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Sample records for dominance genetic variance

  1. Dominance genetic variance for traits under directional selection in Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    Sztepanacz, Jacqueline L; Blows, Mark W

    2015-05-01

    In contrast to our growing understanding of patterns of additive genetic variance in single- and multi-trait combinations, the relative contribution of nonadditive genetic variance, particularly dominance variance, to multivariate phenotypes is largely unknown. While mechanisms for the evolution of dominance genetic variance have been, and to some degree remain, subject to debate, the pervasiveness of dominance is widely recognized and may play a key role in several evolutionary processes. Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that the contribution of dominance variance to phenotypic variance may increase with the correlation between a trait and fitness; however, direct tests of this hypothesis are few. Using a multigenerational breeding design in an unmanipulated population of Drosophila serrata, we estimated additive and dominance genetic covariance matrices for multivariate wing-shape phenotypes, together with a comprehensive measure of fitness, to determine whether there is an association between directional selection and dominance variance. Fitness, a trait unequivocally under directional selection, had no detectable additive genetic variance, but significant dominance genetic variance contributing 32% of the phenotypic variance. For single and multivariate morphological traits, however, no relationship was observed between trait-fitness correlations and dominance variance. A similar proportion of additive and dominance variance was found to contribute to phenotypic variance for single traits, and double the amount of additive compared to dominance variance was found for the multivariate trait combination under directional selection. These data suggest that for many fitness components a positive association between directional selection and dominance genetic variance may not be expected. PMID:25783700

  2. Dominance Genetic Variance for Traits Under Directional Selection in Drosophila serrata

    PubMed Central

    Sztepanacz, Jacqueline L.; Blows, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to our growing understanding of patterns of additive genetic variance in single- and multi-trait combinations, the relative contribution of nonadditive genetic variance, particularly dominance variance, to multivariate phenotypes is largely unknown. While mechanisms for the evolution of dominance genetic variance have been, and to some degree remain, subject to debate, the pervasiveness of dominance is widely recognized and may play a key role in several evolutionary processes. Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that the contribution of dominance variance to phenotypic variance may increase with the correlation between a trait and fitness; however, direct tests of this hypothesis are few. Using a multigenerational breeding design in an unmanipulated population of Drosophila serrata, we estimated additive and dominance genetic covariance matrices for multivariate wing-shape phenotypes, together with a comprehensive measure of fitness, to determine whether there is an association between directional selection and dominance variance. Fitness, a trait unequivocally under directional selection, had no detectable additive genetic variance, but significant dominance genetic variance contributing 32% of the phenotypic variance. For single and multivariate morphological traits, however, no relationship was observed between trait–fitness correlations and dominance variance. A similar proportion of additive and dominance variance was found to contribute to phenotypic variance for single traits, and double the amount of additive compared to dominance variance was found for the multivariate trait combination under directional selection. These data suggest that for many fitness components a positive association between directional selection and dominance genetic variance may not be expected. PMID:25783700

  3. Estimation of Additive, Dominance, and Imprinting Genetic Variance Using Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Marcos S.; Bastiaansen, John W. M.; Janss, Luc; Knol, Egbert F.; Bovenhuis, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, exploration of genetic variance in humans, plants, and livestock species has been limited mostly to the use of additive effects estimated using pedigree data. However, with the development of dense panels of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the exploration of genetic variation of complex traits is moving from quantifying the resemblance between family members to the dissection of genetic variation at individual loci. With SNPs, we were able to quantify the contribution of additive, dominance, and imprinting variance to the total genetic variance by using a SNP regression method. The method was validated in simulated data and applied to three traits (number of teats, backfat, and lifetime daily gain) in three purebred pig populations. In simulated data, the estimates of additive, dominance, and imprinting variance were very close to the simulated values. In real data, dominance effects account for a substantial proportion of the total genetic variance (up to 44%) for these traits in these populations. The contribution of imprinting to the total phenotypic variance of the evaluated traits was relatively small (1–3%). Our results indicate a strong relationship between additive variance explained per chromosome and chromosome length, which has been described previously for other traits in other species. We also show that a similar linear relationship exists for dominance and imprinting variance. These novel results improve our understanding of the genetic architecture of the evaluated traits and shows promise to apply the SNP regression method to other traits and species, including human diseases. PMID:26438289

  4. Heritability of heterozygosity offers a new way of understanding why dominant gene action contributes to additive genetic variance.

    PubMed

    Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Hadfield, Jarrod D

    2015-07-01

    Whenever allele frequencies are unequal, nonadditive gene action contributes to additive genetic variance and therefore the resemblance between parents and offspring. The reason for this has not been easy to understand. Here, we present a new single-locus decomposition of additive genetic variance that may give greater intuition about this important result. We show that the contribution of dominant gene action to parent-offspring resemblance only depends on the degree to which the heterozygosity of parents and offspring covary. Thus, dominant gene action only contributes to additive genetic variance when heterozygosity is heritable. Under most circumstances this is the case because individuals with rare alleles are more likely to be heterozygous, and because they pass rare alleles to their offspring they also tend to have heterozygous offspring. When segregating alleles are at equal frequency there are no rare alleles, the heterozygosities of parents and offspring are uncorrelated and dominant gene action does not contribute to additive genetic variance. PMID:26100570

  5. Efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo implementation of Bayesian analysis of additive and dominance genetic variances in noninbred pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Patrik; Hallander, Jon; Hoti, Fabian; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2008-06-01

    Accurate and fast computation of quantitative genetic variance parameters is of great importance in both natural and breeding populations. For experimental designs with complex relationship structures it can be important to include both additive and dominance variance components in the statistical model. In this study, we introduce a Bayesian Gibbs sampling approach for estimation of additive and dominance genetic variances in the traditional infinitesimal model. The method can handle general pedigrees without inbreeding. To optimize between computational time and good mixing of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) chains, we used a hybrid Gibbs sampler that combines a single site and a blocked Gibbs sampler. The speed of the hybrid sampler and the mixing of the single-site sampler were further improved by the use of pretransformed variables. Two traits (height and trunk diameter) from a previously published diallel progeny test of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and two large simulated data sets with different levels of dominance variance were analyzed. We also performed Bayesian model comparison on the basis of the posterior predictive loss approach. Results showed that models with both additive and dominance components had the best fit for both height and diameter and for the simulated data with high dominance. For the simulated data with low dominance, we needed an informative prior to avoid the dominance variance component becoming overestimated. The narrow-sense heritability estimates in the Scots pine data were lower compared to the earlier results, which is not surprising because the level of dominance variance was rather high, especially for diameter. In general, the hybrid sampler was considerably faster than the blocked sampler and displayed better mixing properties than the single-site sampler. PMID:18558655

  6. Efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo Implementation of Bayesian Analysis of Additive and Dominance Genetic Variances in Noninbred Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, Patrik; Hallander, Jon; Hoti, Fabian; Sillanpää, Mikko J.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate and fast computation of quantitative genetic variance parameters is of great importance in both natural and breeding populations. For experimental designs with complex relationship structures it can be important to include both additive and dominance variance components in the statistical model. In this study, we introduce a Bayesian Gibbs sampling approach for estimation of additive and dominance genetic variances in the traditional infinitesimal model. The method can handle general pedigrees without inbreeding. To optimize between computational time and good mixing of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) chains, we used a hybrid Gibbs sampler that combines a single site and a blocked Gibbs sampler. The speed of the hybrid sampler and the mixing of the single-site sampler were further improved by the use of pretransformed variables. Two traits (height and trunk diameter) from a previously published diallel progeny test of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and two large simulated data sets with different levels of dominance variance were analyzed. We also performed Bayesian model comparison on the basis of the posterior predictive loss approach. Results showed that models with both additive and dominance components had the best fit for both height and diameter and for the simulated data with high dominance. For the simulated data with low dominance, we needed an informative prior to avoid the dominance variance component becoming overestimated. The narrow-sense heritability estimates in the Scots pine data were lower compared to the earlier results, which is not surprising because the level of dominance variance was rather high, especially for diameter. In general, the hybrid sampler was considerably faster than the blocked sampler and displayed better mixing properties than the single-site sampler. PMID:18558655

  7. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  8. On the Additive and Dominant Variance and Covariance of Individuals Within the Genomic Selection Scope

    PubMed Central

    Vitezica, Zulma G.; Varona, Luis; Legarra, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Genomic evaluation models can fit additive and dominant SNP effects. Under quantitative genetics theory, additive or “breeding” values of individuals are generated by substitution effects, which involve both “biological” additive and dominant effects of the markers. Dominance deviations include only a portion of the biological dominant effects of the markers. Additive variance includes variation due to the additive and dominant effects of the markers. We describe a matrix of dominant genomic relationships across individuals, D, which is similar to the G matrix used in genomic best linear unbiased prediction. This matrix can be used in a mixed-model context for genomic evaluations or to estimate dominant and additive variances in the population. From the “genotypic” value of individuals, an alternative parameterization defines additive and dominance as the parts attributable to the additive and dominant effect of the markers. This approach underestimates the additive genetic variance and overestimates the dominance variance. Transforming the variances from one model into the other is trivial if the distribution of allelic frequencies is known. We illustrate these results with mouse data (four traits, 1884 mice, and 10,946 markers) and simulated data (2100 individuals and 10,000 markers). Variance components were estimated correctly in the model, considering breeding values and dominance deviations. For the model considering genotypic values, the inclusion of dominant effects biased the estimate of additive variance. Genomic models were more accurate for the estimation of variance components than their pedigree-based counterparts. PMID:24121775

  9. Dominance, Information, and Hierarchical Scaling of Variance Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceurvorst, Robert W.; Krus, David J.

    1979-01-01

    A method for computation of dominance relations and for construction of their corresponding hierarchical structures is presented. The link between dominance and variance allows integration of the mathematical theory of information with least squares statistical procedures without recourse to logarithmic transformations of the data. (Author/CTM)

  10. Characterizing the evolution of genetic variance using genetic covariance tensors.

    PubMed

    Hine, Emma; Chenoweth, Stephen F; Rundle, Howard D; Blows, Mark W

    2009-06-12

    Determining how genetic variance changes under selection in natural populations has proved to be a very resilient problem in evolutionary genetics. In the same way that understanding the availability of genetic variance within populations requires the simultaneous consideration of genetic variance in sets of functionally related traits, determining how genetic variance changes under selection in natural populations will require ascertaining how genetic variance-covariance (G) matrices evolve. Here, we develop a geometric framework using higher-order tensors, which enables the empirical characterization of how G matrices have diverged among populations. We then show how divergence among populations in genetic covariance structure can then be associated with divergence in selection acting on those traits using key equations from evolutionary theory. Using estimates of G matrices of eight male sexually selected traits from nine geographical populations of Drosophila serrata, we show that much of the divergence in genetic variance occurred in a single trait combination, a conclusion that could not have been reached by examining variation among the individual elements of the nine G matrices. Divergence in G was primarily in the direction of the major axes of genetic variance within populations, suggesting that genetic drift may be a major cause of divergence in genetic variance among these populations. PMID:19414471

  11. Variance in the reproductive success of dominant male mountain gorillas.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Andrew M; Gray, Maryke; Uwingeli, Prosper; Mburanumwe, Innocent; Kagoda, Edwin; Robbins, Martha M

    2014-10-01

    Using 30 years of demographic data from 15 groups, this study estimates how harem size, female fertility, and offspring survival may contribute to variance in the siring rates of dominant male mountain gorillas throughout the Virunga Volcano Region. As predicted for polygynous species, differences in harem size were the greatest source of variance in the siring rate, whereas differences in female fertility and offspring survival were relatively minor. Harem size was positively correlated with offspring survival, even after removing all known and suspected cases of infanticide, so the correlation does not seem to reflect differences in the ability of males to protect their offspring. Harem size was not significantly correlated with female fertility, which is consistent with the hypothesis that mountain gorillas have minimal feeding competition. Harem size, offspring survival, and siring rates were not significantly correlated with the proportion of dominant tenures that occurred in multimale groups versus one-male groups; even though infanticide is less likely when those tenures end in multimale groups than one-male groups. In contrast with the relatively small contribution of offspring survival to variance in the siring rates of this study, offspring survival is a major source of variance in the male reproductive success of western gorillas, which have greater predation risks and significantly higher rates of infanticide. If differences in offspring protection are less important among male mountain gorillas than western gorillas, then the relative importance of other factors may be greater for mountain gorillas. Thus, our study illustrates how variance in male reproductive success and its components can differ between closely related species. PMID:24818867

  12. Analysis of Variance Components for Genetic Markers with Unphased Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    An ANOVA type general multi-allele (GMA) model was proposed in Wang (2014) on analysis of variance components for quantitative trait loci or genetic markers with phased or unphased genotypes. In this study, by applying the GMA model, we further examine estimation of the genetic variance components for genetic markers with unphased genotypes based on a random sample from a study population. In one locus and two loci cases, we first derive the least square estimates (LSE) of model parameters in fitting the GMA model. Then we construct estimators of the genetic variance components for one marker locus in a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium population and two marker loci in an equilibrium population. Meanwhile, we explore the difference between the classical general linear model (GLM) and GMA based approaches in association analysis of genetic markers with quantitative traits. We show that the GMA model can retain the same partition on the genetic variance components as the traditional Fisher's ANOVA model, while the GLM cannot. We clarify that the standard F-statistics based on the partial reductions in sums of squares from GLM for testing the fixed allelic effects could be inadequate for testing the existence of the variance component when allelic interactions are present. We point out that the GMA model can reduce the confounding between the allelic effects and allelic interactions at least for independent alleles. As a result, the GMA model could be more beneficial than GLM for detecting allelic interactions. PMID:27468297

  13. Genetic Variance in the SES-IQ Correlation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckland, Bruce K.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses questions dealing with genetic aspects of the correlation between IQ and socioeconomic status (SES). Questions include: How does assortative mating affect the genetic variance of IQ? Is the relationship between an individual's IQ and adult SES a causal one? And how can IQ research improve schools and schooling? (Author/DB)

  14. The genetic and environmental roots of variance in negativity toward foreign nationals.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Christian; Lewis, Gary J; Feldhaus, Lea Henrike; Riemann, Rainer

    2015-03-01

    This study quantified genetic and environmental roots of variance in prejudice and discriminatory intent toward foreign nationals and examined potential mediators of these genetic influences: right-wing authoritarianism (RWA), social dominance orientation (SDO), and narrow-sense xenophobia (NSX). In line with the dual process motivational (DPM) model, we predicted that the two basic attitudinal and motivational orientations-RWA and SDO-would account for variance in out-group prejudice and discrimination. In line with other theories, we expected that NSX as an affective component would explain additional variance in out-group prejudice and discriminatory intent. Data from 1,397 individuals (incl. twins as well as their spouses) were analyzed. Univariate analyses of twins' and spouses' data yielded genetic (incl. contributions of assortative mating) and multiple environmental sources (i.e., social homogamy, spouse-specific, and individual-specific effects) of variance in negativity toward strangers. Multivariate analyses suggested an extension to the DPM model by including NSX in addition to RWA and SDO as predictor of prejudice and discrimination. RWA and NSX primarily mediated the genetic influences on the variance in prejudice and discriminatory intent toward foreign nationals. In sum, the findings provide the basis of a behavioral genetic framework integrating different scientific disciplines for the study of negativity toward out-groups. PMID:25534512

  15. Influence of genetic variance on sodium sensitivity of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Luft, F C; Miller, J Z; Weinberger, M H; Grim, C E; Daugherty, S A; Christian, J C

    1987-02-01

    To examine the effect of genetic variance on blood pressure, sodium homeostasis, and its regulatory determinants, we studied 37 pairs of monozygotic twins and 18 pairs of dizygotic twins under conditions of volume expansion and contraction. We found that, in addition to blood pressure and body size, sodium excretion in response to provocative maneuvers, glomerular filtration rate, the renin-angiotensin system, and the sympathetic nervous system are influenced by genetic variance. To elucidate the interaction of genetic factors and an environmental influence, namely, salt intake, we restricted dietary sodium in 44 families of twin children. In addition to a modest decrease in blood pressure, we found heterogeneous responses in blood pressure indicative of sodium sensitivity and resistance which were normally distributed. Strong parent-offspring resemblances were found in baseline blood pressures which persisted when adjustments were made for age and weight. Further, mother-offspring resemblances were observed in the change in blood pressure with sodium restriction. We conclude that the control of sodium homeostasis is heritable and that the change in blood pressure with sodium restriction is familial as well. These data speak to the interaction between the genetic susceptibility to hypertension and environmental influences which may result in its expression. PMID:3553721

  16. The molecular basis of genetic dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1994-01-01

    Studies of mutagenesis in many organisms indicate that the majority (over 90%) of mutations are recessive to wild type. If recessiveness represents the 'default' state, what are the distinguishing features that make a minority of mutations give rise to dominant or semidominant characters? This review draws on the rapid expansion in knowledge of molecular and cellular biology to classify the molecular mechanisms of dominant mutation. The categories discussed include (1) reduced gene dosage, expression, or protein activity (haploinsufficiency); (2) increased gene dosage; (3) ectopic or temporally altered mRNA expression; (4) increased or constitutive protein activity; (5) dominant negative effects; (6) altered structural proteins; (7) toxic protein alterations; and (8) new protein functions. This provides a framework for understanding the basis of dominant genetic phenomena in humans and other organisms. Images PMID:8182727

  17. Argentine Population Genetic Structure: Large Variance in Amerindian Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Michael F.; Tian, Chao; Shigeta, Russell; Scherbarth, Hugo R.; Silva, Gabriel; Belmont, John W.; Kittles, Rick; Gamron, Susana; Allevi, Alberto; Palatnik, Simon A.; Alvarellos, Alejandro; Paira, Sergio; Caprarulo, Cesar; Guillerón, Carolina; Catoggio, Luis J.; Prigione, Cristina; Berbotto, Guillermo A.; García, Mercedes A.; Perandones, Carlos E.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2011-01-01

    Argentine population genetic structure was examined using a set of 78 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to assess the contributions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry in 94 individuals members of this population. Using the Bayesian clustering algorithm STRUCTURE, the mean European contribution was 78%, the Amerindian contribution was 19.4%, and the African contribution was 2.5%. Similar results were found using weighted least mean square method: European, 80.2%; Amerindian, 18.1%; and African, 1.7%. Consistent with previous studies the current results showed very few individuals (four of 94) with greater than 10% African admixture. Notably, when individual admixture was examined, the Amerindian and European admixture showed a very large variance and individual Amerindian contribution ranged from 1.5 to 84.5% in the 94 individual Argentine subjects. These results indicate that admixture must be considered when clinical epidemiology or case control genetic analyses are studied in this population. Moreover, the current study provides a set of informative SNPs that can be used to ascertain or control for this potentially hidden stratification. In addition, the large variance in admixture proportions in individual Argentine subjects shown by this study suggests that this population is appropriate for future admixture mapping studies. PMID:17177183

  18. Detecting parent of origin and dominant QTL in a two-generation commercial poultry pedigree using variance component methodology

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Suzanne J; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Haley, Christopher S; Knott, Sara A; De Koning, Dirk-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Variance component QTL methodology was used to analyse three candidate regions on chicken chromosomes 1, 4 and 5 for dominant and parent-of-origin QTL effects. Data were available for bodyweight and conformation score measured at 40 days from a two-generation commercial broiler dam line. One hundred dams were nested in 46 sires with phenotypes and genotypes on 2708 offspring. Linear models were constructed to simultaneously estimate fixed, polygenic and QTL effects. Different genetic models were compared using likelihood ratio test statistics derived from the comparison of full with reduced or null models. Empirical thresholds were derived by permutation analysis. Results Dominant QTL were found for bodyweight on chicken chromosome 4 and for bodyweight and conformation score on chicken chromosome 5. Suggestive evidence for a maternally expressed QTL for bodyweight and conformation score was found on chromosome 1 in a region corresponding to orthologous imprinted regions in the human and mouse. Conclusion Initial results suggest that variance component analysis can be applied within commercial populations for the direct detection of segregating dominant and parent of origin effects. PMID:19284678

  19. Genetic variance components and heritability of multiallelic heterozygosity under inbreeding.

    PubMed

    Nietlisbach, P; Keller, L F; Postma, E

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of genetic diversity in fitness-related traits remains a central topic in evolutionary biology, for example, in the context of sexual selection for genetic benefits. Among the solutions that have been proposed is directional sexual selection for heterozygosity. The importance of such selection is highly debated. However, a critical evaluation requires knowledge of the heritability of heterozygosity, a quantity that is rarely estimated in this context, and often assumed to be zero. This is at least partly the result of the lack of a general framework that allows for its quantitative prediction in small and inbred populations, which are the focus of most empirical studies. Moreover, while current predictors are applicable only to biallelic loci, fitness-relevant loci are often multiallelic, as are the neutral markers typically used to estimate genome-wide heterozygosity. To this end, we first review previous, but little-known, work showing that under most circumstances, heterozygosity at biallelic loci and in the absence of inbreeding is heritable. We then derive the heritability of heterozygosity and the underlying variances for multiple alleles and any inbreeding level. We also show that heterozygosity at multiallelic loci can be highly heritable when allele frequencies are unequal, and that this heritability is reduced by inbreeding. Our quantitative genetic framework can provide new insights into the evolutionary dynamics of heterozygosity in inbred and outbred populations. PMID:26174022

  20. Dominant takeover regimes for genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Baskaran, Subbiah

    1995-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a machine-based optimization routine which connects evolutionary learning to natural genetic laws. The present work addresses the problem of obtaining the dominant takeover regimes in the GA dynamics. Estimated GA run times are computed for slow and fast convergence in the limits of high and low fitness ratios. Using Euler's device for obtaining partial sums in closed forms, the result relaxes the previously held requirements for long time limits. Analytical solution reveal that appropriately accelerated regimes can mark the ascendancy of the most fit solution. In virtually all cases, the weak (logarithmic) dependence of convergence time on problem size demonstrates the potential for the GA to solve large N-P complete problems.

  1. Estimating additive and dominance variances for complex traits in pigs combining genomic and pedigree information.

    PubMed

    Costa, E V; Diniz, D B; Veroneze, R; Resende, M D V; Azevedo, C F; Guimaraes, S E F; Silva, F F; Lopes, P S

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of dominance effects should improve ge-netic evaluations, provide the accurate selection of purebred animals, and enable better breeding strategies, including the exploitation of het-erosis in crossbreeds. In this study, we combined genomic and pedi-gree data to study the relative importance of additive and dominance genetic variation in growth and carcass traits in an F2 pig population. Two GBLUP models were used, a model without a polygenic effect (ADM) and a model with a polygenic effect (ADMP). Additive effects played a greater role in the control of growth and carcass traits than did dominance effects. However, dominance effects were important for all traits, particularly in backfat thickness. The narrow-sense and broad-sense heritability estimates for growth (0.06 to 0.42, and 0.10 to 0.51, respectively) and carcass traits (0.07 to 0.37, and 0.10 to 0.76, respec-tively) exhibited a wide variation. The inclusion of a polygenic effect in the ADMP model changed the broad-sense heritability estimates only for birth weight and weight at 21 days of age. PMID:26125833

  2. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Andreatta, Matthew E.; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or “missing heritability”. Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations. PMID:26599497

  3. Assessment of the genetic variance of late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Perry G; Hoyt, Kaitlyn B; Boehme, Kevin; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Kauwe, John S K

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex genetic disorder with no effective treatments. More than 20 common markers have been identified, which are associated with AD. Recently, several rare variants have been identified in Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), Triggering Receptor Expressed On Myeloid Cells 2 (TREM2) and Unc-5 Netrin Receptor C (UNC5C) that affect risk for AD. Despite the many successes, the genetic architecture of AD remains unsolved. We used Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis to (1) estimate phenotypic variance explained by genetics; (2) calculate genetic variance explained by known AD single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); and (3) identify the genomic locations of variation that explain the remaining unexplained genetic variance. In total, 53.24% of phenotypic variance is explained by genetics, but known AD SNPs only explain 30.62% of the genetic variance. Of the unexplained genetic variance, approximately 41% is explained by unknown SNPs in regions adjacent to known AD SNPs, and the remaining unexplained genetic variance outside these regions. PMID:27036079

  4. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ADPEAF autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features Enable Javascript to view the ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features ( ADPEAF ) is an uncommon form ...

  5. Genetic and environmental heterogeneity of residual variance of weight traits in Nellore beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have provided evidence of the existence of genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance, suggesting that it could be exploited to improve robustness and uniformity of livestock by selection. However, little is known about the perspectives of such a selection strategy in beef cattle. Methods A two-step approach was applied to study the genetic heterogeneity of residual variance of weight gain from birth to weaning and long-yearling weight in a Nellore beef cattle population. First, an animal model was fitted to the data and second, the influence of additive and environmental effects on the residual variance of these traits was investigated with different models, in which the log squared estimated residuals for each phenotypic record were analyzed using the restricted maximum likelihood method. Monte Carlo simulation was performed to assess the reliability of variance component estimates from the second step and the accuracy of estimated breeding values for residual variation. Results The results suggest that both genetic and environmental factors have an effect on the residual variance of weight gain from birth to weaning and long-yearling in Nellore beef cattle and that uniformity of these traits could be improved by selecting for lower residual variance, when considering a large amount of information to predict genetic merit for this criterion. Simulations suggested that using the two-step approach would lead to biased estimates of variance components, such that more adequate methods are needed to study the genetic heterogeneity of residual variance in beef cattle. PMID:22672564

  6. Genetic Influence on the Variance in Coincidence Timing and Its Covariance with IQ: A Twin Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Margaret J.; Smith, Glen A.; Geffen, Gina M.; Geffen, Laurie B.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2000-01-01

    Studied whether genetic variability explained some of the variance in coincidence timing and whether common genetic factors accounted for the association with intellectual functioning using 55 pairs of 16-year-old twins. Results suggest that the genetic influence operating on coincidence timing skills was of similar magnitude to that of response…

  7. Estimates for Genetic Variance Components in Reciprocal Recurrent Selection in Populations Derived from Maize Single-Cross Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Matheus Costa; Pádua, José Maria Villela; Abreu, Guilherme Barbosa; Guedes, Fernando Lisboa; Balbi, Rodrigo Vieira; de Souza, João Cândido

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to obtain the estimates of genetic variance and covariance components related to intra- and interpopulation in the original populations (C0) and in the third cycle (C3) of reciprocal recurrent selection (RRS) which allows breeders to define the best breeding strategy. For that purpose, the half-sib progenies of intrapopulation (P11 and P22) and interpopulation (P12 and P21) from populations 1 and 2 derived from single-cross hybrids in the 0 and 3 cycles of the reciprocal recurrent selection program were used. The intra- and interpopulation progenies were evaluated in a 10 × 10 triple lattice design in two separate locations. The data for unhusked ear weight (ear weight without husk) and plant height were collected. All genetic variance and covariance components were estimated from the expected mean squares. The breakdown of additive variance into intrapopulation and interpopulation additive deviations (στ2) and the covariance between these and their intrapopulation additive effects (CovAτ) found predominance of the dominance effect for unhusked ear weight. Plant height for these components shows that the intrapopulation additive effect explains most of the variation. Estimates for intrapopulation and interpopulation additive genetic variances confirm that populations derived from single-cross hybrids have potential for recurrent selection programs. PMID:25009831

  8. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy: a degenerative disease with a range of developmental ocular anomalies. Eye (Lond). 2011 Jan;25(1):113-8. doi: 10.1038/eye.2010.165. Epub 2010 Nov 12. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Yardley J, Leroy BP, ...

  9. Genome-Enabled Estimates of Additive and Nonadditive Genetic Variances and Prediction of Apple Phenotypes Across Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Molloy, Claire; Muñoz, Patricio; Daetwyler, Hans; Chagné, David; Volz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The nonadditive genetic effects may have an important contribution to total genetic variation of phenotypes, so estimates of both the additive and nonadditive effects are desirable for breeding and selection purposes. Our main objectives were to: estimate additive, dominance and epistatic variances of apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) phenotypes using relationship matrices constructed from genome-wide dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; and compare the accuracy of genomic predictions using genomic best linear unbiased prediction models with or without including nonadditive genetic effects. A set of 247 clonally replicated individuals was assessed for six fruit quality traits at two sites, and also genotyped using an Illumina 8K SNP array. Across several fruit quality traits, the additive, dominance, and epistatic effects contributed about 30%, 16%, and 19%, respectively, to the total phenotypic variance. Models ignoring nonadditive components yielded upwardly biased estimates of additive variance (heritability) for all traits in this study. The accuracy of genomic predicted genetic values (GEGV) varied from about 0.15 to 0.35 for various traits, and these were almost identical for models with or without including nonadditive effects. However, models including nonadditive genetic effects further reduced the bias of GEGV. Between-site genotypic correlations were high (>0.85) for all traits, and genotype-site interaction accounted for <10% of the phenotypic variability. The accuracy of prediction, when the validation set was present only at one site, was generally similar for both sites, and varied from about 0.50 to 0.85. The prediction accuracies were strongly influenced by trait heritability, and genetic relatedness between the training and validation families. PMID:26497141

  10. Maintenance of Quantitative Genetic Variance Under Partial Self-Fertilization, with Implications for Evolution of Selfing

    PubMed Central

    Lande, Russell; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    We analyze two models of the maintenance of quantitative genetic variance in a mixed-mating system of self-fertilization and outcrossing. In both models purely additive genetic variance is maintained by mutation and recombination under stabilizing selection on the phenotype of one or more quantitative characters. The Gaussian allele model (GAM) involves a finite number of unlinked loci in an infinitely large population, with a normal distribution of allelic effects at each locus within lineages selfed for τ consecutive generations since their last outcross. The infinitesimal model for partial selfing (IMS) involves an infinite number of loci in a large but finite population, with a normal distribution of breeding values in lineages of selfing age τ. In both models a stable equilibrium genetic variance exists, the outcrossed equilibrium, nearly equal to that under random mating, for all selfing rates, r, up to critical value, r^, the purging threshold, which approximately equals the mean fitness under random mating relative to that under complete selfing. In the GAM a second stable equilibrium, the purged equilibrium, exists for any positive selfing rate, with genetic variance less than or equal to that under pure selfing; as r increases above r^ the outcrossed equilibrium collapses sharply to the purged equilibrium genetic variance. In the IMS a single stable equilibrium genetic variance exists at each selfing rate; as r increases above r^ the equilibrium genetic variance drops sharply and then declines gradually to that maintained under complete selfing. The implications for evolution of selfing rates, and for adaptive evolution and persistence of predominantly selfing species, provide a theoretical basis for the classical view of Stebbins that predominant selfing constitutes an “evolutionary dead end.” PMID:25969460

  11. Maintenance of Quantitative Genetic Variance Under Partial Self-Fertilization, with Implications for Evolution of Selfing.

    PubMed

    Lande, Russell; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2015-07-01

    We analyze two models of the maintenance of quantitative genetic variance in a mixed-mating system of self-fertilization and outcrossing. In both models purely additive genetic variance is maintained by mutation and recombination under stabilizing selection on the phenotype of one or more quantitative characters. The Gaussian allele model (GAM) involves a finite number of unlinked loci in an infinitely large population, with a normal distribution of allelic effects at each locus within lineages selfed for τ consecutive generations since their last outcross. The infinitesimal model for partial selfing (IMS) involves an infinite number of loci in a large but finite population, with a normal distribution of breeding values in lineages of selfing age τ. In both models a stable equilibrium genetic variance exists, the outcrossed equilibrium, nearly equal to that under random mating, for all selfing rates, r, up to critical value, [Formula: see text], the purging threshold, which approximately equals the mean fitness under random mating relative to that under complete selfing. In the GAM a second stable equilibrium, the purged equilibrium, exists for any positive selfing rate, with genetic variance less than or equal to that under pure selfing; as r increases above [Formula: see text] the outcrossed equilibrium collapses sharply to the purged equilibrium genetic variance. In the IMS a single stable equilibrium genetic variance exists at each selfing rate; as r increases above [Formula: see text] the equilibrium genetic variance drops sharply and then declines gradually to that maintained under complete selfing. The implications for evolution of selfing rates, and for adaptive evolution and persistence of predominantly selfing species, provide a theoretical basis for the classical view of Stebbins that predominant selfing constitutes an "evolutionary dead end." PMID:25969460

  12. Genetic Variance in Nonverbal Intelligence: Data from the Kinships of Identical Twins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Richard J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented from families of monozygotic twin pairs which give evidence of genetic variance on the Block Design Test, a nonverbal measure of intelligence. Analyses of genetic and environmental effects on behavior are possible with this kind of information. (SA)

  13. The Evolution of Human Intelligence and the Coefficient of Additive Genetic Variance in Human Brain Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geoffrey F.; Penke, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Most theories of human mental evolution assume that selection favored higher intelligence and larger brains, which should have reduced genetic variance in both. However, adult human intelligence remains highly heritable, and is genetically correlated with brain size. This conflict might be resolved by estimating the coefficient of additive genetic…

  14. Analysis of Quantitative Traits in Two Long-Term Randomly Mated Soybean Populations I. Genetic Variances

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic effects of long term random mating and natural selection aided by genetic male sterility were evaluated in two soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] populations: RSII and RSIII. Population means, variances, and heritabilities were estimated to determine the effects of 26 generations of random...

  15. Components of genetic variance for plant survival and vigor of apple trees.

    PubMed

    Watkins, R; Spangelo, L P

    1970-01-01

    The additive and non-additive variance components were estimated from progenies derived from two samples of parents (representing a northern continental type climate) for five factors relating to plant survival and two composites of the factors. It was found that additive variance made up 90 and 100%, 91 and 100%, 91 and 100%, 100 and 100%, 82 and 59%, 91 and 100%, and 90 and 100% of the total genetic variance for leafing-out date, leafingout percent, tip injury, stem damage, root damage, a shoot composite, and a shoot-root composite for the two samples respectively. A third sample had 100% additive variance for plant height while, in contrast, a sample of rootstocks, differing from each other in their ability to dwarf grafted scions, had approximately 50-70% additive variance for plant height. It was shown that breeding progress for both winter survival and plant height could be achieved by exploiting the additive variance, the total genetic variance, or (where progenies were the selection unit rather than individuals) by progeny selection. By exploiting the additive variance, it should be possible to improve plant survival and change plant height in each of several successive generations. It is predicted that (with the exception of selection for vigor in a population having a range of dwarfing abilities) potential parents could be efficiently screened phenotypically and so obviate the need for genotypic evaluation. A total of 9180 progeny trees were involved in the analyses considered in this paper. PMID:24435802

  16. Simultaneous Estimation of Additive and Mutational Genetic Variance in an Outbred Population of Drosophila serrata.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Aguirre, J David; Blows, Mark W

    2015-11-01

    How new mutations contribute to genetic variation is a key question in biology. Although the evolutionary fate of an allele is largely determined by its heterozygous effect, most estimates of mutational variance and mutational effects derive from highly inbred lines, where new mutations are present in homozygous form. In an attempt to overcome this limitation, middle-class neighborhood (MCN) experiments have been used to assess the fitness effect of new mutations in heterozygous form. However, because MCN populations harbor substantial standing genetic variance, estimates of mutational variance have not typically been available from such experiments. Here we employ a modification of the animal model to analyze data from 22 generations of Drosophila serrata bred in an MCN design. Mutational heritability, measured for eight cuticular hydrocarbons, 10 wing-shape traits, and wing size in this outbred genetic background, ranged from 0.0006 to 0.006 (with one exception), a similar range to that reported from studies employing inbred lines. Simultaneously partitioning the additive and mutational variance in the same outbred population allowed us to quantitatively test the ability of mutation-selection balance models to explain the observed levels of additive and mutational genetic variance. The Gaussian allelic approximation and house-of-cards models, which assume real stabilizing selection on single traits, both overestimated the genetic variance maintained at equilibrium, but the house-of-cards model was a closer fit to the data. This analytical approach has the potential to be broadly applied, expanding our understanding of the dynamics of genetic variance in natural populations. PMID:26384357

  17. Ontogenetic changes in genetic variances of age-dependent plasticity along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Nilsson-Örtman, V; Rogell, B; Stoks, R; Johansson, F

    2015-10-01

    The expression of phenotypic plasticity may differ among life stages of the same organism. Age-dependent plasticity can be important for adaptation to heterogeneous environments, but this has only recently been recognized. Whether age-dependent plasticity is a common outcome of local adaptation and whether populations harbor genetic variation in this respect remains largely unknown. To answer these questions, we estimated levels of additive genetic variation in age-dependent plasticity in six species of damselflies sampled from 18 populations along a latitudinal gradient spanning 3600 km. We reared full sib larvae at three temperatures and estimated genetic variances in the height and slope of thermal reaction norms of body size at three points in time during ontogeny using random regression. Our data show that most populations harbor genetic variation in growth rate (reaction norm height) in all ontogenetic stages, but only some populations and ontogenetic stages were found to harbor genetic variation in thermal plasticity (reaction norm slope). Genetic variances in reaction norm height differed among species, while genetic variances in reaction norm slope differed among populations. The slope of the ontogenetic trend in genetic variances of both reaction norm height and slope increased with latitude. We propose that differences in genetic variances reflect temporal and spatial variation in the strength and direction of natural selection on growth trajectories and age-dependent plasticity. Selection on age-dependent plasticity may depend on the interaction between temperature seasonality and time constraints associated with variation in life history traits such as generation length. PMID:25649500

  18. The contribution of dominance and inbreeding depression in estimating variance components for litter size in Pannon White rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nagy, I; Gorjanc, G; Curik, I; Farkas, J; Kiszlinger, H; Szendrő, Zs

    2013-08-01

    In a synthetic closed population of Pannon White rabbits, additive (VA ), dominance (VD ) and permanent environmental (VPe ) variance components as well as doe (bF d ) and litter (bF l ) inbreeding depression were estimated for the number of kits born alive (NBA), number of kits born dead (NBD) and total number of kits born (TNB). The data set consisted of 18,398 kindling records of 3883 does collected from 1992 to 2009. Six models were used to estimate dominance and inbreeding effects. The most complete model estimated VA and VD to contribute 5.5 ± 1.1% and 4.8 ± 2.4%, respectively, to total phenotypic variance (VP ) for NBA; the corresponding values for NBD were 1.9 ± 0.6% and 5.3 ± 2.4%, for TNB, 6.2 ± 1.0% and 8.1 ± 3.2% respectively. These results indicate the presence of considerable VD . Including dominance in the model generally reduced VA and VPe estimates, and had only a very small effect on inbreeding depression estimates. Including inbreeding covariates did not affect estimates of any variance component. A 10% increase in doe inbreeding significantly increased NBD (bF d  = 0.18 ± 0.07), while a 10% increase in litter inbreeding significantly reduced NBA (bF l  = -0.41 ± 0.11) and TNB (bF l  = -0.34 ± 0.10). These findings argue for including dominance effects in models of litter size traits in populations that exhibit significant dominance relationships. PMID:23855632

  19. Quantitative genetic variance and multivariate clines in the Ivyleaf morning glory, Ipomoea hederacea

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Amanda J.; Campitelli, Brandon E.; Stinchcombe, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Clinal variation is commonly interpreted as evidence of adaptive differentiation, although clines can also be produced by stochastic forces. Understanding whether clines are adaptive therefore requires comparing clinal variation to background patterns of genetic differentiation at presumably neutral markers. Although this approach has frequently been applied to single traits at a time, we have comparatively fewer examples of how multiple correlated traits vary clinally. Here, we characterize multivariate clines in the Ivyleaf morning glory, examining how suites of traits vary with latitude, with the goal of testing for divergence in trait means that would indicate past evolutionary responses. We couple this with analysis of genetic variance in clinally varying traits in 20 populations to test whether past evolutionary responses have depleted genetic variance, or whether genetic variance declines approaching the range margin. We find evidence of clinal differentiation in five quantitative traits, with little evidence of isolation by distance at neutral loci that would suggest non-adaptive or stochastic mechanisms. Within and across populations, the traits that contribute most to population differentiation and clinal trends in the multivariate phenotype are genetically variable as well, suggesting that a lack of genetic variance will not cause absolute evolutionary constraints. Our data are broadly consistent theoretical predictions of polygenic clines in response to shallow environmental gradients. Ecologically, our results are consistent with past findings of natural selection on flowering phenology, presumably due to season-length variation across the range. PMID:25002704

  20. Quantitative genetic variance and multivariate clines in the Ivyleaf morning glory, Ipomoea hederacea.

    PubMed

    Stock, Amanda J; Campitelli, Brandon E; Stinchcombe, John R

    2014-08-19

    Clinal variation is commonly interpreted as evidence of adaptive differentiation, although clines can also be produced by stochastic forces. Understanding whether clines are adaptive therefore requires comparing clinal variation to background patterns of genetic differentiation at presumably neutral markers. Although this approach has frequently been applied to single traits at a time, we have comparatively fewer examples of how multiple correlated traits vary clinally. Here, we characterize multivariate clines in the Ivyleaf morning glory, examining how suites of traits vary with latitude, with the goal of testing for divergence in trait means that would indicate past evolutionary responses. We couple this with analysis of genetic variance in clinally varying traits in 20 populations to test whether past evolutionary responses have depleted genetic variance, or whether genetic variance declines approaching the range margin. We find evidence of clinal differentiation in five quantitative traits, with little evidence of isolation by distance at neutral loci that would suggest non-adaptive or stochastic mechanisms. Within and across populations, the traits that contribute most to population differentiation and clinal trends in the multivariate phenotype are genetically variable as well, suggesting that a lack of genetic variance will not cause absolute evolutionary constraints. Our data are broadly consistent theoretical predictions of polygenic clines in response to shallow environmental gradients. Ecologically, our results are consistent with past findings of natural selection on flowering phenology, presumably due to season-length variation across the range. PMID:25002704

  1. Quantitative Genetic Analysis of Temperature Regulation in MUS MUSCULUS. I. Partitioning of Variance

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Robert C.; Lynch, Carol Becker

    1979-01-01

    Heritabilities (from parent-offspring regression) and intraclass correlations of full sibs for a variety of traits were estimated from 225 litters of a heterogeneous stock (HS/Ibg) of laboratory mice. Initial variance partitioning suggested different adaptive functions for physiological, morphological and behavioral adjustments with respect to their thermoregulatory significance. Metabolic heat-production mechanisms appear to have reached their genetic limits, with little additive genetic variance remaining. This study provided no genetic evidence that body size has a close directional association with fitness in cold environments, since heritability estimates for weight gain and adult weight were similar and high, whether or not the animals were exposed to cold. Behavioral heat conservation mechanisms also displayed considerable amounts of genetic variability. However, due to strong evidence from numerous other studies that behavior serves an important adaptive role for temperature regulation in small mammals, we suggest that fluctuating selection pressures may have acted to maintain heritable variation in these traits. PMID:17248909

  2. Two-Variance-Component Model Improves Genetic Prediction in Family Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, George; Loh, Po-Ru; MacLeod, Iona M.; Hayes, Ben J.; Goddard, Michael E.; Berger, Bonnie; Price, Alkes L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic prediction based on either identity by state (IBS) sharing or pedigree information has been investigated extensively with best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) methods. Such methods were pioneered in plant and animal-breeding literature and have since been applied to predict human traits, with the aim of eventual clinical utility. However, methods to combine IBS sharing and pedigree information for genetic prediction in humans have not been explored. We introduce a two-variance-component model for genetic prediction: one component for IBS sharing and one for approximate pedigree structure, both estimated with genetic markers. In simulations using real genotypes from the Candidate-gene Association Resource (CARe) and Framingham Heart Study (FHS) family cohorts, we demonstrate that the two-variance-component model achieves gains in prediction r2 over standard BLUP at current sample sizes, and we project, based on simulations, that these gains will continue to hold at larger sample sizes. Accordingly, in analyses of four quantitative phenotypes from CARe and two quantitative phenotypes from FHS, the two-variance-component model significantly improves prediction r2 in each case, with up to a 20% relative improvement. We also find that standard mixed-model association tests can produce inflated test statistics in datasets with related individuals, whereas the two-variance-component model corrects for inflation. PMID:26544803

  3. Two-Variance-Component Model Improves Genetic Prediction in Family Datasets.

    PubMed

    Tucker, George; Loh, Po-Ru; MacLeod, Iona M; Hayes, Ben J; Goddard, Michael E; Berger, Bonnie; Price, Alkes L

    2015-11-01

    Genetic prediction based on either identity by state (IBS) sharing or pedigree information has been investigated extensively with best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) methods. Such methods were pioneered in plant and animal-breeding literature and have since been applied to predict human traits, with the aim of eventual clinical utility. However, methods to combine IBS sharing and pedigree information for genetic prediction in humans have not been explored. We introduce a two-variance-component model for genetic prediction: one component for IBS sharing and one for approximate pedigree structure, both estimated with genetic markers. In simulations using real genotypes from the Candidate-gene Association Resource (CARe) and Framingham Heart Study (FHS) family cohorts, we demonstrate that the two-variance-component model achieves gains in prediction r(2) over standard BLUP at current sample sizes, and we project, based on simulations, that these gains will continue to hold at larger sample sizes. Accordingly, in analyses of four quantitative phenotypes from CARe and two quantitative phenotypes from FHS, the two-variance-component model significantly improves prediction r(2) in each case, with up to a 20% relative improvement. We also find that standard mixed-model association tests can produce inflated test statistics in datasets with related individuals, whereas the two-variance-component model corrects for inflation. PMID:26544803

  4. Shared genetic variance between obesity and white matter integrity in Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Spieker, Elena A.; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M.; Sprooten, Emma; Winkler, Anderson M.; Olvera, Rene L.; Almasy, Laura; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T.; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C.; Curran, Joanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder that may also lead to reduced white matter integrity, potentially due to shared genetic risk factors. Genetic correlation analyses were conducted in a large cohort of Mexican American families in San Antonio (N = 761, 58% females, ages 18–81 years; 41.3 ± 14.5) from the Genetics of Brain Structure and Function Study. Shared genetic variance was calculated between measures of adiposity [(body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) and waist circumference (WC; in)] and whole-brain and regional measurements of cerebral white matter integrity (fractional anisotropy). Whole-brain average and regional fractional anisotropy values for 10 major white matter tracts were calculated from high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging data (DTI; 1.7 × 1.7 × 3 mm; 55 directions). Additive genetic factors explained intersubject variance in BMI (heritability, h2 = 0.58), WC (h2 = 0.57), and FA (h2 = 0.49). FA shared significant portions of genetic variance with BMI in the genu (ρG = −0.25), body (ρG = −0.30), and splenium (ρG = −0.26) of the corpus callosum, internal capsule (ρG = −0.29), and thalamic radiation (ρG = −0.31) (all p's = 0.043). The strongest evidence of shared variance was between BMI/WC and FA in the superior fronto-occipital fasciculus (ρG = −0.39, p = 0.020; ρG = −0.39, p = 0.030), which highlights region-specific variation in neural correlates of obesity. This may suggest that increase in obesity and reduced white matter integrity share common genetic risk factors. PMID:25763009

  5. Increasing Genetic Variance of Body Mass Index during the Swedish Obesity Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Rokholm, Benjamin; Silventoinen, Karri; Tynelius, Per; Gamborg, Michael; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Rasmussen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is no doubt that the dramatic worldwide increase in obesity prevalence is due to changes in environmental factors. However, twin and family studies suggest that genetic differences are responsible for the major part of the variation in adiposity within populations. Recent studies show that the genetic effects on body mass index (BMI) may be stronger when combined with presumed risk factors for obesity. We tested the hypothesis that the genetic variance of BMI has increased during the obesity epidemic. Methods The data comprised height and weight measurements of 1,474,065 Swedish conscripts at age 18–19 y born between 1951 and 1983. The data were linked to the Swedish Multi-Generation Register and the Swedish Twin Register from which 264,796 full-brother pairs, 1,736 monozygotic (MZ) and 1,961 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs were identified. The twin pairs were analysed to identify the most parsimonious model for the genetic and environmental contribution to BMI variance. The full-brother pairs were subsequently divided into subgroups by year of birth to investigate trends in the genetic variance of BMI. Results The twin analysis showed that BMI variation could be explained by additive genetic and environmental factors not shared by co-twins. On the basis of the analyses of the full-siblings, the additive genetic variance of BMI increased from 4.3 [95% CI 4.04–4.53] to 7.9 [95% CI 7.28–8.54] within the study period, as did the unique environmental variance, which increased from 1.4 [95% CI 1.32–1.48] to 2.0 [95% CI 1.89–2.22]. The BMI heritability increased from 75% to 78.8%. Conclusion The results confirm the hypothesis that the additive genetic variance of BMI has increased strongly during the obesity epidemic. This suggests that the obesogenic environment has enhanced the influence of adiposity related genes. PMID:22087252

  6. Genetic impact dominates over environmental effects in development of carotid artery stiffness: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Tamás; Osztovits, János; Pintér, Alexandra; Littvay, Levente; Cseh, Domonkos; Tárnoki, Adám D; Tárnoki, Dávid L; Jermendy, Adám L; Steinbach, Rita; Métneki, Júlia; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Kollai, Márk; Jermendy, György

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and all-cause mortality. Quantifying the genetic influence on the stiff arterial phenotype allows us to better predict the development of arterial stiffness. In this study, we aimed to determine the heritability of carotid artery stiffness in healthy twins. We studied 98 twin pairs of both sexes. We determined carotid artery stiffness locally using echo tracking and applanation tonometry. We estimated the heritability of stiffness parameters using structural equation modeling. The carotid distensibility coefficient showed the highest heritability (64%, 95% confidence interval 45-77%). The incremental elastic modulus, compliance and stiffness index β also showed substantial heritability (62%, 61% and 58%, respectively). The remaining 36-42% phenotypic variance was attributed to unshared environmental effects. Genetic influence appears to dominate over environmental factors in the development of carotid artery stiffness. Environmental factors may have an important role in favorably influencing the genetic predisposition for accelerated arterial stiffening. PMID:24089266

  7. Estimation of genetic parameters and their sampling variances of quantitative traits in the type 2 modified augmented design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We proposed a method to estimate the error variance among non-replicated genotypes, thus to estimate the genetic parameters by using replicated controls. We derived formulas to estimate sampling variances of the genetic parameters. Computer simulation indicated that the proposed methods of estimatin...

  8. Impact of nonrandom mating on genetic variance and gene flow in populations with mass selection.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Leopoldo; Woolliams, John A

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms by which nonrandom mating affects selected populations are not completely understood and remain a subject of scientific debate in the development of tractable predictors of population characteristics. The main objective of this study was to provide a predictive model for the genetic variance and covariance among mates for traits subjected to directional selection in populations with nonrandom mating based on the pedigree. Stochastic simulations were used to check the validity of this model. Our predictions indicate that the positive covariance among mates that is expected to result with preferential mating of relatives can be severely overpredicted from neutral expectations. The covariance expected from neutral theory is offset by an opposing covariance between the genetic mean of an individual's family and the Mendelian sampling term of its mate. This mechanism was able to predict the reduction in covariance among mates that we observed in the simulated populations and, in consequence, the equilibrium genetic variance and expected long-term genetic contributions. Additionally, this study provided confirmatory evidence on the postulated relationships of long-term genetic contributions with both the rate of genetic gain and the rate of inbreeding (deltaF) with nonrandom mating. The coefficient of variation of the expected gene flow among individuals and deltaF was sensitive to nonrandom mating when heritability was low, but less so as heritability increased, and the theory developed in the study was sufficient to explain this phenomenon. PMID:15020441

  9. Genetic regulatory network motifs constrain adaptation through curvature in the landscape of mutational (co)variance.

    PubMed

    Hether, Tyler D; Hohenlohe, Paul A

    2014-04-01

    Systems biology is accumulating a wealth of understanding about the structure of genetic regulatory networks, leading to a more complete picture of the complex genotype-phenotype relationship. However, models of multivariate phenotypic evolution based on quantitative genetics have largely not incorporated a network-based view of genetic variation. Here we model a set of two-node, two-phenotype genetic network motifs, covering a full range of regulatory interactions. We find that network interactions result in different patterns of mutational (co)variance at the phenotypic level (the M-matrix), not only across network motifs but also across phenotypic space within single motifs. This effect is due almost entirely to mutational input of additive genetic (co)variance. Variation in M has the effect of stretching and bending phenotypic space with respect to evolvability, analogous to the curvature of space-time under general relativity, and similar mathematical tools may apply in each case. We explored the consequences of curvature in mutational variation by simulating adaptation under divergent selection with gene flow. Both standing genetic variation (the G-matrix) and rate of adaptation are constrained by M, so that G and adaptive trajectories are curved across phenotypic space. Under weak selection the phenotypic mean at migration-selection balance also depends on M. PMID:24219635

  10. Evidence for further genetic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar-Singh, R.; Kenna, P.F.; Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, P. )

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the possible involvement of further genetic heterogeneity in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa using a previously unreported large Irish family with the disease. We have utilized polymorphic microsatellite markers to exclude the disease gene segregating in this family from 3q, 6p, and the pericentric region of 8, that is, each of the three chromosomal regions to which adRP loci are known to map. Hence, we provide definitive evidence for the involvement of a fourth locus in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Age-specific patterns of genetic variance in Drosophila melanogaster. I. Mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Promislow, D.E.L.; Tatar, M.; Curtsinger, J.W.

    1996-06-01

    Peter Medawar proposed that senescence arises from an age-related decline in the force of selection, which allows late-acting deleterious mutations to accumulate. Subsequent workers have suggested that mutation accumulation could produce an age-related increase in additive genetic variance (V{sub A}) for fitness traits, as recently found in Drosophila melanogaster. Here we report results from a genetic analysis of mortality in 65,134 D. melanogaster. Additive genetic variance for female mortality rates increases from 0.007 in the first week of life to 0.325 by the third week, and then declines to 0.002 by the seventh week. Males show a similar pattern, though total variance is lower than in females. In contrast to a predicted divergence in mortality curves, mortality curves of different genotypes are roughly parallel. Using a three-parameter model, we find significant V{sub A} for the slope and constant term of the curve describing age-specific mortality rates, and also for the rate at which mortality decelerates late in life. These results fail to support a prediction derived from Medawar`s {open_quotes}mutation accumulation{close_quotes} theory for the evolution of senescence. However, our results could be consistent with alternative interpretations of evolutionary models of aging. 65 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Editing genomic DNA in cancer cells with high genetic variance: benefit or risk?

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Yixiang; Guo, Chuanbin

    2014-05-01

    The generation of stably-transfected cell lines is a common and very important technology in cancer science. Considerable knowledge in the field of life sciences has been gained through the modification of the genetic code. However, there is a risk in evaluating exogenous gene function through editing genomic DNA in a cancer cell with high genetic variance. In the present study, we showed that genomic DNA status should be considered when evaluating the exogenous gene function in a cancer cell line with high variant genome through stable transfection technology, immunostaining, wound healing assay, transwell invasion assay, real-time PCR, western blot and karyotyping analysis. Our results showed that the S100P expression level was not related to the migration and invasion abilities in these stably transfected cell lines derived from a human salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line SACC-83. The MMP expression pattern was detected by western blot analysis which matched the biological behaviors in these cells. The genomic analysis showed that SACC-83 presented hypotetraploid karyotyping with high variance. Our data indicated that establishment of stable transgenic cancer cell lines should consider the status of genetic variance in a cancer cell to avoid any biased conclusion. PMID:24604254

  13. Genetic variances and covariances of aerobic metabolic rates in laboratory mice

    PubMed Central

    Wone, Bernard; Sears, Michael W.; Labocha, Marta K.; Donovan, Edward R.; Hayes, Jack P.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic variances and covariances of traits must be known to predict how they may respond to selection and how covariances among them might affect their evolutionary trajectories. We used the animal model to estimate the genetic variances and covariances of basal metabolic rate (BMR) and maximal metabolic rate (MMR) in a genetically heterogeneous stock of laboratory mice. Narrow-sense heritability (h2) was approximately 0.38 ± 0.08 for body mass, 0.26 ± 0.08 for whole-animal BMR, 0.24 ± 0.07 for whole-animal MMR, 0.19 ± 0.07 for mass-independent BMR, and 0.16 ± 0.06 for mass-independent MMR. All h2 estimates were significantly different from zero. The phenotypic correlation of whole animal BMR and MMR was 0.56 ± 0.02, and the corresponding genetic correlation was 0.79 ± 0.12. The phenotypic correlation of mass-independent BMR and MMR was 0.13 ± 0.03, and the corresponding genetic correlation was 0.72 ± 0.03. The genetic correlations of metabolic rates were significantly different from zero, but not significantly different from one. A key assumption of the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy is that BMR and MMR are linked. The estimated genetic correlation between BMR and MMR is consistent with that assumption, but the genetic correlation is not so high as to preclude independent evolution of BMR and MMR. PMID:19656796

  14. Pattern of inbreeding depression, condition dependence, and additive genetic variance in Trinidadian guppy ejaculate traits

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Clelia; Devigili, Alessandro; Dosselli, Ryan; Pilastro, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In polyandrous species, a male's reproductive success depends on his fertilization capability and traits enhancing competitive fertilization success will be under strong, directional selection. This leads to the prediction that these traits should show stronger condition dependence and larger genetic variance than other traits subject to weaker or stabilizing selection. While empirical evidence of condition dependence in postcopulatory traits is increasing, the comparison between sexually selected and ‘control’ traits is often based on untested assumption concerning the different strength of selection acting on these traits. Furthermore, information on selection in the past is essential, as both condition dependence and genetic variance of a trait are likely to be influenced by the pattern of selection acting historically on it. Using the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a livebearing fish with high levels of multiple paternity, we performed three independent experiments on three ejaculate quality traits, sperm number, velocity, and size, which have been previously shown to be subject to strong, intermediate, and weak directional postcopulatory selection, respectively. First, we conducted an inbreeding experiment to determine the pattern of selection in the past. Second, we used a diet restriction experiment to estimate their level of condition dependence. Third, we used a half-sib/full-sib mating design to estimate the coefficients of additive genetic variance (CVA) underlying these traits. Additionally, using a simulated predator evasion test, we showed that both inbreeding and diet restriction significantly reduced condition. According to predictions, sperm number showed higher inbreeding depression, stronger condition dependence, and larger CVA than sperm velocity and sperm size. The lack of significant genetic correlation between sperm number and velocity suggests that the former may respond to selection independently one from other ejaculate quality traits

  15. Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution, but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes.

    PubMed

    Travers, L M; Simmons, L W; Garcia-Gonzalez, F

    2016-05-01

    Polyandry is widespread despite its costs. The sexually selected sperm hypotheses ('sexy' and 'good' sperm) posit that sperm competition plays a role in the evolution of polyandry. Two poorly studied assumptions of these hypotheses are the presence of additive genetic variance in polyandry and sperm competitiveness. Using a quantitative genetic breeding design in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, we first established the potential for polyandry to respond to selection. We then investigated whether polyandry can evolve through sexually selected sperm processes. We measured lifetime polyandry and offensive sperm competitiveness (P2 ) while controlling for sampling variance due to male × male × female interactions. We also measured additive genetic variance in egg-to-adult viability and controlled for its effect on P2 estimates. Female lifetime polyandry showed significant and substantial additive genetic variance and evolvability. In contrast, we found little genetic variance or evolvability in P2 or egg-to-adult viability. Additive genetic variance in polyandry highlights its potential to respond to selection. However, the low levels of genetic variance in sperm competitiveness suggest that the evolution of polyandry may not be driven by sexy sperm or good sperm processes. PMID:26801640

  16. RFLP variation and genealogical distance, multivariate distance, heterosis, and genetic variance in oats.

    PubMed

    Moser, H; Lee, M

    1994-03-01

    Patterns of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) have been proposed as estimators of genetic diversity among breeding lines and as predictors of heterosis and genetic variance. We evaluated these proposals by using a set of nine elite oat lines crossed in a diallel mating design without reciprocals. RFLP analysis was conducted using HindIII-digested DNA and a total of 107 probes from three different sources: 14 heterologous wheat cDNA clones, 17 oat genomic clones, and 76 oat cDNA clones. Of the 77 probes that produced high-quality autoradiographs, 26 detected polymorphisms among this set of lines, with an average of 2.6 variants per probe. RFLP-based genetic distance (FD) was calculated from these data by using Nei and Li's measure of genetic similarity, and was compared with two other measures of genetic divergence. Genealogical distance (GD (*)) was obtained from the coefficients of parentage based on known parental pedigrees, and multivariate distance (DI) was calculated by using the first five principal components of the parental correlation matrix for 12 agronomic traits. FD was significantly correlated with GD (*) (r=0.63, P<0.01), but not with DI (r=-0.05). Cluster analysis based on these three distance estimates did not produce equivalent groupings, but the FD and GD (*) clusters were more similar to each other than to the DI clusters. These results indicate that: (1) sufficient variation exists for further application of RFLP technologyto oats, (2) RFLPs could provide accurate estimates of genetic divergence among elite oat lines, and (3) it is unlikely that dispersed markers can predict heterosis or population genetic variance in oats. Further investigations will require more parental lines, a larger set of markers, and more information on the linkage relationships between RFLP markers and loci controlling the trait of interest. PMID:24190529

  17. Genetically Determined Variation in Lysis Time Variance in the Bacteriophage φX174

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher W.; Miller, Craig R.; Thaweethai, Tanayott; Yuan, Jeffrey; Baker, Meghan Hollibaugh; Joyce, Paul; Weinreich, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers in evolutionary genetics recently have recognized an exciting opportunity in decomposing beneficial mutations into their proximal, mechanistic determinants. The application of methods and concepts from molecular biology and life history theory to studies of lytic bacteriophages (phages) has allowed them to understand how natural selection sees mutations influencing life history. This work motivated the research presented here, in which we explored whether, under consistent experimental conditions, small differences in the genome of bacteriophage φX174 could lead to altered life history phenotypes among a panel of eight genetically distinct clones. We assessed the clones’ phenotypes by applying a novel statistical framework to the results of a serially sampled parallel infection assay, in which we simultaneously inoculated each of a large number of replicate host volumes with ∼1 phage particle. We sequentially plated the volumes over the course of infection and counted the plaques that formed after incubation. These counts served as a proxy for the number of phage particles in a single volume as a function of time. From repeated assays, we inferred significant, genetically determined heterogeneity in lysis time and burst size, including lysis time variance. These findings are interesting in light of the genetic and phenotypic constraints on the single-protein lysis mechanism of φX174. We speculate briefly on the mechanisms underlying our results, and we discuss the potential importance of lysis time variance in viral evolution. PMID:26921293

  18. Genetic Variance in Processing Speed Drives Variation in Aging of Spatial and Memory Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Deborah; McArdle, John J.; Reynolds, Chandra A.; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Pedersen, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous analyses have identified a genetic contribution to the correlation between declines with age in processing speed and higher cognitive abilities. The goal of the current analysis was to apply the biometric dual change score model to consider the possibility of temporal dynamics underlying the genetic covariance between aging trajectories for processing speed and cognitive abilities. Longitudinal twin data from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging, including up to 5 measurement occasions covering a 16-year period, were available from 806 participants ranging in age from 50 to 88 years at the 1st measurement wave. Factors were generated to tap 4 cognitive domains: verbal ability, spatial ability, memory, and processing speed. Model-fitting indicated that genetic variance for processing speed was a leading indicator of variation in age changes for spatial and memory ability, providing additional support for processing speed theories of cognitive aging. PMID:19413434

  19. The Dominance Concept Inventory: A Tool for Assessing Undergraduate Student Alternative Conceptions about Dominance in Mendelian and Population Genetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Joel K.; Perez, Kathryn E.; Price, Rebecca M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the impact of genetics on daily life, biology undergraduates understand some key genetics concepts poorly. One concept requiring attention is dominance, which many students understand as a fixed property of an allele or trait and regularly conflate with frequency in a population or selective advantage. We present the Dominance Concept…

  20. Genetic selection for increased mean and reduced variance of twinning rate in Belclare ewes.

    PubMed

    Cottle, D J; Gilmour, A R; Pabiou, T; Amer, P R; Fahey, A G

    2016-04-01

    It is sometimes possible to breed for more uniform individuals by selecting animals with a greater tendency to be less variable, that is, those with a smaller environmental variance. This approach has been applied to reproduction traits in various animal species. We have evaluated fecundity in the Irish Belclare sheep breed by analyses of flocks with differing average litter size (number of lambs per ewe per year, NLB) and have estimated the genetic variance in environmental variance of lambing traits using double hierarchical generalized linear models (DHGLM). The data set comprised of 9470 litter size records from 4407 ewes collected in 56 flocks. The percentage of pedigreed lambing ewes with singles, twins and triplets was 30, 54 and 14%, respectively, in 2013 and has been relatively constant for the last 15 years. The variance of NLB increases with the mean in this data; the correlation of mean and standard deviation across sires is 0.50. The breeding goal is to increase the mean NLB without unduly increasing the incidence of triplets and higher litter sizes. The heritability estimates for lambing traits were NLB, 0.09; triplet occurrence (TRI) 0.07; and twin occurrence (TWN), 0.02. The highest and lowest twinning flocks differed by 23% (75% versus 52%) in the proportion of ewes lambing twins. Fitting bivariate sire models to NLB and the residual from the NLB model using a double hierarchical generalized linear model (DHGLM) model found a strong genetic correlation (0.88 ± 0.07) between the sire effect for the magnitude of the residual (VE ) and sire effects for NLB, confirming the general observation that increased average litter size is associated with increased variability in litter size. We propose a threshold model that may help breeders with low litter size increase the percentage of twin bearers without unduly increasing the percentage of ewes bearing triplets in Belclare sheep. PMID:26081782

  1. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation–selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. “Animal model” analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population. PMID:24963372

  2. Sex chromosome linked genetic variance and the evolution of sexual dimorphism of quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Husby, Arild; Schielzeth, Holger; Forstmeier, Wolfgang; Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Theory predicts that sex chromsome linkage should reduce intersexual genetic correlations thereby allowing the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Empirical evidence for sex linkage has come largely from crosses and few studies have examined how sexual dimorphism and sex linkage are related within outbred populations. Here, we use data on an array of different traits measured on over 10,000 individuals from two pedigreed populations of birds (collared flycatcher and zebra finch) to estimate the amount of sex-linked genetic variance (h(2)z ). Of 17 traits examined, eight showed a nonzero h(2)Z estimate but only four were significantly different from zero (wing patch size and tarsus length in collared flycatchers, wing length and beak color in zebra finches). We further tested how sexual dimorphism and the mode of selection operating on the trait relate to the proportion of sex-linked genetic variance. Sexually selected traits did not show higher h(2)Z than morphological traits and there was only a weak positive relationship between h(2)Z and sexual dimorphism. However, given the relative scarcity of empirical studies, it is premature to make conclusions about the role of sex chromosome linkage in the evolution of sexual dimorphism. PMID:23461313

  3. Influence of dominance, leptokurtosis and pleiotropy of deleterious mutations on quantitative genetic variation at mutation-selection balance.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Jinliang; Hill, William G

    2004-01-01

    In models of maintenance of genetic variance (V (G)) it has often been assumed that mutant alleles act additively. However, experimental data show that the dominance coefficient varies among mutant alleles and those of large effect tend to be recessive. On the basis of empirical knowledge of mutations, a joint-effect model of pleiotropic and real stabilizing selection that includes dominance is constructed and analyzed. It is shown that dominance can dramatically alter the prediction of equilibrium V (G). Analysis indicates that for the situations where mutations are more recessive for fitness than for a quantitative trait, as supported by the available data, the joint-effect model predicts a significantly higher V (G) than does an additive model. Importantly, for what seem to be realistic distributions of mutational effects (i.e., many mutants may not affect the quantitative trait substantially but are likely to affect fitness), the observed high levels of genetic variation in the quantitative trait under strong apparent stabilizing selection can be generated. This investigation supports the hypothesis that most V (G) comes from the alleles nearly neutral for fitness in heterozygotes while apparent stabilizing selection is contributed mainly by the alleles of large effect on the quantitative trait. Thus considerations of dominance coefficients of mutations lend further support to our previous conclusion that mutation-selection balance is a plausible mechanism of the maintenance of the genetic variance in natural populations. PMID:15020447

  4. Additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in growth trajectories in a wild cooperative mammal.

    PubMed

    Huchard, E; Charmantier, A; English, S; Bateman, A; Nielsen, J F; Clutton-Brock, T

    2014-09-01

    Individual variation in growth is high in cooperative breeders and may reflect plastic divergence in developmental trajectories leading to breeding vs. helping phenotypes. However, the relative importance of additive genetic variance and developmental plasticity in shaping growth trajectories is largely unknown in cooperative vertebrates. This study exploits weekly sequences of body mass from birth to adulthood to investigate sources of variance in, and covariance between, early and later growth in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a cooperative mongoose. Our results indicate that (i) the correlation between early growth (prior to nutritional independence) and adult mass is positive but weak, and there are frequent changes (compensatory growth) in post-independence growth trajectories; (ii) among parameters describing growth trajectories, those describing growth rate (prior to and at nutritional independence) show undetectable heritability while associated size parameters (mass at nutritional independence and asymptotic mass) are moderately heritable (0.09 ≤ h(2) < 0.3); and (iii) additive genetic effects, rather than early environmental effects, mediate the covariance between early growth and adult mass. These results reveal that meerkat growth trajectories remain plastic throughout development, rather than showing early and irreversible divergence, and that the weak effects of early growth on adult mass, an important determinant of breeding success, are partly genetic. In contrast to most cooperative invertebrates, the acquisition of breeding status is often determined after sexual maturity and strongly impacted by chance in many cooperative vertebrates, who may therefore retain the ability to adjust their morphology to environmental changes and social opportunities arising throughout their development, rather than specializing early. PMID:24962704

  5. Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis: Genetics, phenotype, and natural history

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.; Stephens, K.; Dale, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis (ADCH; cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disorder manifested by transient neutropenia that recurs every three weeks. To facilitate mapping the ADCH gene by genetic linkage analysis, we studied 9 ADCH families with 42 affected individuals. Pedigrees revealed AD inheritance with no evidence for decreased penetrance. Similar intra- and interfamilial variable expression was observed, with no evidence to support heterogeneity. At least 3 families displayed apparent new mutations. Many adults developed chronic neutropenia, while offspring always cycled during childhood. Children displayed recurrent oral ulcers, gingivitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, and skin and other infections with additional symptoms. Interestingly, there were no cases of neonatal infection. Some children required multiple hospitalizations for treatment. Four males under age 18 died of Clostridium sepsis following necrotizing enterocolitis; all had affected mothers. No other deaths due to ADCH were found; most had improvement of symptoms and infections as adults. Adults experienced increased tooth loss prior to age 30 (16 out of 27 adults, with 9 edentulous). No increase in myelodysplasia, malignancy, or congenital anomalies was observed. Recombinant G-CSF treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and infections. The results suggest that ADCH is not a benign disorder, especially in childhood, and abdominal pain requires immediate evaluation. Diagnosis of ADCH requires serial blood counts in the proband and at least one CBC in relatives to exclude similar disorders. Genetic counseling requires specific histories as well as CBCs of each family member at risk to determine status regardless of symptom history, especially to assess apparent new mutations.

  6. Contrasting genetic architectures of schizophrenia and other complex diseases using fast variance-components analysis.

    PubMed

    Loh, Po-Ru; Bhatia, Gaurav; Gusev, Alexander; Finucane, Hilary K; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan K; Pollack, Samuela J; de Candia, Teresa R; Lee, Sang Hong; Wray, Naomi R; Kendler, Kenneth S; O'Donovan, Michael C; Neale, Benjamin M; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L

    2015-12-01

    Heritability analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) cohorts have yielded important insights into complex disease architecture, and increasing sample sizes hold the promise of further discoveries. Here we analyze the genetic architectures of schizophrenia in 49,806 samples from the PGC and nine complex diseases in 54,734 samples from the GERA cohort. For schizophrenia, we infer an overwhelmingly polygenic disease architecture in which ≥71% of 1-Mb genomic regions harbor ≥1 variant influencing schizophrenia risk. We also observe significant enrichment of heritability in GC-rich regions and in higher-frequency SNPs for both schizophrenia and GERA diseases. In bivariate analyses, we observe significant genetic correlations (ranging from 0.18 to 0.85) for several pairs of GERA diseases; genetic correlations were on average 1.3 tunes stronger than the correlations of overall disease liabilities. To accomplish these analyses, we developed a fast algorithm for multicomponent, multi-trait variance-components analysis that overcomes prior computational barriers that made such analyses intractable at this scale. PMID:26523775

  7. Contrasting genetic architectures of schizophrenia and other complex diseases using fast variance components analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Gusev, Alexander; Finucane, Hilary K; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan K; Pollack, Samuela J; de Candia, Teresa R; Lee, Sang Hong; Wray, Naomi R; Kendler, Kenneth S; O’Donovan, Michael C; Neale, Benjamin M; Patterson, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Heritability analyses of GWAS cohorts have yielded important insights into complex disease architecture, and increasing sample sizes hold the promise of further discoveries. Here, we analyze the genetic architecture of schizophrenia in 49,806 samples from the PGC, and nine complex diseases in 54,734 samples from the GERA cohort. For schizophrenia, we infer an overwhelmingly polygenic disease architecture in which ≥71% of 1Mb genomic regions harbor ≥1 variant influencing schizophrenia risk. We also observe significant enrichment of heritability in GC-rich regions and in higher-frequency SNPs for both schizophrenia and GERA diseases. In bivariate analyses, we observe significant genetic correlations (ranging from 0.18 to 0.85) among several pairs of GERA diseases; genetic correlations were on average 1.3x stronger than correlations of overall disease liabilities. To accomplish these analyses, we developed a fast algorithm for multi-component, multi-trait variance components analysis that overcomes prior computational barriers that made such analyses intractable at this scale. PMID:26523775

  8. Dominant Genetic Variation and Missing Heritability for Human Complex Traits: Insights from Twin versus Genome-wide Common SNP Models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Rahman, Iffat; Arpegård, Johannes; Viktorin, Alexander; Karlsson, Robert; Hägg, Sara; Svensson, Per; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further illuminate the potential role of dominant genetic variation in the “missing heritability” debate, we investigated the additive (narrow-sense heritability, h2) and dominant (δ2) genetic variance for 18 human complex traits. Within the same study base (10,682 Swedish twins), we calculated and compared the estimates from classic twin-based structural equation model with SNP-based genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum likelihood [GREML(d)] method. Contributions of δ2 were evident for 14 traits in twin models (average δ2twin = 0.25, range 0.14–0.49), two of which also displayed significant δ2 in the GREMLd analyses (triglycerides δ2SNP = 0.28 and waist circumference δ2SNP = 0.19). On average, the proportion of h2SNP/h2twin was 70% for ADE-fitted traits (for which the best-fitting model included additive and dominant genetic and unique environmental components) and 31% for AE-fitted traits (for which the best-fitting model included additive genetic and unique environmental components). Independent evidence for contribution from shared environment, also in ADE-fitted traits, was obtained from self-reported within-pair contact frequency and age at separation. We conclude that despite the fact that additive genetics appear to constitute the bulk of genetic influences for most complex traits, dominant genetic variation might often be masked by shared environment in twin and family studies and might therefore have a more prominent role than what family-based estimates often suggest. The risk of erroneously attributing all inherited genetic influences (additive and dominant) to the h2 in too-small twin studies might also lead to exaggerated “missing heritability” (the proportion of h2 that remains unexplained by SNPs). PMID:26544805

  9. Genetics, phenotype, and natural history of autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E. |; Dale, D.C.

    1996-12-30

    Cyclic hematopoiesis (CH, or cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disease manifested by transient severe neutropenia that recurs approximately every 21 days. The hematologic profile of families with the autosomal dominant form (ADCH) has not been well characterized, and it is unknown if the phenotype is distinct from the more common sporadic congenital or acquired forms of CH. We studied nine ADCH families whose children displayed typical CH blood patterns. Pedigrees confirmed dominant inheritance without evidence of heterogeneity or decreased penetrance; three pedigrees suggested new mutations. Families were Caucasian with exception of one with a Cherokee Native American founder. A wide spectrum of symptom severity, ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening illness, was observed within families. The phenotype changed with age. Children displayed typical neutrophil cycles with symptoms of mucosal ulceration, lymphadenopathy, and infections. Adults often had fewer and milder symptoms, sometimes accompanied by mild chronic neutropenia without distinct cycles. While CH is commonly described as {open_quotes}benign{close_quotes}, four children in three of the nine families died of Clostridium or E. coli colitis, documenting the need for urgent evaluation of abdominal pain. Misdiagnosis with other neutropenias was common but can be avoided by serial blood counts in index cases. Genetic counseling requires specific histories and complete blood counts in relatives at risk to assess status regardless of symptoms, especially to determine individuals with new mutations. We propose diagnostic criteria for ADCH in affected children and adults. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of neutropenia and morbidity. The differential diagnosis from other forms of familial neutropenia is reviewed. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Practical genetics for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Pei, York

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common mendelian disorder of the kidney and accounts for ~5% of end-stage renal disease in North America. It is characterized by focal development of renal cysts which increase in number and size with age. Mutations of PKD1 and PKD2 account for most cases. Although the clinical manifestations of both gene types overlap completely, PKD1 is associated with more severe disease than PKD2, with larger kidneys and earlier onset of end-stage renal disease. Furthermore, marked within-family renal disease variability is well documented in ADPKD and suggests a strong modifier effect from as yet unknown genetic and environmental factors. In turn, the significant inter- and intra-familial renal disease variability poses a challenge for diagnosis and genetic counseling. In general, renal ultrasonography is commonly used for the diagnosis, and age-dependent criteria have been defined for subjects at risk of PKD1. However, the utility of the PKD1 ultrasound criteria in the clinical setting is unclear since their performance characteristics have not been defined for the milder PKD2 and the gene type for most test subjects is unknown. Recently, highly predictive ultrasound diagnostic criteria have been derived for at-risk subjects of unknown gene type. Additionally, both DNA linkage and gene-based direct sequencing are available for the diagnosis of ADPKD, especially in subjects with equivocal imaging results, a negative or indeterminate family history, or in younger at-risk individuals being evaluated as potential living related kidney donor. This review will highlight the utility and limitations of clinical predictors of gene types, imaging- and molecular-based diagnostic tests, and present an integrated approach for evaluating individuals suspected to have ADPKD. PMID:21071968

  11. Genetic and phenotypic variance and covariance components for methane emission and postweaning traits in Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, K A; Bird-Gardiner, T; Arthur, P F; Herd, R M; Hegarty, R F

    2016-04-01

    Ruminants contribute 80% of the global livestock greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mainly through the production of methane, a byproduct of enteric microbial fermentation primarily in the rumen. Hence, reducing enteric methane production is essential in any GHG emissions reduction strategy in livestock. Data on 1,046 young bulls and heifers from 2 performance-recording research herds of Angus cattle were analyzed to provide genetic and phenotypic variance and covariance estimates for methane emissions and production traits and to examine the interrelationships among these traits. The cattle were fed a roughage diet at 1.2 times their estimated maintenance energy requirements and measured for methane production rate (MPR) in open circuit respiration chambers for 48 h. Traits studied included DMI during the methane measurement period, MPR, and methane yield (MY; MPR/DMI), with means of 6.1 kg/d (SD 1.3), 132 g/d (SD 25), and 22.0 g/kg (SD 2.3) DMI, respectively. Four forms of residual methane production (RMP), which is a measure of actual minus predicted MPR, were evaluated. For the first 3 forms, predicted MPR was calculated using published equations. For the fourth (RMP), predicted MPR was obtained by regression of MPR on DMI. Growth and body composition traits evaluated were birth weight (BWT), weaning weight (WWT), yearling weight (YWT), final weight (FWT), and ultrasound measures of eye muscle area, rump fat depth, rib fat depth, and intramuscular fat. Heritability estimates were moderate for MPR (0.27 [SE 0.07]), MY (0.22 [SE 0.06]), and the RMP traits (0.19 [SE 0.06] for each), indicating that genetic improvement to reduce methane emissions is possible. The RMP traits and MY were strongly genetically correlated with each other (0.99 ± 0.01). The genetic correlation of MPR with MY as well as with the RMP traits was moderate (0.32 to 0.63). The genetic correlation between MPR and the growth traits (except BWT) was strong (0.79 to 0.86). These results indicate that

  12. High-dimensional variance partitioning reveals the modular genetic basis of adaptive divergence in gene expression during reproductive character displacement.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Elizabeth A; Ye, Yixin H; Foley, Brad; Chenoweth, Stephen F; Higgie, Megan; Hine, Emma; Blows, Mark W

    2011-11-01

    Although adaptive change is usually associated with complex changes in phenotype, few genetic investigations have been conducted on adaptations that involve sets of high-dimensional traits. Microarrays have supplied high-dimensional descriptions of gene expression, and phenotypic change resulting from adaptation often results in large-scale changes in gene expression. We demonstrate how genetic analysis of large-scale changes in gene expression generated during adaptation can be accomplished by determining high-dimensional variance partitioning within classical genetic experimental designs. A microarray experiment conducted on a panel of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) generated from two populations of Drosophila serrata that have diverged in response to natural selection, revealed genetic divergence in 10.6% of 3762 gene products examined. Over 97% of the genetic divergence in transcript abundance was explained by only 12 genetic modules. The two most important modules, explaining 50% of the genetic variance in transcript abundance, were genetically correlated with the morphological traits that are known to be under selection. The expression of three candidate genes from these two important genetic modules was assessed in an independent experiment using qRT-PCR on 430 individuals from the panel of RILs, and confirmed the genetic association between transcript abundance and morphological traits under selection. PMID:22023580

  13. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... stationary night blindness autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Autosomal dominant congenital stationary night blindness is a disorder of the retina , which is ...

  14. Late-acting dominant lethal genetic systems and mosquito control

    PubMed Central

    Phuc, Hoang Kim; Andreasen, Morten H; Burton, Rosemary S; Vass, Céline; Epton, Matthew J; Pape, Gavin; Fu, Guoliang; Condon, Kirsty C; Scaife, Sarah; Donnelly, Christl A; Coleman, Paul G; White-Cooper, Helen; Alphey, Luke

    2007-01-01

    Background Reduction or elimination of vector populations will tend to reduce or eliminate transmission of vector-borne diseases. One potential method for environmentally-friendly, species-specific population control is the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). SIT has not been widely used against insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes, in part because of various practical difficulties in rearing, sterilization and distribution. Additionally, vector populations with strong density-dependent effects will tend to be resistant to SIT-based control as the population-reducing effect of induced sterility will tend to be offset by reduced density-dependent mortality. Results We investigated by mathematical modeling the effect of manipulating the stage of development at which death occurs (lethal phase) in an SIT program against a density-dependence-limited insect population. We found late-acting lethality to be considerably more effective than early-acting lethality. No such strains of a vector insect have been described, so as a proof-of-principle we constructed a strain of the principal vector of the dengue and yellow fever viruses, Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti, with the necessary properties of dominant, repressible, highly penetrant, late-acting lethality. Conclusion Conventional SIT induces early-acting (embryonic) lethality, but genetic methods potentially allow the lethal phase to be tailored to the program. For insects with strong density-dependence, we show that lethality after the density-dependent phase would be a considerable improvement over conventional methods. For density-dependent parameters estimated from field data for Aedes aegypti, the critical release ratio for population elimination is modeled to be 27% to 540% greater for early-acting rather than late-acting lethality. Our success in developing a mosquito strain with the key features that the modeling indicated were desirable demonstrates the feasibility of this approach for improved SIT for disease

  15. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CADASIL cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy ...

  16. Small Variance in Growth Rate in Annual Plants has Large Effects on Genetic Drift

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When plant size is strongly correlated with plant reproduction, variance in growth rates results in a lognormal distribution of seed production within a population. Fecundity variance affects effective population size (Ne), which reflects the ability of a population to maintain beneficial mutations ...

  17. Age-specific patterns of genetic variance in Drosophila melanogaster. II. Fecundity and its genetic covariance with age-specific mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, M.; Promislow, D.E.L.; Khazaeli, A.A.; Curtsinger, J.W.

    1996-06-01

    Under the mutation accumulation model of senescence, it was predicted that the additive genetic variance (V{sub A}) for fitness traits will increase with age. We measured age-specific mortality and fecundity from 65,134 Drosophila melanogaster and estimated genetic variance components, based on reciprocal crosses of extracted second chromosome lines. Elsewhere we report the results for mortality. Here, for fecundity, we report a biomodal pattern for V{sub A} with peaks at 3 days and at 17-31 days. Under the antagonistic pleiotropy model of senescence, it was predicted that negative correlations will exist between early and late life history traits. For fecundity itself we find positive genetic correlations among age classes >3 days but negative nonsignificant correlations between fecundity at 3 days and at older age classes. For fecundity vs. age-specific mortality, we find positive fitness correlations (negative genetic correlations) among the traits at all ages >3 days but a negative fitness correlation between fecundity at 3 days and mortality at the oldest ages (positive genetic correlations). For age-specific mortality itself we find overwhelmingly positive genetic correlations among all age classes. The data suggest that mutation accumulation may be a major source of standing genetic variance for senescence. 75 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Age-Specific Patterns of Genetic Variance in Drosophila Melanogaster. II. Fecundity and Its Genetic Covariance with Age-Specific Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Tatar, M.; Promislow, DEL.; Khazaeli, A. A.; Curtsinger, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Under the mutation accumulation model of senescence, it was predicted that the additive genetic variance (V(A)) for fitness traits will increase with age. We measured age-specific mortality and fecundity from 65,134 Drosophila melanogaster and estimated genetic variance components, based on reciprocal crosses of extracted second chromosome lines. Elsewhere we report the results for mortality. Here, for fecundity, we report a bimodal pattern for V(A) with peaks at 3 days and at 17-31 days. Under the antagonistic pleiotropy model of senescence, it was predicted that negative correlations will exist between early and late life history traits. For fecundity itself we find positive genetic correlations among age classes >3 days but negative nonsignificant correlations between fecundity at 3 days and at older age classes. For fecundity vs. age-specific mortality, we find positive fitness correlations (negative genetic correlations) among the traits at all ages >3 days but a negative fitness correlation between fecundity at 3 days and mortality at the oldest ages (positive genetic correlations). For age-specific mortality itself we find overwhelmingly positive genetic correlations among all age classes. The data suggest that mutation accumulation may be a major source of standing genetic variance for senescence. PMID:8725233

  19. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... movement ( hyperextensibility ), an abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), reduced bone density (osteopenia), and a tendency for ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  20. FEMALE AND MALE GENETIC EFFECTS ON OFFSPRING PATERNITY: ADDITIVE GENETIC (CO)VARIANCES IN FEMALE EXTRA-PAIR REPRODUCTION AND MALE PATERNITY SUCCESS IN SONG SPARROWS (MELOSPIZA MELODIA)

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Jane M; Arcese, Peter; Keller, Lukas F; Losdat, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing evolution of polyandry, and consequent extra-pair reproduction in socially monogamous systems, is hypothesized to be facilitated by indirect selection stemming from cross-sex genetic covariances with components of male fitness. Specifically, polyandry is hypothesized to create positive genetic covariance with male paternity success due to inevitable assortative reproduction, driving ongoing coevolution. However, it remains unclear whether such covariances could or do emerge within complex polyandrous systems. First, we illustrate that genetic covariances between female extra-pair reproduction and male within-pair paternity success might be constrained in socially monogamous systems where female and male additive genetic effects can have opposing impacts on the paternity of jointly reared offspring. Second, we demonstrate nonzero additive genetic variance in female liability for extra-pair reproduction and male liability for within-pair paternity success, modeled as direct and associative genetic effects on offspring paternity, respectively, in free-living song sparrows (Melospiza melodia). The posterior mean additive genetic covariance between these liabilities was slightly positive, but the credible interval was wide and overlapped zero. Therefore, although substantial total additive genetic variance exists, the hypothesis that ongoing evolution of female extra-pair reproduction is facilitated by genetic covariance with male within-pair paternity success cannot yet be definitively supported or rejected either conceptually or empirically. PMID:24724612

  1. The Dominance Concept Inventory: A Tool for Assessing Undergraduate Student Alternative Conceptions about Dominance in Mendelian and Population Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Kathryn E.; Price, Rebecca M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the impact of genetics on daily life, biology undergraduates understand some key genetics concepts poorly. One concept requiring attention is dominance, which many students understand as a fixed property of an allele or trait and regularly conflate with frequency in a population or selective advantage. We present the Dominance Concept Inventory (DCI), an instrument to gather data on selected alternative conceptions about dominance. During development of the 16-item test, we used expert surveys (n = 12), student interviews (n = 42), and field tests (n = 1763) from introductory and advanced biology undergraduates at public and private, majority- and minority-serving, 2- and 4-yr institutions in the United States. In the final field test across all subject populations (n = 709), item difficulty ranged from 0.08 to 0.84 (0.51 ± 0.049 SEM), while item discrimination ranged from 0.11 to 0.82 (0.50 ± 0.048 SEM). Internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.77, while test–retest reliability values were 0.74 (product moment correlation) and 0.77 (intraclass correlation). The prevalence of alternative conceptions in the field tests shows that introductory and advanced students retain confusion about dominance after instruction. All measures support the DCI as a useful instrument for measuring undergraduate biology student understanding and alternative conceptions about dominance. PMID:26086665

  2. Variance components for statistical genetics: applications in medical research to characteristics related to human diseases and health.

    PubMed

    Hopper, J L

    1993-01-01

    RA Fisher introduced variance components in 1918. He synthesized Mendelian inheritance with Darwin's theory of evolution by showing that the genetic variance of a continuous trait could be decomposed into additive and non-additive components. The model can be extended to include environmental factors, interactions, covariation, and non-random mating. Identifiability depends critically on design. Methods of analysis include modelling the mean squares from a fixed effects analysis of variance, and covariance structure modelling, which can be extended to multivariate traits and has been used to study ordinal traits by reference to postulated, unmeasured, latent 'liabilities'. These methods operate on dependent observations within independent groups of the same size and structure, and therefore require balanced designs ('regular' pedigrees). A multivariate normal model handles data in its generic form, utilizes data efficiently from all members of pedigrees of unequal size or varying structure, accommodates individuals missing at random, and allows flexible modelling with tests of distributional assumptions and fit. Most analytical methods use least squares or maximum likelihood under normal theory. Robust methods, scale transformation, ascertainment, path diagrams and correlational path models (popular in behavioural genetics through addressing nonrandom mating and social interactions), 'heritability', and the contribution and limitations of statistical modelling to the 'nature-nurture' debate, are discussed. PMID:8261258

  3. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Using Naturally Occurring Genetic Variance Among Commercial Inbred Lines of Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan-Ming; Mao, Yongcai; Xie, Chongqing; Smith, Howie; Luo, Lang; Xu, Shizhong

    2005-01-01

    Many commercial inbred lines are available in crops. A large amount of genetic variation is preserved among these lines. The genealogical history of the inbred lines is usually well documented. However, quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for the genetic variances among the lines are largely unexplored due to lack of statistical methods. In this study, we show that the pedigree information of the lines along with the trait values and marker information can be used to map QTL without the need of further crossing experiments. We develop a Monte Carlo method to estimate locus-specific identity-by-descent (IBD) matrices. These IBD matrices are further incorporated into a mixed-model equation for variance component analysis. QTL variance is estimated and tested at every putative position of the genome. The actual QTL are detected by scanning the entire genome. Applying this new method to a well-documented pedigree of maize (Zea mays L.) that consists of 404 inbred lines, we mapped eight QTL for the maize male flowering trait, growing degree day heat units to pollen shedding (GDUSHD). These detected QTL contributed >80% of the variance observed among the inbred lines. The QTL were then used to evaluate all the inbred lines using the best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) technique. Superior lines were selected according to the estimated QTL allelic values, a technique called marker-assisted selection (MAS). The MAS procedure implemented via BLUP may be routinely used by breeders to select superior lines and line combinations for development of new cultivars. PMID:15716509

  4. Applications in genetic risk estimation of data on the induction of dominant skeletal mutations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies on the induction of dominant skeleton mutations and of dominant cataract mutations provide means of estimating genetic hazard to humans from radiation. The breeding-test method of studying the induction of dominant skeletal mutations is slow and cumbersome. In an attempt to devise a more rapid method, three non-breeding-test methods have been developed which are likely to have wider application in mutagenicity testing. (ACR)

  5. Additive-dominance genetic model analyses for late-maturity alpha-amylase activity in a bread wheat factorial crossing population.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Golam; Glover, Karl D; Krishnan, Padmanaban G; Wu, Jixiang; Berzonsky, William A; Ibrahim, Amir M H

    2015-12-01

    Elevated level of late maturity α-amylase activity (LMAA) can result in low falling number scores, reduced grain quality, and downgrade of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) class. A mating population was developed by crossing parents with different levels of LMAA. The F2 and F3 hybrids and their parents were evaluated for LMAA, and data were analyzed using the R software package 'qgtools' integrated with an additive-dominance genetic model and a mixed linear model approach. Simulated results showed high testing powers for additive and additive × environment variances, and comparatively low powers for dominance and dominance × environment variances. All variance components and their proportions to the phenotypic variance for the parents and hybrids were significant except for the dominance × environment variance. The estimated narrow-sense heritability and broad-sense heritability for LMAA were 14 and 54%, respectively. High significant negative additive effects for parents suggest that spring wheat cultivars 'Lancer' and 'Chester' can serve as good general combiners, and that 'Kinsman' and 'Seri-82' had negative specific combining ability in some hybrids despite of their own significant positive additive effects, suggesting they can be used as parents to reduce LMAA levels. Seri-82 showed very good general combining ability effect when used as a male parent, indicating the importance of reciprocal effects. High significant negative dominance effects and high-parent heterosis for hybrids demonstrated that the specific hybrid combinations; Chester × Kinsman, 'Lerma52' × Lancer, Lerma52 × 'LoSprout' and 'Janz' × Seri-82 could be generated to produce cultivars with significantly reduced LMAA level. PMID:26403988

  6. Genetic Variance in Processing Speed Drives Variation in Aging of Spatial and Memory Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkel, Deborah; Reynolds, Chandra A.; McArdle, John J.; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Pedersen, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous analyses have identified a genetic contribution to the correlation between declines with age in processing speed and higher cognitive abilities. The goal of the current analysis was to apply the biometric dual change score model to consider the possibility of temporal dynamics underlying the genetic covariance between aging trajectories…

  7. Evidence for a third genetic locus for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daoust, M.C.; Bichet, D.G.; Reynolds, D.M.

    1995-02-10

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with loci on chromosomes 16p and 4q. It has a moderately high spontaneous mutation rate, although the relative frequency of such mutations at each gene locus is unknown. In studying genetic heterogeneity in the French-Canadian population, we identified a family in which a classical clinical presentation of ADPKD resulted from a mutation at a locus genetically distinct from either of the previously described loci for this disease. This suggests the existence of a third genetic locus for ADPKD. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Estimation of the Proportion of Variation Accounted for by DNA Tests. I: Genetic Variance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proportion of genetic variation accounted for (Rg2) is an important characteristic of a DNA test. For each of 3 levels of narrow sense heritability of the observed trait (h2gy) and 4 levels of Rg2, 500 independent replicates of an observed trait and a molecular breeding value (MBV) for 1000 offs...

  9. Deleterious mutations and the genetic variance of male fitness components in Mimulus guttatus.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John K

    2003-01-01

    Deleterious mutations are relevant to a broad range of questions in genetics and evolutionary biology. I present an application of the "biometric method" for estimating mutational parameters for male fitness characters of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus. The biometric method rests on two critical assumptions. The first is that experimental inbreeding changes genotype frequencies without changing allele frequencies; i.e., there is no genetic purging during the experiment. I satisfy this condition by employing a breeding design in which the parents are randomly extracted, fully homozygous inbred lines. The second is that all genetic variation is attributable to deleterious mutations maintained in mutation-selection balance. I explicitly test this hypothesis using likelihood ratios. Of the three deleterious mutation models tested, the first two are rejected for all characters. The failure of these models is due to an excess of additive genetic variation relative to the expectation under mutation-selection balance. The third model is not rejected for either of two log-transformed male fitness traits. However, this model imposes only "weak conditions" and is not sufficiently detailed to provide estimates for mutational parameters. The implication is that, if biometric methods are going to yield useful parameter estimates, they will need to consider mutational models more complicated than those typically employed in experimental studies. PMID:12871916

  10. Reasoning over genetic variance information in cause-and-effect models of neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Mufassra; Kodamullil, Alpha Tom

    2016-01-01

    The work we present here is based on the recent extension of the syntax of the Biological Expression Language (BEL), which now allows for the representation of genetic variation information in cause-and-effect models. In our article, we describe, how genetic variation information can be used to identify candidate disease mechanisms in diseases with complex aetiology such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. In those diseases, we have to assume that many genetic variants contribute moderately to the overall dysregulation that in the case of neurodegenerative diseases has such a long incubation time until the first clinical symptoms are detectable. Owing to the multilevel nature of dysregulation events, systems biomedicine modelling approaches need to combine mechanistic information from various levels, including gene expression, microRNA (miRNA) expression, protein–protein interaction, genetic variation and pathway. OpenBEL, the open source version of BEL, has recently been extended to match this requirement, and we demonstrate in our article, how candidate mechanisms for early dysregulation events in Alzheimer’s disease can be identified based on an integrative mining approach that identifies ‘chains of causation’ that include single nucleotide polymorphism information in BEL models. PMID:26249223

  11. Temporal Genetic Variance and Propagule-Driven Genetic Structure Characterize Naturalized Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from a Patagonian Lake Impacted by Trout Farming

    PubMed Central

    Seeb, Lisa W.; Seeb, James E.; Arismendi, Ivan; Hernández, Cristián E.; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Galleguillos, Ricardo; Cádiz, Maria I.; Musleh, Selim S.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the genetic underpinnings of invasions—a theme addressed by invasion genetics as a discipline—is still scarce amid well documented ecological impacts of non-native species on ecosystems of Patagonia in South America. One of the most invasive species in Patagonia’s freshwater systems and elsewhere is rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This species was introduced to Chile during the early twentieth century for stocking and promoting recreational fishing; during the late twentieth century was reintroduced for farming purposes and is now naturalized. We used population- and individual-based inference from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to illuminate three objectives related to the establishment and naturalization of Rainbow Trout in Lake Llanquihue. This lake has been intensively used for trout farming during the last three decades. Our results emanate from samples collected from five inlet streams over two seasons, winter and spring. First, we found that significant intra- population (temporal) genetic variance was greater than inter-population (spatial) genetic variance, downplaying the importance of spatial divergence during the process of naturalization. Allele frequency differences between cohorts, consistent with variation in fish length between spring and winter collections, might explain temporal genetic differences. Second, individual-based Bayesian clustering suggested that genetic structure within Lake Llanquihue was largely driven by putative farm propagules found at one single stream during spring, but not in winter. This suggests that farm broodstock might migrate upstream to breed during spring at that particular stream. It is unclear whether interbreeding has occurred between “pure” naturalized and farm trout in this and other streams. Third, estimates of the annual number of breeders (Nb) were below 73 in half of the collections, suggestive of genetically small and recently founded populations that might experience

  12. Temporal Genetic Variance and Propagule-Driven Genetic Structure Characterize Naturalized Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from a Patagonian Lake Impacted by Trout Farming.

    PubMed

    Benavente, Javiera N; Seeb, Lisa W; Seeb, James E; Arismendi, Ivan; Hernández, Cristián E; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Galleguillos, Ricardo; Cádiz, Maria I; Musleh, Selim S; Gomez-Uchida, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the genetic underpinnings of invasions-a theme addressed by invasion genetics as a discipline-is still scarce amid well documented ecological impacts of non-native species on ecosystems of Patagonia in South America. One of the most invasive species in Patagonia's freshwater systems and elsewhere is rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This species was introduced to Chile during the early twentieth century for stocking and promoting recreational fishing; during the late twentieth century was reintroduced for farming purposes and is now naturalized. We used population- and individual-based inference from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to illuminate three objectives related to the establishment and naturalization of Rainbow Trout in Lake Llanquihue. This lake has been intensively used for trout farming during the last three decades. Our results emanate from samples collected from five inlet streams over two seasons, winter and spring. First, we found that significant intra- population (temporal) genetic variance was greater than inter-population (spatial) genetic variance, downplaying the importance of spatial divergence during the process of naturalization. Allele frequency differences between cohorts, consistent with variation in fish length between spring and winter collections, might explain temporal genetic differences. Second, individual-based Bayesian clustering suggested that genetic structure within Lake Llanquihue was largely driven by putative farm propagules found at one single stream during spring, but not in winter. This suggests that farm broodstock might migrate upstream to breed during spring at that particular stream. It is unclear whether interbreeding has occurred between "pure" naturalized and farm trout in this and other streams. Third, estimates of the annual number of breeders (Nb) were below 73 in half of the collections, suggestive of genetically small and recently founded populations that might experience substantial

  13. Evolution of the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix under continuous directional selection on a complex behavioural phenotype.

    PubMed

    Careau, Vincent; Wolak, Matthew E; Carter, Patrick A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-11-22

    Given the pace at which human-induced environmental changes occur, a pressing challenge is to determine the speed with which selection can drive evolutionary change. A key determinant of adaptive response to multivariate phenotypic selection is the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix ( G: ). Yet knowledge of G: in a population experiencing new or altered selection is not sufficient to predict selection response because G: itself evolves in ways that are poorly understood. We experimentally evaluated changes in G: when closely related behavioural traits experience continuous directional selection. We applied the genetic covariance tensor approach to a large dataset (n = 17 328 individuals) from a replicated, 31-generation artificial selection experiment that bred mice for voluntary wheel running on days 5 and 6 of a 6-day test. Selection on this subset of G: induced proportional changes across the matrix for all 6 days of running behaviour within the first four generations. The changes in G: induced by selection resulted in a fourfold slower-than-predicted rate of response to selection. Thus, selection exacerbated constraints within G: and limited future adaptive response, a phenomenon that could have profound consequences for populations facing rapid environmental change. PMID:26582016

  14. Diversity and population structure of a dominant deciduous tree based on morphological and genetic data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin-di; Jia, Rui-Zhi; Meng, Chao; Ti, Chao-Wen; Wang, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic diversity and structure of tree species across their geographic ranges is essential for sustainable use and management of forest ecosystems. Acer grosseri Pax., an economically and ecologically important maple species, is mainly distributed in North China. In this study, the genetic diversity and population differentiation of 24 natural populations of this species were evaluated using sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers and morphological characters. The results show that highly significant differences occurred in 32 morphological traits. The coefficient of variation of 34 characters was 18.19 %. Principal component analysis indicated that 18 of 34 traits explained 60.20 % of the total variance. The phenotypic differentiation coefficient (VST) was 36.06 % for all morphological traits. The Shannon-Wiener index of 34 morphological characters was 6.09, while at the population level, it was 1.77. The percentage of polymorphic bands of all studied A. grosseri populations was 82.14 %. Nei's gene diversity (He) and Shannon's information index (I) were 0.35 and 0.50, respectively. Less genetic differentiation was detected among the natural populations (GST = 0.20, ΦST = 0.10). Twenty-four populations of A. grosseri formed two main clusters, which is consistent with morphological cluster analysis. Principal coordinates analysis and STRUCTURE analysis supported the UPGMA-cluster dendrogram. There was no significant correlation between genetic and geographical distances among populations. Both molecular and morphological data suggested that A. grosseri is rich in genetic diversity. The high level of genetic variation within populations could be affected by the biological characters, mating system and lifespan of A. grosseri, whereas the lower genetic diversity among populations could be caused by effective gene exchange, selective pressure from environmental heterogeneity and the species' geographical range. PMID:26311734

  15. Diversity and population structure of a dominant deciduous tree based on morphological and genetic data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qin-di; Jia, Rui-Zhi; Meng, Chao; Ti, Chao-Wen; Wang, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic diversity and structure of tree species across their geographic ranges is essential for sustainable use and management of forest ecosystems. Acer grosseri Pax., an economically and ecologically important maple species, is mainly distributed in North China. In this study, the genetic diversity and population differentiation of 24 natural populations of this species were evaluated using sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers and morphological characters. The results show that highly significant differences occurred in 32 morphological traits. The coefficient of variation of 34 characters was 18.19 %. Principal component analysis indicated that 18 of 34 traits explained 60.20 % of the total variance. The phenotypic differentiation coefficient (VST) was 36.06 % for all morphological traits. The Shannon–Wiener index of 34 morphological characters was 6.09, while at the population level, it was 1.77. The percentage of polymorphic bands of all studied A. grosseri populations was 82.14 %. Nei's gene diversity (He) and Shannon's information index (I) were 0.35 and 0.50, respectively. Less genetic differentiation was detected among the natural populations (GST = 0.20, ΦST = 0.10). Twenty-four populations of A. grosseri formed two main clusters, which is consistent with morphological cluster analysis. Principal coordinates analysis and STRUCTURE analysis supported the UPGMA-cluster dendrogram. There was no significant correlation between genetic and geographical distances among populations. Both molecular and morphological data suggested that A. grosseri is rich in genetic diversity. The high level of genetic variation within populations could be affected by the biological characters, mating system and lifespan of A. grosseri, whereas the lower genetic diversity among populations could be caused by effective gene exchange, selective pressure from environmental heterogeneity and the species' geographical range. PMID:26311734

  16. Bimodal expressivity in dominant retinitis pigmentosa genetically linked to chromosome 19q.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, K; al-Maghtheh, M; Fitzke, F W; Moore, A T; Jay, M; Inglehearn, C F; Arden, G B; Bird, A C

    1995-01-01

    A clinical, psychophysical, and electrophysiologic study was undertaken of two autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa pedigrees with a genetic mutation assigned to chromosome 19q by linkage analysis. Members with the abnormal haplotype were either symptomatic with adolescent onset nyctalopia, restricted visual fields, and non-detectable electroretinographic responses by 30 years of age, or asymptomatic with normal fundus appearance and minimal or no psychophysical or electroretinographic abnormalities. There was no correlation in the severity in parents and their offspring. Pedigree analysis suggested that although the offspring of parents with the genetic mutation were at 50% risk of having the genetic defect, the risk of being symptomatic during a working lifetime was only 31%. Such bimodal phenotypic expressivity in these particular pedigrees may be explained by a second, allelic genetic influence and may be a phenomenon unique to this genetic locus. Genetic counselling in families expressing this phenotype can only be based on haplotype analysis since clinical investigations, even in the most elderly, would not preclude the presence of the mutant gene. PMID:7488604

  17. Solving multi-objective job shop scheduling problems using a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piroozfard, Hamed; Wong, Kuan Yew

    2015-05-01

    The efforts of finding optimal schedules for the job shop scheduling problems are highly important for many real-world industrial applications. In this paper, a multi-objective based job shop scheduling problem by simultaneously minimizing makespan and tardiness is taken into account. The problem is considered to be more complex due to the multiple business criteria that must be satisfied. To solve the problem more efficiently and to obtain a set of non-dominated solutions, a meta-heuristic based non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm is presented. In addition, task based representation is used for solution encoding, and tournament selection that is based on rank and crowding distance is applied for offspring selection. Swapping and insertion mutations are employed to increase diversity of population and to perform intensive search. To evaluate the modified non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, a set of modified benchmarking job shop problems obtained from the OR-Library is used, and the results are considered based on the number of non-dominated solutions and quality of schedules obtained by the algorithm.

  18. Variance components and genetic parameters for milk production and lactation pattern in an ethiopian multibreed dairy cattle population.

    PubMed

    Gebreyohannes, Gebregziabher; Koonawootrittriron, Skorn; Elzo, Mauricio A; Suwanasopee, Thanathip

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate variance components and genetic parameters for lactation milk yield (LY), lactation length (LL), average milk yield per day (YD), initial milk yield (IY), peak milk yield (PY), days to peak (DP) and parameters (ln(a) and c) of the modified incomplete gamma function (MIG) in an Ethiopian multibreed dairy cattle population. The dataset was composed of 5,507 lactation records collected from 1,639 cows in three locations (Bako, Debre Zeit and Holetta) in Ethiopia from 1977 to 2010. Parameters for MIG were obtained from regression analysis of monthly test-day milk data on days in milk. The cows were purebred (Bos indicus) Boran (B) and Horro (H) and their crosses with different fractions of Friesian (F), Jersey (J) and Simmental (S). There were 23 breed groups (B, H, and their crossbreds with F, J, and S) in the population. Fixed and mixed models were used to analyse the data. The fixed model considered herd-year-season, parity and breed group as fixed effects, and residual as random. The single and two-traits mixed animal repeatability models, considered the fixed effects of herd-year-season and parity subclasses, breed as a function of cow H, F, J, and S breed fractions and general heterosis as a function of heterozygosity, and the random additive animal, permanent environment, and residual effects. For the analysis of LY, LL was added as a fixed covariate to all models. Variance components and genetic parameters were estimated using average information restricted maximum likelihood procedures. The results indicated that all traits were affected (p<0.001) by the considered fixed effects. High grade B×F cows (3/16B 13/16F) had the highest least squares means (LSM) for LY (2,490±178.9 kg), IY (10.5±0.8 kg), PY (12.7±0.9 kg), YD (7.6±0.55 kg) and LL (361.4±31.2 d), while B cows had the lowest LSM values for these traits. The LSM of LY, IY, YD, and PY tended to increase from the first to the fifth parity. Single

  19. Negative-dominance phenomenon with genetic variants of the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5.

    PubMed

    Sottas, Valentin; Abriel, Hugues

    2016-07-01

    During the past two decades, many pathological genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac (monomeric) sodium channel Nav1.5, have been described. Negative dominance is a classical genetic concept involving a "poison" mutant peptide that negatively interferes with the co-expressed wild-type protein, thus reducing its cellular function. This phenomenon has been described for genetic variants of multimeric K(+) channels, which mechanisms are well understood. Unexpectedly, several pathologic SCN5A variants that are linked to Brugada syndrome also demonstrate such a dominant-negative (DN) effect. The molecular determinants of these observations, however, are not yet elucidated. This review article summarizes recent findings that describe the mechanisms underlying the DN phenomenon of genetic variants of K(+), Ca(2+), Cl(-) and Na(+) channels, and in particular Brugada syndrome variants of Nav1.5. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26907222

  20. High variance in reproductive success generates a false signature of a genetic bottleneck in populations of constant size: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Demographic bottlenecks can severely reduce the genetic variation of a population or a species. Establishing whether low genetic variation is caused by a bottleneck or a constantly low effective number of individuals is important to understand a species’ ecology and evolution, and it has implications for conservation management. Recent studies have evaluated the power of several statistical methods developed to identify bottlenecks. However, the false positive rate, i.e. the rate with which a bottleneck signal is misidentified in demographically stable populations, has received little attention. We analyse this type of error (type I) in forward computer simulations of stable populations having greater than Poisson variance in reproductive success (i.e., variance in family sizes). The assumption of Poisson variance underlies bottleneck tests, yet it is commonly violated in species with high fecundity. Results With large variance in reproductive success (Vk ≥ 40, corresponding to a ratio between effective and census size smaller than 0.1), tests based on allele frequencies, allelic sizes, and DNA sequence polymorphisms (heterozygosity excess, M-ratio, and Tajima’s D test) tend to show erroneous signals of a bottleneck. Similarly, strong evidence of population decline is erroneously detected when ancestral and current population sizes are estimated with the model based method MSVAR. Conclusions Our results suggest caution when interpreting the results of bottleneck tests in species showing high variance in reproductive success. Particularly in species with high fecundity, computer simulations are recommended to confirm the occurrence of a population bottleneck. PMID:24131797

  1. Bilateral cataract and high serum ferritin: a new dominant genetic disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Dominique; Winter-Fuseau, Isabelle; Loiseau, Marie-Noëlle; Amati, Patrizia; Berthier, Michel; Oriot, Denis; Beaumont, Carole

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the cosegregation in a three generation pedigree of dominantly inherited cataract with an abnormally high level of serum ferritin. In this family, circulating L ferritin was raised in all subjects affected by cataract independently of iron overload. We suggest that a disorder of ferritin metabolism could be a new genetic disorder leading to lens opacity. Cataract-hyperferritaemia syndrome could also be a new contiguous gene syndrome involving the L ferritin gene and the gene coding for the lens membrane protein (MP19), which both map to the same region of chromosome 19q. PMID:8558554

  2. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: genetics, mutations and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying-Cai; Blumenfeld, Jon; Rennert, Hanna

    2011-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common, monogenic multi-systemic disorder characterized by the development of renal cysts and various extrarenal manifestations. Worldwide, it is a common cause of end-stage renal disease. ADPKD is caused by mutation in either one of two principal genes, PKD1 and PKD2, but has large phenotypic variability among affected individuals, attributable to PKD genic and allelic variability and, possibly, modifier gene effects. Recent studies have generated considerable information regarding the genetic basis and molecular diagnosis of this disease, its pathogenesis, and potential strategies for targeted treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, including mechanisms responsible for disease development, the role of gene variations and mutations in disease presentation, and the putative role of microRNAs in ADPKD etiology. The emerging and important role of genetic testing and the advent of novel molecular diagnostic applications also are reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Polycystic Kidney Disease. PMID:21392578

  3. Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to report on a family with pathologically and genetically diagnosed autosomal dominant inherited centronuclear myopathy (CNM). In addition, this study aimed to investigate the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic characteristics of the disease. This pedigree was traced back three generations, four patients underwent neurological examination, two patients underwent muscle biopsy, and eight family members were subjected to dynamin 2 (DNM2) gene mutation analysis. DNM2 mutations were detected in seven family members, of which four patients exhibited DNM2 mutation‑specific clinical and pathological features. Lower extremity weakness was the predominant symptom of these patients, however, proximal and distal lower extremity involvement was inconsistent. All patients exhibited marked systematic muscle atrophy and various degrees of facial muscle involvement. The patients presented the typical pathological changes of CNM, and their muscle tissues were heavily replaced by adipose tissue, with clustered distribution of muscle fibers as another notable feature. DNM2‑CNM patients of this pedigree exhibited heterogeneous clinical and pathological features, providing a basis for further molecular genetic analysis. PMID:27035234

  4. Estimation of Variance Components of Quantitative Traits in Inbred Populations

    PubMed Central

    Abney, Mark; McPeek, Mary Sara; Ober, Carole

    2000-01-01

    Summary Use of variance-component estimation for mapping of quantitative-trait loci in humans is a subject of great current interest. When only trait values, not genotypic information, are considered, variance-component estimation can also be used to estimate heritability of a quantitative trait. Inbred pedigrees present special challenges for variance-component estimation. First, there are more variance components to be estimated in the inbred case, even for a relatively simple model including additive, dominance, and environmental effects. Second, more identity coefficients need to be calculated from an inbred pedigree in order to perform the estimation, and these are computationally more difficult to obtain in the inbred than in the outbred case. As a result, inbreeding effects have generally been ignored in practice. We describe here the calculation of identity coefficients and estimation of variance components of quantitative traits in large inbred pedigrees, using the example of HDL in the Hutterites. We use a multivariate normal model for the genetic effects, extending the central-limit theorem of Lange to allow for both inbreeding and dominance under the assumptions of our variance-component model. We use simulated examples to give an indication of under what conditions one has the power to detect the additional variance components and to examine their impact on variance-component estimation. We discuss the implications for mapping and heritability estimation by use of variance components in inbred populations. PMID:10677322

  5. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa with apparent incomplete penetrance: a clinical, electrophysiological, psychophysical, and molecular genetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, A T; Fitzke, F; Jay, M; Arden, G B; Inglehearn, C F; Keen, T J; Bhattacharya, S S; Bird, A C

    1993-01-01

    Twenty five symptomatic individuals and six asymptomatic obligate gene carriers from four families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) showing apparent incomplete penetrance have been studied. Symptomatic individuals from three families showed early onset of night blindness, non-recordable rod electroretinograms, and marked elevation of both rod and cone thresholds in all subjects tested. In the fourth family, there was more variation in the age of onset of night blindness and some symptomatic individuals showed well preserved rod and cone function in some retinal areas. All asymptomatic individuals tested had evidence of mild abnormalities of rod and cone function, indicating that these families show marked variation in expressivity rather than true non-penetrance of the adRP gene. No mutations of the rhodopsin or RDS genes were found in these families and the precise genetic mutation(s) remain to be identified. PMID:8025041

  6. [Retracted] Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhong; Wu, Huamin; Gong, Jian; Wang, Tao; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2016-07-01

    We wish to retract our article entitled 'Clinical, pathological and genetic characteristics of autosomal dominant inherited dynamin 2 centronuclear myopathy' published in Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 4273-4278, 2016. The article was submitted by the first author, Xinhong Liu, without the prior knowledge of the corresponding author, Chuanzhu Yan, or the other authors included on the paper. Furthermore, the details of the paper were not discussed by the authors prior to the submission, and all are in agreement that the paper contains data therein (and interpretations thereof) which are either inaccurate or inappropriate. All the authors agree to this retraction, and we apologize for the inconvenience caused in this regard.[the original article was published in the Molecular Medicine Reports 13: 4273-4278, 2016; DOI: 10.3892/mmr.2016.5047]. PMID:27176730

  7. Fitness of Transgenic Mosquito Aedes aegypti Males Carrying a Dominant Lethal Genetic System

    PubMed Central

    Massonnet-Bruneel, Blandine; Corre-Catelin, Nicole; Lacroix, Renaud; Lees, Rosemary S.; Hoang, Kim Phuc; Nimmo, Derric; Alphey, Luke; Reiter, Paul

    2013-01-01

    OX513A is a transgenic strain of Aedes aegypti engineered to carry a dominant, non-sex-specific, late-acting lethal genetic system that is repressed in the presence of tetracycline. It was designed for use in a sterile-insect (SIT) pest control system called RIDL® (Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal gene) by which transgenic males are released in the field to mate with wild females; in the absence of tetracycline, the progeny from such matings will not survive. We investigated the mating fitness of OX513A in the laboratory. Male OX513A were as effective as Rockefeller (ROCK) males at inducing refractoriness to further mating in wild type females and there was no reduction in their ability to inseminate multiple females. They had a lower mating success but yielded more progeny than the wild-type comparator strain (ROCK) when one male of each strain was caged with a ROCK female. Mating success and fertility of groups of 10 males—with different ratios of RIDL to ROCK—competing for five ROCK females was similar, but the median longevity of RIDL males was somewhat (18%) lower. We conclude that the fitness under laboratory conditions of OX513A males carrying a tetracycline repressible lethal gene is comparable to that of males of the wild-type comparator strain. PMID:23690948

  8. Genetic analysis of Iranian autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: new insight to haplotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Entezam, M; Khatami, M R; Saddadi, F; Ayati, M; Roozbeh, J; Saghafi, H; Keramatipour, M

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) caused by mutations in two PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Due to the complexity of the PKD1 gene, its direct mutation screening is an expensive and time-consuming procedure. Pedigree-based haplotype analysis is a useful indirect approach to identify the responsible gene in families with multiple affected individuals, before direct mutation analysis. Here, we applied this approach to investigate 15 appropriate unrelated ADPKD families, selected from 25 families, who referred for genetic counseling. Four polymorphic microsatellite markers were selected around each PKD1 and PKD2 loci. In addition, by investigating the genomic regions, two novel flanking tetranucleotide STR markers were identified. Haplotype analysis and calculating Lod score confirmed linkage to PKD1 in 9 families (60%) and to PKD2 in 2 families (13%). Linkage to both loci was excluded in one family (6.6%). In 2 families (13%) the Lod scores were inconclusive. Causative mutation was identified successfully by direct analysis in two families with confirmed linkage, one to PKD1 and another to PKD2 locus. The study showed that determining the causative locus prior to direct mutation analysis is an efficient strategy to reduce the resources required for genetic analysis of ADPKD families. This is more prominent in PKD2-linked families. Selection of suitable markers, and appropriate PCR multiplexing strategy, using fluorescent labeled primers and 3 primer system, will also add value to this approach. PMID:26950445

  9. Genetic transformation of Nannochloropsis oculata with a bacterial phleomycin resistance gene as dominant selective marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Pan, Kehou; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Baohua; Yang, Guanpin; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2016-04-01

    The gene ble from Streptoalloteichus hindustanus is widely used as a selective antibiotic marker. It can control the phleomycin resistance, and significantly increase the tolerance of hosts to zeocin. The unicellular marine microalga Nannochloropsis oculata is extremely sensitive to zeocin. We selected ble as the selective marker for the genetic transformation of N. oculata. After the algal cells at a density of 2×107 cells mL-1 was digested with 4% hemicellulase and 2% driselase for 1 h, the protoplasts accounted for 90% of the total. The ble was placed at the downstream of promoter HSP70A-RUBS2 isolated from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, yielding a recombinant expression construct pMS188. The construct was transferred into the protoplasts through electroporation (1 kV, 15 μS). The transformed protoplasts were cultured in fresh f/2 liquid medium, and selected on solid f/2 medium supplemented with 500 ng mL-1 zeocin. The PCR result proved that ble existed in the transformants. Three transformants had been cultured for at least 5 generations without losing ble. Southern blotting analysis showed that the ble has been integrated into the genome of N. oculata. The ble will serve as a new dominant selective marker in genetic engineering N. oculata.

  10. Replication of a Gene-Environment Interaction via Multimodel Inference: Additive-Genetic Variance in Adolescents’ General Cognitive Ability Increases with Family-of-Origin Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2015-01-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES—an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research. PMID:25539975

  11. Replication of a gene-environment interaction Via Multimodel inference: additive-genetic variance in adolescents' general cognitive ability increases with family-of-origin socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2015-03-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES-an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research. PMID:25539975

  12. USE OF PRIMITIVE DERIVED COTTON ACCESSIONS FOR AGRONOMIC AND FIBER TRAITS IMPROVEMENT: VARIANCE COMPONENTS AND GENETIC EFFECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is cultivated in warmer climates throughout the world. The genetic base of modern upland cultivars is narrow. As yield and fiber quality traits are improved the genetic base should be extended by the incorporation of new germplasm into cultivars. In this stud...

  13. Genetic variation within a dominant shrub structures green and brown community assemblages.

    PubMed

    Crutsinger, Gregory M; Rodriguez-Cabal, Mariano A; Roddy, Adam B; Peay, Kabir G; Bastow, Justin L; Kidder, Allison G; Dawson, Todd E; Fine, Paul V A; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2014-02-01

    Two rising challenges in ecology are understanding the linkages between above- and belowground components of terrestrial ecosystems and connecting genes to their ecological consequences. Here, we blend these emerging perspectives using a long-term common-garden experiment in a coastal dune ecosystem, whose dominant shrub species, Baccharis pilularis, exists as erect or prostrate architectural morphotypes. We explored variation in green (foliage-based) and brown (detritus-based) community assemblages, local ecosystem processes, and understory microclimate between the two morphs. Prostrate morphs supported more individuals, species, and different compositions of foliage arthropods, litter microarthropods, and soil bacteria than erect morphs. The magnitude of community compositional differences was maintained from crown to litter to soil. Despite showing strikingly similar responses, green and brown assemblages were associated with different underlying mechanisms. Differences in estimated shrub biomass best explained variation in the green assemblage, while understory abiotic conditions accounted for variation in the brown assemblage. Prostrate morphs produced more biomass and litter, which corresponded with their strong lateral growth in a windy environment. Compared to erect morphs, the denser canopy and thicker litter layer of prostrate morphs helped create more humid understory conditions. As a result, decomposition rates were higher under prostrate shrubs, despite prostrate litter being of poorer quality. Together, our results support the hypothesis that intraspecific genetic variation in primary producers is a key mediator of above- and belowground linkages, and that integrating the two perspectives can lead to new insights into how terrestrial communities are linked with ecosystem pools and processes. PMID:24669732

  14. Analyzing the control of mosquito-borne diseases by a dominant lethal genetic system

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Michael P.; Su, Zheng; Alphey, Nina; Alphey, Luke S.; Coleman, Paul G.; Wein, Lawrence M.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the failure of current methods to control dengue fever, we formulate a mathematical model to assess the impact on the spread of a mosquito-borne viral disease of a strategy that releases adult male insects homozygous for a dominant, repressible, lethal genetic trait. A dynamic model for the female adult mosquito population, which incorporates the competition for female mating between released mosquitoes and wild mosquitoes, density-dependent competition during the larval stage, and realization of the lethal trait either before or after the larval stage, is embedded into a susceptible–exposed–infectious–susceptible human-vector epidemic model for the spread of the disease. For the special case in which the number of released mosquitoes is maintained in a fixed proportion to the number of adult female mosquitoes at each point in time, we derive mathematical formulas for the disease eradication condition and the approximate number of released mosquitoes necessary for eradication. Numerical results using data for dengue fever suggest that the proportional policy outperforms a release policy in which the released mosquito population is held constant, and that eradication in ≈1 year is feasible for affected human populations on the order of 105 to 106, although the logistical considerations are daunting. We also construct a policy that achieves an exponential decay in the female mosquito population; this policy releases approximately the same number of mosquitoes as the proportional policy but achieves eradication nearly twice as fast. PMID:17519336

  15. μ-Calpain, calpastatin, and growth hormone receptor genetic effects on preweaning performance, carcass quality traits, and residual variance of tenderness in Angus cattle selected to increase minor haplotype and allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Tait, R G; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; King, D A; Casas, E; Thallman, R M; Smith, T P L; Bennett, G L

    2014-02-01

    Genetic marker effects and interactions are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. An Angus population was subjected to marker assisted selection for multiple years to increase divergent haplotype and minor marker allele frequencies to 1) estimate effect size and mode of inheritance for previously reported SNP on targeted beef carcass quality traits; 2) estimate effects of previously reported SNP on nontarget performance traits; and 3) evaluate tenderness SNP specific residual variance models compared to a single residual variance model for tenderness. Divergent haplotypes within µ-calpain (CAPN1), and SNP within calpastatin (CAST) and growth hormone receptor (GHR) were successfully selected to increase their frequencies. Traits evaluated were birth BW, weaning BW, final BW, fat thickness, LM area, USDA marbling score, yield grade, slice shear force (SSF), and visible and near infrared predicted slice shear force. Both CAPN1 and CAST exhibited additive (P < 0.001) modes of inheritance for SSF and neither exhibited dominance (P ≥ 0.19). Furthermore, the interaction between CAPN1 and CAST for SSF was not significant (P = 0.55). Estimated additive effects of CAPN1 (1.049 kg) and CAST (1.257 kg) on SSF were large in this study. Animals homozygous for tender alleles at both CAPN1 and CAST would have 4.61 kg lower SSF (38.6% of the mean) than animals homozygous tough for both markers. There was also an effect of CAST on yield grade (P < 0.02). The tender CAST allele was associated with more red meat yield and less trimmable fat. There were no significant effects (P ≥ 0.23) for GHR on any of the traits evaluated in this study. Furthermore, CAST specific residual variance models were found to fit significantly better (P < 0.001) than single residual variance models for SSF, with the tougher genotypes having larger residual variance. Thus, the risk of a tough steak from the undesired CAST genotype is increased through both an

  16. FADS2 Genetic Variance in Combination with Fatty Acid Intake Might Alter Composition of the Fatty Acids in Brain.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Thais S; van der Sluis, Sophie; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; van Kesteren, Ronald E; Jacobs, Nele; Van Gestel, Sofie; Vlietinck, Robert; Verhage, Matthijs; Heutink, Peter; Posthuma, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest that fatty acids (FA) play an important role in cognitive function. However, little is known about the functional genetic pathways involved in cognition. The main goals of this study were to replicate previously reported interaction effects between breast feeding (BF) and FA desaturase (FADS) genetic variation on IQ and to investigate the possible mechanisms by which these variants might moderate BF effect, focusing on brain expression. Using a sample of 534 twins, we observed a trend in the moderation of BF effects on IQ by FADS2 variation. In addition, we made use of publicly available gene expression databases from both humans (193) and mice (93) and showed that FADS2 variants also correlate with FADS1 brain expression (P-value<1.1E-03). Our results provide novel clues for the understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating FA brain expression and improve the current knowledge of the FADS moderation effect on cognition. PMID:23826354

  17. Genetic control of the environmental variance for birth weight in seven generations of a divergent selection experiment in mice.

    PubMed

    Formoso-Rafferty, N; Cervantes, I; Ibáñez-Escriche, N; Gutiérrez, J P

    2016-06-01

    Data from seven generations of a divergent selection experiment designed for environmental variability of birth weight were analysed to estimate genetic parameters and to explore signs of selection response. A total of 10 783 birth weight records from 638 females and 1127 litters in combination with 10 007 pedigree records were used. Each record of birth weight was assigned to the mother of the pup in a heteroscedastic model, and after seven generations of selection, evidence of success in the selection process was shown. A Bayesian analysis showed that success of the selection process started from the first generation for birth weight and from the second generation for its environmental variability. Genetic parameters were estimated across generations. However, only from the third generation onwards were the records useful to consider the results to be reliable. The results showed a consistent positive and low genetic correlation between the birth weight trait and its environmental variability, which could allow an independent selection process. This study has demonstrated that the genetic control of the birth weight environmental variability is possible in mice. Nevertheless, before the results are applied directly in farm animals, it would be worth confirming any other implications on other important traits, such as robustness, longevity and welfare. PMID:26150168

  18. School performance and genetic and environmental variance in antisocial behavior at the transition from adolescence to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wendy; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2009-07-01

    Antisocial behavior increases in adolescence, particularly among those who perform poorly in school. As adolescents move into adulthood, both educational attainment and the extent to which antisocial behavior continues have implications for adolescents' abilities to take on constructive social roles. The authors used a population-representative longitudinal twin study to explore how links among genetic and environmental influences at ages 17 and 24 may be implicated in the developmental processes involved. At age 17, expression of both genetic and nonshared environmental vulnerabilities unique to antisocial behavior was greater among those with low GPA than among those with higher GPA. This suggested that maintenance of high GPA buffered the impact of both genetic and environmental influences encouraging antisocial behavior. When GPA was high, both genetic and environmental influences involved in both traits encouraged good school performance and restrained antisocial behavior. At age 24, however, correlated family environmental influences drove the association between educational attainment and antisocial behavior. Antisocial characteristics involving school performance and educational attainment that transcend generations may slot individuals into social categories that restrict opportunities and reinforce antisocial characteristics. PMID:19586174

  19. School Performance and Genetic and Environmental Variance in Antisocial Behavior at the Transition from Adolescence to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Wendy; McGue, Matthew K.; Iacono, William G.

    2009-01-01

    Antisocial behavior increases in adolescence, particularly among those who perform poorly in school. As adolescents move into adulthood, both educational attainment and the extent to which antisocial behavior continues have implications for their abilities to take on constructive social roles. We used a population-representative longitudinal twin study to explore how links between genetic and environmental influences at ages 17 and 24 may be implicated in the developmental processes involved. At age 17, expression of both genetic and nonshared environmental vulnerabilities unique to antisocial behavior was greater among those with low GPA than among those with higher GPA. This suggested that maintenance of high GPA buffered the impact of both genetic and environmental influences encouraging antisocial behavior. When GPA was high, both genetic and environmental influences involved in both traits encouraged good school performance and restrained antisocial behavior. At age 24, however, correlated family environmental influences drove the association between educational attainment and antisocial behavior. Antisocial characteristics involving school performance and educational attainment that transcend generations may slot individuals into social categories that restrict opportunities and reinforce antisocial characteristics. PMID:19586174

  20. THE GENETIC STRUCTURE OF A MAIZE SYNTHETIC: THE ROLE OF DOMINANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In selection programs, the covariance between parents and offspring largely determines the success of selection. We have estimated the variances and covariances between noninbred individuals and both their inbred and outbred progeny in the non-stiff stalk maize population BSCB1(R)C13. Estimation o...

  1. Quantitative genetics of sexually dimorphic traits and capture of genetic variance by a sexually-selected condition-dependent ornament in red junglefowl (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Parker, T H; Garant, D

    2004-11-01

    We studied the quantitative genetics of sexually selected traits in a captive population of red junglefowl (Gallus gallus L.) using a multi-generational 'animal model' approach. We found significant heritability of mass, tarsus length (both strongly sexually dimorphic), residual mass, and male comb (a fleshy head ornament) length. Residual mass has a genetic correlation between the sexes smaller than unity and so could show partially independent responses to selection in the two sexes. In males, tarsus length and mass were not genetically correlated, and this produced a negative genetic correlation between tarsus length and residual mass. The male red junglefowl's comb, an ornament influencing female choice, is highly condition dependent. We show that expression of this ornament is heritable, however, and shows strong genetic correlation with a condition index, residual mass. Because residual mass is partly influenced by various aspects of condition, it appears that comb size has 'captured' genetic variability in condition. PMID:15525412

  2. Sex-linked dominant

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... one of the sex chromosomes, which are the X and Y chromosomes. Dominant inheritance occurs when an ...

  3. Genetic variance and covariance patterns for body weight and energy balance characters in an advanced intercross population of mice

    PubMed Central

    Leamy, Larry J; Elo, Kari; Nielsen, Merlyn K; Van Vleck, L Dale; Pomp, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    We estimated heritabilities and genetic correlations for a suite of 15 characters in five functional groups in an advanced intercross population of over 2000 mice derived from a cross of inbred lines selected for high and low heat loss. Heritabilities averaged 0.56 for three body weights, 0.23 for two energy balance characters, 0.48 for three bone characters, 0.35 for four measures of adiposity, and 0.27 for three organ weights, all of which were generally consistent in magnitude with estimates derived in previous studies. Genetic correlations varied from -0.65 to +0.98, and were higher within these functional groups than between groups. These correlations generally conformed to a priori expectations, being positive in sign for energy expenditure and consumption (+0.24) and negative in sign for energy expenditure and adiposity (-0.17). The genetic correlations of adiposity with body weight at 3, 6, and 12 weeks of age (-0.29, -0.22, -0.26) all were negative in sign but not statistically significant. The independence of body weight and adiposity suggests that this advanced intercross population is ideal for a comprehensive discovery of genes controlling regulation of mammalian adiposity that are distinct from those for body weight. PMID:16194522

  4. CAPN1, CAST, and DGAT1 genetic effects on preweaning performance, carcass quality traits, and residual variance of tenderness in a beef cattle population selected for haplotype and allele equalization.

    PubMed

    Tait, R G; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; King, D A; Keele, J W; Casas, E; Smith, T P L; Bennett, G L

    2014-12-01

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC III) was subjected to marker-assisted selection for multiple years to equalize specific marker frequencies to 1) estimate effect size and mode of inheritance for previously reported SNP on targeted beef carcass quality traits (n=254), 2) estimate pleiotropic effects of previously reported SNP on nontarget performance traits (n=542 or 254), and 3) evaluate tenderness SNP specific residual variance for LM tenderness. Three haplotypes within μ-calpain (CAPN1), a SNP in calpastatin (CAST), and a dinucleotide substitution in diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) were successfully selected to equalize their frequencies. Traits evaluated were birth BW, weaning BW, yearling BW, final BW, dressing percent, HCW, fat thickness, LM area, USDA marbling score, yield grade, LM slice shear force (SSF), and visible and near-infrared (VISNIR)-predicted SSF. While the CAPN1 genotype effect on SSF was not significant (P=0.12), the direction and size of CAPN1 contrasts were consistent with previous research. Effects on SSF between divergent CAPN1 haplotypes (1.153 kg) and the additive effect of CAST (0.902 kg) were large, and animals homozygous for tender alleles at both CAPN1 and CAST would have 4.11 kg lower SSF (27.5% of the mean) than animals homozygous tough for both markers. Furthermore, the interaction between CAPN1 and CAST for SSF was not significant (P=0.40). There were significant effects for DGAT1 on adjusted fat thickness (P=0.02) and VISNIR-predicted SSF (P<0.001) with additive and dominance modes of inheritance (P<0.05) for both traits. Furthermore, CAST genotype specific residual variance models fit significantly better (P<0.001) than single residual variance models for SSF, with the tougher genotypes having progressively larger residual (and hence phenotypic) variances. Therefore, risk of a tough steak

  5. The genetic structure of Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis, populations in China: haplotype variance in northern populations and potential impact on management of resistance to transgenic maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Coates, Brad S; Kim, Kyung Seok; Bourguet, Denis; Ponsard, Sergine; He, Kanglai; Wang, Zhenying

    2014-01-01

    Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée), is a severe pest that infests cultivated maize in the major production regions of China. Populations show genotype-by-environment variation in voltinism, such that populations with a single generation (univoltine) are fixed in Northern China where growing seasons are short. Low genetic differentiation was found among samples from 33 collection sites across China and one site from North Korea (n=1673) using variation at 6 nuclear microsatellite loci (ENA corrected global FST=0.020; P value<0.05). Analysis of molecular variance indicated that geographic region, number of generations or voltinism accounted for <0.38% of the total genetic variation at nuclear loci and was corroborated by clustering of co-ancestries among genotypes using the program STRUCTURE. In contrast, a mitochondrial haplotype network identified 4 distinct clusters, where 70.5% of samples from univoltine populations were within a single group. Univoltine populations were also placed into a unique cluster using Population Graph and Principal component analyses, which showed significant differentiation with multivoltine populations (φST=0.400; P value<0.01). This study suggests that gene flow among O. furnacalis in China may be high among regions, with the exception of northeastern localities. Haplotype variation may be due to random genetic drift resulting from partial reproductive isolation between univoltine and multivoltine O. furnacalis populations. Such reproductive isolation might impact the potential spread of alleles that confer resistance to transgenic maize in China. PMID:25024271

  6. Genomic analysis of dominance effects on milk production and conformation traits in Fleckvieh cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Estimates of dominance variance in dairy cattle based on pedigree data vary considerably across traits and amount to up to 50% of the total genetic variance for conformation traits and up to 43% for milk production traits. Using bovine SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotypes, dominance variance can be estimated both at the marker level and at the animal level using genomic dominance effect relationship matrices. Yield deviations of high-density genotyped Fleckvieh cows were used to assess cross-validation accuracy of genomic predictions with additive and dominance models. The potential use of dominance variance in planned matings was also investigated. Results Variance components of nine milk production and conformation traits were estimated with additive and dominance models using yield deviations of 1996 Fleckvieh cows and ranged from 3.3% to 50.5% of the total genetic variance. REML and Gibbs sampling estimates showed good concordance. Although standard errors of estimates of dominance variance were rather large, estimates of dominance variance for milk, fat and protein yields, somatic cell score and milkability were significantly different from 0. Cross-validation accuracy of predicted breeding values was higher with genomic models than with the pedigree model. Inclusion of dominance effects did not increase the accuracy of the predicted breeding and total genetic values. Additive and dominance SNP effects for milk yield and protein yield were estimated with a BLUP (best linear unbiased prediction) model and used to calculate expectations of breeding values and total genetic values for putative offspring. Selection on total genetic value instead of breeding value would result in a larger expected total genetic superiority in progeny, i.e. 14.8% for milk yield and 27.8% for protein yield and reduce the expected additive genetic gain only by 4.5% for milk yield and 2.6% for protein yield. Conclusions Estimated dominance variance was substantial

  7. Standing genetic variance for female resistance to harm from males and its relationship to intralocus sexual conflict.

    PubMed

    Lew, Timothy A; Morrow, Edward H; Rice, William R

    2006-01-01

    Interlocus sexual conflict theory predicts that some male adaptations are harmful to their mates. Females are therefore expected to evolve resistance to this harm. Using cytogenetic cloning techniques, we tested for heritable genetic variation among females for resistance to harm from males and determined whether propensity to remate, female body size, and intralocus conflict contributes to this variation. We found low but significant heritability for female resistance, but this variation accounted for more than half of the standing genetic variation for net fitness among females. We found no association between female resistance and female body size or level of intralocus sexual conflict. Reluctance to remate was found to be an important factor contributing to the female resistance phenotype, and we found a positive selection gradient on this trait. However, we observed only a nonsignificant positive correlation between a female's resistance and her net fitness. One factor contributing to the observed nominal level of selection on female resistance was that males cause the greatest amount of harm to females with the highest intrinsic fecundity. PMID:16568635

  8. Mating strategies in dominant meerkats: evidence for extra-pair paternity in relation to genetic relatedness between pair mates.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, S; Nielsen, J F; Sharp, S P; Clutton-Brock, T H

    2013-07-01

    Rates of extra-pair paternity (EPP) have frequently been associated with genetic relatedness between social mates in socially monogamous birds. However, evidence is limited in mammals. Here, we investigate whether dominant females use divorce or extra-pair paternity as a strategy to avoid the negative effects of inbreeding when paired with a related male in meerkats Suricata suricatta, a species where inbreeding depression is evident for several traits. We show that dominant breeding pairs seldom divorce, but that rates of EPP are associated with genetic similarity between mates. Although extra-pair males are no more distantly related to the female than social males, they are more heterozygous. Nevertheless, extra-pair pups are not more heterozygous than within-pair pups. Whether females benefit from EPP in terms of increased fitness of the offspring, such as enhanced survival or growth, requires further investigations. PMID:23675879

  9. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphism marker density on degree of genetic variance explained and genomic evaluation for carcass traits in Japanese Black beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Japanese Black cattle are a beef breed whose meat is well known to excel in meat quality, especially in marbling, and whose effective population size is relatively low in Japan. Unlike dairy cattle, the accuracy of genomic evaluation (GE) for carcass traits in beef cattle, including this breed, has been poorly studied. For carcass weight and marbling score in the breed, as well as the extent of whole genome linkage disequilibrium (LD), the effects of equally-spaced single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) density on genomic relationship matrix (G matrix), genetic variance explained and GE were investigated using the genotype data of about 40,000 SNPs and two statistical models. Results Using all pairs of two adjacent SNPs in the whole SNP set, the means of LD (r 2 ) at ranges 0–0.1, 0.1–0.2, 0.2–0.5 and 0.5–1 Mb were 0.22, 0.13, 0.10 and 0.08, respectively, and 25.7, 13.9, 10.4 and 6.4% of the r 2 values exceeded 0.3, respectively. While about 90% of the genetic variance for carcass weight estimated using all available SNPs was explained using 4,000–6,000 SNPs, the corresponding percentage for marbling score was consistently lower. With the conventional linear model incorporating the G matrix, correlation between the genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs) obtained using 4,000 SNPs and all available SNPs was 0.99 for carcass weight and 0.98 for marbling score, with an underestimation of the former GEBVs, especially for marbling score. Conclusions The Japanese Black is likely to be in a breed group with a relatively high extent of whole genome LD. The results indicated that the degree of marbling is controlled by only QTLs with relatively small effects, compared with carcass weight, and that using at least 4,000 equally-spaced SNPs, there is a possibility of ranking animals genetically for these carcass traits in this breed. PMID:24491120

  10. ADJUSTMENT FOR HETEROGENEOUS GENETIC AND NON-GENETIC (CO)VARIANCE STRUCTURES ON TEST-DAY MODELS USING A TRANSFORMATION ON RANDOM REGRESSION EFFECT REGRESSORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method of accounting for differences in variation in components of test-day milk production records was developed. This method could improve the accuracy of genetic evaluations. A random regression model is used to analyze the data, then a transformation is applied to the random regression coeffic...

  11. Genetic correlations and little genetic variance for reaction norms may limit potential for adaptation to pollution by ionic and nanoparticulate silver in a whitefish (Salmonidae).

    PubMed

    Clark, Emily S; Pompini, Manuel; Uppal, Anshu; Wedekind, Claus

    2016-05-01

    For natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats, heritable variation must persist in tolerance traits. Silver nanoparticles, the most widely used engineered nanoparticles, are expected to increase in concentrations in freshwaters. Little is known about how these particles affect wild populations, and whether genetic variation persists in tolerance to permit rapid evolutionary responses. We sampled wild adult whitefish and crossed them in vitro full factorially. In total, 2896 singly raised embryos of 48 families were exposed to two concentrations (0.5 μg/L; 100 μg/L) of differently sized silver nanoparticles or ions (silver nitrate). These doses were not lethal; yet higher concentrations prompted embryos to hatch earlier and at a smaller size. The induced hatching did not vary with nanoparticle size and was stronger in the silver nitrate group. Additive genetic variation for hatching time was significant across all treatments, with no apparent environmental dependencies. No genetic variation was found for hatching plasticity. We found some treatment-dependent heritable variation for larval length and yolk volume, and one instance of additive genetic variation for the reaction norm on length at hatching. Our assessment suggests that the effects of silver exposure on additive genetic variation vary according to trait and silver source. While the long-term fitness consequences of low-level silver exposure on whitefish embryos must be further investigated to determine whether it is, in fact, detrimental, our results suggest that the evolutionary potential for adaptation to these types of pollutants may be low. PMID:27066251

  12. Partial Dominance, Overdominance and Epistasis as the Genetic Basis of Heterosis in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yumei; Hua, Jinping

    2015-01-01

    Determination of genetic basis of heterosis may promote hybrid production in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). This study was designed to explore the genetic mechanism of heterosis for yield and yield components in F2: 3 and F2: 4 populations derived from a hybrid ‘Xinza No. 1’. Replicated yield field trials of the progenies were conducted in 2008 and 2009. Phenotypic data analyses indicated overdominance in F1 for yield and yield components. Additive and dominance effects at single-locus level and digenic epistatic interactions at two-locus level were analyzed by 421 marker loci spanning 3814 cM of the genome. A total of 38 and 49 QTLs controlling yield and yield components were identified in F2: 3 and F2: 4 populations, respectively. Analyses of these QTLs indicated that the effects of partial dominance and overdominance contributed to heterosis in Upland cotton simultaneously. Most of the QTLs showed partial dominance whereas 13 QTLs showing overdominance in F2:3 population, and 19 QTLs showed overdominance in F2:4. Among them, 21 QTLs were common in both F2: 3 and F2: 4 populations. A large number of two-locus interactions for yield and yield components were detected in both generations. AA (additive × additive) epistasis accounted for majority portion of epistatic effects. Thirty three complementary two-locus homozygotes (11/22 and 22/11) were the best genotypes for AA interactions in terms of bolls per plant. Genotypes of double homozygotes, 11/22, 22/11 and 22/22, performed best for AD/DA interactions, while genotype of 11/12 performed best for DD interactions. These results indicated that (1) partial dominance and overdominance effects at single-locus level and (2) epistasis at two-locus level elucidated the genetic basis of heterosis in Upland cotton. PMID:26618635

  13. Biclustering with heterogeneous variance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanhua; Sullivan, Patrick F; Kosorok, Michael R

    2013-07-23

    In cancer research, as in all of medicine, it is important to classify patients into etiologically and therapeutically relevant subtypes to improve diagnosis and treatment. One way to do this is to use clustering methods to find subgroups of homogeneous individuals based on genetic profiles together with heuristic clinical analysis. A notable drawback of existing clustering methods is that they ignore the possibility that the variance of gene expression profile measurements can be heterogeneous across subgroups, and methods that do not consider heterogeneity of variance can lead to inaccurate subgroup prediction. Research has shown that hypervariability is a common feature among cancer subtypes. In this paper, we present a statistical approach that can capture both mean and variance structure in genetic data. We demonstrate the strength of our method in both synthetic data and in two cancer data sets. In particular, our method confirms the hypervariability of methylation level in cancer patients, and it detects clearer subgroup patterns in lung cancer data. PMID:23836637

  14. Locus BoLA-DRB3 is just an ordinary site of the polygene when explaining genetic variance of somatic cell count and milk yield.

    PubMed

    Oprzadek, Jolanta; Sender, Grazyna; Pawlik, Adrianna; Lukaszewicz, Marek

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed at clarifying the problem of the hitherto contradictory results regarding usefulness of BoLA-DRB3 locus as a marker in selection against mastitis and for milk yield. Treating the BoLA-DRB3 locus effect as random was proposed in place of considering it fixed. Somatic cell counts and milk yields recorded monthly on a test day (22,424) of 619 Polish Holstein cows genotyped for BoLA-DRB3 were analysed with an animal model including a random effect for genotype at this locus. The BoLA-DRB3 alleles were defined as restriction patterns obtained with three endonucleases. Two alternative BoLA-DRB3 additive genotype (co)variance structures were constructed for 161 genotypes recorded. One was based on the allelic similarity of the genotypes resulting in element values of 0 (no common allele), 0.5 (one allele in common), and 1 (diagonal). The other considered restriction site similarity (up to 3 in 1 allele) giving element values of 0 (no common restriction sites) and then increasingly in steps of 1/6 up to 6/6 (diagonal), where the numerator represents the number of common sites between genotypes. The DRB3 variance component for the natural logarithm of somatic cell count did not exceed 0.006 of the polygenic additive component or 0.003 for milk yield. Hence, unless we fail to detect the causative site or to properly define traits being the projection of a site, the effect of the genotype at the BoLA-DRB3 locus does not explain variation in somatic cell count and milk yield at a degree expected of a genetic marker. PMID:26333653

  15. Sex-linked dominant

    MedlinePlus

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... type of chromosome that is affected (autosomal or sex chromosome). It also depends on whether the trait ...

  16. Dominant feature selection for the fault diagnosis of rotary machines using modified genetic algorithm and empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lei; Yan, Jihong; de Silva, Clarence W.

    2015-05-01

    This paper develops a novel dominant feature selection method using a genetic algorithm with a dynamic searching strategy. It is applied in the search for the most representative features in rotary mechanical fault diagnosis, and is shown to improve the classification performance with fewer features. First, empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is employed to decompose a vibration signal into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) which represent the signal characteristic with sample oscillatory modes. Then, a modified genetic algorithm with variable-range encoding and dynamic searching strategy is used to establish relationships between optimized feature subsets and the classification performance. Next, a statistical model that uses receiver operating characteristic (ROC) is developed to select dominant features. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) is used to classify different fault patterns. Two real-world problems, rotor-unbalance vibration and bearing corrosion, are employed to evaluate the proposed feature selection scheme and fault diagnosis system. Statistical results obtained by analyzing the two problems, and comparative studies with five well-known feature selection techniques, demonstrate that the method developed in this paper can achieve improvements in identification accuracy with lower feature dimensionality. In addition, the results indicate that the proposed method is a promising tool to select dominant features in rotary machinery fault diagnosis.

  17. Molecular analysis and genetic mapping of the rhodopsin gene in families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Bunge, S.; Wedemann, H.; Samanns, C.; Horn, M.; Schwinger, E.; Gal, A. ); David, D. ); Terwilliger, D.J.; Ott, J. ); Born, L.I. van den )

    1993-07-01

    Eighty-eight patients/families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) were screened for rhodopsin mutations. Direct sequencing revealed 13 different mutations in a total of 14 (i.e., 16%) unrelated patients. Five of these mutations (T4K, Q28H, R135G, F220C, and C222R) have not been reported so far. In addition, multipoint linkage analysis was performed on two large families with autosomal dominant RP due to rhodopsin mutations by using five DNA probes from 3q21-q24. No tight linkage was found between the rhodopsin locus (RHO) and D3S47 ([theta][sub max] = 0.08). By six-point analysis, RHO was localized in the region between D3S21 and D3S47, with a maximum lod score of 13.447 directly at D3S20. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Variance in age-specific sex composition of Pacific halibut catches, and comparison of statistical and genetic methods for reconstructing sex ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loher, Timothy; Woods, Monica A.; Jimenez-Hidalgo, Isadora; Hauser, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Declines in size at age of Pacific halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis, in concert with sexually-dimorphic growth and a constant minimum commercial size limit, have led to the expectation that the sex composition of commercial catches should be increasingly female-biased. Sensitivity analyses suggest that variance in sex composition of landings may be the most influential source of uncertainty affecting current understanding of spawning stock biomass. However, there is no reliable way to determine sex at landing because all halibut are eviscerated at sea. In 2014, a statistical method based on survey data was developed to estimate the probability that fish of any given length at age (LAA) would be female, derived from the fundamental observation that large, young fish are likely female whereas small, old fish have a high probability of being male. Here, we examine variability in age-specific sex composition using at-sea commercial and closed-season survey catches, and compare the accuracy of the survey-based LAA technique to genetic markers for reconstructing the sex composition of catches. Sexing by LAA performed best for summer-collected samples, consistent with the hypothesis that the ability to characterize catches can be influenced by seasonal demographic shifts. Additionally, differences between survey and commercial selectivity that allow fishers to harvest larger fish within cohorts may generate important mismatch between survey and commercial datasets. Length-at-age-based estimates ranged from 4.7% underestimation of female proportion to 12.0% overestimation, with mean error of 5.8 ± 1.5%. Ratios determined by genetics were closer to true sample proportions and displayed less variability; estimation to within < 1% of true ratios was limited to genetics. Genetic estimation of female proportions ranged from 4.9% underestimation to 2.5% overestimation, with a mean absolute error of 1.2 ± 1.2%. Males were generally more difficult to assign than females: 6.7% of

  19. Genetic Differentiation and Genetic Diversity of Castanopsis (Fagaceae), the Dominant Tree Species in Japanese Broadleaved Evergreen Forests, Revealed by Analysis of EST-Associated Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Kyoko; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Kamijo, Takashi; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Makoto; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The broadleaved evergreen forests of the East Asian warm temperate zone are characterised by their high biodiversity and endemism, and there is therefore a need to extend our understanding of its genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns. Castanopsis (Fagaceae) is one of the dominant tree species in the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan. In this study we investigate the genetic diversity, genetic structure and leaf epidermal morphology of 63 natural populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata, using 32 Expressed Sequence Tag associated microsatellites. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was low (GST = 0.069 in C. sieboldii and GST = 0.057 in C. cuspidata). Neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses revealed that the populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata were genetically clearly differentiated, a result which is consistent with the morphology of their epidermal cell layers. This suggests that C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata should be treated as independent species, although intermediate morphologies are often observed, especially at sites where the two species coexist. The higher level of genetic diversity observed in the Kyushu region (for both species) and the Ryukyu Islands (for C. sieboldii) is consistent with the available fossil pollen data for Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen trees during the Last Glacial Maximum and suggests the existence of refugia for Castanopsis forests in southern Japan. Within the C. sieboldii populations, Bayesian clustering analyses detected three clusters, in the western and eastern parts of the main islands and in the Ryukyu Islands. The west-east genetic differentiation observed for this species in the main islands, a pattern which is also found in several plant and animal species inhabiting Castanopsis forests in Japan, suggests that they have been isolated from each other in the western and eastern populations for an extended period of time, and may imply the

  20. Genetic differentiation and genetic diversity of Castanopsis (Fagaceae), the dominant tree species in Japanese broadleaved evergreen forests, revealed by analysis of EST-associated microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kyoko; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Kamijo, Takashi; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Makoto; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The broadleaved evergreen forests of the East Asian warm temperate zone are characterised by their high biodiversity and endemism, and there is therefore a need to extend our understanding of its genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns. Castanopsis (Fagaceae) is one of the dominant tree species in the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan. In this study we investigate the genetic diversity, genetic structure and leaf epidermal morphology of 63 natural populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata, using 32 Expressed Sequence Tag associated microsatellites. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was low (GST = 0.069 in C. sieboldii and GST = 0.057 in C. cuspidata). Neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses revealed that the populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata were genetically clearly differentiated, a result which is consistent with the morphology of their epidermal cell layers. This suggests that C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata should be treated as independent species, although intermediate morphologies are often observed, especially at sites where the two species coexist. The higher level of genetic diversity observed in the Kyushu region (for both species) and the Ryukyu Islands (for C. sieboldii) is consistent with the available fossil pollen data for Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen trees during the Last Glacial Maximum and suggests the existence of refugia for Castanopsis forests in southern Japan. Within the C. sieboldii populations, Bayesian clustering analyses detected three clusters, in the western and eastern parts of the main islands and in the Ryukyu Islands. The west-east genetic differentiation observed for this species in the main islands, a pattern which is also found in several plant and animal species inhabiting Castanopsis forests in Japan, suggests that they have been isolated from each other in the western and eastern populations for an extended period of time, and may imply the

  1. A quantitative model of the relationship between phenotypic variance and heterozygosity at marker loci under partial selfing.

    PubMed Central

    David, P

    1999-01-01

    Negative relationships between allozyme heterozygosity and morphological variance have often been observed and interpreted as evidence for increased developmental stability in heterozygotes. However, inbreeding can also generate such relationships by decreasing heterozygosity at neutral loci and redistributing genetic variance at the same time. I here provide a quantitative genetic model of this process by analogy with heterozygosity-fitness relationships. Inbreeding generates negative heterozygosity-variance relationships irrespective of the genetic architecture of the trait. This holds for fitness traits as well as neutral traits, the effect being stronger for fitness traits under directional dominance or overdominance. The order of magnitude of heterozygosity-variance regressions is compatible with empirical data even with very low inbreeding. Although developmental stability effects cannot be excluded, inbreeding is a parsimonious explanation that should be seriously considered to explain correlations between heterozygosity and both mean and variance of phenotypes in natural populations. PMID:10545474

  2. Genetic linkage analysis of 14 candidate gene loci in a family with autosomal dominant osteoarthritis without dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbelt, I; Bijkerk, C; Breedveld, F C; Slagboom, P E

    1997-01-01

    The role of various gene loci was investigated in a family in which familial osteoarthritis (FOA), with onset at an early age, is transmitted as an autosomal dominant mendelian trait. The absence of clinical and radiographic signs of dysplasia and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPDD) indicates that the basic disease process in this family is osteoarthritis (OA). Genetic linkage analysis of 14 candidate genes resulted in the exclusion of 10 important genes (COL2A1, COL9A1, COL9A2, COL11A1, COL11A2, COMP, the CPDD region, CRTL-1, CRTM, and MMP3). Other relevant genes were not informative in this family. The candidate loci previously identified in FOA and heritable skeletal disorders associated with OA are clearly not involved in the development of the primary FOA phenotype in the family investigated, indicating genetic heterogeneity. Images PMID:9429149

  3. Dominant Enhancers of Egfr in Drosophila Melanogaster: Genetic Links between the Notch and Egfr Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Price, J. V.; Savenye, E. D.; Lum, D.; Breitkreutz, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a key component of a complex signaling pathway that participates in multiple developmental processes. We have performed an F(1) screen for mutations that cause dominant enhancement of wing vein phenotypes associated with mutations in Egfr. With this screen, we have recovered mutations in Hairless (H), vein, groucho (gro), and three apparently novel loci. All of the E(Egfr)s we have identified show dominant interactions in transheterozygous combinations with each other and with alleles of N or Su(H), suggesting that they are involved in cross-talk between the N and EGFR signaling pathways. Further examination of the phenotypic interactions between Egfr, H, and gro revealed that reductions in Egfr activity enhanced both the bristle loss associated with H mutations, and the bristle hyperplasia and ocellar hypertrophy associated with gro mutations. Double mutant combinations of Egfr and gro hypomorphic alleles led to the formation of ectopic compound eyes in a dosage sensitive manner. Our findings suggest that these E(Egfr)s represent links between the Egfr and Notch signaling pathways, and that Egfr activity can either promote or suppress Notch signaling, depending on its developmental context. PMID:9383058

  4. Further evidence for a locus for autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma on chromosome 1q and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.; Paglinauan, C.; Stawski, S.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a term used to describe a group of disorders which have in common a characteristic degeneration of the optic nerve associated with typical visual field defects and usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure. Two percent of white Americans and 6-10% of black Americans are affected by the disease. Compelling data indicate that susceptibility to many types of glaucoma is inherited. Hereditary juvenile glaucoma is one form of glaucoma that develops in children and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance. Using a single large Caucasian pedigree affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma, Sheffield discovered positive linkage to a group of markers that map to a 30 cM region on the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q21-q31). We have subsequently identified three unrelated Caucasian pedigrees affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that also demonstrate linkage to this region on chromosome 1, with the highest combined lod score of 5.12 at theta = .05 for marker D1S218. The identification of critical recombinant individuals in our three pedigrees has allowed us to further localize the disease gene to a 12 cM region between markers D1S242 and D1S431. In addition, we have identified several pedigrees which do not demonstrate linkage to chromosome 1q, including a black family affected with autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma that is indistinguishable clinically from the disorder affecting the caucasian pedigrees and three pedigrees affected with pigmentary dispersion syndrome, a form of glaucoma that also affects the juvenile population and is also inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. These findings provide evidence for genetic heterogeneity in juvenile glaucoma.

  5. Horka, a Dominant Mutation of Drosophila, Induces Nondisjunction And, through Paternal Effect, Chromosome Loss and Genetic Mosaics

    PubMed Central

    Szabad, J.; Mathe, E.; Puro, J.

    1995-01-01

    Fs(3) Horka (Horka) was described as a dominant female-sterile mutation of Drosophila melanogaster. Genetic and cytological data show that Horka induces mostly equational nondisjunction during spermatogenesis but not chromosome loss and possesses a dominant paternal effect: the X, second, third and the fourth chromosomes, but not the Y, are rendered unstable while undergoing spermatogenesis and may be lost in the descending zygotes. The frequency of Horka-induced chromosome loss is usually 2-4% but varies with the genetic background and can be over 20%. The X chromosome loss occurs during the gonomeric and the initial cleavage divisions. Loss of the X and fourth chromosomes shows no correlation. We propose, based on similarities in the mutant phenotypes with the chromosome destabilizing mutations nonclaret disjunctional and paternal loss, that the normal Horka(+) product is required for function of the centromeres and/or nearby regions. Horka is a convenient tool for the generation of gynandromorphs, autosome mosaics and for the study of gene expression in mosaics. PMID:7789762

  6. Genetic differentiation in spite of high gene flow in the dominant rainforest tree of southeastern Australia, Nothofagus cunninghamii.

    PubMed

    Duncan, C J; Worth, J R P; Jordan, G J; Jones, R C; Vaillancourt, R E

    2016-01-01

    Nothofagus cunninghamii is a long-lived, wind-pollinated tree species that dominates the cool temperate rainforests of southeastern Australia. The species' distribution is more or less continuous in western Tasmania but is fragmented elsewhere. However, it is unknown whether this fragmentation has affected the species' genetic architecture. Thus, we examined N. cunninghamii using 12 nuclear microsatellites and 633 individuals from 18 populations spanning the species' natural range. Typical of wind-pollinated trees, there was low range-wide genetic structure (FST=0.04) consistent with significant gene flow across most of the species' range. However, gene flow was not high enough to overcome the effects of drift across some disjunctions. Victorian populations (separated from Tasmania by the 240 km wide Bass Strait) formed a genetic group distinct from Tasmanian populations, had lower diversity (mean allelic richness (Ar)=5.4 in Victoria versus 6.9 in Tasmania) and were significantly more differentiated from one another than those in Tasmania (FST=0.045 in Victoria versus 0.012 in Tasmania). Evidence for bottlenecking was found in small populations that were at least 20 km from other populations. Interestingly, we found little divergence in microsatellite markers between the extremes of genetically based morphological and physiological altitudinal clines suggesting adaptive differentiation is strongly driven by selection because it is likely to be occurring in the presence of gene flow. Even though the cool temperate rainforests of Australia are highly relictual, the species is relatively robust to population fragmentation due to high levels of genetic diversity and gene flow, especially in Tasmania. PMID:26350630

  7. The effects of locus number, genetic divergence, and genotyping error on the utility of dominant markers for hybrid identification

    PubMed Central

    Sovic, Michael G; Kubatko, Laura S; Fuerst, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    In surveys of hybrid zones, dominant genetic markers are often used to identify individuals of hybrid origin and assign these individuals to one of several potential hybrid classes. Quantitative analyses that address the statistical power of dominant markers in such inference are scarce. In this study, dominant genotype data were simulated to evaluate the effects of, first, the number of loci analyzed, second, the magnitude of differentiation between the markers scored in the groups that are hybridizing, and third, the level of genotyping error associated with the data when assigning individuals to various parental and hybrid categories. The overall performance of the assignment methods was relatively modest at the lowest level of divergence examined (Fst ˜ 0.4), but improved substantially at higher levels of differentiation (Fst ˜ 0.67 or 0.8). The effect of genotyping error was dependent on the level of divergence between parental taxa, with larger divergences tempering the effects of genotyping error. These results highlight the importance of considering the effects of each of the variables when assigning individuals to various parental and hybrid categories, and can help guide decisions regarding the number of loci employed in future hybridization studies to achieve the power and level of resolution desired. PMID:24634730

  8. Clinical and Genetic Description of a Family With a High Prevalence of Autosomal Dominant Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jessica E.; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Lin, Siong-Chi; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct clinical and molecular genetic analyses of the members of an extended family in Central Indiana with a high prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS). PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: From February 1, 2006, through August 31, 2008, we collected data from members of this family, which is of English descent. Genealogical methods were used to expand the family tree, and family members were screened with an RLS questionnaire. Telephone interviews and personal examinations were performed at Mayo Clinic and during a field trip to Central Indiana. Blood samples were collected for molecular genetic analysis. A follow-up telephone interview was conducted 1 year later. RESULTS: The family tree spans 7 generations with 88 living members, 30 of whom meet the criteria for diagnosis of RLS established by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Three affected family members also have Parkinson disease or essential tremor. The mode of RLS inheritance is compatible with an autosomal dominant pattern. The affected family members do not exhibit linkage to the 5 known RLS loci or mutations in the RLS susceptibility genes MEIS1 and BTBD9. CONCLUSION: Of 88 members of this single extended family in Central Indiana, 30 were diagnosed as having RLS. Because our analysis shows that the disease is not linked to any of the known RLS loci or risk-associated genes, we postulate that members of this family may carry a gene mutation in a novel genetic locus. PMID:19181647

  9. Molecular genetic study of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in Lithuanian patients.

    PubMed

    Kucinskas, V; Payne, A M; Ambrasiene, D; Jurgelevicius, V; Steponaviciūte, D; Arciuliene, J V; Daktaraviciene, E; Bhattacharya, S

    1999-03-01

    Lithuanian patients with visual problems were clinically examined for retinitis pigmentosa (RP). A total of 33 unrelated families with autosomal dominant RP (adRP) were identified. Screening for mutations in the rhodopsin (RHO) and peripherin/RDS (RDS) genes was performed using DNA heteroduplex analysis. Direct DNA sequencing in the cases of heteroduplex formation showed the presence of the following mutations and polymorphisms in 14 adRP patients: RHO gene - Lys248Arg (1 case), and Pro347Leu (2 cases); RDS gene - Glu304Gln (12 cases), Lys310Arg (5 cases), and Gly338Asp (12 cases). The presence of these mutations (except Lys248Arg in the RHO gene) was confirmed by relevant restriction enzyme digestion. The frequency of the RDS gene mutations Glu304Gln and Gly338Asp was estimated to be 36.4%, while mutation Lys310Arg was less frequent (15.2%). These 3 RDS gene mutations appear to be polypeptide polymorphisms not related to adRP. PMID:10077725

  10. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: no evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar-Singh, R; Wang, H; Humphries, P; Farrar, G J

    1993-01-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue we have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. We performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test we obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses we have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, we have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Zm) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, we have mapped (Zm = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. PMID:8430695

  11. Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa: No evidence for nonallelic genetic heterogeneity on 3q

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar-Singh, R.; He Wang; Humphries, P.; Farrar, G.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Since the initial report of linkage of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) to the long arm of chromosome 3, several mutations in the gene encoding rhodopsin, which also maps to 3q, have been reported in adRP pedigrees. However, there has been some discussion as to the possibility of a second adRP locus on 3q. This suggestion has important diagnostic and research implications and must raise doubts about the usefulness of linked markers for reliable diagnosis of RP patients. In order to address this issue the authors have performed an admixture test (A-test) on 10 D3S47-linked adRP pedigrees and have found a likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity of 4.90. They performed a second A-test, combining the data from all families with known rhodopsin mutations. In this test they obtained a reduced likelihood ratio of heterogeneity versus homogeneity, of 1.0. On the basis of these statistical analyses they have found no significant support for two adRP loci on chromosome 3q. Furthermore, using 40 CEPH families, they have localized the rhodopsin gene to the D3S47-D3S20 interval, with a maximum lod score (Z[sub m]) of 20 and have found that the order qter-D3S47-rhodopsin-D3S20-cen is significantly more likely than any other order. In addition, they have mapped (Z[sub m] = 30) the microsatellite marker D3S621 relative to other loci in this region of the genome. 27 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Genetic mechanisms for dominant V[sub H] gene expression: The V[sub H]B512 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, C. )

    1992-10-01

    A total of 37 mAb with reactivity for dextran B512 have been studied; 30 of them were products of independent rearrangements and 21 made use of the same V[sub H] gene, the V[sub H]B512 gene. These results unambiguously established that the immune response to dextran in the high responder mouse strain C57BL/6 was restricted. Idiotypic determinants are located all over the Ig V region. Many but not all Id described so far can be ascribed to protein structures encoded by V[sub H] or V[sub L] gene segments. The expression of the major Id, 17-9 Id, in C57BL/6 was not absolutely correlated with the expression of the dominant V[sub H]B512 gene in the same mouse strain. Inspection of amino acid sequences of the CDR3 of idiotypic positive and negative clones suggested idiotypic structures may be associated with the expression of Tyr at position 95 and Phe or Leu at position 96 in the H and L chains, respectively. Therefore the indiscriminate use of idiotypic markers to characterize V[sub H] genes and the relevance of idiotypic regulation in V[sub H] gene expression are questioned. Id-positive and Id-negative clones displayed similar affinity values for dextran, indicating that idiotypic and binding structures were probably separated. The exchange of Asp65 for Gly65 in one of the clones reduced affinity for dextran, suggesting the involvement of CDR2 in dextran binding. The dominant expression of V[sub H] genes can be explained by somatic and/or genetic mechanisms. Because somatic mechanisms such as idiotypic regulation or selection based on affinity for dextran did not seem to influence the expression of the V[sub H]B512 gene, the authors favor a genetic alternative. They discuss a model based on the distance between V[sub H] genes and D and J[sub H] elements. This model is compatible with somatic and genetic regulation in other systems and provides a new theoretical approach to the understanding of immune V[sub H] dominance and low responsiveness. 43 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Evolutionary Dynamics Analysis of Human Metapneumovirus Subtype A2: Genetic Evidence for Its Dominant Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianguo; Ren, Lili; Guo, Li; Xiang, Zichun; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vernet, Guy; Wang, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a respiratory viral pathogen in children worldwide. hMPV is divided into four subtypes: hMPV_A1, hMPV_A2, hMPV_B1, and hMPV_B2. hMPV_A2 can be further divided into hMPV_A2a and A2b based on phylogenetic analysis. The typical prevalence pattern of hMPV involves a shift of the predominant subtype within one or two years. However, hMPV_A2, in particular hMPV_A2b, has circulated worldwide with a several years long term high epidemic. To study this distinct epidemic behavior of hMPV_A2, we analyzed 294 sequences of partial G genes of the virus from different countries. Molecular evolutionary data indicates that hMPV_A2 evolved toward heterogeneity faster than the other subtypes. Specifically, a Bayesian skyline plot analysis revealed that hMPV_A2 has undergone a generally upward fluctuation since 1997, whereas the other subtypes experienced only one upward fluctuation. Although hMPV_A2 showed a lower value of mean dN/dS than the other subtypes, it had the largest number of positive selection sites. Meanwhile, various styles of mutation were observed in the mutation hotspots of hMPV_A2b. Bayesian phylogeography analysis also revealed two fusions of diffusion routes of hMPV_A2b in India (June 2006) and Beijing, China (June 2008). Sequences of hMPV_A2b retrieved from GenBank boosted simultaneously with the two fusions respectively, indicating that fusion of genetic transmission routes from different regions improved survival of hMPV_A2. Epidemic and evolutionary dynamics of hMPV_A2b were similar to those of hMPV_A2. Overall, our findings provide important molecular insights into hMPV epidemics and viral variation, and explain the occurrence of an atypical epidemic of hMPV_A2, particularly hMPV_A2b. PMID:22479641

  14. Estimation of Epistatic Variance Components and Heritability in Founder Populations and Crosses

    PubMed Central

    Young, Alexander I.; Durbin, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies have explained only a small proportion of the estimated heritability of complex traits, leaving the remaining heritability “missing.” Genetic interactions have been proposed as an explanation for this, because they lead to overestimates of the heritability and are hard to detect. Whether this explanation is true depends on the proportion of variance attributable to genetic interactions, which is difficult to measure in outbred populations. Founder populations exhibit a greater range of kinship than outbred populations, which helps in fitting the epistatic variance. We extend classic theory to founder populations, giving the covariance between individuals due to epistasis of any order. We recover the classic theory as a limit, and we derive a recently proposed estimator of the narrow sense heritability as a corollary. We extend the variance decomposition to include dominance. We show in simulations that it would be possible to estimate the variance from pairwise interactions with samples of a few thousand from strongly bottlenecked human founder populations, and we provide an analytical approximation of the standard error. Applying these methods to 46 traits measured in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cross, we estimate that pairwise interactions explain 10% of the phenotypic variance on average and that third- and higher-order interactions explain 14% of the phenotypic variance on average. We search for third-order interactions, discovering an interaction that is shared between two traits. Our methods will be relevant to future studies of epistatic variance in founder populations and crosses. PMID:25326236

  15. Genetic linkage of autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma to 1q21-q31 in three affected pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggs, J.L.; Paglinauan, C.; Fine, A.; Sporn, C.; Lou, D. ); Haines, J.L. )

    1994-05-15

    Glaucoma is a common disorder that results in irreversible damage to the optic nerve, causing absolute blindness. In most cases, the optic nerve is damaged by an elevation of the intraocular pressure that is the result of an abnormality in the normal drainage function of the trabecular meshwork. A family history of glaucoma is an important risk factor for the disease, suggesting that genetic defects predisposing to this condition are likely. Three pedigrees segregating an autosomal dominant juvenile glaucoma demonstrated significant linkage to a group of closely spaced markers on chromosome 1. These results confirm the initial mapping of this disease and suggest that this region on chromosome 1 contains an important locus for juvenile glaucoma. The authors describe recombination events that improve the localization of the responsible gene, reducing the size of the candidate region from 30 to 12 cM. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A Nonsyndromic Autosomal Dominant Oligodontia with A Novel Mutation of PAX9-A Clinical and Genetic Report

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Praveen; Athimuthu, Anantharaj; Bhat, Prasanna Kumar; Puttashamachari, Yogish

    2015-01-01

    Oligodontia is congenital absence of one or more teeth which has familial abnormality and attributable to various mutations or polymorphisms of genes often associated with malformative syndromes. The present case reports a rare case of non syndromic oligodontia in an 8-year-old girl with missing 14 permanent teeth excluding third molars in mixed dentition. It is a rare finding which has not been frequently documented in Indian children. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 have been described in families in which inherited oligodontia characteristically involves permanent incisors, lateral incisors, premolars and molars. Our study analysed one large family with dominantly inherited oligodontia clinically and genetically. This phonotype is distinct from oligodontia phenotypes associated with mutations in PAX9. Sequencing of the PAX9 revealed a novel mutation in the paired domain of the molecule. The multiple sequence alignment and SNP analysis of the PAX9 exon 2 revealed two mutations. PMID:26266225

  17. A non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm for a bi-objective pick-up and delivery problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, N.; Dejax, P.; Guéret, C.; Prins, C.

    2012-03-01

    Some companies must transport their personnel within facilities. This is especially the case for oil companies that use helicopters to transport engineers, technicians and assistant personnel from platform to platform. This operation has the potential to become expensive if the transportation routes are not correctly planned and provide a bad quality of service. Here this issue is modelled as a pick-up and delivery problem where a set of transportation requests should be scheduled in routes, minimizing the total transportation cost while the most urgent requests are satisfied by priority. To solve the problem, a method based on a Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II) is proposed. This algorithm is tested on both randomly generated and real instances provided by a petroleum company. The results show that the proposed algorithm improves the best-known solutions.

  18. Characterization of macular structure and function in two Swedish families with genetically identified autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Abdulridha-Aboud, Wissam; Kjellström, Ulrika; Andréasson, Sten

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the phenotype in two families with genetically identified autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) focusing on macular structure and function. Methods Clinical data were collected at the Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University, Sweden, for affected and unaffected family members from two pedigrees with adRP. Examinations included optical coherence tomography (OCT), full-field electroretinography (ffERG), and multifocal electroretinography (mfERG). Molecular genetic screening was performed for known mutations associated with adRP. Results The mode of inheritance was autosomal dominant in both families. The members of the family with a mutation in the PRPF31 (p.IVS6+1G>T) gene had clinical features characteristic of RP, with severely reduced retinal rod and cone function. The degree of deterioration correlated well with increasing age. The mfERG showed only centrally preserved macular function that correlated well with retinal thinning on OCT. The family with a mutation in the RHO (p.R135W) gene had an extreme intrafamilial variability of the phenotype, with more severe disease in the younger generations. OCT showed pathology, but the degree of morphological changes was not correlated with age or with the mfERG results. The mother, with a de novo mutation in the RHO (p.R135W) gene, had a normal ffERG, and her retinal degeneration was detected merely with the reduced mfERG. Conclusions These two families demonstrate the extreme inter- and intrafamilial variability in the clinical phenotype of adRP. This is the first Swedish report of the clinical phenotype associated with a mutation in the PRPF31 (p.IVS6+1G>T) gene. Our results indicate that methods for assessment of the central retinal structure and function may improve the detection and characterization of the RP phenotype. PMID:27212874

  19. Multi-objective optimal design of magnetorheological engine mount based on an improved non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Duan, Xuwei; Deng, Zhaoxue; Li, Yinong

    2014-03-01

    A novel flow-mode magneto-rheological (MR) engine mount integrated a diaphragm de-coupler and the spoiler plate is designed and developed to isolate engine and the transmission from the chassis in a wide frequency range and overcome the stiffness in high frequency. A lumped parameter model of the MR engine mount in single degree of freedom system is further developed based on bond graph method to predict the performance of the MR engine mount accurately. The optimization mathematical model is established to minimize the total of force transmissibility over several frequency ranges addressed. In this mathematical model, the lumped parameters are considered as design variables. The maximum of force transmissibility and the corresponding frequency in low frequency range as well as individual lumped parameter are limited as constraints. The multiple interval sensitivity analysis method is developed to select the optimized variables and improve the efficiency of optimization process. An improved non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) is used to solve the multi-objective optimization problem. The synthesized distance between the individual in Pareto set and the individual in possible set in engineering is defined and calculated. A set of real design parameters is thus obtained by the internal relationship between the optimal lumped parameters and practical design parameters for the MR engine mount. The program flowchart for the improved non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) is given. The obtained results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed optimization approach in minimizing the total of force transmissibility over several frequency ranges addressed.

  20. Horka, a dominant mutation of Drosophila, induces nondisjunction and, through paternal effect, chromosome loss and genetic mosaics

    SciTech Connect

    Szabad, J.; Mathe, E.; Puro, J.

    1995-04-01

    Fs(3) Horka (Horka) was described as a dominant female-sterile mutation of Drosophila melanogaster. Genetic and cytological data show that Horka induces mostly equational nondisjunction during spermatogenesis but not chromosome loss and possesses a predominant paternal effect: the X, second, third and the fourth chromosomes, but not the Y, are rendered unstable while undergoing spermatogenesis and may be lost in the descending zygotes. The frequency of Horka-induced chromosome loss is usually 2-4% but varies with the genetic background and can be over 20%. The X chromosome loss occurs during the gonomeric and the initial cleavage divisions. Loss of the X and fourth chromosomes shows no correlation. We propose, based on similarities in the mutant phenotypes with the chromosome destabilizing mutations nonclaret disjunctional and paternal loss, that the normal Horka{sup +} product is required for function of the centromeres and/or nearby regions. Horka is a convenient tool for the generation of gynandromorphs, autosome mosaics and for the study of gene expression in mosaics. 55 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind

    PubMed Central

    Quartier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. PMID:25645939

  2. Immunological loss-of-function due to genetic gain-of-function in humans: autosomal dominance of the third kind.

    PubMed

    Boisson, Bertrand; Quartier, Pierre; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-02-01

    All the human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) recognized as such in the 1950s were Mendelian traits and, whether autosomal or X-linked, displayed recessive inheritance. The first autosomal dominant (AD) PID, hereditary angioedema, was recognized in 1963. However, since the first identification of autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR) and AD PID-causing genes in 1985 (ADA; severe combined immunodeficiency), 1986 (CYBB, chronic granulomatous disease) and 1989 (SERPING1; hereditary angioedema), respectively, the number of genetically defined AD PIDs has increased more rapidly than that of any other type of PID. AD PIDs now account for 61 of the 260 known conditions (23%). All known AR PIDs are caused by alleles with some loss-of-function (LOF). A single XR PID is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations (WASP-related neutropenia, 2001). In contrast, only 44 of 61 AD defects are caused by LOF alleles, which exert dominance by haploinsufficiency or negative dominance. Since 2003, up to 17 AD disorders of the third kind, due to GOF alleles, have been described. Remarkably, six of the 17 genes concerned also harbor monoallelic (STAT3), biallelic (C3, CFB, CARD11, PIK3R1) or both monoallelic and biallelic (STAT1) LOF alleles in patients with other clinical phenotypes. Most heterozygous GOF alleles result in auto-inflammation, auto-immunity, or both, with a wide range of immunological and clinical forms. Some also underlie infections and, fewer, allergies, by impairing or enhancing immunity to non-self. Malignancies are also rare. The enormous diversity of immunological and clinical phenotypes is thought provoking and mirrors the diversity and pleiotropy of the underlying genotypes. These experiments of nature provide a unique insight into the quantitative regulation of human immunity. PMID:25645939

  3. Pervasive effects of a dominant foliar endophytic fungus on host genetic and phenotypic expression in a tropical tree

    PubMed Central

    Mejía, Luis C.; Herre, Edward A.; Sparks, Jed P.; Winter, Klaus; García, Milton N.; Van Bael, Sunshine A.; Stitt, Joseph; Shi, Zi; Zhang, Yufan; Guiltinan, Mark J.; Maximova, Siela N.

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that macro-organisms (corals, insects, plants, vertebrates) consist of both host tissues and multiple microbial symbionts that play essential roles in their host's ecological and evolutionary success. Consequently, identifying benefits and costs of symbioses, as well as mechanisms underlying them are research priorities. All plants surveyed under natural conditions harbor foliar endophytic fungi (FEF) in their leaf tissues, often at high densities. Despite producing no visible effects on their hosts, experiments have nonetheless shown that FEF reduce pathogen and herbivore damage. Here, combining results from three genomic, and two physiological experiments, we demonstrate pervasive genetic and phenotypic effects of the apparently asymptomatic endophytes on their hosts. Specifically, inoculation of endophyte-free (E−) Theobroma cacao leaves with Colletotrichum tropicale (E+), the dominant FEF species in healthy T. cacao, induces consistent changes in the expression of hundreds of host genes, including many with known defensive functions. Further, E+ plants exhibited increased lignin and cellulose content, reduced maximum rates of photosynthesis (Amax), and enrichment of nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 isotopes. These phenotypic changes observed in E+ plants correspond to changes in expression of specific functional genes in related pathways. Moreover, a cacao gene (Tc00g04254) highly up-regulated by C. tropicale also confers resistance to pathogen damage in the absence of endophytes or their products in host tissues. Thus, the benefits of increased pathogen resistance in E+ plants are derived in part from up-regulation of intrinsic host defense responses, and appear to be offset by potential costs including reduced photosynthesis, altered host nitrogen metabolism, and endophyte heterotrophy of host tissues. Similar effects are likely in most plant-endophyte interactions, and should be recognized in the design and interpretation of genetic

  4. Nonlinear Epigenetic Variance: Review and Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Kees-Jan; Ploeger, Annemie; Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.; Dolan, Conor V.; van Der Maas, Han L. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a review of empirical evidence that suggests that a substantial portion of phenotypic variance is due to nonlinear (epigenetic) processes during ontogenesis. The role of such processes as a source of phenotypic variance in human behaviour genetic studies is not fully appreciated. In addition to our review, we present simulation studies…

  5. Does variance in drinking motives explain the genetic overlap between personality and alcohol use disorder symptoms? A twin study of young women

    PubMed Central

    Littlefield, Andrew K.; Agrawal, Arpana; Ellingson, Jarrod M.; Kristjansson, Sean; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Heath, Andrew C.; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic risk for alcohol dependence has been shown to overlap with genetic factors contributing to variation in dimensions of personality. Though drinking motives have been posited as important mediators of the alcohol-personality relation, the extent to which the genetic covariance between alcohol use disorder (AUD) symptoms (i.e. abuse and dependence criteria) and personality is explained by genetic factors contributing to variation in drinking motives remains unclear. Methods Using data from 2,904 young adult female twins, the phenotypic and genetic associations among personality dimensions (constraint [measured by the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire; Tellegen, 1982], conscientiousness, neuroticism, and agreeableness [measured by the NEO-PI; Costa & McCrae, 1985]), internal drinking motives (enhancement and coping motives [measured by the Drinking Motive Questionnaire; Cooper, 1994]), and AUD symptoms were tested. Results Significant genetic associations were found between all personality measures and AUD symptoms. Coping motives showed significant genetic overlap with AUD symptoms and most personality measures, whereas enhancement motives were not significantly heritable. Adjusting for coping motives, genetic correlations between AUD symptoms and traits of neuroticism and agreeableness were no longer statistically significant. Conclusions Findings suggest that genetic variation in drinking to cope might account for a considerable proportion of the genetic covariance between specific personality dimensions and AUD symptoms. PMID:21790670

  6. A Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Dominance Effects on Number of Teats in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Marcos S.; Bastiaansen, John W. M.; Harlizius, Barbara; Knol, Egbert F.; Bovenhuis, Henk

    2014-01-01

    Dominance has been suggested as one of the genetic mechanisms explaining heterosis. However, using traditional quantitative genetic methods it is difficult to obtain accurate estimates of dominance effects. With the availability of dense SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) panels, we now have new opportunities for the detection and use of dominance at individual loci. Thus, the aim of this study was to detect additive and dominance effects on number of teats (NT), specifically to investigate the importance of dominance in a Landrace-based population of pigs. In total, 1,550 animals, genotyped for 32,911 SNPs, were used in single SNP analysis. SNPs with a significant genetic effect were tested for their mode of gene action being additive, dominant or a combination. In total, 21 SNPs were associated with NT, located in three regions with additive (SSC6, 7 and 12) and one region with dominant effects (SSC4). Estimates of additive effects ranged from 0.24 to 0.29 teats. The dominance effect of the QTL located on SSC4 was negative (−0.26 teats). The additive variance of the four QTLs together explained 7.37% of the total phenotypic variance. The dominance variance of the four QTLs together explained 1.82% of the total phenotypic variance, which corresponds to one-fourth of the variance explained by additive effects. The results suggest that dominance effects play a relevant role in the genetic architecture of NT. The QTL region on SSC7 contains the most promising candidate gene: VRTN. This gene has been suggested to be related to the number of vertebrae, a trait correlated with NT. PMID:25158056

  7. Genetic diagnosis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease by targeted capture and next-generation sequencing: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiao-Ping; Du, Zhen-Fang; Ma, Ju-Ming; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Qing; Fei, Jun; Wei, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Dong; Ke, Hai-Ping; Liu, Xuan-Zhu; Li, Feng; Chen, Zhen-Guang; Su, Zheng; Jin, Hang-Yang; Liu, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Yan; Jiang, Hu-Ling; Lan, Zhang-Zhang; Li, Peng-Fei; Fang, Ming-Yan; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Xian-Ning

    2013-03-01

    Mutation-based molecular diagnostics of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is complicated by genetic and allelic heterogeneity, large multi-exon genes, and duplication sequences of PKD1. Recently, targeted resequencing by pooling long-range polymerase chain reaction (LR-PCR) amplicons has been used in the identification of mutations in ADPKD. Despite its high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, LR-PCR is still complicated. We performed whole-exome sequencing on two unrelated typical Chinese ADPKD probands and evaluated the effectiveness of this approach compared with Sanger sequencing. Meanwhile, we performed targeted gene and next-generation sequencing (targeted DNA-HiSeq) on 8 individuals (1 patient from one family, 5 patients and 2 normal individuals from another family). Both whole-exome sequencing and targeted DNA-HiSeq confirmed c.11364delC (p.H3788QfsX37) within the unduplicated region of PKD1 in one proband; in the other family, targeted DNA-HiSeq identified a small insertion, c.401_402insG (p.V134VfsX79), in PKD2. These methods do not overcome the screening complexity of homology. However, the true positives of variants confirmed by targeted gene and next-generation sequencing were 69.4%, 50% and 100% without a false positive in the whole coding region and the duplicated and unduplicated regions, which indicated that the screening accuracy of PKD1 and PKD2 can be largely improved by using a greater sequencing depth and elaborate design of the capture probe. PMID:23266634

  8. Multicomponent pre-stack seismic waveform inversion in transversely isotropic media using a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padhi, Amit; Mallick, Subhashis

    2014-03-01

    Inversion of band- and offset-limited single component (P wave) seismic data does not provide robust estimates of subsurface elastic parameters and density. Multicomponent seismic data can, in principle, circumvent this limitation but adds to the complexity of the inversion algorithm because it requires simultaneous optimization of multiple objective functions, one for each data component. In seismology, these multiple objectives are typically handled by constructing a single objective given as a weighted sum of the objectives of individual data components and sometimes with additional regularization terms reflecting their interdependence; which is then followed by a single objective optimization. Multi-objective problems, inclusive of the multicomponent seismic inversion are however non-linear. They have non-unique solutions, known as the Pareto-optimal solutions. Therefore, casting such problems as a single objective optimization provides one out of the entire set of the Pareto-optimal solutions, which in turn, may be biased by the choice of the weights. To handle multiple objectives, it is thus appropriate to treat the objective as a vector and simultaneously optimize each of its components so that the entire Pareto-optimal set of solutions could be estimated. This paper proposes such a novel multi-objective methodology using a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm for waveform inversion of multicomponent seismic data. The applicability of the method is demonstrated using synthetic data generated from multilayer models based on a real well log. We document that the proposed method can reliably extract subsurface elastic parameters and density from multicomponent seismic data both when the subsurface is considered isotropic and transversely isotropic with a vertical symmetry axis. We also compute approximate uncertainty values in the derived parameters. Although we restrict our inversion applications to horizontally stratified models, we outline a practical

  9. Testing for beneficial reversal of dominance during salinity shifts in the invasive copepod Eurytemora affinis, and implications for the maintenance of genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Posavi, Marijan; Gelembiuk, Gregory William; Larget, Bret; Lee, Carol Eunmi

    2014-11-01

    Maintenance of genetic variation at loci under selection has profound implications for adaptation under environmental change. In temporally and spatially varying habitats, non-neutral polymorphism could be maintained by heterozygote advantage across environments (marginal overdominance), which could be greatly increased by beneficial reversal of dominance across conditions. We tested for reversal of dominance and marginal overdominance in salinity tolerance in the saltwater-to-freshwater invading copepod Eurytemora affinis. We compared survival of F1 offspring generated by crossing saline and freshwater inbred lines (between-salinity F1 crosses) relative to within-salinity F1 crosses, across three salinities. We found evidence for both beneficial reversal of dominance and marginal overdominance in salinity tolerance. In support of reversal of dominance, survival of between-salinity F1 crosses was not different from that of freshwater F1 crosses under freshwater conditions and saltwater F1 crosses under saltwater conditions. In support of marginal overdominance, between-salinity F1 crosses exhibited significantly higher survival across salinities relative to both freshwater and saltwater F1 crosses. Our study provides a rare empirical example of complete beneficial reversal of dominance associated with environmental change. This mechanism might be crucial for maintaining genetic variation in salinity tolerance in E. affinis populations, allowing rapid adaptation to salinity changes during habitat invasions. PMID:25135455

  10. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) aggregate in Alzheimer’s disease due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently identified U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) tangle-like aggregates and RNA splicing abnormalities in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However little is known about snRNP biology in early onset AD due to autosomal dominant genetic mutations or trisomy 21 in Down syndrome. Therefore we investigated snRNP biochemical and pathologic features in these disorders. Findings We performed quantitative proteomics and immunohistochemistry in postmortem brain from genetic AD cases. Electron microscopy was used to characterize ultrastructural features of pathologic aggregates. U1-70k and other snRNPs were biochemically enriched in the insoluble fraction of human brain from subjects with presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations. Aggregates of U1 snRNP-immunoreactivity formed cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in cortex of AD subjects with PS1 and amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations as well as trisomy 21. Ultrastructural analysis with electron microscopy in an APP mutation case demonstrated snRNP immunogold labeling of paired helical filaments (PHF). Conclusions These studies identify U1 snRNP pathologic changes in brain of early onset genetic forms of AD. Since dominant genetic mutations and trisomy 21 result in dysfunctional amyloid processing, the findings suggest that aberrant β-amyloid processing may influence U1 snRNP aggregate formation. PMID:24773620

  11. Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Ieukoencephalopathy, Genetic Homogeneity, and Mapping of the Locus within a 2-cM Interval

    PubMed Central

    Ducros, A.; Nagy, T.; Alamowitch, S.; Nibbio, A.; Joutel, A.; Vahedi, K.; Chabriat, H.; Iba-Zizen, M. T.; Julien, J.; Davous, P.; Goas, J. Y.; Lyon-Caen, O.; Dubois, B.; Ducrocq, X.; Salsa, F.; Ragno, M.; Burkhard, P.; Bassetti, C.; Hutchinson, M.; Vérin, M.; Viader, F.; Chapon, F.; Levasseur, M.; Mas, J. L.; Delrieu, O.; Maciazek, J.; Prieur, M.; Mohrenweiser, H.; Bach, J. F.; Bousser, M. G.; Tournier-Lasserve, E.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a recently identified autosomal dominant cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of subcortical infarcts leading to dementia. A genetic linkage analysis conducted in two large families recently allowed us to map the affected gene on chromosome 19 in a 12-cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215. In the present study, these first 2 families and 13 additional ones, including a total of 199 potentially informative meiosis, have been genotyped with eight polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families were linked to chromosome 19. The highest combined lod score (Zmax = 37.24 at θ = .01) was obtained with marker D19S841, a new CAn microsatellite marker that we isolated from chromosome 19 cosmids. The recombinant events observed within these families were used to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL within a 2-cM interval that is now bracketed by D19S226 and D19S199 on 19pl3.1. These data strongly suggest the genetic homogeneity of this recently identified condition and establish the value of its clinical and neuroimaging diagnostic criteria. Besides their importance for the ongoing positional cloning of the CADASIL gene, these data help to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL relative to familial hemiplegic migraine and hereditary paroxysmal cerebellar ataxia, conditions that we both mapped within the same chromosome 19 region. PMID:8554054

  12. Variational bayesian method of estimating variance components.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Aisaku; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Hayashi, Takeshi; Mikawa, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    We developed a Bayesian analysis approach by using a variational inference method, a so-called variational Bayesian method, to determine the posterior distributions of variance components. This variational Bayesian method and an alternative Bayesian method using Gibbs sampling were compared in estimating genetic and residual variance components from both simulated data and publically available real pig data. In the simulated data set, we observed strong bias toward overestimation of genetic variance for the variational Bayesian method in the case of low heritability and low population size, and less bias was detected with larger population sizes in both methods examined. The differences in the estimates of variance components between the variational Bayesian and the Gibbs sampling were not found in the real pig data. However, the posterior distributions of the variance components obtained with the variational Bayesian method had shorter tails than those obtained with the Gibbs sampling. Consequently, the posterior standard deviations of the genetic and residual variances of the variational Bayesian method were lower than those of the method using Gibbs sampling. The computing time required was much shorter with the variational Bayesian method than with the method using Gibbs sampling. PMID:26877207

  13. Genetic variances, heritabilities and maternal effects on body weight, breast meat yield, meat quality traits and the shape of the growth curve in turkey birds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Turkey is an important agricultural species and is largely used as a meat bird. In 2004, turkey represented 6.5% of the world poultry meat production. The world-wide turkey population has rapidly grown due to increased commercial farming. Due to the high demand for turkey meat from both consumers and industry global turkey stocks increased from 100 million in 1970 to over 276 million in 2004. This rapidly increasing importance of turkeys was a reason to design this study for the estimation of genetic parameters that control body weight, body composition, meat quality traits and parameters that shape the growth curve in turkey birds. Results The average heritability estimate for body weight traits was 0.38, except for early weights that were strongly affected by maternal effects. This study showed that body weight traits, upper asymptote (a growth curve trait), percent breast meat and redness of meat had high heritability whereas heritabilities of breast length, breast width, percent drip loss, ultimate pH, lightness and yellowness of meat were medium to low. We found high positive genetic and phenotypic correlations between body weight, upper asymptote, most breast meat yield traits and percent drip loss but percent drip loss was found strongly negatively correlated with ultimate pH. Percent breast meat, however, showed genetic correlations close to zero with body weight traits and upper asymptote. Conclusion The results of this analysis and the growth curve from the studied population of turkey birds suggest that the turkey birds could be selected for breeding between 60 and 80 days of age in order to improve overall production and the production of desirable cuts of meat. The continuous selection of birds within this age range could promote high growth rates but specific attention to meat quality would be needed to avoid a negative impact on the quality of meat. PMID:21266032

  14. Monte Carlo variance reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrn, N. R.

    1980-01-01

    Computer program incorporates technique that reduces variance of forward Monte Carlo method for given amount of computer time in determining radiation environment in complex organic and inorganic systems exposed to significant amounts of radiation.

  15. The Rules of Aggression: How Genetic, Chemical and Spatial Factors Affect Intercolony Fights in a Dominant Species, the Mediterranean Acrobat Ant Crematogaster scutellaris

    PubMed Central

    Frizzi, Filippo; Ciofi, Claudio; Dapporto, Leonardo; Natali, Chiara; Chelazzi, Guido; Turillazzi, Stefano; Santini, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Nest-mate recognition plays a key role in the biology of ants. Although individuals coming from a foreign nest are, in most cases, promptly rejected, the degree of aggressiveness towards non nest-mates may be highly variable among species and relies on genetic, chemical and environmental factors. We analyzed intraspecific relationships among neighboring colonies of the dominant Mediterranean acrobat ant Crematogaster scutellaris integrating genetic, chemical and behavioral analyses. Colony structure, parental relationships between nests, cuticular hydrocarbons profiles (CHCs) and aggressive behavior against non nest-mates were studied in 34 nests located in olive tree trunks. Bayesian clustering analysis of allelic variation at nine species-specific microsatellite DNA markers pooled nests into 14 distinct clusters, each representing a single colony, confirming a polydomous arrangement of nests in this species. A marked genetic separation among colonies was also detected, probably due to long distance dispersion of queens and males during nuptial flights. CHCs profiles varied significantly among colonies and between nests of the same colony. No relationship between CHCs profiles and genetic distances was detected. The level of aggressiveness between colonies was inversely related to chemical and spatial distance, suggesting a ‘nasty neighbor’ effect. Our findings also suggest that CHCs profiles in C. scutellaris may be linked to external environmental factors rather than genetic relationships. PMID:26445245

  16. The Rules of Aggression: How Genetic, Chemical and Spatial Factors Affect Intercolony Fights in a Dominant Species, the Mediterranean Acrobat Ant Crematogaster scutellaris.

    PubMed

    Frizzi, Filippo; Ciofi, Claudio; Dapporto, Leonardo; Natali, Chiara; Chelazzi, Guido; Turillazzi, Stefano; Santini, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Nest-mate recognition plays a key role in the biology of ants. Although individuals coming from a foreign nest are, in most cases, promptly rejected, the degree of aggressiveness towards non nest-mates may be highly variable among species and relies on genetic, chemical and environmental factors. We analyzed intraspecific relationships among neighboring colonies of the dominant Mediterranean acrobat ant Crematogaster scutellaris integrating genetic, chemical and behavioral analyses. Colony structure, parental relationships between nests, cuticular hydrocarbons profiles (CHCs) and aggressive behavior against non nest-mates were studied in 34 nests located in olive tree trunks. Bayesian clustering analysis of allelic variation at nine species-specific microsatellite DNA markers pooled nests into 14 distinct clusters, each representing a single colony, confirming a polydomous arrangement of nests in this species. A marked genetic separation among colonies was also detected, probably due to long distance dispersion of queens and males during nuptial flights. CHCs profiles varied significantly among colonies and between nests of the same colony. No relationship between CHCs profiles and genetic distances was detected. The level of aggressiveness between colonies was inversely related to chemical and spatial distance, suggesting a 'nasty neighbor' effect. Our findings also suggest that CHCs profiles in C. scutellaris may be linked to external environmental factors rather than genetic relationships. PMID:26445245

  17. A COSMIC VARIANCE COOKBOOK

    SciTech Connect

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A. E-mail: rix@mpia.de E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu

    2011-04-20

    Deep pencil beam surveys (<1 deg{sup 2}) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by 'cosmic variance'. This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift z-bar and redshift bin size {Delta}z. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, z-bar , {Delta}z, and stellar mass m{sub *}. We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates ({delta}{sigma}{sub v}/{sigma}{sub v}) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at z-bar =2 and with {Delta}z = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m{sub *}>10{sup 11} M{sub sun} is {approx}38%, while it is {approx}27% for GEMS and {approx}12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, the relative cosmic variance is {approx}19% for GOODS, {approx}13% for GEMS, and {approx}6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at z

  18. A Cosmic Variance Cookbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2011-04-01

    Deep pencil beam surveys (<1 deg2) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by "cosmic variance." This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift \\bar{z} and redshift bin size Δz. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, \\bar{z}, Δz, and stellar mass m *. We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates (δσ v /σ v ) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at \\bar{z}=2 and with Δz = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m *>1011 M sun is ~38%, while it is ~27% for GEMS and ~12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m * ~ 1010 M sun, the relative cosmic variance is ~19% for GOODS, ~13% for GEMS, and ~6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at \\bar{z}=2 for small fields and massive galaxies, while for larger fields and intermediate mass galaxies, cosmic variance is

  19. Significant variance in genetic diversity among populations of Schistosoma haematobium detected using microsatellite DNA loci from a genome-wide database

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urogenital schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma haematobium is widely distributed across Africa and is increasingly being targeted for control. Genome sequences and population genetic parameters can give insight into the potential for population- or species-level drug resistance. Microsatellite DNA loci are genetic markers in wide use by Schistosoma researchers, but there are few primers available for S. haematobium. Methods We sequenced 1,058,114 random DNA fragments from clonal cercariae collected from a snail infected with a single Schistosoma haematobium miracidium. We assembled and aligned the S. haematobium sequences to the genomes of S. mansoni and S. japonicum, identifying microsatellite DNA loci across all three species and designing primers to amplify the loci in S. haematobium. To validate our primers, we screened 32 randomly selected primer pairs with population samples of S. haematobium. Results We designed >13,790 primer pairs to amplify unique microsatellite loci in S. haematobium, (available at http://www.cebio.org/projetos/schistosoma-haematobium-genome). The three Schistosoma genomes contained similar overall frequencies of microsatellites, but the frequency and length distributions of specific motifs differed among species. We identified 15 primer pairs that amplified consistently and were easily scored. We genotyped these 15 loci in S. haematobium individuals from six locations: Zanzibar had the highest levels of diversity; Malawi, Mauritius, Nigeria, and Senegal were nearly as diverse; but the sample from South Africa was much less diverse. Conclusions About half of the primers in the database of Schistosoma haematobium microsatellite DNA loci should yield amplifiable and easily scored polymorphic markers, thus providing thousands of potential markers. Sequence conservation among S. haematobium, S. japonicum, and S. mansoni is relatively high, thus it should now be possible to identify markers that are universal among Schistosoma

  20. Multi-objective parametric optimization of Inertance type pulse tube refrigerator using response surface methodology and non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Sachindra K.; Choudhury, Balaji K.; Sahoo, Ranjit K.; Sarangi, Sunil K.

    2014-07-01

    The modeling and optimization of a Pulse Tube Refrigerator is a complicated task, due to its complexity of geometry and nature. The aim of the present work is to optimize the dimensions of pulse tube and regenerator for an Inertance-Type Pulse Tube Refrigerator (ITPTR) by using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and Non-Sorted Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA II). The Box-Behnken design of the response surface methodology is used in an experimental matrix, with four factors and two levels. The diameter and length of the pulse tube and regenerator are chosen as the design variables where the rest of the dimensions and operating conditions of the ITPTR are constant. The required output responses are the cold head temperature (Tcold) and compressor input power (Wcomp). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to model and solve the ITPTR. The CFD results agreed well with those of the previously published paper. Also using the results from the 1-D simulation, RSM is conducted to analyse the effect of the independent variables on the responses. To check the accuracy of the model, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method has been used. Based on the proposed mathematical RSM models a multi-objective optimization study, using the Non-sorted genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) has been performed to optimize the responses.

  1. Multi-objective optimization in spatial planning: Improving the effectiveness of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakostas, Spiros

    2015-05-01

    The multi-objective nature of most spatial planning initiatives and the numerous constraints that are introduced in the planning process by decision makers, stakeholders, etc., synthesize a complex spatial planning context in which the concept of solid and meaningful optimization is a unique challenge. This article investigates new approaches to enhance the effectiveness of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) via the adoption of a well-known metaheuristic: the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II). In particular, the contribution of a sophisticated crossover operator coupled with an enhanced initialization heuristic is evaluated against a series of metrics measuring the effectiveness of MOEAs. Encouraging results emerge for both the convergence rate of the evolutionary optimization process and the occupation of valuable regions of the objective space by non-dominated solutions, facilitating the work of spatial planners and decision makers. Based on the promising behaviour of both heuristics, topics for further research are proposed to improve their effectiveness.

  2. Variance anisotropy in compressible 3-D MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, Minping; Parashar, Tulasi

    2016-06-01

    We employ spectral method numerical simulations to examine the dynamical development of anisotropy of the variance, or polarization, of the magnetic and velocity field in compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Both variance anisotropy and spectral anisotropy emerge under influence of a large-scale mean magnetic field B0; these are distinct effects, although sometimes related. Here we examine the appearance of variance parallel to B0, when starting from a highly anisotropic state. The discussion is based on a turbulence theoretic approach rather than a wave perspective. We find that parallel variance emerges over several characteristic nonlinear times, often attaining a quasi-steady level that depends on plasma beta. Consistency with solar wind observations seems to occur when the initial state is dominated by quasi-two-dimensional fluctuations.

  3. Modeling and optimization of cylindrical wire electro discharge machining of AISI D3 tool steel using non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshan, Abolfazl; Gohari, Soheil; Ayob, Amran

    2011-10-01

    In this study the influence of Cylindrical Wire Electro Discharge Machining on surface roughness and material removal rate is conducted. From experimental DOE method and mathematical modeling, the importance and correlation between corresponding parameters and process output characterization are studied. The investigated input parameters include electrical current, pulse-off time, voltage, rotation speed and cone angle. The Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm is then applied on the outputs to generate appropriate optimized models. The optimization procedure shows that the suggested method results in a high performance problem solving.

  4. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, genetic homogeneity, and mapping of the locus within a 2-cM interval

    SciTech Connect

    Ducros, A.; Alamowitch, S.; Nagy, T.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a recently identified autosomal dominant cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of subcortical infarcts leading to dementia. A genetic linkage analysis conducted in two large families recently allowed us to map the affected gene on chromosome 19 in a 12-cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215. In the present study, these first 2 families and 13 additional ones, including a total of 199 potentially informative meiosis, have been genotyped with eight polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families were linked to chromosome 19. The highest combined lod score (Z{sub max} = 37.24 at {theta} = .01) was obtained with marker D19S841, a new CA{sub n} microsatellite marker that we isolated from chromosome 19 cosmids. The recombinant events observed within these families were used to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL within a 2-cM interval that is now bracketed by D19S226 and D19S199 on 19p13.1. These data strongly suggest the genetic homogeneity of this recently identified condition and establish the value of its clinical and neuroimaging diagnostic criteria. Besides their importance for the ongoing positional cloning of the CADASIL gene, these data help to refine the genetic mapping of CADASIL relative to familial hemiplegic migraine and hereditary paroxysmal cerebellar ataxia, conditions that we both mapped within the same chromosome 19 region. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Getting around cosmic variance

    SciTech Connect

    Kamionkowski, M.; Loeb, A.

    1997-10-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies probe the primordial density field at the edge of the observable Universe. There is a limiting precision ({open_quotes}cosmic variance{close_quotes}) with which anisotropies can determine the amplitude of primordial mass fluctuations. This arises because the surface of last scatter (SLS) probes only a finite two-dimensional slice of the Universe. Probing other SLS{close_quote}s observed from different locations in the Universe would reduce the cosmic variance. In particular, the polarization of CMB photons scattered by the electron gas in a cluster of galaxies provides a measurement of the CMB quadrupole moment seen by the cluster. Therefore, CMB polarization measurements toward many clusters would probe the anisotropy on a variety of SLS{close_quote}s within the observable Universe, and hence reduce the cosmic-variance uncertainty. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Factors affecting the reproductive success of dominant male meerkats.

    PubMed

    Spong, Göran F; Hodge, Sarah J; Young, Andrew J; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2008-05-01

    Identifying traits that affect the reproductive success of individuals is fundamental for our understanding of evolutionary processes. In cooperative breeders, a dominant male typically restricts mating access to the dominant female for extended periods, resulting in pronounced variation in reproductive success among males. This may result in strong selection for traits that increase the likelihood of dominance acquisition, dominance retention and reproductive rates while dominant. However, despite considerable research on reproductive skew, few studies have explored the factors that influence these three processes among males in cooperative species. Here we use genetic, behavioural and demographic data to investigate the factors affecting reproductive success in dominant male meerkats (Suricata suricatta). Our data show that dominant males sire the majority of all offspring surviving to 1 year. A male's likelihood of becoming dominant is strongly influenced by age, but not by weight. Tenure length and reproductive rate, both important components of dominant male reproductive success, are largely affected by group size and composition, rather than individual traits. Dominant males in large groups have longer tenures, but after this effect is controlled, male tenure length also correlates negatively to the number of adult females in the group. Male reproductive rate also declines as the number of intra- and extra-group competitors increases. As the time spent in the dominant position and reproductive rate while dominant explain > 80% of the total variance in reproductive success, group composition thus has major implications for male reproductive success. PMID:18410290

  7. Variance Anisotropy in Kinetic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Tulasi N.; Oughton, Sean; Matthaeus, William H.; Wan, Minping

    2016-06-01

    Solar wind fluctuations admit well-documented anisotropies of the variance matrix, or polarization, related to the mean magnetic field direction. Typically, one finds a ratio of perpendicular variance to parallel variance of the order of 9:1 for the magnetic field. Here we study the question of whether a kinetic plasma spontaneously generates and sustains parallel variances when initiated with only perpendicular variance. We find that parallel variance grows and saturates at about 5% of the perpendicular variance in a few nonlinear times irrespective of the Reynolds number. For sufficiently large systems (Reynolds numbers) the variance approaches values consistent with the solar wind observations.

  8. Testing the genetic predictions of a biogeographical model in a dominant endemic Eastern Pacific coral (Porites panamensis) using a genetic seascape approach.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Sotelo, Nancy C; Calderon-Aguilera, Luis E; Reyes-Bonilla, Héctor; Paz-García, David A; López-Pérez, Ramón A; Cupul-Magaña, Amilcar; Cruz-Barraza, José A; Rocha-Olivares, Axayácatl

    2013-10-01

    The coral fauna of the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP) is depauperate and peripheral; hence, it has drawn attention to the factors allowing its survival. Here, we use a genetic seascape approach and ecological niche modeling to unravel the environmental factors correlating with the genetic variation of Porites panamensis, a hermatypic coral endemic to the ETP. Specifically, we test if levels of diversity and connectivity are higher among abundant than among depauperate populations, as expected by a geographically relaxed version of the Abundant Center Hypothesis (rel-ACH). Unlike the original ACH, referring to a geographical center of distribution of maximal abundance, the rel-ACH refers only to a center of maximum abundance, irrespective of its geographic position. The patterns of relative abundance of P. panamensis in the Mexican Pacific revealed that northern populations from Baja California represent its center of abundance; and southern depauperate populations along the continental margin are peripheral relative to it. Genetic patterns of diversity and structure of nuclear DNA sequences (ribosomal DNA and a single copy open reading frame) and five alloenzymatic loci partially agreed with rel-ACH predictions. We found higher diversity levels in peninsular populations and significant differentiation between peninsular and continental colonies. In addition, continental populations showed higher levels of differentiation and lower connectivity than peninsular populations in the absence of isolation by distance in each region. Some discrepancies with model expectations may relate to the influence of significant habitat discontinuities in the face of limited dispersal potential. Environmental data analyses and niche modeling allowed us to identify temperature, water clarity, and substrate availability as the main factors correlating with patterns of abundance, genetic diversity, and structure, which may hold the key to the survival of P. panamensis in the face of

  9. Testing the genetic predictions of a biogeographical model in a dominant endemic Eastern Pacific coral (Porites panamensis) using a genetic seascape approach

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra-Sotelo, Nancy C; Calderon-Aguilera, Luis E; Reyes-Bonilla, Héctor; Paz-García, David A; López-Pérez, Ramón A; Cupul-Magaña, Amilcar; Cruz-Barraza, José A; Rocha-Olivares, Axayácatl

    2013-01-01

    The coral fauna of the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP) is depauperate and peripheral; hence, it has drawn attention to the factors allowing its survival. Here, we use a genetic seascape approach and ecological niche modeling to unravel the environmental factors correlating with the genetic variation of Porites panamensis, a hermatypic coral endemic to the ETP. Specifically, we test if levels of diversity and connectivity are higher among abundant than among depauperate populations, as expected by a geographically relaxed version of the Abundant Center Hypothesis (rel-ACH). Unlike the original ACH, referring to a geographical center of distribution of maximal abundance, the rel-ACH refers only to a center of maximum abundance, irrespective of its geographic position. The patterns of relative abundance of P. panamensis in the Mexican Pacific revealed that northern populations from Baja California represent its center of abundance; and southern depauperate populations along the continental margin are peripheral relative to it. Genetic patterns of diversity and structure of nuclear DNA sequences (ribosomal DNA and a single copy open reading frame) and five alloenzymatic loci partially agreed with rel-ACH predictions. We found higher diversity levels in peninsular populations and significant differentiation between peninsular and continental colonies. In addition, continental populations showed higher levels of differentiation and lower connectivity than peninsular populations in the absence of isolation by distance in each region. Some discrepancies with model expectations may relate to the influence of significant habitat discontinuities in the face of limited dispersal potential. Environmental data analyses and niche modeling allowed us to identify temperature, water clarity, and substrate availability as the main factors correlating with patterns of abundance, genetic diversity, and structure, which may hold the key to the survival of P. panamensis in the face of

  10. Naive Analysis of Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, W. John

    2012-01-01

    The Analysis of Variance is often taught in introductory statistics courses, but it is not clear that students really understand the method. This is because the derivation of the test statistic and p-value requires a relatively sophisticated mathematical background which may not be well-remembered or understood. Thus, the essential concept behind…

  11. Conversations across Meaning Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Progressive interpretations of scientific theories have long been denounced as naive, because of the inescapability of meaning variance. The charge reportedly applies to recent realist moves that focus on theory-parts rather than whole theories. This paper considers the question of what "theory-parts" of epistemic significance (if any) relevantly…

  12. Minimum variance geographic sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, G. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Resource inventories require samples with geographical scatter, sometimes not as widely spaced as would be hoped. A simple model of correlation over distances is used to create a minimum variance unbiased estimate population means. The fitting procedure is illustrated from data used to estimate Missouri corn acreage.

  13. The genetic architecture of fitness in a seed beetle: assessing the potential for indirect genetic benefits of female choice

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Quantifying the amount of standing genetic variation in fitness represents an empirical challenge. Unfortunately, the shortage of detailed studies of the genetic architecture of fitness has hampered progress in several domains of evolutionary biology. One such area is the study of sexual selection. In particular, the evolution of adaptive female choice by indirect genetic benefits relies on the presence of genetic variation for fitness. Female choice by genetic benefits fall broadly into good genes (additive) models and compatibility (non-additive) models where the strength of selection is dictated by the genetic architecture of fitness. To characterize the genetic architecture of fitness, we employed a quantitative genetic design (the diallel cross) in a population of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, which is known to exhibit post-copulatory female choice. From reciprocal crosses of inbred lines, we assayed egg production, egg-to-adult survival, and lifetime offspring production of the outbred F1 daughters (F1 productivity). Results We used the bio model to estimate six components of genetic and environmental variance in fitness. We found sizeable additive and non-additive genetic variance in F1 productivity, but lower genetic variance in egg-to-adult survival, which was strongly influenced by maternal and paternal effects. Conclusion Our results show that, in order to gain a relevant understanding of the genetic architecture of fitness, measures of offspring fitness should be inclusive and should include quantifications of offspring reproductive success. We note that our estimate of additive genetic variance in F1 productivity (CVA = 14%) is sufficient to generate indirect selection on female choice. However, our results also show that the major determinant of offspring fitness is the genetic interaction between parental genomes, as indicated by large amounts of non-additive genetic variance (dominance and/or epistasis) for F1 productivity. We

  14. Population genetic patterns among social groups of the endangered Central American spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) in a human-dominated landscape

    PubMed Central

    Hagell, Suzanne; Whipple, Amy V; Chambers, Carol L

    2013-01-01

    Spider monkeys (Genus: Ateles) are a widespread Neotropical primate with a highly plastic socioecological strategy. However, the Central American species, Ateles geoffroyi, was recently re-listed as endangered due to the accelerated loss of forest across the subcontinent. There is inconsistent evidence that spider monkey populations could persist when actively protected, but their long-term viability in unprotected, human-dominated landscapes is not known. We analyzed noninvasive genetic samples from 185 individuals in 14 putative social groups on the Rivas Isthmus in southwestern Nicaragua. We found evidence of weak but significant genetic structure in the mitochondrial control region and in eight nuclear microsatellite loci plus negative spatial autocorrelation in Fst and kinship. The overall pattern suggests strong localized mating and at least historical female-biased dispersal, as is expected for this species. Heterozygosity was significantly lower than expected under random mating and lower than that found in other spider monkey populations, possibly reflecting a recent decline in genetic diversity and a threat from inbreeding. We conclude that despite a long history of human disturbance on this landscape, spider monkeys were until recently successful at maintaining gene flow. We consider the recent decline to be further indication of accelerated anthropogenic disturbance, but also of an opportunity to conserve native biodiversity. Spider monkeys are one of many wildlife species in Central America that is threatened by land cover change, and an apt example of how landscape-scale conservation planning could be used to ensure long-term persistence. PMID:23762523

  15. Spectral Ambiguity of Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We study the extent to which knowledge of Allan variance and other finite-difference variances determines the spectrum of a random process. The variance of first differences is known to determine the spectrum. We show that, in general, the Allan variance does not. A complete description of the ambiguity is given.

  16. Nuclear factor kappaB dominant negative genetic constructs inhibit X-ray induction of cell adhesion molecules in the vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Virudachalam, S; Kuchibhotla, J

    1998-12-01

    X-ray-induced expression of inflammatory mediators has been proposed to contribute to radiation injury in normal tissues. Radiation-inducible inflammatory mediators include the cell adhesion molecule (CAM) E-selectin and the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. Nuclear factor (NF)kappaB is activated by X-rays and may participate in the transcriptional regulation of each of these inflammatory mediators. To determine whether NFkappaB inhibition abrogates X-ray induction of inflammatory mediators, we used two experimental approaches including NFkappaB inhibitory drugs and a dominant negative genetic construct. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human microvascular endothelial cells were treated with the NFkappaB inhibitors ALLN, PDTC, NAC, and MG132. After irradiation, E-selectin or ICAM-1 was measured by fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis. E-selectin and ICAM-1 expression was measured by use of immunofluorescence and fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis. E-selectin expression increased 7-fold, and ICAM-1 expression increased 4-fold after irradiation. All of the inhibitors attenuated E-selectin expression after irradiation. ALLN and MG132 attenuated radiation-induced ICAM expression. However, PDTC and NAC induced increased expression of ICAM-1 in HUVECs. Inhibition of X-ray induction of ICAM by these agents could not be demonstrated. In separate experiments, the NFkappaB dominant negative genetic construct was cotransfected with the promoter-reporter constructs by means of Lipofectin reagent. The ICAM promoter-reporter construct consists of the 1.2-kb segment of the human ICAM promoter upstream of the transcriptional start site linked to the luciferase reporter gene (pGL.FL-Luc). The E-selectin promoter-reporter construct consists of 525 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site of the human E-selectin promoter linked to the human growth hormone reporter gene (pE525-GH). Endothelial cells transfected with the ICAM-1 promoter

  17. Nuclear Material Variance Calculation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-01-01

    MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculations) is a custom spreadsheet that significantly reduces the effort required to make the variance and covariance calculations needed to determine the detection sensitivity of a materials accounting system and loss of special nuclear material (SNM). The user is required to enter information into one of four data tables depending on the type of term in the materials balance (MB) equation. The four data tables correspond to input transfers, output transfers,more » and two types of inventory terms, one for nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements and one for measurements made by chemical analysis. Each data entry must contain an identification number and a short description, as well as values for the SNM concentration, the bulk mass (or solution volume), the measurement error standard deviations, and the number of measurements during an accounting period. The user must also specify the type of error model (additive or multiplicative) associated with each measurement, and possible correlations between transfer terms. Predefined spreadsheet macros are used to perform the variance and covariance calculations for each term based on the corresponding set of entries. MAVARIC has been used for sensitivity studies of chemical separation facilities, fuel processing and fabrication facilities, and gas centrifuge and laser isotope enrichment facilities.« less

  18. Molecular Genetic Diagnosis of a Bethlem Myopathy Family with an Autosomal-Dominant COL6A1 Mutation, as Evidenced by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyung Jun; Choi, Young-Chul; Kim, Seung Min; Kim, Se Hoon; Hong, Young Bin; Yoon, Bo Ram

    2015-01-01

    Background We describe herein the application of whole exome sequencing (WES) for the molecular genetic diagnosis of a large Korean family with dominantly inherited myopathy. Case Report The affected individuals presented with slowly progressive proximal weakness and ankle contracture. They were initially diagnosed with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) based on clinical and pathologic features. However, WES and subsequent capillary sequencing identified a pathogenic splicing-site mutation (c.1056+1G>A) in COL6A1, which was previously reported to be an underlying cause of Bethlem myopathy. After identification of the genetic cause of the disease, careful neurologic examination revealed subtle contracture of the interphalangeal joint in the affected members, which is a characteristic sign of Bethlem myopathy. Therefore, we revised the original diagnosis from LGMD to Bethlem myopathy. Conclusions This is the first report of identification of COL6A1-mediated Bethlem myopathy in Korea, and indicates the utility of WES for the diagnosis of muscular dystrophy. PMID:25749816

  19. Genetic linkage of type VII collagen (COL7A1) to dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in families with abnormal anchoring fibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Ryynänen, M; Ryynänen, J; Sollberg, S; Iozzo, R V; Knowlton, R G; Uitto, J

    1992-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) in a group of genodermatoses characterized by the fragility of skin. Previous studies on the dystrophic (scarring) forms of EB have suggested abnormalities in anchoring fibrils, morphologically recognizable attachment structures that provide stability to the association of the cutaneous basement membrane to the underlying dermis. Since type VII collagen is the major component of the anchoring fibrils, we examined the genetic linkage of dominant dystrophic EB (EBDD) and the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1) locus, which we have recently mapped to chromosome 3p, in three large kindreds with abnormal anchoring fibrils. Strong genetic linkage of EBDD and COL7A1 loci was demonstrated with the maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 8.77 at theta = 0. This linkage was further confirmed with two additional markers in this region of the short arm of chromosome 3, and these analyses allowed further refinement of the map locus of COL7A1. Since there were no recombinants between the COL7A1 and EBDD loci, our findings suggest that type VII collagen is the candidate gene that may harbor the mutations responsible for the EB phenotype in these three families. Images PMID:1347297

  20. Genetic engineering of the green alga Chlorella zofingiensis: a modified norflurazon-resistant phytoene desaturase gene as a dominant selectable marker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Sun, Zheng; Gerken, Henri; Huang, Junchao; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2014-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlorella zofingiensis has been proposed as a promising producer of natural astaxanthin, a commercially important ketocarotenoid. But the genetic toolbox for this alga is not available. In the present study, an efficient transformation system was established for C. zofingiensis. The transformation system utilized a modified norflurazon-resistant phytoene desaturase (PDS-L516F, with an leucine-phenylalanine change at position 516) as the selectable marker. Three promoters from endogenous PDS, nitrate reductase (NIT), and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RBCS) genes were tested, with the RBCS promoter demonstrating the highest transformation efficiency. Inclusion of the first intron of the PDS gene further enhanced the efficiency by 91 %. Both particle bombardment and electroporation methods were examined, and the latter gave a fourfold higher transformation efficiency. The introduction of PDS-L516F, which exhibited a 33 % higher desaturation activity than the unaltered enzyme, enabled C. zofingiensis to produce 32.1 % more total carotenoids (TCs) and 54.1 % more astaxanthin. The enhanced accumulation of astaxanthin in transformants was revealed to be related to the increase in the transcripts of PDS, β-carotenoid ketolase (BKT), and hydroxylase (CHYb) genes. Our study clearly shows that the modified PDS gene is a dominant selectable marker for the transformation of C. zofingiensis and possibly for the genetic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. In addition, the engineered C. zofingiensis might serve as an improved source of natural astaxanthin. PMID:24584513

  1. Modeling variance structure of body shape traits of Lipizzan horses.

    PubMed

    Kaps, M; Curik, I; Baban, M

    2010-09-01

    Heterogeneity of variance of growth traits over age is a common issue in estimating genetic parameters and is addressed in this study by selecting appropriate variance structure models for additive genetic and environmental variances. Modeling and partitioning those variances connected with analyzing small data sets were demonstrated on Lipizzan horses. The following traits were analyzed: withers height, chest girth, and cannon bone circumference. The measurements were taken at birth, and at approximately 6, 12, 24, and 36 mo of age of 660 Lipizzan horses born in Croatia between 1948 and 2000. The corresponding pedigree file consisted of 1,458 horses. Sex, age of dam, and stud-year-season interaction were considered fixed effects; additive genetic and permanent environment effects were defined as random. Linear adjustments of age at measuring were done within measuring groups. Maternal effects were included only for measurements taken at birth and at 6 mo. Additive genetic variance structures were modeled by using uniform structures or structures based on polynomial random regression. Environmental variance structures were modeled by using one of the following models: unstructured, exponential, Gaussian, or combinations of identity or diagonal with structures based on polynomial random regression. The parameters were estimated by using REML. Comparison and fits of the models were assessed by using Akaike and Bayesian information criteria, and by checking graphically the adequacy of the shape of the overall (phenotypic) and component (additive genetic and environmental) variance functions. The best overall fit was obtained from models with unstructured error variance. Compared with the model with uniform additive genetic variance, models with structures based on random regression only slightly improved overall fit. Exponential and Gaussian models were generally not suitable because they do not accommodate adequately heterogeneity of variance. Using the unstructured

  2. Spectral variance of aeroacoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. V.; Preisser, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    An asymptotic technique for estimating the variance of power spectra is applied to aircraft flyover noise data. The results are compared with directly estimated variances and they are in reasonable agreement. The basic time series need not be Gaussian for asymptotic theory to apply. The asymptotic variance formulae can be useful tools both in the design and analysis phase of experiments of this type.

  3. Estimating the encounter rate variance in distance sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fewster, R.M.; Buckland, S.T.; Burnham, K.P.; Borchers, D.L.; Jupp, P.E.; Laake, J.L.; Thomas, L.

    2009-01-01

    The dominant source of variance in line transect sampling is usually the encounter rate variance. Systematic survey designs are often used to reduce the true variability among different realizations of the design, but estimating the variance is difficult and estimators typically approximate the variance by treating the design as a simple random sample of lines. We explore the properties of different encounter rate variance estimators under random and systematic designs. We show that a design-based variance estimator improves upon the model-based estimator of Buckland et al. (2001, Introduction to Distance Sampling. Oxford: Oxford University Press, p. 79) when transects are positioned at random. However, if populations exhibit strong spatial trends, both estimators can have substantial positive bias under systematic designs. We show that poststratification is effective in reducing this bias. ?? 2008, The International Biometric Society.

  4. Identifying Source Populations and Genetic Structure for Savannah Elephants in Human-Dominated Landscapes and Protected Areas in the Kenya-Tanzania Borderlands

    PubMed Central

    Ahlering, Marissa A.; Eggert, Lori S.; Western, David; Estes, Anna; Munishi, Linus; Fleischer, Robert; Roberts, Melissa; Maldonado, Jesus E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the genetic metapopulation structure of elephants across the trans Rift Valley region of Kenya and Tanzania, one of the remaining strongholds for savannah elephants (Loxodonata africana) in East Africa, using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers. We then examined this population structure to determine the source population for a recent colonization event of savannah elephants on community-owned land within the trans rift valley region. Four of the five sampled populations showed significant genetic differentiation (p<0.05) as measured with both mtDNA haplotypes and microsatellites. Only the samples from the adjacent Maasai Mara and Serengeti ecosystems showed no significant differentiation. A phylogenetic neighbour-joining tree constructed from mtDNA haplotypes detected four clades. Clade four corresponds to the F clade of previous mtDNA studies that reported to have originated in forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis) but to also be present in some savannah elephant populations. The split between clade four and the other three clades corresponded strongly to the geographic distribution of mtDNA haplotypes across the rift valley in the study area. Clade four was the dominant clade detected on the west side of the rift valley with rare occurrences on the east side. Finally, the strong patterns of population differentiation clearly indicated that the recent colonists to the community-owned land in Kenya came from the west side of the rift valley. Our results indicate strong female philopatry within the isolated populations of the trans rift valley region, with gene flow primarily mediated via male movements. The recent colonization event from Maasai Mara or Serengeti suggests there is hope for maintaining connectivity and population viability outside formal protected areas in the region. PMID:23300634

  5. Identifying source populations and genetic structure for savannah elephants in human-dominated landscapes and protected areas in the Kenya-Tanzania borderlands.

    PubMed

    Ahlering, Marissa A; Eggert, Lori S; Western, David; Estes, Anna; Munishi, Linus; Fleischer, Robert; Roberts, Melissa; Maldonado, Jesus E

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the genetic metapopulation structure of elephants across the trans Rift Valley region of Kenya and Tanzania, one of the remaining strongholds for savannah elephants (Loxodonata africana) in East Africa, using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers. We then examined this population structure to determine the source population for a recent colonization event of savannah elephants on community-owned land within the trans rift valley region. Four of the five sampled populations showed significant genetic differentiation (p<0.05) as measured with both mtDNA haplotypes and microsatellites. Only the samples from the adjacent Maasai Mara and Serengeti ecosystems showed no significant differentiation. A phylogenetic neighbour-joining tree constructed from mtDNA haplotypes detected four clades. Clade four corresponds to the F clade of previous mtDNA studies that reported to have originated in forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis) but to also be present in some savannah elephant populations. The split between clade four and the other three clades corresponded strongly to the geographic distribution of mtDNA haplotypes across the rift valley in the study area. Clade four was the dominant clade detected on the west side of the rift valley with rare occurrences on the east side. Finally, the strong patterns of population differentiation clearly indicated that the recent colonists to the community-owned land in Kenya came from the west side of the rift valley. Our results indicate strong female philopatry within the isolated populations of the trans rift valley region, with gene flow primarily mediated via male movements. The recent colonization event from Maasai Mara or Serengeti suggests there is hope for maintaining connectivity and population viability outside formal protected areas in the region. PMID:23300634

  6. Localization of a gene (CMT2A) for autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 to chromosome 1p and evidence of genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Othmane, K.B.; Loprest, L.J.; Wilkinson, K.M. ); Middleton, L.T. )

    1993-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 (CMT2) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy characterized by variable age of onset and normal or slightly diminished nerve conduction velocity. CMT2 is pathologically and genetically distinct from CMT type 1 (CMT1). While CMT1 has been shown to be genetically heterogeneous, no chromosomal localization has been established for CMT2. The authors have performed pedigree linkage analysis in six large autosomal dominant CMT2 families and have demonstrated linkage and heterogeneity to a series of microsatellites (D1S160, D1S170, D1S244, D1S228 and D1S199) in the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 1. Significant evidence for heterogeneity was found using admixture analyses and the two-point lod scores. Admixture analyses using the multipoint results for the markers D1S244, D1S228, and D1S199 supported the two-point findings. Three families, DUK662, DUK1241, and 1523 gave posterior probabilities of 1.0, 0.98, and 0.88 of being of the linked type. Multipoint analysis examining the [open quotes]linked[close quotes] families showed that the most favored location for the CMT2A gene is within the interval flanked by D1S244 and D1S228 (odds approximately 70:1 of lying within versus outside that interval). These findings suggest that the CMT2 phenotype is secondary to at least two different genes and demonstrate further heterogeneity in the CMT phenotype.

  7. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  8. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  9. Linkage to D3S47 (C17) in one large autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa family and exclusion in another: confirmation of genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed Central

    Lester, D H; Inglehearn, C F; Bashir, R; Ackford, H; Esakowitz, L; Jay, M; Bird, A C; Wright, A F; Papiha, S S; Bhattacharya, S S

    1990-01-01

    Recently Dryja and his co-workers observed a mutation in the 23d codon of the rhodopsin gene in a proportion of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) patients. Linkage analysis with a rhodopsin-linked probe C17 (D3S47) was carried out in two large British ADRP families, one with diffuse-type (D-type) RP and the other with regional-type (R-type) RP. Significantly positive lod scores (lod score maximum [Zmax] = +5.58 at recombination fraction [theta] = .0) were obtained between C17 and our D-type ADRP family showing complete penetrance. Sequence and oligonucleotide analysis has, however, shown that no point mutation at the 23d codon exists in affected individuals in our complete-penetrance pedigree, indicating that another rhodopsin mutation is probably responsible for ADRP in this family. Significantly negative lod scores (Z less than -2 at theta = .045) were, however, obtained between C17 and our R-type family which showed incomplete penetrance. Previous results presented by this laboratory also showed no linkage between C17 and another large British R-type ADRP family with incomplete penetrance. This confirms genetic heterogeneity. Some types of ADRP are being caused by different mutations in the rhodopsin locus (3q21-24) or another tightly linked gene in this region, while other types of ADRP are the result of mutations elsewhere in the genome. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2393026

  10. Cosmology without cosmic variance

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Cai, Yan -Chuan

    2011-10-01

    The growth of structures in the Universe is described by a function G that is predicted by the combination of the expansion history of the Universe and the laws of gravity within it. We examine the improvements in constraints on G that are available from the combination of a large-scale galaxy redshift survey with a weak gravitational lensing survey of background sources. We describe a new combination of such observations that in principle this yields a measure of the growth rate that is free of sample variance, i.e. the uncertainty in G can be reduced without bound by increasing themore » number of redshifts obtained within a finite survey volume. The addition of background weak lensing data to a redshift survey increases information on G by an amount equivalent to a 10-fold increase in the volume of a standard redshift-space distortion measurement - if the lensing signal can be measured to sub-per cent accuracy. This argues that a combined lensing and redshift survey over a common low-redshift volume of the Universe is a more powerful test of general relativity than an isolated redshift survey over larger volume at high redshift, especially as surveys begin to cover most of the available sky.« less

  11. Cosmology without cosmic variance

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Cai, Yan -Chuan

    2011-10-01

    The growth of structures in the Universe is described by a function G that is predicted by the combination of the expansion history of the Universe and the laws of gravity within it. We examine the improvements in constraints on G that are available from the combination of a large-scale galaxy redshift survey with a weak gravitational lensing survey of background sources. We describe a new combination of such observations that in principle this yields a measure of the growth rate that is free of sample variance, i.e. the uncertainty in G can be reduced without bound by increasing the number of redshifts obtained within a finite survey volume. The addition of background weak lensing data to a redshift survey increases information on G by an amount equivalent to a 10-fold increase in the volume of a standard redshift-space distortion measurement - if the lensing signal can be measured to sub-per cent accuracy. This argues that a combined lensing and redshift survey over a common low-redshift volume of the Universe is a more powerful test of general relativity than an isolated redshift survey over larger volume at high redshift, especially as surveys begin to cover most of the available sky.

  12. Budget variance analysis using RVUs.

    PubMed

    Berlin, M F; Budzynski, M R

    1998-01-01

    This article details the use of the variance analysis as management tool to evaluate the financial health of the practice. A common financial tool for administrators has been a simple calculation measuring the difference between actual financials vs. budget financials. Standard cost accounting provides a methodology known as variance analysis to better understand the actual vs. budgeted financial streams. The standard variance analysis has been modified by applying relative value units (RVUs) as standards for the practice. PMID:10387247

  13. The dominant Australian community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone ST93-IV [2B] is highly virulent and genetically distinct.

    PubMed

    Chua, Kyra Y L; Seemann, Torsten; Harrison, Paul F; Monagle, Shaun; Korman, Tony M; Johnson, Paul D R; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Howden, Brian O; Davies, John K; Howden, Benjamin P; Stinear, Timothy P

    2011-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) USA300 has spread rapidly across North America, and CA-MRSA is also increasing in Australia. However, the dominant Australian CA-MRSA strain, ST93-IV [2B] appears distantly related to USA300 despite strikingly similar clinical and epidemiological profiles. Here, we compared the virulence of a recent Australian ST93 isolate (JKD6159) to other MRSA, including USA300, and found that JKD6159 was the most virulent in a mouse skin infection model. We fully sequenced the genome of JKD6159 and confirmed that JKD6159 is a distinct clone with 7616 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distinguishing this strain from all other S. aureus genomes. Despite its high virulence there were surprisingly few virulence determinants. However, genes encoding α-hemolysin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and α-type phenol soluble modulins were present. Genome comparisons revealed 32 additional CDS in JKD6159 but none appeared to encode new virulence factors, suggesting that this clone's enhanced pathogenicity could lie within subtler genome changes, such as SNPs within regulatory genes. To investigate the role of accessory genome elements in CA-MRSA epidemiology, we next sequenced three additional Australian non-ST93 CA-MRSA strains and compared them with JKD6159, 19 completed S. aureus genomes and 59 additional S. aureus genomes for which unassembled genome sequence data was publicly available (82 genomes in total). These comparisons showed that despite its distinctive genotype, JKD6159 and other CA-MRSA clones (including USA300) share a conserved repertoire of three notable accessory elements (SSCmecIV, PVL prophage, and pMW2). This study demonstrates that the genetically distinct ST93 CA-MRSA from Australia is highly virulent. Our comparisons of geographically and genetically diverse CA-MRSA genomes suggest that apparent convergent evolution in CA-MRSA may be better explained by the rapid dissemination of a

  14. Comprehensive Genetic Screening of KCNQ4 in a Large Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hearing Loss Cohort: Genotype-Phenotype Correlations and a Founder Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Takehiko; Nishio, Shin-ya; Iwasa, Yoh-ichiro; Yano, Takuya; Kumakawa, Kozo; Abe, Satoko; Ishikawa, Kotaro; Kojima, Hiromi; Namba, Atsushi; Oshikawa, Chie; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    The present study of KCNQ4 mutations was carried out to 1) determine the prevalence by unbiased population-based genetic screening, 2) clarify the mutation spectrum and genotype/phenotype correlations, and 3) summarize clinical characteristics. In addition, a review of the reported mutations was performed for better understanding of this deafness gene. The screening using 287 probands from unbiased Japanese autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL) families identified 19 families with 7 different disease causing mutations, indicating that the frequency is 6.62% (19/287). While the majority were private mutations, one particular recurrent mutation, c.211delC, was observed in 13 unrelated families. Haplotype analysis in the vicinity of c.211delC suggests existence of a common ancestor. The majority of the patients showed all frequency, but high-frequency predominant, sensorineural hearing loss. The present study adds a new typical audiogram configuration characterized by mid-frequency predominant hearing loss caused by the p.V230E mutation. A variant at the N-terminal site (c. 211delC) showed typical ski-slope type audiogram configuration. Concerning clinical features, onset age was from 3 to 40 years old, and mostly in the teens, and hearing loss was gradually progressive. Progressive nature is a common feature of patients with KCNQ4 mutations regardless of the mutation type. In conclusion, KCNQ4 mutations are frequent among ADNSHL patients, and therefore screening of the gene and molecular confirmation of these mutations have become important in the diagnosis of these conditions. PMID:23717403

  15. Utility functions predict variance and skewness risk preferences in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Genest, Wilfried; Stauffer, William R.; Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Utility is the fundamental variable thought to underlie economic choices. In particular, utility functions are believed to reflect preferences toward risk, a key decision variable in many real-life situations. To assess the validity of utility representations, it is therefore important to examine risk preferences. In turn, this approach requires formal definitions of risk. A standard approach is to focus on the variance of reward distributions (variance-risk). In this study, we also examined a form of risk related to the skewness of reward distributions (skewness-risk). Thus, we tested the extent to which empirically derived utility functions predicted preferences for variance-risk and skewness-risk in macaques. The expected utilities calculated for various symmetrical and skewed gambles served to define formally the direction of stochastic dominance between gambles. In direct choices, the animals’ preferences followed both second-order (variance) and third-order (skewness) stochastic dominance. Specifically, for gambles with different variance but identical expected values (EVs), the monkeys preferred high-variance gambles at low EVs and low-variance gambles at high EVs; in gambles with different skewness but identical EVs and variances, the animals preferred positively over symmetrical and negatively skewed gambles in a strongly transitive fashion. Thus, the utility functions predicted the animals’ preferences for variance-risk and skewness-risk. Using these well-defined forms of risk, this study shows that monkeys’ choices conform to the internal reward valuations suggested by their utility functions. This result implies a representation of utility in monkeys that accounts for both variance-risk and skewness-risk preferences. PMID:27402743

  16. Variance in male lifetime reproductive success and estimation of the degree of polygyny in a primate

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Widdig, Anja

    2014-01-01

    The degree of polygyny is predicted to influence the strength of direct male–male competition, leading to a high variance in male lifetime reproductive success and to reproduction limited to the prime period of adulthood. Here, we explore the variance in male lifetime reproductive success and reproductive time in an anthropoid primate forming multimale–multifemale groups. Males of this species form dominance hierarchies, which are expected to skew reproduction toward few high-ranking males. At the same time, however, females mate with multiple males (polygynandry), which should limit the degree of polygyny. Using 20 years of genetic and demographic data, we calculated lifetime reproductive success for the free-ranging rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) population of Cayo Santiago for subjects that died naturally or reached senescence. Our results show that 1) male lifetime reproductive success was significantly skewed (range: 0–47 offspring; males reproducing below average: 62.8%; nonbreeders: 17.4%), 2) variance in male lifetime reproductive success was 5 times larger than in females, and 3) male lifetime reproductive success was more influenced by variation in fecundity (60%) than longevity (25%), suggesting that some direct male–male competition takes place. However, the opportunity for selection (i.e., standardized variance in male lifetime reproductive success) is low compared with that in other large mammal species characterized by a high degree of polygyny. Moreover, male reproductive life extended much beyond the prime period, showing that physical strength was not required to acquire mates. We conclude that rhesus macaques exhibit a moderate degree of polygyny and, therefore, low levels of direct male–male competition for fertile females, despite the fact that males form linear dominance hierarchies. PMID:25024637

  17. Selection enhanced estimates of µ-calpain, calpastatin, and dacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 genetic effects on pre-weaning performance, carcass quality traits, and residual variance of tenderness in composite ... cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selection of the composite MARC III population for markers allowed better estimates of effects and inheritance of markers for targeted carcass quality traits (n=254) and nontargeted traits and an evaluation of SNP specific residual variance models for tenderness. Genotypic effects of CAPN1 haplotyp...

  18. Male dominance linked to size and age, but not to 'good genes' in brown trout (Salmo trutta)

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Alain; Nusslé, Sébastien; Britschgi, Adrian; Evanno, Guillaume; Müller, Rudolf; Wedekind, Claus

    2007-01-01

    Background Males that are successful in intra-sexual competition are often assumed to be of superior quality. In the mating system of most salmonid species, intensive dominance fights are common and the winners monopolise most mates and sire most offspring. We drew a random sample of mature male brown trout (Salmo trutta) from two wild populations and determined their dominance hierarchy or traits linked to dominance. The fish were then stripped and their sperm was used for in vitro fertilisations in two full-factorial breeding designs. We recorded embryo viability until hatching in both experiments, and juvenile survival during 20 months after release into a natural streamlet in the second experiment. Since offspring of brown trout get only genes from their fathers, we used offspring survival as a quality measure to test (i) whether males differ in their genetic quality, and if so, (ii) whether dominance or traits linked to dominance reveal 'good genes'. Results We found significant additive genetic variance on embryo survival, i.e. males differed in their genetic quality. Older, heavier and larger males were more successful in intra-sexual selection. However, neither dominance nor dominance indicators like body length, weight or age were significantly linked to genetic quality measured as embryo or juvenile survival. Conclusion We found no evidence that females can improve their offspring's genetic viability by mating with large and dominant males. If there still were advantages of mating with dominant males, they may be linked to non-genetic benefits or to genetic advantages that are context dependent and therefore possibly not revealed under our experimental conditions – even if we found significant additive genetic variation for embryo viability under such conditions. PMID:17974038

  19. Multicomponent, multi-azimuth pre-stack seismic waveform inversion for azimuthally anisotropic media using a parallel and computationally efficient non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Mallick, Subhashis

    2015-02-01

    Consideration of azimuthal anisotropy, at least to an orthorhombic symmetry is important in exploring the naturally fractured and unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. Full waveform inversion of multicomponent seismic data can, in principle, provide more robust estimates of subsurface elastic parameters and density than the inversion of single component (P wave) seismic data. In addition, azimuthally dependent anisotropy can only be resolved by carefully studying the multicomponent seismic displacement data acquired and processed along different azimuths. Such an analysis needs an inversion algorithm capable of simultaneously optimizing multiple objectives, one for each data component along each azimuth. These multicomponent and multi-azimuthal seismic inversions are non-linear with non-unique solutions; it is therefore appropriate to treat the objectives as a vector and simultaneously optimize each of its components such that the optimal set of solutions could be obtained. The fast non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA II) is a robust stochastic global search method capable of handling multiple objectives, but its computational expense increases with increasing number of objectives and the number of model parameters to be inverted for. In addition, an accurate extraction of subsurface azimuthal anisotropy requires multicomponent seismic data acquired at a fine spatial resolution along many source-to-receiver azimuths. Because routine acquisition of such data is prohibitively expensive, they are typically available along two or at most three azimuthal orientations at a spatial resolution where such an inversion could be applied. This paper proposes a novel multi-objective methodology using a parallelized version of NSGA II for waveform inversion of multicomponent seismic displacement data along two azimuths. By scaling the objectives prior to ranking, redefining the crowding distance as functions of the scaled objective and the model spaces, and varying

  20. The genetic basis of photoperiodism and its evolutionary divergence among populations of the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii.

    PubMed

    Hard, J J; Bradshaw, W E; Holzapfel, C M

    1993-09-01

    We measured the additive genetic variance within populations and the composite additive, dominance, and epistatic effects contributing to differentiation of photoperiodic response between two southern (ancestral) and each of four progressively more northern (derived) populations of the pitcher-plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii. Critical photoperiod and its additive genetic variance but not its heritability increased with latitude. Directional selection on critical photoperiod during the northward divergence of W. smithii has therefore not eroded the additive genetic variance underlying this trait. Joint scaling tests of crosses between populations showed that epistatic effects, especially additive x additive and dominance x dominance interactions, overwhelm composite additive and dominance effects on critical photoperiod. The presence of substantial epistasis suggests that multiple founder events during the northward divergence of W. smithii may have been responsible for the release of progressively greater additive genetic variance in derived populations, despite directional and stabilizing selection to reduce it. If epistasis makes a similar contribution to the genetic differentiation of populations in other species, then current models of adaptive evolution that consider only additive genetic variation and covariation within populations may be of limited value in predicting how natural populations differentiate in life history. PMID:19425986

  1. Inclusion of Dominance Effects in the Multivariate GBLUP Model

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcellos, Renato Coelho de Castro; Pires, Luiz Paulo Miranda; Von Pinho, Renzo Garcia

    2016-01-01

    New proposals for models and applications of prediction processes with data on molecular markers may help reduce the financial costs of and identify superior genotypes in maize breeding programs. Studies evaluating Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (GBLUP) models including dominance effects have not been performed in the univariate and multivariate context in the data analysis of this crop. A single cross hybrid construction procedure was performed in this study using phenotypic data and actual molecular markers of 4,091 maize lines from the public database Panzea. A total of 400 simple hybrids resulting from this process were analyzed using the univariate and multivariate GBLUP model considering only additive effects additive plus dominance effects. Historic heritability scenarios of five traits and other genetic architecture settings were used to compare models, evaluating the predictive ability and estimation of variance components. Marginal differences were detected between the multivariate and univariate models. The main explanation for the small discrepancy between models is the low- to moderate-magnitude correlations between the traits studied and moderate heritabilities. These conditions do not favor the advantages of multivariate analysis. The inclusion of dominance effects in the models was an efficient strategy to improve the predictive ability and estimation quality of variance components. PMID:27074056

  2. Inclusion of Dominance Effects in the Multivariate GBLUP Model.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Jhonathan Pedroso Rigal; Vasconcellos, Renato Coelho de Castro; Pires, Luiz Paulo Miranda; Balestre, Marcio; Von Pinho, Renzo Garcia

    2016-01-01

    New proposals for models and applications of prediction processes with data on molecular markers may help reduce the financial costs of and identify superior genotypes in maize breeding programs. Studies evaluating Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (GBLUP) models including dominance effects have not been performed in the univariate and multivariate context in the data analysis of this crop. A single cross hybrid construction procedure was performed in this study using phenotypic data and actual molecular markers of 4,091 maize lines from the public database Panzea. A total of 400 simple hybrids resulting from this process were analyzed using the univariate and multivariate GBLUP model considering only additive effects additive plus dominance effects. Historic heritability scenarios of five traits and other genetic architecture settings were used to compare models, evaluating the predictive ability and estimation of variance components. Marginal differences were detected between the multivariate and univariate models. The main explanation for the small discrepancy between models is the low- to moderate-magnitude correlations between the traits studied and moderate heritabilities. These conditions do not favor the advantages of multivariate analysis. The inclusion of dominance effects in the models was an efficient strategy to improve the predictive ability and estimation quality of variance components. PMID:27074056

  3. Genetic variance and breeding values for resistance to a wind-borne disease [Sphaerotheca macularis (Wallr. ex Fr.)] in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) estimated by exploring mixed and spatial models and pedigree information.

    PubMed

    Davik, Jahn; Honne, Bjørn Ivar

    2005-07-01

    A mixed model approach was used to estimate variance components and heritabilities for resistance to powdery mildew, a wind-borne disease in strawberry. In order to improve precision in the statistical computations, spatial error control effects were included to account for systematic environmental variations in the large field trials. Pedigree information was included where feasible. Seedling families obtained from an incomplete 63-by-63 diallel cross were grown at six locations and scored subjectively for mildew attack three times during the growing season. The 63 parents included both European and American cultivars as well as advanced selections from various breeding programmes. A total of 298 full-sib families were realized, including 26 reciprocal families. No reciprocal differences were found. On a plot-mean basis, the broad-sense heritability was found to be intermediate, H(2) = 0.44-0.50, depending on whether the pedigree information was included in the model or not. The increase was mainly due to a substantial increase in the additive variance component. Likewise, the narrow-sense heritability increased from h(2) = 0.39 to h(2) = 0.45 when the pedigree information was included, while the ratio of the specific combining ability variance to the general combining ability variance fell from 13% to 10%. The predicted breeding values of the 63 parents demonstrate that important cultivars such as Elsanta and Korona are unlikely to produce progenies with a high degree of resistance. On the other hand, the Norwegian cultivar Solprins, the Canadian cultivar Kent and the Italian cultivar Patty appeared to give highly resistant progeny. At the full-sib level, the estimated disease scores ranged from 1.15 (Kent x Induka) to 4.19 (Cavendish x Avanta), revealing a huge range of variation for powdery mildew resistance available for selection. PMID:15937703

  4. Integrating Nonadditive Genomic Relationship Matrices into the Study of Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Alireza; Gezan, Salvador A

    2016-03-01

    The study of genetic architecture of complex traits has been dramatically influenced by implementing genome-wide analytical approaches during recent years. Of particular interest are genomic prediction strategies which make use of genomic information for predicting phenotypic responses instead of detecting trait-associated loci. In this work, we present the results of a simulation study to improve our understanding of the statistical properties of estimation of genetic variance components of complex traits, and of additive, dominance, and genetic effects through best linear unbiased prediction methodology. Simulated dense marker information was used to construct genomic additive and dominance matrices, and multiple alternative pedigree- and marker-based models were compared to determine if including a dominance term into the analysis may improve the genetic analysis of complex traits. Our results showed that a model containing a pedigree- or marker-based additive relationship matrix along with a pedigree-based dominance matrix provided the best partitioning of genetic variance into its components, especially when some degree of true dominance effects was expected to exist. Also, we noted that the use of a marker-based additive relationship matrix along with a pedigree-based dominance matrix had the best performance in terms of accuracy of correlations between true and estimated additive, dominance, and genetic effects. PMID:26712858

  5. Latitude dependence of eddy variances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.; Bell, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The eddy variance of a meteorological field must tend to zero at high latitudes due solely to the nature of spherical polar coordinates. The zonal averaging operator defines a length scale: the circumference of the latitude circle. When the circumference of the latitude circle is greater than the correlation length of the field, the eddy variance from transient eddies is the result of differences between statistically independent regions. When the circumference is less than the correlation length, the eddy variance is computed from points that are well correlated with each other, and so is reduced. The expansion of a field into zonal Fourier components is also influenced by the use of spherical coordinates. As is well known, a phenomenon of fixed wavelength will have different zonal wavenumbers at different latitudes. Simple analytical examples of these effects are presented along with an observational example from satellite ozone data. It is found that geometrical effects can be important even in middle latitudes.

  6. The Effect of an Experimental Bottleneck upon Quantitative Genetic Variation in the Housefly

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Edwin H.; McCommas, Steven A.; Combs, Lisa M.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of a population bottleneck (founder-flush cycle) upon quantitative genetic variation of morphometric traits were examined in replicated experimental lines of the housefly founded with one, four or 16 pairs of flies. Heritability and additive genetic variances for eight morphometric traits generally increased as a result of the bottleneck, but the pattern of increase among bottleneck sizes differed among traits. Principal axes of the additive genetic correlation matrix for the control line yielded two suites of traits, one associated with general body size and another set largely independent of body size. In the former set containing five of the traits, additive genetic variance was greatest in the bottleneck size of four pairs, whereas in the latter set of two traits the largest additive genetic variance occurred in the smallest bottleneck size of one pair. One trait exhibited changes in additive genetic variance intermediate between these two major responses. These results were inconsistent with models of additive effects of alleles within loci or of additive effects among loci. An observed decline in viability measures and body size in the bottleneck lines also indicated that there was nonadditivity of allelic effects for these traits. Several possible nonadditive models were explored that increased additive genetic variance as a result of a bottleneck. These included a model with complete dominance, a model with overdominance and a model incorporating multiplicative epistasis. PMID:17246359

  7. Understanding the influence of watershed storage caused by human interferences on ET variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, R.; Cai, X.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the temporal variance of evapotranspiration (ET) at the watershed scale remains a challenging task, because it is affected by complex climate conditions, soil properties, vegetation, groundwater and human activities. In a changing environment with extensive and intensive human interferences, understanding ET variance and its factors is important for sustainable water resources management. This study presents an analysis of the effect of storage change caused by human activities on ET variance Irrigation usually filters ET variance through the use of surface and groundwater; however, over-amount irrigation may cause the depletion of watershed storage, which changes the coincidence of water availability and energy supply for ET. This study develops a framework by incorporating the water balance and the Budyko Hypothesis. It decomposes the ET variance to the variances of precipitation, potential ET, catchment storage change, and their covariances. The contributions of ET variance from the various components are scaled by some weighting functions, expressed as long-term climate conditions and catchment properties. ET variance is assessed by records from 32 major river basins across the world. It is found that ET variance is dominated by precipitation variance under hot-dry condition and by evaporative demand variance under cool-wet condition; while the coincidence of water and energy supply controls ET variance under moderate climate condition. Watershed storage change plays an increasing important role in determining ET variance with relatively shorter time scale. By incorporating storage change caused by human interferences, this framework corrects the over-estimation of ET variance in hot-dry climate and under-estimation of ET variance in cool-wet climate. Furthermore, classification of dominant factors on ET variance shows similar patterns as geographic zonation.

  8. Variance of a Few Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joarder, Anwar H.

    2009-01-01

    This article demonstrates that the variance of three or four observations can be expressed in terms of the range and the first order differences of the observations. A more general result, which holds for any number of observations, is also stated.

  9. The Variance Reaction Time Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker

    2004-01-01

    The variance reaction time model (VRTM) is proposed to account for various recognition data on reaction time, the mirror effect, receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves, etc. The model is based on simple and plausible assumptions within a neural network: VRTM is a two layer neural network where one layer represents items and one layer…

  10. Analysis of Variance: Variably Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Gordon B.; Vowler, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    These authors have previously described how to use the "t" test to compare two groups. In this article, they describe the use of a different test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare more than two groups. ANOVA is a test of group differences: do at least two of the means differ from each other? ANOVA assumes (1) normal distribution of…

  11. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  12. Functional Analysis of Variance for Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vsevolozhskaya, Olga A.; Zaykin, Dmitri V.; Greenwood, Mark C.; Wei, Changshuai; Lu, Qing

    2014-01-01

    While progress has been made in identifying common genetic variants associated with human diseases, for most of common complex diseases, the identified genetic variants only account for a small proportion of heritability. Challenges remain in finding additional unknown genetic variants predisposing to complex diseases. With the advance in next-generation sequencing technologies, sequencing studies have become commonplace in genetic research. The ongoing exome-sequencing and whole-genome-sequencing studies generate a massive amount of sequencing variants and allow researchers to comprehensively investigate their role in human diseases. The discovery of new disease-associated variants can be enhanced by utilizing powerful and computationally efficient statistical methods. In this paper, we propose a functional analysis of variance (FANOVA) method for testing an association of sequence variants in a genomic region with a qualitative trait. The FANOVA has a number of advantages: (1) it tests for a joint effect of gene variants, including both common and rare; (2) it fully utilizes linkage disequilibrium and genetic position information; and (3) allows for either protective or risk-increasing causal variants. Through simulations, we show that FANOVA outperform two popularly used methods – SKAT and a previously proposed method based on functional linear models (FLM), – especially if a sample size of a study is small and/or sequence variants have low to moderate effects. We conduct an empirical study by applying three methods (FANOVA, SKAT and FLM) to sequencing data from Dallas Heart Study. While SKAT and FLM respectively detected ANGPTL 4 and ANGPTL 3 associated with obesity, FANOVA was able to identify both genes associated with obesity. PMID:25244256

  13. The contribution of dominance to phenotype prediction in a pine breeding and simulated population

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Filho, J E; Guimarães, J F R; e Silva, F F; de Resende, M D V; Muñoz, P; Kirst, M; Resende, M F R

    2016-01-01

    Pedigrees and dense marker panels have been used to predict the genetic merit of individuals in plant and animal breeding, accounting primarily for the contribution of additive effects. However, nonadditive effects may also affect trait variation in many breeding systems, particularly when specific combining ability is explored. Here we used models with different priors, and including additive-only and additive plus dominance effects, to predict polygenic (height) and oligogenic (fusiform rust resistance) traits in a structured breeding population of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Models were largely similar in predictive ability, and the inclusion of dominance only improved modestly the predictions for tree height. Next, we simulated a genetically similar population to assess the ability of predicting polygenic and oligogenic traits controlled by different levels of dominance. The simulation showed an overall decrease in the accuracy of total genomic predictions as dominance increases, regardless of the method used for prediction. Thus, dominance effects may not be accounted for as effectively in prediction models compared with traits controlled by additive alleles only. When the ratio of dominance to total phenotypic variance reached 0.2, the additive–dominance prediction models were significantly better than the additive-only models. However, in the prediction of the subsequent progeny population, this accuracy increase was only observed for the oligogenic trait. PMID:27118156

  14. The contribution of dominance to phenotype prediction in a pine breeding and simulated population.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Filho, J E; Guimarães, J F R; E Silva, F F; de Resende, M D V; Muñoz, P; Kirst, M; Resende, M F R

    2016-07-01

    Pedigrees and dense marker panels have been used to predict the genetic merit of individuals in plant and animal breeding, accounting primarily for the contribution of additive effects. However, nonadditive effects may also affect trait variation in many breeding systems, particularly when specific combining ability is explored. Here we used models with different priors, and including additive-only and additive plus dominance effects, to predict polygenic (height) and oligogenic (fusiform rust resistance) traits in a structured breeding population of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Models were largely similar in predictive ability, and the inclusion of dominance only improved modestly the predictions for tree height. Next, we simulated a genetically similar population to assess the ability of predicting polygenic and oligogenic traits controlled by different levels of dominance. The simulation showed an overall decrease in the accuracy of total genomic predictions as dominance increases, regardless of the method used for prediction. Thus, dominance effects may not be accounted for as effectively in prediction models compared with traits controlled by additive alleles only. When the ratio of dominance to total phenotypic variance reached 0.2, the additive-dominance prediction models were significantly better than the additive-only models. However, in the prediction of the subsequent progeny population, this accuracy increase was only observed for the oligogenic trait. PMID:27118156

  15. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  16. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  17. 10 CFR 851.31 - Variance process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Variance process. 851.31 Section 851.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Variances § 851.31 Variance process. (a) Application. Contractors desiring a variance from a safety and health standard, or portion thereof, may submit a...

  18. 13 CFR 307.22 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Variances. 307.22 Section 307.22....22 Variances. EDA may approve variances to the requirements contained in this subpart, provided such variances: (a) Are consistent with the goals of the Economic Adjustment Assistance program and with an...

  19. 29 CFR 1920.2 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Variances. 1920.2 Section 1920.2 Labor Regulations Relating...' COMPENSATION ACT § 1920.2 Variances. (a) Variances from standards in parts 1915 through 1918 of this chapter may be granted in the same circumstances in which variances may be granted under sections 6(b)...

  20. CAPN1, CAST, and DGAT1 genetic effects on preweaning performance, carcass quality traits, and residual variance of tenderness in a beef cattle population selected for haplotype and allele equalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC III) was subjected to marker assisted selection for multiple years to equalize specific marker frequencies to 1) estimate effect size an...

  1. µ-Calpain, calpastatin, and growth hormone receptor genetic effects on preweaning performance, carcass quality traits, and residual variance of tenderness in Angus cattle selected to increase minor haplotype ... frequencies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic marker effects and interactions are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. An Angus population was subjected to marker assisted selection for multiple years to increase divergent haplotype and minor marker allele frequencies to 1) estimate effect size an...

  2. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Le Maître, O. P.; Knio, O. M.; Moraes, A.

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  3. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maître, O. P.; Knio, O. M.; Moraes, A.

    2015-06-01

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  4. Population Genetic Structure, Abundance, and Health Status of Two Dominant Benthic Species in the Saba Bank National Park, Caribbean Netherlands: Montastraea cavernosa and Xestospongia muta

    PubMed Central

    de Bakker, Didier M.; Meesters, Erik H. W. G.; van Bleijswijk, Judith D. L.; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Breeuwer, Hans J. A. J.; Becking, Leontine E.

    2016-01-01

    Saba Bank, a submerged atoll in the Caribbean Sea with an area of 2,200 km2, has attained international conservation status due to the rich diversity of species that reside on the bank. In order to assess the role of Saba Bank as a potential reservoir of diversity for the surrounding reefs, we examined the population genetic structure, abundance and health status of two prominent benthic species, the coral Montastraea cavernosa and the sponge Xestospongia muta. Sequence data were collected from 34 colonies of M. cavernosa (nDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2; 892 bp) and 68 X. muta sponges (mtDNA I3-M11 partition of COI; 544 bp) on Saba Bank and around Saba Island, and compared with published data across the wider Caribbean. Our data indicate that there is genetic connectivity between populations on Saba Bank and the nearby Saba Island as well as multiple locations in the wider Caribbean, ranging in distance from 100s–1000s km. The genetic diversity of Saba Bank populations of M. cavernosa (π = 0.055) and X. muta (π = 0.0010) was comparable to those in other regions in the western Atlantic. Densities and health status were determined along 11 transects of 50 m2 along the south-eastern rim of Saba Bank. The densities of M. cavernosa (0.27 ind. m-2, 95% CI: 0.12–0.52) were average, while the densities of X. muta (0.09 ind. m-2, 95% CI: 0.02–0.32) were generally higher with respect to other Caribbean locations. No disease or bleaching was present in any of the specimens of the coral M. cavernosa, however, we did observe partial tissue loss (77.9% of samples) as well as overgrowth (48.1%), predominantly by cyanobacteria. In contrast, the majority of observed X. muta (83.5%) showed signs of presumed bleaching. The combined results of apparent gene flow among populations on Saba Bank and surrounding reefs, the high abundance and unique genetic diversity, indicate that Saba Bank could function as an important buffer for the region. Either as a natural source of larvae to

  5. Population Genetic Structure, Abundance, and Health Status of Two Dominant Benthic Species in the Saba Bank National Park, Caribbean Netherlands: Montastraea cavernosa and Xestospongia muta.

    PubMed

    de Bakker, Didier M; Meesters, Erik H W G; van Bleijswijk, Judith D L; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C; Breeuwer, Hans J A J; Becking, Leontine E

    2016-01-01

    Saba Bank, a submerged atoll in the Caribbean Sea with an area of 2,200 km2, has attained international conservation status due to the rich diversity of species that reside on the bank. In order to assess the role of Saba Bank as a potential reservoir of diversity for the surrounding reefs, we examined the population genetic structure, abundance and health status of two prominent benthic species, the coral Montastraea cavernosa and the sponge Xestospongia muta. Sequence data were collected from 34 colonies of M. cavernosa (nDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2; 892 bp) and 68 X. muta sponges (mtDNA I3-M11 partition of COI; 544 bp) on Saba Bank and around Saba Island, and compared with published data across the wider Caribbean. Our data indicate that there is genetic connectivity between populations on Saba Bank and the nearby Saba Island as well as multiple locations in the wider Caribbean, ranging in distance from 100s-1000s km. The genetic diversity of Saba Bank populations of M. cavernosa (π = 0.055) and X. muta (π = 0.0010) was comparable to those in other regions in the western Atlantic. Densities and health status were determined along 11 transects of 50 m2 along the south-eastern rim of Saba Bank. The densities of M. cavernosa (0.27 ind. m-2, 95% CI: 0.12-0.52) were average, while the densities of X. muta (0.09 ind. m-2, 95% CI: 0.02-0.32) were generally higher with respect to other Caribbean locations. No disease or bleaching was present in any of the specimens of the coral M. cavernosa, however, we did observe partial tissue loss (77.9% of samples) as well as overgrowth (48.1%), predominantly by cyanobacteria. In contrast, the majority of observed X. muta (83.5%) showed signs of presumed bleaching. The combined results of apparent gene flow among populations on Saba Bank and surrounding reefs, the high abundance and unique genetic diversity, indicate that Saba Bank could function as an important buffer for the region. Either as a natural source of larvae to replenish

  6. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The third-difference approach to modified Allan variance (MVAR) leads to a tractable formula for a measure of MVAR estimator confidence, the equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), in the presence of power-law phase noise. The effect of estimation stride on edf is tabulated. A simple approximation for edf is given, and its errors are tabulated. A theorem allowing conservative estimates of edf in the presence of compound noise processes is given.

  7. Heterogeneity of variances for carcass traits by percentage Brahman inheritance.

    PubMed

    Crews, D H; Franke, D E

    1998-07-01

    considered as a source of heterogeneity of variance. Genetic covariances estimated from the model accounting for heterogeneous variances resulted in genetic correlations of or near unity. These results suggest that different genetic values be considered for genetic evaluation of carcass yield and shear force traits from steers with different degrees of Brahman inheritance. PMID:9690635

  8. Neutrino mass without cosmic variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoVerde, Marilena

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the absolute scale of the neutrino masses is one of the most exciting opportunities available with near-term cosmological data sets. Two quantities that are sensitive to neutrino mass, scale-dependent halo bias b (k ) and the linear growth parameter f (k ) inferred from redshift-space distortions, can be measured without cosmic variance. Unlike the amplitude of the matter power spectrum, which always has a finite error, the error on b (k ) and f (k ) continues to decrease as the number density of tracers increases. This paper presents forecasts for statistics of galaxy and lensing fields that are sensitive to neutrino mass via b (k ) and f (k ). The constraints on neutrino mass from the auto- and cross-power spectra of spectroscopic and photometric galaxy samples are weakened by scale-dependent bias unless a very high density of tracers is available. In the high-density limit, using multiple tracers allows cosmic variance to be beaten, and the forecasted errors on neutrino mass shrink dramatically. In practice, beating the cosmic-variance errors on neutrino mass with b (k ) will be a challenge, but this signal is nevertheless a new probe of neutrino effects on structure formation that is interesting in its own right.

  9. Pathogenic Potential, Genetic Diversity, and Population Structure of Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from a Forest-Dominated Watershed (Comox Lake) in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Asit

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates (n = 658) obtained from drinking water intakes of Comox Lake (2011 to 2013) were screened for the following virulence genes (VGs): stx1 and stx2 (Shiga toxin-producing E. coli [STEC]), eae and the adherence factor (EAF) gene (enteropathogenic E. coli [EPEC]), heat-stable (ST) enterotoxin (variants STh and STp) and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) genes (enterotoxigenic E. coli [ETEC]), and ipaH (enteroinvasive E. coli [EIEC]). The only genes detected were eae and stx2, which were carried by 37.69% (n = 248) of the isolates. Only eae was harbored by 26.74% (n = 176) of the isolates, representing potential atypical EPEC strains, while only stx2 was detected in 10.33% (n = 68) of the isolates, indicating potential STEC strains. Moreover, four isolates were positive for both the stx2 and eae genes, representing potential EHEC strains. The prevalence of VGs (eae or stx2) was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the fall season, and multiple genes (eae plus stx2) were detected only in fall. Repetitive element palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) fingerprint analysis of 658 E. coli isolates identified 335 unique fingerprints, with an overall Shannon diversity (H′) index of 3.653. Diversity varied among seasons over the years, with relatively higher diversity during fall. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed that the majority of the fingerprints showed a tendency to cluster according to year, season, and month. Taken together, the results indicated that the diversity and population structure of E. coli fluctuate on a temporal scale, reflecting the presence of diverse host sources and their behavior over time in the watershed. Furthermore, the occurrence of potentially pathogenic E. coli strains in the drinking water intakes highlights the risk to human health associated with direct and indirect consumption of untreated surface water. PMID:25548059

  10. Heritable environmental variance causes nonlinear relationships between traits: application to birth weight and stillbirth of pigs.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Herman A; Hill, William G; Knol, Egbert F

    2015-04-01

    There is recent evidence from laboratory experiments and analysis of livestock populations that not only the phenotype itself, but also its environmental variance, is under genetic control. Little is known about the relationships between the environmental variance of one trait and mean levels of other traits, however. A genetic covariance between these is expected to lead to nonlinearity between them, for example between birth weight and survival of piglets, where animals of extreme weights have lower survival. The objectives were to derive this nonlinear relationship analytically using multiple regression and apply it to data on piglet birth weight and survival. This study provides a framework to study such nonlinear relationships caused by genetic covariance of environmental variance of one trait and the mean of the other. It is shown that positions of phenotypic and genetic optima may differ and that genetic relationships are likely to be more curvilinear than phenotypic relationships, dependent mainly on the environmental correlation between these traits. Genetic correlations may change if the population means change relative to the optimal phenotypes. Data of piglet birth weight and survival show that the presence of nonlinearity can be partly explained by the genetic covariance between environmental variance of birth weight and survival. The framework developed can be used to assess effects of artificial and natural selection on means and variances of traits and the statistical method presented can be used to estimate trade-offs between environmental variance of one trait and mean levels of others. PMID:25631318