Science.gov

Sample records for doe offsite mixed

  1. Incineration of DOE offsite mixed waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.D.; Harvego, L.A.; Jacobs, A.M.; Willcox, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is one of three incinerators in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Complex capable of incinerating mixed low-level waste (MLLW). WERF has received MLLW from offsite generators and is scheduled to receive more. The State of Idaho supports receipt of offsite MLLW waste at the WERF incinerator within the requirements established in the (INEEL) Site Treatment Plan (STP). The incinerator is operating as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status Facility, with a RCRA Part B permit application currently being reviewed by the State of Idaho. Offsite MLLW received from other DOE facilities are currently being incinerated at WERF at no charge to the generator. Residues associated with the incineration of offsite MLLW waste that meet the Envirocare of Utah waste acceptance criteria are sent to that facility for treatment and/or disposal. WERF is contributing to the treatment and reduction of MLLW in the DOE Complex.

  2. Environmental Assessment Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-05-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) needs to demonstrate the economics and feasibility of offsite commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste (LLMW), containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) and other organics, to meet existing regulatory standards for eventual disposal.

  3. Management of government property in the possession of off-site contractors (DOE-PMR 109-60)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    This handbook contains Part 109-60 of the DOE Property Management Regulations (DOE-PMR) (41 CFR Chapter 109). This Part 109-60 sets forth the minimum requirements to be observed by off-site contractors in establishing and maintaining control over Government property provided pursuant to a contract with DOE. The contract clauses of the DOE Procurement Regulations incorporate Part 109-60 by reference in all off-site contracts in which Government property is provided. Individual Subparts of this Part deal with contractor's responsibility; records and financial reports; identification; physical inventories; care and maintenance; utilization, disposal, and retirement; motor vehicle and aircraft management; and required reports. (RWR)

  4. Finding of no significant impact shipment of stabilized mixed waste from the K-25 Site to an off-site commercial disposal facility, Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the shipment of stabilized mixed waste, removed from K-1407-B and -C ponds, to an off-site commercial disposal facility (Envirocare) for permanent land disposal. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  5. Offsite demonstrations for MWLID technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.; Gruebel, R.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of the Offsite Demonstration Project for Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID)-developed environmental site characterization and remediation technologies is to facilitate the transfer, use, and commercialization of these technologies to the public and private sector. The meet this goal, the project identified environmental restoration needs of mixed waste and/or hazardous waste landfill owners (Native American, municipal, DOE, and DoD); documenting potential demonstration sites and the contaminants present at each site; assessing the environmental regulations that would effect demonstration activities; and evaluating site suitability for demonstrating MWLID technologies at the tribal and municipal sites identified. Eighteen landfill sites within a 40.2-km radius of Sandia National Laboratories are listed on the CERCLIS Site/Event Listing for the state of New Mexico. Seventeen are not located within DOE or DoD facilities and are potential offsite MWLID technology demonstration sites. Two of the seventeen CERCLIS sites, one on Native American land and one on municipal land, were evaluated and identified as potential candidates for off-site demonstrations of MWLID-developed technologies. Contaminants potentially present on site include chromium waste, household/commercial hazardous waste, volatile organic compounds, and petroleum products. MWLID characterization technologies applicable to these sites include Magnetometer Towed Array, Cross-borehole Electromagnetic Imaging, SitePlanner {trademark}/PLUME, Hybrid Directional Drilling, Seamist{trademark}/Vadose Zone Monitoring, Stripping Analyses, and x-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Heavy Metals.

  6. Protecting off-site populations and site workers from vapor discharges during shallow soil mixing at the North Carolina State University National Priorities List Site.

    PubMed

    Schaad, David E; Halley, James M; Alaimo, Vince

    2007-09-01

    Although vapor monitoring is generally a component of remedial action activities, most sites do not have routine gaseous releases or vapor clouds erupting from the soil during implementation of the cleanup process (or during cleanup of the site). At the North Carolina State University Lot 86 National Priorities List Site, over 8410 m3 (11,000 yd3) of chemical waste was disposed at the Site, including organic solvents and shock-sensitive and air- and water-reactive compounds. During the Remedial Action, it was imperative to protect site workers and off-site populations from potential inhalation exposures. Engineering controls were incorporated into the shallow soil mixing process to limit the release of gaseous compounds. To quantify potential exposures to on-site and off-site receptors, modeling was conducted to evaluate potential exposure routes and migration pathways. To demonstrate acceptable levels of airborne constituents, a multifaceted air sampling and monitoring program was implemented. To ensure that potential exposures could be quantified, passive dosimeters, continuous real-time monitoring, time-weighted whole air sampling, and grab samples of vapor clouds were all critical components of the air monitoring program. After the successful completion of the Remedial Action, the pre-Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) chemical waste generated from the University's educational and research laboratories was entirely encapsulated and neither on-site workers nor off-site populations were exposed to analyzed compounds above any health-based action level (i.e., 15-min short-term exposure limit [STEL], 8-hr threshold limit value, or time-weighted average permissible exposure limit). PMID:17912923

  7. DOE regulatory reform initiative vitrified mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S.J.; Holtzscheiter, E.W.; Flaherty, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with responsibly managing the largest volume of mixed waste in the United States. This responsibility includes managing waste in compliance with all applicable Federal and State laws and regulations, and in a cost-effective, environmentally responsible manner. Managing certain treated mixed wastes in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage and disposal units (specifically those mixed wastes that pose low risks from the hazardous component) is unlikely to provide additional protection to human health and the environment beyond that afforded by managing these wastes in storage and disposal units subject to requirements for radiological control. In October, 1995, the DOE submitted a regulatory reform proposal to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) relating to vitrified mixed waste forms. The technical proposal supports a regulatory strategy that would allow vitrified mixed waste forms treated through a permit or other environmental compliance mechanism to be granted an exemption from RCRA hazardous waste regulation, after treatment, based upon the inherent destruction and immobilization capabilities of vitrification technology. The vitrified waste form will meet, or exceed the performance criteria of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass that has been accepted as an international standard for immobilizing radioactive waste components and the LDR treatment standards for inorganics and metals for controlling hazardous constituents. The proposal further provides that vitrified mixed waste would be responsibly managed under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) while reducing overall costs. Full regulatory authority by the EPA or a State would be maintained until an acceptable vitrified mixed waste form, protective of human health and the environment, is produced.

  8. DOE mixed waste treatment capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Wehrman, R.R.; Young, J.R.; Shaver, S.R.

    1994-06-01

    This initial DOE-wide analysis compares the reported national capacity for treatment of mixed wastes with the calculated need for treatment capacity based on both a full treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes to the Land Disposal Restrictions and on treatment of transuranic wastes to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The status of treatment capacity is reported based on a fifty-element matrix of radiation-handling requirements and functional treatment technology categories. The report defines the classifications for the assessment, describes the models used for the calculations, provides results from the analysis, and includes appendices of the waste treatment facilities data and the waste stream data used in the analysis.

  9. DOE acceptance of commercial mixed waste -- Studies are under way

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, T.L.; Owens, C.M.

    1993-03-01

    The topic of the Department of Energy acceptance of commercial mixed waste at DOE facilities has been proposed by host States and compact regions that are developing low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. States support the idea of DOE accepting commercial mixed waste because (a) very little commercial mixed waste is generated compared to generation by DOE facilities (Department of Energy--26,300 cubic meters annually vs. commercial--3400 cubic meters annually); (b) estimated costs for commercial disposal are estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubic foot; (c) once treatment capability becomes available, 70% of the current levels of commercial mixed waste will be eliminated, (d) some State laws prohibit the development of mixed waste disposal facilities in their States; (e) DOE is developing a nationwide strategy that will include treatment and disposal capacity for its own mixed waste and the incremental burden on the DOE facilities would be minuscule, and (6) no States are developing mixed waste disposal facilities. DOE senior management has repeatedly expressed willingness to consider investigating the feasibility of DOE accepting commercial mixed waste. In January 1991, Leo Duffy of the Department of energy met with members of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum, which led to an agreement to explore such an arrangement. He stated that this seems like a cost-effective way to solve commercial mixed waste management problems.

  10. Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain

    2010-08-16

    Ventilation dilutes or removes indoor contaminants to reduce occupant exposure. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining the exposure of occupants to given sources, but the zone- specific distribution of exhaust and supply air, and the mixing of ventilation air can have significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage through the building envelope, air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact that air mixing has on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. Evaluations of existing field measurements and simulations reported in the literature are combined with new analyses to provide an integrated overview of the topic. The results show that for extreme cases additional mixing can be a significant factor but for typical homes looking at average exposures mixing is not helpful and can even make exposures worse.

  11. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the waste transfer leak

    SciTech Connect

    ZIMMERMAN, B.D.

    2003-03-21

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological/consequence of the bounding waste transfer leak accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding waste transfer leak accident is a fine spray leak into the air. The calculation applies reasonably conservative input parameters in accordance with DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A, guidance. The calculated offsite dose of 0.7 rem does not challenge the Evaluation Guideline.

  12. EPA/DOE joint efforts on mixed waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.C.; Huffman, G.L.; Nalesnik, R.P.

    1995-12-31

    Under the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), the Department of Energy (DOE) is directed to develop treatment plans for their stockpile of wastes generated at their various sites. As a result, DOE is facing the monumental problem associated with the treatment and ultimate disposal of their mixed (radioactive and hazardous) waste. Meanwhile, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a final {open_quotes}Hazardous Waste Combustion Strategy{close_quotes} in November 1994. Under the Combustion Strategy, EPA permit writers have been given the authority to use the Omnibus Provision of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) to impose more stringent emission limits for waste combustors prior to the development of new regulations. EPA and DOE established a multi-year Interagency Agreement (IAG) in 1991. The main objective of the IAG (and of the second IAG that was added in 1993) is to conduct a research program on thermal technologies for treating mixed waste and to establish permit procedures for these technologies particularly under the new requirements of the above-mentioned EPA Combustion Strategy. The objective of this Paper is to summarize the results of the EPA/DOE joint efforts on mixed waste treatment since the establishment of the original Interagency Agreement. Specifically, this Paper will discuss six activities that have been underway; namely: (1) National Technical Workgroup (NTW) on Mixed Waste Treatment, (2) State-of-the-Art Assessment of APC (Air Pollution Control) and Monitoring Technologies for the Rocky Flats Fluidized Bed Unit, (3) Initial Study of Permit {open_quotes}Roadmap{close_quotes} Development for Mixed Waste Treatment, (4) Risk Assessment Approach for a Mixed Waste Thermal Treatment Facility, (5) Development and Application of Technology Selection Criteria for Mixed Waste Thermal Treatment, and (6) Performance Testing of Mixed Waste Incineration: In-Situ Chlorine Capture in a Fluidized Bed Unit.

  13. EPA/DOE JOINT EFFORTS ON MIXED WASTE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes the results of six major activities that have been underway since the inception of the EPA/DOE joint effort in mixed waste thermal treatment as a consequence of establishing their Interagency Agreements (IAGS) in 1991 and 1993. he six IAG activities are: 1) ...

  14. User's Guide for RESRAD-OFFSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanapragasam, E.; Yu, C.

    2015-04-01

    The RESRAD-OFFSITE code can be used to model the radiological dose or risk to an offsite receptor. This User’s Guide for RESRAD-OFFSITE Version 3.1 is an update of the User’s Guide for RESRAD-OFFSITE Version 2 contained in the Appendix A of the User’s Manual for RESRAD-OFFSITE Version 2 (ANL/EVS/TM/07-1, DOE/HS-0005, NUREG/CR-6937). This user’s guide presents the basic information necessary to use Version 3.1 of the code. It also points to the help file and other documents that provide more detailed information about the inputs, the input forms and features/tools in the code; two of the features (overriding the source term and computing area factors) are discussed in the appendices to this guide. Section 2 describes how to download and install the code and then verify the installation of the code. Section 3 shows ways to navigate through the input screens to simulate various exposure scenarios and to view the results in graphics and text reports. Section 4 has screen shots of each input form in the code and provides basic information about each parameter to increase the user’s understanding of the code. Section 5 outlines the contents of all the text reports and the graphical output. It also describes the commands in the two output viewers. Section 6 deals with the probabilistic and sensitivity analysis tools available in the code. Section 7 details the various ways of obtaining help in the code.

  15. The Mixed Waste Management Facility: A DOE technology demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.G.; Streit, R.D.

    1994-05-01

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is a national demonstration test bed that will be used to evaluate, at pilot scale, emerging technologies for the effective treatment of low-level radioactive, organic mixed wastes. The treatment technologies will be selected from candidates of advanced processes that have been sufficiently demonstrated in laboratory and bench-scale tests, and most closely meet suitable criteria for demonstration. The primary and initial goal will be to demonstrate technologies that have the potential to effectively treat a selection of organic-based mixed waste streams, currently in storage within the DOE, that list incineration as the best demonstrated available technology (BDAT). In future operations, the facility may also be used to demonstrate technology that addresses a broader range of government, university, medical, and industry needs. The primary objective of the MWMF is to demonstrate integrated mixed-waste processing technologies. While primary treatment processes are an essential component of integrated treatment trains, they are only a part of a fully integrated demonstration.

  16. Determinations of TSD facility acceptability under the CERCLA Off-Site Rule

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    On September 22, 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the ``Off-Site Rule`` to implement section 121(d)(3) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). CERCLA {section}121(d)(3) requires that wastes generated as a result of remediation activities taken under CERCLA authority and transferred off-site be managed only at facilities that comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. In 1994, the DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance (OEPA), RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413) published a CERCLA Information Brief titled ``The Off-Site Rule`` which describes the content of the Off-Site Rule and clarifies some of its implications for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. Additionally, EH-413 published the Guide on Selecting Compliant Off-Site Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities which provides a regulatory roadmap for accomplishing off-site transfers of environmental restoration and process hazardous waste at DOE facilities in a manner compliant with the Off-Site Rule and other relevant Federal regulations. Those guidance documents concentrate primarily on DOE`s perspective as a hazardous waste generator. The purpose of this Information Brief is to address the implications of the Off-Site Rule for DOE-owned hazardous waste treatment, storage or disposal facilities that accept CERCLA remediation wastes from off-site locations.

  17. Benchmarking of RESRAD-OFFSITE : transition from RESRAD (onsite) toRESRAD-OFFSITE and comparison of the RESRAD-OFFSITE predictions with peercodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Biwer, B.

    2006-05-22

    The main purpose of this report is to document the benchmarking results and verification of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code as part of the quality assurance requirements of the RESRAD development program. This documentation will enable the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its licensees and other stakeholders to use the quality-assured version of the code to perform dose analysis in a risk-informed and technically defensible manner to demonstrate compliance with the NRC's License Termination Rule, Title 10, Part 20, Subpart E, of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E); DOE's 10 CFR Part 834, Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment''; and other Federal and State regulatory requirements as appropriate. The other purpose of this report is to document the differences and similarities between the RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE codes so that users (dose analysts and risk assessors) can make a smooth transition from use of the RESRAD (onsite) code to use of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code for performing both onsite and offsite dose analyses. The evolution of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code from the RESRAD (onsite) code is described in Chapter 1 to help the dose analyst and risk assessor make a smooth conceptual transition from the use of one code to that of the other. Chapter 2 provides a comparison of the predictions of RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE for an onsite exposure scenario. Chapter 3 documents the results of benchmarking RESRAD-OFFSITE's atmospheric transport and dispersion submodel against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) CAP88-PC (Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988) and ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex-Long Term) models. Chapter 4 documents the comparison results of the predictions of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code and its submodels with the predictions of peer models. This report was prepared by Argonne National Laboratory's (Argonne

  18. Offsite Shipment Campaign Readiness Assessment (OSCRA): A tool for offsite shipment campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Michelhaugh, R.D.; Pope, R.B.; Bisaria, A.

    1995-12-31

    The Offsite Shipment Campaign Readiness Assessment (OSCRA) tool is designed to assist program managers in identifying, implementing, and verifying applicable transportation and disposal regulatory requirements for specific shipment campaigns. OSCRA addresses these issues and provides the program manager with a tool to support planning for safe and compliant transportation of waste and other regulated materials. Waste transportation and disposal requirements must be identified and addressed in the planning phase of a waste management project. In the past, in some cases, transportation and disposal requirements have not been included in overall project plans. These planning deficiencies have led to substantial delays and cost impacts. Additionally, some transportation regulatory requirements have not been properly implemented, resulting in substantial fines and public embarrassment for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). If a material has been processed and packaged for onsite storage (prior to offsite disposal) in a package that does not meet transportation requirements, it must be repackaged in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT)-compliant packaging for transport. This repackaging can result in additional cost, time, and personnel radiation exposure. The original OSCRA concept was developed during the Pond Waste Project at the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The continued development of OSCRA as a user-friendly tool was funded in 1995 by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, Transportation Management Division (TMD). OSCRA is designed to support waste management managers, site remediation managers, and transportation personnel in defining applicable regulatory transportation and disposal requirements for offsite shipment of hazardous waste and other regulated materials. The need for this tool stems from increasing demands imposed on DOE and the need to demonstrate and document safe and compliant packaging and shipment of wastes from various DOE sites.

  19. Evaluation of groundwater monitoring at offsite nuclear test areas

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.B.; Hokett, S.L.

    1991-03-01

    Groundwater quality has been monitored at nuclear test sites distant from the Nevada Test Site as part of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) since 1972. Separate reports describing the monitoring programs recommended by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrologic Program Advisory Group were issued by the DOE for most of the offsite areas during the early 1980s, and the analytical results from the LTHMP have been regularly reported by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), but there has been little else published about the program. The LTHMP has continued to demonstrate the safety of drinking water supplies near the offsite areas and there have been very few modifications to the program initially mandated by the DOE in 1972. During this time, however, there have been many changes in the fields of hydrogeology and environmental monitoring. In 1988, the DOE requested the Desert Research Institute to perform a critical review of the LTHMP in light of the many technical and regulatory advances in groundwater monitoring in recent years. This report presents an evaluation of the offsite groundwater monitoring program and evaluations specific to the monitoring networks at each of the eight offsite test areas. Discussion of the overall program is presented first, followed by site-specific recommendations. References follow each section for the convenience of readers interested in particular sites. 63 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  20. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR OFF-SITE UTILITIES SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Ziegler

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) offsite utilities system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  1. Offsite Radiological Consequence Analysis for the Bounding Flammable Gas Accident

    SciTech Connect

    CARRO, C.A.

    2003-07-30

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological consequences of the bounding flammable gas accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a single-shell tank The calculation applies reasonably conservation input parameters in accordance with DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A, guidance. Revision 1 incorporates comments received from Office of River Protection.

  2. Off-sites that work.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Bob; Chandler, Logan

    2006-06-01

    Of all the meetings top executives go to in a year, none is more important than the strategy off-site, where the most essential conversations for the future of the business occur. Yet it is the rare management team that can say its strategy off-site truly changed the way the business is run. At best, participants do some vague direction setting and work on team-building skills; at worst, they write off the retreat as a waste of time and resources. It needn't be like that. From their two decades of experience designing and facilitating strategy off-sites in companies large and small around the world, the authors have distilled a set of best practices that businesses can use to make the most of this annual opportunity. Essentially, the problem with most strategy off-sites is that they're insufficiently structured. People think that if you schedule a meeting, invite top leaders (and perhaps an outside expert), and block off units of time to discuss big subjects, the rest will take care of itself. In reality, formlessness leads to aimlessness. Oddly enough, only rigorously designed meetings give rise to truly candid strategy discussions. That rigor starts before the meeting, when the scope of the matters discussed must be limited, the participant list drawn up accordingly, the relevant materials (and only those) sent out and absorbed, and a detailed agenda established. During the meeting, the pace and quality of the conversation can be managed through attention to politics and by using carefully tailored frameworks, decision points, and group exercises. After the meeting, an action plan ensures clear accountability and follow-through. If you and your executive team spend four days a year rafting down rivers together, you'll eventually get good at rafting down rivers. Spend four days a year having well -designed strategy conversations together, and you will transform your annual off-site from a meaningless junket into a genuine turning point for your business. PMID

  3. Plasma hearth process vitrification of DOE low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gillins, R.L.; Geimer, R.M.

    1995-11-01

    The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) demonstration project is one of the key technology projects in the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development Mixed Waste Focus Area. The PHP is recognized as one of the more promising solutions to DOE`s mixed waste treatment needs, with potential application in the treatment of a wide variety of DOE mixed wastes. The PHP is a high temperature vitrification process using a plasma arc torch in a stationary, refractory lined chamber that destroys organics and stabilizes the residuals in a nonleaching, vitrified waste form. This technology will be equally applicable to low-level mixed wastes generated by nuclear utilities. The final waste form will be volume reduced to the maximum extent practical, because all organics will have been destroyed and the inorganics will be in a high-density, low void-space form and little or no volume-increasing glass makers will have been added.

  4. Requirements for shipment of DOE radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gablin, K.; No, Hyo; Herman, J.

    1993-08-01

    There are several sources of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) at Argonne National Laboratory which, in the past, were collected at waste tanks and/or sludge tanks. They were eventually pumped out by special pumps and processed in an evaporator located in the waste operations area in Building No. 306. Some of this radioactive mixed waste represents pure elementary mercury. These cleaning tanks must be manually cleaned up because the RMW material was too dense to pump with the equipment in use. The four tanks being discussed in this report are located in Building No. 306. They are the Acid Waste Tank, IMOX/FLOC Tanks, Evaporation Feed Tanks, and Waste Storage Tanks. All of these tanks are characterized and handled separately. This paper discusses the process and the requirements for characterization and the associated paperwork for Argonne Waste to be shipped to Westinghouse Hanford Company for storage.

  5. 47 CFR 54.637 - Off-site data centers and off-site administrative offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... connections and network equipment associated with off-site data centers and off-site administrative offices... care provider's computer systems, associated components, and data, including (but not limited to... center and the public Internet or another network, (v) An off-site administrative office and the...

  6. 47 CFR 54.637 - Off-site data centers and off-site administrative offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... connections and network equipment associated with off-site data centers and off-site administrative offices... care provider's computer systems, associated components, and data, including (but not limited to... center and the public Internet or another network, (v) An off-site administrative office and the...

  7. Operating cost guidelines for benchmarking DOE thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, R.; Loghry, S.L.; Hermes, W.H.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents guidelines for estimating operating costs for use in benchmarking US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level mixed waste thermal treatment systems. The guidelines are based on operating cost experience at the DOE Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) mixed waste incinerator at the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge. In presenting these guidelines, it should be made clear at the outset that it is not the intention of this report to present operating cost estimates for new technologies, but only guidelines for estimating such costs.

  8. A Survey of Mixed-Waste HEPA Filters in the DOE Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F. S.; Barber, D. B.; Carney, K. P.

    2002-02-28

    A brief investigation was made to determine the quantities of spent, mixed-waste HEPA filters within the DOE Complex. The quantities of both the mixed-waste filters that are currently being generated, as well as the legacy mixed-waste filters being stored and awaiting disposition were evaluated. Seven DOE sites representing over 89% of the recent HEPA filter usage were identified. These sites were then contacted to determine the number of these filters that were likely destined to become mixed waste and to survey the legacy-filter quantities. Inquiries into the disposition plans for the filters were also made. It was determined that the seven sites surveyed possess approximately 500 m3 of legacy mixed-waste HEPA filters that will require processing, with an annual generation rate of approximately 25 m3. No attempt was made to extrapolate the results of this survey to the entire DOE Complex. These results were simply considered to be the lower bound of the totality of mixed-waste HEPA filters throughout the Complex. The quantities determined encourage the development of new treatment technologies for these filters, and provide initial data on which an appropriate capacity for a treatment process may be based.

  9. Transportation and disposal configuration for DOE-managed low-level and mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, T.

    1993-06-01

    This report briefly examines the current U.S. Department of Energy complex-wide configuration for transportation and disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and also retraces the historical sequence of events and rationale that has guided its development. The study determined that Nevada Test Site and the Hanford Site are the only two sites that currently provide substantial disposal services for offsite low-level waste generators. It was also determined that mixed low-level waste shipments are infrequent and are generally limited to shipments to offsite commercial treatment facilities or other Department of Energy sites for storage. The current alignment of generator to disposal site for low-level waste shipments is generally consistent with the programmatic mission of the generator; that is, defense-generated waste is shipped to the Nevada Test Site and research-generated waste is transported to the Hanford Site. The historical development of the current configuration was resurrected by retrieving Department of Energy documentation and interviewing both current and former department and contractor personnel. According to several accounts, the basic framework of the system was developed during the late 1970s, and was reportedly based on the ability of the disposal site to manage a given waste form. Documented evidence to support this reasoning, however, could not be uncovered.

  10. Plasma Hearth Process vitrification of DOE low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gillins, R.L.; Geimer, R.M.

    1995-11-01

    The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) demonstration project is one of the key technology projects in the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development Mixed Waste Focus Area. The PHP is recognized as one of the more promising solutions to DOE`s mixed waste treatment needs, with potential application in the treatment of a wide variety of DOE mixed wastes. The PHP is a high temperature vitrification process using a plasma arc torch in a stationary, refractory lined chamber that destroys organics and stabilizes the residuals in a nonleaching, vitrified waste form. This technology will be equally applicable to low-level mixed wastes generated by nuclear utilities. The final waste form will be volume reduced to the maximum extent practical, because all organics will have been destroyed and the inorganics will be in a high-density, low void-space form and little or no volume-increasing glass makers will have been added. Low volume and high integrity waste forms result in low disposal costs. This project is structured to ensure that the plasma technology can be successfully employed in radioactive service. The PHP technology will be developed into a production system through a sequence of tests on several test units, both non-radioactive and radioactive. As the final step, a prototype PHP system will be constructed for full-scale radioactive waste treatment demonstration.

  11. Hazardous waste shipment data collection from DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.A.; Kirkpatrick, T.D.; Stevens, L.

    1992-12-31

    Past practices at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites for offsite release of hazardous waste are being reviewed to determine if radioactively contaminated hazardous wastes were released to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Records indicating the presence of radioactivity in waste shipped to and treated at a commercial incineration facility led to a ban on offsite hazardous waste shipments and investigation of past practices for offsite release of hazardous waste from the DOE sites. A House of Representatives Interior and Insular Affairs Committee oversight hearing on potentially contaminated waste shipments to commercial facilities concluded that the main issue was the lack of a uniform national standard to govern disposal of mixed waste.

  12. Hazardous waste shipment data collection from DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.A.; Kirkpatrick, T.D. ); Stevens, L. )

    1992-01-01

    Past practices at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites for offsite release of hazardous waste are being reviewed to determine if radioactively contaminated hazardous wastes were released to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Records indicating the presence of radioactivity in waste shipped to and treated at a commercial incineration facility led to a ban on offsite hazardous waste shipments and investigation of past practices for offsite release of hazardous waste from the DOE sites. A House of Representatives Interior and Insular Affairs Committee oversight hearing on potentially contaminated waste shipments to commercial facilities concluded that the main issue was the lack of a uniform national standard to govern disposal of mixed waste.

  13. OFFSITE RADIOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS FOR THE BOUNDING FLAMMABLE GAS ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2005-02-18

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological consequences of the bounding flammable gas accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a SST. The calculation applies reasonably conservative input parameters in accordance with guidance in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The purpose of this analysis is to calculate the offsite radiological consequence of the bounding flammable gas accident. DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', requires the formal quantification of a limited subset of accidents representing a complete set of bounding conditions. The results of these analyses are then evaluated to determine if they challenge the DOE-STD-3009-94, Appendix A, ''Evaluation Guideline,'' of 25 rem total effective dose equivalent in order to identify and evaluate safety-class structures, systems, and components. The bounding flammable gas accident is a detonation in a single-shell tank (SST). A detonation versus a deflagration was selected for analysis because the faster flame speed of a detonation can potentially result in a larger release of respirable material. A detonation in an SST versus a double-shell tank (DST) was selected as the bounding accident because the estimated respirable release masses are the same and because the doses per unit quantity of waste inhaled are greater for SSTs than for DSTs. Appendix A contains a DST analysis for comparison purposes.

  14. Framework for DOE mixed low-level waste disposal: Site fact sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Gruebel, M.M.; Waters, R.D.; Hospelhorn, M.B.; Chu, M.S.Y.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required to prepare and submit Site Treatment Plans (STPS) pursuant to the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct). Although the FFCAct does not require that disposal be addressed in the STPS, the DOE and the States recognize that treatment of mixed low-level waste will result in residues that will require disposal in either low-level waste or mixed low-level waste disposal facilities. As a result, the DOE is working with the States to define and develop a process for evaluating disposal-site suitability in concert with the FFCAct and development of the STPS. Forty-nine potential disposal sites were screened; preliminary screening criteria reduced the number of sites for consideration to twenty-six. The DOE then prepared fact sheets for the remaining sites. These fact sheets provided additional site-specific information for understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the twenty-six sites as potential disposal sites. The information also provided the basis for discussion among affected States and the DOE in recommending sites for more detailed evaluation.

  15. OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT. RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1985

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EMSL-LV operates an Off-Site Radiological Safety Program around the NTS and other sites as requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) under an Interagency Agreement between DOE and EPA. This report, prepared in accordance with DOE guidelines (DOE85a), covers the program acti...

  16. Locations, volumes, and characteristics of DOE's mixed low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Elmore, M.R. ); Warner, C.L. ); Wachter, L.J. . HAZWRAP Support Contractor Office); Carlson, W.L.; Devries, R.L. )

    1992-03-01

    The Mixed Waste Treatment Project (MWTP) has collected and analyzed mixed low-level waste data to assist in developing treatment capability for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) wastes. Initial data on the characteristics of mixed waste was obtained from the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) data base, and has been updated based on visits to DOE sites where most of the wastes are generated and stored. The streams of interest have a current inventory of about 70,000 m{sup 3} and a generation rate of about 7,700 m{sup 3}/yr. The twelve sites with the most significant processing needs are Fernald, Hanford, K-25 (Oak Ridge), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, Savannah River Site (SRS), and Y-12 (Oak Ridge). These twelve sites account for about 98% of the mixed waste volumes. The wastes have been assigned to specific waste characterization categories. The largest category in current interim storage is inorganic solids, with sludges, filter cakes, and residues the largest specific subcategory. Aqueous liquids are the largest currently generated stream. The other large categories are solid organics, metals wastes, and heterogeneous wastes. Organic liquids, which have been a major focus, are the smallest of the categories.

  17. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level mixed waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Chen, S.Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers both the radioactive and chemical hazards associated with LLMW transportation. Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment methods and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS. This report presents additional information that is not included in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLMW. Included are definitions of the LLMW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS; data related to the inventory and to the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of WM LLMW; an overview of the risk assessment methods; and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLMW case considered.

  18. MWIR-1995 DOE national mixed and TRU waste database users guide

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) National 1995 Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR-1995) Database Users Guide provides information on computer system requirements and describes installation, operation, and navigation through the database. The MWIR-1995 database contains a detailed, nationwide compilation of information on DOE mixed waste streams and treatment systems. In addition, the 1995 version includes data on non- mixed, transuranic (TRU) waste streams. These were added to the data set as a result of coordination of the 1995 update with the National Transuranic Program Office`s (NTPO`s) data needs to support the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) TRU Waste Baseline Inventory Report (WTWBIR). However, the information on the TRU waste streams is limited to that associated with the core mixed waste data requirements. The additional, non-core data on TRU streams collected specifically to support the WTWBIR is not included in the MWIR-1995 database. With respect to both the mixed and TRU waste stream data, the data set addresses {open_quotes}stored{close_quotes} streams. In this instance, {open_quotes}stored{close_quotes} streams are defined as (a) streams currently in storage at both EM-30 and EM-40 sites and (b) streams that have yet to be generated but are anticipated within the next five years from sources other than environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (ER/D&D) activities. Information on future ER/D&D streams is maintained in the EM-40 core database. The MWIR-1995 database also contains limited information for both waste streams and treatment systems that have been removed or deleted since the 1994 MWIR. Data on these is maintained only through Section 2, Waste Stream Identification/Tracking/Source, to document the reason for removal from the data set.

  19. 29 CFR 1908.4 - Offsite consultation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Offsite consultation. 1908.4 Section 1908.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... on occupational safety and health issues by telephone and correspondence, and at locations other...

  20. 29 CFR 1908.4 - Offsite consultation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Offsite consultation. 1908.4 Section 1908.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... on occupational safety and health issues by telephone and correspondence, and at locations other...

  1. Benchmarking the New RESRAD-OFFSITE Source Term Model with DUST-MS and GoldSim - 13377

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.J.; Kamboj, S.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Yu, C.

    2013-07-01

    RESRAD-OFFSITE is a computer code developed by Argonne National Laboratory under the sponsorship of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). It is designed on the basis of RESRAD (onsite) code, a computer code designated by DOE and NRC for evaluating soil-contaminated sites for compliance with human health protection requirements pertaining to license termination or environmental remediation. RESRAD-OFFSITE has enhanced capabilities of modeling radionuclide transport to offsite locations and calculating potential radiation exposure to offsite receptors. Recently, a new source term model was incorporated into RESRAD-OFFSITE to enhance its capability further. This new source term model allows simulation of radionuclide releases from different waste forms, in addition to the soil sources originally considered in RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE codes. With this new source term model, a variety of applications can be achieved by using RESRAD-OFFSITE, including but not limited to, assessing the performance of radioactive waste disposal facilities. This paper presents the comparison of radionuclide release rates calculated by the new source term model of RESRAD-OFFSITE versus those calculated by DUST-MS and GoldSim, respectively. The focus of comparison is on the release rates of radionuclides from the bottom of the contaminated zone that was assumed to contain radioactive source materials buried in soil. The transport of released contaminants outside of the primary contaminated zone is beyond the scope of this paper. Overall, the agreement between the RESRAD-OFFSITE results and the DUST-MS and GoldSim results is fairly good, with all three codes predicting identical or similar radionuclide release profiles over time. Numerical dispersion in the DUST-MS and GoldSim results was identified as potentially contributing to the disagreement in the release rates. In general, greater discrepancy in the release rates was found for short

  2. DOE mixed wastes: What are they and where can thermal technologies be applied

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A. ); Borduin, L.C. ); Musgrave, B.C. )

    1992-05-01

    The Mixed Waste Treatment Project (MWTP) has collected and analyzed mixed low-level waste data to assist in developing treatment capability for the US Department of Energy is (DOE) wastes. Initial data on the characteristics of mixed waste was obtained from the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) data base, and has been updated based on visits to DOE sites where most of the wastes are generated and stored. The streams of interest to the MWTP have a current inventory of about 70,000 m[sup 3] and a generation rate of about 7,700 m[sup 3]/yr. The 12 sites with the most significant processing needs are Fernald, Hanford, K-25 (Oak Ridge), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Savannah River Site (SRS), and Y-12 (Oak Ridge). These 12 sites account for about 98% of the mixed waste volumes. The wastes have been assigned to specific waste characterization categories and a flowsheet that identifies applicable technologies has been developed. The largest waste stream category, when considering the current inventory in storage, is inorganic solids, with sludges, filter cakes, and residues the largest specific subcategories. Aqueous liquids are the largest currently generated stream. The other large categories are solid organics, metals wastes, and heterogenous wastes. Organic liquids, which have been a major focus, are the smallest of the categories. The major thermal treatment units include evaporators, incinerators, vitrifiers, metal melters, and off-gas treatment systems.

  3. DOE mixed wastes: What are they and where can thermal technologies be applied?

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Borduin, L.C.; Musgrave, B.C.

    1992-05-01

    The Mixed Waste Treatment Project (MWTP) has collected and analyzed mixed low-level waste data to assist in developing treatment capability for the US Department of Energy is (DOE) wastes. Initial data on the characteristics of mixed waste was obtained from the Waste Management Information System (WMIS) data base, and has been updated based on visits to DOE sites where most of the wastes are generated and stored. The streams of interest to the MWTP have a current inventory of about 70,000 m{sup 3} and a generation rate of about 7,700 m{sup 3}/yr. The 12 sites with the most significant processing needs are Fernald, Hanford, K-25 (Oak Ridge), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Savannah River Site (SRS), and Y-12 (Oak Ridge). These 12 sites account for about 98% of the mixed waste volumes. The wastes have been assigned to specific waste characterization categories and a flowsheet that identifies applicable technologies has been developed. The largest waste stream category, when considering the current inventory in storage, is inorganic solids, with sludges, filter cakes, and residues the largest specific subcategories. Aqueous liquids are the largest currently generated stream. The other large categories are solid organics, metals wastes, and heterogenous wastes. Organic liquids, which have been a major focus, are the smallest of the categories. The major thermal treatment units include evaporators, incinerators, vitrifiers, metal melters, and off-gas treatment systems.

  4. Environmental Assessment for the off-site commercial cleaning of lead and asbestos contaminated laundry from the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts of off-site commercial cleaning of lead and asbestos contaminated laundry generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. The proposed action constitutes an addition to the already-implemented action of sending controlled and routine SRS laundry to an off-site commercial facility for cleaning. This already-implemented action was evaluated in a previous EA (i.e., DOE/EA-0990; DOE, 1994) prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  5. Health technology assessment: Off-site sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Dehnavieh, Reza; Mirshekari, Nadia; Ghasemi, Sara; Goudarzi, Reza; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; Mehrolhassani, Mohammad Hossain; Moshkani, Zahra; Noori Hekmat, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Every year millions of dollars are expended to equip and maintain the hospital sterilization centers, and our country is not an exception of this matter. According to this, it is important to use more effective technologies and methods in health system in order to reach more effectiveness and saving in costs. This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the technology of regional sterilization centers. Methods: This study was done in four steps. At the first step, safety and effectiveness of technology was studied via systematic study of evidence. The next step was done to evaluate the economical aspect of off-site sterilization technology using gathered data from systematic review of the texts which were related to the technology and costs of off-site and in-site hospital sterilization. Third step was conducted to collect experiences of using technology in some selected hospitals around the world. And in the last step different aspects of acceptance and use of this technology in Iran were evaluated. Results: Review of the selected articles indicated that efficacy and effectiveness of this technology is Confirmed. The results also showed that using this method is not economical in Iran. Conclusion: According to the revealed evidences and also cost analysis, due to shortage of necessary substructures and economical aspect, installing the off-site sterilization health technology in hospitals is not possible currently. But this method can be used to provide sterilization services for clinics and outpatients centers. PMID:27390714

  6. Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and the Resin Regeneration Facility Safety Analysis Report, Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29

    The Safety Analysis Report documents the safety authorization basis for the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The present mission of the RBOF and RRF is to continue in providing a facility for the safe receipt, storage, handling, and shipping of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from power and research reactors in the United States, fuel from SRS and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors, and foreign research reactors fuel, in support of the nonproliferation policy. The RBOF and RRF provide the capability to handle, separate, and transfer wastes generated from nuclear fuel element storage. The DOE and Westinghouse Savannah River Company, the prime operating contractor, are committed to managing these activities in such a manner that the health and safety of the offsite general public, the site worker, the facility worker, and the environment are protected.

  7. Quantities and characteristics of the contact-handled low-level mixed waste streams for the DOE complex

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, T.L.; Wilson, J.M.; Ruhter, A.H.; Bonney, S.J.

    1994-08-01

    This report supports the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) Study initiated by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (EM-50), which is a system engineering assessment of a variety of mixed waste treatment process. The DOE generates and stores large quantities of mixed wastes that are contaminated with both chemically hazardous and radioactive species. The treatment of these mixed wastes requires meeting the standards established by the Environmental Protection Agency for the specific hazardous contaminants regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act while also providing adequate control of the radionuclides. The thrust of the study is to develop preconceptual designs and life-cycle cost estimates for integrated thermal treatment systems ranging from conventional incinerators, such as rotary kiln and controlled air systems, to more innovative but not yet established technologies, such as molten salt and molten metal waste destruction systems. Prior to this engineering activity, the physical and chemical characteristics of the DOE low-level mixed waste streams to be treated must be defined or estimated. This report describes efforts to estimate the DOE waste stream characteristics.

  8. Analysis of waste treatment requirements for DOE mixed wastes: Technical basis

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The risks and costs of managing DOE wastes are a direct function of the total quantities of 3wastes that are handled at each step of the management process. As part of the analysis of the management of DOE low-level mixed wastes (LLMW), a reference scheme has been developed for the treatment of these wastes to meet EPA criteria. The treatment analysis in a limited form was also applied to one option for treatment of transuranic wastes. The treatment requirements in all cases analyzed are based on a reference flowsheet which provides high level treatment trains for all LLMW. This report explains the background and basis for that treatment scheme. Reference waste stream chemical compositions and physical properties including densities were established for each stream in the data base. These compositions are used to define the expected behavior for wastes as they pass through the treatment train. Each EPA RCRA waste code was reviewed, the properties, chemical composition, or characteristics which are of importance to waste behavior in treatment were designated. Properties that dictate treatment requirements were then used to develop the treatment trains and identify the unit operations that would be included in these trains. A table was prepared showing a correlation of the waste physical matrix and the waste treatment requirements as a guide to the treatment analysis. The analysis of waste treatment loads is done by assigning wastes to treatment steps which would achieve RCRA compliant treatment. These correlation`s allow one to examine the treatment requirements in a condensed manner and to see that all wastes and contaminant sets are fully considered.

  9. Treatment of DOE and commercial mixed waste by the private sector

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, T.W.; Apel, M.L.; Owens, C.M.

    1993-03-01

    This paper presents a conceptual approach for private sector treatment of mixed low-level radioactive waste generated by the US Department of Energy and commercial industries. This approach focuses on MLLW treatment technologies and capacities available through the private sector in the near term. Wastestream characterization data for 108 MLLW streams at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) were collected and combined with similar data for MLLWs generated through commercial practices. These data were then provided to private treatment facilities and vendors to determine if, and to what extent, they could successfully treat these wastes. Data obtained from this project have provided an initial assessment of private sector capability and capacity to treat a variety of MLLW streams. This information will help formulate plans for future treatment of these and similar wastestreams at DOE facilities. This paper presents details of the MLLW data-gathering efforts used in this research, private sector assessment methods employed, and results of this assessment. Advantages of private sector treatment, as well as barriers to its present use, are also addressed.

  10. Analysis of offsite emergency planning zones project

    SciTech Connect

    Petrocchi, A.J.; Armstrong, C.E. . Rocky Flats Plant); McKinney, J.M.; Verholek, M.G.; Fraser, P.J.; Dalfonso, P.H. )

    1991-07-18

    The Rocky Flats Plant maintains and uses significant nonradioactive chemically hazardous material (HAZMAT) inventories. Some of these materials are used in sufficient quantities to represent a credible risk to the offsite public in the event of an emergency at the facility. In Phase 2 of this project, the EG G Rocky Flats, Inc. and TENERA, L.P. Task Team (Task Team) produced an initial screening-level modeling analysis study and an Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) encompassing the Vulnerable Zones (VZs) for hazardous materials stored at the facility. The screening-level analysis will be supplemented with more refined evaluations during subsequent phases of the project. The existence of these chemicals in the Rocky Flats Plant Occupational Health Information System (OHIS) chemical inventory database was verified. All liquid and gaseous chemicals were considered as potential hazardous material source terms for further screening analysis. Hazards associated with solid substances were not considered in this phase of the project. 2 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. 40 CFR 68.165 - Offsite consequence analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Offsite consequence analysis. 68.165... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.165 Offsite consequence analysis. (a) The owner or operator shall submit in the RMP information: (1) One worst-case...

  12. 40 CFR 68.165 - Offsite consequence analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Offsite consequence analysis. 68.165... (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Risk Management Plan § 68.165 Offsite consequence analysis. (a) The owner or operator shall submit in the RMP information: (1) One worst-case...

  13. 40 CFR 68.22 - Offsite consequence analysis parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Offsite consequence analysis parameters. 68.22 Section 68.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Hazard Assessment § 68.22 Offsite consequence analysis parameters. (a) Endpoints....

  14. 40 CFR 68.22 - Offsite consequence analysis parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Offsite consequence analysis... analysis parameters. (a) Endpoints. For analyses of offsite consequences, the following endpoints shall be.... (b) Wind speed/atmospheric stability class. For the worst-case release analysis, the owner...

  15. Effects of spent fuel types on offsite consequences of hypothetical accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, J. C.; Dwight, C. C.; Lehto, M. A.

    2000-02-18

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducts experimental work on the development of waste forms suitable for several types of spent fuel at its facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) located 48 km West of Idaho Falls, ID. The objective of this paper is to compare the offsite radiological consequences of hypothetical accidents involving the various types of spent nuclear fuel handled in nonreactor nuclear facilities. The highest offsite total effective dose equivalents (TEDEs) are estimated at a receptor located about 5 km SSE of ANL facilities. Criticality safety considerations limit the amount of enriched uranium and plutonium that could be at risk in any given scenario. Heat generated by decay of fission products and actinides does not limit the masses of spent fuel within any given operation because the minimum time elapsed since fissions occurred in any form is at least five years. At cooling times of this magnitude, fewer than ten radionuclides account for 99% of the projected TEDE at offsite receptors for any credible accident. Elimination of all but the most important nuclides allows rapid assessments of offsite doses with little loss of accuracy. Since the ARF (airborne release fraction), RF (respirable fraction), LPF (leak path fraction) and atmospheric dilution factor ({chi}/Q) can vary by orders of magnitude, it is not productive to consider nuclides that contribute less than a few percent of the total dose. Therefore, only {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs-{sup 137m}Ba, and the actinides significantly influence the offsite radiological consequences of severe accidents. Even using highly conservative assumptions in estimating radiological consequences, they remain well below current Department of Energy guidelines for highly unlikely accidents.

  16. Fluid management plan for the Project Shoal Area Offsites Subproject

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has initiated the Offsites Subproject to characterize the hazards posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at facilities other than the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A primary Subproject objective is to gather adequate data to characterize the various Subproject sites through the collection of surface and subsurface soil samples and by drilling several wells for the collection of groundwater data. The Project Shoal Area (PSA) is one of the Subproject`s Nevada sites and is subject to the requirements set forth in the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (DOE, 1996a). In accordance with the FFACO, a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for work at the PSA (designated as Corrective Action Unit Number 416). This Fluid Management Plan (FMP) provides guidance for the management of fluids generated from wells constructed at the PSA. Long-term monitoring and future activities at the site, if required, will be set forth in additional documents as required by the FFACO. The ultimate method for disposition of fluids generated by site operations depends upon sample analysis and process knowledge in relation to fluid management criteria. Section 2 describes well site operations; Section 3 discusses fluid management criteria; Section 4 includes the fluid monitoring program; Section 5 presents the fluid management strategy; Section 6 provides for fluid management during routine well monitoring; and Section 7 contains reporting criteria.

  17. Characterization of mixed waste for shipment to TSD Facilities Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Goyal, K.

    1995-12-31

    In compliance with the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is striving to ship its low-level mixed waste (LLMW) off-site for treatment and disposal. In order to ship LLMW off site to a commercial facility, LANL must request exemption from the DOE Order 5820.2A requirement that LLMW be shipped only to Department of Energy facilities. Because the process of obtaining the required information and approvals for a mixed waste shipment campaign can be very expensive, time consuming, and frustrating, a well-planned program is necessary to ensure that the elements for the exemption request package are completed successfully the first time. LANL has developed such a program, which is cost- effective, quality-driven, and compliance-based. This program encompasses selecting a qualified analytical laboratory, developing a quality project-specific sampling plan, properly sampling liquid and solid wastes, validating analytical data, documenting the waste characterization and decision processes, and maintaining quality records. The products of the program are containers of waste that meet the off-site facility`s waste acceptance criteria, a quality exemption request package, documentation supporting waste characterization, and overall quality assurance for the process. The primary goal of the program is to provide an avenue for documenting decisions, procedures, and data pertinent to characterizing waste and preparing it for off-site treatment or disposal.

  18. Analysis of the suitability of DOE facilities for treatment of commercial low-level radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This report evaluates the capabilities of the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) existing and proposed facilities to treat 52 commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed (LLMW) waste streams that were previously identified as being difficult-to-treat using commercial treatment capabilities. The evaluation was performed by comparing the waste matrix and hazardous waste codes for the commercial LLMW streams with the waste acceptance criteria of the treatment facilities, as identified in the following DOE databases: Mixed Waste Inventory Report, Site Treatment Plan, and Waste Stream and Technology Data System. DOE facility personnel also reviewed the list of 52 commercially generated LLMW streams and provided their opinion on whether the wastes were technically acceptable at their facilities, setting aside possible administrative barriers. The evaluation tentatively concludes that the DOE is likely to have at least one treatment facility (either existing or planned) that is technically compatible for most of these difficult-to-treat commercially generated LLMW streams. This conclusion is tempered, however, by the limited amount of data available on the commercially generated LLMW streams, by the preliminary stage of planning for some of the proposed DOE treatment facilities, and by the need to comply with environmental statutes such as the Clean Air Act.

  19. Comparison of alternative treatment systems for DOE mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1997-03-01

    From 1993 to 1996, the Department of Energy, Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology (OST), has sponsored a series of systems analyses to guide its future research and development (R&D) programs for the treatment of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored in the DOE complex. The two original studies were of 20 mature and innovative thermal systems. As a result of a technical review of these thermal system studies, a similar study of five innovative nonthermal systems was conducted in which unit operations are limited to temperatures less than 350{degrees}C to minimize volatilization of heavy metals and radionuclides, and de novo production of dioxins and furans in the offgas. Public involvement in the INTS study was established through a working group of 20 tribal and stakeholder representatives to provide input to the INTS studies and identify principles against which the systems should be designed and evaluated. Pre-conceptual designs were developed for all systems to treat the same waste input (2927 lbs/hr) in a single centralized facility operating 4032 hours per year for 20 years. This inventory consisted of a wide range of combustible and non-combustible materials such as paper, plastics, metals, concrete, soils, sludges, liquids, etc., contaminated with trace quantities of radioactive materials and RCRA regulated wastes. From this inventory, an average waste profile was developed for simulated treatment using ASPEN PLUS{copyright} for mass balance calculations. Seven representative thermal systems were selected for comparison with the five nonthermal systems. This report presents the comparisons against the TSWG principles, of total life cycle cost (TLCC), and of other system performance indicators such as energy requirements, reagent requirements, land use, final waste volume, aqueous and gaseous effluents, etc.

  20. How does biological and anthropogenic soil mixing contribute to morphologic evolution of landscapes and terrestrial carbon cycles? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, K.; Mudd, S. M.; Chen, C.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Weinman, B.; Ji, J.; Hurst, M. D.; Klaminder, J.

    2009-12-01

    The generation of sediment and its transport occurs within and at the boundaries of colluvial soils. Models that predict the evolution of soil mantled landscapes are most commonly based on statements of mass conservation that quantify mass fluxes (i.e., sediment transport) and mass sources (e.g., soil production) within colluvial soil. Traditionally these models consider soil mixing to be an internal process which does not affect sediment transport and therefore has no impact on landscape evolution. It is known, however, that physical, biological, and anthropogenic soil mixing triggers the lateral movement of soil. Here, by emphasizing that the boundary between physically mobile colluvium and immobile saprolite is defined by the depth that mixing agents are able to penetrate, we provide theoretical and empirical supports that animal burrowing, tree throw, and agricultural plowing have distinct impacts on the morphologic evolution of landscapes and the terrestrial carbon cycles. First, where colluvial flux is proportional to both colluvial thickness and slope gradient, soil mixing agents, by affecting the thickness, contribute to determining the flux. Second, soil mixing drives the physical production of colluvium in thin soils where mixing agents actively disturb underlying saprolite. In this case the depth to which mixing agents are active determines colluvial thickness and increased soil erosion rates may not translate to reduced colluvial thickness. Furthermore, by simultaneously assessing soil mixing and erosion accelerated by agricultural activities, we can better predict how land use changes may affect the contacts between organic matter and minerals during their travel from hillslopes to channels and to floodplains, which may control the production of mineral-bound carbon pools with longer turnover times and thus carbon sequestration. In biologically productive landscapes, soil mixing agents may hold important keys to unlock the black box of colluvial

  1. ELUCIDATING THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ONSITE AND OFFSITE SHIPMENT OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B.; Watkins, R.

    2013-06-19

    Federal regulations stipulate how radioactive materials are transported within the United States. However, the Department of Energy, under Department of Energy Order, has the authority to operate, within the boundaries of their physical site, to other stipulations. In many cases the DOE sites have internal reviews for onsite transfers that rival reviews performed by the regulatory authorities for offsite shipments. Most of the differences are in the level or type of packaging that is required, but in some cases it may be in the amount and type of material that is allowed to be transferred. This paper will describe and discuss those differences and it will discuss ways to effectively align the onsite rules for transferring materials with those for offsite shipment.

  2. Research on jet mixing of settled sludges in nuclear waste tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites: A historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.

    1997-09-01

    Jet mixer pumps will be used in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks to mobilize and mix the settled solids layer (sludge) with the tank supernatant liquid. Predicting the performance of the jet mixer pumps has been the subject of analysis and testing at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. One important aspect of mixer pump performance is sludge mobilization. The research that correlates mixer pump design and operation with the extent of sludge mobilization is the subject of this report. Sludge mobilization tests have been conducted in tanks ranging from 1/25-scale (3 ft-diameter) to full scale have been conducted at Hanford and other DOE sites over the past 20 years. These tests are described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. The computational modeling of sludge mobilization and mixing that has been performed at Hanford is discussed in Section 5.0.

  3. Savannah River Site radioiodine atmospheric releases and offsite maximum doses

    SciTech Connect

    Marter, W.L.

    1990-11-01

    Radioisotopes of iodine have been released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Site since 1955. The releases, mostly from the 200-F and 200-H Chemical Separations areas, consist of the isotopes, I-129 and 1-131. Small amounts of 1-131 and 1-133 have also been released from reactor facilities and the Savannah River Laboratory. This reference memorandum was issued to summarize our current knowledge of releases of radioiodines and resultant maximum offsite doses. This memorandum supplements the reference memorandum by providing more detailed supporting technical information. Doses reported in this memorandum from consumption of the milk containing the highest I-131 concentration following the 1961 1-131 release incident are about 1% higher than reported in the reference memorandum. This is the result of using unrounded 1-131 concentrations of I-131 in milk in this memo. It is emphasized here that this technical report does not constitute a dose reconstruction in the same sense as the dose reconstruction effort currently underway at Hanford. This report uses existing published data for radioiodine releases and existing transport and dosimetry models.

  4. Greenhouse gas emissions during composting of dairy manure: Delaying pile mixing does not reduce overall emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of the timing of pile mixing on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during dairy manure composting was determined using large flux chambers designed to completely cover replicate pilot-scale compost piles. GHG emissions from compost piles that were mixed at 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks after initial c...

  5. Offsite commercial disposal of oil and gas exploration and production waste :availability, options, and cost.

    SciTech Connect

    Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.

    2006-09-05

    A survey conducted in 1995 by the American Petroleum Institute (API) found that the U.S. exploration and production (E&P) segment of the oil and gas industry generated more than 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, almost 18 billion bbl of produced water, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes. The results of that survey, published in 2000, suggested that 3% of drilling wastes, less than 0.5% of produced water, and 15% of associated wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) collected information on commercial E&P waste disposal companies in different states in 1997. While the information is nearly a decade old, the report has proved useful. In 2005, Argonne began collecting current information to update and expand the data. This report describes the new 2005-2006 database and focuses on the availability of offsite commercial disposal companies, the prevailing disposal methods, and estimated disposal costs. The data were collected in two phases. In the first phase, state oil and gas regulatory officials in 31 states were contacted to determine whether their agency maintained a list of permitted commercial disposal companies dedicated to oil. In the second stage, individual commercial disposal companies were interviewed to determine disposal methods and costs. The availability of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities falls into three categories. The states with high oil and gas production typically have a dedicated network of offsite commercial disposal companies and facilities in place. In other states, such an infrastructure does not exist and very often, commercial disposal companies focus on produced water services. About half of the states do not have any industry-specific offsite commercial disposal infrastructure. In those states, operators take their wastes to local municipal landfills if permitted or haul the wastes to other states. This report provides state-by-state summaries of the

  6. A decision methodology for the evaluation of mixed low-level radioactive waste management options for DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, J.; Abashian, M.S.; Chakraborti, S.; Devarakonda, M.; Djordjevic, S.M.

    1993-03-01

    Currently, many DOE sites are developing site-specific solutions to manage their mixed low-level wastes. These site-specific MLLW programs often result in duplication of efforts between the different sites, and consequently, inefficient use of DOE system resources. A nationally integrated program for MLLW eliminates unnecessary duplication of effort, but requires a comprehensive analysis of waste management options to ensure that all site issues are addressed. A methodology for comprehensive analysis of the complete DOE MLLW system is being developed by DOE-HQ to establish an integrated and standardized solution for managing MLLW. To be effective, the comprehensive systems analysis must consider all aspects of MLLW management from cradle-to-grave (i.e. from MLLW generation to disposal). The results of the analysis will include recommendations for alternative management options for the complete DOE MLLW system based on various components such as effectiveness, cost, health and safety risks, and the probability of regulatory acceptance for an option. Because of the diverse nature of these various components and the associated difficulties in comparing between them, a decision methodology is being developed that will integrate the above components into a single evaluation scheme for performing relative comparisons between different MLLW management options. The remainder of this paper provides an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the various participants of the DOE MLLW Program, and discusses in detail the components involved in the development of the decision methodology for a comprehensive systems analysis.

  7. State of offsite construction in India-Drivers and barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, M.; Bendi, D.; Sawhney, A.; Iyer, K. C.

    2012-05-01

    The rapid growth of the construction industry in India has influenced key players in the industry to adopt alternative technologies addressing time, cost and quality. The rising demand in housing, infrastructure and other facilities have further highlighted the need for the construction industry to look at adopting alternate building technologies. Offsite construction has evolved as a panacea to dealing with the under-supply and poor quality in the current age construction industry. Several offsite techniques have been adopted by the construction sector. Although, different forms of offsite techniques have been around for a while but their uptake has been low in the Indian context. This paper presents the perceptions about offsite construction in India and highlights some of the barriers and drivers facing the Indian construction industry. The data was gathered through a survey of 17 high level managers from some of the largest stakeholder organizations of the construction sector in India. The influence of time and cost has been highlighted as a major factor fuelling the adoption of offsite construction. However, the influence of current planning systems and the need for a paradigm shift are some of the prominent barriers towards the adoption of offsite techniques.

  8. Savannah River Site offsite hazardous waste shipment data validation report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.; Kudera, D.E.; Page, L.A.; Rohe, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this data validation is to verify that waste shipments reported in response to the US Department of Energy Headquarters data request are properly categorized according to DOE-HQ definitions. This report documents all findings and actions resulting from the independent review of the Savannah River Site data submittal, and provides a summary of the SRS data submittal and data validation strategy. The overall hazardous waste management and offsite release process from 1987--1991 is documented, along with an identification and description of the hazardous waste generation facilities. SRS did not ship any hazardous waste offsite before 1987. Sampling and analysis and surface surveying procedures and techniques used in determining offsite releasability of the shipments are also described in this report. SRS reported 150 manifested waste shipments from 1984 to 1991 that included 4,755 drums or lab packs and 13 tankers. Of these waste items, this report categorizes 4,251 as clean (including 12 tankers), 326 as likely clean, 138 as likely radioactive, and 55 as radioactive (including one tanker). Although outside the original scope of this report, 14 manifests from 1992 and 1993 are included, covering 393 drums or lab packs and seven tankers. From the 1992--1993 shipments, 58 drums or lab packs are categorized as radioactive and 16 drums are categorized as likely radioactive. The remainder are categorized as clean.

  9. THERMOHALINE MIXING: DOES IT REALLY GOVERN THE ATMOSPHERIC CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF LOW-MASS RED GIANTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Denissenkov, Pavel A.; Merryfield, William J. E-mail: bill.merryfield@ec.gc.ca

    2011-01-20

    First results of our three-dimensional numerical simulations of thermohaline convection driven by {sup 3}He burning in a low-mass red giant branch (RGB) star at the bump luminosity are presented. They confirm our previous conclusion that this convection has a mixing rate that is a factor of 50 lower than the observationally constrained rate of RGB extra-mixing. It is also shown that the large-scale instabilities of the salt-fingering mean field (those of the Boussinesq and advection-diffusion equations averaged over length and timescales of many salt fingers), which have been observed to increase the rate of oceanic thermohaline mixing up to one order of magnitude, do not enhance the RGB thermohaline mixing. We speculate on possible alternative solutions of the problem of RGB extra-mixing, among which the most promising one that is related to thermohaline mixing takes advantage of the shifting of the salt-finger spectrum toward larger diameters by toroidal magnetic field.

  10. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Huff, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history.

  11. Environmental assessment for the offsite commercial cleaning of controlled and routine laundry from the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the offsite commercial cleaning of controlled and routine laundry from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Controlled laundry consists of protective clothing and respirator equipment potentially containing radioactive contamination resulting from activities at SRS facilities. Routine laundry includes uncontaminated protective clothing. The aging onsite SRS laundry facility does not comply with current low hazard nuclear facility standards in DOE Order 6430.1. Constructing a new facility on site or upgrading the existing facility have prohibitive costs. The option to seek a commercial offsite vendor was selected as a viable alternative.

  12. Does the vertical profile of ethane contain more insight into mixing layer height than carbon monoxide?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, Scott; Yacovitch, Tara; Pusede, Sally; Diskin, Glenn; DiGangi, Joshua; Sachse, Glenn; Crawford, James

    2015-04-01

    To improve the interpretation of satellite data measurements near the surface, the DISCOVER-AQ project embarked on a four year campaign to produce an integrated dataset of airborne and surface based measurements at various locations in North America. One of the key metrics when pursuing the the goal of measuring the surface air quality from space is the mixing layer height. The measurement phase in 2014 included the novel 1-Hz Aerodyne Research, Inc. fast Ethane Spectrometer to distinguish the methane emissions from thermogenic (oil&gas) and biogenic sources in the Denver-Julesberg basin. A second potential use of ethane as a determinant of mixing layer height is revealed in the analysis of 213 vertical profiles collected at 7 points during 21 flights. The findings are evaluated relative to other in-situ metrics, such as carbon monoxide and remote sensing attributions of mixing layer height.

  13. Environmental assessment for the off-site volume reduction of low-level radioactive waste from the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1061) for the proposed off-site volume reduction of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  14. Offsite Source Recovery Program (OSRP) Workshop Module: Tianjin, China, July 16-July 17, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Houlton, Robert J.

    2012-07-11

    Recovering and disposal of radioactive sources that are no longer in service in their intended capacity is an area of high concern Globally. A joint effort to recover and dispose of such sources was formed between the US Department of Energy and the Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), in preparation for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. LANL involvement in this agreement continues today under the DOE-Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program. LANL will be presenting overview information on their Offsite Source Recovery (OSRP) and Source Disposal programs, in a workshop for the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) at Tianjin, China, on July 16 and 17, 2012.

  15. User's Manual for RESRAD-OFFSITE Version 2.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Biwer, B. M.; Kamboj, S.; Cheng, J. -J.; Klett, T.; LePoire, D.; Zielen, A. J.; Chen, S. Y.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Domotor, S.; Mo, T.; Schwartzman, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE; NRC

    2007-09-05

    The RESRAD-OFFSITE code is an extension of the RESRAD (onsite) code, which has been widely used for calculating doses and risks from exposure to radioactively contaminated soils. The development of RESRAD-OFFSITE started more than 10 years ago, but new models and methodologies have been developed, tested, and incorporated since then. Some of the new models have been benchmarked against other independently developed (international) models. The databases used have also expanded to include all the radionuclides (more than 830) contained in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 38 database. This manual provides detailed information on the design and application of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code. It describes in detail the new models used in the code, such as the three-dimensional dispersion groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model, the Gaussian plume model for atmospheric dispersion, and the deposition model used to estimate the accumulation of radionuclides in offsite locations and in foods. Potential exposure pathways and exposure scenarios that can be modeled by the RESRAD-OFFSITE code are also discussed. A user's guide is included in Appendix A of this manual. The default parameter values and parameter distributions are presented in Appendix B, along with a discussion on the statistical distributions for probabilistic analysis. A detailed discussion on how to reduce run time, especially when conducting probabilistic (uncertainty) analysis, is presented in Appendix C of this manual.

  16. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the bounding unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 area soils

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS, L.S.

    2003-03-21

    This analysis calculates the offsite radiological consequence of the bounding unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 Area soils accident. The US. Department of Energy (DOE) standard DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', requires the formal quantification of a limited subset of accidents representing a complete set of bounding conditions. The results of these analyses are then evaluated to determine if they challenge the DOE-STD-3009-94 Appendix A, ''Evaluation Guideline,'' of 25 rem total effective dose equivalent to identify and evaluate safety-class structures, systems, and components. This document supports the development of the unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 Area soils accident in the tank farm documented safety analysis. Consequently, it: (1) Provides a comprehensive review of potential unplanned excavation scenarios (i.e., backhoe, buried pressurized line ruptures, drilling, Guzzler vacuum) to determine the representative activity that would bound unmitigated, unplanned, or inadvertent excavations of 200 Area soils. (2) Evaluates radiological isotope inventories of all current Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) liquid waste disposal sites [i.e., cribs, ditches, and ponds (including French drains)], and isotope inventories of unplanned release sites (UPR) and plume columns. (3) Establishes the radiological consequences to the maximum offsite individual (MOI) from an unplanned/inadvertent 200 Area soil disturbance based on bounding site development and representative accident determination.

  17. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA.

  18. Does mode mixing matter in EMD-based highlight volume methods for hydrocarbon detection? Experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ya-juan; Cao, Jun-xing; Du, Hao-kun; Zhang, Gu-lan; Yao, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD)-based spectral decomposition methods have been successfully used for hydrocarbon detection. However, mode mixing that occurs during the sifting process of EMD causes the 'true' intrinsic mode function (IMF) to be extracted incorrectly and blurs the physical meaning of the IMF. We address the issue of how the mode mixing influences the EMD-based methods for hydrocarbon detection by introducing mode-mixing elimination methods, specifically ensemble EMD (EEMD) and complete ensemble EMD (CEEMD)-based highlight volumes, as feasible tools that can identify the peak amplitude above average volume and the peak frequency volume. Three schemes, that is, using all IMFs, selected IMFs or weighted IMFs, are employed in the EMD-, EEMD- and CEEMD-based highlight volume methods. When these methods were applied to seismic data from a tight sandstone gas field in Central Sichuan, China, the results demonstrated that the amplitude anomaly in the peak amplitude above average volume captured by EMD, EEMD and CEEMD combined with Hilbert transforms, whether using all IMFs, selected IMFs or weighted IMFs, are almost identical to each other. However, clear distinctions can be found in the peak frequency volume when comparing results generated using all IMFs, selected IMFs, or weighted IMFs. If all IMFs are used, the influence of mode mixing on the peak frequency volume is not readily discernable. However, using selected IMFs or a weighted IMFs' scheme affects the peak frequency in relation to the reservoir thickness in the EMD-based method. Significant improvement in the peak frequency volume can be achieved in EEMD-based highlight volumes using selected IMFs. However, if the weighted IMFs' scheme is adopted (i.e., if the undesired IMFs are included with reduced weights rather than excluded from the analysis entirely), the CEEMD-based peak frequency volume provides a more accurate reservoir thickness estimate compared with the other two methods. This

  19. Local Optical Closure Using Single Particle Mixing State Observations during the 2010 DOE CARES Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, R. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D. B.; Barnard, J.; Beranek, J.; Cappa, C. D.; Chand, D.; Dubey, M. K.; Easter, R. C.; Flowers, B. A.; Gyawali, M. S.; Jobson, B. T.; Pekour, M. S.; Riemer, N. S.; Subramanian, R.; Song, C.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) particles readily absorb both upwelling and downwelling broadband radiation and are thought to be second only to CO2 in contributing to global warming. However large uncertainties still exist in the global estimates of BC radiative forcing, which depend not only on our ability to accurately simulate the global loading and distribution of BC, but also on the precise knowledge of the mixing state and morphology of BC particles due to aging. To this end, one of the objectives of the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) conducted in Sacramento, CA, during June 2010 was to investigate the evolution of urban BC particles and the associated optical properties, with the overarching goal of improving their process-level model representations. The daytime Sacramento urban plume was routinely transported to the northeast into the Sierra Nevada foothills area rich in biogenic emissions, and the aged aerosols were often recirculated back into the urban area the next morning. The CARES campaign observational strategy was designed to take advantage of this flow pattern by setting up two observation supersites - one located within the Sacramento urban area, referred to as the "T0 site," and another located about 24 km to the northeast in Cool, CA, a small town in the rural foothills area, referred to as the "T1 site." BC size distribution and mixing state were measured at both the sites with single particle soot photometry (SP2). The single particle mass spectrometer SPLAT II was also deployed at the T0 site to characterize the size, composition (mixing state), density, and morphology of BC and non-BC containing particles. Non-refractory aerosol species were measured by Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Aerosol light absorption and scattering (or extinction) at multiple wavelengths were measured using several techniques, including photoacoustic, cavity ring-down, nephelometer as well as the filter-based particle

  20. Commercial treatability study capabilities for application to the US Department of Energy`s anticipated mixed waste streams. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    US DOE mixed low-level and mixed transuranic waste inventory was estimated at 181,000 cubic meters (about 2,000 waste streams). Treatability studies may be used as part of DOE`s mixed waste management program. Commercial treatability study suppliers have been identified that either have current capability in their own facilities or have access to licensed facilities. Numerous federal and state regulations, as well as DOE Order 5820.2A, impact the performance of treatability studies. Generators, transporters, and treatability study facilities are subject to regulation. From a mixed- waste standpoint, a key requirement is that the treatability study facility must have an NRC or state license that allows it to possess radioactive materials. From a RCRA perspective, the facility must support treatability study activities with the applicable plans, reports, and documentation. If PCBs are present in the waste, TSCA will also be an issue. CERCLA requirements may apply, and both DOE and NRC regulations will impact the transportation of DOE mixed waste to an off-site treatment facility. DOE waste managers will need to be cognizant of all applicable regulations as mixed-waste treatability study programs are initiated.

  1. THE RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER EVALUATION OF LOW TANK LEVEL MIXING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK RETRIEVAL 10516

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, A.

    2009-12-08

    technology have proven to be difficult. Through the RKC, DOE-EM funded an evaluation of adaptable commercial technologies that could assist with the removal of the tank heels. This paper will discuss the efforts and results of developing the RKC to improve communications and discussion of tank waste retrieval through a series of meetings designed to identify technical gaps in retrieval technologies at the DOE Hanford and Savannah River Sites. This paper will also describe the results of an evaluation of commercially available technologies for low level mixing as they might apply to HLW tank heel retrievals.

  2. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: Second Quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect

    R. Evans

    1999-12-01

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts an Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the second quarter 1999 is based on 618 samples of air (including airborne radioactivity, fine particulates, and atmospheric moisture), precipitation, milk, drinking water, sheep, wild game tissues, and environmental radiation. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radiation, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons testing, and nuclear operations around the world. No measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  3. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: Third Quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect

    R. Evans

    2000-03-01

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts an offsite environmental surveillance program for the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the third quarter of 1999 is based on 704 samples of air, fine particulates, atmospheric moisture, precipitation, milk, and food. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radiation, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons testing, and nuclear operations around the world. No! measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  4. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: First Quarter 1999

    SciTech Connect

    R. Evans

    1999-09-01

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts an Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the first quarter 1999 is based on 564 samples of air (including airborne radioactivity, fine particulates, and atmospheric moisture), precipitation, milk, and wild game tissues. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radiation, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons ! testing, an d nuclear operations around the world. No measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  5. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program Report: Fourth Quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect

    T. Saffle; R. Evans

    1999-08-01

    The Environmental Science and Research Foundation conducts the Offsite Environmental Surveillance Program at the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Foundation's environmental surveillance program monitors the effects, if any, of US Department of Energy (DOE) activities on the offsite environment, collects data to confirm compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations, and observes any trends in the environmental levels of radioactivity. This report for the fourth quarter 1998 is based on 622 samples collected of air, fine particulates, atmospheric moisture, precipitation, water, milk, potatoes, and game animals. All concentrations of radioactivity found in these samples were consistent with concentrations which have been found in sampling during recent quarters and which have been attributed in the past to natural background radioactivity, worldwide fallout from past nuclear weapons testing, an! d nuclear operations around the world. No measured concentrations could be directly attributed to operations at the INEEL, although statistical differences did exist between on-site and distant gross beta concentrations. No evidence could be found to link these differences with a specific INEEL source. Concentrations in all samples were below the guidelines set by both the DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for protection of the public.

  6. Does age matter? The influence of age on response rates in a mixed-mode survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gigliotti, Larry M.; Dietsch, Alia

    2014-01-01

    The appeal of cost savings and faster results has fish and wildlife management agencies considering the use of Internet surveys instead of traditional mail surveys to collect information from their constituents. Internet surveys, however, may suffer from differential age-related response rates, potentially producing biased results if certain age groups respond to Internet surveys differently than they do to mail surveys. We examined this concern using data from a mixed-mode angler survey conducted in South Dakota following the 2011 fishing season. Results indicated that young anglers (16–18) had the lowest return rates and senior anglers (65+) had the highest, regardless of survey mode. Despite this consistency in response rates, we note two concerns: (a) lower Internet response rates and (b) different age groups represented by the Internet and mail survey samples differed dramatically. Findings indicate that constituent groups may be represented differently with the use of various survey modes.

  7. Employment of Low-Income African American and Latino Teens: Does Neighborhood Social Mix Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Anna; Lucero, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    We quantify how teen employment outcomes for low-income African Americans and Latinos relate to their neighborhood conditions during ages 14–17. Data come from surveys of Denver Housing Authority (DHA) households who have lived in public housing scattered throughout Denver County. Because DHA household allocation mimics random assignment to neighborhood, this program represents a natural experiment for overcoming geographic selection bias. Our logistic and Tobit regression analyses found overall greater odds of teen employment and more hours worked for those who lived in neighborhoods with higher percentages of pre-1940 vintage housing, property crime rates and child abuse rates, though the strength of relationships was highly contingent on gender and ethnicity. Teen employment prospects of African Americans were especially diminished by residence in more socially vulnerable, violent neighborhoods, implying selective potential gains from social mixing alternatives. PMID:26273120

  8. How does the Redi parameter for mesoscale mixing impact global climate in an Earth System Model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradal, Marie-Aude; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2014-09-01

    A coupled climate model is used to examine the impact of an increase in the mixing due to mesoscale eddies on the global climate system. A sixfold increase in the Redi mixing coefficient ARedi, which is within the admissible range of variation, has the overall effect of warming the global-mean surface air and sea surface temperatures by more than 1°C. Locally, sea surface temperatures increase by up to 7°C in the North Pacific and by up to 4°C in the Southern Ocean, with corresponding impacts on the ice concentration and ice extent in polar regions. However, it is not clear that the changes in heat transport from tropics to poles associated with changing this coefficient are primarily responsible for these changes. We found that the changes in the transport of heat are often much smaller than changes in long-wave trapping and short-wave absorption. Additionally, changes in the advective and diffusive transport of heat toward the poles often oppose each other. However, we note that the poleward transport of salt increases near the surface as ARedi increases. We suggest a causal chain in which enhanced eddy stirring leads to increased high-latitude surface salinity reducing salt stratification and water column stability and enhancing convection, triggering two feedback loops. In one, deeper convection prevents sea ice formation, which decreases albedo, which increases SW absorption, further increasing SST and decreasing sea ice formation. In the other, increased SST and reduced sea ice allow for more water vapor in the atmosphere, trapping long-wave radiation. Destratifying the polar regions is thus a potential way in which changes in ocean circulation might warm the planet.

  9. Off-Site Trip Leaders: Selecting Appropriate Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Will

    1996-01-01

    Well-trained off-site trip leaders can turn a trip into a positive educational lesson. American Camping Association standards are referenced, and some personality traits are suggested as criteria for determining the suitability of staff to act responsibly "in loco director." Discusses factors that determine counselor-to-camper ratios, medical…

  10. 40 CFR 279.24 - Off-site shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Used Oil Generators § 279.24 Off-site shipments... oil is transported only by transporters who have obtained EPA identification numbers. (a) Self... identification number, used oil that is generated at the generator's site and used oil collected from...

  11. 40 CFR 279.24 - Off-site shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Used Oil Generators § 279.24 Off-site shipments. Except as provided in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, generators must ensure that their used...-transportation of small amounts to approved collection centers. Generators may transport, without an...

  12. 40 CFR 68.22 - Offsite consequence analysis parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... analysis parameters. (a) Endpoints. For analyses of offsite consequences, the following endpoints shall be used: (1) Toxics. The toxic endpoints provided in appendix A of this part. (2) Flammables. The endpoints for flammables vary according to the scenarios studied: (i) Explosion. An overpressure of 1...

  13. 40 CFR 68.22 - Offsite consequence analysis parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... analysis parameters. (a) Endpoints. For analyses of offsite consequences, the following endpoints shall be used: (1) Toxics. The toxic endpoints provided in appendix A of this part. (2) Flammables. The endpoints for flammables vary according to the scenarios studied: (i) Explosion. An overpressure of 1...

  14. 40 CFR 68.22 - Offsite consequence analysis parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... analysis parameters. (a) Endpoints. For analyses of offsite consequences, the following endpoints shall be used: (1) Toxics. The toxic endpoints provided in appendix A of this part. (2) Flammables. The endpoints for flammables vary according to the scenarios studied: (i) Explosion. An overpressure of 1...

  15. Off-Site Faculty: Perspectives on Online Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Barbara L.; Goodson, Carole; Miertschin, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a cross case analysis involving faculty teaching online from off-site international and interstate locations. The study yielded enabling factors, benefits, communication systems, and challenges in the areas of administration, curriculum, communications, and faculty characteristics. The benefits included the opportunity to be…

  16. 40 CFR 68.30 - Defining offsite impacts-population.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-population... impacts—population. (a) The owner or operator shall estimate in the RMP the population within a circle... defined in § 68.22(a). (b) Population to be defined. Population shall include residential population....

  17. 40 CFR 68.30 - Defining offsite impacts-population.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-population... impacts—population. (a) The owner or operator shall estimate in the RMP the population within a circle... defined in § 68.22(a). (b) Population to be defined. Population shall include residential population....

  18. 40 CFR 68.30 - Defining offsite impacts-population.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-population... impacts—population. (a) The owner or operator shall estimate in the RMP the population within a circle... defined in § 68.22(a). (b) Population to be defined. Population shall include residential population....

  19. 40 CFR 68.30 - Defining offsite impacts-population.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-population... impacts—population. (a) The owner or operator shall estimate in the RMP the population within a circle... defined in § 68.22(a). (b) Population to be defined. Population shall include residential population....

  20. 40 CFR 68.30 - Defining offsite impacts-population.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-population... impacts—population. (a) The owner or operator shall estimate in the RMP the population within a circle... defined in § 68.22(a). (b) Population to be defined. Population shall include residential population....

  1. 40 CFR 279.24 - Off-site shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Used Oil Generators § 279.24 Off-site shipments. Except as provided in paragraphs (a) through (c) of this section, generators must ensure that their used...-transportation of small amounts to approved collection centers. Generators may transport, without an...

  2. 40 CFR 273.55 - Off-site shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... materials under 49 CFR 171.8, the shipment must be properly described on a shipping paper in accordance with the applicable Department of Transportation regulations under 49 CFR part 172. ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Off-site shipments. 273.55 Section...

  3. 40 CFR 273.61 - Off-site shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... destination facility rejects a shipment or a portion of a shipment, he must contact the shipper to notify him... facility must: (1) Send the shipment back to the original shipper, or (2) If agreed to by both the shipper... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Off-site shipments. 273.61 Section...

  4. 40 CFR 68.33 - Defining offsite impacts-environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-environment. 68.33 Section 68.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... impacts—environment. (a) The owner or operator shall list in the RMP environmental receptors within...

  5. 40 CFR 68.33 - Defining offsite impacts-environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-environment. 68.33 Section 68.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... impacts—environment. (a) The owner or operator shall list in the RMP environmental receptors within...

  6. 40 CFR 68.33 - Defining offsite impacts-environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-environment. 68.33 Section 68.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... impacts—environment. (a) The owner or operator shall list in the RMP environmental receptors within...

  7. 40 CFR 68.33 - Defining offsite impacts-environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-environment. 68.33 Section 68.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... impacts—environment. (a) The owner or operator shall list in the RMP environmental receptors within...

  8. 40 CFR 68.33 - Defining offsite impacts-environment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Defining offsite impacts-environment. 68.33 Section 68.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... impacts—environment. (a) The owner or operator shall list in the RMP environmental receptors within...

  9. Evaluation of candidate monitoring technologies for multi-metal emissions from a U.S. DOE mixed waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Dunn, J.E. Jr.; Sallie, R.; Peeler, J.W.; Kinner, L.L.; Shigehara, R.T.

    1998-12-31

    A field evaluation of three candidate monitoring techniques for multi-metal emissions from a mixed waste incinerator was performed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator located at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The test was designed to compare measurements of three multi-metals monitoring systems with EPA Reference Method 29 measurements to determine the relative performance of the monitoring systems at varying stack conditions and their deployment potential based on current status. The three monitoring systems were the Hazardous Element Sampling Train (HEST) developed by Cooper Environmental Services, the Trace-AIR on-line inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system from Thermo Jarrell Ash Corporation, and a laser induced breakdown spectrometer (LIBS) based system from Sandia National Laboratories.

  10. Application of DOE prescribed guides to the evaluation of Hanford`s Mixed Low Level Solid Waste Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, B.F.; Nash, C.R.

    1994-10-01

    A recent Westinghouse Hanford Company report (WHC-SD-W100-ES-008, February, 1994), compared a Vitrification process to the WRAP-2A Grout/PE process for the treatment of Mixed Low Level Waste (MLLW). This comparison applied a limited scope numerical evaluation to compare technology complexity of the two processes, but focused primarily on capital and operating costs. The work reported here is supplementary to WHC-SD-Wl00-ES-008. It provides a record of the application of the more formal DOE-prescribed criteria (Treatment Selection Guides for Federal Facility Compliance Act Draft Site Treatment Plans) to the Vitrification and Grout/PE processes previously evaluated. Results of the evaluation favored the Grout/PE process by a weighted score of 83 to 78 over the Plasma arc vitrification process.

  11. Stabilization of multiple mixed waste streams from Oak Ridge DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, E.F.; Spence, R.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1997-12-31

    IT was contracted to assist in designing and performing a statistically based series of treatability studies on stabilization and solidification of various waste streams from DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation. The waste streams were generated by a variety of processes used in the manufacture of nuclear weapon components and fuel. The treatability studies were designed to provide information on the effects of various quantities of stabilization reagents on the characteristics of the final waste form. Primary performance criteria were no free liquid and meet or exceed LDR leachability levels at 28-day cure. Secondary performance criteria were various implementability parameters. Characteristics monitored were unconfined compressive strength (UCS), rate of set, free liquids, metals leachability, unit weight, and radionuclide leachability. Stabilization reagents used in the study included Portland cement, fly ash, perlite, and blast furnace slag. Twenty formulations were tested for each waste stream. These formulations are statistical extreme vertices desired that was formulated by PNL. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Energy Systems) and IT were conducting parallel programs on different waste streams. A standardized set of test procedures and stabilization reagents were used by IT and Energy Systems. By design formulations were determined that failed and met all primary and secondary performance criteria. The 28-day cured waste-grout mixtures had the consistency ranging form pudding-like to soil-like to monoliths with UCS greater than 5000 psi. Generally, formulations that were monoliths with greater than 100 psi compressive strength had lower leachabilities and liquid bleed. The effect of waste chemical composition on the leachability is discussed.

  12. MERCURY REMOVAL FROM DOE SOLID MIXED WASTE USING THE GEMEP(sm) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), Metcalf and Eddy (M and E), in association with General Electric Corporate Research and Development Center (GE-CRD), Colorado Minerals Research Institute (CMRI), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), conducted laboratory-scale and bench-scale tests of the General Electric Mercury Extraction Process technology on two mercury-contaminated mixed solid wastes from U. S. Department of Energy sites: sediment from the East Fork of Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge (samples supplied by Oak Ridge National Laboratory), and drummed soils from Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL). Fluorescent lamps provided by GE-CRD were also studied. The GEMEP technology, invented and patented by the General Electric Company, uses an extraction solution composed of aqueous potassium iodide plus iodine to remove mercury from soils and other wastes. The extraction solution is regenerated by chemical oxidation and reused, after the solubilized mercury is removed from solution by reducing it to the metallic state. The results of the laboratory- and bench-scale testing conducted for this project included: (1) GEMEP extraction tests to optimize extraction conditions and determine the extent of co-extraction of radionuclides; (2) pre-screening (pre-segregation) tests to determine if initial separation steps could be used effectively to reduce the volume of material needing GEMEP extraction; and (3) demonstration of the complete extraction, mercury recovery, and iodine recovery and regeneration process (known as locked-cycle testing).

  13. 38 CFR 36.4364 - Documentation and related requirements-flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements-flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite facilities. 36.4364 Section 36.4364 Pensions...—flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite facilities. (a) Expandable condominiums. The following...) Other flexible condominiums. Condominiums containing withdrawable real estate (contractable...

  14. 38 CFR 36.4364 - Documentation and related requirements-flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements-flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite facilities. 36.4364 Section 36.4364 Pensions...—flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite facilities. (a) Expandable condominiums. The following...) Other flexible condominiums. Condominiums containing withdrawable real estate (contractable...

  15. 38 CFR 36.4364 - Documentation and related requirements-flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements-flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite facilities. 36.4364 Section 36.4364 Pensions...—flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite facilities. (a) Expandable condominiums. The following...) Other flexible condominiums. Condominiums containing withdrawable real estate (contractable...

  16. 38 CFR 36.4364 - Documentation and related requirements-flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements-flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite facilities. 36.4364 Section 36.4364 Pensions...—flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite facilities. (a) Expandable condominiums. The following...) Other flexible condominiums. Condominiums containing withdrawable real estate (contractable...

  17. 38 CFR 36.4364 - Documentation and related requirements-flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements-flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite facilities. 36.4364 Section 36.4364 Pensions...—flexible condominiums and condominiums with offsite facilities. (a) Expandable condominiums. The following...) Other flexible condominiums. Condominiums containing withdrawable real estate (contractable...

  18. Pollution Prevention Plan for the Y-12 Analytical Chemistry Organization Off-Site Union Valley Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. G.

    2010-03-01

    The Y-12 Analytical Chemistry Organization (ACO) Off-Site Union Valley Facility (Union Valley Facility) is managed by Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, L.L.C. (B and W Y-12) through the Y-12 National Security Complex organization. Accordingly, the Y-12 Pollution Prevention Program encompasses the operations conducted at the Union Valley Facility. The Y-12 Program is designed to fully comply with state, federal and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements concerning waste minimization/pollution prevention as documented in the Y-12 Pollution Prevention Program Plan. The Program is formulated to reduce the generation and toxicity of all Y-12 wastes in all media, including those wastes generated by the Union Valley Facility operations. All regulatory and DOE requirements are met by the Y-12 Program Plan.

  19. An exposure assessment of radionuclide emissions associated with potential mixed-low level waste disposal facilities at fifteen DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.A.; Socolof, M.L.

    1996-05-01

    A screening method was developed to compare the doses received via the atmospheric pathway at 15 potential DOE MLLW (mixed low-level waste) sites. Permissible waste concentrations were back calculated using the radioactivity NESHAP (National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) in 40 FR 61 (DOE Order 5820.2A performance objective). Site-specific soil and meteorological data were used to determine permissible waste concentrations (PORK). For a particular radionuclide, perks for each site do not vary by more than one order of magnitude. perks of {sup 14}C are about six orders of magnitude more restrictive than perks of {sup 3}H because of differences in liquid/vapor partitioning, decay, and exposure dose. When comparing results from the atmospheric pathway to the water and intruder pathways, {sup 14}C disposal concentrations were limited by the atmospheric pathway for most arid sites; for {sup 3}H, the atmospheric pathway was not limiting at any of the sites. Results of this performance evaluation process are to be used for planning for siting of disposal facilities.

  20. 40 CFR 279.58 - Off-site shipments of used oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Off-site shipments of used oil. 279.58....58 Off-site shipments of used oil. Used oil processors/re-refiners who initiate shipments of used oil off-site must ship the used oil using a used oil transporter who has obtained an EPA...

  1. 13 CFR 120.1025 - Off-site reviews and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Off-site reviews and monitoring... Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1025 Off-site reviews and monitoring. SBA may conduct off-site reviews and monitoring of SBA Lenders, Intermediaries, and NTAPs, including SBA...

  2. 13 CFR 120.1025 - Off-site reviews and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Off-site reviews and monitoring... Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1025 Off-site reviews and monitoring. SBA may conduct off-site reviews and monitoring of SBA Lenders, Intermediaries, and NTAPs, including SBA...

  3. 13 CFR 120.1025 - Off-site reviews and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Off-site reviews and monitoring. 120.1025 Section 120.1025 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1025 Off-site reviews and monitoring. SBA may conduct off-site reviews and monitoring of SBA...

  4. 13 CFR 120.1025 - Off-site reviews and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Off-site reviews and monitoring... Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1025 Off-site reviews and monitoring. SBA may conduct off-site reviews and monitoring of SBA Lenders, Intermediaries, and NTAPs, including SBA...

  5. Habitat effects on condition of doe mule deer in arid mixed woodland-grassland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Lomas, L.A.; Kamienski, T.

    2007-01-01

    Productivity of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus Raf.) populations is closely linked to individual nutritional condition. We modeled body fat of individual does as a function of vegetation cover, composition, and water characteristics of their annual, summer, and winter home ranges in north-central New Mexico. We also modeled home range size as a function of the same characteristics. Levels of body fat were most closely and negatively related to the amount of pinyon-juniper in an individual deer's annual home range (F1,21 = 7.6; P = 0.012; r2 = 0.26). Pinyon-juniper types provided little (combined ground cover of preferred forbs and shrubs = 5.7%) mule deer forage but were included in home ranges in excess of their availability on the landscape, likely because of security cover attributes. Proportion of grasslands in home ranges was most strongly related to both annual (F1,23 = 4.9; P = 0.037; r2 = 0.18) and summer (F2,25 = 5.7; P = 0.009; r2 = 0.31) home range sizes, and home ranges increased as the grassland component increased, indicating that this habitat type was providing little value to mule deer. Grassland (0.2% combined cover of preferred forb and shrub) and montane conifer (3.2% ground cover of preferred forb and shrub) habitat types similarly lacked preferred mule deer food, and grasslands also lacked cover. Most immediate gains in mule deer habitat in north-central New Mexico may be attained by management of pinyon-juniper communities to increase forage quantity and quality while maintaining cover attributes. Gains can also be realized in grasslands, but here management must establish both cover and forage.

  6. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgin, C.R.; Armstrong, C.; Daugherty, N.M.; Foppe, T.L.; Petrocchi, A.J.; Southward, B.

    1990-05-01

    This project plan for Phase II summarizes the design of a project to complete analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Federal, state, and local governments develop emergency plans for facilities that may affect the public in the event of an accidental release of nuclear or hazardous materials. One of the purposes of these plans is to identify EPZs where actions might be necessary to protect public health. Public protective actions include sheltering, evacuation, and relocation. Agencies use EPZs to develop response plans and to determine needed resources. The State of Colorado, with support from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Rocky Flats contractors, has developed emergency plans and EPZs for the Rocky Flats Plant periodically beginning in 1980. In Phase II, Interim Emergency Planning Zones Analysis, Maximum Credible Accident'' we will utilize the current Rocky Flats maximum credible accident (MCA), existing dispersion methodologies, and upgraded dosimetry methodologies to update the radiological EPZs. Additionally, we will develop recommendations for EPZs for nonradiological hazardous materials releases and evaluate potential surface water releases from the facility. This project will allow EG G Rocky Flats to meet current commitments to the state of Colorado and make steady, tangible improvements in our understanding of risk to offsite populations during potential emergencies at the Rocky Flats Plant. 8 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Application service provider (ASP) financial models for off-site PACS archiving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Liu, Brent J.; McCoy, J. Michael; Enzmann, Dieter R.

    2003-05-01

    For the replacement of its legacy Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (approx. annual workload of 300,000 procedures), UCLA Medical Center has evaluated and adopted an off-site data-warehousing solution based on an ASP financial with a one-time single payment per study archived. Different financial models for long-term data archive services were compared to the traditional capital/operational costs of on-site digital archives. Total cost of ownership (TCO), including direct and indirect expenses and savings, were compared for each model. Financial parameters were considered: logistic/operational advantages and disadvantages of ASP models versus traditional archiving systems. Our initial analysis demonstrated that the traditional linear ASP business model for data storage was unsuitable for large institutions. The overall cost markedly exceeds the TCO of an in-house archive infrastructure (when support and maintenance costs are included.) We demonstrated, however, that non-linear ASP pricing models can be cost-effective alternatives for large-scale data storage, particularly if they are based on a scalable off-site data-warehousing service and the prices are adapted to the specific size of a given institution. The added value of ASP is that it does not require iterative data migrations from legacy media to new storage media at regular intervals.

  8. Conceptual Design Report: Nevada Test Site Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Project

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-01-31

    Environmental cleanup of contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and test sites generates radioactive waste that must be disposed. Site cleanup activities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex are projected to continue through 2050. Some of this waste is mixed waste (MW), containing both hazardous and radioactive components. In addition, there is a need for MW disposal from other mission activities. The Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision designates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as a regional MW disposal site. The NTS has a facility that is permitted to dispose of onsite- and offsite-generated MW until November 30, 2010. There is not a DOE waste management facility that is currently permitted to dispose of offsite-generated MW after 2010, jeopardizing the DOE environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. A mission needs document (CD-0) has been prepared for a newly permitted MW disposal facility at the NTS that would provide the needed capability to support DOE's environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. This report presents a conceptual engineering design for a MW facility that is fully compliant with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The facility, which will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the NTS, will provide an approximately 20,000-cubic yard waste disposal capacity. The facility will be licensed by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP).

  9. Overview of Nevada Test Site Radioactive and Mixed Waste Disposal Operations

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Carilli; S.K. Krenzien; R.G. Geisinger; S.J. Gordon; B. Quinn

    2009-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is responsible for carrying out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and low-level radioactive mixed waste (MW) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Core elements of this mission are ensuring safe and cost-effective disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the NTS related to LLW and MW. Covered topics include: the first year of direct funding for NTS waste disposal operations; zero tolerance policy for non-compliant packages; the suspension of mixed waste disposal; waste acceptance changes; DOE Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) auditing; the 92-Acre Area closure plan; new eligibility requirements for generators; and operational successes with unusual waste streams.

  10. Maximally exposed offsite individual location determination for NESHAPS compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2000-03-13

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the use of the computer program CAP88 for demonstrating compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS.) One of the inputs required for CAP88 is the location of the maximally exposed individual (MEI) by sector and distance. Distances to the MEI have been determined for 15 different potential release locations at SRS. These locations were compared with previous work and differences were analyzed. Additionally, SREL Conference Center was included as a potential offsite location since in the future it may be used as a dormitory. Worst sectors were then determined based on the distances.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv0899 adopts a mixed α/β structure and does not form a transmembrane β-barrel

    PubMed Central

    Teriete, Peter; Yao, Yong; Kolodzik, Adrian; Yu, Jinghua; Song, Houhui; Niederweis, Michael; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2010-01-01

    The membrane protein, Rv0899 (OmpATb), from M. tuberculosis, has been proposed to act as an outer membrane porin and to contribute to the bacterium's adaptation to the acidic environment of the phagosome during infection. The gene is restricted to pathogenic mycobacteria and, thus, is an attractive candidate for the development of anti-TB chemotherapy. The 326-residue protein contains three domains: an N-terminal domain (residues 1-72) which includes a sequence of 20 hydrophobic amino acids that is required for membrane translocation; a central B domain (residues 73-200) with homology to the conserved putative lipid-binding BON (bacterial OsmY and nodulation) superfamily; and a C domain (residues 201-326) with homology to the OmpA-C-like superfamily of periplasmic peptidoglycan-binding sequences, found in several types of bacterial membrane proteins, including in the C-terminus of the E. coli outer membrane protein OmpA. We have characterized the structure and dynamics of the B and C domains, and have determined the three-dimensional structure of the B domain. Rv0899 does not form a transmembrane β-barrel. Residues 73 to 326 form a mixed α/β globular structure, encompassing two independently folded modules corresponding to the B and C domains connected by a flexible linker. The B domain folds with three parallel/antiparallel α-helices packed against six parallel/antiparallel β-strands which form a flat β-sheet. The core is hydrophobic while the exterior is polar and predominantly acidic. The structure of a BON homology domain is revealed here for the first time. In light of this unexpected structure, it is hard to reconcile an outer membrane porin activity with the central domain of the protein. The structure of the B domain and the overall architecture of the protein suggest alternative modes of membrane association. PMID:20199110

  12. Peripheral blood late mixed chimerism in leucocyte subpopulations following allogeneic stem cell transplantation for childhood malignancies: does it matter?

    PubMed

    Pichler, Herbert; Fritsch, Gerhard; König, Margit; Daxberger, Helga; Glogova, Evgenia; Pötschger, Ulrike; Breuer, Sabine; Lawitschka, Anita; Güclü, Ece D; Karlhuber, Susanne; Holter, Wolfgang; Haas, Oskar A; Lion, Thomas; Matthes-Martin, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    The impact of persistent mixed chimerism (MC) after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains unclarified. We investigated the incidence of MC in peripheral blood beyond day +50 after HSCT and its impact on rejection, chronic graft-versus-host disease (c-GvHD) and relapse in 161 children receiving allogeneic HSCT for haematological malignancies. The 1-year incidence of late MC was 26%. Spontaneous conversion to complete donor chimerism (CC) occurred in 43% of patients as compared to 62% after donor lymphocyte infusions. No graft rejection occurred. The 1-year incidence of c-GvHD was 20 ± 7% for MC, and 18 ± 4% for CC patients (P = 0·734). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) according to chimerism status at days +50 and +100 was 22 ± 4% for CC patients vs. 22 ± 8% for MC patients (day +50; P = 0·935) and 21 ± 4% vs. 20 ± 7% (day +100; P = 0·907). Three-year CIRs in patients with persistent MC and patients with CC/limited MC were comparable (8 ± 7% vs. 19 ± 4%; P = 0·960). HSCT for acute leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome as secondary malignancies (hazard ratio (HR) 4·7; P = 0·008), for AML (HR 3·0; P = 0·02) and from mismatched donors (HR 3·1; P = 0·03) were independent factors associated with relapse. Our data suggest that late MC neither protects from c-GvHD nor does it reliably predict impending disease relapse. PMID:26996395

  13. Extensive management of field margins enhances their potential for off-site soil erosion mitigation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hamada E; Reineking, Björn

    2016-03-15

    Soil erosion is a widespread problem in agricultural landscapes, particularly in regions with strong rainfall events. Vegetated field margins can mitigate negative impacts of soil erosion off-site by trapping eroded material. Here we analyse how local management affects the trapping capacity of field margins in a monsoon region of South Korea, contrasting intensively and extensively managed field margins on both steep and shallow slopes. Prior to the beginning of monsoon season, we equipped a total of 12 sites representing three replicates for each of four different types of field margins ("intensive managed flat", "intensive managed steep", "extensive managed flat" and "extensive managed steep") with Astroturf mats. The mats (n = 15/site) were placed before, within and after the field margin. Sediment was collected after each rain event until the end of the monsoon season. The effect of management and slope on sediment trapping was analysed using linear mixed effects models, using as response variable either the sediment collected within the field margin or the difference in sediment collected after and before the field margin. There was no difference in the amount of sediment reaching the different field margin types. In contrast, extensively managed field margins showed a large reduction in collected sediment before and after the field margins. This effect was pronounced in steep field margins, and increased with the size of rainfall events. We conclude that a field margin management promoting a dense vegetation cover is a key to mitigating negative off-site effects of soil erosion in monsoon regions, particularly in field margins with steep slopes. PMID:26760443

  14. 13 CFR 109.510 - On-site and off-site reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false On-site and off-site reviews. 109.510 Section 109.510 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION INTERMEDIARY LENDING PILOT PROGRAM Oversight § 109.510 On-site and off-site reviews. (a) General. SBA may conduct off-site reviews and monitoring of ILP...

  15. Why does self-reported emotional intelligence predict job performance? A meta-analytic investigation of mixed EI.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Dana L; Jin, Jing; Newman, Daniel A; O'Boyle, Ernest H

    2015-03-01

    Recent empirical reviews have claimed a surprisingly strong relationship between job performance and self-reported emotional intelligence (also commonly called trait EI or mixed EI), suggesting self-reported/mixed EI is one of the best known predictors of job performance (e.g., ρ = .47; Joseph & Newman, 2010b). Results further suggest mixed EI can robustly predict job performance beyond cognitive ability and Big Five personality traits (Joseph & Newman, 2010b; O'Boyle, Humphrey, Pollack, Hawver, & Story, 2011). These criterion-related validity results are problematic, given the paucity of evidence and the questionable construct validity of mixed EI measures themselves. In the current research, we update and reevaluate existing evidence for mixed EI, in light of prior work regarding the content of mixed EI measures. Results of the current meta-analysis demonstrate that (a) the content of mixed EI measures strongly overlaps with a set of well-known psychological constructs (i.e., ability EI, self-efficacy, and self-rated performance, in addition to Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability, Extraversion, and general mental ability; multiple R = .79), (b) an updated estimate of the meta-analytic correlation between mixed EI and supervisor-rated job performance is ρ = .29, and (c) the mixed EI-job performance relationship becomes nil (β = -.02) after controlling for the set of covariates listed above. Findings help to establish the construct validity of mixed EI measures and further support an intuitive theoretical explanation for the uncommonly high association between mixed EI and job performance--mixed EI instruments assess a combination of ability EI and self-perceptions, in addition to personality and cognitive ability. PMID:25243996

  16. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Phase 3, Sitewide spectrum-of-accidents and bounding EPZ analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Petrocchi, A.J.; Zimmerman, G.A.

    1994-03-14

    During Phase 3 of the EPZ project, a sitewide analysis will be performed applying a spectrum-of-accidents approach to both radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials release scenarios. This analysis will include the MCA but will be wider in scope and will produce options for the State of Colorado for establishing a bounding EPZ that is intended to more comprehensively update the interim, preliminary EPZ developed in Phase 2. EG&G will propose use of a hazards assessment methodology that is consistent with the DOE Emergency Management Guide for Hazards Assessments and other methods required by DOE orders. This will include hazards, accident, safety, and risk analyses. Using this methodology, EG&G will develop technical analyses for a spectrum of accidents. The analyses will show the potential effects from the spectrum of accidents on the offsite population together with identification of offsite vulnerable zones and areas of concern. These analyses will incorporate state-of-the-art technology for accident analysis, atmospheric plume dispersion modeling, consequence analysis, and the application of these evaluations to the general public population at risk. The analyses will treat both radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials and mixtures of both released accidentally to the atmosphere. DOE/RFO will submit these results to the State of Colorado for the State`s use in determining offsite emergency planning zones for the Rocky Flats Plant. In addition, the results will be used for internal Rocky Flats Plant emergency planning.

  17. Analysis of offsite Emergency Planning Zones for Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Inger, J.R. ); Brown-Strattan, M.A. . Rocky Flats Plant)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this quality assurance program was to ensure the quality and technical adequacy of Phase 2 of the Analysis of Offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ) for the Rocky Flats Plant project. Quality assurance was accomplished by managing and controlling the processes in the development of the product. The quality assurance task team conducted audits, reviews, and surveillances of project and related activities. This process contributed to identifying areas where the quality assurance plan was not fully implemented, areas needing improvement, and/or corrective actions resulting in a improved product. During the reviews and audits, several key areas were identified where quality assurance plan implementation needed to be improved. These areas included maintaining adequate documentation, reviewing technical results, making inputs traceable to technical results, and understanding that all personnel are responsible for quality.

  18. Program enhancements resulting from the off-site contamination event

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, J.S.; Meiners, S.E.

    1993-12-31

    This paper provides information relating to an offsite contamination event at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and describes some of the general program enhancements resulting both directly and indirectly from that incident. Workers not routinely assigned to the facility, but certified to operate the facility, received contamination on their skin, and on company issued clothing. The contamination was carried to other areas of the building into non-radiological areas and eventually contaminated a few items of personal clothing, although the levels were below allowable release limits. Underlying causes of the contamination included personnel who performed the required frisking upon exit from the radiological area, but did not recognize or acknowledge the alarm monitor while frisking. In general, the workers had a poor understanding of radiological controls and their application. Worker attitude was no appropriate and inadequate training was also a contributing factor, related to worker attitudes. Immediately following the incident numerous compensatory measures took place.

  19. 13 CFR 120.1025 - Off-site reviews and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Off-site reviews and monitoring. 120.1025 Section 120.1025 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1025 Off-site reviews and monitoring. SBA may conduct...

  20. 24 CFR 242.50 - Funds and finances: off-site utilities and streets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Funds and finances: off-site utilities and streets. 242.50 Section 242.50 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... finances: off-site utilities and streets. The Commissioner shall require assurance of completion of...

  1. 24 CFR 242.50 - Funds and finances: off-site utilities and streets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Funds and finances: off-site utilities and streets. 242.50 Section 242.50 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... finances: off-site utilities and streets. The Commissioner shall require assurance of completion of...

  2. 40 CFR 1400.5 - Internet access to certain off-site consequence analysis data elements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Internet access to certain off-site... DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Public Access § 1400.5 Internet access to certain off... elements in the risk management plan database available on the Internet: (a) The concentration of...

  3. 14 CFR 151.95 - Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... landing aids; and offsite work. 151.95 Section 151.95 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Standards § 151.95 Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work. (a) Boundary... navigational aids is eligible for inclusion in a proj- ect whenever necessitated by development on the...

  4. 14 CFR 151.95 - Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... landing aids; and offsite work. 151.95 Section 151.95 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Standards § 151.95 Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work. (a) Boundary... navigational aids is eligible for inclusion in a proj- ect whenever necessitated by development on the...

  5. 14 CFR 151.95 - Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... landing aids; and offsite work. 151.95 Section 151.95 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Standards § 151.95 Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work. (a) Boundary... navigational aids is eligible for inclusion in a proj- ect whenever necessitated by development on the...

  6. 14 CFR 151.95 - Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... landing aids; and offsite work. 151.95 Section 151.95 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Standards § 151.95 Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work. (a) Boundary... navigational aids is eligible for inclusion in a proj- ect whenever necessitated by development on the...

  7. 40 CFR 1400.5 - Internet access to certain off-site consequence analysis data elements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Internet access to certain off-site... DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Public Access § 1400.5 Internet access to certain off... elements in the risk management plan database available on the Internet: (a) The concentration of...

  8. 40 CFR 1400.5 - Internet access to certain off-site consequence analysis data elements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Internet access to certain off-site... DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Public Access § 1400.5 Internet access to certain off... elements in the risk management plan database available on the Internet: (a) The concentration of...

  9. 40 CFR 1400.5 - Internet access to certain off-site consequence analysis data elements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Internet access to certain off-site... DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Public Access § 1400.5 Internet access to certain off... elements in the risk management plan database available on the Internet: (a) The concentration of...

  10. 40 CFR 1400.5 - Internet access to certain off-site consequence analysis data elements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Internet access to certain off-site... DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Public Access § 1400.5 Internet access to certain off... elements in the risk management plan database available on the Internet: (a) The concentration of...

  11. 24 CFR 242.50 - Funds and finances: off-site utilities and streets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Funds and finances: off-site utilities and streets. 242.50 Section 242.50 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... finances: off-site utilities and streets. The Commissioner shall require assurance of completion of...

  12. 24 CFR 242.50 - Funds and finances: off-site utilities and streets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Funds and finances: off-site utilities and streets. 242.50 Section 242.50 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... finances: off-site utilities and streets. The Commissioner shall require assurance of completion of...

  13. 24 CFR 242.50 - Funds and finances: off-site utilities and streets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Funds and finances: off-site utilities and streets. 242.50 Section 242.50 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing... finances: off-site utilities and streets. The Commissioner shall require assurance of completion of...

  14. 24 CFR 242.47 - Insured advances for building components stored off-site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (d) Advances. (1) Before an advance for a building component stored off-site is insured: (i) The... for building components stored off-site. (a) Building components. In insured advances for building..., if the components are stored at a location approved by the mortgagee and HUD. (2) Each...

  15. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Waste at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Denise Lach; Stephanie Sanford

    2006-09-01

    A consensus workshop was developed and convened with ten state regulators to characterize concerns regarding emerging bioremediation technology to be used to clean-up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at US DOE sites. Two questions were explored: integrated questions: (1) What impact does participation in a consensus workshop have on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of state regulators regarding bioremediation technology? (2) How effective is a consensus workshop as a strategy for eliciting and articulating regulators’ concerns regarding the use of bioremediation to clean up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at U.S. Department of Energy Sites around the county? State regulators met together for five days over two months to learn about bioremediation technology and develop a consensus report of their recommendations regarding state regulatory concerns. In summary we found that panel members: - quickly grasped the science related to bioremediation and were able to effectively interact with scientists working on complicated issues related to the development and implementation of the technology; - are generally accepting of in situ bioremediation, but concerned about costs, implementation (e.g., institutional controls), and long-term effectiveness of the technology; - are concerned equally about technological and implementation issues; and - believed that the consensus workshop approach to learning about bioremediation was appropriate and useful. Finally, regulators wanted decision makers at US DOE to know they are willing to work with DOE regarding innovative approaches to clean-up at their sites, and consider a strong relationship between states and the DOE as critical to any effective clean-up. They do not want perceive themselves to be and do not want others to perceive them as barriers to successful clean-up at their sites.

  16. On-site or off-site treatment of medical waste: a challenge.

    PubMed

    Taghipour, Hassan; Mohammadyarei, Taher; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohamad; Asl Hashemi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Treating hazardous-infectious medical waste can be carried out on-site or off-site of health-care establishments. Nevertheless, the selection between on-site and off-site locations for treating medical waste sometimes is a controversial subject. Currently in Iran, due to policies of Health Ministry, the hospitals have selected on-site-treating method as the preferred treatment. The objectives of this study were to assess the current condition of on-site medical waste treatment facilities, compare on-site medical waste treatment facilities with off-site systems and find the best location of medical waste treatment. To assess the current on-site facilities, four provinces (and 40 active hospitals) were selected to participate in the survey. For comparison of on-site and off-site facilities (due to non availability of an installed off-site facility) Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was employed. The result indicated that most on-site medical waste treating systems have problems in financing, planning, determining capacity of installations, operation and maintenance. AHP synthesis (with inconsistency ratio of 0.01 < 0.1) revealed that, in total, the off-site treatment of medical waste was in much higher priority than the on-site treatment (64.1% versus 35.9%). According to the results of study it was concluded that the off-site central treatment can be considered as an alternative. An amendment could be made to Iran's current medical waste regulations to have infectious-hazardous waste sent to a central off-site installation for treatment. To begin and test this plan and also receive the official approval, a central off-site can be put into practice, at least as a pilot in one province. Next, if it was practically successful, it could be expanded to other provinces and cities. PMID:24739145

  17. Scoping evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gruebel, M.M.; Waters, R.D.; Langkopf, B.S.

    1997-05-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a scoping evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of the hazardous metals in mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Eight hazardous metals were evaluated: arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver. The analysis considered transport only through the groundwater pathway. The results are reported as site-specific estimates of maximum concentrations of each hazardous metal in treated mixed low-level waste that do not exceed the performance measures established for the analysis. Also reported are site-specific estimates of travel times of each hazardous metal to the point of compliance.

  18. 10 years and 20,000 sources: the offsite source recovery project

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, Julia R; Abeyta, Cristy L; Pearson, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted sealed sources for ten years. In January 2009, GTRI announced that the project had recovered 20,000 sealed radioactive sources. This project grew out of early efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program. Sealed source recovery was initially considered a waste management activity, as evidenced by its initial organization under the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) program. After the terrorist attacks of 2001, however, the interagency community began to recognize the threat posed by excess and unwanted radiological material, particularly those that could not be disposed at the end of their useful life. After being transferred to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to be part of GTRI, OSRP's mission was expanded to include not only material that would be classified as Greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) when it became waste, but also any other materials that might be a 'national security consideration.' This paper discusses OSRP's history, recovery operations, expansion to accept high-activity beta-gamma-emitting sealed sources and devices and foreign-possessed sources, and more recent efforts such as cooperative projects with the Council on Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and involvement in GTRI's Search and Secure project. Current challenges and future work will also be discussed.

  19. Analysis of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of residuals from the treatment of mixed low-level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M.; Langkopf, B.S.; Kuehne, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has stored or expects to generate over the next five years more than 130,000 m{sup 3} of mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Before disposal, MLLW is usually treated to comply with the land disposal restrictions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Depending on the type of treatment, the original volume of MLLW and the radionuclide concentrations in the waste streams may change. These changes must be taken into account in determining the necessary disposal capacity at a site. Treatment may remove the characteristic in some waste that caused it to be classified as mixed. Treatment of some waste may, by reduction of the mass, increase the concentrations of some transuranic radionuclides sufficiently so that it becomes transuranic waste. In this report, the DOE MLLW streams were analyzed to determine after-treatment volumes and radionuclide concentrations. The waste streams were reclassified as residual MLLW or low-level or transuranic waste resulting from treatment. The volume analysis indicated that about 89,000 m{sup 3} of waste will require disposal as residual MLLW. Fifteen DOE sites were then evaluated to determine their capabilities for hosting disposal facilities for some or all of the residual MLLW. Waste streams associated with about 90% of the total residual MLLW volume are likely to present no significant issues for disposal and require little additional analysis. Future studies should focus on the remaining waste streams that are potentially problematic by examining site-specific waste acceptance criteria, alternative treatment processes, alternative waste forms for disposal, and pending changes in regulatory requirements.

  20. Average Stand Age from Forest Inventory Plots Does Not Describe Historical Fire Regimes in Ponderosa Pine and Mixed-Conifer Forests of Western North America

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jens T.; Safford, Hugh D.; North, Malcolm P.; Fried, Jeremy S.; Gray, Andrew N.; Brown, Peter M.; Dolanc, Christopher R.; Dobrowski, Solomon Z.; Falk, Donald A.; Farris, Calvin A.; Franklin, Jerry F.; Fulé, Peter Z.; Hagmann, R. Keala; Knapp, Eric E.; Miller, Jay D.; Smith, Douglas F.; Swetnam, Thomas W.; Taylor, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying historical fire regimes provides important information for managing contemporary forests. Historical fire frequency and severity can be estimated using several methods; each method has strengths and weaknesses and presents challenges for interpretation and verification. Recent efforts to quantify the timing of historical high-severity fire events in forests of western North America have assumed that the “stand age” variable from the US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program reflects the timing of historical high-severity (i.e. stand-replacing) fire in ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests. To test this assumption, we re-analyze the dataset used in a previous analysis, and compare information from fire history records with information from co-located FIA plots. We demonstrate that 1) the FIA stand age variable does not reflect the large range of individual tree ages in the FIA plots: older trees comprised more than 10% of pre-stand age basal area in 58% of plots analyzed and more than 30% of pre-stand age basal area in 32% of plots, and 2) recruitment events are not necessarily related to high-severity fire occurrence. Because the FIA stand age variable is estimated from a sample of tree ages within the tree size class containing a plurality of canopy trees in the plot, it does not necessarily include the oldest trees, especially in uneven-aged stands. Thus, the FIA stand age variable does not indicate whether the trees in the predominant size class established in response to severe fire, or established during the absence of fire. FIA stand age was not designed to measure the time since a stand-replacing disturbance. Quantification of historical “mixed-severity” fire regimes must be explicit about the spatial scale of high-severity fire effects, which is not possible using FIA stand age data. PMID:27196621

  1. Average Stand Age from Forest Inventory Plots Does Not Describe Historical Fire Regimes in Ponderosa Pine and Mixed-Conifer Forests of Western North America.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jens T; Safford, Hugh D; North, Malcolm P; Fried, Jeremy S; Gray, Andrew N; Brown, Peter M; Dolanc, Christopher R; Dobrowski, Solomon Z; Falk, Donald A; Farris, Calvin A; Franklin, Jerry F; Fulé, Peter Z; Hagmann, R Keala; Knapp, Eric E; Miller, Jay D; Smith, Douglas F; Swetnam, Thomas W; Taylor, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying historical fire regimes provides important information for managing contemporary forests. Historical fire frequency and severity can be estimated using several methods; each method has strengths and weaknesses and presents challenges for interpretation and verification. Recent efforts to quantify the timing of historical high-severity fire events in forests of western North America have assumed that the "stand age" variable from the US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program reflects the timing of historical high-severity (i.e. stand-replacing) fire in ponderosa pine and mixed-conifer forests. To test this assumption, we re-analyze the dataset used in a previous analysis, and compare information from fire history records with information from co-located FIA plots. We demonstrate that 1) the FIA stand age variable does not reflect the large range of individual tree ages in the FIA plots: older trees comprised more than 10% of pre-stand age basal area in 58% of plots analyzed and more than 30% of pre-stand age basal area in 32% of plots, and 2) recruitment events are not necessarily related to high-severity fire occurrence. Because the FIA stand age variable is estimated from a sample of tree ages within the tree size class containing a plurality of canopy trees in the plot, it does not necessarily include the oldest trees, especially in uneven-aged stands. Thus, the FIA stand age variable does not indicate whether the trees in the predominant size class established in response to severe fire, or established during the absence of fire. FIA stand age was not designed to measure the time since a stand-replacing disturbance. Quantification of historical "mixed-severity" fire regimes must be explicit about the spatial scale of high-severity fire effects, which is not possible using FIA stand age data. PMID:27196621

  2. A mixed diet supplemented with L-arabinose does not alter glycaemic or insulinaemic responses in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Halschou-Jensen, Kia; Bach Knudsen, Knud E; Nielsen, Søren; Bukhave, Klaus; Andersen, Jens R

    2015-01-14

    In addition to a yet-to-be published study showing arabinose to have an inhibiting effect on maltase, in vitro studies have shown L-arabinose to exert an inhibiting effect on small-intestinal sucrase and maltase and the consumption of a sucrose-rich drink containing L-arabinose to exert positive effects on postprandial blood glucose, insulin and C-peptide responses in humans. However, the effects of adding L-arabinose to mixed meals on the indices of glucose control are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the positive effects of L-arabinose added to a sugar drink could be reproduced in subjects consuming a mixed meal containing sucrose and/or starch from wheat flour. A total of seventeen healthy men participated in study 1, a randomised, double-blind, cross-over trial. In this study, the subjects consumed two different breakfast meals containing sucrose and starch from wheat flour (meal A) or starch from wheat flour (meal B) supplemented with 0, 5 and 10 % L-arabinose by weight after a 12 h fast. A total of six healthy men participated in study 2, a randomised, double-blind, cross-over trial. In this study, the subjects also consumed meal B served in two different textures and a liquid meal with maltose supplemented with 0 and 20% L-arabinose. In addition, 1·5 g of paracetamol was chosen as an indirect marker to assess gastric emptying. Postprandial plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide concentrations were measured regularly for 3 h. The results of the present study showed that the peak plasma concentration, time to reach peak plasma concentration or AUC values of glucose, insulin and C-peptide were not altered after consumption of the test meals. Overall, it was not possible to reproduce the beneficial effects of L-arabinose added to sucrose drinks when L-arabinose was mixed in a solid or semi-solid mixed meal. PMID:25400106

  3. Evaluating off-site disposal of low-level waste at LANL-9498

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, Kenneth M; French, Sean B; Boyance, Julien A

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory generates a wide range of waste types, including solid low-level radioactive waste (LL W), in conducting its national security mission and other science and technology activities. Although most ofLANL's LLW has been disposed on-site, limitations on expansion, stakeholder concerns, and the potential for significant volumes from environmental remediation and decontamination and demolition (D&D) have led LANL to evaluate the feasibility of increasing off-site disposal. It appears that most of the LL W generated at LANL would meet the Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Nevada Test Site or the available commercial LL W disposal site. Some waste is considered to be problematic to transport to off-site disposal even though it could meet the off-site Waste Acceptance Criteria. Cost estimates for off-site disposal are being evaluated for comparison to estimated costs under the current plans for continued on-site disposal.

  4. Code System for Calculating Early Offsite Consequences from Nuclear Reactor Accidents.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-06-10

    SMART calculates early offsite consequences from nuclear reactor accidents. Once the air and ground concentrations of the radionuclide are estimated, the early dose to an individual is calculated via three pathways: cloudshine, short-term groundshine, and inhalation.

  5. 40 CFR 279.58 - Off-site shipments of used oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Used Oil Processors and Re-Refiners § 279.58 Off-site shipments of used oil. Used oil processors/re-refiners who initiate shipments of used...

  6. 24 CFR 242.47 - Insured advances for building components stored off-site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mortgagor shall: (A) Obtain a bill of sale for the component; (B) Give the mortgagee a security agreement... only for components stored off-site in a quantity required to permit uninterrupted installation at...

  7. 77 FR 59001 - Fee for Services To Support FEMA's Offsite Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Fee for Services To Support FEMA's Offsite Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is establishing a fiscal year (FY) 2014 hourly rate...

  8. 75 FR 19985 - Fee for Services To Support FEMA's Offsite Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Fee for Services To Support FEMA's Offsite Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has established a fiscal year (FY) 2010 hourly rate...

  9. 40 CFR 279.58 - Off-site shipments of used oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Used Oil Processors and Re-Refiners § 279.58 Off-site shipments of used oil. Used oil processors/re-refiners who initiate shipments of used...

  10. Does mixed-species flocking influence how birds respond to a gradient of land-use intensity?

    PubMed

    Mammides, Christos; Chen, Jin; Goodale, Uromi Manage; Kotagama, Sarath Wimalabandara; Sidhu, Swati; Goodale, Eben

    2015-07-22

    Conservation biology is increasingly concerned with preserving interactions among species such as mutualisms in landscapes facing anthropogenic change. We investigated how one kind of mutualism, mixed-species bird flocks, influences the way in which birds respond to different habitat types of varying land-use intensity. We use data from a well-replicated, large-scale study in Sri Lanka and the Western Ghats of India, in which flocks were observed inside forest reserves, in 'buffer zones' of degraded forest or timber plantations, and in areas of intensive agriculture. We find flocks affected the responses of birds in three ways: (i) species with high propensity to flock were more sensitive to land use; (ii) different flock types, dominated by different flock leaders, varied in their sensitivity to land use and because following species have distinct preferences for leaders, this can have a cascading effect on followers' habitat selection; and (iii) those forest-interior species that remain outside of forests were found more inside flocks than would be expected by chance, as they may use flocks more in suboptimal habitat. We conclude that designing policies to protect flocks and their leading species may be an effective way to conserve multiple bird species in mixed forest and agricultural landscapes. PMID:26156772

  11. Does mixed-species flocking influence how birds respond to a gradient of land-use intensity?

    PubMed Central

    Mammides, Christos; Chen, Jin; Goodale, Uromi Manage; Kotagama, Sarath Wimalabandara; Sidhu, Swati; Goodale, Eben

    2015-01-01

    Conservation biology is increasingly concerned with preserving interactions among species such as mutualisms in landscapes facing anthropogenic change. We investigated how one kind of mutualism, mixed-species bird flocks, influences the way in which birds respond to different habitat types of varying land-use intensity. We use data from a well-replicated, large-scale study in Sri Lanka and the Western Ghats of India, in which flocks were observed inside forest reserves, in ‘buffer zones' of degraded forest or timber plantations, and in areas of intensive agriculture. We find flocks affected the responses of birds in three ways: (i) species with high propensity to flock were more sensitive to land use; (ii) different flock types, dominated by different flock leaders, varied in their sensitivity to land use and because following species have distinct preferences for leaders, this can have a cascading effect on followers' habitat selection; and (iii) those forest-interior species that remain outside of forests were found more inside flocks than would be expected by chance, as they may use flocks more in suboptimal habitat. We conclude that designing policies to protect flocks and their leading species may be an effective way to conserve multiple bird species in mixed forest and agricultural landscapes. PMID:26156772

  12. Overview of the Department of Energy's Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project (ORERP).

    PubMed

    Church, B W; Wheeler, D L; Campbell, C M; Nutley, R V; Anspaugh, L R

    1990-11-01

    The Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project (ORERP) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy to (1) collect, preserve, and disseminate historical data related to radioactive fallout and health effects from nuclear testing, and (2) reconstrut, insofar as possible, the exposures to the off-site public from nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site and doses to individuals resulting from these exposures. The goals, methods, and example results of the ORERP are presented. PMID:2211109

  13. Overview of the Department of Energy's Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project (ORERP)

    SciTech Connect

    Church, B.W.; Wheeler, D.L.; Campbell, C.M.; Nutley, R.V.; Anspaugh, L.R. )

    1990-11-01

    The Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project (ORERP) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy to (1) collect, preserve, and disseminate historical data related to radioactive fallout and health effects from nuclear testing, and (2) reconstruct, insofar as possible, the exposures to the off-site public from nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site and doses to individuals resulting from these exposures. The goals, methods, and example results of the ORERP are presented.

  14. Offsite source recovery project - ten years of sealed source recovery and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, Julia Rose; Pearson, Mike; Witkowski, Ioana; Wald - Hopkins, Mark; Cuthbertson, A

    2010-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Offsite Source Recovery Project (OSRP) has been recovering excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources for ten years. In January 2009, GTRI announced that the project had recovered 20,000 sealed radioactive sources (this number has since increased to more than 23,000). This project grew out of early efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to recover and disposition excess Plutonium-239 (Pu-239) sealed sources that were distributed in the 1960s and 1970s under the Atoms for Peace Program. Decades later, these sources began to exceed their special form certifications or fall out of regular use. As OSRP has collected and stored sealed sources, initially using 'No Path Forward' waste exemptions for storage within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, it has consistently worked to create disposal pathways for the material it has recovered. The project was initially restricted to recovering sealed sources that would meet the definition of Greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste, assisting DOE in meeting its obligations under the Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Act Amendments (PL 99-240) to provide disposal for this type of waste. After being transferred from DOE-Environmental Management (EM) to the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to be part of GTRI, OSRP's mission was expanded to include not only material that would be classified as GTCC when it became waste, but also any other materials that might constitute a 'national security consideration.' It was recognized at the time that the GTCC category was a waste designation having to do with environmental consequence, rather than the threat posed by deliberate or accidental misuse. The project faces barriers to recovery in many areas, but disposal continues to be one of the more difficult to overcome. This paper discusses OSRP's disposal efforts over its 10-year history. For sources meeting the DOE definition of

  15. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: On-Site Treatment of Low Level Mixed Waste

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-03-22

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1292) to evaluate the proposed treatment of low level mixed waste (LLMW) at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site). The purpose of the action is to treat LLMW in order to meet the Land Disposal Restrictions specified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the waste acceptance criteria of the planned disposal site(s). Approximately 17,000 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of LLMW are currently stored at the Site. Another 65,000 m{sup 3}of LLMW are likely to be generated by Site closure activities (a total of 82,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW). About 35,000 m{sup 3} can be directly disposed of off-site without treatment, and most of the remaining 47,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW can be treated at off-site treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. However, some LLMW will require treatment on-site, either because it does not meet shipping requirements or because off-site treatment is not available for these particular types of LLMW. Currently, this LLMW is stored at the Site pending the development and implementation of effective treatment processes. The Site needs to treat this LLMW on-site prior to shipment to off-site disposal facilities, in order to meet the DOE long-term objective of clean up and closure of the Site. All on-site treatment of LLMW would comply with applicable Federal and State laws designed to protect public health and safety and to enhance protection of the environment. The EA describes and analyzes the environmental effects of the proposed action (using ten mobile treatment processes to treat waste on-site), and the alternatives of treating waste onsite (using two fixed treatment processes), and of taking no action. The EA was the subject of a public comment period from February 3 to 24, 1999. No written or other comments regarding the EA were received.

  16. Does Combination Therapy with Statins and Fibrates Prevent Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetic Patients with Atherogenic Mixed Dyslipidemia?

    PubMed Central

    Agouridis, Aris P.; Rizos, Christos V.; Elisaf, Moses S.; Filippatos, Theodosios D.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Statins have an established efficacy in the management of dyslipidemia primarily by decreasing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and thus decreasing CVD risk. They also have a favorable safety profile. Despite the statin-mediated benefit of CVD risk reduction a residual CVD risk remains, especially in T2DM patients with high triglyceride (TG) and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) values. Fibrates decrease TG levels, increase HDL-C concentrations, and improve many other atherosclerosis-related variables. Fibrate/statin co-administration improves the overall lipoprotein profile in patients with mixed dyslipidemia and may reduce the residual CVD risk during statin therapy. However, limited data exists regarding the effects of statin/fibrate combination on CVD outcomes in patients with T2DM. In the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study the statin/fibrate combination did not significantly reduce the rate of CVD events compared with simvastatin/placebo in patients with T2DM. However, it did show a possible benefit in a pre-specified analysis in the subgroup of patients with high TG and low HDL-C levels. Furthermore, in the ACCORD study the simvastatin/fenofibrate combination significantly reduced the rate of progression of retinopathy compared with statin/placebo administration in patients with T2DM. The present review presents the available data regarding the effects of statin/fibrate combination in patients with T2DM and atherogenic mixed dyslipidemia. PMID:24380091

  17. Safety analysis approaches or mixed transuranic waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, J. C.; Dwight, C. C.; Forrester, R. J.; Lehto, M. A.; Pan, Y. C.

    1999-02-10

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed a survey of assumptions and techniques used for safety analyses at seven sites that handle or store mixed transuranic (TRU) waste operated by contractors for the US Department of Energy (DOE). While approaches to estimating on-site and off-site consequences of hypothetical accidents differ, there are commonalities in all of the safety studies. This paper identifies key parameters and methods used to estimate the radiological consequences associated with release of waste forms under abnormal conditions. Specific facilities are identified by letters with their safety studies listed in a bibliography rather than as specific references so that similarities and differences are emphasized in a nonjudgmental manner. References are provided for specific parameters used to project consequences associated with compromise of barriers and dispersion of potentially hazardous materials. For all of the accidents and sites, estimated dose commitments are well below guidelines even using highly conservative assumptions. Some of the studies quantified the airborne concentrations of toxic materials; this paper only addresses these analyses briefly, as an entire paper could be dedicated to this subject.

  18. Savannah River Site mixed waste Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). Volumes 1 and 2 and reference document: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, E.; Noller, D.K.; Wierzbicki, K.S.; Bailey, L.L.

    1995-07-13

    The DOE is required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to prepare site treatment plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. This proposed plan contains Savannah River Site`s preferred options and schedules for constructing new facilities, and otherwise obtaining treatment for mixed wastes. The proposed plan consists of 2 volumes. Volume 1, Compliance Plan, identifies the capacity to be developed and the schedules as required. Volume 2, Background, provides a detailed discussion of the preferred options with technical basis, plus a description of the specific waste streams. Chapters are: Introduction; Methodology; Mixed low level waste streams; Mixed transuranic waste; High level waste; Future generation of mixed waste streams; Storage; Process for evaluation of disposal issues in support of the site treatment plans discussions; Treatment facilities and treatment technologies; Offsite waste streams for which SRS treatment is the Preferred Option (Naval reactor wastes); Summary information; and Acronyms and glossary. This revision does not contain the complete revised report, but only those pages that have been revised.

  19. DOE Building America Technology and Energy Savings Analysis of Two 2721 ft2 Homes in a Mixed Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Roderick K; Christian, Jeffrey E; Khowailed, Gannate A

    2013-09-01

    The ZEBRAlliance is an opportunity to accelerate progress toward DOE s goal of maximizing cost-effective energy efficiency by investing in a highly leveraged, focused effort to test new ultra-high-efficiency components emerging from ORNL s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partners and others. The Alliance integrated efficient components into the construction of four research houses that will be used as test markets to gauge the integral success of the components and houses. These four research houses are expected to be the first houses used to field-test several newly emerging products such as the ClimateMaster ground-source integrated heat pump, factory assembled ZEHcor walls, and one or more new appliances from Whirlpool Corporation.

  20. Reconstructing ancient sustainability: a comparison of onsite and offsite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubos, Carolin; Dreibrodt, Stefan; Horejs, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    With the onset of sedentism humans started to convert their surroundings. Whereas reconstructions of geochemical traces of settlement activity (e.g. Arrhenius, 1931) or man's pressure on the soils of landscapes (e.g. van Andel et al., 1990; Bork, 1998) were carried out at many sites holistic approaches questioning the sustainability of ancient societies are missing so far. A new approach, applied to the multi layered settlement mound "Cukurici Höyük" (western Anatolia, Turkey) aims at comparing land use intensity and settlement intensity. Land use intensity of the former settlers will be described by determining slope instability phases and quantifying slope deposits at hills adjacent to the settlement. Geochemical and physical properties as well as bio remains will be analysed of the dated debris layers onsite and quantified as matter fluxes. Matter accumulation onsite, being an indicator for settlement intensities, is compared to slope instability phases offsite, describing the impact of former settlers on their environment. The approach aims at quantifying historical settlement pressure over several settlement phases and might shed light on different phases of sustainability in ancient Times. The planned project is imbedded within the archaeological project (ERC Project / Austrian Archaeological Institute) which investigates alternating societal systems in a changing environment between 7000 and 3000 BC. Focus is laid on architectural research, archaeobotany, archaeozoology, lithics, metallurgy, and ore deposit. In a first geoarchaeological field campaign differentiable slope deposits could be proved. These contained datable organic material as well as pottery sherds dating to different historical phases. A well-established archaeological chronosequence of settlement layers will provide the onsite framework for this new project. The paper presents preliminary results of the outlined approach. Additionally several geochemical methodologies applied to the debris

  1. Soy protein isolate does not affect ellagitannin bioavailability and urolithin formation when mixed with pomegranate juice in humans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jieping; Lee, Rupo; Henning, Susanne M; Thames, Gail; Hsu, Mark; ManLam, Hei; Heber, David; Li, Zhaoping

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the effect of mixing soy protein isolate and pomegranate juice (PJ) on the bioavailability and metabolism of ellagitannins (ETs) in healthy volunteers. Eighteen healthy volunteers consumed PJ alone or PJ premixed with soy protein isolate (PJSP). The concentration of plasma ellagic acid (EA) and urine urolithins was measured. There was no significant difference in plasma EA over a 6-h period between the two interventions. While the maximum concentration of plasma EA after PJSP consumption was slightly but significantly lower than after PJ consumption, EA remained in the plasma longer with an elimination half-life t1/2E at 1.36±0.59 versus 1.06±0.47h for PJSP and PJ consumption, respectively. Urinary urolithin A, B and C was not significantly different between the two interventions. In conclusion, premixing soy protein isolate and PJ did not affect the bioavailability or the metabolism of pomegranate ETs in healthy volunteers. PMID:26471685

  2. Processing mixed-waste compressed-gas cylinders at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.I.; Conley, T.B.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1998-05-01

    Until recently, several thousand kilograms of compressed gases were stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, because these cylinders could not be taken off-site in their state of configuration for disposal. Restrictions on the storage of old compressed-gas cylinders compelled the Waste Management Organization of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) to dispose of these materials. Furthermore, a milestone in the ORR Site Treatment Plan required repackaging and shipment off-site of 21 cylinders by September 30, 1997. A pilot project, coordinated by the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was undertaken to evaluate and recontainerize or neutralize these cylinders, which are mixed waste, to meet that milestone. Because the radiological component was considered to be confined to the exterior of the cylinder, the contents (once removed from the cylinder) could be handled as hazardous waste, and the cylinder could be handled as low-level waste (LLW). This pilot project to process 21 cylinders was important because of its potential impact. The successful completion of the project provides a newly demonstrated technology which can now be used to process the thousands of additional cylinders in inventory across the DOE complex. In this paper, many of the various aspects of implementing this project, including hurdles encountered and the lessons learned in overcoming them, are reported.

  3. OFF-SITE MONITORING FOR THE MIGHTY OAK NUCLEAR TEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    After a nuclear explosives test, code name Mighty Oak, the tunnel leading to the test point became contaminated with radioactive debris. To re-enter and recover valuable equipment and data, the DOE purged the tunnel air using particulate and charcoal filters to minimize discharge...

  4. Using RFID to Enhance Security in Off-Site Data Storage

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Carmona, Miguel A.; Marsa-Maestre, Ivan; de la Hoz, Enrique; Velasco, Juan R.

    2010-01-01

    Off-site data storage is one of the most widely used strategies in enterprises of all sizes to improve business continuity. In medium-to-large size enterprises, the off-site data storage processes are usually outsourced to specialized providers. However, outsourcing the storage of critical business information assets raises serious security considerations, some of which are usually either disregarded or incorrectly addressed by service providers. This article reviews these security considerations and presents a radio frequency identification (RFID)-based, off-site, data storage management system specifically designed to address security issues. The system relies on a set of security mechanisms or controls that are arranged in security layers or tiers to balance security requirements with usability and costs. The system has been successfully implemented, deployed and put into production. In addition, an experimental comparison with classical bar-code-based systems is provided, demonstrating the system’s benefits in terms of efficiency and failure prevention. PMID:22163638

  5. Final Technical Report for "Ice nuclei relation to aerosol properties: Data analysis and model parameterization for IN in mixed-phase clouds" (DOE/SC00002354)

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Prenni; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2012-09-28

    Clouds play an important role in weather and climate. In addition to their key role in the hydrologic cycle, clouds scatter incoming solar radiation and trap infrared radiation from the surface and lower atmosphere. Despite their importance, feedbacks involving clouds remain as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate models. To better simulate cloud processes requires better characterization of cloud microphysical processes, which can affect the spatial extent, optical depth and lifetime of clouds. To this end, we developed a new parameterization to be used in numerical models that describes the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentrations active to form ice crystals in mixed-phase (water droplets and ice crystals co-existing) cloud conditions as these depend on existing aerosol properties and temperature. The parameterization is based on data collected using the Colorado State University continuous flow diffusion chamber in aircraft and ground-based campaigns over a 14-year period, including data from the DOE-supported Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The resulting relationship is shown to more accurately represent the variability of ice nuclei distributions in the atmosphere compared to currently used parameterizations based on temperature alone. When implemented in one global climate model, the new parameterization predicted more realistic annually averaged cloud water and ice distributions, and cloud radiative properties, especially for sensitive higher latitude mixed-phase cloud regions. As a test of the new global IN scheme, it was compared to independent data collected during the 2008 DOE-sponsored Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). Good agreement with this new data set suggests the broad applicability of the new scheme for describing general (non-chemically specific) aerosol influences on IN number concentrations feeding mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds. Finally, the parameterization was implemented into a regional

  6. Environmental assessment for the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility: Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0466) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 for the proposed completion of construction and subsequent operation of a central Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF), in the southeastern portion of Technical Area III at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (SNLA). The RMWMF is designed to receive, store, characterize, conduct limited bench-scale treatment of, repackage, and certify low-level waste (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) (as necessary) for shipment to an offsite disposal or treatment facility. The RMWMF was partially constructed in 1989. Due to changing regulatory requirements, planned facility upgrades would be undertaken as part of the proposed action. These upgrades would include paving of road surfaces and work areas, installation of pumping equipment and lines for surface impoundment, and design and construction of air locks and truck decontamination and water treatment systems. The proposed action also includes an adjacent corrosive and reactive metals storage area, and associated roads and paving. LLW and MW generated at SNLA would be transported from the technical areas to the RMWMF in containers approved by the Department of Transportation. The RMWMF would not handle nonradioactive hazardous waste. Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed completion of construction and operation of the RMWMF does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement for the proposed action is not required.

  7. Wireless remote control clinical image workflow: utilizing a PDA for offsite distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent J.; Documet, Luis; Documet, Jorge; Huang, H. K.; Muldoon, Jean

    2004-04-01

    Last year we presented in RSNA an application to perform wireless remote control of PACS image distribution utilizing a handheld device such as a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA). This paper describes the clinical experiences including workflow scenarios of implementing the PDA application to route exams from the clinical PACS archive server to various locations for offsite distribution of clinical PACS exams. By utilizing this remote control application, radiologists can manage image workflow distribution with a single wireless handheld device without impacting their clinical workflow on diagnostic PACS workstations. A PDA application was designed and developed to perform DICOM Query and C-Move requests by a physician from a clinical PACS Archive to a CD-burning device for automatic burning of PACS data for the distribution to offsite. In addition, it was also used for convenient routing of historical PACS exams to the local web server, local workstations, and teleradiology systems. The application was evaluated by radiologists as well as other clinical staff who need to distribute PACS exams to offsite referring physician"s offices and offsite radiologists. An application for image workflow management utilizing wireless technology was implemented in a clinical environment and evaluated. A PDA application was successfully utilized to perform DICOM Query and C-Move requests from the clinical PACS archive to various offsite exam distribution devices. Clinical staff can utilize the PDA to manage image workflow and PACS exam distribution conveniently for offsite consultations by referring physicians and radiologists. This solution allows the radiologist to expand their effectiveness in health care delivery both within the radiology department as well as offisite by improving their clinical workflow.

  8. Patterns and kinetics of T-cell chimerism after allo transplant with alemtuzumab-based conditioning: mixed chimerism protects from GVHD, but does not portend disease recurrence.

    PubMed

    van Besien, Koen; Dew, Alexander; Lin, Shang; Joseph, Loren; Godley, Lucy A; Larson, Richard A; Odenike, Toyosi; Rich, Elizabeth; Stock, Wendy; Wickrema, Amittha; Artz, Andrew S

    2009-11-01

    We analyzed the kinetics of CD3 chimerism in 120 consecutive allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients receiving alemtuzumab-based conditioning. Fifty-two received fludarabine/melphalan, 44 received fludarabine/busulfan, and 24 received clofarabine/melphalan in addition to alemtuzumab. Post-transplant GVHD prophylaxis consisted of tacrolimus. No prophylactic donor lymphocyte infusion or other interventions were used for mixed donor chimerism (MDC). Bone marrow (BM) and/or peripheral blood (PB) samples were obtained at 30 days, 100 days, 180 days, and 1 year following HCT. On Day 30, 15% of assessable patients had MDC in the CD3 compartment. This had increased to 50% by Day 100, and to 63% by Day 180. MDC predicted for a lower risk of acute (p = 0.08) and particularly of chronic GVHD (p = 0.01). MDC was not associated with subsequent relapse or TRM (p = 0.67 and 0.72, respectively). A decline of more than 15% in CD3 chimerism between Day 30 and Day 180 predicted for a 40% risk of subsequent disease recurrence. The observation of MDC after alemtuzumab conditioning does not by itself constitute a risk factor for relapse and should not be used to guide therapeutic intervention. By contrast, declining donor chimerism between Day 30 and Day 180 is associated with a somewhat increased risk of disease recurrence. The high incidence of MDC after alemtuzumab containing conditioning contributes to the low risk of acute and chronic GVHD. PMID:19821799

  9. 75 FR 69470 - Tele Atlas North America, Inc., Currently Doing Business as Tom Tom Including Off-Site Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... published in the Federal Register on January 25, 2010 (75 FR 3938). At the request of the state, the... Including Off-Site Workers Reporting to This Location, Lebanon, NH; Tele Atlas North America, Inc. Currently..., applicable to workers of Tele Atlas North America, Inc. in Lebanon, New Hampshire and off-site...

  10. 40 CFR 1400.9 - Access to off-site consequence analysis information by State and local government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... analysis information by State and local government officials. 1400.9 Section 1400.9 Protection of... REQUIREMENTS; RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS UNDER THE CLEAN AIR ACT SECTION 112(r)(7); DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Access to...

  11. 40 CFR 1400.9 - Access to off-site consequence analysis information by State and local government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... analysis information by State and local government officials. 1400.9 Section 1400.9 Protection of... REQUIREMENTS; RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS UNDER THE CLEAN AIR ACT SECTION 112(r)(7); DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Access to...

  12. 40 CFR 1400.9 - Access to off-site consequence analysis information by State and local government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... analysis information by State and local government officials. 1400.9 Section 1400.9 Protection of... REQUIREMENTS; RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS UNDER THE CLEAN AIR ACT SECTION 112(r)(7); DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Access to...

  13. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...—Offsite property 2 Column 2—Other offsite property Alpha emission from transuranic isotopes 3.5 microcuries per square meter 0.35 microcuries per square meter. Alpha emission from isotopes other than transuranic isotopes 35 microcuries per square meter 3.5 microcuries per square meter. Beta or gamma...

  14. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...—Offsite property 2 Column 2—Other offsite property Alpha emission from transuranic isotopes 3.5 microcuries per square meter 0.35 microcuries per square meter. Alpha emission from isotopes other than transuranic isotopes 35 microcuries per square meter 3.5 microcuries per square meter. Beta or gamma...

  15. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...—Offsite property 2 Column 2—Other offsite property Alpha emission from transuranic isotopes 3.5 microcuries per square meter 0.35 microcuries per square meter. Alpha emission from isotopes other than transuranic isotopes 35 microcuries per square meter 3.5 microcuries per square meter. Beta or gamma...

  16. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...—Offsite property 2 Column 2—Other offsite property Alpha emission from transuranic isotopes 3.5 microcuries per square meter 0.35 microcuries per square meter. Alpha emission from isotopes other than transuranic isotopes 35 microcuries per square meter 3.5 microcuries per square meter. Beta or gamma...

  17. 10 CFR 840.4 - Criterion I-Substantial discharge of radioactive material or substantial radiation levels offsite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...—Offsite property 2 Column 2—Other offsite property Alpha emission from transuranic isotopes 3.5 microcuries per square meter 0.35 microcuries per square meter. Alpha emission from isotopes other than transuranic isotopes 35 microcuries per square meter 3.5 microcuries per square meter. Beta or gamma...

  18. 40 CFR 1400.9 - Access to off-site consequence analysis information by State and local government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... analysis information by State and local government officials. 1400.9 Section 1400.9 Protection of... REQUIREMENTS; RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS UNDER THE CLEAN AIR ACT SECTION 112(r)(7); DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Access to...

  19. 40 CFR 1400.9 - Access to off-site consequence analysis information by State and local government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... analysis information by State and local government officials. 1400.9 Section 1400.9 Protection of... REQUIREMENTS; RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS UNDER THE CLEAN AIR ACT SECTION 112(r)(7); DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION OF OFF-SITE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS INFORMATION Access to...

  20. PLUTONIUM/HIGH LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE - DBE OFFSITE DOSE CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. O. Bader

    1999-09-20

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide a bounding dose consequence analysis of the immobilized plutonium (can-in-canister) waste form to be handled at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain. The current concept for the Plutonium Can-in-Canister waste form is provided in Attachment III. A typical design basis event (DBE) defines a scenario that generally includes an initiating event and the sequences of events that follow. This analysis will provide (1) radiological releases and dose consequences for a postulated, bounding DBE and (2) design-related assumptions on which the calculated dose consequences are based. This analysis is part of the safety design basis for the repository. Results will be used in other analyses to determine or modify the safety classification and quality assurance level of repository structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The Quality Assurance (QA) program applies to this calculation. The work reported in this document is part of the analysis of MGR DBEs and is performed using AP-3.12Q, Calculations. The work done for this analysis was evaluated according to QAP-2-0, Control of Activities. This evaluation determined that such activities are subject to DOE/RW/0333PY Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (DOE 1998), requirements. This calculation is quality affecting because the results may be used to support analyses of repository SSCs per QAP-2-3, Classification of Permanent Items.

  1. Offsite radiological consequence analysis for the bounding aircraft crash accident

    SciTech Connect

    OBERG, B.D.

    2003-03-22

    The purpose of this calculation note is to quantitatively analyze a bounding aircraft crash accident for comparison to the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', Appendix A, Evaluation Guideline of 25 rem. The potential of aircraft impacting a facility was evaluated using the approach given in DOE-STD-3014-96, ''Accident Analysis for Aircraft Crash into Hazardous Facilities''. The following aircraft crash frequencies were determined for the Tank Farms in RPP-11736, ''Assessment Of Aircraft Crash Frequency For The Hanford Site 200 Area Tank Farms'': (1) The total aircraft crash frequency is ''extremely unlikely.'' (2) The general aviation crash frequency is ''extremely unlikely.'' (3) The helicopter crash frequency is ''beyond extremely unlikely.'' (4) For the Hanford Site 200 Areas, other aircraft type, commercial or military, each above ground facility, and any other type of underground facility is ''beyond extremely unlikely.'' As the potential of aircraft crash into the 200 Area tank farms is more frequent than ''beyond extremely unlikely,'' consequence analysis of the aircraft crash is required.

  2. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D.

    1983-07-01

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

  3. RESRAD-OFFSITE - a new member of the RESRAD family of codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Biwer, B.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Klett, T.; Zielen, A.; Williams, W.A.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; USDOE

    2009-06-01

    The RESRAD-OFFSITE code provides expanded state-of-the art, cost-effective, and user-friendly methods for evaluating the radiological consequences to a receptor located onsite or outside the area of primary contamination. It calculates radiological dose and excess lifetime cancer risk with the predicted radionuclide concentrations in the environment, and derives soil cleanup guidelines corresponding to a specified dose limit. The RESRAD-OFFSITE code is an extension of the RESRAD (onsite) code, which has been widely used for calculating doses and risks from exposure to radioactively contaminated soils. The development of RESRAD-OFFSITE started more than 10 years ago, but new models and methodologies have been developed, tested, and incorporated since then. Some of the new models have been benchmarked against other independently developed (international) models. The databases used have also expanded to include all the radionuclides (more than 830) contained in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 38 database. Detailed information on the design and application of the RESRAD-OFFSITE code is presented in its recently published User's Manual.

  4. Off-Site Supervision in Social Work Education: What Makes It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Sarah P.; Mertz, Linda K. P.; Fortune, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    The field practicum is the signature pedagogy of the social work profession, yet field directors struggle to find adequate field placements--both in quantity and quality. To accommodate more students with a dwindling pool of practicum sites, creative models of field supervision have emerged. This article considers off-site supervision and its…

  5. OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT: RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas continued its Offsite Radiological Safety Program for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other sites of past underground nuclear tests. For each test, the Laboratory provided airborne ...

  6. 40 CFR 62.15140 - What if all the certified operators must be temporarily offsite?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What if all the certified operators must be temporarily offsite? 62.15140 Section 62.15140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS...

  7. 24 CFR 242.47 - Insured advances for building components stored off-site.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Insured advances for building components stored off-site. 242.47 Section 242.47 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  8. 40 CFR 280.51 - Investigation due to off-site impacts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Investigation due to off-site impacts. 280.51 Section 280.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS (UST) Release Reporting, Investigation, and Confirmation § 280.51 Investigation...

  9. 9 CFR 149.5 - Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of certified swine. 149.5 Section 149.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... § 149.5 Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine. Certified swine moved from a..., collection point, or slaughter facility, must remain segregated from noncertified swine at all times...

  10. 9 CFR 149.5 - Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of certified swine. 149.5 Section 149.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... § 149.5 Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine. Certified swine moved from a..., collection point, or slaughter facility, must remain segregated from noncertified swine at all times...

  11. 9 CFR 149.5 - Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of certified swine. 149.5 Section 149.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... § 149.5 Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine. Certified swine moved from a..., collection point, or slaughter facility, must remain segregated from noncertified swine at all times...

  12. 9 CFR 149.5 - Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of certified swine. 149.5 Section 149.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... § 149.5 Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine. Certified swine moved from a..., collection point, or slaughter facility, must remain segregated from noncertified swine at all times...

  13. 9 CFR 149.5 - Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of certified swine. 149.5 Section 149.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... § 149.5 Offsite identification and segregation of certified swine. Certified swine moved from a..., collection point, or slaughter facility, must remain segregated from noncertified swine at all times...

  14. 40 CFR 300.440 - Procedures for planning and implementing off-site response actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedures for planning and implementing off-site response actions. 300.440 Section 300.440 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES...

  15. OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT. RADIATION MONITORING AROUND UNITED STATES NUCLEAR TEST AREAS, CALENDAR YEAR 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify tre...

  16. A Bookless Library, Part I: Relocating Print Materials to Off-Site Storage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Bethany B.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the feasibility of a bookless library in a research setting. As spaces for collections are being converted for increased study and community spaces, many libraries have been moving low-use collections to off-site storage. Issues regarding the types of storage spaces available are addressed. Concerns and…

  17. STS-26 crewmembers participate in bench review at offsite Boeing Bldg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in bench review at the offsite Boeing Building. Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers tests an electric razor while MS George D. Nelson reviews clipboard checklist and looks over hygiene supplies (razors, deodorants, tooth paste, etc.). Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  18. STS-26 crewmembers participate in bench review at offsite Boeing Bldg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in bench review at the offsite Boeing Building. Left to right Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, MS George D. Nelson, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and Pilot Richard O. Covey, holding clipboards with checklists, look over hygiene supplies (razors, deodorants, tooth paste, etc.). Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  19. 14 CFR 151.95 - Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work. 151.95 Section 151.95 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS Project...

  20. 24 CFR 200.60 - Assurance of completion for offsite facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Assurance of completion for offsite facilities. 200.60 Section 200.60 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and...

  1. Process-based index modeling of landscape vulnerability to off-site agrichemical movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    dentifying areas vulnerable to off-site agrichemical movement and surface and ground water contamination through conventional data collection is labor-intensive, costly and time-consuming. To promote efficient agrichemical use and protect water resources, a process-based index model was developed to...

  2. Process-based modeling of landscape vulnerability to off-site pesticide transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying areas vulnerable to off-site agrichemical movement and surface and ground water contamination through conventional data collection is labor-intensive, costly and time-consuming. To promote efficient pesticide use and protect water resources, a process-based index model was developed to a...

  3. Low-level radioactive waste management: transitioning to off-site disposal at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dorries, Alison M

    2010-11-09

    Facing the closure of nearly all on-site management and disposal capability for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is making ready to ship the majority of LLW off-site. In order to ship off-site, waste must meet the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility's (TSDF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In preparation, LANL's waste management organization must ensure LANL waste generators characterize and package waste compliantly and waste characterization documentation is complete and accurate. Key challenges that must be addressed to successfully make the shift to off-site disposal of LLW include improving the detail, accuracy, and quality of process knowledge (PK) and acceptable knowledge (AK) documentation, training waste generators and waste management staff on the higher standard of data quality and expectations, improved WAC compliance for off-site facilities, and enhanced quality assurance throughout the process. Certification of LANL generators will allow direct off-site shipping of LLW from their facilities.

  4. Analysis of offsite emergency planning zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant. Phase 3, Sitewide spectrum-of-accidents and bounding EPZ analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Petrocchi, A.J.; Smith, M.L.

    1993-10-25

    This Charter provides the basis for a cooperative, interagency effort to conduct Phase III of the ``Analysis of Offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Rocky Flats Plant`` Project. The purpose of this Charter is to define the Project and establish an Oversight Committee management structure together with responsibilities and commitments. This Charter establishes a commitment on the part of the signing agencies to participate in a Phase III EPZ analysis to refine existing EPZs for the Rocky Flats Plant. These agencies agree to commit resources to this Project to fulfill their identified roles. The specific types and levels of resources committed by each agency will be determined as part of the Project planning process. This Charter does not commit any agency to any specific level of effort or resources. It does, however, commit these agencies to support the Phase III analysis to completion.

  5. Fluid Management Plan for the Project Shoal Area, Off-sites Subproject, CAU 447, Revision 0 (with Record of Technical Change No. 1, 2, and 3)

    SciTech Connect

    USDOE /NV

    1999-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has initiated the Off-Site Project to characterize the hazards posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at facilities other than the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Project Shoal Area (PSA) is one of the Off-Sites Project areas located off the NTS, but within the state of Nevada. The PSA is located approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. Four wells were drilled at the PSA in 1996 as part of the site investigation administered through the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). The hydrogeologic data gathered from these wells was used to support the groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling of the PSA. However, the subsequent evaluation of the groundwater model concluded that further delineation of the subsurface was required to reduce uncertainties in the model. In accordance with the FFACO, an addendum to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the proposed PSA subsurface investigation, Corrective Action Unit 447, was developed. The addendum proposed the drilling and construction of four additional wells and the conduct of hydrologic testing at the PSA. This Fluid Management Plan (FMP) provides guidance for the management of fluids generated from the well construction and testing activities at the PSA.

  6. Analysis of offsite dose calculation methodology for a nuclear power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    This technical study reviews the methodology for calculating offsite dose estimates as described in the offsite dose calculation manual (ODCM) for Pennsylvania Power and Light - Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES). An evaluation of the SSES ODCM dose assessment methodology indicates that it conforms with methodology accepted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Using 1993 SSES effluent data, dose estimates are calculated according to SSES ODCM methodology and compared to the dose estimates calculated according to SSES ODCM and the computer model used to produce the reported 1993 dose estimates. The 1993 SSES dose estimates are based on the axioms of Publication 2 of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). SSES Dose estimates based on the axioms of ICRP Publication 26 and 30 reveal the total body estimates to be the most affected.

  7. STS-26 crewmembers participate in bench review at offsite Boeing Bldg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in bench review at the offsite Boeing Building. Commander Frederick H. Hauck reviews a checklist of necessary supplies with Flight Equipment Processing engineer Laura E. Duvall. Pilot Richard O. Covey makes notations on checklist in background. Hygiene supplies (razors, deodorants, brushes, combs, etc.) are displayed on table behind Hauck. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  8. STS-26 crewmembers participate in bench review at offsite Boeing Bldg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in bench review at the offsite Boeing Building. Left to right Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, MS George D. Nelson, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, and Pilot Richard O. Covey, holding clipboards with checklists, look over hygiene supplies (razors, deodorants, tooth paste, etc.). Flight Equipment Processing engineer Laura E. Duvall, standing behind crew members, waits to lend a hand in the 'shopping spree'. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  9. TEMA-DOE annual report, July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) will develop off-site Multi-Jurisdictional Emergency Response Plans (MJERPs) in coordination with Federal, State, and local agencies. The MJERPs will describe actions to minimize the risks to the citizens of Tennessee as a result of an off-site release of hazardous material from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. This report describes actions made during each quarter of the year.

  10. Skeletal muscle oxygen saturation does not estimate mixed venous oxygen saturation in patients with severe left heart failure and additional severe sepsis or septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Podbregar, Matej; Možina, Hugon

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Low cardiac output states such as left heart failure are characterized by preserved oxygen extraction ratio, which is in contrast to severe sepsis. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows noninvasive estimation of skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation (StO2). The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between StO2 and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) in patients with severe left heart failure with or without additional severe sepsis or septic shock. Methods Sixty-five patients with severe left heart failure due to primary heart disease were divided into two groups: groups A (n = 24) and B (n = 41) included patients without and with additional severe sepsis/septic shock, respectively. Thenar muscle StO2 was measured using NIRS in the patients and in 15 healthy volunteers. Results StO2 was lower in group A than in group B and in healthy volunteers (58 ± 13%, 90 ± 7% and 84 ± 4%, respectively; P < 0.001). StO2 was higher in group B than in healthy volunteers (P = 0.02). In group A StO2 correlated with SvO2 (r = 0.689, P = 0.002), although StO2 overestimated SvO2 (bias -2.3%, precision 4.6%). In group A changes in StO2 correlated with changes in SvO2 (r = 0.836, P < 0.001; ΔSvO2 = 0.84 × ΔStO2 - 0.67). In group B important differences between these variables were observed. Plasma lactate concentrations correlated negatively with StO2 values only in group A (r = -0.522, P = 0.009; lactate = -0.104 × StO2 + 10.25). Conclusion Skeletal muscle StO2 does not estimate SvO2 in patients with severe left heart failure and additional severe sepsis or septic shock. However, in patients with severe left heart failure without additional severe sepsis or septic shock, StO2 values could be used to provide rapid, noninvasive estimation of SvO2; furthermore, the trend in StO2 may be considered a surrogate for the trend in SvO2. Trial Registration: NCT00384644 PMID:17227587

  11. ALTERNATIVES OF MACCS2 IN LANL DISPERSION ANALYSIS FOR ONSITE AND OFFSITE DOSES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, John HC

    2012-05-01

    In modeling atmospheric dispersion to determine accidental release of radiological material, one of the common statistical analysis tools used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2). MACCS2, however, has some limitations and shortfalls for both onsite and offsite applications. Alternative computer codes, which could provide more realistic calculations, are being investigated for use at LANL. In the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), the suitability of MACCS2 for the calculation of onsite worker doses was a concern; therefore, ARCON96 was chosen to replace MACCS2. YMP's use of ARCON96 provided results which clearly demonstrated the program's merit for onsite worker safety analyses in a wide range of complex configurations and scenarios. For offsite public exposures, the conservatism of MACCS2 on the treatment of turbulence phenomena at LANL is examined in this paper. The results show a factor of at least two conservatism in calculated public doses. The new EPA air quality model, AERMOD, which implements advanced meteorological turbulence calculations, is a good candidate for LANL applications to provide more confidence in the accuracy of offsite public dose projections.

  12. Hazardous and mixed waste generation at the DOE/ORO installations operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. , during calendar years 1987 and 1988

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli, S.M.; Rivera, A.L.; Eisenhower, B.M.

    1990-09-01

    A program was known as the Hazardous Waste Development, Demonstration, and Disposal (HAZWDDD) Program and was formed to address several waste management issues with the main objective being to ensure that all Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) needs for hazardous and mixed waste were identified and planned for properly. A data base was developed and maintained which contained information concerning all hazardous and mixed waste generated, stored, treated, and/or disposed at the five Energy Systems instal-lations during CY 1987. This document presents an update of the HAZWDDD data base for CY 1988. Summaries and figures concerning the data are presented in the body of the report, and a breakdown of the individual waste streams is presented in Appendix A. All five installations produce purely hazardous and mixed waste. The gaseous diffusion plants and Y-12 produce mixed waste contaminated primarily with uranium isotopes, while the mixed waste generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is contaminated with various radioisotopes. Generation rates of both hazardous and mixed waste are reported, and inventories of mixed waste are discussed. 18 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Options and costs for offsite disposal of oil and gas exploration and production wastes.

    SciTech Connect

    Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-01-01

    In the United States, most of the exploration and production (E&P) wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. Certain types of wastes are not suitable for onsite management, and some well locations in sensitive environments cannot be used for onsite management. In these situations, operators must transport the wastes offsite for disposal. In 1997, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) prepared a report that identified offsite commercial disposal facilities in the United States. This information has since become outdated. Over the past year, Argonne has updated the study through contacts with state oil and gas agencies and commercial disposal companies. The new report, including an extensive database for more than 200 disposal facilities, provides an excellent reference for information about commercial disposal operations. This paper describes Argonne's report. The national study provides summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities found in each state. Data are presented by waste type and by disposal method. The categories of E&P wastes in the database include: contaminated soils, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), oil-based muds and cuttings, produced water, tank bottoms, and water-based muds and cuttings. The different waste management or disposal methods in the database involve: bioremediation, burial, salt cavern, discharge, evaporation, injection, land application, recycling, thermal treatment, and treatment. The database includes disposal costs for each facility. In the United States, most of the 18 billion barrels (bbl) of produced water, 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. However, under certain conditions, operators will seek offsite management options for these E&P wastes. Commercial disposal facilities are offsite businesses that

  14. 25 CFR 247.14 - Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities? 247.14 Section 247.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE USE OF COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY FISHING ACCESS SITES § 247.14 Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities? (a) You must share access...

  15. 25 CFR 247.14 - Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities? 247.14 Section 247.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE USE OF COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY FISHING ACCESS SITES § 247.14 Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities? (a) You must share access...

  16. 25 CFR 247.14 - Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities? 247.14 Section 247.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE USE OF COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY FISHING ACCESS SITES § 247.14 Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities? (a) You must share access...

  17. 25 CFR 247.14 - Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities? 247.14 Section 247.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE USE OF COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY FISHING ACCESS SITES § 247.14 Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities? (a) You must share access...

  18. 25 CFR 247.14 - Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities? 247.14 Section 247.14 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE USE OF COLUMBIA RIVER TREATY FISHING ACCESS SITES § 247.14 Can I hook up a campsite to on-site or off-site utilities? (a) You must share access...

  19. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  20. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  1. Nonemergent percutaneous coronary intervention with off-site surgery backup: an emerging new path to access.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Thomas P

    2005-06-01

    Nonemergent primary coronary intervention (PCI) at hospitals with off-site cardiac surgery backup is currently given a "Class III" indication by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) PCI Guidelines on the basis of "consensus opinion of experts," not on trials or studies (Level of Evidence C). Yet the evidence is mounting, both in the US and abroad, that urgent and elective PCI can be performed safely and effectively at qualified nonsurgical hospitals in controlled circumstances. As the need for PCI grows, especially in the large population with high-risk acute coronary syndromes (ACS), the lack of local access to and underutilization of timely PCI can demonstrably result in inferior outcomes. The multiple clinical, performance, and economic advantages of the broader availability of PCI are discussed extensively in this paper. Removing the requirement for on-site cardiac surgery from nonemergent PCI can also increase procedural volumes at the growing numbers of primary angioplasty programs at hospitals with off-site backup, while also reducing the pressure to build new low-volume cardiac surgery programs merely to support PCI programs. The many US hospitals that are already participating in this growing movement to provide PCI with off-site backup are encouraged to enroll in the ACC National Cardiovascular Data Registry to assure that this strategy is fairly assessed and monitored on a national level. We anticipate that state regulations and national guidelines will continue to evolve and keep pace with this growing movement and with the already-evolving guidelines from abroad. PMID:18340191

  2. STS-26 crewmembers participate in bench review at offsite Boeing Bldg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in bench review at the offsite Boeing Building. Standing behind table filled with various items of onboard attire are (left to right) Commander Frederick H. Hauck, Mission Specialist (MS) David C. Hilmers, Pilot Richard O. Covey, MS John M. Lounge, and MS George D. Nelson. Clothing includes light blue constant wear flight coveralls and jacket, shorts (with velcro for pen and pencil pocket attachment), shirts, socks, and slippers. Table with hygiene supplies and flight coveralls hanging on rack appear in the background. Photograph was taken by Keith Meyers of the NEW YORK TIMES.

  3. A simplified model for calculating early offsite consequences from nuclear reactor accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.K.; Cazzoli, E.G.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

    1988-07-01

    A personal computer-based model, SMART, has been developed that uses an integral approach for calculating early offsite consequences from nuclear reactor accidents. The solution procedure uses simplified meteorology and involves direct analytic integration of air concentration equations over time and position. This is different from the discretization approach currently used in the CRAC2 and MACCS codes. The SMART code is fast-running, thereby providing a valuable tool for sensitivity and uncertainty studies. The code was benchmarked against both MACCS version 1.4 and CRAC2. Results of benchmarking and detailed sensitivity/uncertainty analyses using SMART are presented. 34 refs., 21 figs., 24 tabs.

  4. Addition of high concentration of inorganic selenium in orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) hay diet does not interfere with microbial fermentation in mixed ruminal microorganisms in continuous cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current literature lacks information on ruminal microbial metabolism in response to high selenium (Se) concentration in the diet. We investigated changes in ruminal fermentation when high concentration of Se was administered in mixed ruminal cultures in fermentors. Two mature beef cows, 'tted wi...

  5. How Does Bilingual Instruction Enhance English Achievement? A Mixed-Methods Study of Cantonese-Speaking and Spanish-Speaking Bilingual Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uchikoshi, Yuuko; Maniates, Helen

    2010-01-01

    When literacy instruction is integrated and contextualized in a child's background knowledge and daily experiences, learning is increased. This mixed-methods study describes effective bilingual instruction in second-grade classrooms in the United States where teachers utilize students' linguistic capital and foster home-school connections, two…

  6. Does Linking Mixed-Format Tests Using a Multiple-Choice Anchor Produce Comparable Results for Male and Female Subgroups? Research Report. ETS RR-11-44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyeon; Walker, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of subpopulation invariance indices to evaluate the appropriateness of using a multiple-choice (MC) item anchor in mixed-format tests, which include both MC and constructed-response (CR) items. Linking functions were derived in the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design using an MC-only anchor set for 4…

  7. 1996-1997 TEMA/DOE oversite annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) has entered into a five-year agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide emergency response activities associated with the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The Agreement in Principle (AIP) delineates the duties and responsibilities of the parties. The agreement tasked TEMA with the following responsibilities: develop offsite emergency plans; conduct emergency management training; develop offsite emergency organizations; develop emergency communications; develop emergency facilities; conduct exercises and drills; provide detection and protection equipment; and develop an emergency staff. This document reports on progress on these tasks during the past year.

  8. 1996--1997 TEMA/DOE oversight annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA) has entered into a five-year agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide emergency response activities associated with the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The Agreement in Principle (AIP) delineates the duties and responsibilities of the parties. The agreement tasked TEMA with the following responsibilities: develop offsite emergency plans; conduct emergency management training; develop offsite emergency organizations; develop emergency communications; develop emergency facilities; conduct exercises and drills; provide detection and protection equipment; and develop an emergency staff. This report describes progress on the 14 deliverables connected with this contract.

  9. OFF-SITE SMARTPHONE VS. STANDARD WORKSTATION IN THE RADIOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF SMALL INTESTINAL MECHANICAL OBSTRUCTION IN DOGS AND CATS.

    PubMed

    Noel, Peter G; Fischetti, Anthony J; Moore, George E; Le Roux, Alexandre B

    2016-09-01

    Off-site consultations by board-certified veterinary radiologists benefit residents and emergency clinicians by providing immediate feedback and potentially improving patient outcome. Smartphone devices and compressed images transmitted by email or text greatly facilitate availability of these off-site consultations. Criticism of a smartphone interface for off-site consultation is mostly directed at image degradation relative to the standard radiographic viewing room and monitors. The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional, methods comparison study was to compare the accuracy of abdominal radiographs in two imaging interfaces (Joint Photographic Experts Group, off-site, smartphone vs. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine, on-site, standard workstation) for the diagnosis of small intestinal mechanical obstruction in vomiting dogs and cats. Two board-certified radiologists graded randomized abdominal radiographs using a five-point Likert scale for the presence of mechanical obstruction in 100 dogs or cats presenting for vomiting. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curves for both imaging interfaces was high. The accuracy of the smartphone and traditional workstation was not statistically significantly different for either reviewer (P = 0.384 and P = 0.536). Correlation coefficients were 0.821 and 0.705 for each reviewer when the same radiographic study was viewed in different formats. Accuracy differences between radiologists were potentially related to years of experience. We conclude that off-site expert consultation with a smartphone provides an acceptable interface for accurate diagnosis of small intestinal mechanical obstruction in dogs and cat. PMID:27356300

  10. Off-site toxic consequence assessment: a simplified modeling procedure and case study.

    PubMed

    Guarnaccia, Joe; Hoppe, Tom

    2008-11-15

    An assessment of off-site exposure from spills/releases of toxic chemicals can be conducted by compiling site-specific operational, geographic, demographic, and meteorological data and by using screening-level public-domain modeling tools (e.g., RMP Comp, ALOHA and DEGADIS). In general, the analysis is confined to the following: event-based simulations (allow for the use of known, constant, atmospheric conditions), known receptor distances (on the order of miles or less), short time scale for the distances considered (order of 10's of minutes or less), gently sloping rough terrain, dense and neutrally buoyant gas dispersion, known chemical inventory and infrastructure (used to define source-term), and known toxic endpoint (defines significance). While screening-level models are relatively simple to use, care must be taken to ensure that the results are meaningful. This approach allows one to assess risk from catastrophic release (e.g., via terrorism), or plausible release scenarios (related to standard operating procedures and industry standards). In addition, given receptor distance and toxic endpoint, the model can be used to predict the critical spill volume to realize significant off-site risk. This information can then be used to assess site storage and operation parameters and to determine the most economical and effective risk reduction measures to be applied. PMID:18053643