inspiratory capacity maneuvers. Resistive breathing reduced gastric twitch pressure (-24 ± 14%, P = 0.004). During EMF-ex, EELV decreased from rest to the 3rd min of exercise [39 ± 8 vs. 27 ± 7% of forced vital capacity (FVC), P = 0.001] before increasing toward baseline (34 ± 8% of FVC end exercise, P = 0.073 vs. rest). EILV increased from rest to the 3rd min of exercise (54 ± 8 vs. 84 ± 9% of FVC, P = 0.006) and remained elevated to end exercise (88 ± 9% of FVC). Neither EELV (P = 0.18) nor EILV (P = 0.26) was different at any time point during EMF-ex vs. ISO-ex. Four subjects became expiratory flow limited during the final minute of EMF-ex and ISO-ex; the degree of EFL was not different between trials (37 ± 18 vs. 35 ± 16% of tidal volume, P = 0.38). At end exercise in both trials, EELV was greater in subjects without vs. subjects with EFL. These findings suggest that 1) contractile fatigue of the expiratory muscles in healthy humans does not regulate operating lung volumes during high-intensity sustained cycle exercise; and 2) factors other than "frank" EFL cause the terminal increase in EELV. PMID:23558390

  7. Does lung diffusion impairment affect exercise capacity in patients with heart failure?

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, P G; Bussotti, M; Palermo, P; Guazzi, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is a relation between impairment of lung diffusion and reduced exercise capacity in chronic heart failure. Design: 40 patients with heart failure in stable clinical condition and 40 controls participated in the study. All subjects underwent standard pulmonary function tests plus measurements of resting lung diffusion (carbon monoxide transfer, Tlco), pulmonary capillary volume (Vc), and membrane resistance (Dm), and maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In 20 patients and controls, the following investigations were also done: (1) resting and constant work rate Tlco; (2) maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing with inspiratory O2 fractions of 0.21 and 0.16; and (3) rest and peak exercise blood gases. The other subjects underwent Tlco, Dm, and Vc measurements during constant work rate exercise. Results: In normoxia, exercise induced reductions of haemoglobin O2 saturation never occurred. With hypoxia, peak exercise uptake (peak V̇o2) decreased from (mean (SD)) 1285 (395) to 1081 (396) ml/min (p < 0.01) in patients, and from 1861 (563) to 1771 (457) ml/min (p < 0.05) in controls. Resting Tlco correlated with peak V̇o2 in heart failure (normoxia < hypoxia). In heart failure patients and normal subjects, Tlco and peak V̇o2 correlated with O2 arterial content at rest and during peak exercise in both normoxia and hypoxia. Tlco, Vc, and Dm increased during exercise. The increase in Tlco was greater in patients who had a smaller reduction of exercise capacity with hypoxia. Alveolar–arterial O2 gradient at peak correlated with exercise capacity in heart failure during normoxia and, to a greater extent, during hypoxia. Conclusions: Lung diffusion impairment is related to exercise capacity in heart failure. PMID:12381630

  8. Two percent hypohydration does not impair self-selected high intensity intermittent exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Naoyuki; Ito, Ryo; Nakano, Masataka; Matsumoto, Takaaki

    2014-06-26

    The level of hypohydration at which power output during intermittent-exercise performance starts to decrease is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 2% hypohydration without hyperthermia on intermittent-exercise performance. Eight collegiate amateur boxers completed two exercise tests. On day 1, subjects hypohydrated by 2% of body mass by exercising in a hot environment, and on day 2, subjects performed intermittent exercise (4 × 2 min/round [R] separated by 1-min recovery) under a randomly assigned condition of with (HYP) or without (EUH) hypohydration. Each bout consisted of 8 × 5 s of maximal cycling exercise (0.05 kp × body mass) separated by 10 s of passive recovery. Mean power output/kg (MPO); total power output/kg (TPO); energy system relative contribution; and core rectal temperature (Tre) were measured. Changes in body mass before the exercise tests were -2.25 ± 0.18% (HYP) and -0.17 ± 0.19% (EUH) (p < 0.001). MPO, TPO, and each energy contribution ratio were not significantly different between the trials, and pre- and post-exercise-test Tre did not differ significantly between trials. Results demonstrated that approximately 2% hypohydration lies below the point at which power output during intermittent exercise starts to decline. PMID:24978838

  9. Does high muscle temperature accentuate skeletal muscle injury from eccentric exercise?

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Zambraski, Edward J; Sawka, Michael N; Urso, Maria L

    2016-05-01

    Hyperthermia is suspected of accentuating skeletal muscle injury from novel exercise, but this has not been well studied. This study examined if high muscle temperatures alters skeletal muscle injury induced by eccentric exercise (ECC). Eight volunteers (age, 22.5 ± 4.1 year; height, 169.5 ± 10.8 cm; body mass, 76.2 ± 12.6 kg), serving as their own control, and who were not heat acclimatized, completed two elbow flexor ECC trials; in one trial the biceps were heated >40°C (HEAT) and in the other trial there was no heating (NON). HEAT was applied with shortwave diathermy (100 W) for 15 min immediately before the first ECC bout and for 2 min in between each bout. Individuals were followed for 10 days after each ECC session, with a 6-week washout period between arms. The maximal voluntary isometric contraction decreased by 41 ± 17% and 46 ± 20% in the NON and HEAT trials, respectively. Bicep circumference increased by 0.07 ± 0.08 mm (4%, P = 0.04) and relaxed range of motion decreased by 11.5 ± 8.2° (30%, P < 0.001) in both trials. Serum creatine kinase peaked 72-h following ECC (NON: 6289 ± 10407; HEAT: 5486 ± 6229 IU L(-1), 38-fold increase, P < 0.01) as did serum myoglobin (NON: 362 ± 483; HEAT: 355 ± 373 μg L(-1), 13-fold increase, P < 0.03). Plasma HSP 70 was higher (P < 0.02) in HEAT after 120-h of recovery. There were no differences between treatments for plasma HSP27 and interleukins 1β, 6, and 10. The results indicate that >40°C muscle temperature does not alter skeletal muscle injury or functional impairments induced by novel ECC. PMID:27185904

  10. Ibuprofen Ingestion Does Not Affect Markers of Post-exercise Muscle Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Luke; Markworth, James F.; Paulsen, Gøran; Raastad, Truls; Peake, Jonathan M.; Snow, Rod J.; Cameron-Smith, David; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated if oral ingestion of ibuprofen influenced leucocyte recruitment and infiltration following an acute bout of traditional resistance exercise Methods: Sixteen male subjects were divided into two groups that received the maximum over-the-counter dose of ibuprofen (1200mg d−1) or a similarly administered placebo following lower body resistance exercise. Muscle biopsies were taken from m.vastus lateralis and blood serum samples were obtained before and immediately after exercise, and at 3 and 24 h after exercise. Muscle cross-sections were stained with antibodies against neutrophils (CD66b and MPO) and macrophages (CD68). Muscle damage was assessed via creatine kinase and myoglobin in blood serum samples, and muscle soreness was rated on a ten-point pain scale. Results: The resistance exercise protocol stimulated a significant increase in the number of CD66b+ and MPO+ cells when measured 3 h post exercise. Serum creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness all increased post-exercise. Muscle leucocyte infiltration, creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness were unaffected by ibuprofen treatment when compared to placebo. There was also no association between increases in inflammatory leucocytes and any other marker of cellular muscle damage. Conclusion: Ibuprofen administration had no effect on the accumulation of neutrophils, markers of muscle damage or muscle soreness during the first 24 h of post-exercise muscle recovery. PMID:27064890

  11. How Does Exercise Benefit Performance on Cognitive Tests in Primary-School Pupils?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Liam J. B.; Williams, Justin H. G.; Aucott, Lorna; Thomson, Jenny; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We have previously demonstrated improved cognitive performance after a classroom-based exercise regime. In this study, we examined the reproducibility of this effect in a more socio-economically diverse sample and also investigated whether cognitive benefits of exercise were moderated by body mass index (BMI) or symptoms of…

  12. Two percent hypohydration does not impair self-selected high-intensity intermittent exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Naoyuki; Ito, Ryo; Nakano, Masataka; Matsumoto, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    The level of hypohydration at which power output during intermittent exercise performance starts to decrease is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 2% hypohydration without hyperthermia on intermittent exercise performance. Eight collegiate amateur boxers completed 2 exercise tests. On day 1, subjects hypohydrated by 2% of body mass by exercising in a hot environment, and on day 2, subjects performed intermittent exercise (4 × 2 minute per round [R] separated by 1-minute recovery) under a randomly assigned condition of with (HYP) or without (EUH) hypohydration. Each bout consisted of 8 × 5 seconds of maximal cycling exercise (0.05 kp × body mass) separated by 10 seconds of passive recovery. Mean power output per kilogram (MPO), total power output per kilogram (TPO), energy system relative contribution, and core rectal temperature (Tre) were measured. Changes in body mass before the exercise tests were -2.25 ± 0.18% (HYP) and -0.17 ± 0.19% (EUH) (p < 0.001). Mean power output, TPO, and each energy contribution ratio were not significantly different between the trials, and pre- and postexercise test Tre did not differ significantly between trials. Results demonstrated that approximately 2% hypohydration lies below the point at which power output during intermittent exercise starts to decline. PMID:25532431

  13. Melatonin Has An Ergogenic Effect But Does Not Prevent Inflammation and Damage In Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Wladimir Rafael; Botezelli, José Diego; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that exhaustive physical exercise leads to inflammation and skeletal muscle tissue damage. With this in mind, melatonin has been acutely administered before physical exercise; nevertheless, the use of melatonin as an ergogenic agent to prevent tissue inflammation and damage remains uncertain. We evaluated the effects of melatonin on swimming performance, muscle inflammation and damage and several physiological parameters after exhaustive exercise at anaerobic threshold intensity (iLAn) performed during light or dark circadian periods. The iLAn was individually determined and two days later, the animals performed an exhaustive exercise bout at iLAn 30 minutes after melatonin administration. The exercise promoted muscle inflammation and damage, mainly during the dark period, and the exogenous melatonin promoted a high ergogenic effect. The expressive ergogenic effect of melatonin leads to longer periods of muscle contraction, which superimposes a possible melatonin protective effect on the tissue damage and inflammation. PMID:26669455

  14. Television Viewing Does Not Have to Be Sedentary: Motivation to Participate in a TV Exercise Program.

    PubMed

    Meis, Jessie J M; Kremers, Stef P J; Bouman, Martine P A

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored which underlying motivations induced people to participate in a television exercise program called "The Netherlands on the Move!-television" (NOM-tv). A cross-sectional study was carried out among 1,349 viewers of NOM-tv. The respondents completed the intrinsic motivation inventory (IMI), assessing their levels of intrinsic motivation towards participating in the NOM-tv exercises. The results showed that higher levels of intrinsic motivation (i.e. enjoying the NOM-tv exercises, feeling competent to perform this activity, and willingness to put effort into the exercises) were the most important predictive factors of more frequent participation in the NOM-tv exercises. Future screen-based interventions to reduce sedentary behavior should aim especially at encouraging people's intrinsic orientations towards physical activity in an autonomy-supportive way. PMID:22187637

  15. Mental fatigue induced by prolonged self-regulation does not exacerbate central fatigue during subsequent whole-body endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M; Rozand, Vianney; Lepers, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the mental fatigue induced by prolonged self-regulation increases perception of effort and reduces performance during subsequent endurance exercise. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying these negative effects of mental fatigue are unclear. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental fatigue exacerbates central fatigue induced by whole-body endurance exercise. Twelve subjects performed 30 min of either an incongruent Stroop task to induce a condition of mental fatigue or a congruent Stroop task (control condition) in a random and counterbalanced order. Both cognitive tasks (CTs) were followed by a whole-body endurance task (ET) consisting of 6 min of cycling exercise at 80% of peak power output measured during a preliminary incremental test. Neuromuscular function of the knee extensors was assessed before and after CT, and after ET. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured during ET. Both CTs did not induce any decrease in maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque (p = 0.194). During ET, mentally fatigued subjects reported higher RPE (mental fatigue 13.9 ± 3.0, control 13.3 ± 3.2, p = 0.044). ET induced a similar decrease in MVC torque (mental fatigue -17 ± 15%, control -15 ± 11%, p = 0.001), maximal voluntary activation level (mental fatigue -6 ± 9%, control -6 ± 7%, p = 0.013) and resting twitch (mental fatigue -30 ± 14%, control -32 ± 10%, p < 0.001) in both conditions. These findings reject our hypothesis and confirm previous findings that mental fatigue does not reduce the capacity of the central nervous system to recruit the working muscles. The negative effect of mental fatigue on perception of effort does not reflect a greater development of either central or peripheral fatigue. Consequently, mentally fatigued subjects are still able to perform maximal exercise, but they are experiencing an altered performance during submaximal exercise due to higher-than-normal perception of effort

  16. Respiratory heat/water loss alone does not determine the severity of exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Noviski, N; Bar-Yishay, E; Gur, I; Godfrey, S

    1988-03-01

    Respiratory heat loss (RHL) or water loss (RWL) have been proposed as possible triggering factors in exercise and hyperventilation-induced asthma (EIA and HIA). It has recently been demonstrated that exercise intensity and climatic factors are both important in determining the severity of EIA. Eight young asthmatics performed both exercise and isocapnic hyperventilation (IHV) manoeuvres under identical climatic conditions, as part of our investigation of these interactive factors which determine the severity of the asthmatic response. It was found that, when challenged at low ventilatory levels, exercise produced a significantly attenuated asthmatic response compared to IHV. The fall in forced expired volume in 1 sec (delta FEV1) following exercise was 15 +/- 4% as compared with 27 +/- 3% after IHV (p less than 0.002). It is concluded that while the hypernoea in exercise may serve as a trigger, exercise per se introduces an additional factor which serves to limit the full response seen with IHV. This attenuated response is revealed at low ventilatory levels but is masked at high levels. PMID:3384078

  17. Does exercise have a role in the management of gestational diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed Central

    Groeller, Herbert; Lowe, Sandra; Worsley, Anthony; Jenkins, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with a marked increase in the long-term risk of type 2 diabetes and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Engaging in vigorous recreational physical activity prior to and during pregnancy significantly reduces the risk of developing GDM. In contrast, evidence of a therapeutic effect from participation in a structured exercise training regimen, although promising, is limited and requires further more substantial investigation. This paper briefly reviews the pathophysiology of GDM, the evidence related to physical activity participation and exercise regimen intervention on GDM, and the clinical considerations required for prescribing exercise.

  18. Lessons learned during the training exercise for the entry into force of the U.S. additional protocol in the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 in anticipation of the United States bringing into force the Additional Protocol in early 2009 DOE/NNSA planned and executed training exercises in the conduct of Additional Protocol complementary access activities. Brookhaven National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory together produced the exercises designed to prepare the following types of DOE laboratories for complementary access - weapons laboratories, nuclear engineering laboratories, and science laboratories. This panel provides a forum to discuss and summarize the results and lessons learned from the 2008 exercise.

  19. Beta-endorphin infusion during exercise in rats does not alter hepatic or muscle glycogen.

    PubMed

    Jamurtas, A Z; Goldfarb, A H; Chung, S C; Hegde, S; Marino, C; Fatouros, I G

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether beta-endorphin infusion influences liver or muscle glycogen concentration during exercise. Thirty-two rats (Harlan Co., IN, USA) with a body mass of 265-290 g were assigned at random to four groups, each of eight rats: (1) beta-endorphin infusion for 90 min at rest; (2) beta-endorphin infusion for 90 min while running on a rodent treadmill at 22 m x min(-1) and 0% grade; (3) saline infusion (0.9% NaCl) for 90 min at rest; and (4) saline infusion for 90 min while running on a rodent treadmill at 22 m x min(-1) and 0% grade. Beta-endorphin infusion elevated plasma beta-endorphin concentration by 2.5-fold at rest compared with saline infusion at rest, and by two-fold after exercise compared with saline infusion after exercise. Beta-endorphin infusion attenuated exercise-induced glucose concentration but did not alter the fasting hepatic glycogen concentration at rest or after exercise compared with saline infusion. Fasting hepatic glycogen decreased significantly as a result of 90 min of exercise independent of treatment. Deep intermedius muscle glycogen concentration at rest was similar after 90 min of both beta-endorphin and saline infusion and decreased significantly as a result of 90 min of exercise independent of treatment. Our results suggest that liver and muscle glycogenolysis is not responsible for the differences in plasma glucose with beta-endorphin infusion during exercise. PMID:11820687

  20. Exercise training does not affect anthracycline antitumor efficacy while attenuating cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Parry, Traci L; Hayward, Reid

    2015-09-15

    Highly effective anthracyclines, like doxorubicin (DOX), have limited clinical use due to protracted cardiotoxic effects. While exercise is known to be cardioprotective, it is unclear whether exercise compromises chemotherapy treatment efficacy. To determine the effect of exercise training on DOX antitumor efficacy as well as DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, female Fisher 344 rats were randomly assigned to sedentary + saline (SED+SAL), SED+DOX, wheel run exercise training + SAL (WR+SAL), or WR+DOX. On week 11, animals were inoculated with 1×10(6) MatBIII tumor cells. Once tumors reached ∼1 cm in diameter, animals were treated with 12 mg/kg of DOX or SAL. Animals were killed 1, 3, or 5 days following treatment. Tumor growth and cardiac function were measured at each interval. DOX accumulation and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) expression were quantified in tumor and heart tissue. No significant difference (P > 0.05) existed between DOX-treated SED and WR groups for tumor measurements. Exercise preserved cardiac function up to 5 days following DOX treatment. Exercise reduced ventricular DOX accumulation and upregulated ventricular MPR1 and MPR2. In contrast, no differences were observed in DOX accumulation or MRP expression in tumors of SED and WR animals. Endurance exercise had no effect on DOX antitumor efficacy as evidenced by a definitive DOX-induced reduction in tumor growth in both the SED and WR groups. Although exercise did not affect the antitumor efficacy of DOX, it still provided protection against cardiac dysfunction. These effects may be mediated by the degree of DOX tissue accumulation secondary to the regulation of MRP expression. PMID:26246505

  1. The Federal Poverty Level does not meet data needs of the California legislature.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Frausto, D Imelda; Wallace, Steven P

    2012-05-01

    This policy brief highlights results from a survey of a broad sample of the California legislature on their data and information needs, as well as their familiarity and use of various economic measures. It finds that legislative staff most often use the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) when they are making recommendations about policy and evaluating programs for low-income populations. Yet the FPL does not meet most of the criteria for economic data that legislative staff say they want. Specifically, the FPL does not measure local conditions, it is not based on current costs, and it does not take into account all types of expenses faced by low-income families. Other measures of economic security more accurately meet legislative staffs' stated data and information needs, including the Elder and Family Economic Security Indices, the U.S. Census Supplemental Poverty Measure and Relative Poverty Measures. Improving awareness and usability of these other measures of economic security can better match the data and information needs of the California legislature and can contribute to innovative solutions to help California's most vulnerable populations. PMID:22708141

  2. Tyrosine supplementation does not influence the capacity to perform prolonged exercise in a warm environment.

    PubMed

    Watson, Phillip; Enever, Sophie; Page, Andrew; Stockwell, Jenna; Maughan, Ronald J

    2012-10-01

    Eight young men were recruited to a study designed to examine the effect of tyrosine (TYR) supplementation on the capacity to perform prolonged exercise in a warm environment. Subjects entered the laboratory in the morning and remained seated for 1 hr before cycling to exhaustion at 70% VO2peak. Two 250-ml aliquots of a placebo (PLA ) or a TYR solution were ingested at 30-min intervals before exercise, with an additional 150 ml consumed every 15 min throughout exercise (total TYR dose: 150 mg/kg BM). Cognitive function was assessed before drink ingestion, at the end of the rest period, and at exhaustion. TYR ingestion had no effect on exercise capacity (PLA 61.4 ± 13.7 min, TYR 60.2 ± 15.4 min; p = .505). No differences in heart rate (p = .380), core temperature (p = .554), or weighted mean skin temperature (p = .167) were apparent between trials. Ingestion of TYR produced a marked increase in serum TYR concentrations (+236 ± 46 μmol/L; p < .001), with this difference maintained throughout exercise. No change was apparent during the PLA trial (p = .924). Exercise caused an increase in error rate during the complex component of the Stroop test (p = .034), but this response was not influenced by the drink ingested. No other component of cognitive function was altered by the protocol (all p > .05). Ingestion of a TYR solution did not influence time to exhaustion or several aspects of cognitive function when exercise was undertaken in a warm environment. PMID:23011654

  3. Rapamycin does not prevent increases in myofibrillar or mitochondrial protein synthesis following endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Philp, Andrew; Schenk, Simon; Perez-Schindler, Joaquin; Hamilton, D Lee; Breen, Leigh; Laverone, Erin; Jeromson, Stewart; Phillips, Stuart M; Baar, Keith

    2015-09-15

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the regulation of myofibrillar (MyoPS) and mitochondrial (MitoPS) protein synthesis following endurance exercise. Forty-two female C57BL/6 mice performed 1 h of treadmill running (18 m min(-1) ; 5° grade), 1 h after i.p. administration of rapamycin (1.5 mg · kg(-1) ) or vehicle. To quantify skeletal muscle protein fractional synthesis rates, a flooding dose (50 mg · kg(-1) ) of l-[ring-(13) C6 ]phenylalanine was administered via i.p. injection. Blood and gastrocnemius muscle were collected in non-exercised control mice, as well as at 0.5, 3 and 6 h after completing exercise (n = 4 per time point). Skeletal muscle MyoPS and MitoPS were determined by measuring isotope incorporation in their respective protein pools. Activation of the mTORC1-signalling cascade was measured via direct kinase activity assay and immunoblotting, whereas genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis were measured via a quantitative RT-PCR. MyoPS increased rapidly in the vehicle group post-exercise and remained elevated for 6 h, whereas this response was transiently blunted (30 min post-exercise) by rapamycin. By contrast, MitoPS was unaffected by rapamycin, and was increased over the entire post-exercise recovery period in both groups (P < 0.05). Despite rapid increases in both MyoPS and MitoPS, mTORC1 activation was suppressed in both groups post-exercise for the entire 6 h recovery period. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and mitochondrial transcription factor A mRNA increased post-exercise (P < 0.05) and this response was augmented by rapamycin (P < 0.05). Collectively, these data suggest that endurance exercise stimulates MyoPS and MitoPS in skeletal muscle independently of mTORC1 activation. PMID:26227152

  4. Quercetin supplementation does not enhance cerebellar mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative status in exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Casuso, Rafael A; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Camiletti-Moirón, Daniel; Aranda, Pilar; Martínez-López, Emilio

    2015-07-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that quercetin may inhibit the mitochondrial and antioxidant adaptations induced by exercise in cerebellar tissue. Thirty-five 6-week-old Wistar rats were randomly allocated into the following groups: quercetin, exercised (Q-Ex; n = 9); quercetin, sedentary (Q-Sed; n = 9); no quercetin, exercised (NQ-Ex; n = 9); and no quercetin, sedentary (NQ-Sed; n = 8). After 6 weeks of quercetin supplementation and/or exercise training, cerebellums were collected. Protein carbonyl content (PCC), sirtuin 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), messenger RNA levels, citrate synthase (CS), and mitochondrial DNA were measured. When Q-Sed was compared with NQ-Sed, PCC (P < .005) showed decreased levels, whereas PGC-1α, sirtuin 1 (both, P < .01), mitochondrial DNA (P < .001), and CS (P < .01) increased. However, when Q-Ex was compared with Q-Sed, PCC showed increased levels (P < .001), whereas CS decreased (P < .01). Furthermore, the NQ-Ex group experienced an increase in PGC-1α messenger RNA levels in comparison with NQ-Sed (P > .01). This effect, however, did not appear in Q-Ex (P < .05). Therefore, we must hypothesize that either the dose (25 mg/kg) or the length of the quercetin supplementation period that was used in the present study (or perhaps both) may impair exercise-induced adaptations in cerebellar tissue. PMID:26032482

  5. Pyridostigmine bromide does not alter thermoregulation during exercise in cold air

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.E.; Sawka, M.N.; Young, A.J.; Freund, B.J.

    1994-12-31

    This study examined the effects of acute and chronic pyridostigmine bromide (PB) administration on thermoregulatory and metabolic responses to exercise in cold air (5 C). Seven healthy men completed two 7-day trials in a double-blind, crossover experimental design: during one trial they received PB (30 mg three times daily) and during the other trial they received placebo. For each trial, subjects attempted four (3 h) exercise tests: low-intensity exercise (25% Vo2max) and moderate- intensity exercise (-50% Vo2max), on days 2 and 3 and again on days 6 and 7. Metabolic rate, body temperatures, and venous blood samples were obtained before and during exercise. Red blood cell acerylcholinesterase inhibition induced by PB increased (p < 0.05) from 34% on day I to 43% on days 3-7 Metabolic rate, body temperatures, and regional heat conductance responses were not different between trials. Plasma glucose, glycerol, free fatty acid, lactate, sodium, and potassium concentrations were not different between trials. In addition. differences were not found between acute and chronic experiments for any thermoregulatory or metabolic responses. These findings demonstrate that the PB dosage used by military personnel, as a pharmacological defense against nerve-agent poisoning. should not cause any adverse thermoregulatory or metabolic effects during moderate activity in cold climates.

  6. Does Exercise Improve Cognitive Performance? A Conservative Message from Lord's Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sicong; Lebeau, Jean-Charles; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2016-01-01

    Although extant meta-analyses support the notion that exercise results in cognitive performance enhancement, methodology shortcomings are noted among primary evidence. The present study examined relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the past 20 years (1996–2015) for methodological concerns arise from Lord's paradox. Our analysis revealed that RCTs supporting the positive effect of exercise on cognition are likely to include Type I Error(s). This result can be attributed to the use of gain score analysis on pretest-posttest data as well as the presence of control group superiority over the exercise group on baseline cognitive measures. To improve accuracy of causal inferences in this area, analysis of covariance on pretest-posttest data is recommended under the assumption of group equivalence. Important experimental procedures are discussed to maintain group equivalence. PMID:27493637

  7. Does Exercise Improve Cognitive Performance? A Conservative Message from Lord's Paradox.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sicong; Lebeau, Jean-Charles; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2016-01-01

    Although extant meta-analyses support the notion that exercise results in cognitive performance enhancement, methodology shortcomings are noted among primary evidence. The present study examined relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the past 20 years (1996-2015) for methodological concerns arise from Lord's paradox. Our analysis revealed that RCTs supporting the positive effect of exercise on cognition are likely to include Type I Error(s). This result can be attributed to the use of gain score analysis on pretest-posttest data as well as the presence of control group superiority over the exercise group on baseline cognitive measures. To improve accuracy of causal inferences in this area, analysis of covariance on pretest-posttest data is recommended under the assumption of group equivalence. Important experimental procedures are discussed to maintain group equivalence. PMID:27493637

  8. 43 CFR 3137.89 - How does production allocation occur from wells that do not meet the productivity criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... well not meeting the productivity criteria is outside a participating area, the production is allocated... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How does production allocation occur from...-National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Participating Areas § 3137.89 How does production allocation occur...

  9. 43 CFR 3137.89 - How does production allocation occur from wells that do not meet the productivity criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... well not meeting the productivity criteria is outside a participating area, the production is allocated... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How does production allocation occur from...-National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Participating Areas § 3137.89 How does production allocation occur...

  10. 43 CFR 3137.89 - How does production allocation occur from wells that do not meet the productivity criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... well not meeting the productivity criteria is outside a participating area, the production is allocated... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How does production allocation occur from...-National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska Participating Areas § 3137.89 How does production allocation occur...

  11. Cold habituation does not improve manual dexterity during rest and exercise in 5 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Matthew D.; Seo, Yongsuk; Kim, Chul-Ho; Ryan, Edward J.; Pollock, Brandon S.; Burns, Keith J.; Glickman, Ellen L.

    2014-04-01

    When exposed to a cold environment, a barehanded person experiences pain, cold sensation, and reduced manual dexterity. Both acute (e.g. exercise) and chronic (e.g. cold acclimatization or habituation) processes might lessen these negative effects. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of cold habituation on physiology, perception, and manual dexterity during rest, exercise, and recovery in 5 °C. Six cold weather athletes (CWA) and eight non habituated men (NON) volunteered to participate in a repeated measures cross-over design. The protocol was conducted in 5 °C and was 90 min of resting cold exposure, 30 min of cycle ergometry exercise (50 % VO2 peak), and 60 min of seated recovery. Core and finger skin temperature, metabolic rate, Purdue Pegboard dexterity performance, hand pain, thermal sensation, and mood were quantified. Exercise-induced finger rewarming (EIFRW) was calculated for each hand. During 90 min of resting exposure to 5 °C, the CWA had a smaller reduction in finger temperature, a lower metabolic rate, less hand pain, and less negative mood. Despite this cold habituation, dexterity performance was not different between groups. In response to cycle ergometry, EIFRW was greater in CWA (~12 versus 7 °C) and occurred at lower core temperatures (37.02 versus 37.31 °C) relative to NON but dexterity was not greater during post-exercise recovery. The current data indicate that cold habituated men (i.e., CWA) do not perform better on the Purdue Pegboard during acute cold exposure. Furthermore, despite augmented EIFRW in CWA, dexterity during post-exercise recovery was similar between groups.

  12. Does Moderate Intensity Exercise Attenuate the Postprandial Lipemic and Airway Inflammatory Response to a High-Fat Meal?

    PubMed Central

    Kurti, Stephanie P.; Rosenkranz, Sara K.; Levitt, Morton; Cull, Brooke J.; Teeman, Colby S.; Emerson, Sam R.; Harms, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise in the postprandial period attenuates the triglyceride and airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal (HFM) compared to remaining inactive in the postprandial period. Seventeen (11 M/6 F) physically active (≥150 min/week of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise (EX; 60% VO2peak) or sedentary (CON) condition after a HFM (10 kcal/kg, 63% fat). Blood analytes and airway inflammation via exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) were measured at baseline, and 2 and 4 hours after HFM. Airway inflammation was assessed with induced sputum and cell differentials at baseline and 4 hours after HFM. Triglycerides doubled in the postprandial period (~113 ± 18%, P < 0.05), but the increase did not differ between EX and CON. Percentage of neutrophils was increased 4 hours after HFM (~17%), but the increase did not differ between EX and CON. Exhaled nitric oxide changed nonlinearly from baseline to 2 and 4 hours after HFM (P < 0.05,  η2 = 0.36). Our findings suggest that, in active individuals, an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise does not attenuate the triglyceride or airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal. PMID:26000301

  13. Does moderate intensity exercise attenuate the postprandial lipemic and airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal?

    PubMed

    Kurti, Stephanie P; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Levitt, Morton; Cull, Brooke J; Teeman, Colby S; Emerson, Sam R; Harms, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise in the postprandial period attenuates the triglyceride and airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal (HFM) compared to remaining inactive in the postprandial period. Seventeen (11 M/6 F) physically active (≥ 150 min/week of moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise (EX; 60% VO 2peak) or sedentary (CON) condition after a HFM (10 kcal/kg, 63% fat). Blood analytes and airway inflammation via exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) were measured at baseline, and 2 and 4 hours after HFM. Airway inflammation was assessed with induced sputum and cell differentials at baseline and 4 hours after HFM. Triglycerides doubled in the postprandial period (~113 ± 18%, P < 0.05), but the increase did not differ between EX and CON. Percentage of neutrophils was increased 4 hours after HFM (~17%), but the increase did not differ between EX and CON. Exhaled nitric oxide changed nonlinearly from baseline to 2 and 4 hours after HFM (P < 0.05, η (2) = 0.36). Our findings suggest that, in active individuals, an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise does not attenuate the triglyceride or airway inflammatory response to a high-fat meal. PMID:26000301

  14. Does chronic exercise attenuate age-related physiological decline in males?

    PubMed

    Hayes, Lawrence D; Grace, Fergal M; Sculthorpe, Nick; Herbert, Peter; Kilduff, Liam P; Baker, Julien S

    2013-01-01

    Alteration in body composition, physical function, and substrate metabolism occur with advancing age. These changes can be attenuated by exercise. This study evaluated whether master athletes (MA [n = 20]) would have improved exercise capabilities, anthropometry, and hormone profiles when compared with age-matched sedentary counterparts (S [n = 28]). The MA group was predominantly aerobically trained with some resistance exercise incorporated in their routine. The VO(2max), peak power output, and salivary testosterone was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the MA group, while diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, and body fat percentage were lower (p < 0.05). Cortisol, fat free mass, (FFM) and total body mass were not significantly different between groups. Salivary testosterone correlated positively with VO(2max) (r² = .320), suggesting that increased aerobic capacity is linked with higher concentrations of testosterone. These results suggest that life-long exercise is associated with favorable body composition and attenuation of the age related decline in testosterone. PMID:24067120

  15. Aerobic fitness does not modulate protein metabolism in response to increased exercise: a controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: This study examined how a sudden increase in exercise energy expenditure affected whole body protein turnover and nitrogen balance in people of differing aerobic fitness. We hypothesized that whole-body protein turnover would be attenuated, and nitrogen balance would be preserved, in aerobi...

  16. Does Improving Exercise Capacity and Daily Activity Represent the Holistic Perspective of a New COPD Approach?

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Fabiano; Santus, Pierachille; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Blasi, Francesco; Centanni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In COPD patients a reduced daily activity has been well documented, resulting from both respiratory and non-respiratory manifestations of the disease. An evaluation by multisensory armband has confirmed that daily physical activity is mainly associated with dynamic hyperinflation, regardless of COPD severity. This aspect is crucial, since exercise capacity is closely correlated to life expectancy. Notwithstanding the causal key role of lung impairment in the patient's symptoms, some authors have suggested that other factors, such as systemic inflammation and co-morbidities, have an important role, particularly as mortality risk factors. Many studies suggest the efficacy of bronchodilators and rehabilitation in improving exercise capacity, and, speaking in terms of daily life, in increasing the number of days in which patients are able to perform their usual activities. On this evidence, the first aim in the management of COPD should be to improve exercise capacity and daily activity since these outcomes have direct effects on patients' quality of life, co-morbidities (heart and metabolic diseases), and prognosis. Thus, improving physical activity represents a modern approach aimed at dealing with both pulmonary and systemic manifestations of the disease. It is however worth of notice to remember that in patients affected by COPD the relationship between the improvement of "potential" exercise capacity and daily physical activity has been found to be only moderate to weak. Obtaining a significant behavior modification with regard to daily physical activity, together with the optimization of therapy thus represents currently the true challenge. PMID:26457460

  17. Joint Cooling does not Hinder Athletic Performance during High-intensity Intermittent Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Lee, D; Choi, H-M; Park, J

    2016-07-01

    We examined the effects of ankle and knee joint cooling on 20-m sprint times and maximal vertical jump heights during high-intensity intermittent exercise. 21 healthy collegiate male basketball (n=14) and handball players (n=7) underwent 3 experimental sessions. Each session consisted of four 15-min quarters of high-intensity intermittent exercises including various intensities of 20-m shuttle running and jumping. A 20-min bilateral joint cooling (ankle, knee, or control-no cooling: in a counterbalanced order) was applied before quarters 1 and 3. After joint cooling, no warm-up activity other than the exercise protocol was given. The 20-m sprint times and maximal vertical jump heights in each experimental session were recorded at baseline (prior to quarter-1) and during each quarter. To test joint cooling effects over time, we performed 3×5 mixed model ANOVAs. Neither ankle nor knee joint cooling changed 20-m sprint times (F8,280=1.45; p=0.18) or maximal vertical jump heights (F8,280=0.76; p=0.64). However, a trend was observed in which joint cooling immediately decreased (quarters 1 and 3) but active warm-up for approximately 20 min improved 20-min sprint times (quarters 2 and 4). Our study suggests that athletic performance such as sprinting and jumping are not altered by joint cooling applied prior to or during high-intensity intermittent exercise. PMID:27119166

  18. Mental fatigue induced by prolonged self-regulation does not exacerbate central fatigue during subsequent whole-body endurance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M.; Rozand, Vianney; Lepers, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the mental fatigue induced by prolonged self-regulation increases perception of effort and reduces performance during subsequent endurance exercise. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying these negative effects of mental fatigue are unclear. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental fatigue exacerbates central fatigue induced by whole-body endurance exercise. Twelve subjects performed 30 min of either an incongruent Stroop task to induce a condition of mental fatigue or a congruent Stroop task (control condition) in a random and counterbalanced order. Both cognitive tasks (CTs) were followed by a whole-body endurance task (ET) consisting of 6 min of cycling exercise at 80% of peak power output measured during a preliminary incremental test. Neuromuscular function of the knee extensors was assessed before and after CT, and after ET. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured during ET. Both CTs did not induce any decrease in maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque (p = 0.194). During ET, mentally fatigued subjects reported higher RPE (mental fatigue 13.9 ± 3.0, control 13.3 ± 3.2, p = 0.044). ET induced a similar decrease in MVC torque (mental fatigue –17 ± 15%, control –15 ± 11%, p = 0.001), maximal voluntary activation level (mental fatigue –6 ± 9%, control –6 ± 7%, p = 0.013) and resting twitch (mental fatigue –30 ± 14%, control –32 ± 10%, p < 0.001) in both conditions. These findings reject our hypothesis and confirm previous findings that mental fatigue does not reduce the capacity of the central nervous system to recruit the working muscles. The negative effect of mental fatigue on perception of effort does not reflect a greater development of either central or peripheral fatigue. Consequently, mentally fatigued subjects are still able to perform maximal exercise, but they are experiencing an altered performance during submaximal exercise due to higher

  19. Post-exercise cold water immersion does not alter high intensity interval training-induced exercise performance and Hsp72 responses, but enhances mitochondrial markers.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Paula Fernandes; Magalhães, Sílvia Mourão; Fonseca, Ivana Alice Teixeira; da Costa Santos, Vanessa Batista; de Matos, Mariana Aguiar; Peixoto, Marco Fabrício Dias; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; Crandall, Craig; Araújo, Hygor Nunes; Silveira, Leonardo Reis; Rocha-Vieira, Etel; de Castro Magalhães, Flávio; Amorim, Fabiano Trigueiro

    2016-09-01

    , HFS-1 (p = 0.007), PDK4 (p = 0.03), and Tfam (p = 0.03) mRNA were higher in CWI. NRF-1 decrease in both groups after training (p = 0.006). CaMK2 decreased with HIIT (p = 0.003) but it was not affected by CWI (p = 0.99). Cold water immersion does not alter HIIT-induced Hsp72, AMPK, p38 MAPK, and exercise performance but was able to increase some markers of cellular stress response and signaling molecules related to mitochondria biogenesis. PMID:27278803

  20. Timing Carbohydrate Beverage Intake During Prolonged Moderate Intensity Exercise Does Not Affect Cycling Performance

    PubMed Central

    SCHWEITZER, GEORGE G.; SMITH, JOHN D.; LECHEMINANT, JAMES D.

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrate beverages consumed during long-term exercise have been shown to attenuate fatigue and improve performance; however, the optimal timing of ingestion is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if timing the carbohydrate ingestion (continual loading (CL), front-loading (FL), and end-loading (EL)) during prolonged exercise influenced exercise performance in competitive cyclists. Ten well-trained cyclists completed three separate exercise bouts on a bicycle ergometer, each lasting 2 hours at an intensity of ~67% VO2 max, followed by a 15-minute “all out” time trial. In the CL trial, a carbohydrate beverage was ingested throughout the trial. In the FL trial, participants ingested a carbohydrate beverage during the first hour and a placebo beverage during the second hour. In the EL trial, a carbohydrate beverage was ingested during the second hour and a placebo during the first hour. The amount of carbohydrate consumed (75 g) was the same among conditions. The order of conditions was single-blinded, counterbalanced, and determined randomly. Performance was measured by the work output during the 15-minute performance ride. There were no differences in work output among the three conditions during the final time trial. In the first hour of exercise, peak venous blood glucose was highest in the FL condition. In the second hour, peak venous blood glucose was highest in the EL condition. Following the time trial, venous blood glucose levels were similar among CL, FL, and EL. Overall, the timing of carbohydrate beverage consumption during prolonged moderate intensity cycling did not alter cycling performance.

  1. Does Scoliosis-Specific Exercise Treatment in Adolescence Alter Adult Quality of Life?

    PubMed Central

    Płaszewski, Maciej; Cieśliński, Igor; Kowalski, Paweł; Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Nowobilski, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Health-related quality of life in adults, who in adolescence participated in a scoliosis-specific exercise program, was not previously studied. Design. Cross-sectional study, with retrospective data collection. Material and Methods. Homogenous groups of 68 persons (43 women) aged 30.10 (25–39) years, with mild or moderate scoliosis, and 76 (38 women) able-bodied persons, aged 30.11 (24–38) years, who 16.5 (12–26) years earlier had completed scoliosis-specific exercise or observation regimes, participated. Their respiratory characteristics did not differ from predicted values. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, and pain scale (VAS) were applied. Results. The transformed WHOQOL-BREF scores ranged from 54.6 ± 11.19 in the physical domain in the mild scoliotic subgroup to 77.1 ± 16.05 in the social domain in the able-bodied subgroup. The ODQ values did not generally exceed 5.3 ± 7.53. Inter- and intragroup differences were nonsignificant. Age, marital status, education, and gender were significantly associated with the ODQ scores. Significant association between the ODQ and WHOQOL-BREF social relationships domain scores with the participation in exercise treatment was found. Conclusions. Participants with the history of exercise treatment generally did not differ significantly from their peers who were only under observation. This study cannot conclude that scoliosis-specific exercise treatment in adolescence alters quality of life in adulthood. PMID:25436225

  2. Does type 1 diabetes alter post-exercise thermoregulatory and cardiovascular function in young adults?

    PubMed

    McGinn, R; Carter, M R; Barrera-Ramirez, J; Sigal, R J; Flouris, A D; Kenny, G P

    2015-10-01

    Recent data demonstrated that individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) exhibit impaired sweating and increased rectal temperature (i.e., heat storage) during exercise compared with healthy controls. Our purpose in this study was to investigate the consequences of T1DM on post-exercise thermal homeostasis. Sixteen participants (eight controls matched with eight T1DM) performed 90 min of cycling followed by 60 min of seated recovery. Esophageal and rectal temperatures, sweating (forearm, chest, and upper back), skin blood flow [forearm and upper back, presented as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC)], and blood pressure [mean arterial pressure (MAP)] were measured at baseline and throughout recovery. Esophageal temperature was similar during baseline and recovery between groups (P = 0.88). However, rectal temperature was elevated in our T1DM group throughout recovery (P = 0.05). Sweating and CVC were similar between groups at all sites from 10-min post-exercise until the end of recovery (P ≥ 0.16). While absolute MAP was similar between groups (P = 0.43), the overall decrease in MAP post-exercise was greater in controls from 20 min (T1DM: - 8 ± 5 vs control: - 13 ± 6 mmHg, P = 0.03) until the end of recovery. We conclude that despite increased heat storage during exercise, individuals with T1DM exhibit a suppression in heat loss similar to their healthy counterparts during recovery. PMID:25487370

  3. Low intensity exercise does not impact cognitive function during exposure to normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Ryan, Edward J; Seo, Yongsuk; Peacock, Corey; Gunstad, John; Muller, Matthew D; Ridgel, Angela L; Glickman, Ellen L

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to hypoxia is associated with cognitive impairment, mediated by cerebral deoxygenation. This can be problematic for individuals who perform mental tasks at high altitude. Eight healthy men completed two experimental trials consisting of 5h of exposure to normobaric hypoxia (12.5% O2). In one of the experimental trials (Hypoxia) subjects remained resting in a seated position the entire 5h; in the other experimental trial (Hypoxia and Exercise) subjects rested 2h, cycled for 1h at constant wattage (workload equivalent to 50% of altitude adjusted VO2max), then rested the last 2h. Cerebral oxygenation was measured continuously via near-infrared spectroscopy and cognitive performance was assessed by Trail Making Test A and B. Cerebral oxygenation and cognitive performance both were impaired during exposure to hypoxia. In the Hypoxia and Exercise trial, subjects experienced further declinations in cerebral oxygenation without concomitant decreases in cognitive function. These data demonstrate that cognitive function declines during exposure to normobaric hypoxia and this decline is not exacerbated by low intensity exercise. PMID:26160408

  4. Does cheating pay: the role of externally supplied momentum on muscular force in resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Arandjelović, Ognjen

    2013-01-01

    Our work investigates the use of "external momentum" in the context of hypertrophy-oriented training. This is momentum supplied to the load (such as a dumbbell) used in an exercise by means of action of muscles not inherently involved in the exercise. We challenge the general consensus that the use of such momentum often described as "cheating" is counterproductive. We focus on the use of external momentum in the shoulder lateral raise and adopt a framework whereby exercise execution is simulated on a computer. This is achieved using a physical model of motion which is combined with anthropomorphic measurements and empirical data of muscular recruitment from previous work. The introduction of moderate momentum (producing initial angular velocities around 57.5° s(-1)) increases the torque of the target muscles even without an increase in the load used. A moderate increase in the load and the use of momentum allows the torque to be increased even further. In contrast, excessive use of momentum results in lower demands on the target muscles, while an excessive increase of the load reduces the total hypertrophy stimulus by virtue of the decreased number of repetitions which can be performed successfully and thus the dramatically shortened time under tension. Our results disprove the conventional belief that the use of external momentum necessarily reduces the overload of the target muscles. A moderate use of external momentum increases both the per-repetition peak torque and the total hypertrophy stimulus in a set. PMID:22615008

  5. Does swimming exercise affect experimental chronic kidney disease in rats treated with gum acacia?

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2014-01-01

    Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine-induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation. PMID:25048380

  6. Does extending the dual-task functional exercises workout improve postural balance in individuals with ID?

    PubMed

    Mikolajczyk, Edyta; Jankowicz-Szymanska, Agnieszka

    2015-03-01

    Maintaining postural balance, overcoming visual and motor coordination disorders and experiencing problems with low general fitness - typical of intellectually disabled individuals - adversely affect the performance quality of their activities of daily living (ADLs). Physical fitness and postural balance can be improved by taking part in special intervention programs. Our study was designed to test whether extending the dual-task intervention program (combining ADLs with balance exercises on unstable surfaces) from 12 to 24 weeks additionally improved postural balance in individuals with intellectual disability (ID). We also attempted to assess whether the effects of the above intervention program were still noticeable after 8 weeks of holidays, in which participants did not take any rehabilitation exercises. A total of 34 adolescents, aged 14-16 years (15.06±0.9), with moderate ID took part in our study. The experimental group (E) consisted of 17 individuals, who continued the intervention program originated 3 months earlier, and the control group (C) comprised the same number of participants. Postural balance was assessed on a stabilometric platform Alfa. Having extended the workout period by another 12 weeks, we noticed that the path length of the center of pressure (COP) covered by participants on tests with their eyes open and closed significantly shortened. After a lapse of 8 weeks from the completion of the program, the experimental group revealed a statistically significant decrease in the velocity along the medio-lateral (M/L) and anterior-posterior (A/P) axes. The remaining variables stayed at the same level and the control group did not demonstrate any statistically significant changes. Dual-task exercises, in which enhancing functional tasks of daily living is combined with a parallel stimulation of balance reactions, may improve static balance in persons with ID. PMID:25553534

  7. Erythropoietin Does Not Enhance Skeletal Muscle Protein Synthesis Following Exercise in Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lamon, Séverine; Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Gatta, Paul A. Della; Ghobrial, Lobna; Gerlinger-Romero, Frederico; Garnham, Andrew; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Erythropoietin (EPO) is a renal cytokine that is primarily involved in hematopoiesis while also playing a role in non-hematopoietic tissues expressing the EPO-receptor (EPOR). The EPOR is present in human skeletal muscle. In mouse skeletal muscle, EPO stimulation can activate the AKT serine/threonine kinase 1 (AKT) signaling pathway, the main positive regulator of muscle protein synthesis. We hypothesized that a single intravenous EPO injection combined with acute resistance exercise would have a synergistic effect on skeletal muscle protein synthesis via activation of the AKT pathway. Methods: Ten young (24.2 ± 0.9 years) and 10 older (66.6 ± 1.1 years) healthy subjects received a primed, constant infusion of [ring-13C6] L-phenylalanine and a single injection of 10,000 IU epoetin-beta or placebo in a double-blind randomized, cross-over design. 2 h after the injection, the subjects completed an acute bout of leg extension resistance exercise to stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis. Results: Significant interaction effects in the phosphorylation levels of the members of the AKT signaling pathway indicated a differential activation of protein synthesis signaling in older subjects when compared to young subjects. However, EPO offered no synergistic effect on vastus lateralis mixed muscle protein synthesis rate in young or older subjects. Conclusions: Despite its ability to activate the AKT pathway in skeletal muscle, an acute EPO injection had no additive or synergistic effect on the exercise-induced activation of muscle protein synthesis or muscle protein synthesis signaling pathways. PMID:27458387

  8. Does Swimming Exercise Affect Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats Treated with Gum Acacia?

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A.; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A.; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2014-01-01

    Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine –induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation. PMID:25048380

  9. Exercise economy does not change after acclimatization to moderate to very high altitude.

    PubMed

    Lundby, C; Calbet, J A L; Sander, M; van Hall, G; Mazzeo, R S; Stray-Gundersen, J; Stager, J M; Chapman, R F; Saltin, B; Levine, B D

    2007-06-01

    For more than 60 years, muscle mechanical efficiency has been thought to remain unchanged with acclimatization to high altitude. However, recent work has suggested that muscle mechanical efficiency may in fact be improved upon return from prolonged exposure to high altitude. The purpose of the present work is to resolve this apparent conflict in the literature. In a collaboration between four research centers, we have included data from independent high-altitude studies performed at varying altitudes and including a total of 153 subjects ranging from sea-level (SL) residents to high-altitude natives, and from sedentary to world-class athletes. In study A (n=109), living for 20-22 h/day at 2500 m combined with training between 1250 and 2800 m caused no differences in running economy at fixed speeds despite low typical error measurements. In study B, SL residents (n=8) sojourning for 8 weeks at 4100 m and residents native to this altitude (n=7) performed cycle ergometer exercise in ambient air and in acute normoxia. Muscle oxygen uptake and mechanical efficiency were unchanged between SL and acclimatization and between the two groups. In study C (n=20), during 21 days of exposure to 4300 m altitude, no changes in systemic or leg VO(2) were found during cycle ergometer exercise. However, at the substantially higher altitude of 5260 m decreases in submaximal VO(2) were found in nine subjects with acute hypoxic exposure, as well as after 9 weeks of acclimatization. As VO(2) was already reduced in acute hypoxia this suggests, at least in this condition, that the reduction is not related to anatomical or physiological adaptations to high altitude but to oxygen lack because of severe hypoxia altering substrate utilization. In conclusion, results from several, independent investigations indicate that exercise economy remains unchanged after acclimatization to high altitude. PMID:17501869

  10. Exercise Protects Bone after Stroke, or Does It? A Narrative Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Borschmann, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity contributes to accelerated bone loss after stroke, leading to heightened fracture risk, increased mortality, and reduced independence. This paper sought to summarise the evidence for the use of physical activity to protect bone in healthy adults and adults with stroke, and to identify international recommendations regarding any means of bone protection after stroke, in order to guide rehabilitation practice and future research. A search was undertaken, which identified 12 systematic reviews of controlled trials which investigated the effect of physical activity on bone outcomes in adults. Nine reviews included healthy adults and three included adults with stroke. Twenty-five current international stroke management guidelines were identified. High-impact loading exercise appears to have a site-specific effect on the microarchitecture of healthy postmenopausal women, and physical activity has a small effect on enhancing or maintaining bone mineral density in chronic stroke patients. It is not known whether this translates to reduce fracture risk. Most guidelines included recommendations for early mobilisation after stroke and falls prevention. Two recommendations were identified which advocated exercise for the prevention bone loss after stroke, but supporting evidence was limited. Research is required to determine whether targeted physical activity can protect bone from early after stroke, and whether this can reduce fracture risk. PMID:22007349

  11. Exercise protects bone after stroke, or does it? A narrative review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Borschmann, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity contributes to accelerated bone loss after stroke, leading to heightened fracture risk, increased mortality, and reduced independence. This paper sought to summarise the evidence for the use of physical activity to protect bone in healthy adults and adults with stroke, and to identify international recommendations regarding any means of bone protection after stroke, in order to guide rehabilitation practice and future research. A search was undertaken, which identified 12 systematic reviews of controlled trials which investigated the effect of physical activity on bone outcomes in adults. Nine reviews included healthy adults and three included adults with stroke. Twenty-five current international stroke management guidelines were identified. High-impact loading exercise appears to have a site-specific effect on the microarchitecture of healthy postmenopausal women, and physical activity has a small effect on enhancing or maintaining bone mineral density in chronic stroke patients. It is not known whether this translates to reduce fracture risk. Most guidelines included recommendations for early mobilisation after stroke and falls prevention. Two recommendations were identified which advocated exercise for the prevention bone loss after stroke, but supporting evidence was limited. Research is required to determine whether targeted physical activity can protect bone from early after stroke, and whether this can reduce fracture risk. PMID:22007349

  12. Does aerobic exercise intensity affect health-related parameters in overweight women?

    PubMed

    Botero, João P; Prado, Wagner L; Guerra, Ricardo L F; Speretta, Guilherme F F; Leite, Richard D; Prestes, Jonato; Sanz, Adrián V; Lyons, Scott; de Azevedo, Paulo H S M; Baldissera, Vilmar; Perez, Sergio E A; Dâmaso, Ana; da Silva, Rozinaldo G

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a cycling training programme performed at intensity corresponding to the lowest value of the respiratory quotient (RQ) versus at intensity corresponding to the ventilatory threshold (VT), on body composition and health-related parameters in overweight women. Thirty-two sedentary obese women (27-42 years old) were studied in a randomized trial of either RQ (n = 17) or VT (n = 15). RQ and VT training sessions were equalized by time (60 min) and performed in a cycloergometer. Anthropometry, body composition, lipid profile, glucose, basal metabolic rate (BMR) and fitness (maximal oxygen uptake) were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of intervention. Body weight, body mass index, fatness and fitness were improved in both groups (P<0·001). Triglycerides (TG) levels decreased only in response to RQ (P<0·001) and fat-free mass (FFM) to VT (P = 0·002). No differences were observed between groups. Both exercise intensities seem to be effective for improving health in overweight women. However, low-intensity compared with the high-intensity exercise training appears to have additional benefits on TG levels and to maintenance of FFM. PMID:23898989

  13. Protein ingestion does not impair exercise-induced AMPK signalling when in a glycogen-depleted state: implications for train-low compete-high.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Conor; Bartlett, Jonathan D; van de Graaf, Christian Soler; Louhelainen, Jari; Coyne, Vicki; Iqbal, Zafar; Maclaren, Don P M; Gregson, Warren; Close, Graeme L; Morton, James P

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that consuming protein does not attenuate AMPK signalling when exercise is commenced in a glycogen-depleted state. After performing a glycogen-depleting protocol the evening before, the subsequent morning ten active men performed 45 min steady-state cycling at 50 % of peak power output (PPO) followed by an exercise capacity test (1-min intervals at 80 % PPO interspersed with 1-min periods at 40 % PPO). In a repeated measures design, subjects consumed 20 g of a casein hydrolysate solution (PRO) 45 min before exercise, 10 g during and a further 20 g immediately post-exercise, or an equivalent volume of a non-calorie taste matched placebo (PLA). Resting (PRO = 134 ± 29; PLA = 136 ± 28 mmol kg(-1)) and post-exercise muscle glycogen (PRO = 43 ± 16; PLA = 47 ± 18 mmol kg(-1)) was not different (P > 0.05) between trials nor was exercise capacity (PRO = 26 ± 9; PLA = 25 ± 10 min, P > 0.05). Phosphorylation of AMPK(Thr172) increased threefold immediately post-exercise (P < 0.05) and PGC1-mRNA increased sixfold at 3 h post-exercise (P < 0.05), though there were no differences between conditions (P > 0.05). In contrast, there was a trend (P = 0.08) for a divergent response in eEF2(Thr56) phosphorylation such that 1.5 fold increases post- and 3 h post-exercise in PLA were blunted with PRO, thus indicative of greater eEF2 activation. We conclude that athletes who deliberately incorporate training phases with reduced muscle glycogen into their training programmes may consume protein before, during and after exercise without negating signalling through the AMPK cascade. PMID:23263742

  14. Resistance exercise load does not determine training-mediated hypertrophic gains in young men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; Churchward-Venne, Tyler A.; West, Daniel W. D.; Burd, Nicholas A.; Breen, Leigh; Baker, Steven K.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported that the acute postexercise increases in muscle protein synthesis rates, with differing nutritional support, are predictive of longer-term training-induced muscle hypertrophy. Here, we aimed to test whether the same was true with acute exercise-mediated changes in muscle protein synthesis. Eighteen men (21 ± 1 yr, 22.6 ± 2.1 kg/m2; means ± SE) had their legs randomly assigned to two of three training conditions that differed in contraction intensity [% of maximal strength (1 repetition maximum)] or contraction volume (1 or 3 sets of repetitions): 30%-3, 80%-1, and 80%-3. Subjects trained each leg with their assigned regime for a period of 10 wk, 3 times/wk. We made pre- and posttraining measures of strength, muscle volume by magnetic resonance (MR) scans, as well as pre- and posttraining biopsies of the vastus lateralis, and a single postexercise (1 h) biopsy following the first bout of exercise, to measure signaling proteins. Training-induced increases in MR-measured muscle volume were significant (P < 0.01), with no difference between groups: 30%-3 = 6.8 ± 1.8%, 80%-1 = 3.2 ± 0.8%, and 80%-3= 7.2 ± 1.9%, P = 0.18. Isotonic maximal strength gains were not different between 80%-1 and 80%-3, but were greater than 30%-3 (P = 0.04), whereas training-induced isometric strength gains were significant but not different between conditions (P = 0.92). Biopsies taken 1 h following the initial resistance exercise bout showed increased phosphorylation (P < 0.05) of p70S6K only in the 80%-1 and 80%-3 conditions. There was no correlation between phosphorylation of any signaling protein and hypertrophy. In accordance with our previous acute measurements of muscle protein synthetic rates a lower load lifted to failure resulted in similar hypertrophy as a heavy load lifted to failure. PMID:22518835

  15. DOE Hanford Network Upgrades and Disaster Recovery Exercise Support the Cleanup Mission Now and into the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Eckman, Todd J.; Hertzel, Ali K.; Lane, James J.

    2013-11-07

    In 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, located in Washington State, funded an update to the critical network infrastructure supporting the Hanford Federal Cloud (HFC). The project, called ET-50, was the final step in a plan that was initiated five years ago called "Hanford's IT Vision, 2015 and Beyond." The ET-50 project upgraded Hanford's core data center switches and routers along with a majority of the distribution layer switches. The upgrades allowed HFC the network intelligence to provide Hanford with a more reliable and resilient network architecture. The culmination of the five year plan improved network intelligence and high performance computing as well as helped to provide 10 Gbps capable links between core backbone devices (10 times the previous bandwidth). These improvements allow Hanford the ability to further support bandwidth intense applications, such as video teleconferencing. The ET-50 switch upgrade, along with other upgrades implemented from the five year plan, have prepared Hanford's network for the next evolution of technology in voice, video, and data. Hand-in-hand with ET-50's major data center outage, Mission Support Alliance's (MSA) Information Management (IM) organization executed a disaster recovery (DR) exercise to perform a true integration test and capability study. The DR scope was planned within the constraints of ET-50's 14 hour datacenter outage window. This DR exercise tested Hanford's Continuity of Operations (COOP) capability and failover plans for safety and business critical Hanford Federal Cloud applications. The planned suite of services to be tested was identified prior to the outage and plans were prepared to test the services ability to failover from the primary Hanford data center to the backup data center. The services tested were: Core Network (backbone, firewall, load balancers); Voicemail; Voice over IP (VoIP); Emergency Notification; Virtual desktops; and, Select set of production applications

  16. Glucose administration does not modulate prolactin response to exercise, TRH or haloperidol injection.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Jezová, D

    1994-01-01

    Glucose was found to exert an In vitro regulatory effect on prolactin secretion. Its role in the modulation of stimulated secretion of prolactin in man is, however, not clear. To evaluate the effect of hyperglycaemia on prolactin release, three stimulatory tests with different mechanisms of stimulation were employed. Healthy male subjects served as volunteers during submaximal exercise, TRH test (0.2 mg i.v.) and administration of haloperidol (2 mg i.v.). Glucose (100 g in 400 ml) or an equal volume of water was given 30 min before the tests. Blood for glucose and prolactin analysis was taken via an indwelling catheter. The plasma prolactin concentration increased in response to each of the stimuli applied. However, the prolactin increase during hyperglycaemia did not differ from values obtained in tests performed in normoglycaemia after water administration. These results indicate that prolactin release in healthy man is not modulated by hyperglycaemia. PMID:7711007

  17. Muscle ischemic preconditioning does not improve performance during self-paced exercise.

    PubMed

    Tocco, F; Marongiu, E; Ghiani, G; Sanna, I; Palazzolo, G; Olla, S; Pusceddu, M; Sanna, P; Corona, F; Concu, A; Crisafulli, A

    2015-01-01

    Muscle ischemic preconditioning (IP) has been found to improve exercise performance in laboratory tests. This investigation aims at verifying whether performance is improved by IP during self-paced exercise (SPE) in the field. 11 well-trained male runners performed 3 randomly assigned 5 000 m self-paced running tests on an outdoor track. One was the reference (RT) test, while the others were performed following muscle IP (IPT) and a control sham test (ST). Average speeds were measured during each test. Mean values in oxygen uptake (VO2), aerobic energy cost (AEC) during race and post-race blood lactate (BLa) were gathered. Data showed that none of the studied variables were affected by IPT or ST with respect to the RT test. Average speeds were 4.63±0.31, 4.62±0.31 and 4.60±0.25 m·s(-1) for the RT, the ST and the IPT tests, respectively. Moreover, there was no difference among tests in speed reached during each lap. VO2 was 3.5±0.69, 3.74±0.85 and 3.62±1.19 l·min(-1). AEC was 1.04±0.15, 1.08±0.1 and 1.09±0.15 kcal·kg(-1)·km(-1). Finally, post-race BLa levels reached 12.85±3.54, 11.88±4.74 and 12.82±3.6 mmol·l(-1). These findings indicate that performance during SPE is not ameliorated by ischemic preconditioning, thereby indicating that IP is not suitable as an ergogenic aid. PMID:25264861

  18. The need for salt: does a relationship exist between cystic fibrosis and exercise-associated hyponatremia?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Douglas P; Hoffman, Martin D; Stuempfle, Kristin J; Owen, Bethan E; Rogers, Ian R; Verbalis, Joseph G; Hew-Butler, Tamara D

    2014-03-01

    Salt replacement is often recommended to prevent exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) despite a lack of evidence to support such practice. Exercise-associated hyponatremia is known to be a complex process resulting from the interplay of hydration, arginine vasopressin, and sodium balance. Although evidence suggests overhydration is the dominant pathophysiologic factor in most cases, the contributions of sweat sodium losses remain unclear. A theoretical genetic mechanism producing exuberant sweat sodium loss in athletes is the presence of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene. Individuals with CF develop hypovolemic hyponatremia by sodium loss via sweat through a defective chloride ion transport channel, the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Elevated sweat sodium concentrations in CF single heterozygotes suggest that athletes developing EAH may be CFTR carriers. We targeted the 2010 and 2011 Western States Endurance Run ultramarathon, an event where athletes with EAH regularly present in a hypovolemic state, for a cohort maximizing the potential to document such a relationship. A total of 798 runners started the 2010 (n = 423) and 2011 (n = 375) races. Of the 638 finishers, 373 were screened for EAH by blood draw, 60 (16%) were found to have EAH, and 31 (alpha = 0.05 for n = 9) reported their CF result from a saliva-based genetic testing kit. Neither the 31 EAH-positive athletes nor the 25 EAH-negative comparison cohort athletes tested positive for a CF mutation. This null relationship suggests that CFTR mutations are not associated with the development of EAH and that salt supplementation is unnecessary for such a reason. PMID:23897018

  19. Increasing blood flow before exercise in spinal cord-injured individuals does not alter muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Olive, Jennifer L; Slade, Jill M; Bickel, C Scott; Dudley, Gary A; McCully, Kevin K

    2004-02-01

    Previous studies have shown increased fatigue in paralyzed muscle of spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients (Castro M, Apple D Jr, Hillegass E, and Dudley GA. Eur J Appl Physiol 80: 373-378, 1999; Gerrits H, Hopman MTE, Sargeant A, and de Haan A. Clin Physiol 21: 105-113, 2001). Our purpose was to determine whether the increased muscle fatigue could be due to a delayed rise in blood flow at the onset of exercise in SCI individuals. Isometric electrical stimulation was used to induce fatigue in the quadriceps femoris muscle of seven male, chronic (>1 yr postinjury), complete (American Spinal Injury Association, category A) SCI subjects. Cuff occlusion was used to elevate blood flow before electrical stimulation, and the magnitude of fatigue was compared with a control condition of electrical stimulation without prior cuff occlusion. Blood flow was measured in the femoral artery by Doppler ultrasound. Prior cuff occlusion increased blood flow in the first 30 s of stimulation compared with the No-Cuff condition (1,350 vs. 680 ml/min, respectively; P < 0.001), although blood flow at the end of stimulation was the same between conditions (1,260 +/- 140 vs. 1,160 +/- 370 ml/min, Cuff and No-Cuff condition, respectively; P = 0.511). Muscle fatigue was not significantly different between prior cuff occlusion and the control condition (32 +/- 13 vs. 35 +/- 10%; P = 0.670). In conclusion, increased muscle fatigue in SCI individuals is not associated with the prolonged time for blood flow to increase at the onset of exercise. PMID:14506095

  20. Does a fall prevention educational programme improve knowledge and change exercise prescribing behaviour in health and exercise professionals? A study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, A; Sturnieks, D L; Hill, A-M; Lovitt, L; Clemson, L; Lord, S R; Harvey, L; Sherrington, C

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Falling in older age is a serious and costly problem. At least one in three older people fall annually. Although exercise is recognised as an effective fall prevention intervention, low numbers of older people engage in suitable programmes. Health and exercise professionals play a crucial role in addressing fall risk in older adults. This trial aims to evaluate the effect of participation in a fall prevention educational programme, compared with a wait-list control group, on health and exercise professionals’ knowledge about fall prevention and the effect on fall prevention exercise prescription behaviour and confidence to prescribe the exercises to older people. Methods and analysis A randomised controlled trial involving 220 consenting health and exercise professionals will be conducted. Participants will be individually randomised to an intervention group (n=110) to receive an educational workshop plus access to internet-based support resources, or a wait-list control group (n=110). The two primary outcomes, measured 3 months after randomisation, are: (1) knowledge about fall prevention and (2) self-perceived change in fall prevention exercise prescription behaviour. Secondary outcomes include: (1) participants’ confidence to prescribe fall prevention exercises; (2) the proportion of people aged 60+ years seen by trial participants in the past month who were prescribed fall prevention exercise; and (3) the proportion of fall prevention exercises prescribed by participants to older people in the past month that comply with evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes will be measured with a self-report questionnaire designed specifically for the trial. Ethics and dissemination The trial protocol was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee, The University of Sydney, Australia. Trial results will be disseminated via peer reviewed journals, presentations at international conferences and participants’ newsletters. Trial registration number Trial

  1. 43 CFR 3137.89 - How does production allocation occur from wells that do not meet the productivity criteria?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How does production allocation occur from wells that do not meet the productivity criteria? 3137.89 Section 3137.89 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL AND GAS...

  2. 20 CFR 663.640 - May an individual with a disability whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May an individual with a disability whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be eligible for priority as a low-income adult? 663.640 Section 663.640 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER...

  3. Does whole-body cryotherapy improve vertical jump recovery following a high-intensity exercise bout?

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Amilton; Bottaro, Martim; Ferreira-Junior, Joao B; Vieira, Carlos; Cleto, Vitor A; Cadore, Eduardo L; Simões, Herbert G; Carmo, Jake Do; Brown, Lee E

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) has been used as a recovery strategy following different sports activities. Thus, the aim of the study reported here was to examine the effect of WBC on vertical jump recovery following a high-intensity exercise (HIE) bout. Twelve trained men (mean ± standard deviation age = 23.9±5.9 years) were randomly exposed to two different conditions separated by 7 days: 1) WBC (3 minutes of WBC at −110°C immediately after the HIE) and 2) control (CON; no WBC after the HIE). The HIE consisted of six sets of ten repetitions of knee extensions at 60° · s−1 concentric and 180° · s−1 eccentric on an isokinetic dynamometer. The vertical jump test was used to evaluate the influence of HIE on lower extremity muscular performance. The vertical jump was performed on a force platform before HIE (T1) and 30 minutes after (T2) the WBC and CON conditions. As a result of HIE, jump height, muscle power, and maximal velocity (Vmax) had significant decreases between T1 and T2, however no significance was found between the WBC and CON conditions. The results indicate that one session of WBC had no effect on vertical jump following an HIE compared with a CON condition. WBC may not improve muscle-function (dependent on stretch-shortening cycle) recovery in very short periods (ie, 30 minutes) following HIE. PMID:25750548

  4. Does acute side-alternating vibration exercise enhance ballistic upper-body power?

    PubMed

    Cochrane, D J; Black, M J; Barnes, M J

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute vibration exercise, at 2 different frequencies, on upper body power output. Muscle activity (EMG) and upper-body peak power was measured in 12 healthy males during ballistic bench press throws at 30% of 1-repetition maximum on a Smith machine. Measures were made prior to, 30 s and 5 min after one of 3 conditions performed for 30 s in a press-up position: side-alternating vibration at 20 Hz, 26 Hz and no vibration. EMG was recorded in the anterior deltoid, triceps brachii and pectoralis major during ballistic bench press throws as well as during application of each condition. While peak power output was higher at 5 min post condition across all conditions, compared to baseline measures (P<0.05), only 20 Hz vibration resulted in a significant increase in peak power output (P<0.05) compared to no vibration. EMG was greater during both vibration conditions, compared to no vibration (P<0.001). However, this difference was not evident during bench press throws when no difference was seen in muscle activity between conditions. These findings suggest that 20 Hz vibration has an ergogenic effect on upper-body power that may be due to peripheral, rather than central, mediated mechanisms. PMID:24838267

  5. Clinical Applications for Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, David

    1989-01-01

    Patients with chronic conditions such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity might benefit from prescribed exercise. Although exercise does not reverse pathologic changes, it may play a role in disease management. (JD)

  6. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every ... children more likely to develop asthma. How does exercise cause asthma symptoms? The symptoms of asthma are ...

  7. Does Increased Exercise or Physical Activity Alter Ad-Libitum Daily Energy Intake or Macronutrient Composition in Healthy Adults? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Joseph E.; Herrmann, Stephen D.; Lambourne, Kate; Szabo, Amanda N.; Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The magnitude of the negative energy balance induced by exercise may be reduced due to compensatory increases in energy intake. Objective To address the question: Does increased exercise or physical activity alter ad-libitum daily energy intake or macronutrient composition in healthy adults? Data Sources PubMed and Embase were searched (January 1990–January 2013) for studies that presented data on energy and/or macronutrient intake by level of exercise, physical activity or change in response to exercise. Ninety-nine articles (103 studies) were included. Study Eligibility Criteria Primary source articles published in English in peer-reviewed journals. Articles that presented data on energy and/or macronutrient intake by level of exercise or physical activity or changes in energy or macronutrient intake in response to acute exercise or exercise training in healthy (non-athlete) adults (mean age 18–64 years). Study Appraisal and Synthesis Methods Articles were grouped by study design: cross-sectional, acute/short term, non-randomized, and randomized trials. Considerable heterogeneity existed within study groups for several important study parameters, therefore a meta-analysis was considered inappropriate. Results were synthesized and presented by study design. Results No effect of physical activity, exercise or exercise training on energy intake was shown in 59% of cross-sectional studies (n = 17), 69% of acute (n = 40), 50% of short-term (n = 10), 92% of non-randomized (n = 12) and 75% of randomized trials (n = 24). Ninety-four percent of acute, 57% of short-term, 100% of non-randomized and 74% of randomized trials found no effect of exercise on macronutrient intake. Forty-six percent of cross-sectional trials found lower fat intake with increased physical activity. Limitations The literature is limited by the lack of adequately powered trials of sufficient duration, which have prescribed and measured exercise energy expenditure

  8. Increased Resistance during Jump Exercise Does Not Enhance Cortical Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, Ramon D.; Swift, Joshua M.; Gasier, Heath G.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Hogan, Harry A.; Fluckey, James D.; Bloomfield, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study sought to elucidate the effects of a low- and high-load jump resistance exercise (RE) training protocol on cortical bone of the tibia and femur mid-diaphyses. METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 6-mos-old) were randomly assigned to high-load RE (HRE; n = 16), low-load RE (LRE; n = 15) or cage control (CC; n = 11) groups. Animals in the HRE and LRE groups performed 15 sessions of jump RE for 5 weeks. Load in the HRE group was progressively increased from 80g added to a weighted vest (50 repetitions) to 410g (16 repetitions). The LRE rats completed the same protocol as the HRE group (same number of repetitions) with only a 30g vest applied. RESULTS Low- and high-load jump RE resulted in 6–11% higher cortical bone mineral content (BMC) and cortical bone area compared to controls as determined by in vivo pQCT measurements. In the femur, however, only LRE demonstrated improvements in cortical volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD; +11%) and cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI; +20%) versus CC group. Three-point bending to failure revealed a marked increase in tibial max force (25–29%), stiffness (19–22%), and energy to max force (35–55%), and a reduction in elastic modulus (−11–14%) in both LRE and HRE compared to controls. Dynamic histomorphometry assessed at the tibia mid-diaphysis determined that both LRE and HRE resulted in 20–30% higher periosteal mineralizing surface versus CC group. Mineral apposition rate (MAR) and bone formation rate (BFR) were significantly greater in LRE animals (27%, 39%) than in the HRE group. CONCLUSION These data demonstrate that jump training with minimal loading is equally, and sometimes more, effective at augmenting cortical bone integrity compared to overload training in skeletally mature rats. PMID:24743108

  9. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... or difficulty walking. To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  10. Voluntary exercise does not ameliorate spatial learning and memory deficits induced by chronic administration of nandrolone decanoate in rats.

    PubMed

    Tanehkar, Fatemeh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Haghighi, Saeed; Miladi-Gorji, Hossien; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Bavarsad, Kowsar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to the anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) nandrolone decanoate (ND) in supra-physiological doses is associated with learning and memory impairments. Given the well-known beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on cognitive functions, we examined whether voluntary exercise would improve the cognitive deficits induced by chronic administration of ND. We also investigated the effects of ND and voluntary exercise on hippocampal BDNF levels. The rats were randomly distributed into 4 experimental groups: the vehicle-sedentary group, the ND-sedentary group, the vehicle-exercise group, and the ND-exercise group. The vehicle-exercise and the ND-exercise groups were allowed to freely exercise in a running wheel for 15 days. The vehicle-sedentary and the ND-sedentary groups were kept sedentary for the same period. Vehicle or ND injections were started 14 days prior to the voluntary exercise and continued throughout the 15 days of voluntary exercise. After the 15-day period, the rats were trained and tested on a water maze spatial task using four trials per day for 5 consecutive days followed by a probe trial two days later. Exercise significantly improved performance during both the training and retention of the water maze task, and enhanced hippocampal BDNF. ND impaired spatial learning and memory, and this effect was not rescued by exercise. ND also potentiated the exercise-induced increase in hippocampal BDNF levels. These results seem to indicate that voluntary exercise is unable to improve the disruption of cognitive functions by chronic ND. Moreover, increased levels of BDNF may play a role in ND-induced impairments in learning and memory. The harmful effects of ND and other AAS on learning and memory should be taken into account when athletes decide to use AAS for performance or body image improvement. PMID:23068768

  11. Proceedings of the fourth annual participants' information meeting, DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Large, D.E.: Mezga, L.J.; Stratton, L.E.; Rose, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The Fourth Annual Participants' Information Meeting of the Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Management Program was held in Denver, Colorado, August 31 to September 2, 1982. The purpose of the meeting was to report and evaluate technology development funded by the program and to examine mechanisms for technology transfer. The meeting consisted of an introductory plenary session, followed by two concurrent overview sessions and then six concurrent technical sessions. There were two group meetings to review the findings of the technical sessions. The meeting concluded with a plenary summary session in which the major findings of the meeting were addressed. All papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  12. Albumin infusion in humans does not model exercise induced hypervolaemia after 24 hours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, A.; Gillen, C. M.; Mack, G. W.; Nadel, E. R.

    1998-01-01

    We rapidly infused 234 +/- 3 mL of 5% human serum albumin in eight men while measuring haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration, plasma volume (PV), albumin concentration, total protein concentration, osmolality, sodium concentration, renin activity, aldosterone concentration, and atrial natriuretic peptide concentration to test the hypotheses that plasma volume expansion and plasma albumin content expansion will not persist for 24 h. Plasma volume and albumin content were expanded for the first 6 h after infusion (44.3 +/- 1.9-47.2 +/- 2.0 mL kg-1 and 1.9 +/- 0.1-2.1 +/- 0.1 g kg-1 at pre-infusion and 1 h, respectively, P < 0.05), but by 24 h plasma volume and albumin content decreased significantly from 1 h post-infusion and were not different from pre-infusion (44.8 +/- 1.9 mL kg-1 and 1.9 +/- 0.1 g kg-1, respectively). Plasma aldosterone concentration showed a significant effect of time over the 24 h after infusion (P < 0.05), and showed a trend to decrease at 2 h after infusion (167.6 +/- 32.5(-1) 06.2 +/- 13.4 pg mL-1, P = 0.07). These data demonstrate that a 6.8% expansion of plasma volume and 10.5% expansion of plasma albumin content by infusion does not remain in the vascular space for 24 h and suggest a redistribution occurs between the intravascular space and interstitial fluid space.

  13. Addition of glutamine to essential amino acids and carbohydrate does not enhance anabolism in young human males following exercise.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Sarah B; Kim, Paul L; Armstrong, David; Phillips, Stuart M

    2006-10-01

    We examined the effect of a post-exercise oral carbohydrate (CHO, 1 g.kg(-1).h(-1)) and essential amino acid (EAA, 9.25 g) solution containing glutamine (0.3 g/kg BW; GLN trial) versus an isoenergetic CHO-EAA solution without glutamine (control, CON trial) on muscle glycogen resynthesis and whole-body protein turnover following 90 min of cycling at 65% VO2 peak. Over the course of 3 h of recovery, muscle biopsies were taken to measure glycogen resynthesis and mixed muscle protein synthesis (MPS), by incorporation of [ring-2H5] phenylalanine. Infusion of [1-13C] leucine was used to measure whole-body protein turnover. Exercise resulted in a significant decrease in muscle glycogen (p < 0.05) with similar declines in each trial. Glycogen resynthesis following 3 h of recovery indicated no difference in total accumulation or rate of repletion. Leucine oxidation increased 2.5 fold (p < 0.05) during exercise, returned to resting levels immediately post-exercise,and was again elevated at 3 h post-exercise (p < 0.05). Leucine flux, an index of whole-body protein breakdown rate, was reduced during exercise, but increased to resting levels immediately post-exercise, and was further increased at 3 h post-exercise (p < 0.05), but only during the CON trial. Exercise resulted in a marked suppression of whole-body protein synthesis (50% of rest; p < 0.05), which was restored post-exercise; however, the addition of glutamine did not affect whole-body protein synthesis post-exercise. The rate of MPS was not different between trials. The addition of glutamine to a CHO + EAA beverage had no effect on post-exercise muscle glycogen resynthesis or muscle protein synthesis, but may suppress a rise in whole-body proteolysis during the later stages of recovery. PMID:17111006

  14. Acute exercise increases feeding latency in healthy normal weight young males but does not alter energy intake.

    PubMed

    King, James A; Wasse, Lucy K; Stensel, David J

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the acute influence of exercise on eating behaviour in an ecologically valid setting whereby healthy active males were permitted complete ad libitum access to food. Ten healthy males completed two, 8h trials (exercise and control) in a randomised-crossover design. In the exercise trials participants consumed a breakfast snack and then rested for 1h before undertaking a 60 min run (72% of VO(2)max) on a treadmill. Participants then rested in the laboratory for 6h during which time they were permitted complete ad libitum access to a buffet meal. The timing of meals, energy/macronutrient intake and eating frequency were assessed. Identical procedures were completed in the control trial except no exercise was performed. Exercise increased the length of time (35 min) before participants voluntarily requested to eat afterwards. Despite this, energy intake at the first meal consumed, or at subsequent eating episodes, was not influenced by exercise (total trial energy intake: control 7426 kJ, exercise 7418 kJ). Neither was there any difference in macronutrient intake or meal frequency between trials. These results confirm that food intake remains unaffected by exercise in the immediate hours after but suggest that exercise may invoke a delay before food is desired. PMID:23137828

  15. Sustained submaximal exercise does not alter the integrity of the lung blood-gas barrier in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, S R; Schoene, R B; Henderson, W R; Spragg, R G; West, J B

    1998-04-01

    The extreme thinness of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier results in high mechanical stresses in the capillary wall when the capillary pressure rises during exercise. We have previously shown that, in elite cyclists, 6-8 min of maximal exercise increase blood-gas barrier permeability and result in higher concentrations of red blood cells, total protein, and leukotriene B4 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid compared with results in sedentary controls. To test the hypothesis that stress failure of the barrier only occurs at the highest level of exercise, we performed BAL in six healthy athletes after 1 h of exercise at 77% of maximal O2 consumption. Controls were eight normal nonathletes who did not exercise before BAL. In contrast with our previous study, we did not find higher concentrations of red blood cells, total protein, and leukotriene B4 in the exercising athletes compared with control subjects. However, higher concentrations of surfactant apoprotein A and a higher surfactant apoprotein A-to-phospholipid ratio were observed in the athletes performing prolonged exercise, compared with both the controls and the athletes from our previous study. These results suggest that, in elite athletes, the integrity of the blood-gas barrier is altered only at extreme levels of exercise. PMID:9516183

  16. Gas stream cleanup papers from DOE/METC sponsored contractors review meetings in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bedick, R.C.; Kothari, V.P.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains gas stream cleanup papers that were presented at two contractors review meetings sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy in 1988. The two meetings were (1) the Eighth Annual Gasification and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting held May 10-12, 1988, and (2) the Annual Coal Fuel Heat Engines and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting held June 14-16, 1988. The purpose of the meetings was to present recent technical information on selected projects in the gasification, heat engines, and gas stream cleanup programs. The meetings provided a forum for the exchange and dissemination of gasification, heat engine, and gas stream cleanup research results generated under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy. The gas stream cleanup program was discussed in combination with the gasification and heat engines programs to emphasize the importance of approaching research on gas stream cleanup concepts from a system perspective. Gas stream cleanup is an integral part of all coal conversion technologies. Individual papers are processed separately for the data bases.

  17. Acute and Chronic Whole-Body Vibration Exercise does not Induce Health-Promoting Effects on The Blood Profile

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, Anastasios A.; Gerodimos, Vassilis; Karatrantou, Konstantina; Paschalis, Vassilis; Chanou, Konstantina; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) exercise is an alternative, popular and easy exercise that can be followed by general public. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of acute and chronic WBV exercise on health-related parameters. Twenty-eight women were allocated into a control group (n=11, mean ±SEM: age, 43.5 ±1.5 yr; body mass, 66.1 ±3.1 kg; height, 160.6 ±1.5 cm) and a vibration group (n=17, mean ±SEM: age, 44.0 ±1.0 yr; body mass, 67.1 ±2.2 kg; height, 162.5 ±1.5 cm). After baseline assessments, participants of the experimental group performed WBV training 3 times/week for 8 weeks. Before and after the chronic WBV exercise, the participants of the vibration group performed one session of acute WBV exercise. Blood chemistry measurements (hematology, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, C-reactive protein, glucose, insulin, triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B and lipoprotein, thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances, protein carbonyls, total antioxidant capacity, uric acid, albumin and bilirubin) were assessed pre-exercise and post-exercise at the first and eighth week of WBV exercise in both control and vibration groups. The results failed to support any effect of both acute and chronic WBV exercise on biochemical health-related parameters. However, it seems that WBV exercise is a safe way of training without a negative impact on muscle and liver functionality. PMID:26240654

  18. Impaired myocardial function does not explain reduced left ventricular filling and stroke volume at rest or during exercise at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Stembridge, Mike; Ainslie, Philip N; Hughes, Michael G; Stöhr, Eric J; Cotter, James D; Tymko, Michael M; Day, Trevor A; Bakker, Akke; Shave, Rob

    2015-11-15

    Impaired myocardial systolic contraction and diastolic relaxation have been suggested as possible mechanisms contributing to the decreased stroke volume (SV) observed at high altitude (HA). To determine whether intrinsic myocardial performance is a limiting factor in the generation of SV at HA, we assessed left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic mechanics and volumes in 10 healthy participants (aged 32 ± 7; mean ± SD) at rest and during exercise at sea level (SL; 344 m) and after 10 days at 5,050 m. In contrast to SL, LV end-diastolic volume was ∼19% lower at rest (P = 0.004) and did not increase during exercise despite a greater untwisting velocity. Furthermore, resting SV was lower at HA (∼17%; 60 ± 10 vs. 70 ± 8 ml) despite higher LV twist (43%), apical rotation (115%), and circumferential strain (17%). With exercise at HA, the increase in SV was limited (12 vs. 22 ml at SL), and LV apical rotation failed to augment. For the first time, we have demonstrated that EDV does not increase upon exercise at high altitude despite enhanced in vivo diastolic relaxation. The increase in LV mechanics at rest may represent a mechanism by which SV is defended in the presence of a reduced EDV. However, likely because of the higher LV mechanics at rest, no further increase was observed up to 50% peak power. Consequently, although hypoxia does not suppress systolic function per se, the capacity to increase SV through greater deformation during submaximal exercise at HA is restricted. PMID:25749445

  19. 25 CFR 162.588 - What happens if BIA does not meet a deadline for issuing a decision on a lease document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Director does not meet the deadline in paragraph (d) or (e) of this section. (g) The provisions of 25 CFR 2... OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Wind and Solar Resource Leases Wsr...

  20. 25 CFR 162.588 - What happens if BIA does not meet a deadline for issuing a decision on a lease document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Director does not meet the deadline in paragraph (d) or (e) of this section. (g) The provisions of 25 CFR 2... OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Wind and Solar Resource Leases Wsr...

  1. Exercise-induced intrapulmonary shunting of venous gas emboli does not occur after open-sea diving.

    PubMed

    Dujić, Zeljko; Palada, Ivan; Obad, Ante; Duplancić, Darko; Brubakk, Alf O; Valic, Zoran

    2005-09-01

    Paradoxical arterializations of venous gas emboli can lead to neurological damage after diving with compressed air. Recently, significant exercise-induced intrapulmonary anatomical shunts have been reported in healthy humans that result in widening of alveolar-to-arterial oxygen gradient. The aim of this study was to examine whether intrapulmonary shunts can be found following strenuous exercise after diving and, if so, whether exercise should be avoided during that period. Eleven healthy, military male divers performed an open-sea dive to 30 m breathing air, remaining at pressure for 30 min. During the bottom phase of the dive, subjects performed mild exercise at approximately 30% of their maximal oxygen uptake. The ascent rate was 9 m/min. Each diver performed graded upright cycle ergometry up to 80% of the maximal oxygen uptake 40 min after the dive. Monitoring of venous gas emboli was performed in both the right and left heart with an ultrasonic scanner every 20 min for 60 min after reaching the surface pressure during supine rest and following two coughs. The diving profile used in this study produced significant amounts of venous bubbles. No evidence of intrapulmonary shunting was found in any subject during either supine resting posture or any exercise grade. Also, short strenuous exercise after the dive did not result in delayed-onset decompression sickness in any subject, but studies with a greater number of participants are needed to confirm whether divers should be allowed to exercise after diving. PMID:15845772

  2. Protein supplementation does not alter intramuscular anabolic signaling or endocrine response after resistance exercise in trained men.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Adam M; Hoffman, Jay R; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; Boone, Carleigh H; Beyer, Kyle S; Baker, Kayla M; Wells, Adam J; Church, David D; Mangine, Gerald T; Oliveira, Leonardo P; Moon, Jordan R; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2015-11-01

    The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway appears to be the primary regulator of muscle protein synthesis. A variety of stimuli including resistance exercise, amino acids, and hormonal signals activate mTORC1 signaling. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a protein supplement on mTORC1 signaling following a resistance exercise protocol designed to promote elevations in circulating hormone concentrations. We hypothesized that the protein supplement would augment the intramuscular anabolic signaling response. Ten resistance-trained men (age, 24.7 ± 3.4 years; weight, 90.1 ± 11.3 kg; height, 176.0 ± 4.9 cm) received either a placebo or a supplement containing 20 g protein, 6 g carbohydrates, and 1 g fat after high-volume, short-rest lower-body resistance exercise. Blood samples were obtained at baseline, immediately, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 5 hours after exercise. Fine-needle muscle biopsies were completed at baseline, 1 hour, and 5 hours after exercise. Myoglobin, lactate dehydrogenase, and lactate concentrations were significantly elevated after resistance exercise (P < .0001); however, no differences were observed between trials. Resistance exercise also elicited a significant insulin, growth hormone, and cortisol response (P < .01); however, no differences were observed between trials for insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin, testosterone, growth hormone, or cortisol. Intramuscular anabolic signaling analysis revealed significant elevations in RPS6 phosphorylation after resistance exercise (P = .001); however, no differences were observed between trials for signaling proteins including Akt, mTOR, p70S6k, and RPS6. The endocrine response and phosphorylation status of signaling proteins within the mTORC1 pathway did not appear to be altered by ingestion of supplement after resistance exercise in resistance-trained men. PMID:26428621

  3. Acute acetaminophen ingestion does not alter core temperature or sweating during exercise in hot-humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Coombs, G B; Cramer, M N; Ravanelli, N M; Morris, N B; Jay, O

    2015-06-01

    Acute acetaminophen (ACT) ingestion has been reported to reduce thermal strain during cycling in the heat. In this study, nine active participants ingested 20 mg of ACT per kg of total body mass (ACT) or a placebo (PLA), 60 min prior to cycling at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (ACT: 8.3 ± 0.3 W/kg; PLA: 8.5 ± 0.5 W/kg), which was equivalent to 55 ± 6% VO2max , for 60 min at 34.5 ± 0.1 °C, 52 ± 1% relative humidity. Resting rectal temperature (Tre ; ACT: 36.70 ± 0.17 °C; PLA: 36.80 ± 0.16 °C, P = 0.24), esophageal temperature (Tes ; ACT: 36.54 ± 0.22 °C; PLA: 36.61 ± 0.17 °C, P = 0.50) and mean skin temperature (Tsk ; ACT: 34.00 ± 0.14 °C; PLA: 33.96 ± 0.20 °C, P = 0.70) were all similar among conditions. At end-exercise, no differences in ΔTre (ACT: 1.12 ± 0.15 °C; PLA: 1.11 ± 0.21 °C, P = 0.92), ΔTes (ACT: 0.90 ± 0.28 °C; PLA: 0.88 ± 0.23 °C, P = 0.84), ΔTsk (ACT: 0.80 ± 0.39 °C; PLA: 0.70 ± 0.46 °C, P = 0.63), mean local sweat rate (ACT: 1.02 ± 0.15 mg/cm(2) /min; PLA: 1.02 ± 0.13 mg/cm(2) /min, P = 0.98) and whole-body sweat loss (ACT: 663 ± 83 g; PLA: 663 ± 77 g, P = 0.995) were evident. Furthermore, ratings of perceived exertion and thermal sensation and thermal comfort were not different between ACT and PLA conditions. In conclusion, ACT ingested 60 min prior to moderate intensity exercise in hot-humid conditions does not alter physiologic thermoregulatory control nor perceived strain. PMID:25943660

  4. Patent Foramen Ovale Is Not Associated with Hypoxemia in Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Does Not Impair Exercise Performance

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Zarrin F.; Kelly, Julia L.; Shrikrishna, Dinesh; de Villa, Manuel; Mullen, Michael J.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.; Morrell, Mary J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Patent foramen ovale (PFO) may be disadvantageous in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is unknown whether right-to-left shunting through PFO increases during exercise impairing exercise performance. Objectives: To determine whether (1) PFO prevalence is greater in hypoxemic versus less hypoxemic patients with COPD, (2) PFO is associated with clinically relevant impairment, and (3) right-to-left shunting increases during exercise and impairs exercise performance. Methods: Patients with COPD and age-matched control subjects underwent contrast transthoracic echocardiography and transcranial Doppler to identify PFO. Patients with COPD with no shunt and patients with large PFO underwent cardiopulmonary exercise tests with contrast transcranial Doppler, esophageal, and gastric balloon catheters. Measurements and Main Results: PFO prevalence was similar in 50 patients with COPD and 50 healthy control subjects (46% vs. 30%; P = 0.15). Large shunts were more common in patients with COPD (26% vs. 6%; P = 0.01). In an expanded COPD cohort, PFO prevalence was similar in 31 hypoxemic (Pao2 ≤ 7.3 kPa) and 63 less hypoxemic (Pao2 > 8.0 kPa) patients with COPD (39% vs. 52%; P = 0.27). Patients with intrapulmonary shunting had lower Pao2 than both patients with PFO and those with no right-to-left shunt (7.7 vs. 8.6 vs. 9.3 kPa, respectively; P = 0.002). Shunting significantly increased during exercise in patients with COPD with PFO. Endurance time at 60% Vo2max was 574 (178) seconds for patients with PFO and 534 (279) seconds for those without (P = ns). Conclusions: Hypoxemic patients with COPD do not have a higher prevalence of PFO. Patients with COPD with PFO do not perform less well either on a 6-minute walk or submaximal exercise testing despite increased right-to-left shunting during exercise. PMID:24450410

  5. Endothelial function does not improve with high-intensity continuous exercise training in SHR: implications of eNOS uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Battault, Sylvain; Singh, François; Gayrard, Sandrine; Zoll, Joffrey; Reboul, Cyril; Meyer, Grégory

    2016-02-01

    Exercise training is a well-recognized way to improve vascular endothelial function by increasing nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. However, in hypertensive subjects, unlike low- and moderate-intensity exercise training, the beneficial effects of continuous high-intensity exercise on endothelial function are not clear, and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of high-intensity exercise on vascular function, especially on the NO pathway, in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR). These effects were studied on WKY, sedentary SHR and SHR that exercised at moderate (SHR-MOD) and high intensity (SHR-HI) on a treadmill (1 h per day; 5 days per week for 6 weeks at 55% and 80% of their maximal aerobic velocity, respectively). Endothelial function and specific NO contributions to acetylcholine-mediated relaxation were evaluated by measuring the aortic ring isometric forces. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and phosphorylation (ser1177) were evaluated by western blotting. The total aortic and eNOS-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was assessed using electron paramagnetic resonance in aortic tissue. Although the aortas of SHR-HI had increased eNOS levels without alteration of eNOS phosphorylation, high-intensity exercise had no beneficial effect on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, unlike moderate exercise. This result was associated with increased eNOS-dependent ROS production in the aortas of SHR-HI. Notably, the use of the recoupling agent BH4 or a thiol-reducing agent blunted eNOS-dependent ROS production in the aortas of SHR-HI. In conclusion, the lack of a positive effect of high-intensity exercise on endothelial function in SHR was mainly explained by redox-dependent eNOS uncoupling, resulting in a switch from NO to O2(-) generation. PMID:26537830

  6. Does a Wii-based exercise program enhance balance control of independently functioning older adults? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Yocheved; Dar, Gali; Kodesh, Einat

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise programs that challenge an individual’s balance have been shown to reduce the risk of falls among older adults. Virtual reality computer-based technology that provides the user with opportunities to interact with virtual objects is used extensively for entertainment. There is a growing interest in the potential of virtual reality-based interventions for balance training in older adults. This work comprises a systematic review of the literature to determine the effects of intervention programs utilizing the Nintendo Wii console on balance control and functional performance in independently functioning older adults. Methods Studies were obtained by searching the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, EMBASE, SPORTdiscus, and Google Scholar, followed by a hand search of bibliographic references of the included studies. Included were randomized controlled trials written in English in which Nintendo Wii Fit was used to enhance standing balance performance in older adults and compared with an alternative exercise treatment, placebo, or no treatment. Results Seven relevant studies were retrieved. The four studies examining the effect of Wii-based exercise compared with no exercise reported positive effects on at least one outcome measure related to balance performance in older adults. Studies comparing Wii-based training with alternative exercise programs generally indicated that the balance improvements achieved by Wii-based training are comparable with those achieved by other exercise programs. Conclusion The review indicates that Wii-based exercise programs may serve as an alternative to more conventional forms of exercise aimed at improving balance control. However, due to the great variability between studies in terms of the intervention protocols and outcome measures, as well as methodological limitations, definitive recommendations as to optimal treatment protocols and the potential of such an intervention as a safe and effective home

  7. Exercise does not enhance aged bone's impaired response to artificial loading in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Meakin, Lee B; Udeh, Chinedu; Galea, Gabriel L; Lanyon, Lance E; Price, Joanna S

    2015-12-01

    Bones adapt their structure to their loading environment and so ensure that they become, and are maintained, sufficiently strong to withstand the loads to which they are habituated. The effectiveness of this process declines with age and bones become fragile fracturing with less force. This effect in humans also occurs in mice which experience age-related bone loss and reduced adaptation to loading. Exercise engenders many systemic and local muscular physiological responses as well as engendering local bone strain. To investigate whether these physiological responses influence bones' adaptive responses to mechanical strain we examined whether a period of treadmill exercise influenced the adaptive response to an associated period of artificial loading in young adult (17-week) and old (19-month) mice. After treadmill acclimatization, mice were exercised for 30 min three times per week for two weeks. Three hours after each exercise period, right tibiae were subjected to 40 cycles of non-invasive axial loading engendering peak strain of 2250 με. In both young and aged mice exercise increased cross-sectional muscle area and serum sclerostin concentration. In young mice it also increased serum IGF1. Exercise did not affect bone's adaptation to loading in any measured parameter in young or aged bone. These data demonstrate that a level of exercise sufficient to cause systemic changes in serum, and adaptive changes in local musculature, has no effect on bone's response to loading 3h later. This study provides no support for the beneficial effects of exercise on bone in the elderly being mediated by systemic or local muscle-derived effects rather than local adaptation to altered mechanical strain. PMID:26142929

  8. Contemporary Day Care: Does It Meet Either Educational or Family Needs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Marian

    Center-based day care, at its current level of funding, is meeting neither adult nor child needs. Parents, especially working mothers, need child care that is reliable, flexible, professional, and affordable, but day care is rarely flexible, has few accommodations for emergencies, and is often not satisfactory for the maximum development of…

  9. Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Participants' Information Meeting: DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    The meeting consisted of the following six sessions: (1) plenary session I; (2) disposal technology; (3) characteristics and treatment of low-level waste; (4) environmental aspects and performance prediction; (5) overall summary sessions; and (6) plenary session II. Fifty two papers of the papers presented were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  10. When Intervention Meets Organisation, a Qualitative Study of Motivation and Barriers to Physical Exercise at the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Bredahl, Thomas Viskum Gjelstrup; Særvoll, Charlotte Ahlgren; Kirkelund, Lasse; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To provide a comprehensive understanding of the motivational factors and barriers that are important for compliance with high-intensity workplace physical exercise that is aimed at reducing musculoskeletal disorders. Method. The present study, which used semideductive, thematic, and structured in-depth interviews, was nested in a 20-week cluster randomised controlled trial among office workers. Interviews were conducted with 18 informants with diverse fields of sedentary office work who participated in strength training at the workplace for 20 minutes, three times per week. Organisational, implementational, and individual motives and barriers were explored. Results & Discussion. The results show that attention should be given to the interaction between the management, the employees, and the intervention, as the main barrier to compliance was the internal working culture. The results emphasised the need for a clear connection between the management's implementational intentions and the actual implementation. The results emphasise the importance of ensuring the legitimacy of the intervention among managers, participants, and colleagues. Moreover, it is important to centrally organise, structure, and ensure flexibility in the working day to free time for participants to attend the intervention. Recommendations from this study suggest that a thorough intervention mapping process should be performed to analyse organisational and implementational factors before initiating workplace physical exercise training. PMID:26380361

  11. A putative low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet elicits mild nutritional ketosis but does not impair the acute or chronic hypertrophic responses to resistance exercise in rodents.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michael D; Holland, A Maleah; Kephart, Wesley C; Mobley, C Brooks; Mumford, Petey W; Lowery, Ryan P; Fox, Carlton D; McCloskey, Anna E; Shake, Joshua J; Mesquita, Paulo; Patel, Romil K; Martin, Jeffrey S; Young, Kaelin C; Kavazis, Andreas N; Wilson, Jacob M

    2016-05-15

    We examined whether acute and/or chronic skeletal muscle anabolism is impaired with a low-carbohydrate diet formulated to elicit ketosis (LCKD) vs. a mixed macronutrient Western diet (WD). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (9-10 wk of age, 300-325 g) were provided isoenergetic amounts of a LCKD or a WD for 6 wk. In AIM 1, basal serum and gastrocnemius assessments were performed. In AIM 2, rats were resistance exercised for one bout and were euthanized 90-270 min following exercise for gastrocnemius analyses. In AIM 3, rats voluntarily exercised daily with resistance-loaded running wheels, and hind limb muscles were analyzed for hypertrophy markers at the end of the 6-wk protocol. In AIM 1, basal levels of gastrocnemius phosphorylated (p)-rps6, p-4EBP1, and p-AMPKα were similar between diets, although serum insulin (P < 0.01), serum glucose (P < 0.001), and several essential amino acid levels (P < 0.05) were lower in LCKD-fed rats. In AIM 2, LCKD- and WD-fed rats exhibited increased postexercise muscle protein synthesis levels (P < 0.0125), but no diet effect was observed (P = 0.59). In AIM 3, chronically exercise-trained LCKD- and WD-fed rats presented similar increases in relative hind limb muscle masses compared with their sedentary counterparts (12-24%, P < 0.05), but there was no between-diet effects. Importantly, the LCKD induced "mild" nutritional ketosis, as the LCKD-fed rats in AIM 2 exhibited ∼1.5-fold greater serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels relative to WD-fed rats (diet effect P = 0.003). This study demonstrates that the tested LCKD in rodents, while only eliciting mild nutritional ketosis, does not impair the acute or chronic skeletal muscle hypertrophic responses to resistance exercise. PMID:26718785

  12. Pre-Exercise Hyperhydration-Induced Bodyweight Gain Does Not Alter Prolonged Treadmill Running Time-Trial Performance in Warm Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gigou, Pierre-Yves; Dion, Tommy; Asselin, Audrey; Berrigan, Felix; Goulet, Eric D. B.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effect of pre-exercise hyperhydration (PEH) and pre-exercise euhydration (PEE) upon treadmill running time-trial (TT) performance in the heat. Six highly trained runners or triathletes underwent two 18 km TT runs (~28 °C, 25%–30% RH) on a motorized treadmill, in a randomized, crossover fashion, while being euhydrated or after hyperhydration with 26 mL/kg bodyweight (BW) of a 130 mmol/L sodium solution. Subjects then ran four successive 4.5 km blocks alternating between 2.5 km at 1% and 2 km at 6% gradient, while drinking a total of 7 mL/kg BW of a 6% sports drink solution (Gatorade, USA). PEH increased BW by 1.00 ± 0.34 kg (P < 0.01) and, compared with PEE, reduced BW loss from 3.1% ± 0.3% (EUH) to 1.4% ± 0.4% (HYP) (P < 0.01) during exercise. Running TT time did not differ between groups (PEH: 85.6 ± 11.6 min; PEE: 85.3 ± 9.6 min, P = 0.82). Heart rate (5 ± 1 beats/min) and rectal (0.3 ± 0.1 °C) and body (0.2 ± 0.1 °C) temperatures of PEE were higher than those of PEH (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in abdominal discomfort and perceived exertion or heat stress between groups. Our results suggest that pre-exercise sodium-induced hyperhydration of a magnitude of 1 L does not alter 80–90 min running TT performance under warm conditions in highly-trained runners drinking ~500 mL sports drink during exercise. PMID:23016126

  13. Pre-exercise hyperhydration-induced bodyweight gain does not alter prolonged treadmill running time-trial performance in warm ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Gigou, Pierre-Yves; Dion, Tommy; Asselin, Audrey; Berrigan, Felix; Goulet, Eric D B

    2012-08-01

    This study compared the effect of pre-exercise hyperhydration (PEH) and pre-exercise euhydration (PEE) upon treadmill running time-trial (TT) performance in the heat. Six highly trained runners or triathletes underwent two 18 km TT runs (~28 °C, 25%-30% RH) on a motorized treadmill, in a randomized, crossover fashion, while being euhydrated or after hyperhydration with 26 mL/kg bodyweight (BW) of a 130 mmol/L sodium solution. Subjects then ran four successive 4.5 km blocks alternating between 2.5 km at 1% and 2 km at 6% gradient, while drinking a total of 7 mL/kg BW of a 6% sports drink solution (Gatorade, USA). PEH increased BW by 1.00 ± 0.34 kg (P < 0.01) and, compared with PEE, reduced BW loss from 3.1% ± 0.3% (EUH) to 1.4% ± 0.4% (HYP) (P < 0.01) during exercise. Running TT time did not differ between groups (PEH: 85.6 ± 11.6 min; PEE: 85.3 ± 9.6 min, P = 0.82). Heart rate (5 ± 1 beats/min) and rectal (0.3 ± 0.1 °C) and body (0.2 ± 0.1 °C) temperatures of PEE were higher than those of PEH (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in abdominal discomfort and perceived exertion or heat stress between groups. Our results suggest that pre-exercise sodium-induced hyperhydration of a magnitude of 1 L does not alter 80-90 min running TT performance under warm conditions in highly-trained runners drinking ~500 mL sports drink during exercise. PMID:23016126

  14. Capsaicin and evodiamine ingestion does not augment energy expenditure and fat oxidation at rest or after moderately-intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Neil A; Spillane, Mike; La Bounty, Paul; Grandjean, Peter W; Leutholtz, Brian; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2013-12-01

    Capsaicin and evodiamine are 2 thermogenic agents recognized for their ability to stimulate the sympathetic nervous system. We hypothesized that both capsaicin and evodiamine would be effective at increasing thermogenesis and lipid oxidation during rest and exercise. In a randomized, cross-over design, 11 men ingested 500 mg of cayenne pepper (1.25 mg capsaicin), 500 mg evodiamine, or placebo at rest following 30 minutes of energy expenditure assessment using open-circuit spirometry. Energy expenditure was assessed again prior to commencing approximately 30 minutes of treadmill exercise at 65% peak oxygen consumption. Energy expenditure was assessed for another 30 minutes of the post-exercise period. Heart rate, blood pressure, core temperature, and venous blood samples were obtained 30 minutes before supplement ingestion, 1 hour after supplement ingestion, immediately post-exercise, and 45 minutes post-exercise. Serum markers of lipid oxidation (glycerol, free fatty acids, glucose, epinephrine, and norepinephrine) were determined spectrophotometrically with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Two-way analyses of variance with repeated measures were performed for each dependent variable (P ≤ .05) with Supplement and Test as main effects. Statistical analyses revealed significant main effects for Test for hemodynamics, energy expenditure, serum catecholamines, and markers of fat oxidation immediately post-exercise (P < .05). No significant interactions between Supplement and Test were noted for any criterion variable (P > .05). These results suggest that acute ingestion of 500 mg of cayenne (1.25 mg capsaicin) or evodiamine is not effective at inducing thermogenesis and increasing fat oxidation at rest or during exercise in men. PMID:24267043

  15. Superficial cooling does not decrease core body temperature before, during, or after exercise in an American football uniform.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rebecca M; Eberman, Lindsey E; Cleary, Michelle A

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of superficial cooling on thermoregulatory responses while exercising in a hot humid environment while wearing an American football uniform. Nine male and female subjects wore a superficial cooling garment while in a cooling (CS) experimental condition or a no cooling (NCS) control condition during an exercise task consisting of warm-up (WU), exercise (EX), and recovery (R). The exercise task simulated an American football conditioning session with subjects wearing a full American football uniform and performing anaerobic and aerobic exercises in a hot humid environment. Subjects were allowed to drink water ad libitum during rest breaks. During the WU, EX, and R periods, core body temperature (T(c)) was measured to assess the effect of the cooling garment. Neither baseline resting before warm-up T(c) nor after warm-up T(c) was significantly different between trials. No significant differences in exercise T(c) between conditions were found. Time to return to baseline T(c) revealed no significant differences between the experimental and control conditions. The authors found that the volume of fluid consumed was 34% less in the experimental condition (711.1 ± 188.0 ml) compared with the control condition (1,077.8 ± 204.8 ml). The findings indicate that the cooling garment was not effective in blunting the rise in T(c) during warm-up, attenuating a rise in T(c) during intermittent exercise, or in increasing a return to baseline T(c) during a resting recovery period in a hot humid environment while wearing an American football uniform. PMID:23007493

  16. DOE workshop meeting on the application of positron spectroscopy to materials sciences: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, C.H.

    1993-04-01

    Positron spectroscopy has advanced to the point where it is in the best interest of DOE to assess past progress and to identify research needs/opportunities that can be exploited to advance the understanding of materials problems important to DOE. Purpose of the workshop is to identify areas of materials science where positron spectroscopy can serve to advance goals of DOE in energy research: problem areas for which positron spectroscopy can serve as a unique or complementary tool for materials characterization and analysis, possible sources of positrons at high intensities and instrumentation, and possible applications (defect profiles at surfaces/interfaces, composite materials, superconductors). Separate abstracts and indexing were prepared for the 23 papers.

  17. Proceedings of the Third Annual Information Meeting DOE Low-Level Waste-Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Large, D.E.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stratton, L.E.; Jacobs, D.G.

    1981-12-01

    The Third Annual Participants Information Meeting of the Low-Level Waste Management Program was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, November 4-6, 1981 The specific purpose was to bring together appropriate representatives of industry, USNRC, program management, participating field offices, and contractors to: (1) exchange information and analyze program needs, and (2) involve participants in planning, developing and implementing technology for low-level waste management. One hundred seven registrants participated in the meeting. Presentation and workshop findings are included in these proceedings under the following headings: low-level waste activities; waste treatment; shallow land burial; remedial action; greater confinement; ORNL reports; panel workshops; and summary. Forty-six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the data base.

  18. Does wearing clothing made of a synthetic “cooling” fabric improve indoor cycle exercise endurance in trained athletes?

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Sara J; Krug, Robin; Jensen, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, double-blind, crossover study examined the effects of a clothing ensemble made of a synthetic fabric promoted as having superior cooling properties (COOL) on exercise performance and its physiological and perceptual determinants during cycle exercise in ambient laboratory conditions that mimic environmental conditions of indoor training/sporting facilities. Twenty athletes (15 men:5 women) aged 25.8 ± 1.2 years (mean ± SEM) with a maximal rate of O2 consumption of 63.7 ± 1.5 mL·kg−1·min−1 completed cycle exercise testing at 85% of their maximal incremental power output to exhaustion while wearing an ensemble consisting of a fitted long-sleeved shirt and full trousers made of either COOL or a synthetic control fabric (CTRL). Exercise endurance time was not different under COOL versus CTRL conditions: 12.38 ± 0.98 versus 11.75 ± 1.10 min, respectively (P > 0.05). Similarly, COOL had no effect on detailed thermoregulatory (skin and esophageal temperatures), cardiometabolic, ventilatory, and perceptual responses to exercise (all P > 0.05). In conclusion, clothing made of a synthetic fabric with purported “cooling” properties did not improve high-intensity cycle exercise endurance in trained athletes under ambient laboratory conditions that mimic the environmental conditions of indoor training/sporting facilities. PMID:26290527

  19. Does impaired O2 delivery during exercise accentuate central and peripheral fatigue in patients with coexistent COPD-CHF?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Mayron F; Zelt, Joel T J; Jones, Joshua H; Hirai, Daniel M; O'Donnell, Denis E; Verges, Samuel; Neder, J Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Impairment in oxygen (O2) delivery to the central nervous system ("brain") and skeletal locomotor muscle during exercise has been associated with central and peripheral neuromuscular fatigue in healthy humans. From a clinical perspective, impaired tissue O2 transport is a key pathophysiological mechanism shared by cardiopulmonary diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). In addition to arterial hypoxemic conditions in COPD, there is growing evidence that cerebral and muscle blood flow and oxygenation can be reduced during exercise in both isolated COPD and CHF. Compromised cardiac output due to impaired cardiopulmonary function/interactions and blood flow redistribution to the overloaded respiratory muscles (i.e., ↑work of breathing) may underpin these abnormalities. Unfortunately, COPD and CHF coexist in almost a third of elderly patients making these mechanisms potentially more relevant to exercise intolerance. In this context, it remains unknown whether decreased O2 delivery accentuates neuromuscular manifestations of central and peripheral fatigue in coexistent COPD-CHF. If this holds true, it is conceivable that delivering a low-density gas mixture (heliox) through non-invasive positive pressure ventilation could ameliorate cardiopulmonary function/interactions and reduce the work of breathing during exercise in these patients. The major consequence would be increased O2 delivery to the brain and active muscles with potential benefits to exercise capacity (i.e., ↓central and peripheral neuromuscular fatigue, respectively). We therefore hypothesize that patients with coexistent COPD-CHF stop exercising prematurely due to impaired central motor drive and muscle contractility as the cardiorespiratory system fails to deliver sufficient O2 to simultaneously attend the metabolic demands of the brain and the active limb muscles. PMID:25610401

  20. Comparison of Different Forms of Exercise Training in Patients With Cardiac Disease: Where Does High-Intensity Interval Training Fit?

    PubMed

    Gayda, Mathieu; Ribeiro, Paula A B; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2016-04-01

    In this review, we discuss the most recent forms of exercise training available to patients with cardiac disease and their comparison or their combination (or both) during short- and long-term (phase II and III) cardiac rehabilitation programs. Exercise training modalities to be discussed include inspiratory muscle training (IMT), resistance training (RT), continuous aerobic exercise training (CAET), and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Particular emphasis is placed on HIIT compared or combined (or both) with other forms such as CAET or RT. For example, IMT combined with CAET was shown to be superior to CAET alone for improving functional capacity, ventilatory function, and quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure. Similarly, RT combined with CAET was shown to optimize benefits with respect to functional capacity, muscle function, and quality of life. Furthermore, in recent years, HIIT has emerged as an alternative or complementary (or both) exercise modality to CAET, providing equivalent if not superior benefits to conventional continuous aerobic training with respect to aerobic fitness, cardiovascular function, quality of life, efficiency, safety, tolerance, and exercise adherence in both short- and long-term training studies. Finally, short-interval HIIT was shown to be useful in the initiation and improvement phases of cardiac rehabilitation, whereas moderate- or longer-interval (or both) HIIT protocols appear to be more appropriate for the improvement and maintenance phases because of their high physiological stimulus. We now propose progressive models of exercise training (phases II-III) for patients with cardiac disease, including a more appropriate application of HIIT based on the scientific literature in the context of a multimodal cardiac rehabilitation program. PMID:26927863

  1. Proceedings of the DOE/Industry Sensor Working Group meeting, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This paper report contains topics presented at a sensor workshop group meeting. The topics describe measuring instruments of use in the pulp and paper industry. Topics include: measurement of solids fraction; process instrumentation research for the pulp paper industry; real-time non-contact optical surface motion monitor; on-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties; hierarchical intelligent control of industrial processes -- an in-parallel lime kiln application; proposal for research on lignin concentration measurement in pulping liquors; and advanced polymeric sensor materials for industrial drying.

  2. Does meeting the HEDIS substance abuse treatment engagement criterion predict patient outcomes?

    PubMed

    Harris, Alex H S; Humphreys, Keith; Bowe, Thomas; Tiet, Quyen; Finney, John W

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the patient-level associations between the Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) substance use disorder (SUD) treatment engagement quality indicator and improvements in clinical outcomes. Administrative and survey data from 2,789 US Department of Veterans Affairs SUD patients were used to estimate the effects of meeting the HEDIS engagement criterion on improvements in Addiction Severity Index Alcohol, Drug, and Legal composite scores. Patients meeting the engagement indicator improved significantly more in all domains than patients who did not engage, and the relationship was stronger for alcohol and legal outcomes for patients seen in outpatient settings. The benefit accrued by those who engaged was statistically significant but clinically modest. These results add to the literature documenting the clinical benefits of treatment entry and engagement. Although these findings only indirectly support the use of the HEDIS engagement measure for its intended purpose-discriminating quality at the facility or system level-they confirm that the processes of care captured by the measure are associated with important patient outcomes. PMID:18770044

  3. Level of dietary protein does not impact whole body protein turnover during an exercise induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: This study examined the effect of a high protein diet on whole body protein turnover during an exercise-induced energy deficit. A sustained energy deficit induced by energy intake restriction increases protein catabolism which can cause lean-body mass loss. A high-protein diet has be...

  4. How Does an Activity Theory Model Help to Know Better about Teaching with Electronic-Exercise-Bases?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abboud-Blanchard, Maha; Cazes, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The research presented in this paper relies on Activity Theory and particularly on Engestrom's model, to better understand the use of Electronic-Exercise-Bases (EEB) by mathematics teachers. This theory provides a holistic approach to illustrate the complexity of the EEB integration. The results highlight reasons and ways of using EEB and show…

  5. Does Composition Medium Affect the Psychometric Properties of Scores on an Exercise Designed to Assess Written Medical Communication Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulet, John R.; McKinley, Danette W.; Rebbecchi, Thomas; Whelan, Gerald P.

    2007-01-01

    The ECFMG[R] Clinical Skills Assessment (CSA[R]) was developed to evaluate whether graduates of international medical schools are ready to enter graduate training programs in the United States. The performance-based patient note exercise is specifically used to assess an examinee's ability to summarize, synthesize and interpret the data collected…

  6. Where tendons and ligaments meet bone: attachment sites ('entheses') in relation to exercise and/or mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, M; Toumi, H; Ralphs, J R; Bydder, G; Best, T M; Milz, S

    2006-04-01

    Entheses (insertion sites, osteotendinous junctions, osteoligamentous junctions) are sites of stress concentration at the region where tendons and ligaments attach to bone. Consequently, they are commonly subject to overuse injuries (enthesopathies) that are well documented in a number of sports. In this review, we focus on the structure-function correlations of entheses on both the hard and the soft tissue sides of the junction. Particular attention is paid to mechanical factors that influence form and function and thus to exploring the relationship between entheses and exercise. The molecular parameters indicative of adaptation to mechanical stress are evaluated, and the basis on which entheses are classified is explained. The application of the 'enthesis organ' concept (a collection of tissues adjacent to the enthesis itself, which jointly serve the common function of stress dissipation) to understanding enthesopathies is considered and novel roles of adipose tissue at entheses are reviewed. A distinction is made between different locations of fat at entheses, and possible functions include space-filling and proprioception. The basic anchorage role of entheses is considered in detail and comparisons are explored between entheses and other biological 'anchorage' sites. The ability of entheses for self-repair is emphasized and a range of enthesopathies common in sport are reviewed (e.g. tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, jumper's knee, plantar fasciitis and Achilles insertional tendinopathies). Attention is drawn to the degenerative, rather than inflammatory, nature of most enthesopathies in sport. The biomechanical factors contributing to the development of enthesopathies are reviewed and the importance of considering the muscle-tendon-bone unit as a whole is recognized. Bony spur formation is assessed in relation to other changes at entheses which parallel those in osteoarthritic synovial joints. PMID:16637873

  7. Where tendons and ligaments meet bone: attachment sites (‘entheses’) in relation to exercise and/or mechanical load

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, M; Toumi, H; Ralphs, J R; Bydder, G; Best, T M; Milz, S

    2006-01-01

    Entheses (insertion sites, osteotendinous junctions, osteoligamentous junctions) are sites of stress concentration at the region where tendons and ligaments attach to bone. Consequently, they are commonly subject to overuse injuries (enthesopathies) that are well documented in a number of sports. In this review, we focus on the structure–function correlations of entheses on both the hard and the soft tissue sides of the junction. Particular attention is paid to mechanical factors that influence form and function and thus to exploring the relationship between entheses and exercise. The molecular parameters indicative of adaptation to mechanical stress are evaluated, and the basis on which entheses are classified is explained. The application of the ‘enthesis organ’ concept (a collection of tissues adjacent to the enthesis itself, which jointly serve the common function of stress dissipation) to understanding enthesopathies is considered and novel roles of adipose tissue at entheses are reviewed. A distinction is made between different locations of fat at entheses, and possible functions include space-filling and proprioception. The basic anchorage role of entheses is considered in detail and comparisons are explored between entheses and other biological ‘anchorage’ sites. The ability of entheses for self-repair is emphasized and a range of enthesopathies common in sport are reviewed (e.g. tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, jumper's knee, plantar fasciitis and Achilles insertional tendinopathies). Attention is drawn to the degenerative, rather than inflammatory, nature of most enthesopathies in sport. The biomechanical factors contributing to the development of enthesopathies are reviewed and the importance of considering the muscle–tendon–bone unit as a whole is recognized. Bony spur formation is assessed in relation to other changes at entheses which parallel those in osteoarthritic synovial joints. PMID:16637873

  8. Decontaminating the DOE-STD-3013 Inner Container to Meet 10-CFR-835 Appendix D Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.; Rivera, Y.M.; Wedman, D.E.; Weisbrod, K.R.

    1999-03-03

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has published a standard that specifies the criteria for preparation and packaging of plutonium metals and oxides for safe long-term storage (DOE-STD-3013-96). This standard is followed for the packaging of materials resulting from the disassembly of nuclear weapons at Los Alamos National Laboratory under the Advanced Retirement and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project. Declassified plutonium metal or oxide material from the ARES project is packaged into doubly contained and welded type 304L stainless steel containers that comply with the DOE standard. The 3013-96 standard describes requirements for maximum contamination limits on the outer surface of the sealed inner container. These limits are 500 dpm per 100 cm2 for direct measurements and 20 dpm per 100 cm2 for removable contamination. For containers filled, welded, and handled inside a highly contaminated glovebox line, these limits are difficult to obtain. Simple handling within the line is demonstrated to contaminate surfaces from 10,000 to 10,000,000 dpm alpha per 100 cm2. To routinely achieve contamination levels below the maximum contamination levels specified by the 3013-96 standard within a processing operation, a decontamination step must be included. In the ARIES line, this decontamination step is an electrolytic process that produces a controlled uniform etch of the container surfaces. Decontamination of the 3013-96 compliant ARIES inner container is well demonstrated. Within 30 to 50 minutes electrolysis time, tixed contamination is reduced to hundreds of dpm generally occurring only at electrode contact points and welds. Removable contamination is routinely brought to non-detectable levels. The total process time for the cycle (includes electrolysis, rinse, and dry stages) is on the order of 1.5 to 2 hours per container. The ARIES inner container decontamination system highly automated and consists of a plumbing loop, electronic controls and

  9. Does pilates exercise increase physical activity, quality of life, latency, and sleep quantity in middle-aged people?

    PubMed

    García-Soidán, J L; Giraldez, V Arufe; Cachón Zagalaz, J; Lara-Sánchez, A J

    2014-12-01

    This prospective study assessed the effects of a 12-wk. exercise program based on the Pilates method (2 one-hr. sessions per week) on 99 sedentary middle-aged volunteers (M age = 47.6 yr., SD = 0.8), using an accelerometry, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the SF-36 questionnaire to measure changes in physical activity, quality of life, sleep latency, and quantity. The variables (quality of life, sleep latency, and quantity) were compared before and after applying the Pilates program. All of the physical and emotional components of the SF-36 questionnaire showed significant improvement, and the latency and sleep quantity also showed significant increases. The results indicate that Pilates is an accessible, interesting exercise program that can generate important changes in middle age. PMID:25456245

  10. Breathing He-O2 increases ventilation but does not decrease the work of breathing during exercise.

    PubMed

    Babb, T G

    2001-04-01

    We previously observed an increase in minute ventilation (V E) with resistive unloading (He-O2 breathing) in healthy elderly subjects with normal pulmonary function. To investigate the effects of resistive unloading in elderly subjects with mild chronic airflow limitation (FEV(1)/FVC: 61 +/- 4%), we studied 10 elderly men and women 70 +/- 3 yr of age. These subjects performed graded cycle ergometry to exhaustion, once breathing room air and once breathing a He-O2 gas mixture (79% He, 21% O2). V E, pulmonary mechanics, and PET(CO2) were measured during each 1-min increment in work rate. Data were analyzed by paired t test at rest, at ventilatory threshold (VTh), and during maximal exercise. V E was significantly (p < 0.05) increased at VTh (3.4 +/- 4.0 L/min or 12 +/- 15% increase) and maximal exercise (15.2 +/- 9.7 L/min or 22 +/- 13% increase) while breathing He-O2. Concomitant to the increase in V E, PET(CO2) was decreased at all levels (p < 0.01), whereas total work of breathing against the lung was not different. We concluded that V E is increased during He-O2 breathing because of resistive unloading of the airways and the maintenance of the relationship between the work of breathing and exercise work rate. PMID:11316648

  11. Moderate dose of watercress and red radish does not reduce oxygen consumption during graded exhaustive exercise

    PubMed Central

    Meamarbashi, Abbas; Alipour, Meysam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Very recent studies have reported positive effects of dietary nitrate on the oxygen consumption during exercise. This research aimed to study the effect of moderate dose of high-nitrate vegetables, watercress (Nasturtium officinale) and red radish (Raphanus sativus) compared with a control group on the incremental treadmill exercise test following a standard Bruce protocol controlled by computer. Materials and Methods: Group 1 consumed 100 g watercress (n=11, 109.5 mg nitrate/day), and group 2 consumed 100 g red radish (n=11, mg 173.2 mg nitrate/day) for seven days, and control group (n=14) was prohibited from high nitrate intake. Results: During exercise, watercress group showed significant changes in the maximum values of Respiratory Exchange Ratio (RER) (p<0.05), End-Tidal O2 Fraction (FETO2) (p<0.05), and energy consumption from carbohydrate (p<0.01). Red radish group had a significant increase in the VCO2 (p<0.01), RER (p<0.01), VT (p<0.05), VCO2/kg (p<0.05), and energy consumption from carbohydrates (p<0.01). When all groups in the same workload were normalized by the subject’s body mass, watercress had a significant increase in the total expired CO2 (p<0.05), RER (p<0.05), FETO2 (p<0.05), and energy consumption from carbohydrates (p<0.05) compared with the control group. Similar comparison between red radish and control group revealed a significant increase during pre-test in the total CO2 production (p<0.05), VCO2 (p<0.05), RER (p<0.01), VT (p<0.05), and VCO2/kg (p<0.05). Conclusion : Current results indicate higher carbon dioxide production in the experimental groups in the same workload. This might have a negative impact on the exercise performance. Further investigations with controlled exercise program will be necessary. PMID:25068141

  12. Carbohydrate restricted recovery from long term endurance exercise does not affect gene responses involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in highly trained athletes

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Line; Gejl, Kasper D; Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Jakob L; Bech, Rune D; Nygaard, Tobias; Sahlin, Kent; Frandsen, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to determine if the metabolic adaptations, particularly PGC-1α and downstream metabolic genes were affected by restricting CHO following an endurance exercise bout in trained endurance athletes. A second aim was to compare baseline expression level of these genes to untrained. Elite endurance athletes (VO2max 66 ± 2 mL·kg−1·min−1, n = 15) completed 4 h cycling at ∼56% VO2max. During the first 4 h recovery subjects were provided with either CHO or only H2O and thereafter both groups received CHO. Muscle biopsies were collected before, after, and 4 and 24 h after exercise. Also, resting biopsies were collected from untrained subjects (n = 8). Exercise decreased glycogen by 67.7 ± 4.0% (from 699 ± 26.1 to 239 ± 29.5 mmol·kg−1·dw−1) with no difference between groups. Whereas 4 h of recovery with CHO partly replenished glycogen, the H2O group remained at post exercise level; nevertheless, the gene expression was not different between groups. Glycogen and most gene expression levels returned to baseline by 24 h in both CHO and H2O. Baseline mRNA expression of NRF-1, COX-IV, GLUT4 and PPAR-α gene targets were higher in trained compared to untrained. Additionally, the proportion of type I muscle fibers positively correlated with baseline mRNA for PGC-1α, TFAM, NRF-1, COX-IV, PPAR-α, and GLUT4 for both trained and untrained. CHO restriction during recovery from glycogen depleting exercise does not improve the mRNA response of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Further, baseline gene expression of key metabolic pathways is higher in trained than untrained. PMID:25677542

  13. High-sweat Na+ in cystic fibrosis and healthy individuals does not diminish thirst during exercise in the heat

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, N. A.; Millard-Stafford, M.

    2011-01-01

    Sweat Na+ concentration ([Na+]) varies greatly among individuals and is particularly high in cystic fibrosis (CF). The purpose of this study was to determine whether excess sweat [Na+] differentially impacts thirst drive and other physiological responses during progressive dehydration via exercise in the heat. Healthy subjects with high-sweat [Na+] (SS) (91.0 ± 17.3 mmol/l), Controls with average sweat [Na+] (43.7 ± 9.9 mmol/l), and physically active CF patients with very high sweat [Na+] (132.6 ± 6.4 mmol/l) cycled in the heat without drinking until 3% dehydration. Serum osmolality increased less (P < 0.05) in CF (6.1 ± 4.3 mosmol/kgH2O) and SS (8.4 ± 3.0 mosmol/kgH2O) compared with Control (14.8 ± 3.5 mosmol/kgH2O). Relative change in plasma volume was greater (P < 0.05) in CF (−19.3 ± 4.5%) and SS (−18.8 ± 3.1%) compared with Control (−14.3 ± 2.3%). Thirst during exercise and changes in plasma levels of vasopressin, angiotensin II, and aldosterone relative to percent dehydration were not different among groups. However, ad libitum fluid replacement was 40% less, and serum NaCl concentration was lower for CF compared with SS and Control during recovery. Despite large variability in sweat electrolyte loss, thirst appears to be appropriately maintained during exercise in the heat as a linear function of dehydration, with relative contributions from hyperosmotic and hypovolemic stimuli dependent upon the magnitude of salt lost in sweat. CF exhibit lower ad libitum fluid restoration following dehydration, which may reflect physiological cues directed at preservation of salt balance over volume restoration. PMID:21813870

  14. High-sweat Na+ in cystic fibrosis and healthy individuals does not diminish thirst during exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Brown, M B; McCarty, N A; Millard-Stafford, M

    2011-10-01

    Sweat Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]) varies greatly among individuals and is particularly high in cystic fibrosis (CF). The purpose of this study was to determine whether excess sweat [Na(+)] differentially impacts thirst drive and other physiological responses during progressive dehydration via exercise in the heat. Healthy subjects with high-sweat [Na(+)] (SS) (91.0 ± 17.3 mmol/l), Controls with average sweat [Na(+)] (43.7 ± 9.9 mmol/l), and physically active CF patients with very high sweat [Na(+)] (132.6 ± 6.4 mmol/l) cycled in the heat without drinking until 3% dehydration. Serum osmolality increased less (P < 0.05) in CF (6.1 ± 4.3 mosmol/kgH(2)O) and SS (8.4 ± 3.0 mosmol/kgH(2)O) compared with Control (14.8 ± 3.5 mosmol/kgH(2)O). Relative change in plasma volume was greater (P < 0.05) in CF (-19.3 ± 4.5%) and SS (-18.8 ± 3.1%) compared with Control (-14.3 ± 2.3%). Thirst during exercise and changes in plasma levels of vasopressin, angiotensin II, and aldosterone relative to percent dehydration were not different among groups. However, ad libitum fluid replacement was 40% less, and serum NaCl concentration was lower for CF compared with SS and Control during recovery. Despite large variability in sweat electrolyte loss, thirst appears to be appropriately maintained during exercise in the heat as a linear function of dehydration, with relative contributions from hyperosmotic and hypovolemic stimuli dependent upon the magnitude of salt lost in sweat. CF exhibit lower ad libitum fluid restoration following dehydration, which may reflect physiological cues directed at preservation of salt balance over volume restoration. PMID:21813870

  15. Exercise and Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... supporting your weight against gravity. This promotes bone density and protects against osteoporosis. What does cardiovascular exercise ... doing different activities, such as tennis and swimming. Water-based activities, such as swimming or water aerobics, ...

  16. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--Surface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) 6th Annual PI Meeting: Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen Ed., T.C.

    2011-04-11

    On behalf of the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program managers in the Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD), Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER), welcome to the 2011 SBR Principal Investigators meeting. Thank you in advance for your attendance and your presentations at this year's meeting. As the events in Japan continue to unfold, we are all reminded that the research we perform on radionuclide behavior in the environment has implications beyond legacy waste cleanup and in fact has its place in the discussion on the expanded use of nuclear power. As in the past, there are three broad objectives to the Principal Investigators meeting: (1) to provide opportunities to share research results and promote interactions among the SBR scientists and other invited guests; (2) to evaluate the progress of each project within the program; and (3) to showcase the scientific expertise and research progress over the past year to senior managers within the DOE Office of Science, the technology offices within DOE, and other invited attendees from other Federal Agencies. This past year has seen a few significant changes within BER and within the SBR program. In November, our Associate Director for BER, Anna Palmisano, retired from Federal service. Just this month, Dr. Sharlene Weatherwax (Division Director for Biological Systems Sciences) has been named as the new Associate Director for BER. In August, BER welcomed Dr. Gary Geernaert as the new Division Director for CESD. Gary joins the division from Los Alamos National Laboratory with a background in atmospheric science. Within the SBR program, a new Strategic Plan was completed last June (currently posted on the SBR and the Office of Science website). The new strategic plan is intended to foster integration within the Environmental Systems Science portion of the BER budget that includes both SBR and Terrestrial Ecosystem Sciences (TES). Both these programs share a goal of advancing a

  17. Does skeletal muscle have an 'epi'-memory? The role of epigenetics in nutritional programming, metabolic disease, aging and exercise.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Adam P; Stewart, Claire E; Seaborne, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mass, quality and adaptability are fundamental in promoting muscle performance, maintaining metabolic function and supporting longevity and healthspan. Skeletal muscle is programmable and can 'remember' early-life metabolic stimuli affecting its function in adult life. In this review, the authors pose the question as to whether skeletal muscle has an 'epi'-memory? Following an initial encounter with an environmental stimulus, we discuss the underlying molecular and epigenetic mechanisms enabling skeletal muscle to adapt, should it re-encounter the stimulus in later life. We also define skeletal muscle memory and outline the scientific literature contributing to this field. Furthermore, we review the evidence for early-life nutrient stress and low birth weight in animals and human cohort studies, respectively, and discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms culminating in skeletal muscle dysfunction, metabolic disease and loss of skeletal muscle mass across the lifespan. We also summarize and discuss studies that isolate muscle stem cells from different environmental niches in vivo (physically active, diabetic, cachectic, aged) and how they reportedly remember this environment once isolated in vitro. Finally, we will outline the molecular and epigenetic mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle memory and review the epigenetic regulation of exercise-induced skeletal muscle adaptation, highlighting exercise interventions as suitable models to investigate skeletal muscle memory in humans. We believe that understanding the 'epi'-memory of skeletal muscle will enable the next generation of targeted therapies to promote muscle growth and reduce muscle loss to enable healthy aging. PMID:27102569

  18. Does aerobic exercise training promote changes in structural and biomechanical properties of the tendons in experimental animals? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, M A; Lemos, A; Lira, K D S; Silveira, P V C; Coutinho, M P G; E Moraes, S R A

    2012-12-01

    To develop a systematic review to evaluate, through the best scientific evidence available, the effectiveness of aerobic exercise in improving the biomechanical characteristics of tendons in experimental animals. Two independent assessors conducted a systematic search in the databases Medline/PUBMED and Lilacs/BIREME, using the following descriptors of Mesh in animal models. The ultimate load of traction and the elastic modulus tendon were used as primary outcomes and transverse section area, ultimate stress and tendon strain as secondary outcomes. The assessment of risk of bias in the studies was carried out using the following methodological components: light/dark cycle, temperature, nutrition, housing, research undertaken in conjunction with an ethics committee, randomization, adaptation of the animals to the training and preparation for the mechanical test. Eight studies, comprising 384 animals, were selected; it was not possible to combine them into one meta-analysis due to the heterogeneity of the samples. There was a trend to increasing ultimate load without changes in the other outcomes studied. Only one study met more than 80% of the quality criteria. Physical training performed in a structured way with imposition of overloads seems to be able to promote changes in tendon structure of experimental models by increasing the ultimate load supported. However, the results of the influence of exercise on the elastic modulus parameters, strain, transverse section area and ultimate stress, remain controversial and inconclusive. Such a conclusion must be evaluated with reservation as there was low methodological control in the studies included in this review. PMID:24868114

  19. Does PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF Elicit the Beneficial Effects of Exercise on Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    PubMed

    Jodeiri Farshbaf, Mohammad; Ghaedi, Kamran; Megraw, Timothy L; Curtiss, Jennifer; Shirani Faradonbeh, Mahsa; Vaziri, Pooneh; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases have high prevalence among the elderly. Many strategies have been established to alleviate the symptoms experienced by affected individuals. Recent studies have shown that exercise helps patients with neurological disorders to regain lost physical abilities. PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF has emerged recently as a critical pathway for neuroprotection. PGC1α is a highly conserved co-activator of transcription factors that preserves and protects neurons against destruction. PGC1α regulates FNDC5 and its processed and secreted peptide Irisin, which has been proposed to play a critical role in energy expenditure and to promote neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. FNDC5 may also increase the expression of the neurotrophic factor BDNF, a neuroprotective agent, in the hippocampus. BDNF is secreted from hippocampus, amygdala, cerebral cortex and hypothalamus neurons and initiates intracellular signaling pathways through TrkB receptors. These pathways have positive feedback on CREB activities and lead to enhancement in PGC1α expression in neurons. Therefore, FNDC5 could behave as a key regulator in neuronal survival and development. This review presents recent findings on the PGC1α/FNDC5/BDNF pathway and its role in neuroprotection, and discusses the controversial promise of irisin as a mediator of the positive benefits of exercise. PMID:26611102

  20. 20 CFR 664.250 - May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be eligible for youth services? 664.250 Section 664.250 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER...

  1. 20 CFR 664.250 - May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be eligible for youth services? 664.250 Section 664.250 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER...

  2. 20 CFR 664.250 - May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be eligible for youth services? 664.250 Section 664.250 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH...

  3. 20 CFR 664.250 - May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be eligible for youth services? 664.250 Section 664.250 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH...

  4. 20 CFR 664.250 - May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May a disabled youth whose family does not meet income eligibility criteria under the Act be eligible for youth services? 664.250 Section 664.250 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH...

  5. 20 CFR 661.207 - How does the State Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How does the State Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the âsunshine provisionâ of WIA section 111(g)? 661.207 Section 661.207 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  6. 36 CFR 51.33 - What if a preferred offeror does not timely amend its proposal to meet the terms and conditions...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... does not timely amend its proposal to meet the terms and conditions of the best proposal? 51.33 Section 51.33 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONCESSION CONTRACTS Right of Preference to a New Concession Contract § 51.33 What if a preferred...

  7. 20 CFR 661.307 - How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to conduct business in an open manner under the âsunshine provisionâ of WIA section 117(e)? 661.307...) STATEWIDE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Local Governance Provisions § 661.307 How does the Local Board meet its requirement to...

  8. 20 CFR 661.307 - How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to conduct business in an open manner under the âsunshine provisionâ of WIA section 117(e)? 661.307... AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Local Governance Provisions § 661.307 How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct...

  9. 20 CFR 661.307 - How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to conduct business in an open manner under the âsunshine provisionâ of WIA section 117(e)? 661.307...) STATEWIDE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Local Governance Provisions § 661.307 How does the Local Board meet its requirement to...

  10. 20 CFR 661.307 - How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to conduct business in an open manner under the âsunshine provisionâ of WIA section 117(e)? 661.307... AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Local Governance Provisions § 661.307 How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct...

  11. 20 CFR 661.307 - How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to conduct business in an open manner under the âsunshine provisionâ of WIA section 117(e)? 661.307...) STATEWIDE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Local Governance Provisions § 661.307 How does the Local Board meet its requirement to...

  12. 14 CFR 39.9 - What if I operate an aircraft or use a product that does not meet the requirements of an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What if I operate an aircraft or use a product that does not meet the requirements of an airworthiness directive? 39.9 Section 39.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT...

  13. Muscle-Specific Overexpression of PGC-1α Does Not Augment Metabolic Improvements in Response to Exercise and Caloric Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kari E.; Mikus, Catherine R.; Slentz, Dorothy H.; Seiler, Sarah E.; DeBalsi, Karen L.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Crain, Karen I.; Kinter, Michael T.; Kien, C. Lawrence; Stevens, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    This study used mice with muscle-specific overexpression of PGC-1α, a transcriptional coactivator that promotes mitochondrial biogenesis, to determine whether increased oxidative potential facilitates metabolic improvements in response to lifestyle modification. MCK-PGC1α mice and nontransgenic (NT) littermates were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 10 weeks, followed by stepwise exposures to voluntary wheel running (HFD+Ex) and then 25% caloric restriction with exercise (Ex/CR), each for an additional 10 weeks with continued HFD. Running and CR improved weight and glucose control similarly in MCK-PGC1α and NT mice. Sedentary MCK-PGC1α mice were more susceptible to diet-induced glucose intolerance, and insulin action measured in isolated skeletal muscles remained lower in the transgenic compared with the NT group, even after Ex/CR. Comprehensive profiling of >200 metabolites and lipid intermediates revealed dramatic group-specific responses to the intervention but did not produce a lead candidate that tracked with changes in glucose tolerance irrespective of genotype. Instead, principal components analysis identified a chemically diverse metabolite cluster that correlated with multiple measures of insulin responsiveness. These findings challenge the notion that increased oxidative capacity defends whole-body energy homeostasis and suggest that the interplay between mitochondrial performance, lipotoxicity, and insulin action is more complex than previously proposed. PMID:25422105

  14. Does one night of partial sleep deprivation affect the evening performance during intermittent exercise in Taekwondo players?

    PubMed Central

    Mejri, Mohamed Arbi; Yousfi, Narimen; Mhenni, Thouraya; Tayech, Amel; Hammouda, Omar; Driss, Tarak; Chaouachi, Anis; Souissi, Nizar

    2016-01-01

    Athletes and coaches believe that adequate sleep is essential for peak performance. There is ample scientific evidence which support the conclusion that sleep loss seems to stress many physiological functions in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of one night’s sleep deprivation on intermittent exercise performance in the evening of the following day. Ten male Taekwondo players performed the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test (YYIRT) in three sleep conditions (reference sleep night [RN], partial sleep deprivation at the beginning of night [PSDBN], partial sleep deprivation at the end of night [PSDEN]) in a counterbalanced order, allowing a recovery period ≥36 hr in between them. Heart rate peak (HRpeak), plasma lactate concentrations (Lac) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during the test. A significant effect of sleep restriction was observed on the total distance covered in YYIRT (P<0.0005) and Lac (P<0.01) in comparison with the RN. In addition, performance more decreased after PSDEN (P<0.0005) than PSDBN (P<0.05). Also, Lac decreased significantly only after PS-DEN (P<0.05) compared with RN. However, there were no significant changes in HRpeak and RPE after the two types of partial sleep deprivation compared to RN. The present study indicates that short-term sleep restriction affect the intermittent performance, as well as the Lac levels of the Taekwondo players in the evening of the following day, without alteration of HRpeak and RPE. PMID:26933660

  15. Does one night of partial sleep deprivation affect the evening performance during intermittent exercise in Taekwondo players?

    PubMed

    Mejri, Mohamed Arbi; Yousfi, Narimen; Mhenni, Thouraya; Tayech, Amel; Hammouda, Omar; Driss, Tarak; Chaouachi, Anis; Souissi, Nizar

    2016-02-01

    Athletes and coaches believe that adequate sleep is essential for peak performance. There is ample scientific evidence which support the conclusion that sleep loss seems to stress many physiological functions in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of one night's sleep deprivation on intermittent exercise performance in the evening of the following day. Ten male Taekwondo players performed the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test (YYIRT) in three sleep conditions (reference sleep night [RN], partial sleep deprivation at the beginning of night [PSDBN], partial sleep deprivation at the end of night [PSDEN]) in a counterbalanced order, allowing a recovery period ≥36 hr in between them. Heart rate peak (HRpeak), plasma lactate concentrations (Lac) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during the test. A significant effect of sleep restriction was observed on the total distance covered in YYIRT (P<0.0005) and Lac (P<0.01) in comparison with the RN. In addition, performance more decreased after PSDEN (P<0.0005) than PSDBN (P<0.05). Also, Lac decreased significantly only after PS-DEN (P<0.05) compared with RN. However, there were no significant changes in HRpeak and RPE after the two types of partial sleep deprivation compared to RN. The present study indicates that short-term sleep restriction affect the intermittent performance, as well as the Lac levels of the Taekwondo players in the evening of the following day, without alteration of HRpeak and RPE. PMID:26933660

  16. Muscle-Specific Overexpression of PGC-1α Does Not Augment Metabolic Improvements in Response to Exercise and Caloric Restriction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kari E; Mikus, Catherine R; Slentz, Dorothy H; Seiler, Sarah E; DeBalsi, Karen L; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Crain, Karen I; Kinter, Michael T; Kien, C Lawrence; Stevens, Robert D; Muoio, Deborah M

    2015-05-01

    This study used mice with muscle-specific overexpression of PGC-1α, a transcriptional coactivator that promotes mitochondrial biogenesis, to determine whether increased oxidative potential facilitates metabolic improvements in response to lifestyle modification. MCK-PGC1α mice and nontransgenic (NT) littermates were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 10 weeks, followed by stepwise exposures to voluntary wheel running (HFD+Ex) and then 25% caloric restriction with exercise (Ex/CR), each for an additional 10 weeks with continued HFD. Running and CR improved weight and glucose control similarly in MCK-PGC1α and NT mice. Sedentary MCK-PGC1α mice were more susceptible to diet-induced glucose intolerance, and insulin action measured in isolated skeletal muscles remained lower in the transgenic compared with the NT group, even after Ex/CR. Comprehensive profiling of >200 metabolites and lipid intermediates revealed dramatic group-specific responses to the intervention but did not produce a lead candidate that tracked with changes in glucose tolerance irrespective of genotype. Instead, principal components analysis identified a chemically diverse metabolite cluster that correlated with multiple measures of insulin responsiveness. These findings challenge the notion that increased oxidative capacity defends whole-body energy homeostasis and suggest that the interplay between mitochondrial performance, lipotoxicity, and insulin action is more complex than previously proposed. PMID:25422105

  17. Questionable Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer…

  18. The exercise-induced myokine irisin does not show an association with depressiveness, anxiety and perceived stress in obese women.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, T; Elbelt, U; Ahnis, A; Obbarius, A; Rose, M; Klapp, B F; Stengel, A

    2016-04-01

    Irisin has recently been proposed to act as a myokine secreted from skeletal muscle following exercise and to exert several health-beneficial effects, although its role is far from being established. In contrast to the growing body of literature on the biological regulation and function of irisin, there is no evidence on potential associations with mental functions. Since physical activity has been reported to have favorable impact on mental functions, we investigated the association of irisin with depressiveness, perceived stress, and anxiety as well as eating disorder symptoms in obese women. We included 98 female obese inpatients (age: mean ± S.D. 43.9 ± 12.5 years; body mass index 49.2 ± 8.3 kg/m(2)) covering a broad spectrum of psychopathology. Depressiveness (PHQ-9), perceived stress (PSQ-20), anxiety (GAD-7), and eating disorder symptoms (EDI-2) were assessed psychometrically. Plasma irisin obtained at the same time was determined by ELISA. Irisin did not correlate with depressiveness (r = -0.03, P = 0.80), anxiety (r = 0.14, P = 0.17) and perceived stress (r = -0.14, P = 0.18) as well as eating disorder symptoms in general (r = -0.09, P = 0.39). No correlation of irisin was observed with any subscales of the PSQ-20 and EDI-2 (after Bonferroni correction). In conclusion, irisin is not associated with depressiveness, anxiety and perceived stress in female obese patients. These results do not support the assumption of irisin being involved in psychoendocrine pathways of the regulation of depression or other mental functions such as anxiety and perceived stress. PMID:27226179

  19. Twelve weeks of moderate aerobic exercise without dietary intervention or weight loss does not affect 24-h energy expenditure in lean and obese adolescents.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exercise might have a persistent effect on energy expenditure and fat oxidation, resulting in increased fat loss. However, even without weight loss, exercise results in positive metabolic effects. The effect of an aerobic exercise program on 24-h total energy expenditure (TEE), and its components-ba...

  20. Designing exercise clinical trials for older adults with cancer: Recommendations from 2015 Cancer and Aging Research Group NCI U13 Meeting.

    PubMed

    Kilari, Deepak; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Presley, Carolyn J; Wildes, Tanya M; Klepin, Heidi D; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Jatoi, Amina; Harrison, Robert; Won, Elizabeth; Mustian, Karen M

    2016-07-01

    Cancer and its treatment can lead to a myriad of adverse events and negatively impact quality of life of older cancer patients and survivors. Unmet physical activity needs vary across the cancer continuum and remain an important yet understudied area of research in this population. Exercise interventions have been shown to be effective in treating both the physical and psychological declines associated with cancer and its treatment, with a potential to improve cancer-related outcomes. Despite the current evidence, exercise is clearly underutilized due to several barriers and knowledge gaps in existing trials that include appropriate population identification, design, and outcome measures selection. The benefits of regular exercise in both the primary and secondary prevention of chronic conditions are well established in the non-cancer population. In older cancer patients and survivors, further research is needed before exercise gains widespread acceptance. The Cancer and Aging Research Group convened experts in exercise, aging and cancer to evaluate current scientific evidence and knowledge gaps in geriatric exercise oncology. This report summarizes these findings and provides future research directions. PMID:27197916

  1. Designing exercise clinical trials for older adults with cancer: Recommendations from 2015 Cancer and Aging Research Group NCI U13 Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Kilari, Deepak; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Alibhai, Shabbir M.H.; Presley, Carolyn J.; Wildes, Tanya M.; Klepin, Heidi D.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Jatoi, Amina; Harrison, Robert; Won, Elizabeth; Mustian, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment can lead to a myriad of adverse events and negatively impact quality of life of older cancer patients and survivors. Unmet physical activity needs vary across the cancer continuum and remain an important yet understudied area of research in this population. Exercise interventions have been shown to be effective in treating both the physical and psychological declines associated with cancer and its treatment, with a potential to improve cancer-related outcomes. Despite the current evidence, exercise is clearly underutilized due to several barriers and knowledge gaps in existing trials that include appropriate population identification, design, and outcome measures selection. The benefits of regular exercise in both the primary and secondary prevention of chronic conditions are well established in the non-cancer population. In older cancer patients and survivors, further research is needed before exercise gains widespread acceptance. The Cancer and Aging Research Group convened experts in exercise, aging and cancer to evaluate current scientific evidence and knowledge gaps in geriatric exercise oncology. This report summarizes these findings and provides future research directions. PMID:27197916

  2. 77 FR 23673 - Notice of Stakeholder Meeting: Industry Roundtable-DON/USDA/DOE/DOT-FAA Advanced Drop-In Biofuels...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... Drop-In Biofuels Initiative AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of public meeting... biofuels supply chain. The purpose of the roundtable meeting is for the federal government to present... Biofuels Production Project. Questions related to the Special Notices or the pending Broad...

  3. Event mapping meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, L.; Mason, D.

    1997-02-20

    A one-day meeting was held by the authors to evaluate how the strategic lab workshops would tie to this year`s tactical planning exercise. In particular, they wanted to find recent events that would support the tactical goal decisions of the Lab, and they wanted to find events that verify the Lab`s present course. The events which are each briefly discussed are: Galvin Commission recommends consolidating DOE defense labs (1995); Congressional subcommittee staff force budget cuts and consolidation (1995); 28% of DOE/DP budget held back pending completion of a clear 5-yr plan for nukes (1995); DOD and DOE focus on dual use (1995); LANL work includes weapons rebuilds (1995); LANL chosen by DOE to develop and test advanced remediation techniques (1995); AGEX/DARHT Project is stopped by suits from environmental activities (1996); Non-proliferation treaty renewed (1996); US complies with Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (1996); Capability based deterrence policy put into place (1998); Stockpile shrinks to approximately 2000 weapons (2005); DOE weapons labs re-chartered as true national labs (1996); DOE terminates all nuclear weapons testing support (1996); Industrial projects at LANL up 20% from previous year (1997); NIST-ATP Program becomes an interagency process (1997); DOE warns that spent commercial reactor fuels is a major proliferation threat (1998); Non-lethal weapons work helps to reshape LANL image (1998); Global warning theory proven (2005); Overall US spending on science has been flat or decreasing for three years (1998); and Economic role of LANL in northern New Mexico declines (2005).

  4. Exercise Prescription.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribisl, Paul M.

    If exercise programs are to become effective in producing the desired results, then the correct exercise prescription must be applied. Four variables should be controlled in the prescription of exercise: (a) type of activity, (b) intensity, (c) duration, and (d) frequency. The long-term prescription of exercise involves the use of a (a) starter…

  5. Regulation of Flowering in Brachypodium distachyon (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Amasino, Rick

    2013-03-01

    Rick Amasino of the University of Wisconsin on "Regulation of Flowering in Brachypodium distachyon" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  6. PMI: Plant-Microbe Interfaces (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Schadt, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Christopher Schadt of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Plant-Microbe Interactions" in the context of poplar trees at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 held in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  7. Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Jane

    2013-03-01

    Jane Lau of the Joint BioEnergy Institute on "Improving biofuel feedstocks by modifying xylan biosynthesis" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  8. Genomics of Climate Resilience (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    2013-03-27

    Eldredge Bermingham of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute-Panama on "Genomics of climate resilience" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  9. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Meeting DOE Challenge Home Program Certification - Chicago, IL; Denver, CO; Devens, MA

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-01

    In this project, three production home builders—K. Hovnanian Homes, David Weekley Homes, and Transformations, Inc.—partnered with Building America team Building Science Corporation to evaluate the certification of five test homes to the new DOE Challenge Home program performance standard (now DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program). The builders identified key benefits and barriers that impacted the certification of the test homes, and the likelihood of whether DOE Challenge Home certification would be pursued in future homes

  10. Aerobic exercise training increases circulating IGFBP-1 concentration, but does not attenuate the reduction in circulating IGFBP-1 after a high-fat meal

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Steven J.; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Brandauer, Josef; Weiss, Edward P.; Hagberg, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) has metabolic effects throughout the body and its expression is regulated in part by insulin. Circulating IGFBP-1 predicts development of cardiometabolic diseases in longitudinal studies and low IGFBP-1 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance and consumption of a high-fat diet. Because of the favorable metabolic effects of regular aerobic exercise, we hypothesized that aerobic exercise training would increase plasma IGFBP-1 concentrations and attenuate the reduction in IGFBP-1 after a high-fat meal. Methods Ten overweight (BMI=28.7±0.9kg/m2), older (61±2yr) men and women underwent high-fat feeding and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) at baseline and after 6 months of aerobic exercise training. Results In response to aerobic exercise training, subjects increased cardiorespiratory fitness 13% (p<0.05) and insulin sensitivity index 28% (p<0.05). Basal plasma concentrations of IGFBP-1 increased 41% after aerobic exercise training (p<0.05). The insulin response to an OGTT was a significant predictor of fasting plasma IGFBP-1 concentrations at baseline and after exercise training (p=0.02). In response to the high-fat meal at baseline, plasma IGFBP-1 concentrations decreased 58% (p<0.001); a 61% decrease to similar postprandial concentrations was observed after exercise training (p<0.001). Plasma insulin response to the high-fat meal was inversely associated with postprandial IGFBP-1 concentrations at baseline and after exercise training (p=0.06 and p<0.05, respectively). Conclusion While aerobic exercise training did not attenuate the response to a high-fat meal, the increase in IGFBP-1 concentrations after exercise training may be one mechanism by which exercise reduces risk for cardiometabolic diseases in older adults. PMID:21872284

  11. Prescribing exercise for women.

    PubMed

    Senter, Carlin; Appelle, Nicole; Behera, Sarina K

    2013-06-01

    One- half of women in the United States do not meet the weekly dose of physical activity recommended by the Centers for Disease Control. Many women could benefit tremendously if they were to adopt a more active lifestyle. Health benefits from exercise include lowering the risk for cardiovascular disease, slowing the rate of bone loss in osteoporosis, and improving mood during pregnancy. In this article, we review the health benefits that women may gain from physical activity and the recommendations for physical activity for adults in the United States. We offer evidence supporting use of the exercise prescription, discuss how to write an exercise prescription, and how to tailor the exercise prescription for women with particular medical problems. PMID:23553380

  12. Short-term supplementation with alpha-ketoglutaric acid and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural does not prevent the hypoxia induced decrease of exercise performance despite attenuation of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gatterer, H; Greilberger, J; Philippe, M; Faulhaber, M; Djukic, R; Burtscher, M

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are thought to partly be responsible for the hypoxia induced performance decrease. The present study evaluated the effects of a broad based antioxidant supplementation or the combined intake of alpha-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) on the performance decrease at altitude. 18 healthy, well-trained males (age: 25±3 years; height: 179±6 cm; weight: 76.4±6.8 kg) were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to a placebo group (PL), a α-KG and 5-HMF supplementation group (AO1) or a broad based antioxidant supplementation group (AO2). Participants performed 2 incremental exercise tests to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer; the first test under normoxia and the second under hypoxia conditions (simulated altitude, FiO2=13% ~ 4 300 m). Supplementation started 48 h before the hypoxia test. Maximal oxygen uptake, maximal power output, power output at the ventilatory and lactate threshold and the tissue oxygenation index (NIRS) were measured under both conditions. Oxidative stress markers were measured before the supplementation and after the hypoxia test. Under hypoxia conditions all performance parameters decreased in the range of 19-39% with no differences between groups. A significant change from normoxia to hypoxia (p<0.001) and between groups (p=0.038) were found for the tissue oxygenation index. Post hoc test revealed significant differences between the PL and both, the AO1 and the AO2 group. The oxidative stress parameter carbonyl protein changed from normoxia to hypoxia in all participants and 4-hydroxynonenal decreased in the AO1 group only. In conclusion the results suggest that short-term supplementation with an antioxidant does not prevent the performance decrease at altitude. However, positive effects on muscle oxygen extraction, as indicated by the tissue oxygenation index, might indicate that mitochondrial functioning was actually influenced by the supplementation. PMID:22893323

  13. Report on DOE analytical laboratory capacity available to meet EM environmental sampling and analysis needs for FY 93-99

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-30

    The DOE Analytical Laboratory Capacity Study was conducted to give EM-263 current information about existing and future analytical capacities and capabilities of site laboratories within the DOE Complex. Each DOE site may have one or more analytical laboratories in operation. These facilities were established to support site missions such as production, research and development, and personnel and environmental monitoring. With changing site missions and the DOE directives for environmental monitoring and cleanup, these laboratories are either devoting or planning to devote resources to support EM activities. The DOE site laboratories represent a considerable amount of capital investment and analytical capability, capacity, and expertise that can be applied to support the EM mission. They not only provide cost-effective high-volume analytical laboratory services, but are also highly recognized analytical research and development centers. Several sites have already transferred their analytical capability from traditional production support to environmental monitoring and waste management support. A model was developed to determine the analytical capacity of all laboratories in the DOE Complex. The model was applied at nearly all the major laboratories and the results collected from these studies are summarized in this report.

  14. Exercise enclosures for guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cyndi

    2009-11-01

    Exercise and exploration are important to the health and happiness of guinea pigs. Laboratory housing does not always provide the space necessary for such opportunities. This article presents an inexpensive, versatile option for an enclosed exercise area for the laboratory guinea pig. PMID:19847177

  15. Does acute exercise affect the performance of whole-body, psychomotor skills in an inverted-U fashion? A meta-analytic investigation.

    PubMed

    McMorris, Terry; Hale, Beverley J; Corbett, Jo; Robertson, Kevin; Hodgson, Christopher I

    2015-03-15

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine, using meta-analytical measures, whether research into the performance of whole-body, psychomotor tasks following moderate and heavy exercise demonstrates an inverted-U effect. A secondary purpose was to compare the effects of acute exercise on tasks requiring static maintenance of posture versus dynamic, ballistic skills. Moderate intensity exercise was determined as being between 40% and 79% maximum power output (ẆMAX) or equivalent, while ≥80% ẆMAX was considered to be heavy. There was a significant difference (Zdiff=4.29, p=0.001, R(2)=0.42) between the mean effect size for moderate intensity exercise (g=0.15) and that for heavy exercise size (g=-0.86). These data suggest a catastrophe effect during heavy exercise. Mean effect size for static tasks (g=-1.24) was significantly different (Zdiff=3.24, p=0.001, R(2)=0.90) to those for dynamic/ballistic tasks (g=-0.30). The result for the static versus dynamic tasks moderating variables point to perception being more of an issue than peripheral fatigue for maintenance of static posture. The difference between this result and those found in meta-analyses examining the effects of acute exercise on cognition shows that, when perception and action are combined, the complexity of the interaction induces different effects to when cognition is detached from motor performance. PMID:25582516

  16. Teaching and Learning and Technology: Does WebCT Help Universities Meet Organisational and Customer Goals? A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, L.; Vigar-Ellis, D.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores whether WebCT, a virtual learning technology, meets organisational and customer goals at Coventry University Business School (CBS). Lecturer and student perceptions about the benefits of WebCT as a teaching and learning resource are examined as well as the goals of WebCT for the university as an organization. CBS students…

  17. Gasification advanced research and technology development (AR and TD) cross-cut meeting and review. [US DOE supported

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The US Department of Energy gasification advanced research and technology development (AR and TD) cross-cut meeting and review was held June 24 to 26, 1981, at Germantown, Maryland. Forty-eight papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  18. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... of power to help them cope with low self-esteem. Although compulsive exercising doesn't have to accompany ... a downward spiral of negative thinking and low self-esteem. continue Why Is Exercising Too Much a Bad ...

  19. Exercise & Sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Back to School, the Healthy Way Exercise & Sleep Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents ... helps kids. Photo: iStock 6 "Bests" About Kids' Exercise At least one hour of physical activity a ...

  20. Morning Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Natalie Crohn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, Natalie Schmitt recalls her teaching experiences with morning exercise programs, beginning with her first teaching job as assistant Morning Exercise teacher at the Francis W. Parker School in Chicago. In the Morning Exercises, students were encouraged to employ all means of expression: speaking, drawing, dancing, singing, acting.…

  1. Does Exercise Reduce Aggressive Feelings? An Experiment Examining the Influence of Movement Type and Social Task Conditions on Testiness and Anger Reduction.

    PubMed

    Pels, Fabian; Kleinert, Jens

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, it was assumed that a decrease in aggressive feelings is stronger with movements that are unlike aggressive actions compared with those that are similar to aggressive actions. Furthermore, cooperative exercise tasks were expected to lead to lower aggressive feelings compared with competitive tasks. After undergoing an induction of aggressive feelings, 60 participants were randomly assigned to one of six experimental treatment groups, each differing in "movement type" (rowing and combat exercise) and "social task condition" (cooperation, competition, and individualization). A significant reduction of aggressive feelings was only found for participants exercising individually in the rowing condition compared with the individual combat exercise condition. There were no sole effects of "movement type" and "social task condition." PMID:27184261

  2. Home-Based Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... do when I don't have access to physical therapy? While VEDA does not recommend doing vestibular exercises ... already existing ringing Fluid discharge from your ears Pain and ... try a general low-impact and balance-strengthening fitness program. The more ...

  3. Does exercise therapy improve the health-related quality of life of people with knee osteoarthritis? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ryo; Ozawa, Junya; Kito, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise therapy on the health-related QOL of people with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects] Four databases (PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) were searched for randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of exercise therapy on health-related QOL assessed by the SF-36 for inclusion in our systematic review. The methodological qualities of the trials were assessed independently by two reviewers using the PEDro scale. Pooled analyses with a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model were used in the meta-analyses to calculate the standardized mean differences and 95% confidence intervals. [Results] Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Our meta-analysis provides high-quality evidence that exercise therapy increases the summary score, physical functioning score, and role-physical score of knee osteoarthritis sufferers. Our meta-analysis also provides moderate-quality evidence that the physical component summary and mental component summary scores were improved to a greater extent by exercise therapy than by control interventions. [Conclusion] Exercise therapy can improve health-related QOL, as assessed by the SF-36, of knee osteoarthritis sufferers. PMID:26644699

  4. Perspective: Does Laboratory-Based Maximal Incremental Exercise Testing Elicit Maximum Physiological Responses in Highly-Trained Athletes with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury?

    PubMed Central

    West, Christopher R.; Leicht, Christof A.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.; Romer, Lee M.

    2016-01-01

    The physiological assessment of highly-trained athletes is a cornerstone of many scientific support programs. In the present article, we provide original data followed by our perspective on the topic of laboratory-based incremental exercise testing in elite athletes with cervical spinal cord injury. We retrospectively reviewed our data on Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby athletes collected during the last two Paralympic cycles. We extracted and compared peak cardiometabolic (heart rate and blood lactate) responses between a standard laboratory-based incremental exercise test on a treadmill and two different maximal field tests (4 min and 40 min maximal push). In the nine athletes studied, both field tests elicited higher peak responses than the laboratory-based test. The present data imply that laboratory-based incremental protocols preclude the attainment of true peak cardiometabolic responses. This may be due to the different locomotor patterns required to sustain wheelchair propulsion during treadmill exercise or that maximal incremental treadmill protocols only require individuals to exercise at or near maximal exhaustion for a relatively short period of time. We acknowledge that both field- and laboratory-based testing have respective merits and pitfalls and suggest that the choice of test be dictated by the question at hand: if true peak responses are required then field-based testing is warranted, whereas laboratory-based testing may be more appropriate for obtaining cardiometabolic responses across a range of standardized exercise intensities. PMID:26834642

  5. Perspective: Does Laboratory-Based Maximal Incremental Exercise Testing Elicit Maximum Physiological Responses in Highly-Trained Athletes with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury?

    PubMed

    West, Christopher R; Leicht, Christof A; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Romer, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    The physiological assessment of highly-trained athletes is a cornerstone of many scientific support programs. In the present article, we provide original data followed by our perspective on the topic of laboratory-based incremental exercise testing in elite athletes with cervical spinal cord injury. We retrospectively reviewed our data on Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby athletes collected during the last two Paralympic cycles. We extracted and compared peak cardiometabolic (heart rate and blood lactate) responses between a standard laboratory-based incremental exercise test on a treadmill and two different maximal field tests (4 min and 40 min maximal push). In the nine athletes studied, both field tests elicited higher peak responses than the laboratory-based test. The present data imply that laboratory-based incremental protocols preclude the attainment of true peak cardiometabolic responses. This may be due to the different locomotor patterns required to sustain wheelchair propulsion during treadmill exercise or that maximal incremental treadmill protocols only require individuals to exercise at or near maximal exhaustion for a relatively short period of time. We acknowledge that both field- and laboratory-based testing have respective merits and pitfalls and suggest that the choice of test be dictated by the question at hand: if true peak responses are required then field-based testing is warranted, whereas laboratory-based testing may be more appropriate for obtaining cardiometabolic responses across a range of standardized exercise intensities. PMID:26834642

  6. Exercise does not activate the β3 adrenergic receptor-eNOS pathway, but reduces inducible NOS expression to protect the heart of obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kleindienst, Adrien; Battault, Sylvain; Belaidi, Elise; Tanguy, Stephane; Rosselin, Marie; Boulghobra, Doria; Meyer, Gregory; Gayrard, Sandrine; Walther, Guillaume; Geny, Bernard; Durand, Gregory; Cazorla, Olivier; Reboul, Cyril

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with higher cardiac vulnerability to ischemia-reperfusion (IR). The cardioprotective effect of regular exercise has been attributed to β3-adrenergic receptor (β3AR) stimulation and increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. Here, we evaluated the role of the β3AR-eNOS pathway and NOS isoforms in exercise-induced cardioprotection of C57Bl6 mice fed with high fat and sucrose diet (HFS) for 12 weeks and subjected or not to exercise training during the last 4 weeks (HFS-Ex). HFS animals were more sensitive to in vivo and ex vivo IR injuries than control (normal diet) and HFS-Ex mice. Cardioprotection in HFS-Ex mice was not associated with increased myocardial eNOS activation and NO metabolites storage, possibly due to the β3AR-eNOS pathway functional loss in their heart. Indeed, a selective β3AR agonist (BRL37344) increased eNOS activation and had a protective effect against IR in control, but not in HFS hearts. Moreover, iNOS expression, nitro-oxidative stress (protein s-nitrosylation and nitrotyrosination) and ROS production during early reperfusion were increased in HFS, but not in control mice. Exercise normalized iNOS level and reduced protein s-nitrosylation, nitrotyrosination and ROS production in HFS-Ex hearts during early reperfusion. The iNOS inhibitor 1400 W reduced in vivo infarct size in HFS mice to control levels, supporting the potential role of iNOS normalization in the cardioprotective effects of exercise training in HFS-Ex mice. Although the β3AR-eNOS pathway is defective in the heart of HFS mice, regular exercise can protect their heart against IR by reducing iNOS expression and nitro-oxidative stress. PMID:27164904

  7. Heavy and moderate interval exercise training alters low-flow-mediated constriction but does not increase circulating progenitor cells in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Rakobowchuk, Mark; Harris, Emma; Taylor, Annabelle; Baliga, Vivek; Cubbon, Richard M; Rossiter, Harry B; Birch, Karen M

    2012-03-01

    Moderate-intensity endurance exercise training improves vascular endothelial vasomotor function; however, the impact of high-intensity exercise training has been equivocal. Thus, the effect of the physiological stress of the exercise remains poorly understood. Furthermore, enhanced vascular repair mediated by circulating progenitor cells may also be improved. To address whether the physiological stress of exercise training is an important factor contributing to these adaptations, 20 healthy participants trained for 6 weeks. Training involved either moderate (MSIT; n = 9) or heavy metabolic stress (HSIT; n = 11) interval exercise training programmes matched for total work and duration of exercise. Before and after training, flow-mediated dilatation, low-flow-mediated constriction and total vessel reactivity were measured at the brachial artery using Doppler ultrasound. Circulating progenitor cells (CD34(+), CD133(+) and CD309/KDR(+)) were measured by flow cytometry (means ± SD). Relative (MSIT pre- 5.5 ± 3.4 versus post-training 6.6 ± 2.5%; HSIT pre- 6.6 ± 4.1 versus post-training 7.0 ± 3.4%, P = 0.33) and normalized (P = 0.16) flow-mediated dilatation did not increase with either training programme. However, low-flow-mediated constriction was greater after training in both groups (MSIT pre- -0.5 ± 3.2 versus post-training -1.9 ± 3.1%; HSIT pre- -1.0 ± 1.7 versus post-training -2.9 ± 3.0%, P = 0.04) and contributed to greater total vessel reactivity (MSIT pre- 7.4 ± 3.3 versus post-training 10.1 ± 3.7%; HSIT pre- 10.9 ± 5.9 versus post-training 12.7 ± 6.2%, P = 0.01). Peak reactive hyperaemia and the area under the shear rate curve were not different between groups, either before or after training. Although circulating progenitor cell numbers increased following heavy-intensity interval exercise training, variability was great amongst participants [MSIT pre- 16 ± 18 versus post-training 14 ± 12 cells (ml whole blood)(-1); HSIT pre- 8 ± 6 versus post

  8. Underserved patients' perspectives on patient-centered primary care: does the patient-centered medical home model meet their needs?

    PubMed

    Mead, Holly; Andres, Ellie; Regenstein, Marsha

    2014-02-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has gained significant interest as a delivery system model that can improve health care quality while reducing costs. This study uses focus groups to investigate underserved, chronically ill patients' preferences for care and develops a patient-centered framework of priorities. Seven major priorities were identified: (a) communication and partnership, (b) affordable care, (c) coordinated care, (d) personal responsibility, (e) accessible care, (f) education and support resources, and (g) the essential role of nonphysician providers in supporting their care. Using the framework, we analyzed the PCMH joint principals as developed by U.S. medical societies to identify where the PCMH model could be improved to better meet the needs of these patients. Four of the seven patient priorities were identified as not present in or supported by current PCMH joint principles. The study discusses how the PCMH model can better address the needs of low-income, disadvantaged patients. PMID:24288366

  9. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  10. SnapShot: Exercise Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brendan; Hawley, John A; Zierath, Juleen R

    2016-08-01

    Exercise represents a major challenge to whole-body homeostasis. To meet this challenge, myriad acute and adaptive responses take place at multiple cellular and systemic levels. The molecular bases of skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise are mediated by an array of signaling events, pre- and post-transcriptional processes, regulation of translation, and ultimately the increased abundance and/or maximal activity of key proteins with roles in energy provision. PMID:27508878

  11. The American College of nuclear physicians 18th annual meeting and scientific sessions DOE day: Substance abuse and nuclear medicine abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Despite the enormous personal and social cost Of substance abuse, there is very little knowledge with respect to the mechanisms by which these drugs produce addiction as well as to the mechanisms of toxicity. Similarly, there is a lack of effective therapeutic intervention to treat the drug abusers. In this respect, nuclear medicine could contribute significantly by helping to gather information using brain imaging techniques about mechanisms of drug addiction which, in turn, could help design better therapeutic interventions, and by helping in the evaluation and diagnosis of organ toxicity from the use of drugs of abuse. This volume contains six short descriptions of presentations made at the 18th Meeting of the American College of Nuclear Physicians -- DOE Day: Substance Abuse and Nuclear Medicine.

  12. Validation of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory for Axis II disorders: does it meet the Daubert standard?

    PubMed

    Rogers, R; Salekin, R T; Sewell, K W

    1999-08-01

    Relevant to forensic practice, the Supreme Court in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (1993) established the boundaries for the admissibility of scientific evidence that take into account its trustworthiness as assessed via evidentiary reliability. In conducting forensic evaluations, psychologists and other mental health professionals must be able to offer valid diagnoses, including Axis II disorders. The most widely available measure of personality disorders is the Million Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) and its subsequent revisions (MCMI-II and MCMI-III). We address the critical question, "Do the MCMI-II and MCMI-III meet the requirements of Daubert?" Fundamental problems in the scientific validity and error rates for MCMI-III appear to preclude its admissibility under Daubert for the assessment of Axis II disorders. We address the construct validity for the MCMI and MCMI-II via a meta-analysis of 33 studies. The resulting multitrait-multimethod approach allowed us to address their convergent and discriminant validity through method effects (Marsh, 1990). With reference to Daubert, the results suggest a circumscribed use for the MCMI-II with good evidence of construct validity for Avoidant, Schizotypal, and Borderline personality disorders. PMID:10439726

  13. Does Multidisciplinary Care Enhance the Management of Advanced Breast Cancer?: Evaluation of Advanced Breast Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Chirgwin, Jacquie; Craike, Melinda; Gray, Christine; Watty, Kathy; Mileshkin, Linda; Livingston, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the contribution of the advanced breast cancer (ABC) multidisciplinary team meetings (MDMs) to patient care and clinical outcomes. Methods: Members of ABC MDMs at two health services completed questionnaires in November 2007. The questionnaire asked about the performance of the MDMs and their contribution to improvement in patient care in five domains: medical management, psychosocial care, palliative care, care in the community, and benefits for team members. A final section covered the perceived value and importance of the MDM in patient management. Descriptive statistics (frequencies, mean, and standard deviation) were used to summarize the performance, improvement, and importance scores. Results: A total of 27 multidisciplinary team members (73%) completed the questionnaire. The MDM performed best in medical management (mean performance score out of 5 [M] = 3.78) and palliative care (M = 3.77). These were also the areas that were most improved through the MDM. Benefits to team members and care in the community (both M = 3.05) ranked lowest by both measures. The MDM provided the most benefit for patient management in the areas of “awareness of services available” (M = 4.32), “efficiency of referrals” (M = 4.27) and “supportive care for patients” (M = 4.27). “Awareness of services available,” “psychological care for patients,” and “continuity of care” were considered the most important (M = 4.64). Conclusion: The study provides evidence that MDMs make an important contribution to the logistical and medical management of patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:21358959

  14. Does education plays a role in meeting the human rights needs of Indian women with mental illness?

    PubMed Central

    Poreddi, Vijayalakshmi; Ramachandra; Math, Suresh Bada

    2015-01-01

    Background: Globally women are one of the vulnerable populations and women without education and with mental illness are doubly disadvantaged. Aim: To find out the role of education in meeting the human rights needs of women with mental illness at family and community levels. Materials and Methods: A descriptive design was carried out among randomly selected recovered women (N = 100) with mental illness at a tertiary care center. Data was collected through face-to-face interview using a structured questionnaire. Results: Our findings revealed that human rights needs in physical needs dimension, i.e. access to safe drinking water (χ2 = 7.447, P < 0.059) and serving in the same utensils (χ2 = 10.866, P < 0.012), were rated higher in women with illiteracy. The human rights needs in emotional dimension, i.e. afraid of family members (χ2 = 13.266, P < 0.004), not involved in making decisions regarding family matters (χ2 = 21.133, P < 0.00) and called with filthy nicknames (χ2 = 8.334, P < 0.040), were rated higher in literate women. The human rights needs in religious needs dimension, i.e. allowed to go to temple, church, mosque etc. (χ2 = 9.459, P < 0.024), were not satisfied by the illiterate women. Similarly, literate women felt that they were discriminated by community members due to their illness (χ2 = 9.823, P < 0.044). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggested that women without education were more deprived of human rights needs than literate women. Thus, there is an urgent need to improve literacy of women and to strengthen the legal framework to protect the rights of the women with mental illness. PMID:26167021

  15. L-Alanylglutamine inhibits signaling proteins that activate protein degradation, but does not affect proteins that activate protein synthesis after an acute resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanyi; Choi, Ran Hee; Solares, Geoffrey J; Tseng, Hung-Min; Ding, Zhenping; Kim, Kyoungrae; Ivy, John L

    2015-07-01

    Sustamine™ (SUS) is a dipeptide composed of alanine and glutamine (AlaGln). Glutamine has been suggested to increase muscle protein accretion; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms of glutamine on muscle protein metabolism following resistance exercise have not been fully addressed. In the present study, 2-month-old rats climbed a ladder 10 times with a weight equal to 75 % of their body mass attached at the tail. Rats were then orally administered one of four solutions: placebo (PLA-glycine = 0.52 g/kg), whey protein (WP = 0.4 g/kg), low dose of SUS (LSUS = 0.1 g/kg), or high dose of SUS (HSUS = 0.5 g/kg). An additional group of sedentary (SED) rats was intubated with glycine (0.52 g/kg) at the same time as the ladder-climbing rats. Blood samples were collected immediately after exercise and at either 20 or 40 min after recovery. The flexor hallucis longus (FHL), a muscle used for climbing, was excised at 20 or 40 min post exercise and analyzed for proteins regulating protein synthesis and degradation. All supplements elevated the phosphorylation of FOXO3A above SED at 20 min post exercise, but only the SUS supplements significantly reduced the phosphorylation of AMPK and NF-kB p65. SUS supplements had no effect on mTOR signaling, but WP supplementation yielded a greater phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6k, and rpS6 compared with PLA at 20 min post exercise. However, by 40 min post exercise, phosphorylation of mTOR and rpS6 in PLA had risen to levels not different than WP. These results suggest that SUS blocks the activation of intracellular signals for MPB, whereas WP accelerates mRNA translation. PMID:25837301

  16. Building America Case Study: Meeting DOE Challenge Home Program Certification, Chicago, Illinois; Denver, Colorado; Devens, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate integrated packages of advanced measures in individual test homes to assess their performance with respect to Building America Program goals, specifically compliance with the DOE Challenge Home Program. BSC consulted on the construction of five test houses by three Cold Climate production builders in three separate US cities. BSC worked with the builders to develop a design package tailored to the cost-related impacts for each builder. Therefore, the resulting design packages do vary from builder to builder. BSC provided support through this research project on the design, construction and performance testing of the five test homes. Overall, the builders have concluded that the energy related upgrades (either through the prescriptive or performance path) represent reasonable upgrades. The builders commented that while not every improvement in specification was cost effective (as in a reasonable payback period), many were improvements that could improve the marketability of the homes and serve to attract more energy efficiency discerning prospective homeowners. However, the builders did express reservations on the associated checklists and added certifications. An increase in administrative time was observed with all builders. The checklists and certifications also inherently increase cost due to: 1. Adding services to the scope of work for various trades, such as HERS Rater, HVAC contractor. 2. Increased material costs related to the checklists, especially the EPA Indoor airPLUS and EPA WaterSense Efficient Hot Water Distribution requirement.

  17. Caffeine and exercise.

    PubMed

    Paluska, Scott A

    2003-08-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly consumed drug in the world, and athletes frequently use it as an ergogenic aid. It improves performance and endurance during prolonged, exhaustive exercise. To a lesser degree it also enhances short-term, high-intensity athletic performance. Caffeine improves concentration, reduces fatigue, and enhances alertness. Habitual intake does not diminish caffeine's ergogenic properties. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the physiologic effects of caffeine, but adenosine receptor antagonism most likely accounts for the primary mode of action. It is relatively safe and has no known negative performance effects, nor does it cause significant dehydration or electrolyte imbalance during exercise. Routine caffeine consumption may cause tolerance or dependence, and abrupt discontinuation produces irritability, mood shifts, headache, drowsiness, or fatigue. Major sport governing bodies ban excessive use of caffeine, but current monitoring techniques are inadequate, and ethical dilemmas persist regarding caffeine intake by athletes. PMID:12834577

  18. 77 FR 34974 - Sunshine Act Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... BOARD MEETING Sunshine Act Meetings TIME AND DATE: June 25, 2012; 9:00 a.m.-1:15 p.m. PLACE: 1331... TO BE CONSIDERED: Approval of the Minutes of the March 26, 2012, Meeting of the Board of Directors... Exercise Initial Fundraising Plan Web site Demo Next Meetings PORTIONS TO BE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC:...

  19. Healthy Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Oberman, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Persons at any age can substantially improve their fitness for work and play through appropriate exercise training. Considerable evidence indicates that physical activity is valuable for weight control, modifying lipids and improving carbohydrate tolerance. Less rigorous scientific data are available for associated long-term blood pressure and psychological changes with habitual exercise. Strenuous physical activity most likely reduces the incidence of coronary heart disease and the detrimental impact of certain chronic diseases on health. Adverse effects may result from a training program, but the major concern is the susceptibility to cardiovascular events during and immediately after exertion. To achieve optimal benefits with minimal risk, exercise must be carefully prescribed within the context of overall health and training objectives. Taken altogether, a distinct rationale exists for regular vigorous exercise as an integral part of a personal health maintenance program. PMID:6395501

  20. Exercise Habit

    MedlinePlus

    ... lungs. Examples of aerobic exercise include walking, hiking, running, aerobic dance, biking, rowing, swimming, and cross-country ... Brisk walking can burn as many calories as running, but it is less likely to cause injuries ...

  1. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. Many teens who play sports have higher self-esteem than their less active pals, and exercise can ... may have a distorted body image and low self-esteem. They may see themselves as overweight or out ...

  2. Exercise response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Michel, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    The bicycle ergometer and a graded stress protocol were used to conduct exercise stress tests for the Apollo project. The graded exercise tests permitted a progressive evaluation of physiological control system response and provided a better understanding of safe stress limits; heart rate was used for determining stress levels. During each test, workload, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory gas exchange (oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and minute volume) measurements were made. The results are presented and discussed.

  3. Kinesio Taping Does Not Provide Additional Benefits in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain Who Receive Exercise and Manual Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Added, Marco Aurélio Nemitalla; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; de Freitas, Diego Galace; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Monteiro, Renan Lima; Salomão, Evelyn Cassia; de Medeiros, Flávia Cordeiro; Costa, Lucíola da Cunha Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Background Many clinical practice guidelines endorse both manual therapy and exercise as effective treatment options for patients with low back pain. To optimize the effects of the treatments recommended by the guidelines, a new intervention known as Kinesio Taping is being widely used in these patients. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain when added to a physical therapy program consisting of exercise and manual therapy. Methods One hundred forty-eight patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain were randomly allocated to receive 10 (twice weekly) sessions of physical therapy, consisting of exercise and manual therapy, or the same treatment with the addition of Kinesio Taping applied to the lower back. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and disability (5 weeks after randomization) and the secondary outcomes were pain intensity, disability (3 months and 6 months after randomization), global perceived effect, and satisfaction with care (5 weeks after treatment). Data were collected by a blinded assessor. Results No between-group differences were observed in the primary outcomes of pain intensity (mean difference, -0.01 points; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.88, 0.85) or disability (mean difference, 1.14 points; 95% CI: -0.85, 3.13) at 5 weeks' follow-up. In addition, no between-group differences were observed for any of the other outcomes evaluated, except for disability 6 months after randomization (mean difference, 2.01 points; 95% CI: 0.03, 4.00) in favor of the control group. Conclusion Patients who received a physical therapy program consisting of exercise and manual therapy did not get additional benefit from the use of Kinesio Taping. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Prospectively registered May 28, 2013 at www.ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01866332). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):506-513. Epub 6 Jun 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016

  4. An Evidence-Based Approach To Exercise Prescriptions on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This presentation describes current exercise countermeasures and exercise equipment for astronauts onboard the ISS. Additionally, a strategy for evaluating evidence supporting spaceflight exercise is described and a new exercise prescription is proposed. The current exercise regimen is not fully effective as the ISS exercise hardware does not allow for sufficient exercise intensity, the exercise prescription is adequate and crew members are noncompliant with the prescription. New ISS hardware is proposed, Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED), which allows additional exercises, is instrumented for data acquisition and offers improved loading. The new T2 hardware offers a better harness and subject loading system, is instrumented to allow ground reaction force data, and offers improved speed. A strategy for developing a spaceflight exercise prescription is described and involves identifying exercise training programs that have been shown to maximize adaptive benefits of people exercising in both 0 and 1 g environments. Exercise intensity emerged as an important factor in maintaining physiologic adaptations in the spaceflight environment and interval training is suggested. New ISS exercise hardware should allow for exercise at intensities high enough to elicit adaptive responses. Additionally, new exercise prescriptions should incorporate higher intensity exercises and seek to optimize intensity, duration and frequency for greater efficiency.

  5. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging during maximal and submaximal exercise: comparison of submaximal exercise with propranolol

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P.; Sklar, J.; Kirch, D.; Vogel, R.; Rhodes, C.A.

    1983-12-01

    Propranolol is an effective drug for patients with angina and has been shown to favorably alter exercise ejection fraction and myocardial perfusion images in patients with coronary disease. A characteristic effect of propranolol is reduction in exercise heart rate (HR). Twenty men with coronary disease (10 with prior infarction), angina-limited exercise tests, abnormal myocardial blood flow distribution images (MBFDI) (201thallium) during exercise, and normal resting ejection fractions underwent treadmill exercise testing with imaging on three occasions. Control maximal exercise was performed initially with measurement of MBFDI. Propranolol, 40 mg by mouth four times a day, was administered for a week with exercise repeated to the same workload. A third study, with men off propranolol, was undertaken with exercise continued only to the HR obtained while the men were taking propranolol (submaximal exercise). All men had improvement in MBFDI while receiving propranolol (men without infarction +780 +/- 88 (average +/- SEM) normalized count rate difference between control and propranolol; men with infarction +724 +/- 73 normalized counts). Greater count differences were noted when control exercise and HR-controlled, submaximal exercise MBFDI were compared with a greater difference in men with infarction (+1094 +/- 89 normalized counts) than for men without infarction (+896 +/- 88 normalized counts). Results suggest that propranolol improves MBFDI during exercise in men with angina, but that submaximal exercise results in more normal MBFDI than does propranolol for exercise to the same HR.

  6. Maternal Responses to Aerobic Exercise in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Margie H; Skow, Rachel J; Steinback, Craig D

    2016-09-01

    Exercise is one of the most physiologically challenging stressors requiring the coordination of metabolic, respiratory, and cardiovascular responses to meet increased energy requirements of the working muscle. During pregnancy, all women without contraindication are encouraged to exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. Pregnancy itself is associated with profound physiological adaptations to the maternal cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems, which serve to support the needs of the growing fetus. Therefore the physiological adaptations to exercise during pregnancy are more pronounced and critically important. This review provides an overview of our current understanding of the physiological adaptations to acute prenatal exercise. PMID:27042798

  7. Metabolic consequences of resistive-type exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    This brief review concerns acute and chronic metabolic responses to resistive-type exercise (RTE) (i.e., Olympic/power weight lifting and bodybuilding). Performance of RTE presents power output substantially greater (10-15-fold) than that evident with endurance-type exercise. Accordingly, RTE relies heavily on the anaerobic enzyme machinery of skeletal muscle for energy supply, with alterations in the rate of aerobic metabolism being modest. Hydrolysis of high energy phosphate compounds (PC, ATP), glycogenolysis, and glycolysis are evident during an acute bout of RTE as indicated by metabolic markers in mixed fiber type skeletal muscle samples. The type of RTE probably influences the magnitude of these responses since the increase in blood lactate is much greater during a typical "bodybuilding" than "power lifting" session. The influence of RTE training on acute metabolic responses to RTE has received little attention. An individual's inherent metabolic characteristics are apparently sufficient to meet the energy demands of RTE as training of this type does not increase VO2max or substantially alter the content of marker enzymes in mixed fiber type skeletal muscle. Analyses of pools of fast- vs slow-twitch fibers, however, indicate that RTE-induced changes may be fiber type specific. Future studies should better delineate the metabolic responses to RTE and determine whether these are related to the enhanced performance associated with such training.

  8. A process evaluation: Does recruitment for an exercise program through ethnically specific channels and key figures contribute to its reach and receptivity in ethnic minority mothers?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnic minority women from low-income countries who live in high-income countries are more physically inactive than ethnic majority women in those countries. At the same time, they can be harder to reach with health promotion programs. Targeting recruitment channels and execution to ethnic groups could increase reach and receptivity to program participation. We explored using ethnically specific channels and key figures to reach Ghanaian, Antillean, and Surinamese mothers with an invitation for an exercise program, and subsequently, to determine the mothers’ receptivity and participation. Methods We conducted a mixed methods process evaluation in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. To recruit mothers, we employed ethnically specific community organizations and ethnically matched key figures as recruiters over Dutch health educators. Reach and participation were measured using reply cards and the attendance records from the exercise programs. Observations were made of the recruitment process. We interviewed 14 key figures and 32 mothers to respond to the recruitment channel and recruiter used. Content analysis was used to analyze qualitative data. Results Recruitment through ethnically specific community channels was successful among Ghanaian mothers, but less so among Antillean and Surinamese mothers. The more close-knit an ethnic community was, retaining their own culture and having poorer comprehension of the Dutch language, the more likely we were to reach mothers through ethnically specific organizations. Furthermore, we found that using ethnically matched recruiters resulted in higher receptivity to the program and, among the Ghanaian mothers in particular, in greater participation. This was because the ethnically matched recruiter was a familiar, trusted person, a translator, and a motivator who was enthusiastic, encouraging, and able to adapt her message (targeting/tailoring). Using a health expert was preferred in order to increase the credibility and

  9. Does multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training boost cognitive performance in older adults? A 6-month randomized controlled trial with a 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Eggenberger, Patrick; Schumacher, Vera; Angst, Marius; Theill, Nathan; de Bruin, Eling D

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is a health problem that concerns almost every second elderly person. Physical and cognitive training have differential positive effects on cognition, but have been rarely applied in combination. This study evaluates synergistic effects of multicomponent physical exercise complemented with novel simultaneous cognitive training on cognition in older adults. We hypothesized that simultaneous cognitive–physical components would add training specific cognitive benefits compared to exclusively physical training. Methods Seniors, older than 70 years, without cognitive impairment, were randomly assigned to either: 1) virtual reality video game dancing (DANCE), 2) treadmill walking with simultaneous verbal memory training (MEMORY), or 3) treadmill walking (PHYS). Each program was complemented with strength and balance exercises. Two 1-hour training sessions per week over 6 months were applied. Cognitive performance was assessed at baseline, after 3 and 6 months, and at 1-year follow-up. Multiple regression analyses with planned comparisons were calculated. Results Eighty-nine participants were randomized to the three groups initially, 71 completed the training, while 47 were available at 1-year follow-up. Advantages of the simultaneous cognitive–physical programs were found in two dimensions of executive function. “Shifting attention” showed a time×intervention interaction in favor of DANCE/MEMORY versus PHYS (F[2, 68] =1.95, trend P=0.075, r=0.17); and “working memory” showed a time×intervention interaction in favor of DANCE versus MEMORY (F[1, 136] =2.71, trend P=0.051, R2=0.006). Performance improvements in executive functions, long-term visual memory (episodic memory), and processing speed were maintained at follow-up in all groups. Conclusion Particular executive functions benefit from simultaneous cognitive–physical training compared to exclusively physical multicomponent training. Cognitive–physical training programs

  10. Post-prandial carbohydrate ingestion during 1-h of moderate-intensity, intermittent cycling does not improve mood, perceived exertion, or subsequent power output in recreationally-active exercisers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate ingestion consumed by recreational exercisers during a 1–h, moderate-intensity aerobic workout did not alter mood or perceived exertion, nor did it affect subsequent anaerobic performance under the conditions of this study. Drinking caloric sport beverages does not benefit recreational exercisers in a non-fasted state. PMID:23347391

  11. Exercise and Weight Loss: The Uncertain Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawks, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    In terms of physical impact, recent studies suggest that many benefits previously attributed to exercise as a factor in weight loss do not exist. Researchers do seem to agree that exercise does have a positive effect on body composition during weight loss. (IAH)

  12. Photogrammetric Exercise for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunley, A. Tom

    1986-01-01

    Describes an exercise in which students calculate distances and heights from a single aerial photograph. The exercise (which does not require stereo photographic pairs) is adaptable to any aerial photograph for which the flight height, focal length, and photo center are known. (JN)

  13. Daily exercise routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Patrick L.; Amoroso, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on daily exercise routines are presented. Topics covered include: daily exercise and periodic stress testings; exercise equipment; physiological monitors; exercise protocols; physiological levels; equipment control; control systems; and fuzzy logic control.

  14. Exercise and age

    MedlinePlus

    Age and exercise ... It is never too late to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry ... as you age. The right kind of regular exercise can also reduce your risk of heart disease, ...

  15. Exercise and Posture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info For Teens Message Boards & Forums Donate Shop Exercise & Posture About Spondylitis / Exercise & Posture Overview For The ... Diet Blood Work and Spondylitis Spondylitis Awareness Month Exercise Exercise is an integral part of any spondylitis ...

  16. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  17. Diabetes and exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000083.htm Diabetes and exercise To use the sharing features on this page, ... not exercising at all. Your Blood Sugar and Exercise Check your blood sugar before you exercise. Also, ...

  18. Exercise at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Divisions Home Health Insights Exercise Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  19. Laboratory Exercise to Evaluate Hay Preservatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, R. L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a laboratory exercise designed to demonstrate the effects of moisture on hay preservation products in a manner that does not require large amounts of equipment or instructor time. Materials, procedures, and probable results are discussed. (CW)

  20. Task Failure during Exercise to Exhaustion in Normoxia and Hypoxia Is Due to Reduced Muscle Activation Caused by Central Mechanisms While Muscle Metaboreflex Does Not Limit Performance

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Morales-Alamo, David; González-Izal, Miriam; Losa-Reyna, José; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A. L.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether task failure during incremental exercise to exhaustion (IE) is principally due to reduced neural drive and increased metaboreflex activation eleven men (22 ± 2 years) performed a 10 s control isokinetic sprint (IS; 80 rpm) after a short warm-up. This was immediately followed by an IE in normoxia (Nx, PIO2:143 mmHg) and hypoxia (Hyp, PIO2:73 mmHg) in random order, separated by a 120 min resting period. At exhaustion, the circulation of both legs was occluded instantaneously (300 mmHg) during 10 or 60 s to impede recovery and increase metaboreflex activation. This was immediately followed by an IS with open circulation. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis. Muscle biopsies and blood gases were obtained in separate experiments. During the last 10 s of the IE, pulmonary ventilation, VO2, power output and muscle activation were lower in hypoxia than in normoxia, while pedaling rate was similar. Compared to the control sprint, performance (IS-Wpeak) was reduced to a greater extent after the IE-Nx (11% lower P < 0.05) than IE-Hyp. The root mean square (EMGRMS) was reduced by 38 and 27% during IS performed after IE-Nx and IE-Hyp, respectively (Nx vs. Hyp: P < 0.05). Post-ischemia IS-EMGRMS values were higher than during the last 10 s of IE. Sprint exercise mean (IS-MPF) and median (IS-MdPF) power frequencies, and burst duration, were more reduced after IE-Nx than IE-Hyp (P < 0.05). Despite increased muscle lactate accumulation, acidification, and metaboreflex activation from 10 to 60 s of ischemia, IS-Wmean (+23%) and burst duration (+10%) increased, while IS-EMGRMS decreased (−24%, P < 0.05), with IS-MPF and IS-MdPF remaining unchanged. In conclusion, close to task failure, muscle activation is lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. Task failure is predominantly caused by central mechanisms, which recover to great extent within 1 min even when the legs remain ischemic. There is dissociation between the

  1. ACRF Archive User Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect

    SA Edgerton; RA McCord; DP Kaiser

    2007-10-30

    On October 30, 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sponsored an all-day workshop to assess the status of the ACRF Archive. Focus areas included usability of current functions, plans for revised functions, proposals for new functions, and an overarching discussion of new ideas. Although 13 scientists familiar with ACRF and the ARM Program were invited to the workshop, only 10 scientists were available to attend the workshop. ACRF consists of the infrastructure that was developed to support the ARM Program and includes the ACRF Archive (previously called the ARM Archive). The scientists who participated in the meeting ranged from those who used the Archive frequently to those who seldom or never had accessed the Archive. The group was spread across disciplines, i.e. modelers, conservationists, and others from universities and government laboratories. A few of the participants were funded by the ARM Program, but most were not funded currently by ARM. During the past year, several improvements were made to the ACRF Archive to link it with the ARM/ACRF web pages, add a shopping cart feature, and expand on search parameters. Additional modifications have been proposed and prototypes of these proposals were made available for the participants. The participants were given several exercises to do before the meeting, and their feedback was requested to help identify potential problems and shortcomings with the existing structure and to recommend improvements.

  2. Exercise apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant (Inventor); Bentley, Jason R. (Inventor); Loehr, James A. (Inventor); Gundo, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus and method for exercising whereby the user is supported by various mechanisms in such as way that the user's shoulder area is free to translate and rotate; the user's pelvic area is free to translate and rotate; or in any combination.

  3. Budget Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clowes, Darrel A.

    Following a discussion of the factors to be considered in constructing feasible college budgets, an exercise in budget development is presented involving a hypothetical community college with 2,500 full-time equivalent (FTE) students, 500 in developmental education, 750 each in transfer and technical programs, and 500 undecided. Exercise…

  4. Brain glycogen supercompensation following exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takashi; Ishikawa, Taro; Ito, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Masahiro; Inoue, Koshiro; Lee, Min-Chul; Fujikawa, Takahiko; Ichitani, Yukio; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2012-02-01

    Brain glycogen localized in astrocytes, a critical energy source for neurons, decreases during prolonged exhaustive exercise with hypoglycaemia. However, it is uncertain whether exhaustive exercise induces glycogen supercompensation in the brain as in skeletal muscle. To explore this question, we exercised adult male rats to exhaustion at moderate intensity (20 m min(-1)) by treadmill, and quantified glycogen levels in several brain loci and skeletal muscles using a high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation method as a gold standard. Skeletal muscle glycogen was depleted by 82-90% with exhaustive exercise, and supercompensated by 43-46% at 24 h after exercise. Brain glycogen levels decreased by 50-64% with exhaustive exercise, and supercompensated by 29-63% (whole brain 46%, cortex 60%, hippocampus 33%, hypothalamus 29%, cerebellum 63% and brainstem 49%) at 6 h after exercise. The brain glycogen supercompensation rates after exercise positively correlated with their decrease rates during exercise. We also observed that cortical and hippocampal glycogen supercompensation were sustained until 24 h after exercise (long-lasting supercompensation), and their basal glycogen levels increased with 4 weeks of exercise training (60 min day(-1) at 20 m min(-1)). These results support the hypothesis that, like the effect in skeletal muscles, glycogen supercompensation also occurs in the brain following exhaustive exercise, and the extent of supercompensation is dependent on that of glycogen decrease during exercise across brain regions. However, supercompensation in the brain preceded that of skeletal muscles. Further, the long-lasting supercompensation of the cortex and hippocampus is probably a prerequisite for their training adaptation (increased basal levels), probably to meet the increased energy demands of the brain in exercising animals. PMID:22063629

  5. 41 CFR 102-37.355 - What obligations does a SASP have to ensure that donees meet Circular A-133 requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SASP have to ensure that donees meet Circular A-133 requirements? 102-37.355 Section 102-37.355 Public... meet Circular A-133 requirements? SASPs, if they donate $500,000 or more in Federal property to a donee in a fiscal year, must ensure that the donee has an audit performed in accordance with Circular...

  6. 41 CFR 102-37.355 - What obligations does a SASP have to ensure that donees meet Circular A-133 requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SASP have to ensure that donees meet Circular A-133 requirements? 102-37.355 Section 102-37.355 Public... meet Circular A-133 requirements? SASPs, if they donate $500,000 or more in Federal property to a donee in a fiscal year, must ensure that the donee has an audit performed in accordance with Circular...

  7. The fast exercise drive to breathe.

    PubMed

    Duffin, James

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a personal view of research into the exercise drive to breathe that can be observed to act immediately to increase breathing at the start of rhythmic exercise. It is based on a talk given at the Experimental Biology 2013 meeting in a session entitled 'Recent advances in understanding mechanisms regulating breathing during exercise'. This drive to breathe has its origin in a combination of central command, whereby voluntary motor commands to the exercising muscles produce a concurrent respiratory drive, and afferent feedback, whereby afferent information from the exercising muscles affects breathing. The drive at the start and end of rhythmic exercise is proportional to limb movement frequency, and its magnitude decays as exercise continues so that the immediate decrease of ventilation at the end of exercise is about 60% of the immediate increase at the start. With such evidence for the effect of this fast drive to breathe at the start and end of rhythmic exercise, its existence during exercise is hypothesised. Experiments to test this hypothesis have, however, provided debatable evidence. A fast drive to breathe during both ramp and sine wave changes in treadmill exercise speed and grade appears to be present in some individuals, but is not as evident in the general population. Recent sine-wave cycling experiments show that when cadence is varied sinusoidally the ventilation response lags by about 10 s, whereas when pedal loading is varied ventilation lags by about 30 s. It therefore appears that limb movement frequency is effective in influencing ventilation during exercise as well as at the start and end of exercise. PMID:23940383

  8. Matrix metalloproteinases in exercise and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jaoude, Jonathan; Koh, Yunsuk

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc- and calcium-dependent endoproteinases that have the ability to break down extracellular matrix. The large range of MMPs’ functions widens their spectrum of potential role as activators or inhibitors in tissue remodeling, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity. In particular, MMP-1, -2, and -9 may be associated with exercise and obesity. Thus, the current study reviewed the effects of different types of exercise (resistance and aerobic) on MMP-1, -2, and -9. Previous studies report that the response of MMP-2 and -9 to resistance exercise is dependent upon the length of exercise training, since long-term resistance exercise training increased both MMP-2 and -9, whereas acute bout of resistance exercise decreased these MMPs. Aerobic exercise produces an inconsistent result on MMPs, although some studies showed a decrease in MMP-1. Obesity is related to a relatively lower level of MMP-9, indicating that an exercise-induced increase in MMP-9 may positively influence obesity. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between exercise, obesity, and MMPs does not exist yet. Future studies examining the acute and chronic responses of these MMPs using different subject models may provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are associated with exercise, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:27471391

  9. Orthostasis: exercise and exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    There are two major problems here that are not independent. One is the more practically oriented problem of determining the effect of various modes of exercise training on gravitational tolerances, i.e., the point of syncope (unconsciousness) usually estimated from the time of appearance of presyncopal signs and symptoms. The other is more theoretical and concerns the mechanism of blood pressure failure that results in syncope. In many experimental designs these two problems or purposes have been intermingled, with equivocal results.

  10. Meetings in Academe: It's Time for an "EXTREME MEETING MAKEOVER!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Meetings have a bad reputation with faculty. Rarely does one hear a positive word uttered about an upcoming or past meeting. That reputation has metastasized throughout higher education. The primary reason is because meetings can be major time wasters, accomplishing very little, often deteriorating into just another social event, or they may be…

  11. Exercise and Compulsive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polivy, Janet; Clendenen, Vanessa

    Although reports on the positive effects of fitness and exercise predominate in the exercise literature, some researchers describe frequent exercise as compulsive or addictive behavior. This paper addresses these "negative addictions" of exercise. As early as 1970, researchers recognized the addictive qualities of exercise. Short-term studies on…

  12. The Challenges and Opportunities for Extending Plant Genomics to Climate (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, David

    2013-03-01

    David Weston of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "The challenges and opportunities for extending plant genomics to climate" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  13. Delineating Molecular Interaction Mechanisms in an In Vitro Microbial-Plant Community (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Peter Larsen of Argonne National Lab on "Delineating molecular interaction mechanisms in an in vitro microbial-plant community" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  14. Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Sam

    2013-03-01

    Sam Hazen of the University of Massachusetts on "Genetic Regulation of Grass Biomass Accumulation and Biological Conversion Quality" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  15. Succession of Phylogeny and Function During Plant Litter Decomposition (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, Eoin

    2013-03-01

    Eoin Brodie of Berkeley Lab on "Succession of phylogeny and function during plant litter decomposition" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  16. Modulation of Root Microbiome Community Assembly by the Plant Immune Response (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Lebeis, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Sarah Lebeis of University of North Carolina on "Modulation of root microbiome community assembly by the plant immune response" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  17. TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Karsenti, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Eric Karsenti of EMBL delivers the closing keynote on "TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  18. Assembly-driven metagenomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Eric Allen of Scripps and UC San Diego on "Assembly-driven metagenomics of a hypersaline microbial ecosystem" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  19. Natural variation in Brachypodium disctachyon: Deep Sequencing of Highly Diverse Natural Accessions (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Sean

    2013-03-01

    Sean Gordon of the USDA on "Natural variation in Brachypodium disctachyon: Deep Sequencing of Highly Diverse Natural Accessions" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  20. Biodiversity Monitoring Using NGS Approaches on Unusual Substrates (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Tom Gilbert of the Natural History Museum of Denmark on "Biodiversity monitoring using NGS approaches on unusual substrates" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  1. Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for Biofuel Production (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Adam Guss of Oak Ridge National Lab on "Metabolic engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for biofuel production" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  2. New Approaches and Technologies to Sequence de novo Plant reference Genomes (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmutz, Jeremy

    2013-03-01

    Jeremy Schmutz of the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology on "New approaches and technologies to sequence de novo plant reference genomes" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  3. Exercise, nutrition and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Nieman, David C; Pedersen, Bente K

    2004-01-01

    Strenuous bouts of prolonged exercise and heavy training are associated with depressed immune cell function. Furthermore, inadequate or inappropriate nutrition can compound the negative influence of heavy exertion on immunocompetence. Dietary deficiencies of protein and specific micronutrients have long been associated with immune dysfunction. An adequate intake of iron, zinc and vitamins A, E, B6 and B12 is particularly important for the maintenance of immune function, but excess intakes of some micronutrients can also impair immune function and have other adverse effects on health. Immune system depression has also been associated with an excess intake of fat. To maintain immune function, athletes should eat a well-balanced diet sufficient to meet their energy requirements. An athlete exercising in a carbohydrate-depleted state experiences larger increases in circulating stress hormones and a greater perturbation of several immune function indices. Conversely, consuming 30-60 g carbohydrate x h(-1) during sustained intensive exercise attenuates rises in stress hormones such as cortisol and appears to limit the degree of exercise-induced immune depression. Convincing evidence that so-called 'immune-boosting' supplements, including high doses of antioxidant vitamins, glutamine, zinc, probiotics and Echinacea, prevent exercise-induced immune impairment is currently lacking. PMID:14971437

  4. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  5. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Shoulder exercises ... A key part in your recovery is doing exercises to make the muscles and tendons in your ... for everyday tasks or sports activities Before doing exercises at home, ask your doctor or physical therapist ...

  6. Exercise and Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Exercise and Physical Activity Being active and getting exercise helps people with Alzheimer’s disease feel better. Exercise helps keep their muscles, joints, and heart in ...

  7. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... know exactly if or how exercise increases your immunity to certain illnesses, but there are several theories ( ... not exercise more intensely just to increase their immunity. Heavy, long-term exercise (such as marathon running ...

  8. Clothing and thermoregulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Timothy P

    2003-01-01

    Exercise increases heat production. During exercise in both warm and cold conditions, the major dilemma is the dissipation of the heat produced from muscular activity. The use of clothing generally represents a layer of insulation and as such imposes a barrier to heat transfer and evaporation from the skin surface. In warm environments, additional clothing increases thermal insulation causing more rapid increases in temperature during exercise and imposes a barrier to sweat evaporation. However, clothing can serve a protective function by reducing radiant heat gain and thermal stress. Recent research suggests that neither the inclusion of modest amounts of clothing nor the clothing fabric alter thermoregulation or thermal comfort during exercise in warm conditions. In the cold, most reports do not support an effect of clothing fabric on thermoregulation; however, there are reports demonstrating an effect. Clothing construction does alter thermoregulation during and following exercise in the cold, where fishnet construction offers greater heat dissipation. Future research should include conditions that more closely mimic outdoor conditions, where high work rates, large airflow and high relative humidity can significantly impact thermoregulation. PMID:14606923

  9. Exercise countermeasures for spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A; Sandler, H

    1995-01-01

    The authors present a physiological basis for the use of exercise as a weightlessness countermeasure, outline special considerations for the development of exercise countermeasures, review and evaluate exercise used during space flight, and provide new approaches and concepts for the implementation of novel exercise countermeasures for future space flight. The discussion of the physiological basis for countermeasures examines maximal oxygen uptake, blood volume, metabolic responses to work, muscle function, bone loss, and orthostatic instability. The discussion of considerations for exercise prescriptions during space flight includes operational considerations, type of exercise, fitness considerations, age and gender, and psychological considerations. The discussion of exercise currently used in space flight examines cycle ergometry, the treadmill, strength training devices, electrical stimulation, and the Penguin suit worn by Russian crews. New approaches to exercise countermeasures include twin bicycles, dynamic resistance exercisers, maximal exercise effects, grasim (gravity simulators), and the relationship between exercise and LBNP. PMID:11541470

  10. Exercise Is Key to Healthy Aging | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the National Institute on Aging, does regular strength training and aerobic exercise. Photo courtesy of National Institute ... routine has changed very little, always including both strength training and aerobic exercise. Strength training involves upper body ...

  11. Appendices to report on DOE analytical laboratory capacity available to meet EM environmental sampling and analysis needs for FY 93-99

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-30

    The DOE Analytical Laboratory Capacity Study was conducted to give EM-263 current information about existing and future analytical capacities and capabilities of site laboratories within the DOE Complex. Each DOE site may have one or more analytical laboratories in operation. These facilities were established to support site missions such as production, research and development, and personnel and environmental monitoring. With changing site missions and the DOE directives for environmental monitoring and cleanup, these laboratories are either devoting or planning to devote resources to support EM activities. The DOE site laboratories represent a considerable amount of capital investment and analytical capability, capacity, and expertise that can be applied to support the EM mission. They not only provide cost-effective high-volume analytical laboratory services, but are also highly recognized analytical research and development centers. Several sites have already transferred their analytical capability from traditional production support to environmental monitoring and waste management support. A model was developed to determine the analytical capacity of all laboratories in the DOE Complex. The model was applied at nearly all the major laboratories and the results collected from these studies are summarized in this report.

  12. 33 CFR 155.4052 - Drills and exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with an alternate program that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 155.1060(a), and has been approved under 33 CFR 155.1065 will also satisfy the vessel response plan exercise requirements. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drills and exercises....

  13. 33 CFR 155.4052 - Drills and exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with an alternate program that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 155.1060(a), and has been approved under 33 CFR 155.1065 will also satisfy the vessel response plan exercise requirements. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drills and exercises....

  14. 33 CFR 155.4052 - Drills and exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... with an alternate program that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 155.1060(a), and has been approved under 33 CFR 155.1065 will also satisfy the vessel response plan exercise requirements. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drills and exercises....

  15. 33 CFR 155.4052 - Drills and exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with an alternate program that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 155.1060(a), and has been approved under 33 CFR 155.1065 will also satisfy the vessel response plan exercise requirements. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drills and exercises....

  16. George Williams in Thailand: An Ethical Decision-Making Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Constance R.; Smith, J. Goosby

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a classroom ethical decision-making exercise designed to help students make reasoned ethical decisions while gaining insight into their own and others' ethical decision-making strategies. During the exercise, students individually analyze an original mini-case, then meet in small groups to reach consensus on the advice and…

  17. Exercise Is Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrick, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that exercise should be the first-line therapy for preventing and treating many common diseases; however, physicians need more training in how best to use exercise therapy. The paper explains the power of exercise and discusses how to motivate individuals to start safe, enjoyable, and life-saving exercise routines. (SM)

  18. Kegel Exercise Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Español Kegel Exercise Tips Page Content What are Kegel exercises? To do Kegel exercises, you just squeeze your ... help with your bladder control. How do you exercise your pelvic muscles? Find the right muscles. Try ...

  19. Headaches and exercise.

    PubMed

    McCrory, P

    2000-09-01

    Exercise-related headache is one of the most common medical problems affecting the modern-day athlete. Despite the high prevalence of headache in community populations, the epidemiology of sports-related headache is unclear. In certain collision sports, up to 50% of athletes report regular headaches as a consequence of their athletic participation. The classification of the different types of sport-related headache by the International Headache Society (IHS) and in previously published articles does not adequately encompass the clinical problem faced by team physicians. Confusion exists where terms such as 'effort headache' and 'exertional headache' may be used to describe similar entities. In this review, the specific headache entities discussed include benign exertional headache, effort headache, acute post-traumatic headache and cervicogenic headache. For the sports physician, an understanding of the variety of specific headache syndromes that occur with particular sports is necessary for everyday clinical practice. This article reviews the common exercise-related headache syndromes and attempts to provide a framework for their overall management. Team physicians also need to be cognisant that many of the standard preparations used to treat headaches may be banned drugs under International Olympic Committee (IOC) rules. PMID:10999425

  20. The Cutting Edge in Physical Education and Exercise Science Research. American Academy of Physical Education Papers No. 20. Papers Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Physical Education (58th, Cincinnati, Ohio, April 7-8, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Academy of Physical Education, Washington, DC.

    Ten papers that address the theoretical advances being made in various areas of specialization in physical education and exercise science are included in this volume of American Academy of Physical Education Papers. General trends are reviewed in selected areas, including the social sciences, the biological sciences, motor learning, curriculum and…

  1. A Summary of Orientation Meetings and Planning Exercises Conducted Within the OCE Coalition, Appendix J. Vol. II, A Plan for Managing the Development, Implementation and Operation of a Model Elementary Teacher Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Coll. of Education, Monmouth.

    This report summarizes the orientation meetings and the planning review sessions held with members of all the Oregon College of Education coalition constituencies. Three separate orientation meetings were held, one with staff and administrators from the public schools, one with staff and administrators from the college as a whole, and one with…

  2. Publication rates of abstracts presented at annual scientific meetings: how does the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists compare?

    PubMed

    Bydder, Sean A; Joseph, David J; Spry, Nigel A

    2004-03-01

    The abstract to publication ratio (APR) is a measure of the quality of scientific meetings. The aim of the present study was to determine the publication rate of abstracts presented at annual Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) conferences, and to identify the publishing journals. All free paper research abstracts (oral or poster) presented by RANZCR radiologists, radiation oncologists and trainees at the four consecutive meetings between 1996 and 1999 were identified retrospectively from conference programmes. The PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed/) was searched to determine whether or not the abstract had been published as a full paper. Of the 480 free paper research abstracts, 168 (35%) had been published as full articles. The overall abstract to publication ratio for radiology was 29% and for radiation oncology was 41%. Papers were published in a variety of journals but Australasian Radiology accounted for 27%. The mean time between presentation and publication was 16.5 months (median 17 months). These overall abstract to publication ratios are lower than those reported for overseas-based meetings in each respective area. Guidelines to scientific committees could increase the APR by more rigorous selection of abstracts. Future research should look at barriers to the publication of research findings, and identify ways to assist the publication process. PMID:15027917

  3. Physical Exercise and Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Russell; Koegel, Lynn Kern; Ashbaugh, Kristen; Regester, April; Ence, Whitney; Smith, Whitney

    2010-01-01

    Studies involving physical exercise and individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were reviewed. Systematic search procedures identified 18 studies meeting predetermined inclusion criteria. These studies were evaluated in terms of: (a) participant characteristics, (b) type of exercise, (c) procedures used to increase exercise, (d) outcomes,…

  4. 78 FR 24225 - Exercise of Authority Under the Immigration and Nationality Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Exercise of Authority Under the Immigration and Nationality Act AGENCY... meets each of the criteria set forth above. This exercise of authority may be revoked as a matter of... determination made under this exercise of authority as set out above can inform but shall not control a...

  5. 77 FR 51545 - Exercise of Authority Under the Immigration and Nationality Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Exercise of Authority Under the Immigration and Nationality Act AGENCY... meets each of the criteria set forth above. This exercise of authority may be revoked as a matter of... determination made under this exercise of authority as set out above can inform but shall not control a...

  6. Operations Course Icebreaker: Campus Club Cupcakes Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Brent; Southin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Campus Club Cupcakes is an in-class "introduction to operations management" experiential learning exercise which can be used within minutes of starting the course. After reading the one-page mini case, students are encouraged to meet each other and collaborate to determine if making and selling cupcakes to fellow business students would…

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and exercise impairment.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Jane E B; Bridenstine, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2013-03-01

    Limitations in physical fitness, a consistent finding in individuals with both type I and type 2 diabetes mellitus, correlate strongly with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These limitations may significantly contribute to the persistent excess cardiovascular mortality affecting this group. Exercise impairments in VO2 peak and VO2 kinetics manifest early on in diabetes, even with good glycemic control and in the absence of clinically apparent complications. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction is often present but does not fully explain the observed defect in exercise capacity in persons with diabetes. In part, the cardiac limitations are secondary to decreased perfusion with exercise challenge. This is a reversible defect. Similarly, in the skeletal muscle, impairments in nutritive blood flow correlate with slowed (or inefficient) exercise kinetics and decreased exercise capacity. Several correlations highlight the likelihood of endothelial-specific impairments as mediators of exercise dysfunction in diabetes, including insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, decreased myocardial perfusion, slowed tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and impairment in mitochondrial function. Both exercise training and therapies targeted at improving insulin sensitivity and endothelial function improve physical fitness in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Optimization of exercise functions in people with diabetes has implications for diabetes prevention and reductions in mortality risk. Understanding the molecular details of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may provide specific therapeutic targets for the remediation of this defect. Rat models to test this hypothesis are under study. PMID:23299658

  8. Exercising Tactically for Taming Postmeal Glucose Surges

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Elsamma

    2016-01-01

    This review seeks to synthesize data on the timing, intensity, and duration of exercise found scattered over some 39 studies spanning 3+ decades into optimal exercise conditions for controlling postmeal glucose surges. The results show that a light aerobic exercise for 60 min or moderate activity for 20–30 min starting 30 min after meal can efficiently blunt the glucose surge, with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. Exercising at other times could lead to glucose elevation caused by counterregulation. Adding a short bout of resistance exercise of moderate intensity (60%–80%  VO2max) to the aerobic activity, 2 or 3 times a week as recommended by the current guidelines, may also help with the lowering of glucose surges. On the other hand, high-intensity exercise (>80%  VO2max) causes wide glucose fluctuations and its feasibility and efficacy for glucose regulation remain to be ascertained. Promoting the kind of physical activity that best counters postmeal hyperglycemia is crucial because hundreds of millions of diabetes patients living in developing countries and in the pockets of poverty in the West must do without medicines, supplies, and special diets. Physical activity is the one tool they may readily utilize to tame postmeal glucose surges. Exercising in this manner does not violate any of the current guidelines, which encourage exercise any time. PMID:27073714

  9. Exercising Tactically for Taming Postmeal Glucose Surges.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Elsamma

    2016-01-01

    This review seeks to synthesize data on the timing, intensity, and duration of exercise found scattered over some 39 studies spanning 3+ decades into optimal exercise conditions for controlling postmeal glucose surges. The results show that a light aerobic exercise for 60 min or moderate activity for 20-30 min starting 30 min after meal can efficiently blunt the glucose surge, with minimal risk of hypoglycemia. Exercising at other times could lead to glucose elevation caused by counterregulation. Adding a short bout of resistance exercise of moderate intensity (60%-80%  VO2max) to the aerobic activity, 2 or 3 times a week as recommended by the current guidelines, may also help with the lowering of glucose surges. On the other hand, high-intensity exercise (>80%  VO2max) causes wide glucose fluctuations and its feasibility and efficacy for glucose regulation remain to be ascertained. Promoting the kind of physical activity that best counters postmeal hyperglycemia is crucial because hundreds of millions of diabetes patients living in developing countries and in the pockets of poverty in the West must do without medicines, supplies, and special diets. Physical activity is the one tool they may readily utilize to tame postmeal glucose surges. Exercising in this manner does not violate any of the current guidelines, which encourage exercise any time. PMID:27073714

  10. Cardiovascular responses to static exercise in distance runners and weight lifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhurst, J. C.; Kelly, A. R.; Gonyea, W. J.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Three groups of athletes including long-distance runners, competitive and amateur weight lifters, and age- and sex-matched control subjects have been studied by hemodynamic and echocardiographic methods in order to determine the effect of the training programs on the cardiovascular response to static exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, and double product data at rest and at fatigue suggest that competitive endurance (dynamic exercise) training alters the cardiovascular response to static exercise. In contrast to endurance exercise, weight lifting (static exercise) training does not alter the cardiovascular response to static exercise: weight lifters responded to static exercise in a manner very similar to that of the control subjects.

  11. Workshop on Countering Space Adaptation with Exercise: Current Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Bernard A. (Editor); Siconolfi, Steven F. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The proceedings represent an update to the problems associated with living and working in space and the possible impact exercise would have on helping reduce risk. The meeting provided a forum for discussions and debates on contemporary issues in exercise science and medicine as they relate to manned space flight with outside investigators. This meeting also afforded an opportunity to introduce the current status of the Exercise Countermeasures Project (ECP) science investigations and inflight hardware and software development. In addition, techniques for physiological monitoring and the development of various microgravity countermeasures were discussed.

  12. Exercise and the asthmatic.

    PubMed

    Bundgaard, A

    1985-01-01

    Physical exercise is not hazardous to asthmatics. Some asthmatics may benefit from physical training, and almost all asthmatics can perform any kind of physical exercise. Free running was earlier thought to induce more asthma than swimming, for example; however, when ventilation is identical during running and swimming, the exercise-induced asthma will also be the same. Hyperventilation alone is as good as physical exercise to induce exercise-induced asthma. If the physical exercise provokes an asthmatic attack, this is most often easily reversed by inhaled beta 2-agonists. Pretreatment of exercise-induced asthma is most efficient by inhaled beta 2-agonist; orally dosed beta 2-agonist is not as efficient as inhaled beta 2-agonist in the pretreatment of exercise-induced asthma. Inhaled sodium cromoglycate diminishes exercise-induced asthma, and the effect seems to be better in children than in adults. Inhaled steroids have no immediate effect on exercise-induced asthma, but long term treatment with steroids diminishes exercise-induced asthma. The pathogenesis of exercise-induced asthma remains obscure. If the water content is low in the inhaled air, e.g. in cold air, the changes in ventilatory capacity following exercise. will be greater than when the exercise is performed while inhaling hot air with high humidity. Almost all asthmatics present changes in the ventilatory capacity following exercise. Seasonal changes in exercise-induced asthma are only present in asthmatics with seasonal allergies, e.g. pollen allergy. No diurnal variation is found in exercise-induced asthma. Asthmatics can do any form of physical exercise. Almost all asthmatics can prevent major changes in ventilatory capacity by pretreatment of exercise-induced asthma or be treated for exercise-induced asthma during the physical activity so that they will not suffer from asthma while performing physical exercise. Asthmatics who have been successfully treated for exercise-induced asthma can do

  13. Exercise training in asthma.

    PubMed

    Satta, A

    2000-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that is often limiting the exercise capacity. Rehabilitation programs are recommended and widely applied in asthmatic patients, and exercise prescription is a keystone of these programs. The impairment of exercise performance in asthmatics, the role of exercise training in such patients, the mechanisms of its beneficial effects and the suggested programs are discussed in a review, accordingly to the current evidence and available data in scientific literature. Exercise performance is impaired in most asthmatics. There is no conclusive evidence that asthma may involve a ventilatory limitation to exercise. The lesser fitness in asthmatics seems mainly due to inactivity and sedentary lifestyle. Exercise induced asthma (EIA) is a significant problem, and the best approach to minimise its effects on exercise capacity is prevention. Exercise training has been proved to have health-related benefits and to improve the quality of life. There is substantial evidence that exercise training increases exercise performance and fitness in asthmatics. It is still unclear whether physical training improves pulmonary function and bronchial responsiveness. Since asthma ranges widely, exercise prescription varies for each patient. The proper selection of the patients and the choice of exercise programs are the steps required. Accordingly with the severity of the disease, exercise strategies may range from sports activities to, when the disease is severe, inpatient hospital programs that overlap with COPD rehabilitation. Further research to clarify some aspects (effects on pulmonary function and EIA, outcomes, cost-benefit relationship) is necessary. PMID:11296996

  14. Metabolic and hormonal responses to exercise in partially hepatectomised rats.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, J M; Warren, C; Arcelin, K; Latour, M G; Désy, F; Shinoda, M; Ethier, C; Gascon-Barré, M

    1998-06-01

    To characterise how the liver affects metabolic and hormonal exercise responses, hepatectomised (70%; HX) rats were submitted to a 30- or 50-min treadmill exercise (26 m/min, 0% slope) 48 hr or 7 days after surgery (reduced or normal liver mass, respectively). To determine whether metabolic effects of liver mass reduction during exercise were caused by reduced capacity of the liver to produce glucose, metabolic and hormonal responses to the same exercise protocol were measured in 48-hr HX rats. Euglycemia, maintained by exogenous glucose infusion, produced attenuated lactate, insulin, and glucagon values in 48-hr HX rats but did not affect FFA, glycerol, and plasma catecholamine responses. Results indicate that metabolic and hormonal exercise responses are amplified in 48-hr HX rats. Maintaining euglycemia in 48-hr HX rats during exercise does not reduce all responses. Intrahepatic events, similar to those in a short-term (48-hr) HX liver, may influence metabolic and hormonal exercise responses. PMID:9615872

  15. Soybean (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Stacey, Gary

    2011-04-26

    Gary Stacey, associate director of the National Center for Soybean Biotechnology at the University of Missouri, gives a talk simply titled "Soybean" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  16. Soybean (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, Gary

    2010-03-24

    Gary Stacey, associate director of the National Center for Soybean Biotechnology at the University of Missouri, gives a talk simply titled "Soybean" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  17. Exercise for Everyone: A randomized controlled trial of Project Workout On Wheels in promoting exercise among wheelchair users

    PubMed Central

    Froehlich-Grobe, Katherine; Lee, Jaehoon; Aaronson, Lauren; Nary, Dorothy E.; Washburn, Richard A; Little, Todd D

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of two home-based behavioral interventions to promote wheelchair users exercise adoption and maintenance over 12 months. Design Randomized controlled trial, with participants stratified into groups based on disability type (stable, episodic, progressive) and support partner availability. Setting Exercise occurred in participant preferred locations (e.g., home, recreation center), with physiological data collected at the university-based exercise lab. Participants One hundred twenty-eight inactive wheelchair users (64 women) with sufficient upper arm mobility for arm-based exercise enrolled. Participants on average were 45 years old, lived with their impairment for 22 years, with spinal cord injury (46.1%) most commonly reported as causing mobility impairment. Interventions Both groups received home-based exercise interventions. The staff-supported group (n= 69) received intensive exercise support, while the self-guided group (n= 59) received minimal support. Both received exercise information, resistance bands, instructions to self-monitor exercise, regularly-scheduled phone calls, and handwritten cards. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome derived from weekly self-reported exercise. Secondary outcomes included physical fitness (aerobic/muscular) and predictors of exercise participation. Results The staff-supported group reported significantly greater exercise (~ 16 minutes/week) than the self-guided group over the year (t=10.6, p=0.00), with no significant between group difference in aerobic capacity (t=0.76, p=0.45) and strength (t=1.5, p=0.14). Conclusions Although the staff-supported group reported only moderately more exercise, the difference is potentially clinically significant as they also exercised more frequently. The staff-supported approach holds promise for encouraging exercise among wheelchair users, yet additional support may be necessary to achieve more exercise to meet national recommendations. PMID

  18. Writing Exercises from "Exercise Exchange." Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Charles R., Ed.

    Reflecting current practices in the teaching of writing, the exercises in this compilation were drawn from the journal "Exercise Exchange." The articles are arranged into six sections: sources for writing; prewriting; modes for writing; writing and reading; language, mechanics, and style; and revising, responding, and evaluating. Among the topics…

  19. Learn to love exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... can join. Choose your sweet spot. Do you love being outdoors? Choose activities that get you outside, ... Council on Exercise. 5 Tips for Learning to Love Exercise (or at Least Develop a Crush on ...

  20. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at ... fine. The key is to find the right exercise for you. It should be fun and should ...

  1. Exercise and Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Exercise and Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease that weakens ... calcium and vitamin D. Include regular weight-bearing exercise in your lifestyle. Stop smoking. Limit how much ...

  2. Learn to love exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... mix it up. For example, you might play golf on a Saturdays, take tango classes on Mondays, ... American Council on Exercise. 5 Tips for Learning to Love Exercise (or at Least Develop a Crush on It). ... ...

  3. Kids and Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family How Can Families Be ... a Fit Kid Why Exercise Is Cool Cold-Weather Sports Strength Training Weight Management: Strength Training Exercises ( ...

  4. Exercising on a budget

    MedlinePlus

    ... use proper form, go to the online exercise library at the American Council on Exercise. They also have sample workout routines you can try. Look for low-cost fitness options Many sports and activities are free ...

  5. Exercise for Seniors

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise and physical activity are good for just about everyone, including older adults. There are four main ... jogging, dancing, swimming, and biking are examples. Strength exercises make your muscles stronger. Lifting weights or using ...

  6. Why Exercise Is Wise

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... the reasons: Exercise benefits every part of the body, including the mind. Exercising causes the body to produce endorphins, chemicals ...

  7. Exercise for Seniors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and heart rate. Brisk walking or jogging, dancing, swimming, and biking are examples. Strength exercises make your muscles stronger. Lifting weights or using a resistance band can build strength. Balance exercises help prevent ...

  8. Exercise during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Patient Education FAQs Exercise During Pregnancy Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Exercise During Pregnancy FAQ119, May 2016 PDF Format ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  9. Exercise After Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Patient Education FAQs Exercise After Pregnancy Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Exercise After Pregnancy FAQ131, June 2015 PDF Format ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  10. Diet and Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types Risk Factors Prevention & Early Detection Diet And Exercise Transplant recipients need to be aware of the ... help arrange for counseling and other support services. Exercise After a Transplant Most people are weak after ...

  11. Impact of Physical Exercise on Endocrine Aging.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Joseph A M J L

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise may be vital to the maintenance of the endocrine system with aging and its helps to restore loss of activity of the endocrine system with aging. There is evidence that physical exercise induces activity of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis and so produces anabolic effects in skeletal muscles. Mechano growth factor (MGF), a locally produced isoform of IGF-1, has been hypothesized to be important for the maintenance of skeletal muscles with aging. Short-term high-resistance exercise results in an increase of MGF mRNA in young but not in elderly subjects. Reported changes in levels of circulating sex steroid hormones in men after different types of (acute and chronic) physical exercise are mixed and not consistent. In addition, physical exercise may increase local effects of sex steroid hormones, and this may be more important than levels of circulating sex steroids for the maintenance and function of skeletal muscles. In elderly women, both increased physical exercise and reduced body fat may decrease levels of circulating sex hormones. Aging is further associated with changes in the dynamic functions of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, but these changes may be attenuated/modified by aerobic training. Chronic exercise does not alter circulating cortisol levels in elderly subjects. PMID:27348867

  12. Physical exercise speeds up motor timing

    PubMed Central

    Sysoeva, Olga V.; Wittmann, Marc; Mierau, Andreas; Polikanova, Irina; Strüder, Heiko K.; Tonevitsky, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine effect of physical exercise on motor timing: personal, maximum and “once per second” tapping. The acute effect was examined by comparing the baseline tapping with that after acute exercise in 9 amateur athletes, 8 elite synchronous swimmers and 9 elite biathletes. Then the baseline tapping was compared among athletes of different sports and professional levels (15 elite biathletes, 27 elite cross-country skiers, 15 elite synchronous swimmers and 9 amateur wrestlers) with a control group (44 non-athletes) not involved in regular exercise to examine the sport-specific or long-term effects. Maximum and “once per second” tapping speed increased after acute physical exercise and were also faster in elite athletes compared to controls during the baseline condition. However, personal tapping tempo was not affected by exercise. In addition, physical exercise had no effects on the variability of the intertap interval. The accuracy of “once per second” tapping differentiates controls and amateur wrestlers from elite synchronous swimmers and skiers suggesting sport-specific adaptations to play a role. It is concluded that acute physical exercise selectively speeds up motor timing but does not affect its variability and accuracy, and this speeding-up is suggested to transfer into a long-term effect in elite athletes. PMID:24062707

  13. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  14. Resistance exercise training and the orthostatic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, J. P.; Bamman, M. M.; Yelle, J. M.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Rowe, R. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Lee, S. M.; Spector, E. R.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been suggested to increase blood volume, increase the sensitivity of the carotid baroreceptor cardiac reflex response (BARO), and decrease leg compliance, all factors that are expected to improve orthostatic tolerance. To further test these hypotheses, cardiovascular responses to standing and to pre-syncopal limited lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were measured in two groups of sedentary men before and after a 12-week period of either exercise (n = 10) or no exercise (control, n = 9). Resistance exercise training consisted of nine isotonic exercises, four sets of each, 3 days per week, stressing all major muscle groups. After exercise training, leg muscle volumes increased (P < 0.05) by 4-14%, lean body mass increased (P = 0.00) by 2.0 (0.5) kg, leg compliance and BARO were not significantly altered, and the maximal LBNP tolerated without pre-syncope was not significantly different. Supine resting heart rate was reduced (P = 0.03) without attenuating the heart rate or blood pressure responses during the stand test or LBNP. Also, blood volume (125I and 51Cr) and red cell mass were increased (P < 0.02) by 2.8% and 3.9%, respectively. These findings indicate that intense resistance exercise increases blood volume but does not consistently improve orthostatic tolerance.

  15. The immune response to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Simonson, S R

    2001-08-01

    The immune response to exercise has received increased attention in the last decade. Most of this attention has focused on aerobic exercise (AEX), whereas the effect of resistance exercise (REX) has received comparatively little notice. Resistance exercise and AEX have different physiologic impacts; perhaps this also applies to the immune system. The purpose of this review was to determine a consensus from the REX immune studies that have been completed. This is complicated by the multitude of immune parameters, the varying methods used to assess them, and the paucity of studies performed. Thus, it is difficult to make a blanket statement. There is a REX-induced leukocytosis. Resistance conditioning (RCO) does not alter this response or affect the resting immune system. From these data, it appears that neither REX nor RCO demonstrates a significant impact on peripheral immunosurveillance. PMID:11710669

  16. Exercises Abroad: How Differing National Experiences are Reflected in Emergency Response Planning and Exercises

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Marianno

    2007-04-30

    Recently a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Consequence Management Response Team took part in outreaches and an exercise in different foreign countries. In Brazil and South Korea, the outreaches revolved around a nuclear power plant exercise. In Canada, participation was limited to a table top Consequence Management exercise. This talk will briefly discuss each event and resulting pertinent observations. In each case, it became evident that governments respond to disasters very differently, and that these differences are not only culturally based, but also influenced by each government’s respective experience in dealing with natural disasters.

  17. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  18. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  19. Exercise and Your Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet presents information on the effects of physical activity on the heart and practical guidelines for starting and staying on an exercise program. The following topics are discussed: (1) the benefits of getting sufficient exercise; (2) possible risks in exercising compared to benefits; (3) when to seek doctor's advice and prevention of…

  20. Exercising in Cold Weather

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercising in Cold Weather Exercise has benefits all year, even during winter. ... activities when it’s cold outside: l Check the weather forecast. If it’s very windy or cold, exercise ...

  1. Sleep, Exercise, and Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrelson, Orvis A.; And Others

    The first part of this booklet concerns why sleep and exercise are necessary. It includes a discussion of what occurs during sleep and what dreams are. It also deals with the benefits of exercise, fatigue, posture, and the correlation between exercise and personality. The second part concerns nutrition and the importance of food. This part covers…

  2. Exercise, Aging and Longevity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stanley P.; Cundiff, David E.

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether or not a lifelong program of exercise actually has a bearing on longevity is discussed. The effects of exercise on the aging process, and the longevity-exercise relationship are reviewed. The conflicting evidence on the subject is presented. (JL)

  3. Japanese Radio Exercises. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn

    This unit focuses on Japanese radio exercises which became popular in Japan just after World War II and are still used among students and workers in companies to help raise morale and form group unity. The exercises reflect the general role of exercise in Japanese culture--to serve as a symbol of unity and cooperation among the Japanese, as well…

  4. Prenatal exercise research.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2012-06-01

    In this review of recent research on prenatal exercise, studies from several different countries suggest that only approximately 40% of pregnant women exercise, even though about 92% are encouraged by their physicians to exercise, albeit with some 69% of the women being advised to limit their exercise. A moderate exercise regime reputedly increases infant birthweight to within the normal range, but only if exercise is decreased in late pregnancy. Lower intensity exercise such as water aerobics has decreased low back pain more than land-based physical exercise. Heart rate and blood pressure have been lower following yoga than walking, and complications like pregnancy-induced hypertension with associated intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity have been less frequent following yoga. No studies could be found on tai chi with pregnant women even though balance and the risk of falling are great concerns during pregnancy, and tai chi is one of the most effective forms of exercise for balance. Potential underlying mechanisms for exercise effects are that stimulating pressure receptors during exercise increases vagal activity which, in turn, decreases cortisol, increases serotonin and decreases substance P, leading to decreased pain. Decreased cortisol is particularly important inasmuch as cortisol negatively affects immune function and is a significant predictor of prematurity. Larger, more controlled trials are needed before recommendations can be made about the type and amount of pregnancy exercise. PMID:22721740

  5. Conducting Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Tribes Educational Technical Center, Bismarck, ND.

    Written for anyone interested in what makes a meeting run smoothly (and what doesn't), the guide for conducting meetings is divided into the following sections: the chairperson (his/her responsibilities, preparing an agenda, organizing discussions); the meeting (quorums, discussions, points of order, and clarification); the motion (making the…

  6. Peer consultation reflection exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. B.; Hogg, W.; Delva, D.; Nanchoff-Glatt, M.; Moore, L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore participants' overall perception of the value of the Peer Consultation Reflection Exercise (PCRE); of barriers and facilitators to participation and learning during a PCRE; and of the transferability of the experience to participants' own settings. DESIGN: This study used the qualitative techniques of key informant interviews and a focus group. SETTING: Focus group and key informant interviews at the 1996 Annual Meeting of the College of Family Physicians of Canada's Section of Teachers. PARTICIPANTS: Family medicine teachers attending a PCRE. METHOD: Five key informant interviews and one focus group composed of five participants were conducted to explore participants' experience of participating and learning during a PCRE. MAIN FINDINGS: Participants viewed the PCRE as a valuable opportunity to interact and learn from colleagues a were especially impressed with the opportunity to listen. Confidentiality and the important role of the facilitator were identified as key components. The greatest perceived barrier was the formal structure of the PCRE. CONCLUSIONS: The PCRE is an innovative strategy for personal and professional development. It could be used in other settings. PMID:10386215

  7. Sickle Cell Trait, Exercise, and Altitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Sickle cell trait is generally benign and does not shorten life, but it may confer some small risk with extremes of exercise or altitude. Research concerning these risks is presented, and it is concluded sickle cell trait is no barrier to outstanding athletic performance. (Author/MT)

  8. An Exercise in Data Collection and Display

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawcroft, David

    2007-01-01

    It is common to find students believing that they have a high skill level in computer use yet this does not normally include proficiency in the use of computer packages for data presentation. This exercise develops team work in data collection, requires the production of a simple spreadsheet, and the exporting of the data from that into one or…

  9. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  10. Development of the discipline of exercise immunology.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Roy J

    2010-01-01

    Interest in the influence of exercise upon the human white cell population dates back more than a 100 years. Thus, when introducing the third meeting of the International Society of Exercise Immunology in Brussels, Dr. Bente Klarlund-Pedersen noted that Schulte had already described an exercise-induced leukocytosis as early as 1893. However, for much of the following century interest remained strictly clinical, with physicians assessing the possible changes in vulnerability to bacterial and viral diseases that were induced by various forms of physical activity. In the absence of specific remedies, bed rest was a common medical recommendation for infectious disease, and if the patient recovered from the immediate infection there was often a substantial residual loss of physical condition. Army hospitals in particular were thus anxious to know whether recovery would be compromised if physical activity were to be encouraged during convalescence. Prominent concerns of this era were the influence of exercise upon anterior poliomyelitis and viral hepatitis. The paralysis resulting from the anterior poliomyelitis virus was generally localized to body parts that had been active, and it seemed most likely to develop in those who continued to engage in vigorous exercise in the face of early symptoms (46, 57, 119, 120). Data on viral hepatitis also suggested a need for rest in the acute phase of the disease (1, 65, 115, 128), although most authors concluded that in this condition exercise could be resumed during convalescence, provided that the patient was no longer severely jaundiced (5, 32, 136). PMID:20839500

  11. 78 FR 64965 - Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ..., 78 FR 55753. The meeting will be held at the Virginian Suites Arlington, 1500 Arlington Blvd... Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Skeletal Muscle and Exercise Physiology...

  12. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B 531K allele carriers sustain a higher respiratory quotient after aerobic exercise, but β3-adrenoceptor 64R allele does not affect lipolysis: a human model.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gómez, Eduardo; Ríos-Martínez, Martín Efrén; Castro-Rodríguez, Elena Margarita; Del-Toro-Equíhua, Mario; Ramírez-Flores, Mario; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Pérez-Huitimea, Ana Lilia; Baltazar-Rodríguez, Luz Margarita; Velasco-Pineda, Gilberto; Muñiz-Murguía, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB (CPT1B) and adrenoceptor beta-3 (ADRB3) are critical regulators of fat metabolism. CPT1B transports free acyl groups into mitochondria for oxidation, and ADRB3 triggers lipolysis in adipocytes, and their respective polymorphisms E531K and W64R have been identified as indicators of obesity in population studies. It is therefore important to understand the effects of these mutations on ADRB3 and CPT1B function in adipose and skeletal muscle tissue, respectively. This study aimed to analyze the rate of lipolysis of plasma indicators (glycerol, free fatty acids, and beta hydroxybutyrate) and fat oxidation (through the non-protein respiratory quotient). These parameters were measured in 37 participants during 30 min of aerobic exercise at approximately 62% of maximal oxygen uptake, followed by 30 min of recovery. During recovery, mean respiratory quotient values were higher in K allele carriers than in non-carriers, indicating low post-exercise fatty acid oxidation rates. No significant differences in lipolysis or lipid oxidation were observed between R and W allele carriers of ADRB3 at any time during the aerobic load. The substitution of glutamic acid at position 531 by lysine in the CPT1B protein decreases the mitochondrial beta-oxidation pathway, which increases the non-protein respiratory quotient value during recovery from exercise. This may contribute to weight gain or reduced weight-loss following exercise. PMID:24905907

  13. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1B 531K Allele Carriers Sustain a Higher Respiratory Quotient after Aerobic Exercise, but β3-Adrenoceptor 64R Allele Does Not Affect Lipolysis: A Human Model

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Eduardo; Ríos-Martínez, Martín Efrén; Castro-Rodríguez, Elena Margarita; Del-Toro-Equíhua, Mario; Ramírez-Flores, Mario; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Pérez-Huitimea, Ana Lilia; Baltazar-Rodríguez, Luz Margarita; Velasco-Pineda, Gilberto; Muñiz-Murguía, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB (CPT1B) and adrenoceptor beta-3 (ADRB3) are critical regulators of fat metabolism. CPT1B transports free acyl groups into mitochondria for oxidation, and ADRB3 triggers lipolysis in adipocytes, and their respective polymorphisms E531K and W64R have been identified as indicators of obesity in population studies. It is therefore important to understand the effects of these mutations on ADRB3 and CPT1B function in adipose and skeletal muscle tissue, respectively. This study aimed to analyze the rate of lipolysis of plasma indicators (glycerol, free fatty acids, and beta hydroxybutyrate) and fat oxidation (through the non-protein respiratory quotient). These parameters were measured in 37 participants during 30 min of aerobic exercise at approximately 62% of maximal oxygen uptake, followed by 30 min of recovery. During recovery, mean respiratory quotient values were higher in K allele carriers than in non-carriers, indicating low post-exercise fatty acid oxidation rates. No significant differences in lipolysis or lipid oxidation were observed between R and W allele carriers of ADRB3 at any time during the aerobic load. The substitution of glutamic acid at position 531 by lysine in the CPT1B protein decreases the mitochondrial beta-oxidation pathway, which increases the non-protein respiratory quotient value during recovery from exercise. This may contribute to weight gain or reduced weight-loss following exercise. PMID:24905907

  14. Ventilation during rest and exercise in pregnancy and postpartum.

    PubMed

    Pernoll, M L; Metcalfe, J; Kovach, P A; Wachtel, R; Dunham, M J

    1975-12-01

    The expiratory minute volume (Ve), respiratory frequency (f), tidal volume (VT), carbon dioxide production (Vco2), and end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration (FETCO2) and pressure (PETCO2) were measured at monthly intervals in 12 normal women during pregnancy and two, six and 12 weeks, and six months postpartum. At eacy study, measurements were made sitting at rest and during steady-state exercise at 306 kpm/min on a bicycle ergometer. During pregnancy, a significant increase in VE occurred, both at rest and during exercise, due to a significantly greater VT. Although VCO2 was significantly increased at rest throughout pregnancy and with exercise in late pregnancy, the respiratory exchange ratio (R) was not significantly altered during pregnancy. The FETCO2 was lower during pregnancy than postpartum, both at rest and during exercise. The ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (VE/VO2) was greater at rest near term and during exercise throughout pregnancy. However, resting physiologic dead space increased during pregnancy. Alveolar ventilation (VA) was calculated on the basis of three alternative assumptions: (1) that PETCO2 during exercise accurately reflects mean alveolar PCO2; (2) that the physiological dead space does not change during exercise; and (3) that mean alveolar PCO2 does not change from rest to exercise. Exercise VA, calculated on the basis of any of these three assumptions, is greater during pregnancy than postpartum. PMID:1226465

  15. Influence of blood donation on oxygen uptake kinetics during moderate and heavy intensity cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D; Marshall, K; Connell, A; Barnes, R J

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a reduced whole body blood volume on the kinetic response of VO(2) during moderate and heavy intensity exercise. Six males and four females (age, 21+/-2 yrs; height, 175.2+/-5.1 cm; weight, 66.4+/-2.8 kg; VO(2)max, 53.0+/-4.1 ml x kg (-1) x min(-1)), completed a square-wave cycling ramp test to determine ventilatory threshold (VT) and VO(2max). Kinetics trials were completed 24 h pre and post donation of 450 cm (3) of blood. The kinetics trials were moderate intensity (80%VT) and heavy intensity (Delta50% VT - VO(2max)). Breath-by-breath gas exchange, heart rate, blood pressure, haemoglobin O(2) saturation, and blood [lactate] were measured throughout the trials. Post-donation haemoglobin, haematocrit and erythrocyte count were all significantly reduced (pexercise (p>or= 0.05), or in the amplitude of the slow component. The capacity of the cardiovascular system to meet the metabolic demands of skeletal muscle at the onset of exercise does not limit the oxygen uptake. PMID:20180178

  16. 76 FR 2131 - Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and... meets each of the criteria set forth above. This exercise of authority may be revoked as a matter of... determination made under this exercise of authority as set out above can inform but shall not control a...

  17. 77 FR 41795 - Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and... meets each of the criteria set forth above. This exercise of authority may be revoked as a matter of... determination made under this exercise of authority as set out above can inform but shall not control a...

  18. 76 FR 2130 - Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Exercise of Authority Under Section 212(d)(3)(B)(i) of the Immigration and... the particular applicant meets each of the criteria set forth above. This exercise of authority may be... subject to it. Any determination made under this exercise of authority as set out above can inform...

  19. The Cognitive Benefits of Exercise in Youth.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Alex B

    2015-01-01

    As our schools and children struggle to meet ever-changing and mandated academic standards, challenges in the time spent on physical activity continue to arise. On the other hand, however, we continue to face a global climate mired in the midst of an obesity epidemic. It is widely accepted that the health benefits of exercise are wide-ranging and powerful. It appears that cognitive function and academic achievement are additional realms beyond the physical where exercise is beneficial. The school setting presents a unique public health opportunity to enact change on a variety of levels. As sports medicine and exercise specialists, we need to support efforts that increase access to quality physical fitness across the board for all children. PMID:26166057

  20. Breaking sarcomeres by in vitro exercise

    PubMed Central

    Orfanos, Zacharias; Gödderz, Markus P. O.; Soroka, Ekaterina; Gödderz, Tobias; Rumyantseva, Anastasia; van der Ven, Peter F. M.; Hawke, Thomas J.; Fürst, Dieter O.

    2016-01-01

    Eccentric exercise leads to focal disruptions in the myofibrils, referred to as “lesions”. These structures are thought to contribute to the post-exercise muscle weakness, and to represent areas of mechanical damage and/or remodelling. Lesions have been investigated in human biopsies and animal samples after exercise. However, this approach does not examine the mechanisms behind lesion formation, or their behaviour during contraction. To circumvent this, we used electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) to simulate exercise in C2C12 myotubes, combined with live microscopy. EPS application led to the formation of sarcomeric lesions in the myotubes, resembling those seen in exercised mice, increasing in number with the time of application or stimulation intensity. Furthermore, transfection with an EGFP-tagged version of the lesion and Z-disc marker filamin-C allowed us to observe the formation of lesions using live cell imaging. Finally, using the same technique we studied the behaviour of these structures during contraction, and observed them to be passively stretching. This passive behaviour supports the hypothesis that lesions contribute to the post-exercise muscle weakness, protecting against further damage. We conclude that EPS can be reliably used as a model for the induction and study of sarcomeric lesions in myotubes in vitro. PMID:26804343

  1. Breaking sarcomeres by in vitro exercise.

    PubMed

    Orfanos, Zacharias; Gödderz, Markus P O; Soroka, Ekaterina; Gödderz, Tobias; Rumyantseva, Anastasia; van der Ven, Peter F M; Hawke, Thomas J; Fürst, Dieter O

    2016-01-01

    Eccentric exercise leads to focal disruptions in the myofibrils, referred to as "lesions". These structures are thought to contribute to the post-exercise muscle weakness, and to represent areas of mechanical damage and/or remodelling. Lesions have been investigated in human biopsies and animal samples after exercise. However, this approach does not examine the mechanisms behind lesion formation, or their behaviour during contraction. To circumvent this, we used electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) to simulate exercise in C2C12 myotubes, combined with live microscopy. EPS application led to the formation of sarcomeric lesions in the myotubes, resembling those seen in exercised mice, increasing in number with the time of application or stimulation intensity. Furthermore, transfection with an EGFP-tagged version of the lesion and Z-disc marker filamin-C allowed us to observe the formation of lesions using live cell imaging. Finally, using the same technique we studied the behaviour of these structures during contraction, and observed them to be passively stretching. This passive behaviour supports the hypothesis that lesions contribute to the post-exercise muscle weakness, protecting against further damage. We conclude that EPS can be reliably used as a model for the induction and study of sarcomeric lesions in myotubes in vitro. PMID:26804343

  2. 78 FR 49262 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... SAFETY BOARD Sunshine Act Meeting AGENCY: Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. ACTION: Notice of... Facilities Safety Board's (Board) public meeting and hearing described below. The Board invites any... does not require that the scheduled discussion be conducted in a meeting, the Board has determined...

  3. 2013 Building America Research Planning Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, C.; Hunt, S.

    2014-02-01

    The Building America Research Planning Meeting was held October 28-30, 2013, in Washington, DC. This meeting provides one opportunity each year for the research teams, national laboratories and Department of Energy (DOE) managers to meet in person to share the most pertinent information and collaboration updates. This report documents the presentations, highlights key program updates, and outlines next steps for the program.

  4. 78 FR 69411 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Sunshine Act Meeting Notice The following notice of meeting is published... HOLDING MEETING: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, DOE. DATE AND TIME: November 21, 2013, 10:00...

  5. 77 FR 16826 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency Meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy, DoE. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on March 28 and 29,...

  6. 76 FR 35869 - International Energy Agency meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY International Energy Agency meetings AGENCY: Department of Energy, DOE. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will meet on June 28, 2011, at...

  7. Exercise and immune function: effect of ageing and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, B K; Bruunsgaard, H; Jensen, M; Krzywkowski, K; Ostrowski, K

    1999-08-01

    Strenuous exercise is followed by lymphopenia, neutrophilia, impaired natural immunity, decreased lymphocyte proliferative responses to mitogens, a low level of secretory immunoglobulin A in saliva, but high circulating levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. These exercise-induced immune changes may provide the physiological basis of altered resistance to infections. The mechanisms underlying exercise-induced immune changes are multifactorial and include neuroendocrinological and metabolic mechanisms. Nutritional supplementation with glutamine abolishes the exercise-induced decline in plasma glutamine, but does not influence post-exercise immune impairment. However, carbohydrate loading diminishes most exercise effects of cytokines, lymphocyte and neutrophils. The diminished neutrophilia and elastase (EC 3.4.21.37) responses to eccentric exercise in elderly subjects were enhanced to levels comparable with those of young subjects by fish oil or vitamin E supplements. However, although vitamin C supplementation may diminish the risk of contracting an infection after strenuous exercise, it is not obvious that this effect is linked to an effect of vitamin C on exercise-induced immune changes. In conclusion, it is premature to make recommendations regarding nutritional supplementation to avoid post-exercise impairment of the immune system. PMID:10604210

  8. Effects of age on hemorheological responses to acute endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Ahmadizad, Sajad; Moradi, Akram; Nikookheslat, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Hadi; Rahbaran, Adel; Connes, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of age on the acute responses of hemorheological variables and biochemical parameters to a single bout of sub-maximal endurance exercise. Fifteen young (20-30 years), 15 middle-aged (40-50 years) and 12 old (60-70 years) male subjects participated in the study. All subjects performed one single bout of endurance exercise encompassed 30-min cycling at 70-75% of maximal heart rate which was followed by 30-min recovery. Three blood samples were taken before, immediately after exercise and after 30-min recovery. Resting levels of hematocrit, red blood cells count, plasma albumin and fibrinogen concentrations, plasma viscosity and whole blood viscosity were significantly different among the three groups (P < 0.01). Thirty minutes of cycling resulted in significant increases (P < 0.05) in all parameters; while these changes were temporary and returned to pre-exercise level at the end of recovery. Responses of all parameters to exercise and recovery were not significantly different among the three groups (P > 0.05). Fibrinogen changes during exercise and recovery were corrected for exercise- and recovery-induced changes in plasma volume. Data analysis showed effects of exercise and recovery only for raw data (P > 0.05). In addition, raw and corrected fibrinogen data in response to exercise and recovery were not age-related. Our results demonstrate that age does not affect the hemorheological responses to an acute endurance exercise in healthy men. PMID:22214687

  9. Aging, exercise, and attention.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, H L; Kramer, A F; Capaldi, D

    1992-12-01

    The authors investigated the relationship among aging, attentional processes, and exercise in 2 experiments. First they examined age differences on 2 attentional tasks, a time-sharing task and an attentional flexibility task. Young adults alternated attention between 2 sequenced tasks more rapidly and time-shared the processing of 2 tasks more efficiently than older adults. They then investigated the effects of aerobic exercise on the same 2 attentional tasks in older adults. Following the 10-week exercise program, older exercisers showed substantially more improvement in alternation speed and time-sharing efficiency than older controls. Interestingly, this exercise effect was specific to dual-task processing. Both groups of subjects showed equivalent effects on single-task performance. These results indicate that aerobic exercise can exert a beneficial influence on the efficiency of at least 2 different attentional processes in older adults. PMID:1466833

  10. Australian association for exercise and sports science position statement on exercise and asthma.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alan R; Fitch, Kenneth D

    2011-07-01

    Asthma, a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways is associated with variable obstruction to the airways and is provoked by many triggers including exercise. The management of asthma is primarily pharmacological, but exercise, despite causing bronchoconstriction in almost all asthmatics, is an important adjunct to treatment. With adequate control of the hyperresponsive airways obtained with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and inhaled beta 2 agonists (IBA), used as both a pre-exercise preventive agent and a reliever if necessary, all asthmatics should benefit from an exercise program. Some have realised this benefit with such success as to become Olympic and world champions in many sports. Exercise programs should be individually tailored, follow established guidelines and result in similar benefits to those obtained by non-asthmatics. However asthmatics must try to avoid or minimise triggers whenever possible. A specific benefit of a physical training program is that it allows asthmatics to exercise with less bronchoconstriction at the same exercise stress, although it does not abolish or reduce airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). PMID:21440499

  11. Candidate Exercise Technologies and Prescriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loerch, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews potential exercise technologies to counter the effects of space flight. It includes a overview of the exercise countermeasures project, a review of some of the candidate exercise technologies being considered and a few of the analog exercise hardware devices, and a review of new studies that are designed to optimize the current and future exercise protocols.

  12. Exercise for the Overweight Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Janis A.

    1990-01-01

    Exercise can help patients maintain lean body mass during weight loss. Although exercise is not extremely useful in shedding excess pounds, it helps keep off weight lost through calorie restriction. This article discusses the specifics of exercise prescription, types of exercise, motivation to exercise, and special problems such as diabetes. (SM)

  13. Exercise in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajarajeswaran, P.; Vishnupriya, R.

    2009-01-01

    Physical exercise has attracted increased interest in rehabilitation of oncological patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature and summarize the evidence of physical exercise in preventing cancer, its ability in attenuating the effect of cancer and its treatments and to provide guidelines for exercise prescription Review of recent literature by electronic search of MEDline (Pub Med), Cancer lit, Cochrane libraries, CINAHL were done using Keywords and the variables were identified and systematically evaluated. There is strong evidence for reduced risk of colorectal and breast cancer with possible association for prostate, endometrial and lung cancer with increasing physical activity. Exercise helps cancer survivors cope with and recover from treatment; exercise may improve the health of long term cancer survivors and extend survival. Physical exercise will benefit throughout the spectrum of cancer. However, an understanding of the amount, type and intensity of exercise needed has not been fully elucidated. There is sufficient evidence to promote exercise in cancer survivors following careful assessment and tailoring on exercise prescription. PMID:20596305

  14. Exercise and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zisser, H; Gong, P; Kelley, C M; Seidman, J S; Riddell, M C

    2011-02-01

    Diet and exercise form the foundation of a healthy lifestyle. These are especially important for people living with diabetes mellitus, as they are the most practical non-pharmacological means by which patients may significantly improve their blood glucose levels. Exercise increases insulin sensitivity (both short and long term), lowers blood sugar levels, reduces body fat and improves cardiovascular (CV) function. Because of this, exercise offers enormous benefit to patients with diabetes. Blood glucose levels can significantly drop during and after physical activities, due to the increased utilisation of glucose as a fuel during exercise and the up-regulation of glucose transport into working muscles. Therefore, patients (especially those with type 1 diabetes) must account for the effects of exercise and adjust their medications and nutrition accordingly. Improvements in real-time continuous glucose monitoring and optimisation of basal insulin dosing may offer significant benefit to preventing hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes who regularly exercise. Diverse exercise programmes and devices can also assist patients in monitoring their activities as well as motivating them to achieve their exercise goals. For patients with type 1 diabetes, questions such as how much, how long, how strenuous and what kind of exercise must be addressed in order for healthcare professionals to offer maximum benefit to their patients. Additionally, since patients with type 2 diabetes often have other significant co-morbidities such as obesity and CV disease, care providers must evaluate each patient's risk factors before designing an exercise programme. Several publications in the last year have addressed these issues and may serve as a valuable resource to provide safe and effective recommendations to patients and their healthcare providers. To be included in the Exercise and Diabetes chapter for the 2010 YEARBOOK, we reviewed leading peer-reviewed manuscripts that were

  15. US/Japan collaborative program on fusion reactor materials: Summary of the tenth DOE/JAERI Annex I technical progress meeting on neutron irradiation effects in first wall and blanket structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1989-03-17

    This meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on March 17, 1989, to review the technical progress on the collaborative DOE/JAERI program on fusion reactor materials. The purpose of the program is to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior and dimensional stability of US and Japanese austenitic stainless steels. Phase I of the program focused on the effects of high concentrations of helium on the tensile, fatigue, and swelling properties of both US and Japanese alloys. In Phase II of the program, spectral and isotropic tailoring techniques are fully utilized to reproduce the helium:dpa ratio typical of the fusion environment. The Phase II program hinges on a restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor by mid-1989. Eight target position capsules and two RB* position capsules have been assembled. The target capsule experiments will address issues relating to the performance of austenitic steels at high damage levels including an assessment of the performance of a variety of weld materials. The RB* capsules will provide a unique and important set of data on the behavior of austenitic steels irradiated under conditions which reproduce the damage rate, dose, temperature, and helium generation rate expected in the first wall and blanket structure of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

  16. Exercises to help prevent falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be active You can do the following exercises anytime and almost anywhere. As you get stronger, ... your ankles. This will increase how effective the exercise is. Try to exercise 2 or more days ...

  17. Exercises to help prevent falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000493.htm Exercises to help prevent falls To use the sharing ... and easily. Do not hold your breath. Balance exercises You can do some balance exercises during everyday ...

  18. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  19. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  20. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises designed to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor. ... Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are recommended for: Women ... Men with urinary stress incontinence after prostate surgery ...

  1. Cardiovascular control during concomitant dynamic leg exercise and static arm exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Strange, S

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle blood flow is thought to be determined by a balance between sympathetic vasoconstriction and metabolic vasodilatation. The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of high levels of sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity in control of blood flow to human skeletal muscle during dynamic exercise.Muscle sympathetic nerve activity to the exercising leg was increased by static or static ischaemic arm exercise added to on-going dynamic leg exercise. Ten subjects performed light (20 W) or moderate (40 W) dynamic knee extension for 6 min with one leg alone or concomitant with bilateral static handgrip at 20% of maximal voluntary contraction force with or without forearm muscle ischaemia or post-exercise forearm muscle ischaemia.Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was measured by microneurography (peroneal nerve) and leg muscle blood flow by a constant infusion thermodilution technique (femoral vein).Activation of an exercise pressor reflex from the arms, causing a 2- to 4-fold increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and a 15–32% increase in mean arterial blood pressure, did not affect blood flow to the dynamically exercising leg muscles at any level of leg exercise. Leg vascular conductance was reduced in line with the higher perfusion pressure.The results demonstrate that the vasoconstrictor effects of high levels of muscle sympathetic nerve activity does not affect blood flow to human skeletal muscle exercising at moderate intensities. One question remaining is whether the observed decrease in muscle vascular conductance is the result of sympathetic vasoconstriction or metabolic autoregulation of muscle blood flow. PMID:9831733

  2. Lab Exercises for Kinesiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Brett D.; And Others

    This monograph presents descriptions of various exercises and athletic activities with a kinesiological and biomechanical analysis of the muscle systems involved. It is intended as examples of laboratory activities and projects in a college course in kinesiology. A listing of the required laboratory exercises precedes the examples. Specific…

  3. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... you finish doing all 4 exercises, put an ice pack on your shoulder for 20 minutes. It's best to use a plastic bag with ice cubes in it or a bag of frozen peas, not gel packs. If you do all 4 exercises 3 to ...

  4. Exercise and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Thomas W.

    This book paints a broad picture of the role of exercise in children's health and provides information for the physician and other health care providers on healthful forms of physical activity for children. The book is divided into three parts: (1) "Developmental Exercise Physiology: The Physiological Basis of Physical Fitness in Children"; (2)…

  5. Exercise through Menopause.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuhr, Robyn M.

    2002-01-01

    Menopause is associated with many different health effects and symptoms. This paper explains that regular exercise can play a critical role in protecting health and battling the increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, pelvic floor atrophy, and joint stiffness associated with menopause. Exercise programs for menopausal women should…

  6. Literature: Released Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    This volume contains 1970-71 Literature assessment exercises (all in the public domain) which have been selected for release at this time by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Information furnished for each exercise includes: the literature objective it was designed to measure, the theme (section) in which it appears, relevant…

  7. Water Exercise Causes Ripples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszuta, Laurie Einstein

    1986-01-01

    Water exercise provides benefits independently of participants' skill levels, and reduces the likelihood of injury from overuse syndromes and heat-related problems. The advantages of water resistance exercises for athletes and for elderly, overweight, or physically disabled people are discussed. (MT)

  8. Don't neglect routine staff meetings.

    PubMed

    Board, H K

    1982-03-01

    Staff meetings are essential to good staff communication. Meetings help keep the grapevine from growing so big that it strangles the group with its rumors. By holding regular meetings with your staff, you create a consistency in your communications that helps prevent problems that you don't even suspect from cropping up. All personnel should attend the meetings. This way everyone hears news at the same time. Be consistent in your use of meetings. Meetings are more effective if you have a planned agenda and a firm time schedule. Encourage your staff to use meetings to talk out problems that affect the group. Once the meeting is over, encourage them to leave their feelings in the room. Many leaders are reluctant, for a variety of reasons, to hold meetings with their staffs. But it's like dieting and exercise; the more you do it, the easier it becomes. This type of meeting will pay rich dividends in staff personal and professional growth and in improved communication. The sense of participation that can be gained by the effective use of staff meetings can lead to high morale and effective staff performance. As you begin to see the results of a cohesive staff functioning together well, you will realize the routine staff meeting is a management tool that should not be overlooked or underused. PMID:6917733

  9. Ventilation-perfusion matching during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    In normal subjects, exercise widens the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference (P[A-a]O2) despite a more uniform topographic distribution of ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) ratios. While part of the increase in P(A-a)O2 (especially during heavy exercise) is due to diffusion limitation, a considerable amount is caused by an increase in VA/Q mismatch as detected by the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Why this occurs is unknown, but circumstantial evidence suggests it may be related to interstitial pulmonary edema rather than to factors dependent on ventilation, airway gas mixing, airway muscle tone, or pulmonary vascular tone. In patients with lung disease, the gas exchange consequences of exercise are variable. Thus, arterial PO2 may increase, remain the same, or fall. In general, patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or interstitial fibrosis who exercise show a fall in PO2. This is usually not due to worsening VA/Q relationships but mostly to the well-known fall in mixed venous PO2, which itself results from a relatively smaller increase in cardiac output than VO2. However, in interstitial fibrosis (but not COPD), there is good evidence that a part of the fall in PO2 on exercise is caused by alveolar-capillary diffusion limitation of O2 transport; in COPD (but not interstitial fibrosis), a frequent additional contributing factor to the hypoxemia of exercise is an inadequate ventilatory response, such that minute ventilation does not rise as much as does CO2 production or O2 uptake, causing arterial PCO2 to increase and PO2 to fall.

  10. Exercise and functional foods.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Wataru; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential prerequisite for effective improvement of athletic performance, conditioning, recovery from fatigue after exercise, and avoidance of injury. Nutritional supplements containing carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and minerals have been widely used in various sporting fields to provide a boost to the recommended daily allowance. In addition, several natural food components have been found to show physiological effects, and some of them are considered to be useful for promoting exercise performance or for prevention of injury. However, these foods should only be used when there is clear scientific evidence and with understanding of the physiological changes caused by exercise. This article describes various "functional foods" that have been reported to be effective for improving exercise performance or health promotion, along with the relevant physiological changes that occur during exercise. PMID:16749944

  11. Exercise and cancer recovery.

    PubMed

    Visovsky, Constance; Dvorak, Colleen

    2005-05-01

    Disease and cancer treatment-related side effects such as decreased energy level, muscle weakness, and declines in functional status and body mass have been well documented. There is evidence that exercise, such as low intensity aerobics walking, Tai Chi, or cycling, results in an overall decrease in fatigue levels over the course of cancer treatment. Additionally, there is evidence that regular physical activity or exercise can decrease emotional stress, blood pressure, the duration of neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and pain. Exercise also has been shown to increase quality of life and improve the maximal oxygen uptake during exertion, sleep patterns, and cognition. However, the majority of studies of exercise and cancer have been conducted with women with early stage breast cancer, limiting the generalizability of these studies to other cancer populations. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a synthesis of the extant research evidence about th e benefits of exercise related to cancer recovery. PMID:15977980

  12. Exercise and functional foods

    PubMed Central

    Aoi, Wataru; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential prerequisite for effective improvement of athletic performance, conditioning, recovery from fatigue after exercise, and avoidance of injury. Nutritional supplements containing carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and minerals have been widely used in various sporting fields to provide a boost to the recommended daily allowance. In addition, several natural food components have been found to show physiological effects, and some of them are considered to be useful for promoting exercise performance or for prevention of injury. However, these foods should only be used when there is clear scientific evidence and with understanding of the physiological changes caused by exercise. This article describes various "functional foods" that have been reported to be effective for improving exercise performance or health promotion, along with the relevant physiological changes that occur during exercise. PMID:16749944

  13. Leukocyte Responsiveness to Exercise in Individuals Positive for Human Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J N; Navalta, J W

    2016-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects 50% of adults in the United States. HCMV can become a cause for concern in individuals who have a compromised immune system, which may occur after high-intensity exercise. The purpose of this preliminary study was to characterize the lymphocyte, monocyte, and neutrophil responses to exercise in HCMV+individuals. Participants were either positive (HCMV +) or negative (HCMV-) for HCMV. Participants visited the laboratory on 3 separate occasions: HCMV screening, 100% VO2max test, and 80% VO2max run. Mixed-model factorial ANOVA procedures with repeated measures on sampling condition were performed on absolute and relative circulating lymphocytes, monocytes, and neutrophils. Significant main effects for time for both absolute and relative values were seen for all leukocyte subsets regardless of virus status. Significant differences for absolute and relative values were seen between sampling conditions for all leukocyte subsets. We report for the first time that HCMV status does not affect circulating neutrophil responses to high-intensity exercise, though exercise-induced neutrocytosis is seen during the post-exercise and 60 min post-exercise sampling conditions, regardless of HCMV status. There is no HCMV effect on circulating monocyte responses to exercise, though exercise-induced monocytosis was seen during the post-exercise sampling condition regardless of HCMV status. PMID:26837931

  14. Your call could not be completed as dialled: why truth does not speak to power in global health. Comment on "Knowledge, moral claims and the exercise of power in global health".

    PubMed

    Bump, Jesse B

    2015-06-01

    This article contends that legitimacy in the exercise of power comes from the consent of those subject to it. In global health, this implies that the participation of poor country citizens is required for the legitimacy of major actors and institutions. But a review of institutions and processes suggests that this participation is limited or absent. Particularly because of the complex political economy of non-communicable diseases, this participation is essential to the future advancement of global health and the legitimacy of its institutions. More analysis of power and legitimacy provides one entry point for fostering progress. PMID:26029900

  15. Hydrogen Contractors Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, Tim

    2006-05-16

    This volume highlights the scientific content of the 2006 Hydrogen Contractors Meeting sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DMS&E) on behalf of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Hydrogen Contractors Meeting held from May 16-19, 2006 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott Hotel Arlington, Virginia. This meeting is the second in a series of research theme-based Contractors Meetings sponsored by DMS&E held in conjunction with our counterparts in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the first with the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The focus of this year’s meeting is BES funded fundamental research underpinning advancement of hydrogen storage. The major goals of these research efforts are the development of a fundamental scientific base in terms of new concepts, theories and computational tools; new characterization capabilities; and new materials that could be used or mimicked in advancing capabilities for hydrogen storage.

  16. Exercise and "the pill": putting a rumor to rest.

    PubMed

    Schelkun, P H

    1991-03-01

    Every once in a while, female athletes hear the rumor that oral contraceptives (OCs) keep them from performing their best. Yet, studies that have tried to evaluate the effects of OCs on physically active women have not been conclusive. This rumor probably started with the initial, higher-dose formulations instead of with the current biphasic or triphasic OCs. Side effects of the higher-dose OCs included weight gain, nausea, fatigue, headaches, and increased risks of hypertension, thromboembolism, and changes in glucose and lipid metabolism. Current OCs minimize these side effects and the risk of complications. In fact, the aerobic exercise female athletes undergo most likely neutralizes the negative effects of OCs on coagulation and lipid metabolism. Further, OCs may even improve athletic performance because they can decrease bleeding, the risk of iron deficiency, and frequency of cramps. Moreover, athletes can use OCs to orchestrate their menstrual cycles around competitive meets. Some studies with small sample sizes show that athletes on OCs experience a slight reduction in functional aerobic capacity and endurance capability. A Swedish study of female soccer players reported that OC users suffer fewer traumatic injuries than nonusers. It is difficult to attribute this to OCs, because there is considerable psychological control over sports performance. A sports physician in Hawaii is aware of rumors that OCs induce sluggishness or fatigue during certain days of the month, but he does not know a female athlete who believes this. The head trainer of the US Olympic Committee says that many female Olympic athletes use OCs. Strenuous exercise, considerable weight loss, and possibly other stress factors induce athletic amenorrhea, especially in adolescent females. In many cases, OCs can treat it. They are especially needed to minimize the risk of reduced bone density and musculoskeletal injury. PMID:12286895

  17. Sixth annual DOE LLWMP Participants' Information Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Papers were presented at the following sessions: Improved Shallow Land Burial; Greater Confinement Disposal; Corrective Measures Technology; Characteristics and Treatment of Low-Level Waste; and Environmental Aspects and Performance Prediction. Three workshops were held: Predicting Source Terms for Low-Level Waste; Performance Assessment for Low-Level Disposal Facilities; and Approaches to Low-Level Disposal Facility Siting and Characterization.

  18. Impaired sympathetic vascular regulation in humans after acute dynamic exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Halliwill, J R; Taylor, J A; Eckberg, D L

    1996-01-01

    1. The reduction in vascular resistance which accompanies acute dynamic exercise does not subside immediately during recovery, resulting in a post-exercise hypotension. This sustained vasodilatation suggests that sympathetic vascular regulation is altered after exercise. 2. Therefore, we assessed the baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow in response to arterial pressure changes, and transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance during a sympatho-excitatory stimulus (isometric handgrip exercise) after either exercise (60 min cycling at 60% peak aerobic power (VO2,peak)) or sham treatment (60 min seated rest) in nine healthy subjects. 3. Both muscle sympathetic nerve activity and calf vascular resistance were reduced after exercise (-29.7 +/- 8.8 and -25.3 +/- 9.1%, both P < 0.05). The baroreflex relation between diastolic pressure and sympathetic outflow was shifted downward after exercise (post-exercise intercept, 218 +/- 38 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1; post-sham intercept, 318 +/- 51 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1, P < 0.05), indicating less sympathetic outflow across all diastolic pressures. Further, the relation between sympathetic activity and vascular resistance was attenuated after exercise (post-exercise slope, 0.0031 +/- 0.0007 units (total integrated activity)-1 min; post-sham slope, 0.0100 +/- 0.0033 units (total integrated activity)-1 min, P < 0.05), indicating less vasoconstriction with any increase in sympathetic activity. 4. Thus, both baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow and the transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance are altered after dynamic exercise. We conclude that the vasodilation which underlies post-exercise hypotension results from both neural and vascular phenomena. Images Figure 7 PMID:8866370

  19. Impaired sympathetic vascular regulation in humans after acute dynamic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwill, J. R.; Taylor, J. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    1. The reduction in vascular resistance which accompanies acute dynamic exercise does not subside immediately during recovery, resulting in a post-exercise hypotension. This sustained vasodilatation suggests that sympathetic vascular regulation is altered after exercise. 2. Therefore, we assessed the baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow in response to arterial pressure changes, and transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance during a sympatho-excitatory stimulus (isometric handgrip exercise) after either exercise (60 min cycling at 60% peak aerobic power (VO2,peak)) or sham treatment (60 min seated rest) in nine healthy subjects. 3. Both muscle sympathetic nerve activity and calf vascular resistance were reduced after exercise (-29.7 +/- 8.8 and -25.3 +/- 9.1%, both P < 0.05). The baroreflex relation between diastolic pressure and sympathetic outflow was shifted downward after exercise (post-exercise intercept, 218 +/- 38 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1; post-sham intercept, 318 +/- 51 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1, P < 0.05), indicating less sympathetic outflow across all diastolic pressures. Further, the relation between sympathetic activity and vascular resistance was attenuated after exercise (post-exercise slope, 0.0031 +/- 0.0007 units (total integrated activity)-1 min; post-sham slope, 0.0100 +/- 0.0033 units (total integrated activity)-1 min, P < 0.05), indicating less vasoconstriction with any increase in sympathetic activity. 4. Thus, both baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow and the transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance are altered after dynamic exercise. We conclude that the vasodilation which underlies post-exercise hypotension results from both neural and vascular phenomena.

  20. 12 CFR 150.70 - Must I obtain OCC approval or file a notice before I exercise fiduciary powers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... before I exercise fiduciary powers? 150.70 Section 150.70 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY....70 Must I obtain OCC approval or file a notice before I exercise fiduciary powers? You should refer... before you exercise fiduciary powers. This chart does not apply to activities that are exempt...

  1. 12 CFR 150.70 - Must I obtain OCC approval or file a notice before I exercise fiduciary powers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... before I exercise fiduciary powers? 150.70 Section 150.70 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY....70 Must I obtain OCC approval or file a notice before I exercise fiduciary powers? You should refer... before you exercise fiduciary powers. This chart does not apply to activities that are exempt...

  2. 12 CFR 150.70 - Must I obtain OCC approval or file a notice before I exercise fiduciary powers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... before I exercise fiduciary powers? 150.70 Section 150.70 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY....70 Must I obtain OCC approval or file a notice before I exercise fiduciary powers? You should refer... before you exercise fiduciary powers. This chart does not apply to activities that are exempt...

  3. 76 FR 9780 - Consumer Advisory Council; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Consumer Advisory Council; Notice of Meeting The Consumer Advisory Council will meet on Thursday, March 10... the Board on the exercise of the Board's responsibilities under various consumer financial services... new Regulation II, which would establish debit card interchange fee standards and prohibit...

  4. 77 FR 10542 - Revision of the National Preparedness for Response Exercise Program (PREP) Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public meeting: After considering public comments and developing a revised... SECURITY Coast Guard Revision of the National Preparedness for Response Exercise Program (PREP) Guidelines... Response Exercise Program (PREP) is designed to facilitate the periodic testing of oil spill response...

  5. The Human Scavenger Hunt: A Unique Classroom Ice-Breaker Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Peter V.; Weinswig, S. Edward

    This paper describes a classroom exercise used on the first day of class to help students meet each other and to help make them feel comfortable in the class. It also helps improve students' memory and interpersonal skills such as active listening, communication and trust. Originally designed for use by college students, the exercise can easily be…

  6. ARGX-87: Accident Response Group Exercise, 1987: A Broken Arrow mini exercise. [Training

    SciTech Connect

    Schuld, E.P.; Cruff, D.F.

    1987-07-01

    A Broken Arrow mini exercise dubbed ''Accident Response Group Exercise - 1987'' (ARGX-87) was conducted on June 1, 1987 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNLL). The exercise started at 0445 PDT with a call from the Department of Energy (DOE) - EOC in Washington, DC, to the Albuquerque Operations (AL - ) - EOC. AL, in turn, called the Laboratory off-hour emergency number (Fire Dispatcher), who called the Laboratory Emergency Duty Officer (LEDO). The LEDO then contacted the Accident Response Group (ARG) Senior Scientific Advisor. Calls were placed to assemble appropriate members of the ARG in the ALERT Center. No phone number for SNLL was available at the Albuquerque Operations EOC, so a controller injected a message to SNLL to get them involved in the exercise. The messages received at the Laboratory identified the Air Force line item weapon system involved in the accident and the accident location. As people arrived at the ALERT Center they began discussing the details of the accident. They also started working the deployment logistics and other issues. Travel arrangements for the HOT SPOT equipment and ARG personnel were made for immediate deployment to the accident site in North Dakota. The exercise was terminated at 0840 as planned. While certain procedural deficiencies were noted, the exercise was considered a valuable learning experience. The results and observations from this experience will be used to refine the operating procedures and the training program.

  7. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise. PMID:26927864

  8. 29 CFR 1612.3 - Open meeting policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Open meeting policy. 1612.3 Section 1612.3 Labor... ACT REGULATIONS § 1612.3 Open meeting policy. (a) All meetings of the Commission shall be conducted in... every meeting shall be open to public observation. Public observation does not include participation...

  9. 29 CFR 1612.3 - Open meeting policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Open meeting policy. 1612.3 Section 1612.3 Labor... ACT REGULATIONS § 1612.3 Open meeting policy. (a) All meetings of the Commission shall be conducted in... every meeting shall be open to public observation. Public observation does not include participation...

  10. Diabetes, Nutrition, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with body composition changes that lead to glucose intolerance and increased risk of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases with aging, and the prevalence has increased because of the increased life expectancy of the population. Lifestyle modifications through nutrition and exercise in combination with medications are the main components of diabetes management. The potential benefits of nutrition and exercise intervention in older people with diabetes are enormous. Nutrition and exercise training are feasible even in frail older people living in care homes and should take into consideration individual circumstances, cultural factors, and ethnic preferences. PMID:26195102

  11. Aquatic Exercise for the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Michael; And Others

    The development and implementation of aquatic exercise programs for the aged are discussed in this paper. Program development includes a discussion of training principles, exercise leadership and the setting up of safe water exercise programs for the participants. The advantages of developing water exercise programs and not swimming programs are…

  12. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus. PMID:23899752

  13. DOE JGI Welcome Remarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, Jim

    2010-06-03

    Jim Bristow, Deputy Director of Programs at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, discusses the impact of advances in sequencing technologies on large genome centers on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  14. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities, including your shoulder joint and your shoulder blade Observe your spine and posture as you stand ... band Isometric shoulder exercises Wall push-ups Shoulder blade (scapular) retraction - no tubing Shoulder blade (scapular) retraction - ...

  15. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Going to the gym every other day Playing golf regularly Exercise can help you feel better about ... important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , ...

  16. Getting Exercise in College

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... hours of studying burn mental energy, both your body and mind need physical exercise to function at their peak. ...

  17. Hand and Finger Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Hand and Finger Exercises  Place your palm flat on a table. Raise and lower your fingers one ... times for ____ seconds.  Pick up objects with your hand. Start out with larger objects. Repeat ____ times for ____ ...

  18. Exercise stress test

    MedlinePlus

    ... on a treadmill or pedal on an exercise bicycle. Slowly (about every 3 minutes), you will be ... walking on a treadmill or pedaling a stationary bicycle. The pace and incline of the treadmill (or ...

  19. Exercises in Applied Geochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackleton, W. G.

    1977-01-01

    Reviews exercises in the analysis of samples and interpretations of results from the geochemical survey portion of a three year teacher education program in geology presented at Salisbury College of Advanced Education. (SL)

  20. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers Strengthen your bones and muscles Improve your mental health and mood Improve your ability to do daily activities and prevent falls, if you're an older adult Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise ...

  1. Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of EIB. Avoid exercising in extremely cold temperatures or when you have a respiratory infection, such ... by T Sinha, MD; AK David, MD (American Family Physician February 15, 2003, http://www.aafp.org/ ...

  2. Intense exercise training and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Williams, Clyde

    2013-01-01

    Regular moderate exercise reduces the risk of infection compared with a sedentary lifestyle, but very prolonged bouts of exercise and periods of intensified training are associated with increased infection risk. In athletes, a common observation is that symptoms of respiratory infection cluster around competitions, and even minor illnesses such as colds can impair exercise performance. There are several behavioral, nutritional and training strategies that can be adopted to limit exercise-induced immunodepression and minimize the risk of infection. Athletes and support staff can avoid transmitting infections by avoiding close contact with those showing symptoms of infection, by practicing good hand, oral and food hygiene and by avoiding sharing drinks bottles and cutlery. Medical staff should consider appropriate immunization for their athletes particularly when travelling to international competitions. The impact of intensive training stress on immune function can be minimized by getting adequate sleep, minimizing psychological stress, avoiding periods of dietary energy restriction, consuming a well-balanced diet that meets energy and protein needs, avoiding deficiencies of micronutrients (particularly iron, zinc, and vitamins A, D, E, B6 and B12), ingesting carbohydrate during prolonged training sessions, and consuming - on a daily basis - plant polyphenol containing supplements or foodstuffs and Lactobacillus probiotics. PMID:23899753

  3. FEMA Asteroid Impact Tabletop Exercise Simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boslough, Mark; Jennings, Barbara; Carvey, Brad; Fogleman, William

    2015-05-19

    We describe the computational simulations and damage assessments that we provided in support of a tabletop exercise (TTX) at the request of NASA's Near-Earth Objects Program Office. The overall purpose of the exercise was to assess leadership reactions, information requirements, and emergency management responses to a hypothetical asteroid impact with Earth. The scripted exercise consisted of discovery, tracking, and characterization of a hypothetical asteroid; inclusive of mission planning, mitigation, response, impact to population, infrastructure and GDP, and explicit quantification of uncertainty. Participants at the meeting included representatives of NASA, Department of Defense, Department of State, Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergencymore » Management Agency (FEMA), and the White House. The exercise took place at FEMA headquarters. Sandia's role was to assist the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in developing the impact scenario, to predict the physical effects of the impact, and to forecast the infrastructure and economic losses. We ran simulations using Sandia's CTH hydrocode to estimate physical effects on the ground, and to produce contour maps indicating damage assessments that could be used as input for the infrastructure and economic models. We used the FASTMap tool to provide estimates of infrastructure damage over the affected area, and the REAcct tool to estimate the potential economic severity expressed as changes to GDP (by nation, region, or sector) due to damage and short-term business interruptions.« less

  4. FEMA Asteroid Impact Tabletop Exercise Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, Mark; Jennings, Barbara; Carvey, Brad; Fogleman, William

    2015-05-19

    We describe the computational simulations and damage assessments that we provided in support of a tabletop exercise (TTX) at the request of NASA's Near-Earth Objects Program Office. The overall purpose of the exercise was to assess leadership reactions, information requirements, and emergency management responses to a hypothetical asteroid impact with Earth. The scripted exercise consisted of discovery, tracking, and characterization of a hypothetical asteroid; inclusive of mission planning, mitigation, response, impact to population, infrastructure and GDP, and explicit quantification of uncertainty. Participants at the meeting included representatives of NASA, Department of Defense, Department of State, Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the White House. The exercise took place at FEMA headquarters. Sandia's role was to assist the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in developing the impact scenario, to predict the physical effects of the impact, and to forecast the infrastructure and economic losses. We ran simulations using Sandia's CTH hydrocode to estimate physical effects on the ground, and to produce contour maps indicating damage assessments that could be used as input for the infrastructure and economic models. We used the FASTMap tool to provide estimates of infrastructure damage over the affected area, and the REAcct tool to estimate the potential economic severity expressed as changes to GDP (by nation, region, or sector) due to damage and short-term business interruptions.

  5. Hard-surface contamination detection exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Kawa, S.

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of this thesis is to create a practical exercise which demonstrates the techniques used by Health Physicists to detect surface contamination, including both instrumentation and smear survey techniques. By understanding the basic principles of the most commonly found instruments the intent is that a new Health Physics graduate can correctly choose, and apply an instrument to their detection situation. The exercise is also intended to acquaint students with the very basic principles of smear techniques. Smear surveys are probably the most universally applied technique in this industry, however, very little literature exists on the subject. The techniques are usually taught, on-the-job and by demonstration. By their seeing and participating in this presentation, it is intended that Health Physics students can accelerate their first few weeks at their new careers, and enable them to recognize common mistakes. Health Physicists are expected to have knowledge of the basic practices of their profession. This exercise will allow Health Physics students to become familiar with the use of hand-held detection devices and the technique of smear surveys. Adequate measurement and recording of surface contamination information is necessary to: meet licensing requirements; protect the health and safety of the workers; maintain accurate records in the case of litigation or dose reconstruction; and maintain high levels of professional competency. This exercise will assist students in obtaining the skills necessary to adequately measure and record levels of surface contamination. 41 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. A disaster relief exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliotti, Fulvia; Novaro Mascarello, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) is an effective tool for military applications, both for properly military operations, such as research missions and road surveillance, and for civilian support after natural disasters, like landslides, floods, and earthquakes, when reaching victims is often hard or it would take too much time for their survival. Information are needed without hazarding the life of the military troops. When roads, bridges and other communication ways are usually not available, the unmanned platform is the only easy and fast way to contact people. It can be launched directly from the operation site and it could take crucial information or carry medication, necessaries and everything that could help rescue teams. The unmanned platform can also be used for the first aid in an emergency situation when the use of a helicopter is too dangerous and other troops could be involved in heavy fighting. The RPAS has some advantages. First is the reduced cost, compared to traditional aircraft, that could enable the user to have several operating units. Secondly, pilots are not on board and therefore, if needed, the crew' rotation and rest do not imply the need to stop operations. The third fact is that, depending on the type of delivery that is used, the operations may take place on a twenty-four hours' base. The main benefit achieved with these three facts is that continuous operation may take place and eventually make up the capacity difference. To sum up, the main motivation behind this employment of UAS is to replace human lives on the cockpits and to assure the execution of Dangerous, Dull and Dirty missions. In May 2015, the ERIDANO Exercise was performed in Moncalieri city, near Turin (Italy) and it was a joint exercise between the Italian Army, National Emergency Service and Politecnico of Turin. The aim was the control and management of emergency situations due to natural disasters. In particular, a flood was simulated. A multicopter was used

  7. Troponin and exercise.

    PubMed

    Gresslien, T; Agewall, S

    2016-10-15

    Cardiac troponins are the preferred biomarkers in diagnostic of myocardial infarction, but these markers also can rise in response to exercise. Multiple studies have assessed troponins post-exercise, but the results have varied and there have been disagreements about the mechanism of troponin release. The aim of this paper was to review the literature, and to consider factors and mechanisms regarding exercise-induced increase of troponin. 145 studies were found after a search in pubmed and inclusion of additional articles found in the reference list of the first articles. Results showed that troponin rises in 0-100% of subjects after prolonged heavy exercise like marathon, but also after short-term and intermittent exercise like 30min of running and basketball. The variation can be due to factors like intensity, age, training experience, variation in sample size, blood sample timing and troponin assay. The pattern of troponin level post-exercise corresponds to release from the cytosolic compartment of cardiomyocytes. Increased membrane permeability might be caused by production of reactive oxygen species or alterations in calcium, pH, glucose/fat metabolism or in communication between integrins. Other suggested mechanisms are increased cardiovascular stress, inflammation, vasculitis, release of troponin degradation products in "blebs", dehydration, impaired renal clearance and expression of cardiac troponin in skeletal muscle. It can be concluded that both heavy and light exercise may cause elevated troponin, which have to be considered when patient are suspected to have a myocardial infarction. Several factors probably influence post-exercise levels of troponin, but the mechanism of release is most likely physiologic. PMID:27420587

  8. Parkinson disease and exercise.

    PubMed

    Earhart, Gammon M; Falvo, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative movement disorder. PD was originally attributed to neuronal loss within the substantia nigra pars compacta, and a concomitant loss of dopamine. PD is now thought to be a multisystem disorder that involves not only the dopaminergic system, but other neurotransmitter systems whose role may become more prominent as the disease progresses (189). PD is characterized by four cardinal symptoms, resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability, all of which are motor. However, PD also may include any combination of a myriad of nonmotor symptoms (195). Both motor and nonmotor symptoms may impact the ability of those with PD to participate in exercise and/or impact the effects of that exercise on those with PD. This article provides a comprehensive overview of PD, its symptoms and progression, and current treatments for PD. Among these treatments, exercise is currently at the forefront. People with PD retain the ability to participate in many forms of exercise and generally respond to exercise interventions similarly to age-matched subjects without PD. As such, exercise is currently an area receiving substantial research attention as investigators seek interventions that may modify the progression of the disease, perhaps through neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:23720332

  9. [Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Terms exercise-induced asthma (EIA) or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are used to describe transient bronchoconstriction occurring during or immediately after vigorous exercise in some subjects. For the diagnosis of EIB it is necessary to show at least 10% decrease in FEV1 from baseline following physical exercise. The prevalence of EIB has been reported to be 12-15% in general population, 10-20% in summer olympic athletes, affecting up to 50-70% of winter athletes (particularly ski runners and skaters). There are two key theories explaining EIB: thermal and osmotic. Differential diagnosis of EIB should include chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases, vocal cord dysfunction, hyperventilation syndrome and poor physical fitness or overtraining. According to the ATS guidelines from 1999 for the diagnosis of EIB a standardized exercise on a treadmill or cycle ergometer test with stable environmental conditions regarding temperature and humidity of inhaled air, should be employed. Other laboratory tests assessing bronchial hyperresponsiveness to indirect stimuli including eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH), mannitol, hypertonic saline, AMP or measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) are also successfully used. In the prevention of EIB include both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment. In patients with poorly controlled asthma intensification of anti-inflammatory treatment can decrease the frequency and severity of EIB. Short and long acting beta2-agonists, antileukotriene drugs can be used prior to exercise to prevent EIB. PMID:21190152

  10. 33 CFR 155.4052 - Drills and exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Guidelines”. Compliance with an alternate program that meets the requirements of 33 CFR 155.1060(a) and 155.5061, and has been approved under 33 CFR 155.1065 and 155.5065 will also satisfy the vessel response... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drills and exercises....

  11. Meeting Demand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneman, Kathy

    1998-01-01

    Addresses how a school district can use temporary classroom space to meet increasing student enrollment while additional space is being built. Provides examples of using portable facilities to supplement educational sites, including how to protect students who are in portable classrooms when tornadoes appear. (GR)

  12. Exercise awareness and barriers after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is an essential element in managing several of the non-communicable diseases after spinal cord injury (SCI). Awareness of the importance of prescribing a customized exercise program that meets the goals of persons with SCI should be highly considered in the rehabilitation community. The barriers of implementing specific exercise program as well as the factors that may mask the outcomes of regular exercise regimen need to be continuously addressed as a part of patients’ rehabilitation care. The focus of this editorial is to encourage the medical community to consider routine physical activity as one of the necessary vital signs that needs to be routinely checked in patients with SCI. Providing education tips, nutritional counseling and engaging in recreational programs may provide motivational route to the community of SCI. This may result in reinforcing active lifestyle in survivors with SCI as well as to reduce the impact of chronic life threatening medical disorders. PMID:25035817

  13. Exercise awareness and barriers after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gorgey, Ashraf S

    2014-07-18

    Exercise is an essential element in managing several of the non-communicable diseases after spinal cord injury (SCI). Awareness of the importance of prescribing a customized exercise program that meets the goals of persons with SCI should be highly considered in the rehabilitation community. The barriers of implementing specific exercise program as well as the factors that may mask the outcomes of regular exercise regimen need to be continuously addressed as a part of patients' rehabilitation care. The focus of this editorial is to encourage the medical community to consider routine physical activity as one of the necessary vital signs that needs to be routinely checked in patients with SCI. Providing education tips, nutritional counseling and engaging in recreational programs may provide motivational route to the community of SCI. This may result in reinforcing active lifestyle in survivors with SCI as well as to reduce the impact of chronic life threatening medical disorders. PMID:25035817

  14. [Cardiac reserve in Parkinson's disease and exercise therapy].

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Masaaki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sobue, Gen

    2013-01-01

    The clinical feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not based on the identification of the extrapyramidal symptom such as bradykinesia, restinbg tremor, rigidity, but also other non-motor symptom (REM sleep disorder, autonomic dysfunction, hyposmia etc). According to the cardio-sympathetic dysfunction, it is well known abnormal MIBG and orthostatic hypotension finding was seen in early disease stage. Furthermore denervation supersensitivity using β1 stimulant correlates the severity of MIBG image, so that this abnormal cardiac function induces inadequate cardiac capacity for exercise. Inadequate cardiac capacity makes easy fatigability, which correlates the abnormal MIBG image and cardio-sympathetic damage. So it is difficult to prescribe a specific exercise program to meet individual PD patients needs. Music therapy and trunk exercise (for example Tai-Chi exercise) are better suited for PD patients. PMID:24291996

  15. Creating an acute energy deficit without stimulating compensatory increases in appetite: is there an optimal exercise protocol?

    PubMed

    Deighton, Kevin; Stensel, David J

    2014-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed significant interest from both the scientific community and the media regarding the influence of exercise on subsequent appetite and energy intake responses. This review demonstrates a consensus among the majority of scientific investigations that an acute bout of land-based endurance exercise does not stimulate any compensatory increases in appetite and energy intake on the day of exercise. Alternatively, preliminary evidence suggests that low volume, supramaximal exercise may stimulate an increase in appetite perceptions during the subsequent hours. In accordance with the apparent insensitivity of energy intake to exercise in the short term, the daily energy balance response to exercise appears to be primarily determined by the energy cost of exercise. This finding supports the conclusions of recent training studies that the energy expenditure of exercise is the strongest predictor of fat loss during an exercise programme. PMID:24717417

  16. Electromyographic and haemodynamic activities in lumbar muscles during bicycle ergometer exercise and walking.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Hirata, J; Ohtsuki, K; Watanabe, S

    2010-01-01

    value than that of the other exercises. The Deoxy-Hb, on the other hand, declined significantly in every exercise compared with those before the exercises, with no significant differences in the change rates between each of the exercises. Bicycle ergometer exercise has been suggested as an aerobic exercise permitting as much oxygen uptake as walking does, with fewer loads on lumbar muscles and less likelihood of inducing a hypoxic state on lumbar muscles. PMID:20718331

  17. Expert Meeting Report: Foundations Research Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ojczyk, C.; Huelman, P.; Carmody, J.

    2013-05-01

    In the Expert Meeting Plan, the NorthernSTAR Team proposed to host two Expert Meetings in calendar year 2011. Invitees to the meetings would include experts in the current field of study, other BA team members, and representatives from DOE and NREL. They will invite leading industry experts to present at these meetings. The Expert Meetings will focus on key systems areas that will be required to meet the Building America performance goals and shall be sufficiently narrow in scope that specific conclusions, action items, and delegation of future tasks can be identified and completed. The two expert meeting topics are 'Foundations' and 'Window Retrofit.' The first session is designed as a webinar only and the second will be a live meeting.

  18. Practical Approaches to Prescribing Physical Activity and Monitoring Exercise Intensity.

    PubMed

    Reed, Jennifer L; Pipe, Andrew L

    2016-04-01

    Regular physical activity helps to prevent heart disease, and reduces the risk of first or subsequent cardiovascular events. It is recommended that Canadian adults accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise per week, in bouts of 10 minutes or more, and perform muscle- and bone-strengthening activities at least 2 days per week. Individual exercise prescriptions can be developed using the frequency, intensity, time, and type principles. Increasing evidence suggests that high-intensity interval training is efficacious for a broad spectrum of heart health outcomes. Several practical approaches to prescribing and monitoring exercise intensity exist including: heart rate monitoring, the Borg rating of perceived exertion scale, the Talk Test, and, motion sensors. The Borg rating of perceived exertion scale matches a numerical value to an individual's perception of effort, and can also be used to estimate heart rate. The Talk Test, the level at which simple conversation is possible, can be used to monitor desired levels of moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise. Motion sensors can provide users with practical and useful exercise training information to aid in meeting current exercise recommendations. These approaches can be used by the public, exercise scientists, and clinicians to easily and effectively guide physical activity in a variety of settings. PMID:26897182

  19. Left ventricular systolic response to exercise in patients with systemic hypertension without left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Christian, T F; Zinsmeister, A R; Miller, T D; Clements, I P; Gibbons, R J

    1990-05-15

    Supine exercise radionuclide angiography was performed in 367 men to assess left ventricular (LV) systolic response to exercise; 58 had systemic hypertension without LV hypertrophy on a resting electrocardiogram and 309 were normotensive. All patients met the following criteria defining a low pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease: age less than 50 years; normal electrocardiographic response to exercise; absence of typical or atypical chest pain; and exercise heart rate greater than 120 beats/min. Patients taking beta-receptor blockers were excluded. There were no significant differences between hypertensive and normotensive groups in peak exercise heart rate, workload or exercise duration. However, hypertensive patients had significantly higher peak exercise systolic blood pressures and peak exercise rate-pressure products. There were no differences between patients with and without hypertension in resting ejection fraction, peak exercise ejection fraction (hypertensive patients 0.71 +/- 0.01, normotensive patients 0.70 +/- 0.05) or change in ejection fraction at peak exercise (hypertensive patients 0.07 +/- 0.01, normotensive patients 0.07 +/- 0.04). Diastolic and systolic ventricular volumes tended to be smaller in the hypertensive patients, but the difference was not statistically significant. The change in systolic volume with exercise was similar in the 2 groups (hypertensive -10 +/- 3 ml/m2, normotensive -10 +/- 1 ml/m2). In the absence of electrocardiographic evidence of LV hypertrophy, systemic hypertension does not influence LV systolic response to exercise. PMID:2140008

  20. Fish under exercise.

    PubMed

    Palstra, Arjan P; Planas, Josep V

    2011-06-01

    Improved knowledge on the swimming physiology of fish and its application to fisheries science and aquaculture (i.e., farming a fitter fish) is currently needed in the face of global environmental changes, high fishing pressures, increased aquaculture production as well as increased concern on fish well-being. Here, we review existing data on teleost fish that indicate that sustained exercise at optimal speeds enhances muscle growth and has consequences for flesh quality. Potential added benefits of sustained exercise may be delay of ovarian development and stimulation of immune status. Exercise could represent a natural, noninvasive, and economical approach to improve growth, flesh quality as well as welfare of aquacultured fish: a FitFish for a healthy consumer. All these issues are important for setting directions for policy decisions and future studies in this area. For this purpose, the FitFish workshop on the Swimming Physiology of Fish ( http://www.ub.edu/fitfish2010 ) was organized to bring together a multidisciplinary group of scientists using exercise models, industrial partners, and policy makers. Sixteen international experts from Europe, North America, and Japan were invited to present their work and view on migration of fishes in their natural environment, beneficial effects of exercise, and applications for sustainable aquaculture. Eighty-eight participants from 19 different countries contributed through a poster session and round table discussion. Eight papers from invited speakers at the workshop have been contributed to this special issue on The Swimming Physiology of Fish. PMID:21611721

  1. Mitohormesis in exercise training.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Ristow, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Hormesis is a process whereby exposure to a low dose of a potentially harmful stressor promotes adaptive changes to the cell that enables it to better tolerate subsequent stress. In recent years this concept has been applied specifically to the mitochondria (mitohormesis), suggesting that in response to a perturbation the mitochondria can initiate and transduce a signal to the nucleus that coordinates a transcriptional response resulting in both mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial adaptations that return and maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review we summarize the evidence that mitohormesis is a significant adaptive-response signaling pathway, and suggest that it plays a role in mediating exercise-induced adaptations. We discuss potential mitochondrial emitters of retrograde signals that may activate known exercise-sensitive transcription factors to modulate transcription responses to exercise, and draw on evidence from mitochondrial dysfunction animal models to support a role for mitohormesis in mitochondrial biogenesis. Studies directly linking mitohormesis to the exercise training response are lacking, however mounting evidence suggests numerous signals are emitted from the mitochondria during exercise and have the potential to induce a nuclear transcription response, with reactive oxygen species (ROS) being the primary candidate. PMID:26654757

  2. Exercise and Sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Phu, Steven; Boersma, Derek; Duque, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a major component of the frailty syndrome and is also a strong predictor of disability, morbidity, and mortality in older persons. Without any available pharmacological intervention to sarcopenia, non-pharmacological interventions are the only option to prevent these poor outcomes in sarcopenic patients. Among those interventions, physical activity with or without protein supplementation has demonstrated to be effective in improving muscle mass and function and in preventing disability and frailty in older persons. Additionally, to the beneficial effect of physical activity on metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, a regular exercise program (3 times/wk) that includes resistance and endurance exercise training would have a major positive effect on sarcopenic muscle through improving muscle mass, strength, and function. In this review, we looked at the effect of exercise on sarcopenic frail older persons from the biological aspects of the response of the muscle to exercise to some practical aspects of exercise prescription in this high-risk population. We conclude that, although challenging, older persons should be encouraged to participate in this type of programs, which would improve not only their function and independence but also their quality of life. PMID:26071171

  3. Exercise and longevity.

    PubMed

    Gremeaux, Vincent; Gayda, Mathieu; Lepers, Romuald; Sosner, Philippe; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2012-12-01

    Aging is a natural and complex physiological process influenced by many factors, some of which are modifiable. As the number of older individuals continues to increase, it is important to develop interventions that can be easily implemented and contribute to "successful aging". In addition to a healthy diet and psychosocial well-being, the benefits of regular exercise on mortality, and the prevention and control of chronic disease affecting both life expectancy and quality of life are well established. We summarize the benefits of regular exercise on longevity, present the current knowledge regarding potential mechanisms, and outline the main recommendations. Exercise can partially reverse the effects of the aging process on physiological functions and preserve functional reserve in the elderly. Numerous studies have shown that maintaining a minimum quantity and quality of exercise decreases the risk of death, prevents the development of certain cancers, lowers the risk of osteoporosis and increases longevity. Training programs should include exercises aimed at improving cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle function, as well as flexibility and balance. Though the benefits of physical activity appear to be directly linked to the notion of training volume and intensity, further research is required in the elderly, in order to develop more precise recommendations, bearing in mind that the main aim is to foster long-term adherence to physical activity in this growing population. PMID:23063021

  4. Epilepsy and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, José; Tojal, Raquel; Morgado, Joana

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurologic diseases and has always been associated with stigma. In the interest of safety, the activities of persons with epilepsy (PWE) are often restricted. In keeping with this, physical exercise has often been discouraged. The precise nature of a person's seizures (or whether seizures were provoked or unprovoked) may not have been considered. Although there has been a change in attitude over the last few decades, the exact role of exercise in inducing seizures or aggravating epilepsy still remains a matter of discussion among experts in the field. Based mainly on retrospective, but also on prospective, population and animal-based research, the hypothesis that physical exercise is prejudicial has been slowly replaced by the realization that physical exercise might actually be beneficial for PWE. The benefits are related to improvement of physical and mental health parameters and social integration and reduction in markers of stress, epileptiform activity and the number of seizures. Nowadays, the general consensus is that there should be no restrictions to the practice of physical exercise in people with controlled epilepsy, except for scuba diving, skydiving and other sports at heights. Whilst broader restrictions apply for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, individual risk assessments taking into account the seizure types, frequency, patterns or triggers may allow PWE to enjoy a wide range of physical activities. PMID:25458104

  5. A Meeting Perspective and Advances in Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Chain, Patrick

    2010-06-04

    Patrick Chain, a DOE JGI scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, looks back on previous SFAF meetings and gives an update on the genome standards first publicly proposed in 2009 on June 4, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  6. Resource assessment/commercialization planning meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy and Division of Geothermal Resource Management, sponsored a Resource Assessment/Commercialization Planning meeting in Salt Lake City on January 21-24, 1980. The meeting included presentations by state planning and resource teams from all DOE regions. An estimated 130 people representing federal, state and local agencies, industry and private developers attended.

  7. Statistical Learning Is Not Affected by a Prior Bout of Physical Exercise.

    PubMed

    Stevens, David J; Arciuli, Joanne; Anderson, David I

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the effect of a prior bout of exercise on implicit cognition. Specifically, we examined whether a prior bout of moderate intensity exercise affected performance on a statistical learning task in healthy adults. A total of 42 participants were allocated to one of three conditions-a control group, a group that exercised for 15 min prior to the statistical learning task, and a group that exercised for 30 min prior to the statistical learning task. The participants in the exercise groups cycled at 60% of their respective V˙O2 max. Each group demonstrated significant statistical learning, with similar levels of learning among the three groups. Contrary to previous research that has shown that a prior bout of exercise can affect performance on explicit cognitive tasks, the results of the current study suggest that the physiological stress induced by moderate-intensity exercise does not affect implicit cognition as measured by statistical learning. PMID:26084984

  8. 2013 Building America Research Planning Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, C. E.; Hunt, S.

    2014-02-01

    The Building America (BA) Research Planning Meeting was held October 28-30, 2013, in Washington, DC. This meeting provides one opportunity each year for the research teams, national laboratories and Department of Energy (DOE) managers to meet in person to share the most pertinent information and collaboration updates. This report documents the presentations, highlights key program updates, and outlines next steps for the program.

  9. 75 FR 26285 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... public interest does not require that the meeting be open to public observation. The Board also... meeting be called without seven days' public notice of the meeting. In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552b(f)(1... properly be closed to public observation pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552b(c)(2) and Sec. 102.139(c)(2) of...

  10. Staff meeting

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN?s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  11. Anxiety Sensitivity Uniquely Predicts Exercise Behaviors in Young Adults Seeking to Increase Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Moshier, Samantha J; Szuhany, Kristin L; Hearon, Bridget A; Smits, Jasper A J; Otto, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with elevated levels of anxiety sensitivity (AS) may be motivated to avoid aversive emotional or physical states, and therefore may have greater difficulty achieving healthy behavioral change. This may be particularly true for exercise, which produces many of the somatic sensations within the domain of AS concerns. Cross-sectional studies show a negative association between AS and exercise. However, little is known about how AS may prospectively affect attempts at behavior change in individuals who are motivated to increase their exercise. We recruited 145 young adults who self-identified as having a desire to increase their exercise behavior. Participants completed a web survey assessing AS and additional variables identified as important for behavior change-impulsivity, grit, perceived behavioral control, and action planning-and set a specific goal for exercising in the next week. One week later, a second survey assessed participants' success in meeting their exercise goals. We hypothesized that individuals with higher AS would choose lower exercise goals and would complete less exercise at the second survey. AS was not significantly associated with exercise goal level, but significantly and negatively predicted exercise at Time 2 and was the only variable to offer significant prediction beyond consideration of baseline exercise levels. These results underscore the importance of considering AS in relation to health behavior intentions. This is particularly apt given the absence of prediction offered by other traditional predictors of behavior change. PMID:26342011

  12. Exercise-induced purpura.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, Albert-Adrien

    2004-01-01

    Exercise-induced purpura (EIP) occurs on the lower legs after unusual or major muscular activity, as in marathon runners or as after long walks, especially in the mountains in hot weather. In leisure walkers, patients are otherwise healthy females. There is no relation with chronic venous disorder. Erythematous, urticarial or purpuric plaques arise on the lower leg, usually sparing the skin compressed by socks. Symptoms include itch, pain and a burning sensation. Histopathology demonstrates leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The lesions fade after some days, with frequent relapses at further muscular exercises and may be prevented in some cases by compression, intake of venoactive drugs and local application of steroids. EIP is not uncommon, even if very few descriptions have yet been published. It appears to be consecutive to venous stasis induced by an acute failure of the muscle pump of the calf and thermoregulation decompensation, after a prolonged and unusual exercise, such as running or walking in hot weather. PMID:15178910

  13. Exercise in Pregnancy: Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Artal, Raul

    2016-09-01

    In recent years it has been recognized that in all phases of life, including pregnancy, physical activity promotes health benefits and precludes comorbidities, the scientific evidence is indisputable. Several organizations around the world have updated in recent years the guidelines and recommendations for exercise in pregnancy. The December 2015, updated guidelines of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists emphasize that physical activity in pregnancy has minimal risk. Although recommending exercise in pregnancy, the anatomic/physiological changes, absolute and relative contraindications should be considered. Women who exercised regularly before pregnancy, in the absence of contraindications, can continue and engage in moderate to strenuous activities, although information on strenuous activities in pregnancy is still limited. This review summarizes the most recent published and recommended guidelines. PMID:27398880

  14. Locomotor exercise in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Whitmore, H.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements for exercise in space by means of locomotion are established and addressed with prototype treadmills for use during long-duration spaceflight. The adaptation of the human body to microgravity is described in terms of 1-G locomotor biomechanics, the effects of reduced activity, and effective activity-replacement techniques. The treadmill is introduced as a complement to other techniques of force replacement with reference given to the angle required for exercise. A motor-driven unit is proposed that can operate at a variety of controlled speeds and equivalent grades. The treadmills permit locomotor exercise as required for long-duration space travel to sustain locomotor and cardiorespiratory capacity at a level consistent with postflight needs.

  15. Exercise and autonomic function.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, R L; Bloomfield, D M; Rosenwinkel, E T

    2000-03-01

    The complex interplay between the dichotomous subdivisions of the autonomic nervous system establishes and maintains a delicately tuned homeostasis in spite of an ever-changing environment. Aerobic exercise training can increase activity of the parasympathetic nervous system and decrease sympathetic activity. Conversely, it is well-documented that cardiac disease is often characterized by attenuated parasympathetic activity and heightened sympathetic tone. A correlation between autonomic disequilibrium and disease has led to the hypothesis that exercise training, as a therapy that restores the autonomic nervous system towards normal function, may be associated with, and possibly responsible for, outcome improvements in various populations. This is merely one of the many benefits that is conferred by chronic exercise training and reviewed in this issue. PMID:10758814

  16. Public meetings on nuclear waste management: their function and organization

    SciTech Connect

    Duvernoy, E.G.; Marcus, A.A.; Overcast, T.; Schilling, A.H.

    1981-05-01

    This report focuses on public meetings as a vehicle for public participation in nuclear waste management. The nature of public meetings is reviewed and the functions served by meetings highlighted. The range of participants and their concerns are addressed, including a review of the participants from past nuclear waste management meetings. A sound understanding of the expected participants allows DOE to tailor elements of the meeting, such as notification, format, and agenda to accommodate the attendees. Finally, the report discusses the organization of public meetings on nuclear waste management in order to enhance the DOE's functions for such meetings. Possible structures are suggested for a variety of elements that are relevant prior to, during and after the public meeting. These suggestions are intended to supplement the DOE Public Participation Manual.

  17. Effects of Dietary Acid Load on Exercise Metabolism and Anaerobic Exercise Performance

    PubMed Central

    Caciano, Susan L.; Inman, Cynthia L.; Gockel-Blessing, Elizabeth E.; Weiss, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    the acid or alkaline promoting qualities of the diet, quantified as potential renal acid load (PRAL), alter systemic pH, as evidenced in the present study by changes in fasted morning urine pH. Low-PRAL (alkaline promoting) diets are characterized by high intakes of vegetables and fruits with limited consumption of meats, cheeses, and grains while high-PRAL diets are characterized by the opposite dietary pattern. An alkaline promoting (low-PRAL) diet increases anaerobic exercise performance, as evidenced by greater time-to-exhaustion during high-intensity treadmill running. Preliminary evidence suggests that an alkaline promoting (low-PRAL) diet increases lipid oxidation and may have a carbohydrate-sparing effect during submaximal endurance exercise, although further studies are needed. In contrast to what has been observed in response to habitual/long-term dietary patterns, a short-term low-PRAL diet does not increase maximal exercise respiratory exchange ratio and even appears to lower it. This suggests that short-term and long-term alterations in PRAL have different physiologic effects on this parameter. PMID:25983586

  18. [Metabolic intolerance to exercise].

    PubMed

    Arenas, J; Martín, M A

    2003-01-01

    Exercise intolerance (EI) is a frequent cause of medical attention, although it is sometimes difficult to come to a final diagnosis. However, there is a group of patients in whom EI is due to a metabolic dysfunction. McArdle's disease (type V glucogenosis) is due to myophosphorylase (MPL) deficiency. The ischemic exercise test shows a flat lactate curve. The most frequent mutations in the PYGM gene (MPL gene) in Spanish patients with MPL deficiency are R49X and W797R. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency is invariably associated to repetitive episodes of myoglobinuria triggered by exercise, cold, fever or fasting. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of CPT II deficiency in muscle. The most frequent mutation in the CPT2 gene is the S113L. Patients with muscle adenylate deaminase deficiency usually show either a mild myopathy or no symptom. The diagnosis is based on the absence of enzyme activity in muscle and the lack of rise of ammonia in the forearm ischemic exercise test. The mutation Q12X in the AMPD1 gene is strongly associated with the disease. Exercise intolerance is a common complaint in patients with mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) deficiencies, although it is often overshadowed by other symptoms and signs. Only recently we have come to appreciate that exercise intolerance can be the sole presentation of defects in the mtDNA, particularly in complex I, complex III, complex IV, or in some tRNAs. In addition, myoglobinuria can be observed in patients under statin treatment, particularly if associated with fibrates, due to an alteration in the assembly of the complex IV of the MRC. PMID:12838448

  19. Flow for Exercise Adherence: Testing an Intrinsic Model of Health Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Holtz, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health behavior theory generally does not include intrinsic motivation as a determinate of health practices. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the flow theory of exercise adherence. Flow theory posits that exercise can be intrinsically rewarding if the experiences of self/time transcendence and control/mastery are achieved…

  20. The Entropy Criterion for Chemical Equilibrium: An Exercise in the Second Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Norman O.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exercise in which the entropy maximum is illustrated with a chemical example. The exercise allows students to work with an isolated, chemically reactive system and shows that the entropy of a nonisolated system can pass through a maximum but does so at a nonequilibrium point. (JN)

  1. Stimulation of net muscle protein synthesis by whey protein ingestion before and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Kevin D; Elliott, Tabatha A; Cree, Melanie G; Aarsland, Asle A; Sanford, Arthur P; Wolfe, Robert R

    2007-01-01

    Timing of nutrient ingestion has been demonstrated to influence the anabolic response of muscle following exercise. Previously, we demonstrated that net amino acid uptake was greater when free essential amino acids plus carbohydrates were ingested before resistance exercise rather than following exercise. However, it is unclear if ingestion of whole proteins before exercise would stimulate a superior response compared with following exercise. This study was designed to examine the response of muscle protein balance to ingestion of whey proteins both before and following resistance exercise. Healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two groups. A solution of whey proteins was consumed either immediately before exercise (PRE; n = 8) or immediately following exercise (POST; n = 9). Each subject performed 10 sets of 8 repetitions of leg extension exercise. Phenylalanine concentrations were measured in femoral arteriovenous samples to determine balance across the leg. Arterial amino acid concentrations were elevated by approximately 50%, and net amino acid balance switched from negative to positive following ingestion of proteins at either time. Amino acid uptake was not significantly different between PRE and POST when calculated from the beginning of exercise (67 +/- 22 and 27 +/- 10 for PRE and POST, respectively) or from the ingestion of each drink (60 +/- 17 and 63 +/- 15 for PRE and POST, respectively). Thus the response of net muscle protein balance to timing of intact protein ingestion does not respond as does that of the combination of free amino acids and carbohydrate. PMID:16896166

  2. Exercise, immunity and aging.

    PubMed

    Venjatraman, J T; Fernandes, G

    1997-01-01

    In general population, many protective immune responses are impaired in old age, leading to an increased risk of infection. However, recent studies in SENIEUR subjects (healthy centenarians who are examples of successful aging) suggest that complex remodeling and reshaping of the immune system occurs with aging. An appropriate regular regimen of endurance exercise might help elderly to lead a quality of life by preserving immune function. However, very little is known regarding the interaction between exercise, aging and the immune system. Given that a number of age-related changes occur in many physiological systems which are known to alter the immune function both at rest and during exercise, it would be of value to learn the extent to which both acute and chronic exercise influence immune function in the elderly. The immune system response to exercise is multifaceted, depending on the nature of exercise. Significant interaction between the neuroendocrine and immune systems, and the role of lifestyle factors in immune function are known to occur. In theory, moderate exercise should help to reverse the adverse effects of aging upon the immune system by increasing the production of endocrine hormones which may contribute to less accumulation of autoreactive immune cells by enhancing the programmed cell death. Active elderly subjects demonstrated a significantly greater proliferative response to phytohemagglutinins (PHA) and to pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and higher rates of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) production. A moderate training program can enhance the resting natural killer (NK) cell function of healthy elderly people, potentially increasing resistance to both viral infections and preventing the formation of malignant cells. Recent studies have suggested that endurance training in later life is associated with a lesser age-related decline in certain aspects of circulating T cell function and related cytokine

  3. Exercise acts as a drug; the pharmacological benefits of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vina, J; Sanchis-Gomar, F; Martinez-Bello, V; Gomez-Cabrera, MC

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial effects of regular exercise for the promotion of health and cure of diseases have been clearly shown. In this review, we would like to postulate the idea that exercise can be considered as a drug. Exercise causes a myriad of beneficial effects for health, including the promotion of health and lifespan, and these are reviewed in the first section of this paper. Then we deal with the dosing of exercise. As with many drugs, dosing is extremely important to get the beneficial effects of exercise. To this end, the organism adapts to exercise. We review the molecular signalling pathways involved in these adaptations because understanding them is of great importance to be able to prescribe exercise in an appropriate manner. Special attention must be paid to the psychological effects of exercise. These are so powerful that we would like to propose that exercise may be considered as a psychoactive drug. In moderate doses, it causes very pronounced relaxing effects on the majority of the population, but some persons may even become addicted to exercise. Finally, there may be some contraindications to exercise that arise when people are severely ill, and these are described in the final section of the review. Our general conclusion is that exercise is so effective that it should be considered as a drug, but that more attention should be paid to the dosing and to individual variations between patients. PMID:22486393

  4. Exercise, Lymphokines, Calories, and Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of epidemiological studies suggesting that exercise reduces the risk of cancer concludes that exercise may help defend against cancer by preventing obesity, stimulating lymphokines, and/or facilitating other healthful changes in behavior. (Author/CB)

  5. Exercise Helps Ease Psychosis Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... has shown that exercise can benefit people with schizophrenia. The study was published recently in the journal ... Health Topics Exercise and Physical Fitness Psychotic Disorders Schizophrenia About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  6. Eye Exercises and Reading Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Earl J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Evaluated with a total of 60 primary-grade children was the effectiveness in improving ocular motor control of three training programs: the Bender proprioceptive facilitative feedback exercises, the Marsden ball program, and perceptual exercises. (DB)

  7. ISS Update: SPRINT Exercise Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews Lori Ploutz-Snyder, Ph.D., NASA Lead Exercise Physiology Scientist, about the SPRINT exercise program used by the crew members aboard the Inter...

  8. Exercising with a Muscle Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: • cramping in muscles (probably related to insufficient energy supply for muscles) • pain in muscles • weakness of exercised muscles • dark urine that looks like cola, following exercise (seek ...

  9. Kegel exercises - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000141.htm Kegel exercises - self-care To use the sharing features on ... move up and down. How to do Kegel Exercises Once you know what the movement feels like, ...

  10. Exercise for Your Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Exercise for Your Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... A Complete Osteoporosis Program For Your Information Why Exercise? Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds ...

  11. Exercise to Improve Your Balance

    MedlinePlus

    ... nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercise to Improve Your Balance Having good balance is important for many everyday activities, such as ... fracture of the arm, hand, ankle, or hip. Balance exercises can help you prevent falls and avoid ...

  12. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise ... Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become brittle and more likely to fracture (break). With osteoporosis, the bones lose density. Bone density is the amount of bone ...

  13. Exercise and Energy intake in Overweight, Sedentary Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Kristin L.; Spring, Bonnie; Pagoto, Sherry L.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise expends energy, but without dietary intervention, exercise does not appear to produce substantial weight loss. The present study examined whether overweight, sedentary individuals increase their energy intake after moderate intensity exercise, particularly in the presence of negative mood. A repeated measures design was used where overweight, sedentary individuals (N=65) completed, in counterbalanced order, two conditions: 3 minutes of exercise (Active) and 3 minutes of sedentary activity (Sedentary) during one session. Snack foods were presented 10 minutes after each activity. Mixed-effects regression modeling revealed no significant effect of Active versus Sedentary condition on energy intake. However, moderational analyses revealed that change in negative mood interacted with condition to predict energy intake, such that participants who reported increased negative mood during exercise consumed more calories in the Active compared to the Sedentary condition. That a short bout of exercise resulted in mood deterioration and increased energy intake for some overweight, sedentary individuals is concerning. Further research examining behavioral and physiological mechanisms of mood deterioration and caloric overcompensation following exercise in overweight, sedentary individuals is warranted. PMID:19171314

  14. Hydration and vascular fluid shifts during exercise in the heat

    SciTech Connect

    Sawka, M.N.; Francesconi, R.P.; Pimental, N.A.; Pandolf, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    The present study has the primary objective to determine the effects of hydration level on vascular fluid shifts during exercise in the heat. The effect of gender on these fluid shifts was also investigated. The subjects employed in the tests included six male and six female volunteers. It was found that hemoconcentration occurs when subjects are hypohydrated and are performing light intensity exercise in the heat. A decrease in total plasma protein was observed under these test conditions. Gender does not alter vascular fluid shifts during exercise in the heat when subjects are matched with respect to fitness level. It is concluded that hydration level alters vascular fluid shifts during exercise in a hot environment.

  15. COPD: benefits of exercise training.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    In patients with stable, moderate or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), general exercise training, including limb exercises, provides sustained improvement in various quality of life domains, compared with care without pulmonary rehabilitation. After a COPD exacerbation, exercise training appears to reduce the risk of hospitalisation in the following months by at least half. Few studies have evaluated the adverse effects of exercise training in COPD, but based on the data available in 2015, its harm-benefit balance appears favourable. PMID:27152405

  16. Exercise and Crohn’s disease: Speculations on potential benefits

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Victor; Millard, Wanda; Lebrun, Constance; Howard, John

    2006-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects nearly one million people in the United States and Canada. While current pharmaceutical treatments are effective in controlling symptoms, patients continue to experience a reduced quality of life (QOL). Based on preliminary studies, QOL in CD patients may be improved by engaging in physical activity. Exercise may decrease CD activity and reduce psychological stress. Current research also suggests that low-intensity exercise does not exacerbate gastrointestinal symptoms and does not lead to flare-ups. Furthermore, exercise appears to reduce CD symptoms and improve QOL. In summary, physical activity may be beneficial to certain patient groups, but more studies are needed before broad recommendations can be made. PMID:17066157

  17. Exercise and Fluid Balance Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlicht, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    One common piece of advice that exercise professionals give their clients is to drink water before, during, and after exercise. During exercise people can lose as much as three liters of water per hour (about 100 ounces) through sweat. Dehydration alters normal sweat patterns, which can lead to an increased core body temperature. Since most of the…

  18. Closing the Loop with Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altizer, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Conducting exercises provides a critical bridge between the theory of an Emergency Action Plan and its effective implementation. When conducted properly, exercises can fill the gap between training and after-action review to close the preparedness loop--before an actual emergency occurs. Often exercises are planned and conducted on campus based on…

  19. Cognitive Aging and Physical Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Ellen; Sharps, Matthew J.

    2003-01-01

    Younger (n=58) and older (n=49) adults completed the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test and recall tests of verbal and visual stimuli with maximum and minimum semantic support. Category support did not help young adults who exercised less. Older adults' exercise had no effect on use of category support; less-frequent exercisers had poorer results…

  20. Exercise and Fat Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This document analyzes the problems encountered by the obese individual and the effects of regular exercise on weight loss and fat reduction. Part one compares the psychological traits of obese children with age groups of normal weight and discusses the organic disorders and social attitudes which plague the overweight individual. Part two states…