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Sample records for dopamine depletion induces

  1. DOPAMINE DEPLETION SLOWS RETINAL TRANSMISSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In male hooded rats, depletion of norepinephrine and dopamine by a-methyl-paratyrosine (AMT) significantly increased the latencies of early peaks in flash-evoked potentials recorded from the visual cortex, lateral geniculate nucleus, and optic tract. These effects were not produc...

  2. Relationship between methamphetamine-induced dopamine release, hyperthermia, self-injurious behaviour and long term dopamine depletion in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Halladay, Alycia K; Kusnecov, Alexander; Michna, Lauri; Kita, Taizo; Hara, Chiaki; Wagner, George C

    2003-07-01

    Differential sensitivity to neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine on striatal dopaminergic neurones between C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice has been established. In the present studies, the interaction of methamphetamine-induced dopamine release, self-injurious behaviour, the neural immune response, and the long-term (3 day) dopamine depletion were examined in these strains after administration of 8 mg/kg methamphetamine. BALB/c mice showed increased hyperthermia compared to the C57BL/6 strain, as well as induction of interleukin-1beta. Additionally, homovanillic acid (HVA) levels, as well as HVA/DA turnover ratios were elevated in the striatum and frontal cortex of BALB/c mice, both compared to untreated mice and to the C57BL/6 strain after a single injection of methamphetamine. Pretreatment with acetaminophen eliminated the methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia in BALB/c mice and reduced body temperature in C57BL/6 mice. However, acetaminophen pretreatment did not affect any parameters of dopaminergic toxicity in the striatum or frontal cortex of the BALB/c strain following repeated methamphetamine injections. Furthermore, acetaminophen pretreatment did not alter the incidence of self-injurious behaviour in BALB/c mice. Therefore, hyperthermia and methamphetamine-induced toxicity appear to be independent phenomena while self-injurious behaviour may provide a better predictor of toxicity, which, in turn, may be related to dopamine release. PMID:12828572

  3. POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ORGANOTYPIC CO-CULTURES: EXPERIMENTAL DOPAMINE DEPLETION PREVENTS REDUCTIONS IN GABA

    PubMed Central

    Lyng, Gregory D.; Seegal, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that have been demonstrated to be toxic to the dopamine (DA) systems of the central nervous system. One proposed mechanism for PCB-induced DA neurotoxicity is inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT); such inhibition results in increased levels of unsequestered DA and DA metabolism leading to oxidative stress. We have used an organotypic co-culture system of developing rat striatum and ventral mesencephalon (VM) to determine whether alterations in the vesicular storage of DA, resulting from PCB exposure and consequent induction of oxidative stress, leads to GABA and DA neuronal dysfunction. 24 hr exposure to an environmentally relevant mixture of PCBs reduced tissue DA and GABA concentrations, increased medium levels of DA and measures of oxidative stress in both the striatum and VM. Alterations in neurochemistry and increases in measures of oxidative stress were blocked in the presence of n-acetylcysteine (NAC). Although NAC treatment did not alter PCB-induced changes in DA neurochemistry, it did protect against reductions in GABA concentration. To determine whether alterations in the vesicular storage of DA were responsible for PCB-induced oxidative stress and consequent reductions in GABA levels, we depleted DA from the co-cultures using α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT). AMPT reduced striatal and VM DA levels by 90% and 70%, respectively. PCB exposure, following DA depletion, neither increased levels of oxidative stress nor resulted in GABA depletion. These results suggest that PCB-induced alterations in the vesicular storage of DA, resulting in increased levels of unsequestered DA, leads to increased oxidative stress, depletion of tissue glutathione, and consequent reductions in tissue GABA concentrations. PMID:18262273

  4. Orbitofrontal Dopamine Depletion Upregulates Caudate Dopamine and Alters Behavior via Changes in Reinforcement Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, R. N.; Rygula, R.; Hong, Y. T.; Fryer, T. D.; Sawiak, S. J.; Ferrari, V.; Cockcroft, G.; Aigbirhio, F. I.; Robbins, T. W.; Roberts, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with upregulation of dopamine (DA) release in the caudate nucleus. The caudate has dense connections with the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) via the frontostriatal loops, and both areas exhibit pathophysiological change in schizophrenia. Despite evidence that abnormalities in dopaminergic neurotransmission and prefrontal cortex function co-occur in schizophrenia, the influence of OFC DA on caudate DA and reinforcement processing is poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that OFC dopaminergic dysfunction disrupts caudate dopamine function, we selectively depleted dopamine from the OFC of marmoset monkeys and measured striatal extracellular dopamine levels (using microdialysis) and dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding (using positron emission tomography), while modeling reinforcement-related behavior in a discrimination learning paradigm. OFC dopamine depletion caused an increase in tonic dopamine levels in the caudate nucleus and a corresponding reduction in D2/D3 receptor binding. Computational modeling of behavior showed that the lesion increased response exploration, reducing the tendency to persist with a recently chosen response side. This effect is akin to increased response switching previously seen in schizophrenia and was correlated with striatal but not OFC D2/D3 receptor binding. These results demonstrate that OFC dopamine depletion is sufficient to induce striatal hyperdopaminergia and changes in reinforcement learning relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:24872570

  5. The MAO-B inhibitor deprenyl reduces the oral tremor and the dopamine depletion induced by the VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine.

    PubMed

    Podurgiel, Samantha J; Yohn, Samantha E; Dortche, Kristina; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-02-01

    Tetrabenazine (TBZ) is prescribed for the treatment of chorea associated with Huntington's disease. Via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT-2), TBZ blocks dopamine (DA) storage and depletes striatal DA; this drug also has been shown to induce Parkinsonian motor side effects in patients. Recently, TBZ was shown to induce tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) in rats and mice. TJMs are an oral tremor that has many of the characteristics of Parkinsonian tremor in humans. The present study focused upon the ability of the well-established antiparkinsonian agent deprenyl to attenuate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of 2.0mg/kg TBZ. Deprenyl is a selective and irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-B, and administration of deprenyl produced a dose-related suppression of TBZ-induced TJMs. A second experiment employed in vivo microdialysis to examine extracellular DA levels in the ventrolateral striatum, the neostriatal region most closely associated with the production of TJMs, after administration of TBZ and deprenyl. Consistent with the behavioral data, TBZ alone produced a biphasic effect on extracellular DA, with an initial increases followed by a prolonged decrease during the period in which TJMs are displayed. Co-administration of deprenyl with TBZ increased DA levels compared to rats treated with TBZ alone. These results provide support for use of TBZ as a rodent model of Parkinsonism, and future studies should utilize this model to evaluate putative anti-Parkinsonian agents. PMID:26590367

  6. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  7. L-DOPA Reverses the Increased Free Amino Acids Tissue Levels Induced by Dopamine Depletion and Rises GABA and Tyrosine in the Striatum.

    PubMed

    Solís, Oscar; García-Sanz, Patricia; Herranz, Antonio S; Asensio, María-José; Moratalla, Rosario

    2016-07-01

    Perturbations in the cerebral levels of various amino acids are associated with neurological disorders, and previous studies have suggested that such alterations have a role in the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, the direct effects of chronic L-DOPA treatment, that produces dyskinesia, on neural tissue amino acid concentrations have not been explored in detail. To evaluate whether striatal amino acid concentrations are altered in peak dose dyskinesia, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian mice were treated chronically with L-DOPA and tissue amino acid concentrations were assessed by HPLC analysis. These experiments revealed that neither 6-OHDA nor L-DOPA treatment are able to alter glutamate in the striatum. However, glutamine increases after 6-OHDA and returns back to normal levels with L-DOPA treatment, suggesting increased striatal glutamatergic transmission with lack of dopamine. In addition, glycine and taurine levels are increased following dopamine denervation and restored to normal levels by L-DOPA. Interestingly, dyskinetic animals showed increased levels of GABA and tyrosine, while aspartate striatal tissue levels are not altered. Overall, our results indicate that chronic L-DOPA treatment, besides normalizing the altered levels of some amino acids after 6-OHDA, robustly increases striatal GABA and tyrosine levels which may in turn contribute to the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. PMID:26966009

  8. Effects of some antioxidative aporphine derivatives on striatal dopaminergic transmission and on MPTP-induced striatal dopamine depletion in B6CBA mice.

    PubMed

    Loghin, Felicia; Chagraoui, Abdeslam; Asencio, Marcelo; Comoy, Etienne; Speisky, Hernan; Cassels, Bruce K; Protais, Philippe

    2003-02-01

    (S)-(+)-boldine, an aporphine alkaloid displaying antioxidative and dopaminergic properties, and six of its derivatives (glaucine, 3-bromoboldine, 3-iodoboldine, 8-aminoboldine, 8-nitrosoboldine and 2,9-O,O'-dipivaloylboldine) were tested for these properties in comparison with their parent compound. All the tested compounds displayed in vitro antioxidative properties equal to or slightly weaker than those of boldine, and equal to or stronger than (+/-)-6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8,-tetramethylchromane-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox), a water-soluble vitamin E analogue, used as a reference compound. All the aporphine compounds tested displaced [3H]SCH 23390 and [3H]raclopride from their specific binding sites in rat striatum. When tested on dopamine (DA) metabolism in the striatum of B6CBA mice, all the compounds, except 8-aminoboldine, increased striatal levels of DOPAC and HVA, and the HVA/DA ratio, indicating that they cross the blood-brain barrier and that they seem to act as dopamine antagonists in vivo. B6CBA mice were sensitive to the neurotoxic action of MPTP on dopaminergic neurons as indicated by the strongly decreased striatal levels of DA, DOPAC and HVA following administration of MPTP (20 mg/kg, i.p.). Among these aporphine derivatives, only 3-bromoboldine was able to reduce the MPTP-induced decrease of striatal levels of DA and DOPAC, whereas (R)-apomorphine (5 mg/kg, s.c.) and acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg, i.p.), used as reference compounds, were very active. These data suggest that potent in vitro antioxidative properties and the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier are not sufficient criteria to predict the inhibition of neuronal degeneration induced by MPTP. PMID:12594006

  9. Effectiveness of γ-oryzanol in reducing neuromotor deficits, dopamine depletion and oxidative stress in a Drosophila melanogaster model of Parkinson's disease induced by rotenone.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Stífani Machado; de Paula, Mariane Trindade; Poetini, Marcia Rósula; Meichtry, Luana; Bortolotto, Vandreza Cardoso; Zarzecki, Micheli Stefani; Jesse, Cristiano Ricardo; Prigol, Marina

    2015-12-01

    The γ-orizanol present in rice bran oil contains a mix of steryl triterpenyl esters of ferulic acid, which is believed to be linked to its antioxidant potential. In this study we investigated the neuroprotective actions of γ-orizanol (ORY) against the toxicity induced by rotenone (ROT) in Drosophila melanogaster. The flies (both genders) aged between 1 and 5 days old were divided into four groups of 50 flies each: (1) control, (2) ORY 25 μM, (3) ROT 500 μM, (4) ORY 25 μM+ROT 500 μM. Flies were concomitantly exposed to a diet containing ROT and ORY for 7 days according to their respective groups. Survival and behavior analyses were carried out in vivo, and ex vivo analyses involved acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), determination of dopaminergic levels, cellular viability and mitochondrial viability, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), reactive species levels (RS), lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and contents of total thiols and non-proteic thiols (NPSH). Our results show for the first time that ORY not only acts as an endogenous activator of the cellular antioxidant defenses, but it also ameliorates rotenone induced mortality, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Our salient findings regarded the restoration of cholinergic deficits, dopamine levels and improved motor function provided by ORY. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective potential of ORY and that this effect can be potentially due to its antioxidant action. In conclusion, the present results show that ORY is effective in reducing the ROT induced toxicity in D. melanogaster, which showed a neuroprotective action, possibly due to the presence of the antioxidant constituents such as the ferulic acid. PMID:26366809

  10. Dopamine and norepinephrine depletion in ring doves fed DDE, dieldrin, and Aroclor 1254

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hill, E.F.; Contrera, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The levels of dopamine and norepinephrine were measured in one-half of the brain of ring doves fed a control diet or a diet containing 2, 20, or 200 ppm DDE; 1, 4, or 16 ppm dieldrin; or 1, 10, or 100 ppm Aroclor 1254. Levels of DDE, dieldrin, or Aroclor 1254 were determined in the other half of each brain. The intermediate and high levels of each chemical caused depletions in both neurotransmitters, and brain residues of each chemical were negatively correlated with levels of neurotransmitters. The highest concentrations of DDE, dieldrin, and Aroclor 1254 depressed averages of dopamine to 42.4, 41.4, and 45.2% of the control level and norepinephrine to 61.6, 62.0, and 56.9% of controls, respectively. Depletions of dopamine and norepinephrine could result in abnormal behavior of contaminated birds in the wild, and the detection of such depletions could become an important tool in assessing contaminant-induced behavioral aberrations in birds.

  11. Behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal is altered after prefrontocortical dopamine depletion in rats: monoaminergic correlates.

    PubMed

    Espejo, E F; Serrano, M I; Caillé, S; Stinus, L

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the effects of prefrontocortical dopamine depletion on opiate withdrawal and prefrontocortical neurochemical changes elicited by morphine dependence and withdrawal. The dopaminergic content was also measured in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal, in order to detect reactive changes induced by prefrontocortical lesion. Withdrawal was induced by naloxone in morphine-dependent rats. Monoamine levels were analyzed post-mortem by high performance liquid cromatography. The results showed that chronic morphine dependence did not modify basal levels of monoamines in sham rats, revealing neuroadaptation of prefrontocortical dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin systems to chronic morphine. The neuroadaptive phenomenon remained after prefrontocortical lesion (> 79% dopamine depletion). On the other hand, a strong increase of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin contents in the medial prefrontal cortex of sham rats was detected during opiate withdrawal. However, in lesioned rats, the increase of prefrontocortical dopamine and serotonin content, but not that of noradrenaline, was much lower. In the nucleus accumbens, prefrontocortical lesion reactively enhanced the dopaminergic tone and, although opiate withdrawal reduced dopaminergic activity in both sham and lesioned rats, this reduction was less intense in the latter group. At a behavioral level, some symptoms of physical opiate withdrawal were exacerbated in lesioned rats (writhing, mastication, teeth-chattering, global score) and exploration was reduced. The findings hence indicate that: (i) prefrontocortical monoaminergic changes play a role in the behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal; (ii) the severity of some withdrawal signs are related to the dopaminergic and serotonergic tone of the medial prefrontal cortex rather than to the noradrenergic one, and (iii) an inverse relationship between mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems exists. PMID:11425504

  12. Differential sensitivity of cranial and limb motor function to nigrostriatal dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Plowman, Emily K; Maling, Nicholas; Rivera, Benjamin J; Larson, Krista; Thomas, Nagheme J; Fowler, Stephen C; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Shrivastav, Rahul; Kleim, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-15

    The present study determined the differential effects of unilateral striatal dopamine depletion on cranial motor versus limb motor function. Forty male Long Evans rats were first trained on a comprehensive motor testing battery that dissociated cranial versus limb motor function and included: cylinder forepaw placement, single pellet reaching, vermicelli pasta handling; sunflower seed opening, pasta biting acoustics, and a licking task. Following baseline testing, animals were randomized to either a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (n=20) or control (n=20) group. Animals in the 6-OHDA group received unilateral intrastriatal 6-OHDA infusions to induce striatal dopamine depletion. Six-weeks following infusion, all animals were re-tested on the same battery of motor tests. Near infrared densitometry was performed on sections taken through the striatum that were immunohistochemically stained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Animals in the 6-OHDA condition showed a mean reduction in TH staining of 88.27%. Although 6-OHDA animals were significantly impaired on all motor tasks, limb motor deficits were more severe than cranial motor impairments. Further, performance on limb motor tasks was correlated with degree of TH depletion while performance on cranial motor impairments showed no significant correlation. These results suggest that limb motor function may be more sensitive to striatal dopaminergic depletion than cranial motor function and is consistent with the clinical observation that therapies targeting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in Parkinson's disease are more effective for limb motor symptoms than cranial motor impairments. PMID:23018122

  13. Selective Effects of Dopamine Depletion and L-DOPA Therapy on Learning-Related Firing Dynamics of Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ledia F.; Kubota, Yasuo; Hu, Dan; Howe, Mark W.; Lemaire, Nune; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite evidence that dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum is critical for learning as well as for movement control, little is yet known about how the learning-related dynamics of striatal activity are affected by dopamine depletion, a condition faced in Parkinson’s disease. We made localized intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in rats and recorded within the dopamine-depleted sensorimotor striatal zone and its contralateral correspondent as the animals learned a conditional maze task. Rather than producing global, non-specific elevations in firing rate across the task, the dopamine depletion altered striatal projection neuron activity and fast-spiking interneuron activity selectively, with sharply task-specific and cell-type specific effects, and often, with learning-stage selective effects as well. Striatal projection neurons with strong responses during the maze runs had especially elevated responsiveness during the maze runs. Projection neurons that, instead, fired most strongly prior to maze running showed elevated pre-start firing rates, but not during maze running, as learning progressed. The intrastriatal dopamine depletion severely affected the learning-related patterning of fast-spiking interneuron ensembles, especially during maze running and after extended training. Remarkably, L-DOPA treatment almost entirely reversed the depletion-induced elevations in pre-run firing of the projection neurons, and elevated their responses around start and end of maze runs. By contrast, L-DOPA failed to normalize fast-spiking interneuron activity. Thus the effects of striatal dopamine depletion and restoration on striatal activity are highly dependent not only on cell type, as previously shown, but also on the behavioral activity called for and the state of behavioral learning achieved. PMID:23486949

  14. Differential degradation of motor deficits during gradual dopamine depletion with 6-hydroxydopamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Willard, A M; Bouchard, R S; Gittis, A H

    2015-08-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a movement disorder whose cardinal motor symptoms arise due to the progressive loss of dopamine. Although this dopamine loss typically progresses slowly over time, currently there are very few animal models that enable incremental dopamine depletion over time within the same animal. This type of gradual dopamine depletion model would be useful in studies aimed at the prodromal phase of PD, when dopamine levels are pathologically low but motor symptoms have not yet presented. Utilizing the highly characterized neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), we have developed a paradigm to gradually deplete dopamine levels in the striatum over a user-defined time course - spanning weeks to months - in C57BL/6 mice. Dopamine depletions were achieved by administration of five low-dose injections (0.75μg) of 6-OHDA through an implanted intracranial bilateral cannula targeting the medial forebrain bundle. Levels of dopamine within the striatum declined linearly with successive injections, quantified using tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining and high-performance liquid chromatography. Behavioral testing was carried out at each time point to study the onset and progression of motor impairments as a function of dopamine loss over time. We found that spontaneous locomotion, measured in an open field, was robust until ∼70% of striatal dopamine was lost. Beyond this point, additional dopamine loss caused a sharp decline in motor performance, reaching a final level comparable to that of acutely depleted mice. Similarly, although rearing behavior was more sensitive to dopamine loss and declined linearly as a function of dopamine levels, it eventually declined to levels similar to those seen in acutely depleted mice. In contrast, motor coordination, measured on a vertical pole task, was only moderately impaired in gradually depleted mice, despite severe impairments observed in acutely depleted mice. These results demonstrate the importance of the temporal

  15. Sex-dependent changes in ADHD-like behaviors in juvenile rats following cortical dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Freund, Nadja; MacGillivilray, Heather T; Thompson, Britta S; Lukkes, Jodi L; Stanis, Jessica J; Brenhouse, Heather C; Andersen, Susan L

    2014-08-15

    Reduced cortical dopamine levels have been observed in individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Global dopamine depletions by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; with noradrenergic protection) in neonatal rats produces locomotor hyperactivity, with less known about how cortical depletion modulates risky behaviors. Here, we determined the effect of a medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) 6-OHDA depletions (30-60%) or sham microinjection at postnatal day 11 on behavior in male and female juvenile rats. Separate groups were studied for delay discounting (impulsive choice), novelty-preference, and preferences for cues and environments associated with cocaine (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg), their extinction, and reinstatement with place conditioning. Because PFC D1 receptors play a role in these behaviors, confocal microscopy was used to measure D1-immunoreactive projections to the nucleus accumbens core. Both 6-OHDA males and females increased delay discounting relative to sham controls, although only 6-OHDA females increased novelty preferences. Preferences for cocaine-associated environments, their extinction, and reinstatement with a priming dose of cocaine were reduced in 6-OHDA subjects overall. However, impulsive choice at 5s positively correlated with preferences for cocaine-associated environments in 6-OHDA subjects, but not sham controls. As possible compensation for low dopamine levels, D1-immunoreactivity on traced neurons increased in 6-OHDA females; dopamine levels did not remain low in adolescent 6-OHDA males and D1 did not change. We believe that these modest depletions restricted to the PFC demonstrate the role of dopamine, and not norepinephrine, in understanding these behaviors in other animal models where cortical dopamine is reduced during development. PMID:24861711

  16. The presence of perforated synapses in the striatum after dopamine depletion, is this a sign of maladaptive brain plasticity?

    PubMed

    Anaya-Martínez, Verónica; Gutierrez-Valdez, Ana Luisa; Ordoñez-Librado, Jose Luis; Montiel-Flores, Enrique; Sánchez-Betancourt, Javier; Sánchez Vázquez del Mercado, César; Reynoso-Erazo, Leonardo; Tron-Alvarez, Rocío; Avila-Costa, Maria Rosa

    2014-12-01

    Synaptic plasticity is the process by which long-lasting changes take place at synaptic connections. The phenomenon itself is complex and can involve many levels of organization. Some authors separate forms into adaptations that have positive or negative consequences for the individual. It has been hypothesized that an increase in the number of synapses may represent a structural basis for the enduring expression of synaptic plasticity during some events that involve memory and learning; also, it has been suggested that perforated synapses increase in number after some diseases and experimental situations. The aim of this study was to analyze whether dopamine depletion induces changes in the synaptology of the corpus striatum of rats after the unilateral injection of 6-OHDA. The findings suggest that after the lesion, both contralateral and ipsilateral striata exhibit an increased length of the synaptic ending in ipsilateral (since third day) and contralateral striatum (since Day 20), loss of axospinous synapses in ipsilateral striatum and a significant increment in the number of perforated synapses, suggesting brain plasticity that might be deleterious for the spines, because this type of synaptic contacts are presumably excitatory, and in the absence of the modulatory effects of dopamine, the neuron could die through excitotoxic mechanisms. Thus, we can conclude that the presence of perforated synapses after striatal dopamine depletion might be a form of maladaptive synaptic plasticity. PMID:25246608

  17. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI—LC–MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte. PMID:26182429

  18. The effect of striatal dopamine depletion on striatal and cortical glutamate: A mini-review.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Gerretsen, Philip; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the interplay between the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate in the striatum has become the highlight of several theories of neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia. Using in vivo brain imaging in humans, alterations in dopamine and glutamate concentrations have been observed in several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear a priori how alterations in striatal dopamine should modulate glutamate concentrations in the basal ganglia. In this selective mini-review, we examine the consequence of reducing striatal dopamine functioning on glutamate concentrations in the striatum and cortex; regions of interest heavily examined in the human brain imaging studies. We examine the predictions of the classical model of the basal ganglia, and contrast it with findings in humans and animals. The review concludes that chronic dopamine depletion (>4months) produces decreases in striatal glutamate levels which are consistent with the classical model of the basal ganglia. However, acute alterations in striatal dopamine functioning, specifically at the D2 receptors, may produce opposite affects. This has important implications for models of the basal ganglia and theorizing about neurochemical alterations in neuropsychiatric diseases. Moreover, these findings may help guide a priori hypotheses for (1)H-MRS studies measuring glutamate changes given alterations in dopaminergic functioning in humans. PMID:26334687

  19. Dopamine Depletion Reduces Food-Related Reward Activity Independent of BMI.

    PubMed

    Frank, Sabine; Veit, Ralf; Sauer, Helene; Enck, Paul; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Unholzer, Theresa; Bauer, Ute-Maria; Linder, Katarzyna; Heni, Martin; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert

    2016-05-01

    Reward sensitivity and possible alterations in the dopaminergic-reward system are associated with obesity. We therefore aimed to investigate the influence of dopamine depletion on food-reward processing. We investigated 34 female subjects in a randomized placebo-controlled, within-subject design (body mass index (BMI)=27.0 kg/m(2) ±4.79 SD; age=28 years ±4.97 SD) using an acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion drink representing dopamine depletion and a balanced amino acid drink as the control condition. Brain activity was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging during a 'wanting' and 'liking' rating of food items. Eating behavior-related traits and states were assessed on the basis of questionnaires. Dopamine depletion resulted in reduced activation in the striatum and higher activation in the superior frontal gyrus independent of BMI. Brain activity during the wanting task activated a more distributed network than during the liking task. This network included gustatory, memory, visual, reward, and frontal regions. An interaction effect of dopamine depletion and the wanting/liking task was observed in the hippocampus. The interaction with the covariate BMI was significant in motor and control regions but not in the striatum. Our results support the notion of altered brain activity in the reward and prefrontal network with blunted dopaminergic action during food-reward processing. This effect is, however, independent of BMI, which contradicts the reward-deficiency hypothesis. This hints to the hypothesis suggesting a different or more complex mechanism underlying the dopaminergic reward function in obesity. PMID:26450814

  20. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Caitlin B.; Keyes, Alexandra; Renwick, Bethany; Leyton, Marco; Campbell, Iain C.; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17) and healthy controls (HC, n = 15) were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR) exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN. PMID:26808920

  1. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Reinforcing Value of Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Caitlin B; Keyes, Alexandra; Renwick, Bethany; Leyton, Marco; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether dopaminergic systems are involved in the motivation to engage in behaviours associated with anorexia nervosa (AN), specifically, the drive to exercise. Women recovered from AN (AN REC, n = 17) and healthy controls (HC, n = 15) were recruited. The acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion (APTD) method was used to transiently decrease dopamine synthesis and transmission. The effect of dopamine precursor depletion on drive to exercise was measured using a progressive ratio (PR) exercise breakpoint task. Both groups worked for the opportunity to exercise, and, at baseline, PR breakpoint scores were higher in AN REC than HC. Compared to values on the experimental control session, APTD did not decrease PR breakpoint scores in AN REC, but significantly decreased scores in HC. These data show that women recovered from AN are more motivated to exercise than HC, although in both groups, activity is more reinforcing than inactivity. Importantly, decreasing dopamine does not reduce the motivation to exercise in people recovered from AN, but in contrast, does so in HC. It is proposed that in AN, drive to exercise develops into a behaviour that is largely independent of dopamine mediated reward processes and becomes dependent on cortico-striatal neurocircuitry that regulates automated, habit- or compulsive-like behaviours. These data strengthen the case for the involvement of reward, learning, habit, and dopaminergic systems in the aetiology of AN. PMID:26808920

  2. Dopamine toxicity in neuroblastoma cells: role of glutathione depletion by L-BSO and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Stokes, A H; Lewis, D Y; Lash, L H; Jerome, W G; Grant, K W; Aschner, M; Vrana, K E

    2000-03-01

    Dopamine (DA), while an essential neurotransmitter, is also a known neurotoxin that potentially plays an etiologic role in several neurodegenerative diseases. DA metabolism and oxidation readily produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DA can also be oxidized to a reactive quinone via spontaneous, enzyme-catalyzed or metal-enhanced reactions. A number of these reactions are cytotoxic, yet the precise mechanisms by which DA leads to cell death remain unknown. In this study, the neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-SH, was utilized to examine DA toxicity under varying oxidant states. Cells pretreated with the glutathione (GSH)-depleting compound, L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO), exhibited enhanced sensitivity to DA compared to controls (non-GSH-depleted cells). Furthermore, in cells pretreated with L-BSO, the addition of ascorbate (250 microM) afforded significant protection against DA-induced toxicity, while pyruvate (500 microM) had no protective effect. To further characterize the possibility that DA is associated with oxidative stress, additional studies were carried out with manganese (30 microM) as a pro-oxidant. Manganese and DA (200 microM), although not cytotoxic when individually administered to SK-N-SH cells, had a synergistic action on cytotoxicity. Finally, morphological and molecular markers of programmed cell death (apoptosis) were observed in cells treated with DA and L-BSO. These markers included membrane blebbing and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. These results suggest that DA toxicity is tightly linked to intracellular oxidant/antioxidant levels, and that environmental factors, such as excessive Mn exposure, may modulate cellular sensitivity to DA. PMID:10700589

  3. Orbitofrontal or accumbens dopamine depletion does not affect risk-based decision making in rats.

    PubMed

    Mai, Bettina; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Considerable evidence has implicated dopamine (DA) signals in target regions of midbrain DA neurons such as the medial prefrontal cortex or the core region of the nucleus accumbens in controlling risk-based decision-making. However, to date little is known about the contribution of DA in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the medial shell region of the nucleus accumbens (AcbS) to risk-based decision-making. Here we examined in rats the effects of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced DA depletions of the OFC and AcbS on risky choice using an instrumental two-lever choice task that requires the assessment of fixed within-session reward probabilities that were shifted across subsequent sessions, i.e., rats had to choose between two levers, a small/certain lever that delivered one certain food reward (one pellet at p = 1) and a large/risky lever that delivered a larger uncertain food reward with decreasing probabilities across subsequent sessions (four pellets at p = 0.75, 0.5, 0.25, 0.125, 0.0625). Results show that systemic administration of amphetamine or cocaine increased the preference for the large/risky lever. Results further demonstrate that, like sham controls, rats with OFC or AcbS DA depletion were sensitive to changes in probabilities for obtaining the large/risky reward across sessions and displayed probabilistic discounting. These findings point to the view that the basal capacity to evaluate the magnitude and likelihood of rewards associated with alternative courses of action as well as long-term changes of reward probabilities does not rely on DA input to the AcbS or OFC. PMID:25860659

  4. Acute dopamine depletion with branched chain amino acids decreases auditory top-down event-related potentials in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Andres H; Goldberg, Terry E; Hassoun, Youssef; Bates, John A; Nassauer, Katharine W; Sevy, Serge; Opgen-Rhein, Carolin; Malhotra, Anil K

    2009-06-01

    Cerebral dopamine homeostasis has been implicated in a wide range of cognitive processes and is of great pathophysiological importance in schizophrenia. A novel approach to study cognitive effects of dopamine is to deplete its cerebral levels with branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) that acutely lower dopamine precursor amino acid availability. Here, we studied the effects of acute dopamine depletion on early and late attentive cortical processing. Auditory event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3 were investigated using high-density electroencephalography in 22 healthy male subjects after receiving BCAAs or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Total free serum prolactin was also determined as a surrogate marker of cerebral dopamine depletion. Acute dopamine depletion increased free plasma prolactin and significantly reduced prefrontal ERP components N2 and P3. Subcomponent analysis of N2 revealed a significant attenuation of early attentive N2b over prefrontal scalp sites. As a proof of concept, these results strongly suggest that BCAAs are acting on basic information processing. Dopaminergic neurotransmission seems to be involved in auditory top-down processing as indexed by prefrontal N2 and P3 reductions during dopamine depletion. In healthy subjects, intact early cortical top-down processing can be acutely dysregulated by ingestion of BCAAs. We discuss the potential impact of these findings on schizophrenia research. PMID:19356906

  5. Striatal Dopamine Depletion Patterns and Early Non-Motor Burden in Parkinsons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Jung; Ham, Jee Hyun; Ye, Byoung Seok; Lee, Phil Hyu; Sohn, Young H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanism underlying non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we hypothesized that Parkinson patients with more non-motor symptoms have a different pattern of striatal dopamine depletion, particularly in areas other than the sensorimotor striatum, compared to those with fewer non-motor symptoms. Methods We conducted a prospective survey of the degree of non-motor symptoms (using the Korean version of the Non-Motor Symptoms Scale; K-NMSS) in 151 patients with early-stage Parkinson’s disease who had undergone a dopamine transporter PET scan as an initial diagnostic procedure. We classified the patients into two groups; high non-motor patients (HNM-PD; K-NMSS score ≥ 41) and low non-motor patients (LNM-PD). Results Patients in the HNM-PD group (n = 71) were older, had longer symptom duration, exhibited more severe motor deficits, and had been prescribed higher levodopa-equivalent doses at follow-up than those in the LNM-PD group. However, dopamine transporter binding to the striatal sub-regions and inter-sub-regional binding ratios were comparable between the two groups. A general linear model showed that the HNM-PD group had significantly more severe motor deficits than the LNM-PD group after controlling for age, gender, symptom duration, and dopamine transporter binding to the sensorimotor striatum. Conclusions This study demonstrated that the pattern of striatal dopamine depletion does not contribute to early non-motor burden in Parkinson’s disease. Our results suggest that LNM-PD patients may have a more benign course of motor symptom progression than HNM-PD patients. PMID:27529171

  6. Levodopa Reverses Cytokine-Induced Reductions in Striatal Dopamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Carla R.; Miller, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies using neuroimaging and in vivo microdialysis in humans and nonhuman primates indicate that inflammatory cytokines such as interferon-alpha reduce dopamine release in the ventral striatum in association with depressive symptoms including anhedonia and psychomotor slowing. Methods: Herein, we examined whether reduced striatal dopamine release in rhesus monkeys chronically treated with interferon-alpha can be restored by administration of the dopamine precursor levodopa via reverse in vivo microdialysis. Results: Levodopa completely reversed interferon-alpha–induced reductions in striatal dopamine release. No changes were found in the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid to dopamine ratio, which increases when unpackaged dopamine is metabolized via monoamine oxidase. Conclusions: These findings suggest that inflammatory cytokines reduce the availability of dopamine precursors without affecting end-product synthesis or vesicular packaging and/or release and provide the foundation for future studies investigating therapeutic strategies that facilitate availability of dopamine precursors to improve depressive symptoms in patient populations with increased inflammation. PMID:25638816

  7. Impact of partial dopamine depletion on cognitive flexibility in BDNF heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Vinay; Naughton, Sean X.; Yegla, Brittney; Guzman, Dawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Cognitive flexibility is a key component of executive function and is disrupted in major psychiatric disorders. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) exerts neuromodulatory effects on synaptic transmission and cognitive/affective behaviors. However the causal mechanisms linking BDNF hypofunction with executive deficits are not well understood. Objectives Here, we assessed the consequences of BDNF hemizygosity on cognitive flexibility in mice performing an operant conditioning task. As dopaminergic-glutamatergic interaction in the striatum is important for cognitive processing, and BDNF heterozygous (BDNF+/−) mice display a higher dopamine tone in the dorsal striatum, we also assessed the effects of partial striatal dopamine depletion on task performance and glutamate release. Results BDNF+/− mice acquired discrimination learning as well as new rule learning during set-shifting as efficiently as wild-type mice. However, partial removal of striatal dopaminergic inputs with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) impaired these cognitive processes by impeding the maintenance of a new learning strategy in both genotypes. BDNF mutants exhibited performance impairments during reversal learning and these deficits were associated with increased perseveration to the previously acquired strategy. Partial dopamine depletion of the striatum reversed these cognitive impairments. Additionally, reduction in depolarization-evoked glutamate release noted in the dorsal striatum of BDNF+/− mice was not observed in 6-OHDA-infused BDNF mutants indicating normalization of glutamatergic transmission in these animals. Conclusions Our data illustrate that BDNF signaling regulates cognitive control processes presumably by maintaining striatal dopamine-glutamate balance. Moreover, aberrations in BDNF signaling may act as a common neurobiological substrate that accounts for executive dysfunction observed in multiple psychiatric conditions. PMID:26861892

  8. Neural correlates of sleepiness induced by catecholamine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Noah; Fromm, Stephen; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Drevets, Wayne C.; Hasler, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Although extensive indirect evidence exists to suggest that the central dopaminergic system plays a significant role in the modulation of arousal, the functional effect of the dopaminergic influence on the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle remains unclear. Thirteen healthy volunteers and 15 unmedicated subjects with a history of major depressive disorder underwent catecholamine depletion (CD) using oral alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. The main outcome measures in both sessions were sleepiness (Stanford-Sleepiness-Scale), cerebral glucose metabolism (positron emission tomography), and serum prolactin concentration. CD consistently induced clinically relevant sleepiness in both groups (p<0.0001). The CD-induced prolactin increase correlated with CD-induced sleepiness (r=0.71, p<0.0001) but not with CD-induced mood and anxiety symptoms (p≥0.2). CD-induced sleepiness correlated with CD-induced increases in metabolism in the medial and orbital frontal cortex, bilateral superior temporal cortex, left insula, cingulate motor area and in the vicinity of the periaqueductal gray. This study suggests that the association between dopamine depletion and sleepiness is independent of the brain reward system and the risk for depression. The visceromotor system, the cingulate motor area, the periaqueductal gray and the caudal hypothalamus may mediate the impact of the dopaminergic system on regulation of wakefulness and sleep. PMID:21872452

  9. Dopamine and food reward: effects of acute tyrosine/phenylalanine depletion on appetite.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Charlotte A; Herbert, Vanessa M B; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Munafò, Marcus R; Rogers, Peter J

    2012-03-20

    It has been suggested that obese individuals over-eat in order to compensate for deficits in the dopaminergic reward system. The current study used acute tyrosine/phenylalanine depletion (ATPD) to investigate the effect of reduced dopamine function on appetite and the reward value of food in healthy volunteers. The compensatory-eating hypothesis would predict an increase in the reward value and consumption of food following depletion by this method. In a double-blind, counterbalanced, crossover study, 17 male participants (mean age=29.2 (SEM=2.7) years; mean body mass index=24.4 (SEM=0.6) kg/m(2)) were administered with a tyrosine/phenylalanine-free mixture (TYR/PHE-free; depletion condition) and a balanced amino acid mixture (BAL; control). Plasma amino acid levels were measured at baseline and peak depletion (300 min). Appetite, willingness to pay for food, liking, desired portion size and ad libitum food intake were also assessed. The TYR/PHE-free mixture was associated with significant decreases in tyrosine, phenylalanine, and the ratio of tyrosine+phenylalanine to the other large neutral amino acids (all p<.001). There were no effects on our measures of willingness to pay for food or liking. However, in the TYR/PHE-free condition, participants reported significantly lower levels of hunger following a fixed-test meal relative to the BAL condition. In conclusion, we found no evidence for compensatory eating following ATPD. Our results also provide support for the role of dopamine in motivational components of eating. PMID:22230253

  10. Depletion of nucleus accumbens dopamine leads to impaired reward and aversion processing in mice: Relevance to motivation pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, Giorgio; Sigrist, Hannes; Ferger, Boris; Singewald, Nicolas; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, particularly the ventral tegmental area-nucleus accumbens (VTA-NAcc) projection, underlies reward and aversion processing, and deficient DA function could underlie motivational impairments in psychiatric disorders. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection is an established method for chronic DA depletion, principally applied in rat to study NAcc DA regulation of reward motivation. Given the increasing focus on studying environmental and genetic regulation of DA function in mouse models, it is important to establish the effects of 6-OHDA DA depletion in mice, in terms of reward and aversion processing. This mouse study investigated effects of 6-OHDA-induced NAcc DA depletion using the operant behavioural test battery of progressive ratio schedule (PRS), learned non-reward (LNR), learned helplessness (LH), treadmill, and in addition Pavlovian fear conditioning. 6-OHDA NAcc DA depletion, confirmed by ex vivo HPLC-ED, reduced operant responding: for gustatory reward under effortful conditions in the PRS test; to a stimulus recently associated with gustatory non-reward in the LNR test; to escape footshock recently experienced as uncontrollable in the LH test; and to avoid footshock by physical effort in the treadmill test. Evidence for specificity of effects to NAcc DA was provided by lack of effect of medial prefrontal cortex DA depletion in the LNR and LH tests. These findings add significantly to the evidence that NAcc DA is a major regulator of behavioural responding, particularly at the motivational level, to both reward and aversion. They demonstrate the suitability of mouse models for translational study of causation and reversal of pathophysiological DA function underlying motivation psychopathologies. PMID:27036890

  11. Cytosolic Sulfotransferase 1A3 Is Induced by Dopamine and Protects Neuronal Cells from Dopamine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sidharthan, Neelima P.; Minchin, Rodney F.; Butcher, Neville J.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine neurotoxicity is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, and neurons utilize several mechanisms, including uptake and metabolism, to protect them from injury. Metabolism of dopamine involves three enzymes: monoamine oxidase, catechol O-methyltransferase, and sulfotransferase. In primates but not lower order animals, a sulfotransferase (SULT1A3) is present that can rapidly metabolize dopamine to dopamine sulfate. Here, we show that SULT1A3 and a closely related protein SULT1A1 are highly inducible by dopamine. This involves activation of the D1 and NMDA receptors. Both ERK1/2 phosphorylation and calcineurin activation are required for induction. Pharmacological agents that inhibited induction or siRNA targeting SULT1A3 significantly increased the susceptibility of cells to dopamine toxicity. Taken together, these results show that dopamine can induce its own metabolism and protect neuron-like cells from damage, suggesting that SULT1A3 activity may be a risk factor for dopamine-dependent neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24136195

  12. Mesocortical dopamine depletion and anxiety-related behavior in the rat: sex and hemisphere differences.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, R M; Dufresne, M M; Siontas, D; Chehab, S; Townsend, J; Laplante, F

    2014-10-01

    The mesocortical dopamine (DA) system of the rat plays an important role in prefrontal cortex (PFC) regulation of stress and emotion and exhibits functional hemispheric asymmetry for such processing. Since few studies examine sex differences in this context, we compared the effects of left vs. right unilateral PFC DA depletion in males and females in several behavioral situations associated with anxiety or aversion. Adult rats received unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or vehicle in the ventromedial (vm) PFC. Behavioral tests included a predator odor burying test, elevated plus maze and sucrose consumption with simple taste aversion. Tissue analysis confirmed that vmPFCs injected with 6-OHDA were depleted of DA (75-85%) compared to controls. Burying behavior and sucrose consumption were affected only by left lesions, similarly in both sexes. However, risk assessment behaviors were affected by right lesions in opposite directions in males and females. Behaviors modified preferentially by the left cortex thus showed less evidence of sex differences than those modulated by the right. While mesocortical DA depletion effects are lateralized, the nature of these effects can vary with sex and specific behavior. Such findings may be clinically significant, given the large gender differences in the incidence of mood and anxiety disorders, which also show many lateralized prefrontal abnormalities. PMID:24819821

  13. Scoliosis in rats with experimentally-induced hemiparkinsonism: dependence upon striatal dopamine denervation.

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Marschitz, M; Utsumi, H; Ungerstedt, U

    1990-01-01

    Rats suffering from experimental hemiparkinsonism induced by a unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the left area ventralis tegmenti showed a strong ipsilateral deviation and scoliosis-like skeletal deformity. The rats often showed single rotatory curves affecting the thoracic and lumbar regions, although cases with multiple curves were also found. The severity of the scoliosis was closely related to a decrease in extracellular striatal dopamine measured with microdialysis and to the development of postsynaptic dopamine receptor supersensitivity, functionally evaluated with rotational behaviour elicited with apomorphine. Indeed, rats with the strongest dopamine depletion (greater than 95%) and the strongest rotational responses showed the sharpest spinal deviation and skeletal deformity. These findings agree with the clinical observations that scoliosis occurs in patients with Parkinson's disease and its direction is correlated with the side of the major signs and symptoms of parkinsonism. Images PMID:2303830

  14. Age Moderates the Effect of Acute Dopamine Depletion on Passive Avoidance Learning

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, Mary Katherine; Boettiger, Charlotte Ann

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive links between reinforcement-based learning and dopamine (DA), studies to date have not found consistent effects of acute DA reduction on reinforcement learning in both men and women. Here, we tested the effects of reducing DA on reward- and punishment-based learning using the deterministic passive avoidance learning (PAL) task We tested 16 (5 female) adults (ages 22–40) in a randomized, cross-over design to determine whether reducing global DA by administering an amino acid beverage deficient in the DA precursors, phenylalanine and tyrosine (P/T[−]), would affect performance on the PAL task. We found that P/T[−] beverage effects on PAL performance were modulated by age. In particular, we found that P/T depletion significantly improved learning from punishment with increasing participant age. Participants committed 1.49 fewer passive avoidance errors per additional year of age (95% CI, −0.71 – −2.27, r=−0.74, p=0.001). Moreover, in this small sample, P/T depletion improved learning from punishment in adults (ages 26–40) while it impaired learning from punishment in emerging adults (ages 22–25). We observed similar, but non-significant trends in learning from reward. While there was no overall effect of P/T-depletion on reaction time (RT), there was a relationship between the effect of P/T depletion on PAL performance and RT; those who responded more slowly on the P/T[−] beverage also made more errors on the P/T[−] beverage. When P/T-depletion slowed RT after a correct response, there was a worsening of PAL task performance; there was no similar relationship for the RT after an incorrect response and PAL task performance. Moreover, among emerging adults, changes in mood on the P/T[−] beverage negatively correlated with learning from reward on the P/T[−] beverage. Together, we found that both reward- and punishment-based learning are sensitive to central catecholamine levels, and that these effects of acute DA reduction vary

  15. RASGRF2 regulates alcohol-induced reinforcement by influencing mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity and dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, David; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Easton, Alanna C.; Longueville, Sophie; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Büchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia J.; Desrivières, Sylvane; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Palkovits, Miklós; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruggeri, Barbara; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael N.; Staehlin, Oliver; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Mameli, Manuel; Müller, Christian P.; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Schumann, Gunter

    2012-01-01

    The firing of mesolimbic dopamine neurons is important for drug-induced reinforcement, although underlying genetic factors remain poorly understood. In a recent genome-wide association metaanalysis of alcohol intake, we identified a suggestive association of SNP rs26907 in the ras-specific guanine-nucleotide releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene, encoding a protein that mediates Ca2+-dependent activation of the ERK pathway. We performed functional characterization of this gene in relation to alcohol-related phenotypes and mesolimbic dopamine function in both mice and adolescent humans. Ethanol intake and preference were decreased in Rasgrf2−/− mice relative to WT controls. Accordingly, ethanol-induced dopamine release in the ventral striatum was blunted in Rasgrf2−/− mice. Recording of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area revealed reduced excitability in the absence of Ras-GRF2, likely because of lack of inhibition of the IA potassium current by ERK. This deficit provided an explanation for the altered dopamine release, presumably linked to impaired activation of dopamine neurons firing. Functional neuroimaging analysis of a monetary incentive–delay task in 663 adolescent boys revealed significant association of ventral striatal activity during reward anticipation with a RASGRF2 haplotype containing rs26907, the SNP associated with alcohol intake in our previous metaanalysis. This finding suggests a link between the RASGRF2 haplotype and reward sensitivity, a known risk factor for alcohol and drug addiction. Indeed, follow-up of these same boys at age 16 y revealed an association between this haplotype and number of drinking episodes. Together, these combined animal and human data indicate a role for RASGRF2 in the regulation of mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity, reward response, and alcohol use and abuse. PMID:23223532

  16. RASGRF2 regulates alcohol-induced reinforcement by influencing mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity and dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Stacey, David; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Easton, Alanna C; Longueville, Sophie; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Büchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia J; Desrivières, Sylvane; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Bokde, Arun L W; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Palkovits, Miklós; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruggeri, Barbara; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael N; Staehlin, Oliver; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Sommer, Wolfgang H; Mameli, Manuel; Müller, Christian P; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Schumann, Gunter

    2012-12-18

    The firing of mesolimbic dopamine neurons is important for drug-induced reinforcement, although underlying genetic factors remain poorly understood. In a recent genome-wide association metaanalysis of alcohol intake, we identified a suggestive association of SNP rs26907 in the ras-specific guanine-nucleotide releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene, encoding a protein that mediates Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the ERK pathway. We performed functional characterization of this gene in relation to alcohol-related phenotypes and mesolimbic dopamine function in both mice and adolescent humans. Ethanol intake and preference were decreased in Rasgrf2(-/-) mice relative to WT controls. Accordingly, ethanol-induced dopamine release in the ventral striatum was blunted in Rasgrf2(-/-) mice. Recording of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area revealed reduced excitability in the absence of Ras-GRF2, likely because of lack of inhibition of the I(A) potassium current by ERK. This deficit provided an explanation for the altered dopamine release, presumably linked to impaired activation of dopamine neurons firing. Functional neuroimaging analysis of a monetary incentive-delay task in 663 adolescent boys revealed significant association of ventral striatal activity during reward anticipation with a RASGRF2 haplotype containing rs26907, the SNP associated with alcohol intake in our previous metaanalysis. This finding suggests a link between the RASGRF2 haplotype and reward sensitivity, a known risk factor for alcohol and drug addiction. Indeed, follow-up of these same boys at age 16 y revealed an association between this haplotype and number of drinking episodes. Together, these combined animal and human data indicate a role for RASGRF2 in the regulation of mesolimbic dopamine neuron activity, reward response, and alcohol use and abuse. PMID:23223532

  17. Lack of evidence for reduced prefrontal cortical serotonin and dopamine efflux after acute tryptophan depletion

    PubMed Central

    Meerkerk, Dorie (T). J.; Lieben, Cindy K. J.; Blokland, Arjan; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is a widely used method to study the role of serotonin (5-HT) in affect and cognition. ATD results in a strong but transient decrease in plasma tryptophan and central 5-HT synthesis and availability. Although its use is widespread, the evidence that the numerous functional effects of ATD are caused by actual changes in 5-HT neuronal release is not very strong. Thus far, decreases in 5-HT efflux (thought to reflect synaptic release) were only reported after chronic tryptophan depletion or when ATD was combined with blockade of 5-HT reuptake. Objective With the current experiment, we aimed to study the validity of the method of ATD by measuring the extent to which it reduces the efflux of 5-HT (and dopamine) in the prefrontal cortex in the absence of reuptake blockage. Materials and methods We simultaneously measured in freely moving animals plasma tryptophan via a catheter in the jugular vein and 5-HT and DA efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex through microdialysis after ATD treatment. Results ATD reduced plasma tryptophan to less than 30% of control, without affecting 5-HT or DA efflux in the prefrontal cortex, indicating that even strong reductions of plasma tryptophan do not necessarily result in decreases in central 5-HT efflux. Conclusion The present experiment showed that reductions in plasma tryptophan, similar to values associated with behavioural effects, do not necessarily reduce 5-HT efflux and suggest that the cognitive and behavioural effects of ATD may not be (exclusively) due to alterations in 5-HT release. PMID:17713760

  18. Relative contributions of severe dopaminergic neuron ablation and dopamine depletion to cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R Garrett; Gibbs, Jeffrey T; Melief, Erica J; Postupna, Nadia O; Sherfield, Emily E; Wilson, Angela; Keene, C Dirk; Montine, Thomas J; Palmiter, Richard D; Darvas, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons and produces a movement disorder and cognitive impairment that becomes more extensive with the duration of the disease. To what extent cognitive impairment in advanced PD can be attributed to severe loss of dopamine (DA) signaling is not well understood. Furthermore, it is unclear if the loss of DA neurons contributes to the cognitive impairment caused by the reduction in DA signaling. We generated genetic mouse models with equally severe chronic loss of DA achieved by either extensive ablation of DA neurons or inactivation of DA synthesis from preserved neurons and compared their motor and cognitive performance. Motor behaviors were equally blunted in both models, but we observed that DA neuron ablation caused more severe cognitive deficits than DA depletion. Both models had marked deficits in cue-discrimination learning. Yet, deficits in cue-discrimination learning were more severe in mice with DA neuron ablation and only mice with DA neuron ablation had drastically impaired performance in spatial learning, spatial memory and object memory tests. These results indicate that while a severe reduction in DA signaling results in motor and cognitive impairments, the loss of DA neurons promotes more extensive cognitive deficits and suggest that a loss of additional factors that depend on DA neurons may participate in the progressive cognitive decline found in patients with PD. PMID:26079646

  19. A SINGLE HIGH DOSE OF METHAMPHETAMINE INCREASES COCAINE SELF-ADMINISTRATION BY DEPLETION OF STRIATAL DOPAMINE IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    XI, Z.-X.; KLEITZ, H. K.; DENG, X.; LADENHEIM, B.; PENG, X.-Q.; LI, X.; GARDNER, E. L.; STEIN, E. A.; CADET, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Psychostimulant addicts often take high doses of drugs, and high doses of psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (METH) are neurotoxic to striatal dopamine (DA) terminals. Yet, the effects of high doses of METH on drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior have not been examined. In the present study, we found that single high doses of METH in rats (10–20 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased cocaine self-administration under fixed-ratio 2 (FR2) reinforcement conditions, while higher doses (40 mg/kg×1 or 10 mg/kg/2 h×4) caused high mortality among rats maintained on daily cocaine self-administration. The increased cocaine self-administration appeared to be a compensatory response to reduced cocaine reward after METH, because the same doses of METH caused a dose-dependent reduction both in “breakpoint” levels for cocaine self-administration under progressive-ratio reinforcement and in nucleus accumbens DA response to acute cocaine. Further, METH (10–20 mg/kg) produced large DA release (4000%–6000% over baseline), followed by a significant reduction in striatal DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) contents, but without significant changes in striatal DA transporter levels. These findings suggest that the present high doses of METH caused striatal DA depletion or hypofunction without severe damage in DA terminals, which may contribute to the increased cocaine-taking behavior observed in the present study. Provided that the present doses of METH may mimic METH overdose incidents in humans, the present findings suggest that METH-induced DA depletion or neurotoxicity may lead to an increase in subsequent drug-taking and drug-seeking behavior. PMID:19336247

  20. A single high dose of methamphetamine increases cocaine self-administration by depletion of striatal dopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Xi, Z-X; Kleitz, H K; Deng, X; Ladenheim, B; Peng, X-Q; Li, X; Gardner, E L; Stein, E A; Cadet, J L

    2009-06-30

    Psychostimulant addicts often take high doses of drugs, and high doses of psychostimulants such as methamphetamine (METH) are neurotoxic to striatal dopamine (DA) terminals. Yet, the effects of high doses of METH on drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior have not been examined. In the present study, we found that single high doses of METH in rats (10-20 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased cocaine self-administration under fixed-ratio 2 (FR2) reinforcement conditions, while higher doses (40 mg/kgx1 or 10 mg/kg/2 hx4) caused high mortality among rats maintained on daily cocaine self-administration. The increased cocaine self-administration appeared to be a compensatory response to reduced cocaine reward after METH, because the same doses of METH caused a dose-dependent reduction both in "break-point" levels for cocaine self-administration under progressive-ratio reinforcement and in nucleus accumbens DA response to acute cocaine. Further, METH (10-20 mg/kg) produced large DA release (4000%-6000% over baseline), followed by a significant reduction in striatal DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) contents, but without significant changes in striatal DA transporter levels. These findings suggest that the present high doses of METH caused striatal DA depletion or hypofunction without severe damage in DA terminals, which may contribute to the increased cocaine-taking behavior observed in the present study. Provided that the present doses of METH may mimic METH overdose incidents in humans, the present findings suggest that METH-induced DA depletion or neurotoxicity may lead to an increase in subsequent drug-taking and drug-seeking behavior. PMID:19336247

  1. Ascorbate depletion as a consequence of product recycling during dopamine. beta. -monooxygenase catalyzed selenoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    May, S.W.; Herman, H.H.; Roberts, S.F.; Ciccarello, M.C.

    1987-03-24

    The competence of dopamine ..beta..-monooxygenase (DBM) to process selenide substrates was investigated, in anticipation that the expected selenoxide products would exhibit unique reactivity and redox properties. The prototypical selenide phenyl 2-aminoethyl selenide (PAESe) was synthesized and shown to be a substrate for DBM with the characteristic e/O/sub 2/ ratio of 2:1 for monooxygenation. The kinetic parameters for oxygenation of PAESe were found to be similar to those for the DBM-catalyzed sulfoxidation of the cognate sulfide phenyl 2-aminoethyl sulfide, and selenoxidation was stimulated by fumarate in a manner similar to other well-characterized DBM monooxygenation reactions. Identification of phenyl 2-aminoethyl selenoxide (PAESeO) as the enzymatic product was accomplished by the demonstration of coincident elution of authentic PAESeO with the enzymatic product in three significantly different HPLC systems. PAESeO was found to oxidize ascorbic acid with the concomitant and stoichiometric reduction of PAESeO back to the selenide, PAESe. As a consequence of this nonenzymatic reaction, ascorbate-supported DBM turnover was prematurely terminated under standard assay conditions due to depletion of reduced ascorbate. The kinetics of the redox reaction between PAESeO and ascorbate were investigated with a spectrophotometric assay of ascorbate at 300 nm, and a second-order rate constant of 3.4 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ was determined at pH 5.0, 25/sup 0/C. Spectrophotometric assay of cytochrome c (cyt c) reduction at 550 nm during the oxidation of ascorbate by PAESeO demonstrated that no cyt c trappable semidehydroascorbate was produced in this nonenzymatic reaction.

  2. Rat Globus Pallidus Neurons: Functional Classification and Effects of Dopamine Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Karain, Brad; Xu, Dan; Bellone, John A.; Hartman, Richard E.; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The rat globus pallidus (GP) is homologous to the primate GP externus. Studies with injectable anesthetics suggest that GP neurons can be classified into Type-I and Type-II cells based on extracellularly recorded spike shape, or positively coupled (PC), negatively coupled (NC), and uncoupled (UC) cells based on functional connectivity with the cortex. In this study, we examined the electrophysiology of rat GP neurons using the inhalational anesthetic isoflurane which offers more constant and easily regulated levels of anesthesia than injectable anesthetics. In 130 GP neurons recorded using small-tip glass electrodes (<1 μm), all but one fired Type-II spikes (positive/negative waveform). Type-I cells were unlikely to be inhibited by isoflurane since all GP neurons also fired Type-II spikes under ketamine-induced anesthesia. When recorded with large-tip electrodes (~2 μm), however, over 70% of GP neurons exhibited Type-I spikes (negative/positive waveform). These results suggest that the spike shape, recorded extracellularly, varies depending on the electrode used and is not reliable in distinguishing Type-I and Type-II neurons. Using dual-site recording, 40% of GP neurons were identified as PC cells, 17.5% NC cells, and 42.5% UC cells. The three subtypes also differed significantly in firing rate and pattern. Lesions of dopamine neurons increased the number of NC cells, decreased that of UC cells, and significantly shifted the phase relationship between PC cells and the cortex. These results support the presence of GP neuron subtypes and suggest that each subtype plays a different role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25196543

  3. Deficits in a lateralized associative learning task in dopamine-depleted rats with functional recovery by dopamine-rich transplants.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Eilís; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2004-10-01

    Experimental therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD) are commonly validated in unilateral animal models using simple tests of motor asymmetry such as rotation, stepping and cylinder tests. However, the human disorder is considerably more complex than this, and alternative tests that permit a more complete evaluation of the efficacy and mechanism of action of novel treatments are needed. In this study, an operant task that assesses the selection, initiation and execution of lateralized movements was used to investigate the effects of embryonic dopamine cell transplants in the unilateral medial forebrain bundle (MFB) lesion model of PD. Lesioned Lister Hooded rats had a pronounced contralateral selection and initiation deficit, as well as an impairment in execution of movements bilaterally. They also attempted fewer trials and made more procedural errors than unlesioned rats. Transplantation of fetal dopaminergic neurons to the striatum led to a marked improvement in specific parameters and a more modest improvement in others. The graft improved the contralateral selection deficit and the execution of movements bilaterally, but had no effect on the initiation of contralateral movements. Transplanted rats also attempted more trials and made fewer errors. In contrast, the more commonly used stepping and cylinder tests revealed no functional effect of the graft. This data suggests that this operant task may be a powerful tool for validating and elucidating the mechanism of action of experimental brain repair therapies prior to entering the clinic. PMID:15380018

  4. Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonists induce neurotrophic effects on mesencephalic dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Du, Fang; Li, Rui; Huang, Yuangui; Li, Xuping; Le, Weidong

    2005-11-01

    Anti-parkinsonian agents, pramipexole (PPX) and ropinirole (ROP), have been reported to possess neuroprotective properties, both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms underlying neuroprotection afforded by the D3-preferring receptor agonists remain poorly understood. The present study demonstrates that incubation of primary mesencephalic cultures with PPX and ROP or the conditioned medium from PPX- or ROP-treated primary cultures induced a marked increase in the number of dopamine (DA) neurons in the cultures. Similar effects can be observed after incubating with the conditioned medium derived from PPX- and ROP-treated substantia nigra astroglia. Meanwhile, PPX and ROP can protect the primary cells from insult of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), the active metabolite of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Furthermore, the neurotrophic effects of PPX and ROP on mesencephalic dopamine neurons could be significantly blocked by D3 receptor antagonist, but not by D2 receptor antagonist. Moreover, we found that the levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the conditioned medium of mesencephalic cultures treated with PPX and ROP were significantly increased. Blocking GDNF and BDNF with the neutralizing antibodies, the neurotrophic effects of PPX and ROP were greatly diminished. These results suggest that D3 dopamine receptor-preferring agonists, PPX and ROP, exert neurotrophic effects on cultured DA neurons by modulating the production of endogenous GDNF and BDNF, which may participate in their neuroprotection. PMID:16307585

  5. Dopamine and Pain Sensitivity: Neither Sulpiride nor Acute Phenylalanine and Tyrosine Depletion Have Effects on Thermal Pain Sensations in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Susanne; Ceko, Marta; Louis-Foster, Mytsumi; Elfassy, Nathaniel M.; Leyton, Marco; Shir, Yoram; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Based on animal studies and some indirect clinical evidence, dopamine has been suggested to have anti-nociceptive effects. Here, we investigated directly the effects of increased and decreased availability of extracellular dopamine on pain perception in healthy volunteers. In Study 1, participants ingested, in separate sessions, a placebo and a low dose of the centrally acting D2-receptor antagonist sulpiride, intended to increase synaptic dopamine via predominant pre-synaptic blockade. No effects were seen on thermal pain thresholds, tolerance, or temporal summation. Study 2 used the acute phenylalanine and tyrosine depletion (APTD) method to transiently decrease dopamine availability. In one session participants ingested a mixture that depletes the dopamine amino acid precursors, phenylalanine and tyrosine. In the other session they ingested a nutritionally balanced control mixture. APTD led to a small mood-lowering response following aversive thermal stimulation, but had no effects on the perception of cold, warm, or pain stimuli. In both studies the experimental manipulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission was successful as indicated by manipulation checks. The results contradict proposals that dopamine has direct anti-nociceptive effects in acute experimental pain. Based on dopamine’s well-known role in reward processing, we hypothesize that also in the context of pain, dopamine acts on stimulus salience and might play a role in the initiation of avoidance behavior rather than having direct antinociceptive effects in acute experimental pain. PMID:24236199

  6. Dopamine induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages in rat C6 glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Tian; Wang, Chenlong; Chen, Xuewei; Duan, Chenfan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jing; Chai, Hongyan; Tang, Tian; Chen, Honglei; Yue, Jiang; Li, Ying; Yang, Jing

    2015-07-15

    Dopamine (DA), a monoamine catecholamine neurotransmitter with antiangiogenic activity, stabilizes tumor vessels in colon, prostate and ovarian cancers, thus increases chemotherapeutic efficacy. Here, in the rat C6 glioma models, we investigated the vascular normalization effects of DA and its mechanisms of action. DA (25, 50 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth, while a precursor of DA (levodopa) prolonged the survival time of rats bearing orthotopic C6 glioma. DA improved tumor perfusion, with significant effects from day 3, and a higher level at days 5 to 7. In addition, DA decreased microvessel density and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression in tumor tissues, while increasing the coverage of pericyte. Conversely, an antagonist of dopamine receptor 2 (DR2) (eticlopride) but not DR1 (butaclamol) abrogated DA-induced tumor regression and vascular normalization. Furthermore, DA improved the delivery and efficacy of temozolomide therapy. Importantly, DA increased representative M1 markers (iNOS, CXCL9, etc.), while decreasing M2 markers (CD206, arginase-1, etc.). Depletion of macrophages by clodronate or zoledronic acid attenuated the effects of DA. Notably, DA treatment induced M2-to-M1 polarization in RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages, and enhanced the migration of pericyte-like cells (10T1/2), which was reversed by eticlopride or DR2-siRNA. Such changes were accompanied by the downregulation of VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling. In summary, DA induces growth inhibition and vascular normalization through reprogramming M2-polarized macrophages. Thus, targeting the tumor microvasculature by DA represents a promising strategy for human glioma therapy. - Highlights: • Dopamine induces tumor growth inhibition and vascular normalization in rat C6 glioma. • Dopamine switches macrophage phenotype from M2 to M1. • Dopamine-induced vascular normalization is mediated by macrophage polarization. • Dopamine is a promising agent targeting the microvasculature in tumor

  7. Effects of mesolimbic dopamine depletion on responding maintained by cocaine and food.

    PubMed Central

    Caine, S B; Koob, G F

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that mesolimbic dopamine is selectively involved in cocaine reinforcement was investigated in the rat. Animals were trained under a multiple schedule in which responding was reinforced by intravenous cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/injection) or food (45-mg pellets) under fixed-ratio 15 schedule requirements in alternate 30-min components of a 2-hr daily session. Infusion of the catecholaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine, but not the vehicle solution, into the region of the nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle produced selective reductions in cocaine self-administration without significantly altering responding maintained by food within the same sessions. This effect was reproduced in intact animals by substituting saline for cocaine in the self-administration component. These results support the hypothesis that the reinforcing effects of cocaine are dependent upon mesolimbic dopamine and demonstrate that cocaine self-administration can be disrupted in animals without altering behavior maintained by a nondrug reinforcer. PMID:8169570

  8. Protein disulfide isomerase mediates glutathione depletion-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazushi; Fukui, Masayuki; Zhu, Bao-Ting

    2016-08-26

    Glutathione depletion is a distinct cause underlying many forms of pathogenesis associated with oxidative stress and cytotoxicity. Earlier studies showed that glutamate-induced glutathione depletion in immortalized murine HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ultimately cell death, but the precise mechanism underlying these processes is not clear. Here we show that during the induction of glutathione depletion, nitric oxide (NO) accumulation precedes ROS accumulation. While neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in untreated HT22 cells exists mostly as a monomer, glutathione depletion results in increased formation of the dimer nNOS, accompanied by increases in the catalytic activity. We identified that nNOS dimerization is catalyzed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). Inhibition of PDI's isomerase activity effectively abrogates glutathione depletion-induced conversion of monomer nNOS into dimer nNOS, accumulation of NO and ROS, and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we found that PDI is present in untreated cells in an inactive S-nitrosylated form, which becomes activated following glutathione depletion via S-denitrosylation. These results reveal a novel role for PDI in mediating glutathione depletion-induced oxidative cytotoxicity, as well as its role as a valuable therapeutic target for protection against oxidative cytotoxicity. PMID:27317486

  9. Neuroprotection by pramipexole against dopamine- and levodopa-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zou, L; Jankovic, J; Rowe, D B; Xie, W; Appel, S H; Le, W

    1999-01-01

    Pramipexole, a novel non-ergoline dopamine (DA) agonist, has been applied successfully for treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). We report here that pramipexole can protect dopaminergic cell line Mes23.5 against dopamine- and levodopa-induced cytotoxicity possibly through a mechanism related to antioxidant activity. In the MES 23.5 cultures, DA and L-DOPA induce a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity, as determined by tetrazolium salt and trypan blue assays. Furthermore, an in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase assay demonstrates that DA-induced cell death is apoptotic. Pretreatment with pramipexole in a concentration range (4-100 microM) significantly attenuates DA- or L-DOPA-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis, an action which is not blocked by D3 antagonist U-99194 A or D2 antagonist raclopride. Pramipexole also protects MES 23.5 cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. In cell-free system, pramipexole can effectively inhibit the formation of melanin, an end product resulting from DA or L-DOPA oxidation. These results indicate that pramipexole exerts its neuroprotective effect possibly through a mechanism, which is independent of DA receptors but related to antioxidation or scavenging of free radicals (e.g. hydrogen peroxide). As a direct DA agonist and potentially neuroprotective agent, pramipexole remains attractive in the treatment of PD. PMID:10227583

  10. Overexpression of the dopamine D3 receptor in the rat dorsal striatum induces dyskinetic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cote, Samantha R; Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Bleickardt, Carina; Sapru, Hreday N; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2014-04-15

    L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID) are motor side effects associated with treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). The etiology of LID is not clear; however, studies have shown that the dopamine D3 receptor is upregulated in the basal ganglia of mice, rats and non-human primate models of LID. It is not known if the upregulation of D3 receptor is a cause or result of LID. In this paper we tested the hypothesis that overexpression of the dopamine D3 receptor in dorsal striatum, in the absence of dopamine depletion, will elicit LID. Replication-deficient recombinant adeno-associated virus-2 expressing the D3 receptor or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were stereotaxically injected, unilaterally, into the dorsal striatum of adult rats. Post-hoc immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ectopic expression of the D3 receptor was limited to neurons near the injection sites in the dorsal striatum. Following a 3-week recovery period, rats were administered saline, 6 mg/kg L-DOPA, 0.1 mg/kg PD128907 or 10 mg/kg ES609, i.p., and motor behaviors scored. Rats overexpressing the D3 receptor specifically exhibited contralateral axial abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) following administration of L-DOPA and PD128907 but not saline or the novel agonist ES609. Daily injection of 6 mg/kg L-DOPA to the rats overexpressing the D3 receptor also caused increased vacuous chewing behavior. These results suggest that overexpression of the D3 receptor in the dorsal striatum results in the acute expression of agonist-induced axial AIMs and chronic L-DOPA-induced vacuous chewing behavior. Agonists such as ES609 might provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat dyskinesia. PMID:24462727

  11. Altered expression and subcellular distribution of GRK subtypes in the dopamine-depleted rat basal ganglia is not normalized by L-DOPA treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M. Rafiuddin; Bychkov, Evgeny; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Benovic, Jeffrey L.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulation of dopamine (DA) receptors is believed to underlie Parkinson’s disease pathology and L-DOPA-induced motor complications. DA receptors are subject to regulation by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins. DA lesion with 6-hydroxydopamine caused multiple protein- and brain region-specific changes in the expression of GRKs. In the globus pallidus, all four GRK isoforms (GRK2, 3, 5, 6) were reduced in the lesioned hemisphere. In the caudal caudate-putamen (cCPu) three GRK isoforms (GRK2, 3, 6) were decreased by DA depletion. The decrease in GRK proteins in globus pallidus, but not cCPu, was mirrored by reduction in mRNA. GRK3 protein was reduced in the rostral caudate-putamen (rCPu), whereas other isoforms were either unchanged or up-regulated. GRK6 protein and mRNA were up-regulated in rCPu and nucleus accumbens. L-DOPA (25 mg/kg, twice daily for 10 days) failed to reverse changes caused by DA depletion, whereas D2/D3 agonist pergolide (0.25 mg/kg daily for 10 days) restored normal levels of expression of GRK5 and 6. In rCPu, GRK2 protein was increased in most subcellular fractions by L-DOPA but not by DA depletion alone. Similarly, L-DOPA up-regulated arrestin3 in membrane fractions in both regions. GRK5 was down-regulated by L-DOPA in cCPu in the light membrane fraction, where this isoform is the most abundant. The data suggest that alterations in the expression and subcellular distribution of arrestins and GRKs contribute to pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease. Thus, these proteins may be targets for antiparkinsonian therapy. PMID:17996024

  12. Dopamine depletion affects communicative intentionality in Parkinson's disease patients: Evidence from action kinematics.

    PubMed

    Straulino, Elisa; Scaravilli, Tomaso; Castiello, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate communication is at the heart of successful, healthy social interactions in humans. Deficits in social communication are a hallmark of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Yet, very little research has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms underlying these issues. It has been suggested that dopamine is a candidate neurotransmitter system involved in stimulating communication in individuals that are not highly motivated to communicate. A typical model to study dopaminergic dysfunctions in humans is represented by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, who show motor, cognitive and motivational symptoms. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of social communication on actions in non-demented PD patients receiving dopamine replacement therapy (Levodopa = l-Dopa) and in neurologically healthy control participants. Patients' ability to modulate motor patterning depending on the communicative intention motivating the action to be performed was evaluated both in "on" (with l-Dopa) and "off" (without l-Dopa) states. In two main conditions, participants were requested to reach towards, grasp an object, and either simply lift it (individual condition) or lift it with the intent to communicate a meaning to a partner (communicative condition). Movements' kinematics was recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results indicate that kinematics is sensitive to communicative intention and that l-Dopa treatment has positive effects on translating communicative intentions into specific motor patterns in PD patients. Although the to-be-grasped object remained the same both the controls and the PD patients in an 'on' state adopted different kinematic patterning for the 'individual' and the 'communication' conditions. The PD patients in the 'off' state, instead, were unable to kinematically differentiate between the two conditions. We contend that social and communicative impairments are associated with abnormalities in

  13. Cyclooxygenase-independent neuroprotective effects of aspirin against dopamine quinone-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Masato; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Kikkawa, Yuri; Kimoto, Naotaka; Takeshima, Mika; Murakami, Shinki; Miyoshi, Ko

    2012-09-01

    Prostaglandin H synthase exerts not only cyclooxygenase activity but also peroxidase activity. The latter activity of the enzyme is thought to couple with oxidation of dopamine to dopamine quinone. Therefore, it has been proposed that cyclooxygenase inhibitors could suppress dopamine quinone formation. In the present study, we examined effects of various cyclooxygenase inhibitors against excess methyl L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced quinoprotein (protein-bound quinone) formation and neurotoxicity using dopaminergic CATH.a cells. The treatment with aspirin inhibited excess methyl L-DOPA-induced quinoprotein formation and cell death. However, acetaminophen did not show protective effects, and indomethacin and meloxicam rather aggravated these methyl L-DOPA-induced changes. Aspirin and indomethacin did not affect the level of glutathione that exerts quenching dopamine quinone in dopaminergic cells. In contrast with inhibiting effects of higher dose in the previous reports, relatively lower dose of aspirin that affected methyl L-DOPA-induced quinoprotein formation and cell death failed to prevent cyclooxygenase-induced dopamine chrome generation in cell-free system. Furthermore, aspirin but not acetaminophen or meloxicam showed direct dopamine quinone-scavenging effects in dopamine-semiquinone generating systems. The present results suggest that cyclooxygenase shows little contribution to dopamine oxidation in dopaminergic cells and that protective effects of aspirin against methyl L-DOPA-induced dopamine quinone neurotoxicity are based on its cyclooxygenase-independent property. PMID:22674083

  14. Depletion induced clustering of red blood cells in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-11-01

    The flow properties of blood are determined by the physical properties of its main constituents, the red blood cells (RBC's). At low shear rates RBC's form aggregates, so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates can break them up and the viscosity of blood shows a shear thinning behavior. The physical origin of the rouleaux formation is not yet fully resolved and there are two competing models available. One predicts that the adhesion is induced by bridging of the plasma (macromolecular) proteins in-between two RBC's. The other is based on the depletion effect and thus predicts the absence of macromolecules in-between the cells of a rouleaux. Recent single cell force measurements by use of an AFM support strongly the depletion model. By varying the concentration of Dextran at different molecular weights we can control the adhesions strength. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the depletion induced adhesion strength.

  15. Synergistic effects of melatonin and deprenyl against MPTP-induced mitochondrial damage and DA depletion.

    PubMed

    Khaldy, Hoda; Escames, Germaine; León, Josefa; Bikjdaouene, Leila; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies showed a synergistic effect of melatonin and deprenyl against dopamine (DA) autoxidation in vitro. Since oxidative stress is implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD), we explored the effects of melatonin plus deprenyl administration in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD in C57/Bl6 mice. Melatonin, but not deprenyl prevents the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I and the oxidative damage in nigrostriatal neurons induced by MPTP. With the dose used deprenyl recovers 50% DA levels and tyrosine hydroxylase activity depressed by the neurotoxin, normalizing locomotor activity of mice. Melatonin, which was unable to counteract MPTP-induced DA depletion and inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase activity, potentiates the effect of deprenyl on catecholamine turnover and mice ambulatory activity. These results suggest a dissociation of complex I inhibition from DA depletion in this model of Parkinson's disease. The data also support that a combination of melatonin, which improves mitochondrial electron transport chain and reduces oxidative damage, and deprenyl, which promotes the specific function of the rescued neurons, i.e. DA turnover, may be a promising strategy for the treatment of PD. PMID:12600724

  16. Reduced vocal variability in a zebra finch model of dopamine depletion: implications for Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Julie E; Hafzalla, George W; Burkett, Zachary D; Fox, Cynthia M; White, Stephanie A

    2015-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) modulates the activity of basal ganglia circuitry important for motor control in a variety of species. In songbirds, DA underlies motivational behavior including reproductive drive and is implicated as a gatekeeper for neural activity governing vocal variability. In the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, DA levels increase in Area X, a song-dedicated subregion of the basal ganglia, when a male bird sings his courtship song to a female (female-directed; FD). Levels remain stable when he sings a less stereotyped version that is not directed toward a conspecific (undirected; UD). Here, we used a mild dose of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to reduce presynaptic DA input to Area X and characterized the effects on FD and UD behaviors. Immunoblots were used to quantify levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) as a biomarker for DA afferent loss in vehicle- and 6-OHDA-injected birds. Following 6-OHDA administration, TH signals were lower in Area X but not in an adjacent subregion, ventral striatal-pallidum (VSP). A postsynaptic marker of DA signaling was unchanged in both regions. These observations suggest that effects were specific to presynaptic afferents of vocal basal ganglia. Concurrently, vocal variability was reduced during UD but not FD song. Similar decreases in vocal variability are observed in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), but the link to DA loss is not well-understood. The 6-OHDA songbird model offers a unique opportunity to further examine how DA loss in cortico-basal ganglia pathways affects vocal control. PMID:26564062

  17. Reduced vocal variability in a zebra finch model of dopamine depletion: implications for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Julie E; Hafzalla, George W; Burkett, Zachary D; Fox, Cynthia M; White, Stephanie A

    2015-11-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) modulates the activity of basal ganglia circuitry important for motor control in a variety of species. In songbirds, DA underlies motivational behavior including reproductive drive and is implicated as a gatekeeper for neural activity governing vocal variability. In the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, DA levels increase in Area X, a song-dedicated subregion of the basal ganglia, when a male bird sings his courtship song to a female (female-directed; FD). Levels remain stable when he sings a less stereotyped version that is not directed toward a conspecific (undirected; UD). Here, we used a mild dose of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to reduce presynaptic DA input to Area X and characterized the effects on FD and UD behaviors. Immunoblots were used to quantify levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) as a biomarker for DA afferent loss in vehicle- and 6-OHDA-injected birds. Following 6-OHDA administration, TH signals were lower in Area X but not in an adjacent subregion, ventral striatal-pallidum (VSP). A postsynaptic marker of DA signaling was unchanged in both regions. These observations suggest that effects were specific to presynaptic afferents of vocal basal ganglia. Concurrently, vocal variability was reduced during UD but not FD song. Similar decreases in vocal variability are observed in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), but the link to DA loss is not well-understood. The 6-OHDA songbird model offers a unique opportunity to further examine how DA loss in cortico-basal ganglia pathways affects vocal control. PMID:26564062

  18. The Effects of Acute Dopamine Precursor Depletion on the Cognitive Control Functions of Performance Monitoring and Conflict Processing: An Event-Related Potential (ERP) Study

    PubMed Central

    Primosch, Mark; Leyton, Marco; Steffensen, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Studies using medications and psychiatric populations implicate dopamine in cognitive control and performance monitoring processes. However, side effects associated with medication or studying psychiatric groups may confound the relationship between dopamine and cognitive control. To circumvent such possibilities, we utilized a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design wherein participants were administered a nutritionally-balanced amino acid mixture (BAL) and an amino acid mixture deficient in the dopamine precursors tyrosine (TYR) and phenylalanine (PHE) on two separate occasions. Order of sessions was randomly assigned. Cognitive control and performance monitoring were assessed using response times (RT), error rates, the N450, an event-related potential (ERP) index of conflict monitoring, the conflict slow potential (conflict SP), an ERP index of conflict resolution, and the error-related negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe), ERPs associated with performance monitoring. Participants were twelve males who completed a Stroop color-word task while ERPs were collected four hours following acute PHE and TYR depletion (APTD) or balanced (BAL) mixture ingestion in two separate sessions. N450 and conflict SP ERP amplitudes significantly differentiated congruent from incongruent trials, but did not differ as a function of APTD or BAL mixture ingestion. Similarly, ERN and Pe amplitudes showed significant differences between error and correct trials that were not different between APTD and BAL conditions. Findings indicate that acute dopamine precursor depletion does not significantly alter cognitive control and performance monitoring ERPs. Current results do not preclude the role of dopamine in these processes, but suggest that multiple methods for dopamine-related hypothesis testing are needed. PMID:26492082

  19. Hyperthermia induced by the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SK&F38393 in combination with the dopamine D2 receptor agonist talipexole in the rat.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, M; Yamada, K; Kimura, H; Matsumoto, S; Furukawa, T

    1992-12-01

    The present experiments were performed to investigate the effects of dopamine D1 receptor agonists given alone or in combination with dopamine D2 receptor agonists on body temperature in rats. The selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist, 1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,8-diol (SK&F38393), produced hyperthermia. However, the dopamine D2 receptor agonist, B-HT 920 (talipexole), and the newly synthesized dopamine D2 receptor agonist, (S)-2-amino-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-6-propylamino-benzothiazole (SND 919), did not change the temperature. Interestingly, the SK&F38393-induced hyperthermia was enhanced by talipexole and SND 919. The drastic hyperthermia induced by combined administration of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor agonists was blocked by either the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390, or the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, spiperone. On the other hand, treatment with prazosin, yohimbine, propranolol, scopolamine, or methysergide failed to affect the marked hyperthermia. The present results suggest that a functional link between dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may be synergistic in the regulation of body temperature and that concurrent stimulation of both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors thereby produces marked hyperthermia in the rat. PMID:1361996

  20. Ammonia Induces Autophagy through Dopamine Receptor D3 and MTOR

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Wenchao; Liu, Juanjuan; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Hong; Liu, Jing; Eggert, Ulrike S.; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is frequently seen in tumor microenvironments as well as in liver diseases where it can lead to severe brain damage or death. Ammonia induces autophagy, a mechanism that tumor cells may use to protect themselves from external stresses. However, how cells sense ammonia has been unclear. Here we show that culture medium alone containing Glutamine can generate milimolar of ammonia at 37 degrees in the absence of cells. In addition, we reveal that ammonia acts through the G protein-coupled receptor DRD3 (Dopamine receptor D3) to induce autophagy. At the same time, ammonia induces DRD3 degradation, which involves PIK3C3/VPS34-dependent pathways. Ammonia inhibits MTOR (mechanistic target of Rapamycin) activity and localization in cells, which is mediated by DRD3. Therefore, ammonia has dual roles in autophagy: one to induce autophagy through DRD3 and MTOR, the other to increase autophagosomal pH to inhibit autophagic flux. Our study not only adds a new sensing and output pathway for DRD3 that bridges ammonia sensing and autophagy induction, but also provides potential mechanisms for the clinical consequences of hyperammonemia in brain damage, neurodegenerative diseases and tumors. PMID:27077655

  1. Depletion-induced structure and dynamics in bimodal colloidal suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, M.; Sandy, A. R.; Narayanan, S.

    2011-05-03

    Combined small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy studies of moderately concentrated bimodal hard-sphere colloidal suspensions in the fluid phase show that depletion-induced demixing introduces spatially heterogeneous dynamics with two distinct time scales. The adhesive nature, as well as the mobility, of the large particles is determined by the level of interaction within the monomodal domains. This interaction is driven by osmotic forces, which are governed by the relative concentration of the constituents.

  2. Alcohol-induced alterations in dopamine modulation of prefrontal activity.

    PubMed

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Chandler, L Judson

    2015-12-01

    Long-term alcohol use leads to persistent cognitive deficits that may be associated with maladaptive changes in the neurocircuitry that mediates executive functions. Impairments caused by these changes can persist well into abstinence and have a negative impact on quality of life and job performance, and can increase the probability of relapse. Many of the changes that affect cognitive function appear to involve dysregulation of the mesocortical dopamine system. This includes changes in dopamine release and alterations in dopamine receptor expression and function in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). This review summarizes the cellular effects of acute and chronic ethanol exposure on dopamine release and dopamine receptor function in the PFC with the goal of providing greater understanding of the effects of alcohol-use disorders on the dopamine system and how this relates to deficits in the executive function of the PFC. PMID:26558348

  3. PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Restall, Ian J; Parolin, Doris A E; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Simard, Manon A; Fitzpatrick, Megan E; Kumar, Ritesh; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a tumor suppressor mechanism where cells enter a permanent growth arrest following cellular stress. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is induced in non-malignant cells following the expression of an oncogene or inactivation of a tumor suppressor. Previously, we have shown that protein kinase C iota (PKCι) depletion induces cellular senescence in glioblastoma cells in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Here we demonstrate that senescent glioblastoma cells exhibit an aberrant centrosome morphology. This was observed in basal levels of senescence, in p21-induced senescence, and in PKCι depletion-induced senescence. In addition, senescent glioblastoma cells are polyploid, Ki-67 negative and arrest at the G1/S checkpoint, as determined by expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. These markers are all consistent with cells that have undergone mitotic slippage. Failure of the spindle assembly checkpoint to function properly can lead to mitotic slippage, resulting in the premature exit of mitotic cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Although in G1, these cells have the replicated DNA and centrosomal phenotype of a cell that has entered mitosis and failed to divide. Overall, we demonstrate that PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of markers of mitotic slippage directly in senescent cells by co-staining for senescence-associated β-galactosidase and immunofluorescence markers in the same cell population. We suggest that markers of mitotic slippage be assessed in future studies of senescence to determine the extent of mitotic slippage in the induction of cellular senescence. PMID:26208522

  4. Relationship between cocaine-induced subjective effects and dopamine transporter occupancy

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fischman, M.; Wang, G.J.

    1997-05-01

    The ability of cocaine to occupy the dopamine transporter has been linked to its reinforcing properties. However, such a relationship has not been demonstrated in humans. Methods: Positron Emission Tomography and [C-11]cocaine were used to estimate dopamine transporter occupancies after different doses of cocaine in 18 active cocaine abusers. The ratio of the distribution volume of [C-11]cocaine in striatum to that in cerebellum, which corresponds to Bmax/Kd +1 and is insensitive to changes in cerebral blood flow, was our measure of dopamine transporter availability. In parallel subjective effects were measured to assess the relationship between dopamine transporter occupancy and cocaines behavioral effects. Intravenous cocaine produced a significant dose,-dependent blockade of dopamine transporters: 73 % for 0.6 mg/kg; 601/6 for 0.3 mg/kg; 48 % for 0.1 mg/kg iv and 40 % for 0.05 mg/kg. In addition, dopamine transporter occupancies were significantly correlated with cocaine plasma concentration (r = 0.55 p < 0.001). Cocaine also produced dose-dependent increases in self-reported ratings of {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} which were significantly correlated with the levels of dopamine transporter blockade. Discussion: These results provide the first documentation in humans that dopamine transporter occupancy is associated with cocaine induced subjective effects. They also suggest that dopamine transporter occupancies equal to or greater than 60% are required to produce significant effects on ratings of {open_quotes}high{close_quotes}.

  5. Cystamine induces AIF-mediated apoptosis through glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Yup; Lee, Jin-Haeng; Ju, Mi-kyeong; Jeong, Eui Man; Kim, Hyo-Jun; Lim, Jisun; Lee, Seungun; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Park, Hyun Ho; Choi, Kihang; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Kim, In-Gyu

    2015-03-01

    Cystamine and its reduced form cysteamine showed protective effects in various models of neurodegenerative disease, including Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. Other lines of evidence demonstrated the cytotoxic effect of cysteamine on duodenal mucosa leading to ulcer development. However, the mechanism for cystamine cytotoxicity remains poorly understood. Here, we report a new pathway in which cystamine induces apoptosis by targeting apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). By screening of various cell lines, we observed that cystamine and cysteamine induce cell death in a cell type-specific manner. Comparison between cystamine-sensitive and cystamine-resistant cell lines revealed that cystamine cytotoxicity is not associated with unfolded protein response, reactive oxygen species generation and transglutaminase or caspase activity; rather, it is associated with the ability of cystamine to trigger AIF nuclear translocation. In cystamine-sensitive cells, cystamine suppresses the levels of intracellular glutathione by inhibiting γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase expression that triggers AIF translocation. Conversely, glutathione supplementation completely prevents cystamine-induced AIF translocation and apoptosis. In rats, cysteamine administration induces glutathione depletion and AIF translocation leading to apoptosis of duodenal epithelium. These results indicate that AIF translocation through glutathione depletion is the molecular mechanism of cystamine toxicity, and provide important implications for cystamine in the neurodegenerative disease therapeutics as well as in the regulation of AIF-mediated cell death. PMID:25549939

  6. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm(-3) yr(-1) on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics. PMID:26629819

  7. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J. Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0°C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm-3 yr-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics. PMID:26629819

  8. Trans-synaptic (GABA-dopamine) modulation of cocaine induced dopamine release: A potential therapeutic strategy for cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, S.L.; Straughter-Moore, R.; Chen, R.

    1995-05-01

    We recently developed a new experimental strategy for measuring interactions between functionally-linked neurotransmitter systems in the primate and human brain with PET. As part of this research, we demonstrated that increases in endogenous GABA concentrations significantly reduced striatal dopamine concentrations in the primate brain. We report here the application of the neurotransmitter interaction paradigm with PET and with microdialysis to the investigation of a novel therapeutic strategy for treating cocaine abuse based on the ability of GABA to inhibit cocaine induced increases in striatal dopamine. Using gamma-vinyl GABA (GVG, a suicide inhibitor of GABA transaminase), we performed a series of PET studies where animals received a baseline PET scan with labeled raclopride injection, animals received cocaine (2.0 mg/kg). Normally, a cocaine challenge significantly reduces the striatal binding of {sup 11}C-raclopride. However, in animals pretreated with GVG, {sup 11}C-raclopride binding was less affected by a cocaine challenge compared to control studies. Furthermore, microdialysis studies in freely moving rats demonstrate that GVG (300 mg/kg) significantly inhibited cocaine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine release. GVG also attenuated cocaine-induced increases in locomotor activity. However, at a dose of 100 mg/kg, GVG had no effect. Similar findings were obtained with alcohol. Alcohol pretreatment dose dependantly (1-4 g/kg) inhibited cocaine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine concentrations in freely moving rats. Taken together, these studies suggest that therapeutic strategies targeted at increasing central GABA concentrations may be beneficial for the treatment of cocaine abuse.

  9. Ceramide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Evan L; Rau, Kristi S; Topham, Matthew K; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ceramide on dopamine and serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) transporters. Exposure of rat striatal synaptosomes to C2-ceramide caused a reversible, concentration-dependent decrease in plasmalemmal dopamine uptake. In contrast, ceramide exposure increased striatal 5-HT synaptosomal uptake. This increase did not appear to be due to an increased uptake by the 5-HT transporter. Rather, the increase appeared to result from an increase in 5-HT transport through the dopamine transporter, an assertion evidenced by findings that this increase: (1) does not occur in hippocampal synaptosomes (i.e., a preparation largely devoid of dopamine transporters), (2) occurs in striatal synaptosomes prepared from para-chloroamphetamine-treated rats (i.e., a preparation lacking 5-HT transporters), (3) is attenuated by pretreatment with methylphenidate (i.e., a relatively selective dopamine reuptake inhibitor) and (4) is inhibited by exposure to exogenous dopamine (i.e., which presumably competes for uptake with 5-HT). Taken together, these results reveal that ceramide is a novel modulator of monoamine transporter function, and may alter the affinity of dopamine transporters for its primary substrate. PMID:12498904

  10. Partial mitochondrial inhibition causes striatal dopamine release suppression and medium spiny neuron depolarization via H2O2 elevation, not ATP depletion.

    PubMed

    Bao, Li; Avshalumov, Marat V; Rice, Margaret E

    2005-10-26

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a potential causal factor in Parkinson's disease. We show here that acute exposure to the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (30-100 nM; 30 min) causes concentration-dependent suppression of single-pulse evoked dopamine (DA) release monitored in real time with carbon-fiber microelectrodes in guinea pig striatal slices, with no effect on DA content. Suppression of DA release was prevented by the sulfonylurea glibenclamide, implicating ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels; however, tissue ATP was unaltered. Because KATP channels can be activated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as well as by low ATP, we examined the involvement of rotenone-enhanced H2O2 generation. Confirming an essential role for H2O2, the inhibition of DA release by rotenone was prevented by catalase, a peroxide-scavenging enzyme. Striatal H2O2 generation during rotenone exposure was examined in individual medium spiny neurons using fluorescence imaging with dichlorofluorescein (DCF). An increase in intracellular H2O2 levels followed a similar time course to that of DA release suppression and was accompanied by cell membrane depolarization, decreased input resistance, and increased excitability. Extracellular catalase markedly attenuated the increase in DCF fluorescence and prevented rotenone-induced effects on membrane properties; membrane changes were also largely prevented by flufenamic acid, a blocker of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Thus, partial mitochondrial inhibition can cause functional DA denervation via H2O2 and KATP channels, without DA or ATP depletion. Furthermore, amplified H2O2 levels and TRP channel activation in striatal spiny neurons indicate potential sources of damage in these cells. Overall, these novel factors could contribute to parkinsonian motor deficits and neuronal degeneration caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:16251452

  11. ATP depletion inhibits glucocorticoid-induced thymocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, C; Bonavita, F; Stanic', I; Farruggia, G; Falcieri, E; Robuffo, I; Pignatti, C; Muscari, C; Rossoni, C; Guarnieri, C; Caldarera, C M

    1997-01-01

    In quiescent thymocytes, mitochondrial de-energization was not correlated to apoptotic death. In fact, thymocytes treated with oligomycin, a highly specific inhibitor of ATP synthase, alone or with atractyloside to block ATP translocation from the cytoplasm, were alive, even if their mitochondria were depolarized, as revealed by flow cytometry after Rhodamine 123 staining. Furthermore, oligomycin was a powerful inhibitor of apoptosis induced in rat thymocytes by dexamethasone and, to a lesser extent, by the calcium ionophore A23187 and etoposide, but was without effect when apoptosis was induced by staurosporine, and increased cell death in mitogen-treated thymocytes. The inhibition of apoptosis was confirmed by morphological criteria, inhibition of inter-nucleosomal DNA fragmentation and inhibition of the loss of membrane integrity. The anti-apoptotic effect of oligomycin in cells treated with A23187 or etoposide was correlated to the inhibition of protein synthesis, while inhibition of apoptosis induced by dexamethasone, already evident at an oligomycin concentration of 10 ng/ml, was instead strictly correlated to the effect exerted on the cellular ATP level. Thymocyte apoptosis triggered by dexamethasone was blocked or delayed by inhibitors of respiratory-chain uncouplers, inhibitors of ATP synthase and antioxidants: a lasting protection from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis was always correlated to a drastic and rapid reduction in ATP level (31-35% of control), while a delay in the death process was characterized by a moderate decrease in ATP (73-82% of control). Oligomycin inhibited the specific binding of radioactive corticosteroid to thymocyte nuclei, confirming the inhibitory effect of ATP depletion on glucocorticoid binding and suggesting that ATP depletion is a common mediator of the anti-apoptotic action of different effectors in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, the reported data indicate that ATP may act as a cellular modulator of some

  12. ATP depletion inhibits glucocorticoid-induced thymocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Stefanelli, C; Bonavita, F; Stanic', I; Farruggia, G; Falcieri, E; Robuffo, I; Pignatti, C; Muscari, C; Rossoni, C; Guarnieri, C; Caldarera, C M

    1997-03-15

    In quiescent thymocytes, mitochondrial de-energization was not correlated to apoptotic death. In fact, thymocytes treated with oligomycin, a highly specific inhibitor of ATP synthase, alone or with atractyloside to block ATP translocation from the cytoplasm, were alive, even if their mitochondria were depolarized, as revealed by flow cytometry after Rhodamine 123 staining. Furthermore, oligomycin was a powerful inhibitor of apoptosis induced in rat thymocytes by dexamethasone and, to a lesser extent, by the calcium ionophore A23187 and etoposide, but was without effect when apoptosis was induced by staurosporine, and increased cell death in mitogen-treated thymocytes. The inhibition of apoptosis was confirmed by morphological criteria, inhibition of inter-nucleosomal DNA fragmentation and inhibition of the loss of membrane integrity. The anti-apoptotic effect of oligomycin in cells treated with A23187 or etoposide was correlated to the inhibition of protein synthesis, while inhibition of apoptosis induced by dexamethasone, already evident at an oligomycin concentration of 10 ng/ml, was instead strictly correlated to the effect exerted on the cellular ATP level. Thymocyte apoptosis triggered by dexamethasone was blocked or delayed by inhibitors of respiratory-chain uncouplers, inhibitors of ATP synthase and antioxidants: a lasting protection from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis was always correlated to a drastic and rapid reduction in ATP level (31-35% of control), while a delay in the death process was characterized by a moderate decrease in ATP (73-82% of control). Oligomycin inhibited the specific binding of radioactive corticosteroid to thymocyte nuclei, confirming the inhibitory effect of ATP depletion on glucocorticoid binding and suggesting that ATP depletion is a common mediator of the anti-apoptotic action of different effectors in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, the reported data indicate that ATP may act as a cellular modulator of some

  13. Grafted dopamine neurons: Morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, Ingrid; Bickford, Paula; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2010-02-01

    Grafting of dopamine-rich tissue to counteract the symptoms in Parkinson's disease became a promising tool for future treatment. This article discusses how to improve the functional outcome with respect to graft outgrowth and functions of dopamine release and electrophysiological responses to graft implantation in the host brain striatal target. It has been documented that a subpopulation of the dopamine neurons innervates the host brain in a target-specific manner, while some of the grafted dopamine neurons never project to the host striatum. Neurochemical studies have demonstrated that the graft-induced outgrowth synthesize, store, metabolize and release dopamine and possibly other neurotransmitters such as 5-HT. Furthermore, the released dopamine affects the dopamine-depleted brain in areas that are larger than the graft-derived nerve fibers reach. While stem cells will most likely be the future source of cells to be used in grafting, it is important to find the guiding cues for how to reinnervate the dopamine-depleted striatum in a proper way with respect to the dopamine subpopulations of A9 and A10 to efficiently treat the motor abnormalities seen in Parkinson's disease. PMID:19853009

  14. The Role of Endogenous Serotonin in Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity to Dopamine Nerve Endings of the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David M.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M.; Shah, Mrudang M.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages the dopamine (DA) neuronal system in a highly delimited manner. The brain structure most affected by METH is the striatum where long-term DA depletion and microglial activation are maximal. Endogenous DA has been implicated as a critical participant in METH-induced neurotoxicity, most likely as a substrate for non-enzymatic oxidation by METH-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). The striatum is also extensively innervated by serotonin (5HT) nerve endings and this neurochemical system is modified by METH in much the same manner as seen in DA nerve endings (i.e., increased release of 5HT, loss of function in tryptophan hydroxylase and the serotonin transporter, long-term depletion of 5HT stores). 5HT can also be modified by ROS to form highly reactive species that damage neurons but its role in METH neurotoxicity has not been assessed. Increases in 5HT levels with 5HTP do not change METH-induced neurotoxicity to the DA nerve endings as revealed by reductions in DA, tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels. Partial reductions in 5HT with p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) are without effect on METH toxicity, despite the fact that PCPA largely prevents METH-induced hyperthermia. Mice lacking the gene for brain tryptophan hydroxylase 2 are devoid of brain 5HT and respond to METH in the same manner as wild-type controls, despite showing enhanced drug-induced hyperthermia. Taken together, the present results indicate that endogenous 5HT does not appear to play a role in METH-induced damage to DA nerve endings of the striatum. PMID:20722968

  15. The role of endogenous serotonin in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity to dopamine nerve endings of the striatum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Angoa Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Shah, Mrudang M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2010-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages the dopamine (DA) neuronal system in a highly delimited manner. The brain structure most affected by METH is the striatum where long-term DA depletion and microglial activation are maximal. Endogenous DA has been implicated as a critical participant in METH-induced neurotoxicity, most likely as a substrate for non-enzymatic oxidation by METH-generated reactive oxygen species. The striatum is also extensively innervated by serotonin (5HT) nerve endings and this neurochemical system is modified by METH in much the same manner as seen in DA nerve endings (i.e., increased release of 5HT, loss of function in tryptophan hydroxylase and the serotonin transporter, long-term depletion of 5HT stores). 5HT can also be modified by reactive oxygen species to form highly reactive species that damage neurons but its role in METH neurotoxicity has not been assessed. Increases in 5HT levels with 5-hydroxytryptophan do not change METH-induced neurotoxicity to the DA nerve endings as revealed by reductions in DA, tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels. Partial reductions in 5HT with p-chlorophenylalanine are without effect on METH toxicity, despite the fact that p-chlorophenylalanine largely prevents METH-induced hyperthermia. Mice lacking the gene for brain tryptophan hydroxylase 2 are devoid of brain 5HT and respond to METH in the same manner as wild-type controls, despite showing enhanced drug-induced hyperthermia. Taken together, the present results indicate that endogenous 5HT does not appear to play a role in METH-induced damage to DA nerve endings of the striatum. PMID:20722968

  16. The newly synthesized pool of dopamine determines the severity of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David M.; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has long been implicated as a participant in the neurotoxicity caused by methamphetamine (METH), yet, its mechanism of action in this regard is not fully understood. Treatment of mice with the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) inhibitor α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) lowers striatal cytoplasmic DA content by 55% and completely protects against METH-induced damage to DA nerve terminals. Reserpine, by disrupting vesicle amine storage, depletes striatal DA by more than 95% and accentuates METH-induced neurotoxicity. L-DOPA reverses the protective effect of AMPT against METH and enhances neurotoxicity in animals with intact TH. Inhibition of MAO-A by clorgyline increases pre-synaptic DA content and enhances METH striatal neurotoxicity. In all conditions of altered pre-synaptic DA homeostasis, increases or decreases in METH neurotoxicity paralleled changes in striatal microglial activation. Mice treated with AMPT, L-DOPA, or clorgyline + METH developed hyperthermia to the same extent as animals treated with METH alone, whereas mice treated with reserpine + METH were hypothermic, suggesting that the effects of alterations in cytoplasmic DA on METH neurotoxicity were not strictly mediated by changes in core body temperature. Taken together, the present data reinforce the notion that METH-induced release of DA from the newly synthesized pool of transmitter into the extracellular space plays an essential role in drug-induced striatal neurotoxicity and microglial activation. Subtle alterations in intracellular DA content can lead to significant enhancement of METH neurotoxicity. Our results also suggest that reactants derived from METH-induced oxidation of released DA may serve as neuronal signals that lead to microglial activation early in the neurotoxic process associated with METH. PMID:18088364

  17. Dopamine induces the accumulation of insoluble prion protein and affects autophagic flux

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Marcio H. M.; Peres, Italo T.; Santos, Tiago G.; Martins, Vilma R.; Icimoto, Marcelo Y.; Lee, Kil S.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of protein aggregates is a histopathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, but in most cases the aggregation occurs without defined mutations or clinical histories, suggesting that certain endogenous metabolites can promote aggregation of specific proteins. One example that supports this hypothesis is dopamine and its metabolites. Dopamine metabolism generates several oxidative metabolites that induce aggregation of α-synuclein, and represents the main etiology of Parkinson's diseases. Because dopamine and its metabolites are unstable and can be highly reactive, we investigated whether these molecules can also affect other proteins that are prone to aggregate, such as cellular prion protein (PrPC). In this study, we showed that dopamine treatment of neuronal cells reduced the number of viable cells and increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as demonstrated in previous studies. Overall PrPC expression level was not altered by dopamine treatment, but its unglycosylated form was consistently reduced at 100 μM of dopamine. At the same concentration, the level of phosphorylated mTOR and 4EBP1 was also reduced. Moreover, dopamine treatment decreased the solubility of PrPC, and increased its accumulation in autophagosomal compartments with concomitant induction of LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1 levels. In vitro oxidation of dopamine promoted formation of high-order oligomers of recombinant prion protein. These results suggest that dopamine metabolites alter the conformation of PrPC, which in turn is sorted to degradation pathway, causing autophagosome overload and attenuation of protein synthesis. Accumulation of PrPC aggregates is an important feature of prion diseases. Thus, this study brings new insight into the dopamine metabolism as a source of endogenous metabolites capable of altering PrPC solubility and its subcellular localization. PMID:25698927

  18. Impact of grafted serotonin and dopamine neurons on development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian rats is determined by the extent of dopamine neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Thomas; Carta, Manolo; Muñoz, Ana; Mattsson, Bengt; Winkler, Christian; Kirik, Deniz; Björklund, Anders

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that serotonin neurons play an important role in the induction and maintenance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in animals with lesion of the nigrostriatal dopamine system. Patients with Parkinson's disease that receive transplants of foetal ventral mesencephalic tissue, the graft cell preparation is likely to contain, in addition to dopamine neurons, serotonin neurons that will vary in number depending on the landmarks used for dissection. Here, we have studied the impact of grafted serotonin neurons--alone or mixed with dopamine neurons--on the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rats with a partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the host nigrostriatal projection. In these rats, which showed only low-level dyskinesia at the time of transplantation, serotonin grafts induced a worsening in the severity of dyskinesia that developed during continued L-DOPA treatment, while the dopamine-rich graft had the opposite, dampening effect. The detrimental effect seen in animals with serotonin neuron grafts was dramatically increased when the residual dopamine innervation in the striatum was removed by a second 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. Interestingly, rats with grafts that contained a mixture of dopamine and serotonin neurons (in approximately 2:1) showed a marked reduction in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia over time, and the appearance of severe dyskinesia induced by the removal of the residual dopamine innervation, seen in the animals with transplants of serotonin neurons alone, was blocked. FosB expression in the striatal projection neurons, which is associated with dyskinesias, was also normalized by the dopamine-rich grafts, but not by the serotonin neuron grafts. These data indicate that as long as a sufficient portion, some 10-20%, of the dopamine innervation still remains, the increased host serotonin innervation generated by the grafted serotonin neurons will have limited effect on the development or severity of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias. At

  19. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  20. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Steffen, P; Verdier, C; Wagner, C

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow. PMID:23383842

  1. The Roles of Dopamine Transport Inhibition and Dopamine Release Facilitation in Wake Enhancement and Rebound Hypersomnolence Induced by Dopaminergic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gruner, John A.; Marcy, Val R.; Lin, Yin-Guo; Bozyczko-Coyne, Donna; Marino, Michael J.; Gasior, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: Rebound hypersomnolence (RHS: increased sleep following increased wake) is a limiting side-effect of many wake-promoting agents. In particular, RHS in the first few hours following wake appears to be associated with dopamine (DA)-releasing agents, e.g., amphetamine, but whether it can also be produced by DA transporter (DAT) inhibition alone is unknown. In these studies, DA-releasing and DAT-inhibiting agents and their interaction were systematically examined for their ability to increase wake and induce RHS. Design: Chronically implanted rats were evaluated in a blinded, pseudo-randomized design. Participants: 237 rats were used in these studies with 1 week between repeat tests. Interventions: Animals were habituated overnight and dosed the next day, 5 h after lights on, with test agents. Measurements and Results: Sleep/wake activity and RHS were evaluated using EEG/EMG recording up to 22 h post dosing. In vitro dopamine release was evaluated in rat synaptosomes. At doses that produced equal increases in wake, DA-releasing (amphetamine, methamphetamine, phentermine) and several DAT-inhibiting agents (cocaine, bupropion, and methylphenidate) produced RHS during the first few hours after the onset of sleep recovery. However, other DAT-inhibiting agents (mazindol, nomifensine, GBR-12909, and GBR-12935) did not produce RHS. Combination treatment with amphetamine and nomifensine produced waking activity greater than the sum of their individual activities alone while ameliorating the amphetamine-like RHS. In rat synaptosomes, nomifensine reduced the potency of amphetamine to induce DA release ∼270-fold, potentially explaining its action in ameliorating amphetamine-induced RHS. Conclusions: All DA releasing agents tested, and some DAT-inhibiting agents, produced RHS at equal wake-promoting doses. Thus amphetamine-like DA release appears sufficient for inducing RHS, but additional properties (pharmacologic and/or pharmacokinetic) evidently underlie RHS

  2. Medial frontal ∼4-Hz activity in humans and rodents is attenuated in PD patients and in rodents with cortical dopamine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Krystal L.; Chen, Kuan-Hua; Kingyon, Johnathan R.; Cavanagh, James F.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal control of action is a highly conserved and critical mammalian behavior. Here, we investigate the neuronal basis of this process using an interval timing task. In rats and humans, instructional timing cues triggered spectral power across delta and theta bands (2–6 Hz) from the medial frontal cortex (MFC). Humans and rodents with dysfunctional dopamine have impaired interval timing, and we found that both humans with Parkinson's disease (PD) and rodents with local MFC dopamine depletion had attenuated delta and theta activity. In rodents, spectral activity in this range could functionally couple single MFC neurons involved in temporal processing. Without MFC dopamine, these neurons had less functional coupling with delta/theta activity and less temporal processing. Finally, in humans this 2- to 6-Hz activity was correlated with executive function in matched controls but not in PD patients. Collectively, these findings suggest that cue-evoked low-frequency rhythms could be a clinically important biomarker of PD that is translatable to rodent models, facilitating mechanistic inquiry and the development of neurophysiological biomarkers for human disease. PMID:26133799

  3. Dieldrin exposure induces oxidative damage in the mouse nigrostriatal dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Jaime M; Richardson, Jason R; Guillot, Thomas S; McCormack, Alison L; Di Monte, Donato A; Jones, Dean P; Pennell, Kurt D; Miller, Gary W

    2007-04-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown an association between pesticide exposure and an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we provide evidence that the insecticide dieldrin causes specific oxidative damage in the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. We report that exposure of mice to low levels of dieldrin for 30 days resulted in alterations in dopamine-handling as evidenced by a decrease in dopamine metabolites, DOPAC (31.7% decrease) and HVA (29.2% decrease) and significantly increased cysteinyl-catechol levels in the striatum. Furthermore, dieldrin resulted in a 53% decrease in total glutathione, an increase in the redox potential of glutathione, and a 90% increase in protein carbonyls. Alpha-synuclein protein expression was also significantly increased in the striatum (25% increase). Finally, dieldrin caused a significant decrease in striatal expression of the dopamine transporter as measured by (3)H-WIN 35,428 binding and (3)H-dopamine uptake. These alterations occurred in the absence of dopamine neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta. These effects represent the ability of low doses of dieldrin to increase the vulnerability of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons by inducing oxidative stress and suggest that pesticide exposure may act as a promoter of PD. PMID:17291500

  4. Dieldrin exposure induces oxidative damage in the mouse nigrostriatal dopamine system

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Jaime M.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; McCormack, Alison L.; Di Monte, Donato A.; Jones, Dean P.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Miller, Gary W.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown an association between pesticide exposure and an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here, we provide evidence that the insecticide dieldrin causes specific oxidative damage in the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. We report that exposure of mice to low levels of dieldrin for 30 days resulted in alterations in dopamine-handling as evidenced by a decrease in dopamine metabolites, DOPAC (31.7% decrease) and HVA (29.2% decrease) and significantly increased cysteinyl-catechol levels in the striatum. Furthermore, dieldrin resulted in a 53% decrease in total glutathione, an increase in the redox potential of glutathione, and a 90% increase in protein carbonyls. α-Synuclein protein expression was also significantly increased in the striatum (25% increase). Finally, dieldrin caused a significant decrease in striatal expression of the dopamine transporter as measured by 3H-WIN 35,428 binding and 3H-dopamine uptake. These alterations occurred in the absence of dopamine neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta. These effects represent the ability of low doses of dieldrin to increase the vulnerability of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons by inducing oxidative stress and suggest that pesticide exposure may act as a promoter of PD. PMID:17291500

  5. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM–100 μM) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 μM) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 μM) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD. PMID:16005927

  6. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    SciTech Connect

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W. . E-mail: gary.miller@emory.edu

    2006-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM-100 {mu}M) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 {mu}M) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 {mu}M) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD.

  7. Hormetic effect induced by depleted uranium in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Ng, C Y P; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2016-06-01

    The present work studied the hormetic effect induced by uranium (U) in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) using apoptosis as the biological endpoint. Hormetic effect is characterized by biphasic dose-response relationships showing a low-dose stimulation and a high-dose inhibition. Embryos were dechorionated at 4h post fertilization (hpf), and were then exposed to 10 or 100μg/l depleted uranium (DU) in uranyl acetate solutions from 5 to 6 hpf. For exposures to 10μg/l DU, the amounts of apoptotic signals in the embryos were significantly increased at 20 hpf but were significantly decreased at 24 hpf, which demonstrated the presence of U-induced hormesis. For exposures to 100μg/l DU, the amounts of apoptotic signals in the embryos were significantly increased at 20, 24 and 30 hpf. Hormetic effect was not shown but its occurrence between 30 and 48 hpf could not be ruled out. In conclusion, hormetic effect could be induced in zebrafish embryos in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. PMID:27060238

  8. Evidence for a Role of Transporter-Mediated Currents in the Depletion of Brain Serotonin Induced by Serotonin Transporter Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Michael H; Bulling, Simon; Benaderet, Tova S; Saha, Kusumika; Ayestas, Mario A; Partilla, John S; Ali, Syed F; Stockner, Thomas; Rothman, Richard B; Sandtner, Walter; Sitte, Harald H

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) substrates like fenfluramine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine cause long-term depletion of brain 5-HT, while certain other substrates do not. The 5-HT deficits produced by SERT substrates are dependent upon transporter proteins, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. Here, we compared the pharmacology of several SERT substrates: fenfluramine, d-fenfluramine, 1-(m-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP) and 1-(m-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperainze (TFMPP), to establish relationships between acute drug mechanisms and the propensity for long-term 5-HT depletions. In vivo microdialysis was carried out in rat nucleus accumbens to examine acute 5-HT release and long-term depletion in the same subjects. In vitro assays were performed to measure efflux of [3H]5-HT in rat brain synaptosomes and transporter-mediated ionic currents in SERT-expressing Xenopus oocytes. When administered repeatedly to rats (6 mg/kg, i.p., four doses), all drugs produce large sustained elevations in extracellular 5-HT (>5-fold) with minimal effects on dopamine. Importantly, 2 weeks after dosing, only rats exposed to fenfluramine and d-fenfluramine display depletion of brain 5-HT. All test drugs evoke fluoxetine-sensitive efflux of [3H]5-HT from synaptosomes, but d-fenfluramine and its bioactive metabolite d-norfenfluramine induce significantly greater SERT-mediated currents than phenylpiperazines. Our data confirm that drug-induced 5-HT release probably does not mediate 5-HT depletion. However, the magnitude of transporter-mediated inward current may be a critical factor in the cascade of events leading to 5-HT deficits. This hypothesis warrants further study, especially given the growing popularity of designer drugs that target SERT. PMID:24287719

  9. Effects of pharmacologic dopamine β-hydroxylase inhibition on cocaine-induced reinstatement and dopamine neurochemistry in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Debra A; Kimmel, Heather L; Manvich, Daniel F; Schmidt, Karl T; Weinshenker, David; Howell, Leonard L

    2014-07-01

    Disulfiram has shown promise as a pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence in clinical settings, although it has many targets, and the behavioral and molecular mechanisms underlying its efficacy are unclear. One of many biochemical actions of disulfiram is inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), the enzyme that converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic neurons. Thus, disulfiram simultaneously reduces NE and elevates DA tissue levels in the brain. In rats, both disulfiram and the selective DBH inhibitor nepicastat block cocaine-primed reinstatement, a paradigm which is thought to model some aspects of drug relapse. This is consistent with some clinical results and supports the use of DBH inhibitors for the treatment of cocaine dependence. The present study was conducted to confirm and extend these results in nonhuman primates. Squirrel monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine were pretreated with disulfiram or nepicastat prior to cocaine-induced reinstatement sessions. Neither DBH inhibitor altered cocaine-induced reinstatement. Unexpectedly, nepicastat administered alone induced a modest reinstatement effect in squirrel monkeys, but not in rats. To investigate the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the behavioral results, the effects of DBH inhibition on extracellular DA were analyzed in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) using in vivo microdialysis in squirrel monkeys. Both DBH inhibitors attenuated cocaine-induced DA overflow in the NAc. Hence, the attenuation of cocaine-induced changes in accumbal DA neurochemistry was not associated with altered cocaine-seeking behavior. Overall, the reported behavioral effects of DBH inhibition in rodent models of relapse did not extend to nonhuman primates under the conditions used in the current studies. PMID:24817036

  10. A transgenic mouse model of neuroepithelial cell specific inducible overexpression of dopamine D1-receptor.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, K; Araki, K; McCarthy, D M; Sims, J R; Ren, J Q; Zhang, X; Bhide, P G

    2010-10-27

    Dopamine and its receptors appear in the brain during early embryonic period suggesting a role for dopamine in brain development. In fact, dopamine receptor imbalance resulting from impaired physiological balance between D1- and D2-receptor activities can perturb brain development and lead to persisting changes in brain structure and function. Dopamine receptor imbalance can be produced experimentally using pharmacological or genetic methods. Pharmacological methods tend to activate or antagonize the receptors in all cell types. In the traditional gene knockout models the receptor imbalance occurs during development and also at maturity. Therefore, assaying the effects of dopamine imbalance on specific cell types (e.g. precursor versus postmitotic cells) or at specific periods of brain development (e.g. pre- or postnatal periods) is not feasible in these models. We describe a novel transgenic mouse model based on the tetracycline dependent inducible gene expression system in which dopamine D1-receptor transgene expression is induced selectively in neuroepithelial cells of the embryonic brain at experimenter-chosen intervals of brain development. In this model, doxycycline-induced expression of the transgene causes significant overexpression of the D1-receptor and significant reductions in the incorporation of the S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine into neuroepithelial cells of the basal and dorsal telencephalon indicating marked effects on telencephalic neurogenesis. The D1-receptor overexpression occurs at higher levels in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) than the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) or cerebral wall (CW). Moreover, although the transgene is induced selectively in the neuroepithelium, D1-receptor protein overexpression appears to persist in postmitotic cells. The mouse model can be modified for neuroepithelial cell-specific inducible expression of other transgenes or induction of the D1-receptor transgene in other cells in specific brain regions by

  11. Phosphate depletion impairs leucine-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Oh, H Y; Fadda, G Z; Smogorzewski, M; Liou, H H; Massry, S G

    1994-11-01

    Phosphate depletion (PD) in vivo causes a sundry of abnormalities in pancreatic islets including a rise in cytosolic calcium, low ATP content, reduced Ca2+ ATPase and Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, and impaired insulin secretion in response to glucose or potassium. L-Leucine is a strong secretagogue that triggers insulin secretion by deamination to alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) and the subsequent metabolism of the latter to ATP and by the activation of glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), which acts on glutamate to generate alpha-ketoglutarate, the metabolism of which results in ATP production. The generation of ATP triggers events that lead to insulin secretion. It is not known whether PD impairs leucine-induced insulin secretion, and the cellular derangements that are involved in such an abnormality are not defined. These issues were studied in PD rats and in pair-weighed normal animals as controls. D-Leucine uptake by islets from PD rats is normal, but both leucine- and KIC-induced insulin secretions are impaired and the activity of branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase, which facilitates the metabolism of KIC, is reduced. Both leucine and 2-aminobicyclo (2-2-1) haptene failed to stimulate GLDH and to augment the generation of alpha-ketoglutarate in the islets of PD rats. Also, the concentration of basal alpha-ketoglutarate was significantly higher in the islets of PD rats, suggesting that its metabolism is impaired. In addition, the activity of glutaminase is significantly reduced, an abnormality that would result in decreased production of glutamate, the substrate for GLDH. The data show that PD impairs leucine-induced insulin secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7873737

  12. Increased baseline occupancy of D2 receptors by dopamine in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Rodenhiser, Janine; Printz, David; Zea-Ponce, Yolanda; Gil, Roberto; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Weiss, Richard; Cooper, Thomas B.; Mann, J. John; Van Heertum, Ronald L.; Gorman, Jack M.; Laruelle, Marc

    2000-01-01

    The classical dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia postulates a hyperactivity of dopaminergic transmission at the D2 receptor. We measured in vivo occupancy of striatal D2 receptors by dopamine in 18 untreated patients with schizophrenia and 18 matched controls, by comparing D2 receptor availability before and during pharmacologically induced acute dopamine depletion. Acute depletion of intrasynaptic dopamine resulted in a larger increase in D2 receptor availability in patients with schizophrenia (19% ± 11%) compared with control subjects (9% ± 7%, P = 0.003). The increased occupancy of D2 receptors by dopamine occurred both in first-episode neuroleptic-naive patients and in previously treated chronic patients experiencing an episode of illness exacerbation. In addition, elevated synaptic dopamine was predictive of good treatment response of positive symptoms to antipsychotic drugs. This finding provides direct evidence of increased stimulation of D2 receptors by dopamine in schizophrenia, consistent with increased phasic activity of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:10884434

  13. Dopamine-induced nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Ariane; Stacy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) may emerge secondary to the underlying pathogenesis of the disease, while others are recognized side effects of treatment. Inevitably, there is an overlap as the disease advances and patients require higher dosages and more complex medical regimens. The non-motor symptoms that emerge secondary to dopaminergic therapy encompass several domains, including neuropsychiatric, autonomic, and sleep. These are detailed in the paper. Neuropsychiatric complications include hallucinations and psychosis. In addition, compulsive behaviors, such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, shopping, binge eating, and punding, have been shown to have a clear association with dopaminergic medications. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) is a compulsive behavior that is typically viewed through the lens of addiction, with patients needing escalating dosages of dopamine replacement therapy. Treatment side effects on the autonomic system include nausea, orthostatic hypotension, and constipation. Sleep disturbances include fragmented sleep, nighttime sleep problems, daytime sleepiness, and sleep attacks. Recognizing the non-motor symptoms that can arise specifically from dopamine therapy is useful to help optimize treatment regimens for this complex disease. PMID:21603184

  14. Dopamine-Induced Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ariane; Stacy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) may emerge secondary to the underlying pathogenesis of the disease, while others are recognized side effects of treatment. Inevitably, there is an overlap as the disease advances and patients require higher dosages and more complex medical regimens. The non-motor symptoms that emerge secondary to dopaminergic therapy encompass several domains, including neuropsychiatric, autonomic, and sleep. These are detailed in the paper. Neuropsychiatric complications include hallucinations and psychosis. In addition, compulsive behaviors, such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, shopping, binge eating, and punding, have been shown to have a clear association with dopaminergic medications. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) is a compulsive behavior that is typically viewed through the lens of addiction, with patients needing escalating dosages of dopamine replacement therapy. Treatment side effects on the autonomic system include nausea, orthostatic hypotension, and constipation. Sleep disturbances include fragmented sleep, nighttime sleep problems, daytime sleepiness, and sleep attacks. Recognizing the non-motor symptoms that can arise specifically from dopamine therapy is useful to help optimize treatment regimens for this complex disease. PMID:21603184

  15. Dopamine is a key regulator in the signalling pathway underlying predator-induced defences in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Linda C; Leese, Florian; Laforsch, Christian; Tollrian, Ralph

    2015-10-01

    The waterflea Daphnia is a model to investigate the genetic basis of phenotypic plasticity resulting from one differentially expressed genome. Daphnia develops adaptive phenotypes (e.g. morphological defences) thwarting predators, based on chemical predator cue perception. To understand the genomic basis of phenotypic plasticity, the description of the precedent cellular and neuronal mechanisms is fundamental. However, key regulators remain unknown. All neuronal and endocrine stimulants were able to modulate but not induce defences, indicating a pathway of interlinked steps. A candidate able to link neuronal with endocrine responses is the multi-functional amine dopamine. We here tested its involvement in trait formation in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia longicephala using an induction assay composed of predator cues combined with dopaminergic and cholinergic stimulants. The mere application of both stimulants was sufficient to induce morphological defences. We determined dopamine localization in cells found in close association with the defensive trait. These cells serve as centres controlling divergent morphologies. As a mitogen and sclerotization agent, we anticipate that dopamine is involved in proliferation and structural formation of morphological defences. Furthermore, dopamine pathways appear to be interconnected with endocrine pathways, and control juvenile hormone and ecdysone levels. In conclusion, dopamine is suggested as a key regulator of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:26423840

  16. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine alter monocyte, macrophage and T cell functions: implications for HAND

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Calderon, Tina M.; Coley, Jacqueline S.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications resulting from HIV infection remain a major public health problem as individuals live longer due to the success of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As many as 70% of HIV infected people have HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Many HIV infected individuals abuse drugs, such as cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine, that may be important cofactors in the development of HIV CNS disease. Despite different mechanisms of action, all drugs of abuse increase extracellular dopamine in the CNS. The effects of dopamine on HIV neuropathogenesis are not well understood, and drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which different types of drugs of abuse impact the development of HAND. Monocytes and macrophages are central to HIV infection of the CNS and to HAND. While T cells have not been shown to be a major factor in HIV-associated neuropathogenesis, studies indicate that T cells may play a larger role in the development of HAND in HIV infected drug abusers. Drug induced increases in CNS dopamine may dysregulate functions of, or increase HIV infection in, monocytes, macrophages and T cells in the brain. Thus, characterizing the effects of dopamine on these cells is important for understanding the mechanisms that mediate the development of HAND in drug abusers. PMID:23456305

  17. Gravitational collapse of depletion-induced colloidal gels.

    PubMed

    Harich, R; Blythe, T W; Hermes, M; Zaccarelli, E; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F; Poon, W C K

    2016-05-11

    We study the ageing and ultimate gravitational collapse of colloidal gels in which the interparticle attraction is induced by non-adsorbing polymers via the depletion effect. The gels are formed through arrested spinodal decomposition, whereby the dense phase arrests into an attractive glass. We map the experimental state diagram onto a theoretical one obtained from computer simulations and theoretical calculations. Discrepancies between the experimental and simulated gel regions in the state diagram can be explained by the particle size and density dependence of the boundary below which the gel is not strong enough to resist gravitational stress. Visual observations show that gravitational collapse of the gels falls into two distinct regimes as the colloid and polymer concentrations are varied, with gels at low colloid concentrations showing the onset of rapid collapse after a delay time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to provide quantitative, spatio-temporally resolved measurements of the solid volume fraction in these rapidly collapsing gels. We find that during the delay time, a dense region builds up at the top of the sample. The rapid collapse is initiated when the gel structure is no longer able to support this dense layer. PMID:27001686

  18. Metallothionein deficiency aggravates depleted uranium-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuhui; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Liu, Cong; Li, Hong; Liu, Jing; Ren, Jiong; Yang, Zhangyou; Peng, Shuangqing; Wang, Weidong; Li, Rong

    2015-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been widely used in both civilian and military activities, and the kidney is the main target organ of DU during acute high-dose exposures. In this study, the nephrotoxicity caused by DU in metallothionein-1/2-null mice (MT-/-) and corresponding wild-type (MT+/+) mice was investigated to determine any associations with MT. Each MT-/- or MT+/+ mouse was pretreated with a single dose of DU (10mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) or an equivalent volume of saline. After 4days of DU administration, kidney changes were assessed. After DU exposure, serum creatinine and serum urea nitrogen in MT-/- mice significantly increased than in MT+/+ mice, with more severe kidney pathological damage. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and generation of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde increased in MT-/- mice. The apoptosis rate in MT-/- mice significantly increased, with a significant increase in both Bax and caspase 3 and a decrease in Bcl-2. Furthermore, sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) and sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) were significantly reduced after DU exposure, and the change of SGLT was more evident in MT-/- mice. Finally, exogenous MT was used to evaluate the correlation between kidney changes induced by DU and MT doses in MT-/- mice. The results showed that, the pathological damage and cell apoptosis decreased, and SOD and SGLT levels increased with increasing dose of MT. In conclusion, MT deficiency aggravated DU-induced nephrotoxicity, and the molecular mechanisms appeared to be related to the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, and decreased SGLT expression. PMID:26148447

  19. Inhibitory effects of ginseng total saponins on behavioral sensitization and dopamine release induced by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Lee, BomBi; Yang, Chae Ha; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Hye-Jung; Han, Seung-Moo; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Shim, Insop

    2008-03-01

    Many studies have suggested that the behavioral and reinforcing effects of cocaine can be mediated by the central dopaminergic systems. It has been shown that repeated injections of cocaine produce an increase in locomotor activity, the expression of the immediate-early gene, c-fos, and the release of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which is one of the main dopaminergic terminal areas. Several studies have shown that behavioral activation and changes in extracellular dopamine levels in the central nervous system induced by psychomotor stimulants are prevented by ginseng total saponins (GTS). In order to investigate the effects of GTS on the repeated cocaine-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations, we examined the influence of GTS on the cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and on c-Fos expression in the brain using immunohistochemistry in rats repeatedly treated with cocaine. We also examined the effect of GTS on cocaine-induced dopamine release in the NAc of freely moving rats repeatedly treated with cocaine using an in vivo microdialysis technique. Pretreatment with GTS (100, 200, 400 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before the daily injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited the repeated cocaine-induced increase in locomotor activity as well as the c-Fos expression in the core and shell in a dose-dependent manner. Also, pretreatment with GTS significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine release in the NAc. Our data demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of GTS on the repeated cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization were closely associated with the reduction of dopamine release and the postsynaptic neuronal activity. The results of the present study suggest that GTS may be effective for inhibiting the behavioral effects of cocaine by possibly modulating the central dopaminergic system. These results also suggest that GTS may prove to be a useful therapeutic agent for cocaine addiction. PMID:18310906

  20. Metallothionein deficiency aggravates depleted uranium-induced nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yuhui; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Liu, Cong; Li, Hong; Liu, Jing; Ren, Jiong; Yang, Zhangyou; Peng, Shuangqing; Wang, Weidong; Li, Rong

    2015-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been widely used in both civilian and military activities, and the kidney is the main target organ of DU during acute high-dose exposures. In this study, the nephrotoxicity caused by DU in metallothionein-1/2-null mice (MT −/−) and corresponding wild-type (MT +/+) mice was investigated to determine any associations with MT. Each MT −/− or MT +/+ mouse was pretreated with a single dose of DU (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) or an equivalent volume of saline. After 4 days of DU administration, kidney changes were assessed. After DU exposure, serum creatinine and serum urea nitrogen in MT −/− mice significantly increased than in MT +/+ mice, with more severe kidney pathological damage. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and generation of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde increased in MT −/− mice. The apoptosis rate in MT −/− mice significantly increased, with a significant increase in both Bax and caspase 3 and a decrease in Bcl-2. Furthermore, sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) and sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) were significantly reduced after DU exposure, and the change of SGLT was more evident in MT −/− mice. Finally, exogenous MT was used to evaluate the correlation between kidney changes induced by DU and MT doses in MT −/− mice. The results showed that, the pathological damage and cell apoptosis decreased, and SOD and SGLT levels increased with increasing dose of MT. In conclusion, MT deficiency aggravated DU-induced nephrotoxicity, and the molecular mechanisms appeared to be related to the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, and decreased SGLT expression. - Highlights: • MT −/− and MT +/+ mice were used to evaluate nephrotoxicity of DU. • Renal damage was more evident in the MT −/− mice after exposure to DU. • Exogenous MT also protects against DU-induced nephrotoxicity. • MT deficiency induced more ROS and apoptosis after exposure to

  1. Desynchronization of fast-spiking interneurons reduces β-band oscillations and imbalance in firing in the dopamine-depleted striatum.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Sriraman; Cressman, John R; Jedrzejewski-Szmek, Zbigniew; Blackwell, Kim T

    2015-01-21

    Oscillations in the β-band (8-30 Hz) that emerge in the output nuclei of the basal ganglia during Parkinson's disease, along with an imbalanced activation of the direct and indirect pathways, have been linked to the hypokinetic motor output associated with the disease. Although dopamine depletion causes a change in cellular and network properties in the striatum, it is unclear whether abnormal activity measured in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata is caused by abnormal striatal activity. Here we use a computational network model of medium spiny neurons (MSNs)-fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), based on data from several mammalian species, and find that robust β-band oscillations and imbalanced firing emerge from implementation of changes to cellular and circuit properties caused by dopamine depletion. These changes include a reduction in connections between MSNs, a doubling of FSI inhibition to D2 MSNs, an increase in D2 MSN dendritic excitability, and a reduction in D2 MSN somatic excitability. The model reveals that the reduced decorrelation between MSNs attributable to weakened lateral inhibition enables the strong influence of synchronous FSIs on MSN firing and oscillations. Weakened lateral inhibition also produces an increased sensitivity of MSN output to cortical correlation, a condition relevant to the parkinsonian striatum. The oscillations of FSIs, in turn, are strongly modulated by fast electrical transmission between FSIs through gap junctions. These results suggest that pharmaceuticals that desynchronize FSI activity may provide a novel treatment for the enhanced β-band oscillations, imbalanced firing, and motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25609629

  2. Desynchronization of Fast-Spiking Interneurons Reduces β-Band Oscillations and Imbalance in Firing in the Dopamine-Depleted Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Damodaran, Sriraman; Cressman, John R.; Jedrzejewski-Szmek, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Oscillations in the β-band (8–30 Hz) that emerge in the output nuclei of the basal ganglia during Parkinson's disease, along with an imbalanced activation of the direct and indirect pathways, have been linked to the hypokinetic motor output associated with the disease. Although dopamine depletion causes a change in cellular and network properties in the striatum, it is unclear whether abnormal activity measured in the globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata is caused by abnormal striatal activity. Here we use a computational network model of medium spiny neurons (MSNs)—fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), based on data from several mammalian species, and find that robust β-band oscillations and imbalanced firing emerge from implementation of changes to cellular and circuit properties caused by dopamine depletion. These changes include a reduction in connections between MSNs, a doubling of FSI inhibition to D2 MSNs, an increase in D2 MSN dendritic excitability, and a reduction in D2 MSN somatic excitability. The model reveals that the reduced decorrelation between MSNs attributable to weakened lateral inhibition enables the strong influence of synchronous FSIs on MSN firing and oscillations. Weakened lateral inhibition also produces an increased sensitivity of MSN output to cortical correlation, a condition relevant to the parkinsonian striatum. The oscillations of FSIs, in turn, are strongly modulated by fast electrical transmission between FSIs through gap junctions. These results suggest that pharmaceuticals that desynchronize FSI activity may provide a novel treatment for the enhanced β-band oscillations, imbalanced firing, and motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25609629

  3. Neurotensin Induces Presynaptic Depression of D2 Dopamine Autoreceptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Piccart, Elisabeth; Courtney, Nicholas A.; Branch, Sarah Y.; Ford, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Increased dopaminergic signaling is a hallmark of severe mesencephalic pathologies such as schizophrenia and psychostimulant abuse. Activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons is under strict control of inhibitory D2 autoreceptors. Application of the modulatory peptide neurotensin (NT) to midbrain dopaminergic neurons transiently increases activity by decreasing D2 dopamine autoreceptor function, yet little is known about the mechanisms that underlie long-lasting effects. Here, we performed patch-clamp electrophysiology and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in mouse brain slices to determine the effects of NT on dopamine autoreceptor-mediated neurotransmission. Application of the active peptide fragment NT8–13 produced synaptic depression that exhibited short- and long-term components. Sustained depression of D2 autoreceptor signaling required activation of the type 2 NT receptor and the protein phosphatase calcineurin. NT application increased paired-pulse ratios and decreased extracellular levels of somatodendritic dopamine, consistent with a decrease in presynaptic dopamine release. Surprisingly, we observed that electrically induced long-term depression of dopaminergic neurotransmission that we reported previously was also dependent on type 2 NT receptors and calcineurin. Because electrically induced depression, but not NT-induced depression, was blocked by postsynaptic calcium chelation, our findings suggest that endogenous NT may act through a local circuit to decrease presynaptic dopamine release. The current research provides a mechanism through which augmented NT release can produce a long-lasting increase in membrane excitability of midbrain dopamine neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Whereas plasticity of glutamate synapses in the brain has been studied extensively, demonstrations of plasticity at dopaminergic synapses have been more elusive. By quantifying inhibitory neurotransmission between midbrain dopaminergic neurons in brain slices from mice we have

  4. Attenuation of antagonist-induced impairment of dopamine receptors by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, M.I.M.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether chronic,long-term postnatal challenge of rat pups per se, with specific dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists, would modify the ontogeny of the respective receptor types. Since the neuropeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) attenuates the effect of haloperidol on dopamine D2 receptors in adult rats it was of interest to determine whether PLG would modulate antagonists-induced alterations in the ontogeny of striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Half of the rats were treated daily for 32 days from birth with SCH-23390, a selective dopamine D1 antagonist; or spiroperidol, a selective dopamine D2 antagonists; or both SCH-23390 and spiroperidol; or saline. The other half of the litters were treated with PLG, in combination with the other treatments. Animals were decapitated at 5, 8, and 12 weeks from birth for neurochemical analysis of the striatum. Chronic SCH-23390 treatment produced a 70-80% decrease in the binding of ({sup 3}H) SCH-23390 to striatal homogenates. The alteration at 5 weeks was associated with a 78% decrease in the Bmax for ({sup 3}H) SCH-23390 binding, and no change in the K{sub D}. Similarly, at 5, 8, and 12 weeks, chronic spiroperidol treatment reduced the binding of ({sup 3}H) spiroperidol to striatal homogenates by 70-80%.

  5. Dopamine D1 receptors within the basolateral amygdala mediate heroin-induced conditioned immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Szczytkowski, Jennifer L; Lysle, Donald T

    2010-09-14

    This study investigates the role of basolateral amygdala (BLA) dopamine in heroin-induced conditioned immunomodulation. Animals underwent conditioning in which heroin administration was repeatedly paired with placement into a conditioning chamber. Six days after the final conditioning session animals were returned to the chamber and received intra-BLA microinfusions of dopamine, D(1) or D(2), antagonist. Antagonism of D(1), but not D(2), receptors within the BLA blocked the suppressive effect of heroin-associated environmental stimuli on iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1β. This study is the first to demonstrate that the expression of heroin's conditioned effects on proinflammatory mediators require dopamine D(1) receptors within the BLA. PMID:20605224

  6. Adaptations of presynaptic dopamine terminals induced by psychostimulant self-administration.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Cody A; Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-21

    A great deal of research has focused on investigating neurobiological alterations induced by chronic psychostimulant use in an effort to describe, understand, and treat the pathology of psychostimulant addiction. It has been known for several decades that dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens is integrally involved in the selection and execution of motivated and goal-directed behaviors, and that psychostimulants act on this system to exert many of their effects. As such, a large body of work has focused on defining the consequences of psychostimulant use on dopamine signaling in the striatum as it relates to addictive behaviors. Here, we review presynaptic dopamine terminal alterations observed following self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine, as well as possible mechanisms by which these alterations occur and their impact on the progression of addiction. PMID:25491345

  7. Influence of idazoxan on the dopamine D2 receptor agonist-induced behavioural effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, F; Giuliani, D

    1993-11-30

    The behavioural effects in rats of the dopamine D2 receptor agonists, lisuride, B-HT 920 and SND 919, were variously influenced by pre-treatment with the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, idazoxan (2 mg/kg), depending on the nature of the effect in question and the doses of agonist employed. The influence of idazoxan on drug-induced stretching-yawning, penile erection, sedation, stereotyped behaviour, aggressiveness and mounting is described and tentatively interpreted in neurochemical terms, account being taken of the activity of respective alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist and dopamine receptor agonists used, at alpha 2-adrenoceptors and at different dopamine D2 receptor subtypes, pre- and postsynaptically located. PMID:7907024

  8. Measurement of depletion-induced force in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilitski, Fiodar; Ward, Andrew; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2014-03-01

    Microtubule (MT) bundles formed in the presence of non-adsorbing polymers - poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) or Dextran - are widely used in experimental active matter systems. However, many properties of such MT bundles have not been studied experimentally. In this work, we combine optical trapping techniques with an umbrella sampling method in order to measure the depletion force acting on individual microtubule in the axial direction within the bundle. We find depletion force is independent of bundle overlap length and measure its magnitude to be on the order of tens of kB/T μm. We explore the dependence of the depletion force on concentration of depletant (PEG 20K) as well as K+ ions (necessary for screening electrostatic repulsion between MT filaments). We also verify additivity of depletion interaction and confirm that force is increased by a factor of two for three-MT bundles. Additionally, our experimental technique allows us to probe interactions between MTs within the bundle. Experimental data suggests that filaments in the bundle interact only hydrodynamically when depletant concentrations are low enough; however, we observe onset of solid-like friction when osmotic pressure is increased above a certain threshold.

  9. The alcohol-induced locomotor stimulation and accumbal dopamine release is suppressed in ghrelin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Jerlhag, Elisabet; Landgren, Sara; Egecioglu, Emil; Dickson, Suzanne L; Engel, Jörgen A

    2011-06-01

    Ghrelin, the first endogenous ligand for the type 1A growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1A), plays a role in energy balance, feeding behavior, and reward. Previously, we showed that pharmacologic and genetic suppression of the GHS-R1A attenuates the alcohol-induced stimulation, accumbal dopamine release, and conditioned place preference as well as alcohol consumption in mice, implying that the GHS-R1A is required for alcohol reward. The present study further elucidates the role of ghrelin for alcohol-induced dopamine release in nucleus accumbens and locomotor stimulation by means of ghrelin knockout mice. We found that the ability of alcohol to increase accumbal dopamine release in wild-type mice is not observed in ghrelin knockout mice. Furthermore, alcohol induced a locomotor stimulation in the wild-type mice and ghrelin knockout mice; however, the locomotor stimulation in homozygote mice was significantly lower than in the wild-type mice. The present series of experiments suggest that endogenous ghrelin may be required for the ability of alcohol to activate the mesolimbic dopamine system. PMID:21145690

  10. Hyperthermia restores apoptosis induced by death receptors through aggregation-induced c-FLIP cytosolic depletion.

    PubMed

    Morlé, A; Garrido, C; Micheau, O

    2015-01-01

    TRAIL is involved in immune tumor surveillance and is considered a promising anti-cancer agent owing to its limited side effects on healthy cells. However, some cancer cells display resistance, or become resistant to TRAIL-induced cell death. Hyperthermia can enhance sensitivity to TRAIL-induced cell death in various resistant cancer cell lines, including lung, breast, colon or prostate carcinomas. Mild heat shock treatment has been proposed to restore Fas ligand or TRAIL-induced apoptosis through c-FLIP degradation or the mitochondrial pathway. We demonstrate here that neither the mitochondria nor c-FLIP degradation are required for TRAIL-induced cell death restoration during hyperthermia. Our data provide evidence that insolubilization of c-FLIP, alone, is sufficient to enhance apoptosis induced by death receptors. Hyperthermia induced c-FLIP depletion from the cytosolic fraction, without apparent degradation, thereby preventing c-FLIP recruitment to the TRAIL DISC and allowing efficient caspase-8 cleavage and apoptosis. Hyperthermia-induced c-FLIP depletion was independent of c-FLIP DED2 FL chain assembly motif or ubiquitination-mediated c-FLIP degradation, as assessed using c-FLIP point mutants on lysine 167 and 195 or threonine 166, a phosphorylation site known to regulate ubiquitination of c-FLIP. Rather, c-FLIP depletion was associated with aggregation, because addition of glycerol not only prevented the loss of c-FLIP from the cytosol but also enabled c-FLIP recruitment within the TRAIL DISC, thus inhibiting TRAIL-induced apoptosis during hyperthermia. Altogether our results demonstrate that c-FLIP is a thermosensitive protein whose targeting by hyperthermia allows restoration of apoptosis induced by TNF ligands, including TRAIL. Our findings suggest that combining TRAIL agonists with whole-body or localized hyperthermia may be an interesting approach in cancer therapy. PMID:25675293

  11. Multiple functions of Na/K-ATPase in dopamine-induced salivation of the Blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghun; Urban, Joshua; Boyle, Daniel L.; Park, Yoonseong

    2016-01-01

    Control of salivary secretion in ticks involves autocrine dopamine activating two dopamine receptors: D1 and Invertebrate-specific D1-like dopamine receptors. In this study, we investigated Na/K-ATPase as an important component of the secretory process. Immunoreactivity for Na/K-ATPase revealed basal infolding of lamellate cells in type-I, abluminal interstitial (epithelial) cells in type-II, and labyrinth-like infolding structures opening towards the lumen in type-III acini. Ouabain (10 μmol l−1), a specific inhibitor of Na/K-ATPase, abolished dopamine-induced salivary secretion by suppressing fluid transport in type III acini. At 1 μmol l−1, ouabain, the secreted saliva was hyperosmotic. This suggests that ouabain also inhibits an ion resorptive function of Na/K-ATPase in the type I acini. Dopamine/ouabain were not involved in activation of protein secretion, while dopamine-induced saliva contained constitutively basal level of protein. We hypothesize that the dopamine-dependent primary saliva formation, mediated by Na/K-ATPase in type III and type II acini, is followed by a dopamine-independent resorptive function of Na/K-ATPase in type I acini located in the proximal end of the salivary duct. PMID:26861075

  12. Vitamin D3: A Role in Dopamine Circuit Regulation, Diet-Induced Obesity, and Drug Consumption.

    PubMed

    Trinko, Joseph R; Land, Benjamin B; Solecki, Wojciech B; Wickham, Robert J; Tellez, Luis A; Maldonado-Aviles, Jaime; de Araujo, Ivan E; Addy, Nii A; DiLeone, Ralph J

    2016-01-01

    The influence of micronutrients on dopamine systems is not well defined. Using mice, we show a potential role for reduced dietary vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) in promoting diet-induced obesity (DIO), food intake, and drug consumption while on a high fat diet. To complement these deficiency studies, treatments with exogenous fully active vitamin D3 (calcitriol, 10 µg/kg, i.p.) were performed. Nondeficient mice that were made leptin resistant with a high fat diet displayed reduced food intake and body weight after an acute treatment with exogenous calcitriol. Dopamine neurons in the midbrain and their target neurons in the striatum were found to express vitamin D3 receptor protein. Acute calcitriol treatment led to transcriptional changes of dopamine-related genes in these regions in naive mice, enhanced amphetamine-induced dopamine release in both naive mice and rats, and increased locomotor activity after acute amphetamine treatment (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Alternatively, mice that were chronically fed either the reduced D3 high fat or chow diets displayed less activity after acute amphetamine treatment compared with their respective controls. Finally, high fat deficient mice that were trained to orally consume liquid amphetamine (90 mg/L) displayed increased consumption, while nondeficient mice treated with calcitriol showed reduced consumption. Our findings suggest that reduced dietary D3 may be a contributing environmental factor enhancing DIO as well as drug intake while eating a high fat diet. Moreover, these data demonstrate that dopamine circuits are modulated by D3 signaling, and may serve as direct or indirect targets for exogenous calcitriol. PMID:27257625

  13. Shock induced multi-mode damage in depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, Darcie D; Cerreta, Ellen K; Gray, Ill, George T

    2009-01-01

    Recent dynamic damage studies on depleted uranium samples have revealed mixed mode failure mechanisms leading to incipient cracking as well as ductile failure processes. Results show that delamination of inclusions upon compression may provide nucleation sites for damage initiation in the form of crack tip production. However, under tension the material propagates cracks in a mixed shear localization and mode-I ductile tearing and cracking. Cracks tips appear to link up through regions of severe, shear dominated plastic flow. Shock recovery experiments were conducted on a 50 mm single stage light gas gun. Serial metallographic sectioning was conducted on the recovered samples to characterize the bulk response of the sample. Experiments show delaminated inclusions due to uniaxial compression without damage propagation. Further results show the propagation of the damage through tensile loading to the incipient state, illustrating ductile processes coupled with mixed mode-I tensile ductile tearing, shear localization, and mode-I cracking in depleted uranium.

  14. Amphetamine elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine via an action potential-dependent mechanism that is modulated by endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Covey, Dan P; Bunner, Kendra D; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Cheer, Joseph F; Garris, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of abused drugs are mediated by their ability to elevate nucleus accumbens dopamine. Amphetamine (AMPH) was historically thought to increase dopamine by an action potential-independent, non-exocytotic type of release called efflux, involving reversal of dopamine transporter function and driven by vesicular dopamine depletion. Growing evidence suggests that AMPH also acts by an action potential-dependent mechanism. Indeed, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that AMPH activates dopamine transients, reward-related phasic signals generated by burst firing of dopamine neurons and dependent on intact vesicular dopamine. Not established for AMPH but indicating a shared mechanism, endocannabinoids facilitate this activation of dopamine transients by broad classes of abused drugs. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry coupled to pharmacological manipulations in awake rats, we investigated the action potential and endocannabinoid dependence of AMPH-induced elevations in nucleus accumbens dopamine. AMPH increased the frequency, amplitude and duration of transients, which were observed riding on top of slower dopamine increases. Surprisingly, silencing dopamine neuron firing abolished all AMPH-induced dopamine elevations, identifying an action potential-dependent origin. Blocking cannabinoid type 1 receptors prevented AMPH from increasing transient frequency, similar to reported effects on other abused drugs, but not from increasing transient duration and inhibiting dopamine uptake. Thus, AMPH elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine by eliciting transients via cannabinoid type 1 receptors and promoting the summation of temporally coincident transients, made more numerous, larger and wider by AMPH. Collectively, these findings are inconsistent with AMPH eliciting action potential-independent dopamine efflux and vesicular dopamine depletion, and support endocannabinoids facilitating phasic dopamine signalling as a common action in drug reinforcement

  15. Macrophage depletion ameliorates nephritis induced by pathogenic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Samantha A.; Chitu, Violeta; Herlitz, Leal C.; Sahu, Ranjit; Stanley, E. Richard; Putterman, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Objective Kidney involvement affects 40–60% of patients with lupus and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Using depletion approaches, several studies have suggested that macrophages may play a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. However, “off target” effects of macrophage depletion, such as altered hematopoiesis or enhanced autoantibody production, impeded the determination of a conclusive relationship. Methods In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in mice receiving rabbit anti-glomerular antibodies, or nephrotoxic serum (NTS), an experimental model which closely mimics the immune complex mediated disease seen in murine and human lupus nephritis. GW2580, a selective inhibitor of the colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor kinase, was used for macrophage depletion. Results We found that GW2580-treated, NTS challenged mice did not develop the increased levels of proteinuria, serum creatinine, or serum urea seen in control-treated, NTS challenged mice. NTS challenged mice exhibited significantly increased kidney expression of inflammatory cytokines including RANTES, IP-10, VCAM-1 and iNOS, whereas GW2580-treated mice were protected from the robust expression of these inflammatory cytokines that are associated with LN. Quantification of macrophage related gene expression, flow cytometry analysis of kidney single cell suspensions, and immunofluorescence staining confirmed the depletion of macrophages in GW2580-treated mice, specifically within renal glomeruli. Conclusions Our results strongly implicate a specific and necessary role for macrophages in the development of immune glomerulonephritis mediated by pathogenic antibodies, and support the development of macrophage targeting approaches for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:25554644

  16. Macrophage depletion ameliorates nephritis induced by pathogenic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Samantha A; Chitu, Violeta; Herlitz, Leal C; Sahu, Ranjit; Stanley, E Richard; Putterman, Chaim

    2015-02-01

    Kidney involvement affects 40-60% of patients with lupus, and is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Using depletion approaches, several studies have suggested that macrophages may play a key role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. However, "off target" effects of macrophage depletion, such as altered hematopoiesis or enhanced autoantibody production, impeded the determination of a conclusive relationship. In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in mice receiving rabbit anti-glomerular antibodies, or nephrotoxic serum (NTS), an experimental model which closely mimics the immune complex mediated disease seen in murine and human lupus nephritis. GW2580, a selective inhibitor of the colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor kinase, was used for macrophage depletion. We found that GW2580-treated, NTS challenged mice did not develop the increased levels of proteinuria, serum creatinine, and BUN seen in control-treated, NTS challenged mice. NTS challenged mice exhibited significantly increased kidney expression of inflammatory cytokines including RANTES, IP-10, VCAM-1 and iNOS, whereas GW2580-treated mice were protected from the robust expression of these inflammatory cytokines that are associated with lupus nephritis. Quantification of macrophage related gene expression, flow cytometry analysis of kidney single cell suspensions, and immunofluorescence staining confirmed the depletion of macrophages in GW2580-treated mice, specifically within renal glomeruli. Our results strongly implicate a specific and necessary role for macrophages in the development of immune glomerulonephritis mediated by pathogenic antibodies, and support the development of macrophage targeting approaches for the treatment of lupus nephritis. PMID:25554644

  17. A search for relativistic electron induced stratospheric ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Possible ozone changes at 1 mb associated with the time variation and precipitation of relativistic electrons are investigated by examining the NIMBUS 7 SBUV ozone data set and corresponding temperatures derived from NMC data. No ozone depletion was observed in high-latitude summer when temperature fluctuations are small. In winter more variation in ozone occurs, but large temperature changes make it difficult to identify specific ozone decreases as being the result of relativistic electron precipitation.

  18. Drug-induced up-regulation of dopamine D2 receptors on cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Starr, S; Kozell, L B; Neve, K A

    1995-08-01

    Ligand-induced up-regulation of recombinant dopamine D2 receptors was assessed using C6 glioma cells stably expressing the short (415-amino-acid; D2s) and long (444-amino-acid; D2L) forms of the receptor. Overnight treatment of C6-D2L cells with N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the density of receptors, as assessed by the binding of radioligand to membranes prepared from the cells, with no change in the affinity of the receptors for the radioligand. The effect of 10 microM NPA was maximal after 10 h, at which time the density of D2L receptors was more than doubled. The agonists dopamine and quinpirole also increased the density of D2L receptors. The receptor up-regulation was not specific for agonists, because the antagonists epidepride, sulpiride, and domperidone caused smaller (30-60%) increases in receptor density. Prolonged treatment with 10 microM NPA desensitized D2L receptors, as evidenced by a reduced ability of dopamine to inhibit adenylyl cyclase, whereas treatment with sulpiride was associated with an enhanced responsiveness to dopamine. The magnitude of NPA-induced receptor up-regulation in each of four clonal lines of C6-D2L cells (mean increase, 80%) was greater than in all four lines of C6-D2S cells (33%). Inactivation of pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins had no effect on the basal density of D2L receptors or on the NPA-induced receptor up-regulation. Treatment with 5 micrograms/ml of cycloheximide, on the other hand, decreased the basal density of receptors and attenuated, but did not prevent, the NPA-induced increase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7616211

  19. Systematic analysis of dopamine receptor genes (DRD1-DRD5) in antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Müller, D J; Zai, C C; Sicard, M; Remington, E; Souza, R P; Tiwari, A K; Hwang, R; Likhodi, O; Shaikh, S; Freeman, N; Arenovich, T; Heinz, A; Meltzer, H Y; Lieberman, J A; Kennedy, J L

    2012-04-01

    Antipsychotic-induced weight gain has emerged as a serious complication in the treatment of patients with most antipsychotics. We have conducted the first in-depth examination of dopamine receptor genes in antipsychotic-induced weight gain. A total of 206 patients (139 of European descent and 56 African Americans) who underwent treatment for chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were evaluated after on average over 6 weeks of treatment. Thirty-six tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and one variable-number tandem repeat, spanning the five dopamine receptor genes (DRD1-DRD5) were analyzed. In the total sample, we found a nominally significant association between the DRD2 rs1079598 marker and weight change using a cutoff of 7% gain (P=0.03). When stratifying the sample according to ethnicity and antipsychotics with highest risk for weight gain, we found significant associations in three DRD2 SNPs: rs6277 (C957T), rs1079598 and rs1800497 (TaqIA). The other genes were primarily negative. We provide evidence that dopamine receptor DRD2 gene variants might be associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain in chronic schizophrenia patients. PMID:20714340

  20. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of depletion-induced interactions for soft matter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Bertrand, Martin; Harden, James L.; Slater, Gary W.; Haan, Hendrick W. de

    2014-12-28

    Given the ubiquity of depletion effects in biological and other soft matter systems, it is desirable to have coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation approaches appropriate for the study of complex systems. This paper examines the use of two common truncated Lennard-Jones (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA)) potentials to describe a pair of colloidal particles in a thermal bath of depletants. The shifted-WCA model is the steeper of the two repulsive potentials considered, while the combinatorial-WCA model is the softer. It is found that the depletion-induced well depth for the combinatorial-WCA model is significantly deeper than the shifted-WCA model because the resulting overlap of the colloids yields extra accessible volume for depletants. For both shifted- and combinatorial-WCA simulations, the second virial coefficients and pair potentials between colloids are demonstrated to be well approximated by the Morphometric Thermodynamics (MT) model. This agreement suggests that the presence of depletants can be accurately modelled in MD simulations by implicitly including them through simple, analytical MT forms for depletion-induced interactions. Although both WCA potentials are found to be effective generic coarse-grained simulation approaches for studying depletion effects in complicated soft matter systems, combinatorial-WCA is the more efficient approach as depletion effects are enhanced at lower depletant densities. The findings indicate that for soft matter systems that are better modelled by potentials with some compressibility, predictions from hard-sphere systems could greatly underestimate the magnitude of depletion effects at a given depletant density.

  1. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of depletion-induced interactions for soft matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Bertrand, Martin; Harden, James L.; Slater, Gary W.; de Haan, Hendrick W.

    2014-12-01

    Given the ubiquity of depletion effects in biological and other soft matter systems, it is desirable to have coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation approaches appropriate for the study of complex systems. This paper examines the use of two common truncated Lennard-Jones (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA)) potentials to describe a pair of colloidal particles in a thermal bath of depletants. The shifted-WCA model is the steeper of the two repulsive potentials considered, while the combinatorial-WCA model is the softer. It is found that the depletion-induced well depth for the combinatorial-WCA model is significantly deeper than the shifted-WCA model because the resulting overlap of the colloids yields extra accessible volume for depletants. For both shifted- and combinatorial-WCA simulations, the second virial coefficients and pair potentials between colloids are demonstrated to be well approximated by the Morphometric Thermodynamics (MT) model. This agreement suggests that the presence of depletants can be accurately modelled in MD simulations by implicitly including them through simple, analytical MT forms for depletion-induced interactions. Although both WCA potentials are found to be effective generic coarse-grained simulation approaches for studying depletion effects in complicated soft matter systems, combinatorial-WCA is the more efficient approach as depletion effects are enhanced at lower depletant densities. The findings indicate that for soft matter systems that are better modelled by potentials with some compressibility, predictions from hard-sphere systems could greatly underestimate the magnitude of depletion effects at a given depletant density.

  2. Myc Depletion Induces a Pluripotent Dormant State Mimicking Diapause

    PubMed Central

    Scognamiglio, Roberta; Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Thier, Marc Christian; Altamura, Sandro; Reyes, Alejandro; Prendergast, Áine M.; Baumgärtner, Daniel; Carnevalli, Larissa S.; Atzberger, Ann; Haas, Simon; von Paleske, Lisa; Boroviak, Thorsten; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Essers, Marieke A.G.; Kloz, Ulrich; Eisenman, Robert N.; Edenhofer, Frank; Bertone, Paul; Huber, Wolfgang; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Smith, Austin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are maintained in a naive ground state of pluripotency in the presence of MEK and GSK3 inhibitors. Here, we show that ground-state ESCs express low Myc levels. Deletion of both c-myc and N-myc (dKO) or pharmacological inhibition of Myc activity strongly decreases transcription, splicing, and protein synthesis, leading to proliferation arrest. This process is reversible and occurs without affecting pluripotency, suggesting that Myc-depleted stem cells enter a state of dormancy similar to embryonic diapause. Indeed, c-Myc is depleted in diapaused blastocysts, and the differential expression signatures of dKO ESCs and diapaused epiblasts are remarkably similar. Following Myc inhibition, pre-implantation blastocysts enter biosynthetic dormancy but can progress through their normal developmental program after transfer into pseudo-pregnant recipients. Our study shows that Myc controls the biosynthetic machinery of stem cells without affecting their potency, thus regulating their entry and exit from the dormant state. PMID:26871632

  3. Myc Depletion Induces a Pluripotent Dormant State Mimicking Diapause.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, Roberta; Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Thier, Marc Christian; Altamura, Sandro; Reyes, Alejandro; Prendergast, Áine M; Baumgärtner, Daniel; Carnevalli, Larissa S; Atzberger, Ann; Haas, Simon; von Paleske, Lisa; Boroviak, Thorsten; Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Essers, Marieke A G; Kloz, Ulrich; Eisenman, Robert N; Edenhofer, Frank; Bertone, Paul; Huber, Wolfgang; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Smith, Austin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2016-02-11

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are maintained in a naive ground state of pluripotency in the presence of MEK and GSK3 inhibitors. Here, we show that ground-state ESCs express low Myc levels. Deletion of both c-myc and N-myc (dKO) or pharmacological inhibition of Myc activity strongly decreases transcription, splicing, and protein synthesis, leading to proliferation arrest. This process is reversible and occurs without affecting pluripotency, suggesting that Myc-depleted stem cells enter a state of dormancy similar to embryonic diapause. Indeed, c-Myc is depleted in diapaused blastocysts, and the differential expression signatures of dKO ESCs and diapaused epiblasts are remarkably similar. Following Myc inhibition, pre-implantation blastocysts enter biosynthetic dormancy but can progress through their normal developmental program after transfer into pseudo-pregnant recipients. Our study shows that Myc controls the biosynthetic machinery of stem cells without affecting their potency, thus regulating their entry and exit from the dormant state. PMID:26871632

  4. Inducible depletion of adult skeletal muscle stem cells impairs the regeneration of neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxuan; Wei-LaPierre, Lan; Klose, Alanna; Dirksen, Robert T; Chakkalakal, Joe V

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle maintenance depends on motor innervation at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Multiple mechanisms contribute to NMJ repair and maintenance; however muscle stem cells (satellite cells, SCs), are deemed to have little impact on these processes. Therefore, the applicability of SC studies to attenuate muscle loss due to NMJ deterioration as observed in neuromuscular diseases and aging is ambiguous. We employed mice with an inducible Cre, and conditionally expressed DTA to deplete or GFP to track SCs. We found SC depletion exacerbated muscle atrophy and type transitions connected to neuromuscular disruption. Also, elevated fibrosis and further declines in force generation were specific to SC depletion and neuromuscular disruption. Fate analysis revealed SC activity near regenerating NMJs. Moreover, SC depletion aggravated deficits in reinnervation and post-synaptic morphology at regenerating NMJs. Therefore, our results propose a mechanism whereby further NMJ and skeletal muscle decline ensues upon SC depletion and neuromuscular disruption. PMID:26312504

  5. Parkin Controls Dopamine Utilization in Human Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Houbo; Ren, Yong; Yuen, Eunice Y; Zhong, Ping; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Hu, Zhixing; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Yan, Zhen; Feng, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is defined by the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons and can be caused by monogenic mutations of genes such as parkin. The lack of phenotype in parkin knockout mice suggests that human nigral DA neurons have unique vulnerabilities. Through the generation and analyses of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from normal subjects and PD patients with parkin mutations, we show here that loss of parkin in human midbrain DA neurons greatly increased the transcription of monoamine oxidases and oxidative stress, significantly reduced DA uptake and increased spontaneous DA release. Lentiviral expression of parkin, but not its PD-linked mutant, rescued all the phenotypes. The results suggest that parkin controls dopamine utilization in human midbrain DA neurons by enhancing the precision of dopaminergic neurotransmission and suppressing dopamine oxidation. Thus, the study provides novel targets and a physiologically relevant screening platform for disease-modifying therapies of PD. PMID:22314364

  6. Parkin controls dopamine utilization in human midbrain dopaminergic neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Houbo; Ren, Yong; Yuen, Eunice Y; Zhong, Ping; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Hu, Zhixing; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Yan, Zhen; Feng, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is defined by the degeneration of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons and can be caused by monogenic mutations of genes such as parkin. The lack of phenotype in parkin knockout mice suggests that human nigral DA neurons have unique vulnerabilities. Here we generate induced pluripotent stem cells from normal subjects and PD patients with parkin mutations. We demonstrate that loss of parkin in human midbrain DA neurons greatly increases the transcription of monoamine oxidases and oxidative stress, significantly reduces DA uptake and increases spontaneous DA release. Lentiviral expression of parkin, but not its PD-linked mutant, rescues these phenotypes. The results suggest that parkin controls dopamine utilization in human midbrain DA neurons by enhancing the precision of DA neurotransmission and suppressing dopamine oxidation. Thus, the study provides novel targets and a physiologically relevant screening platform for disease-modifying therapies of PD. PMID:22314364

  7. The decrease in hypothalamic dopamine secretion induced by suckling: comparison of voltammetric and radioisotopic methods of measurement. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Plotsky, P.M.; Neill, J.D.

    1982-03-01

    Previous in situ voltammetric microelectrode measurements of median eminence dopamine release during mammary nerve stimulation of anesthetized lactating rats revealed a transient (1-3 min) 70% decline of dopamine concentrations. This dopamine was believed to be destined for secretion into the hypophysial portal circulation, but direct experimental support for this supposition was lacking. Thus, in the present study, (3H)dopamine release into brief sequential samples of hypophysial portal blood was compared with dopamine release in the median eminence measured by voltammetry. Lactating female rats were urethane anesthetized, and the median eminence pituitary region was exposed. (3H)Tyrosine was injected into a jugular cannula (100 microCi) followed by continuous infusion (5 microCi/min). In a preliminary experiment, this regimen produced a steady state level of (3H)dopamine in the portal blood within 45 min. In subsequent experiments, portal blood was collected as sequential 3-min samples, and electrochemical sampling from a microelectrode placed in the median eminence occurred at 1-min intervals. Electrochemical current resulting from the oxidation of dopamine in the medial median eminence was unvarying throughout the 75-min experiment in control rats (n . 4) and during the 30-min control period preceding mammary nerve stimulation in the other group (n . 4). These results were paralled by (3H) dopamine levels in portal blood during the same periods of time. All animals showed simultaneous decreases in oxidation current and (3H)dopamine levels within 1-4 min after initiation of mammary nerve stimulation. These and earlier results demonstrate that mammary nerve stimulation (and by extension, suckling) induces a momentary, but profound, decrease in hypothalamic dopamine secretion which precedes or accompanies the rise in PRL secretion evoked by the same stimulus.

  8. The ovarian DNA damage repair response is induced prior to phosphoramide mustard-induced follicle depletion, and ataxia telangiectasia mutated inhibition prevents PM-induced follicle depletion.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Keating, Aileen F

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM) is an ovotoxic metabolite of cyclophosphamide and destroys primordial and primary follicles potentially by DNA damage induction. The temporal pattern by which PM induces DNA damage and initiation of the ovarian response to DNA damage has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated DNA damage initiation, the DNA repair response, as well as induction of follicular demise using a neonatal rat ovarian culture system. Additionally, to delineate specific mechanisms involved in the ovarian response to PM exposure, utility was made of PKC delta (PKCδ) deficient mice as well as an ATM inhibitor (KU 55933; AI). Fisher 344 PND4 rat ovaries were cultured for 12, 24, 48 or 96h in medium containing DMSO ±60μM PM or KU 55933 (48h; 10nM). PM-induced activation of DNA damage repair genes was observed as early as 12h post-exposure. ATM, PARP1, E2F7, P73 and CASP3 abundance were increased but RAD51 and BCL2 protein decreased after 96h of PM exposure. PKCδ deficiency reduced numbers of all follicular stages, but did not have an additive impact on PM-induced ovotoxicity. ATM inhibition protected all follicle stages from PM-induced depletion. In conclusion, the ovarian DNA damage repair response is active post-PM exposure, supporting that DNA damage contributes to PM-induced ovotoxicity. PMID:26708502

  9. Differential subcellular distribution of rat brain dopamine receptors and subtype-specific redistribution induced by cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Voulalas, Pamela J.; Schetz, John; Undieh, Ashiwel S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the subcellular distribution of dopamine D1, D2 and D5 receptor subtypes in rat frontal cortex, and examined whether psychostimulant-induced elevation of synaptic dopamine could alter the receptor distribution. Differential detergent solubilization and density gradient centrifugation were used to separate various subcellular fractions, followed by semi-quantitative determination of the relative abundance of specific receptor proteins in each fraction. D1 receptors were predominantly localized to detergent-resistant membranes, and a portion of these receptors also floated on sucrose gradients. These properties are characteristic of proteins found in lipid rafts and caveolae. D2 receptors exhibited variable distribution between cytoplasmic, detergent-soluble and detergent-resistant membrane fractions, yet were not present in buoyant membranes. Most D5 receptor immunoreactivity was distributed into the cytoplasmic fraction, failing to sediment at forces up to 300,000g, while the remainder was localized to detergent-soluble membranes in cortex. D5 receptors were undetectable in detergent-resistant fractions or raft-like subdomains. Following daily cocaine administration for seven days, a significant portion of D1 receptors translocated from detergent-resistant membranes to detergent-soluble membranes and the cytoplasmic fraction. The distributions of D5 and D2 receptor subtypes were not significantly altered by cocaine treatment. These data imply that D5 receptors are predominantly cytoplasmic, D2 receptors are diffusely distributed within the cell, whereas D1 receptors are mostly localized to lipid rafts within the rat frontal cortex. Dopamine receptor subtype localization is susceptible to modulation by pharmacological manipulations that elevate synaptic dopamine, however the functional implications of such drug-induced receptor warrant further investigation. PMID:21236347

  10. Depletion force induced collective motion of microtubules driven by kinesin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Mahmot, Bulbul; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Farhana, Tamanna Ishrat; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Sada, Kazuki; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being considered a model system to experimentally investigate various aspects of group behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. In the in vitro gliding assay, cytoskeletal filaments F-actin or microtubules are driven by the surface immobilized associated biomolecular motors myosin or dynein respectively. Although the F-actin/myosin or microtubule/dynein system was found to be promising in understanding the collective motion and pattern formation by self-propelled objects, the most widely used biomolecular motor system microtubule/kinesin could not be successfully employed so far in this regard. Failure in exhibiting collective motion by kinesin driven microtubules is attributed to the intrinsic properties of kinesin, which was speculated to affect the behavior of individual gliding microtubules and mutual interactions among them. In this work, for the first time, we have demonstrated the collective motion of kinesin driven microtubules by regulating the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules, by employing a depletion force among them. Proper regulation of the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules through the employment of the depletion force was found to allow the exhibition of collective motion and stream pattern formation by the microtubules. This work offers a universal means for demonstrating the collective motion using the in vitro gliding assay of biomolecular motor systems and will help obtain a meticulous understanding of the fascinating coordinated behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects.Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being

  11. Depletion force induced collective motion of microtubules driven by kinesin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Mahmot, Bulbul; Kabir, Arif Md Rashedul; Farhana, Tamanna Ishrat; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Sada, Kazuki; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2015-11-21

    Collective motion is a fascinating example of coordinated behavior of self-propelled objects, which is often associated with the formation of large scale patterns. Nowadays, the in vitro gliding assay is being considered a model system to experimentally investigate various aspects of group behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. In the in vitro gliding assay, cytoskeletal filaments F-actin or microtubules are driven by the surface immobilized associated biomolecular motors myosin or dynein respectively. Although the F-actin/myosin or microtubule/dynein system was found to be promising in understanding the collective motion and pattern formation by self-propelled objects, the most widely used biomolecular motor system microtubule/kinesin could not be successfully employed so far in this regard. Failure in exhibiting collective motion by kinesin driven microtubules is attributed to the intrinsic properties of kinesin, which was speculated to affect the behavior of individual gliding microtubules and mutual interactions among them. In this work, for the first time, we have demonstrated the collective motion of kinesin driven microtubules by regulating the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules, by employing a depletion force among them. Proper regulation of the mutual interaction among the gliding microtubules through the employment of the depletion force was found to allow the exhibition of collective motion and stream pattern formation by the microtubules. This work offers a universal means for demonstrating the collective motion using the in vitro gliding assay of biomolecular motor systems and will help obtain a meticulous understanding of the fascinating coordinated behavior and pattern formation by self-propelled objects. PMID:26260025

  12. Temporal pore pressure induced stress changes during injection and depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Birgit; Heidbach, Oliver; Schilling, Frank; Fuchs, Karl; Röckel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Induced seismicity is observed during injection of fluids in oil, gas or geothermal wells as a rather immediate response close to the injection wells due to the often high-rate pressurization. It was recognized even earlier in connection with more moderate rate injection of fluid waste on a longer time frame but higher induced event magnitudes. Today, injection-related induced seismicity significantly increased the number of events with M>3 in the Mid U.S. However, induced seismicity is also observed during production of fluids and gas, even years after the onset of production. E.g. in the Groningen gas field production was required to be reduced due to the increase in felt and damaging seismicity after more than 50 years of exploitation of that field. Thus, injection and production induced seismicity can cause severe impact in terms of hazard but also on economic measures. In order to understand the different onset times of induced seismicity we built a generic model to quantify the role of poro-elasticity processes with special emphasis on the factors time, regional crustal stress conditions and fault parameters for three case studies (injection into a low permeable crystalline rock, hydrothermal circulation and production of fluids). With this approach we consider the spatial and temporal variation of reservoir stress paths, the "early" injection-related induced events during stimulation and the "late" production induced ones. Furthermore, in dependence of the undisturbed in situ stress field conditions the stress tensor can change significantly due to injection and long-term production with changes of the tectonic stress regime in which previously not critically stressed faults could turn to be optimally oriented for fault reactivation.

  13. Visualization and ligand-induced modulation of dopamine receptor dimerization at the single molecule level.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Alina; Weisenburger, Siegfried; Banerjee, Ashutosh; Purkayastha, Nirupam; Kaindl, Jonas M; Hübner, Harald; Wei, Luxi; Grömer, Teja W; Kornhuber, Johannes; Tschammer, Nuska; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Mashanov, Gregory I; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors, represent a group of important pharmacological targets. An increased formation of dopamine receptor D2 homodimers has been suggested to be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Selective labeling and ligand-induced modulation of dimerization may therefore allow the investigation of the pathophysiological role of these dimers. Using TIRF microscopy at the single molecule level, transient formation of homodimers of dopamine receptors in the membrane of stably transfected CHO cells has been observed. The equilibrium between dimers and monomers was modulated by the binding of ligands; whereas antagonists showed a ratio that was identical to that of unliganded receptors, agonist-bound D2 receptor-ligand complexes resulted in an increase in dimerization. Addition of bivalent D2 receptor ligands also resulted in a large increase in D2 receptor dimers. A physical interaction between the protomers was confirmed using high resolution cryogenic localization microscopy, with ca. 9 nm between the centers of mass. PMID:27615810

  14. Running wheel exercise enhances recovery from nigrostriatal dopamine injury without inducing neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, S J; Gross, N B; Fricks, A N; Casiano, B D; Nguyen, T B; Marshall, J F

    2007-02-01

    Forced use of the forelimb contralateral to a unilateral injection of the dopaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine can promote recovery of motor function in that limb and can significantly decrease damage to dopamine terminals. The present study was conducted to determine (1) whether a form of voluntary exercise, wheel running, would improve motor performance in rats with such lesions, and (2) whether any beneficial effects of wheel running are attributable to ameliorating the dopaminergic damage. In experiment 1, rats were allowed to run in exercise wheels or kept in home cages for 2 1/2 weeks, then given stereotaxic infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine into the left striatum. The rats were replaced into their original environments (wheels or home cages) for four additional weeks, and asymmetries in forelimb use were quantified at 3, 10, 17, and 24 days postoperatively. After killing, dopaminergic damage was assessed by both quantifying 3 beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125)I]RTI-55) binding to striatal dopamine transporters and counting tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra. Exercised 6-hydroxydopamine-infused rats showed improved motor outcomes relative to sedentary lesioned controls, effects that were most apparent at postoperative days 17 and 24. Despite this behavioral improvement, 6-hydroxydopamine-induced loss of striatal dopamine transporters and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive nigral cells in exercised and sedentary groups did not differ. Since prior studies suggested that forced limb use improves motor performance by sparing nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine damage, experiment 2 used a combined regimen of forced plus voluntary wheel running. Again, we found that the motor performance of exercised rats improved more rapidly than that of sedentary controls, but that there were no differences between these groups in the damage produced by 6-hydroxydopamine. It appears that voluntary

  15. The combined depletion of monoamines alters the effectiveness of subthalamic deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Faggiani, Emilie; Delaville, Claire; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid

    2015-10-01

    Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease are under-studied and therefore not well treated. Here, we investigated the role of combined depletions of dopamine, norepinephrine and/or serotonin in the manifestation of motor and non-motor deficits in the rat. Then, we studied the impact of these depletions on the efficacy of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS). We performed selective depletions of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, and the behavioral effects of different combined depletions were investigated using the open field, the elevated plus maze and the forced swim test. Bilateral dopamine depletion alone induced locomotor deficits associated with anxiety and mild "depressive-like" behaviors. Although additional depletions of norepinephrine and/or serotonin did not potentiate locomotor and anxiety disorders, combined depletions of the three monoamines dramatically exacerbated "depressive-like" behavior. STN-DBS markedly reversed locomotor deficits and anxiety behavior in animals with bilateral dopamine depletion alone. However, these improvements were reduced or lost by the additional depletion of norepinephrine and/or serotonin, indicating that the depletion of these monoamines may interfere with the antiparkinsonian efficacy of STN-DBS. Furthermore, our results showed that acute STN-DBS improved "depressive-like" disorder in animals with bilateral depletion of dopamine and also in animals with combined depletions of the three monoamines, which induced severe immobility in the forced swim test. Our data highlight the key role of monoamine depletions in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depressive-like disorders and provide the first evidence of their negative consequences on the efficacy of STN-DBS upon the motor and anxiety disorders in the context of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26206409

  16. Phosphodiesterase 2 and 5 inhibition attenuates the object memory deficit induced by acute tryptophan depletion.

    PubMed

    van Donkelaar, Eva L; Rutten, Kris; Blokland, Arjan; Akkerman, Sven; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Prickaerts, Jos

    2008-12-14

    The underlying mechanism of short-term memory improvement after inhibition of specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs) is still poorly understood. The present study aimed to reveal the ability of PDE5 and PDE2 inhibitors, that increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cGMP, respectively, to reverse an object recognition deficit induced by acute tryptophan depletion. Acute tryptophan depletion is a pharmacological challenge tool to lower central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) levels by depleting the availability of its dietary precursor tryptophan. Short-term object memory was tested in male Wistar rats by exposing them to the object recognition task. First, the effects of acute tryptophan depletion upon object recognition 2 h after administration of the nutritional mixture were established. Subsequently, acute tryptophan depletion was combined with the PDE5 inhibitor vardenafil (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg) or with the PDE2 inhibitor BAY 60-7550 (0.3, 1 and 3 mg/kg), 30 min prior to testing. Acute tryptophan depletion significantly lowered plasma tryptophan levels and impaired object recognition performance. Vardenafil (3 and 10 mg/kg) and BAY 60-7550 (3 mg/kg) were able to attenuate the acute tryptophan depletion induced object recognition impairment. Thus, both PDE5 and PDE2 inhibition improved short-term object recognition performance after an acute tryptophan depletion induced deficit. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood and further studies are needed to determine whether the present findings can be explained by a direct effect of enhanced cAMP and cGMP levels upon 5-HT activity, or even other neurotransmitter systems, and possibly an interaction with synthesis of nitric oxide or effects upon cerebral blood flow function. PMID:18957291

  17. Increased L-DOPA-derived dopamine following selective MAO-A or-B inhibition in rat striatum depleted of dopaminergic and serotonergic innervation

    PubMed Central

    Sader-Mazbar, O; Loboda, Y; Rabey, M J; Finberg, J P M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Selective MAO type B (MAO-B) inhibitors are effective in potentiation of the clinical effect of L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease, but dopamine (DA) is deaminated mainly by MAO type A (MAO-A) in rat brain. We sought to clarify the roles of MAO-A and MAO-B in deamination of DA formed from exogenous L-DOPA in rat striatum depleted of dopaminergic, or both dopaminergic and serotonergic innervations. We also studied the effect of organic cation transporter-3 (OCT-3) inhibition by decinium-22 on extracellular DA levels following L-DOPA. Experimental Approach Striatal dopaminergic and/or serotonergic neuronal innervations were lesioned by 6-hydroxydopamine or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine respectively. Microdialysate DA levels after systemic L-DOPA were measured after inhibition of MAO-A or MAO-B by clorgyline or rasagiline respectively. MAO subtype localization in the striatum was determined by immunofluorescence. Key Results Rasagiline increased DA extracellular levels following L-DOPA to a greater extent in double-than in single-lesioned rats (2.8-and 1.8-fold increase, respectively, relative to saline treatment); however, clorgyline elevated DA levels in both models over 10-fold. MAO-A was strongly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in intact and lesioned striata, while MAO-B was localized in glia and to a small extent in MSNs. Inhibition of OCT-3 increased DA levels in the double-more than the single-lesion animals. Conclusions and Implications In striatum devoid of dopaminergic and serotonergic inputs, most deamination of L-DOPA-derived DA is mediated by MAO-A in MSN and a smaller amount by MAO-B in both MSN and glia. OCT-3 plays a significant role in uptake of DA from extracellular space. Inhibitors of OCT-3 are potential future targets for anti-Parkinsonian treatments. PMID:23992249

  18. Kappa Opioid Receptor-Induced Aversion Requires p38 MAPK Activation in VTA Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Jonathan M.; Messinger, Daniel I.; Knakal, Cerise R.; Kuhar, Jamie R.; Schattauer, Selena S.; Bruchas, Michael R.; Zweifel, Larry S.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Phillips, Paul E.M.

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous dynorphin-κ opioid receptor (KOR) system encodes the dysphoric component of the stress response and controls the risk of depression-like and addiction behaviors; however, the molecular and neural circuit mechanisms are not understood. In this study, we report that KOR activation of p38α MAPK in ventral tegmental (VTA) dopaminergic neurons was required for conditioned place aversion (CPA) in mice. Conditional genetic deletion of floxed KOR or floxed p38α MAPK by Cre recombinase expression in dopaminergic neurons blocked place aversion to the KOR agonist U50,488. Selective viral rescue by wild-type KOR expression in dopaminergic neurons of KOR−/− mice restored U50,488-CPA, whereas expression of a mutated form of KOR that could not initiate p38α MAPK activation did not. Surprisingly, while p38α MAPK inactivation blocked U50,488-CPA, p38α MAPK was not required for KOR inhibition of evoked dopamine release measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens. In contrast, KOR activation acutely inhibited VTA dopaminergic neuron firing, and repeated exposure attenuated the opioid response. This adaptation to repeated exposure was blocked by conditional deletion of p38α MAPK, which also blocked KOR-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK) subunit Kir3.1 in VTA dopaminergic neurons. Consistent with the reduced response, GIRK phosphorylation at this amino terminal tyrosine residue (Y12) enhances channel deactivation. Thus, contrary to prevailing expectations, these results suggest that κ opioid-induced aversion requires regulation of VTA dopaminergic neuron somatic excitability through a p38α MAPK effect on GIRK deactivation kinetics rather than by presynaptically inhibiting dopamine release. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) agonists have the potential to be effective, nonaddictive analgesics, but their therapeutic utility is greatly limited by adverse effects on mood

  19. Demon voltammetry and analysis software: Analysis of cocaine-induced alterations in dopamine signaling using multiple kinetic measures

    PubMed Central

    Yorgason, Jordan T.; España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    The fast sampling rates of fast scan cyclic voltammetry make it a favorable method for measuring changes in brain monoamine release and uptake kinetics in slice, anesthetized, and freely moving preparations. The most common analysis technique for evaluating changes in dopamine signaling uses well-established Michaelis-Menten kinetic methods that can accurately model dopamine release and uptake parameters across multiple experimental conditions. Nevertheless, over the years, many researchers have turned to other measures to estimate changes in dopamine release and uptake, yet to our knowledge no systematic comparison amongst these measures has been conducted. To address this lack of uniformity in kinetic analyses, we have created the Demon Voltammetry and Analysis software suite, which is freely available to academic and non-profit institutions. Here we present an explanation of the Demon Acquisition and Analysis features, and demonstrate its utility for acquiring voltammetric data under in vitro, in vivo anesthetized, and freely moving conditions. Additionally, the software was used to compare the sensitivity of multiple kinetic measures of release and uptake to cocaine-induced changes in electrically evoked dopamine efflux in nucleus accumbens core slices. Specifically, we examined and compared tau, full width at half height, half-life, T20, T80, slope, peak height, calibrated peak dopamine concentration, and area under the curve to the well-characterized Michaelis-Menten parameters, dopamine per pulse, maximal uptake rate, and apparent affinity. Based on observed results we recommend tau for measuring dopamine uptake and calibrated peak dopamine concentration for measuring dopamine release. PMID:21392532

  20. Stimulants as Specific Inducers of Dopamine-Independent σ Agonist Self-Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L.; Tanda, Gianluigi; Kopajtic, Theresa A.

    2013-01-01

    A previous study showed that cocaine self-administration induced dopamine-independent reinforcing effects of σ agonists mediated by their selective actions at σ1 receptors (σ1Rs), which are intracellularly mobile chaperone proteins implicated in abuse-related effects of stimulants. The present study assessed whether the induction was specific to self-administration of cocaine. Rats were trained to self-administer the dopamine releaser, d-methamphetamine (0.01–0.32 mg/kg per injection), the μ-opioid receptor agonist, heroin (0.001–0.032 mg/kg per injection), and the noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor/channel antagonist ketamine (0.032–1.0 mg/kg per injection). As with cocaine, self-administration of d-methamphetamine induced reinforcing effects of the selective σ1R agonists PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride] and (+)-pentazocine (0.032–1.0 mg/kg per injection, each). In contrast, neither self-administration of heroin nor ketamine induced PRE-084 or (+)-pentazocine (0.032–10 mg/kg per injection, each) self-administration. Although the σ1R agonists did not maintain responding in subjects with histories of heroin or ketamine self-administration, substitution for those drugs was obtained with appropriate agonists (e.g., remifentanil, 0.1–3.2 µg/kg per injection, for heroin and (5S,10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine ((+)-MK 801; dizocilpine), 0.32–10.0 µg/kg per injection, for ketamine). The σR antagonist N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine dihydrobromide (BD 1008; 1.0–10 mg/kg) dose-dependently blocked PRE-084 self-administration but was inactive against d-methamphetamine, heroin, and ketamine. In contrast, PRE-084 self-administration was affected neither by the dopamine receptor antagonist (+)-butaclamol (10–100 μg/kg) nor by the opioid antagonist (−)-naltrexone (1.0–10 mg/kg), whereas these antagonists were active

  1. Auranofin induces apoptosis and necrosis in HeLa cells via oxidative stress and glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    You, Bo Ra; Shin, Hye Rim; Han, Bo Ram; Kim, Suhn Hee; Park, Woo Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Auranofin (Au), an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase, is a known anti‑cancer drug. In the present study, the anti‑growth effect of Au on HeLa cervical cancer cells was examined in association with levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH). Au inhibited the growth of HeLa cells with an IC50 of ~2 µM at 24 h. This agent induced apoptosis and necrosis, accompanied by the cleavage of poly (ADP‑ribose) polymerase and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. The pan‑caspase inhibitor, benzyloxycarbonyl‑Val‑Ala‑Asp‑fluoromethylketone, prevented apoptotic cell death and each of the assessed caspase inhibitors inhibited necrotic cell death induced by Au. With respect to the levels of ROS and GSH, Au increased intracellular O2•- in the HeLa cells and induced GSH depletion. The pan‑caspase inhibitor reduced the levels of O2•- and GSH depletion in Au‑treated HeLa cells. The antioxidant, N‑acetyl cysteine, not only attenuated apoptosis and necrosis in the Au‑treated HeLa cells, but also decreased the levels of O2•- and GSH depletion in the cells. By contrast, L‑buthionine sulfoximine, a GSH synthesis inhibitor, intensified cell death O2•- and GSH depletion in the Au‑treated HeLa cells. In conclusion, Au induced apoptosis and necrosis in HeLa cells via the induction of oxidative stress and the depletion of GSH. PMID:25370167

  2. Vacuum-ultraviolet-induced charge depletion in plasma-charged patterned-dielectric wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, G. S.; Shohet, J. L.; Kruger, J. B.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma-induced charging of patterned-dielectric structures during device fabrication can cause structural and electrical damage to devices. In this work, we report on vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation-induced charge depletion in plasma-charged patterned-silicon-oxide dielectric wafers. Charge depletion is studied as a function of photon energy and the aspect ratio of hole structures. The wafers were charged in a plasma and subsequently exposed to monochromatic-synchrotron-VUV. Surface-potential measurements after VUV exposure showed that photon energies less than 11 eV were beneficial in depleting the plasma-induced charge from the patterned-dielectric wafers. In addition, for a given photon-flux density and for photon energies less than 11 eV, VUV-induced charge depletion decreases with increasing hole aspect ratio. The results are explained with a physically plausible equivalent-circuit model, which suggests that both electron photoinjection from Si into the oxide and oxide surface conductivity play an important role in the charge-depletion process.

  3. Involvement of the dorsal hippocampal dopamine D2 receptors in histamine-induced anxiogenic-like effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Piri, Morteza; Ayazi, Elham; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2013-08-29

    Anxiety-related behaviors increase histamine and dopamine release in the brain. On the other hand, central histamine counteracts reward and reinforcement processes mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system. We investigated the effects of the histaminergic system and dopamine D2 receptors agents and their interactions on anxiety-related behaviors using the elevated plus-maze (EPM). The intra-hippocampal (Intra-CA1) microinjection of histamine (10 μg/mouse) decreased the percentage of open arm time (%OAT) and open arm entries (%OAE) but not the locomotor activity, indicating an anxiogenic-like response. Quinpirole (0.5 and 2 μg/mouse) or sulpiride (0.3 and 1 μg/mouse) when injected into the dorsal hippocampus also induced anxiety-like behavior, however, the drugs reversed the anxiogenic response induced by the effective dose of histamine (10 μg/mouse). Taken together and under the present experimental design, our results indicate that activation of the dorsal hippocampal histaminergic receptors causes anxiety-like behaviors altered by dopamine D2 receptor agonist and antagonist. Histamine can decrease dopaminergic tone in the dorsal hippocampus through decreasing the endogenous dopamine release, whereas quinpirole does the same via the postsynaptic DA receptors' activation. Sulpiride however renders the same effect through autoreceptors' blockade and potentiated dopamine transmission. Thus, quinpirole and sulpiride seem to compensate the effects of the intra-CA1 injection of exogenous histamine, and tend to exert anxiolytic effects in the presence of histamine. PMID:23872092

  4. Measuring cohesion between macromolecular filaments one pair at a time: depletion-induced microtubule bundling.

    PubMed

    Hilitski, Feodor; Ward, Andrew R; Cajamarca, Luis; Hagan, Michael F; Grason, Gregory M; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-04-01

    In the presence of nonadsorbing polymers, colloidal particles experience ubiquitous attractive interactions induced by depletion forces. Here, we measure the depletion interaction between a pair of microtubule filaments using a method that combines single filament imaging with optical trapping. By quantifying the dependence of filament cohesion on both polymer concentration and solution ionic strength, we demonstrate that the minimal model of depletion, based on the Asakura-Oosawa theory, fails to quantitatively describe the experimental data. By measuring the cohesion strength in two- and three- filament bundles, we verify pairwise additivity of depletion interactions for the specific experimental conditions. The described experimental technique can be used to measure pairwise interactions between various biological or synthetic filaments and complements information extracted from bulk osmotic stress experiments. PMID:25884139

  5. Inhibition by dizocilpine (MK-801) of striatal dopamine release induced by MPTP and MPP+: possible action at the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Clarke, P B; Reuben, M

    1995-01-01

    1. The NMDA-type glutamate receptor antagonist, dizocilpine (MK-801) can protect against neurotoxicity associated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and its principal metabolite, the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+). It has been suggested that these neurotoxic effects may be mediated by release of excitatory amino acids, but possible alternative mechanisms have been little investigated. 2. MPTP and MPP+ (0.1-1000 microM) were tested in superfused rat striatal synaptosomes preloaded with [3H]-dopamine. Both MPTP (10 microM and higher) and MPP+ (1 microM and higher) evoked an immediate and concentration-dependent release of [3H]-dopamine. The maximal effect exceeded that achievable with nicotine. For subsequent experiments, submaximal concentrations of MPTP (50 microM) and MPP+ (10 microM) were tested. 3. MK-801 (0.1-100 microM) inhibited responses to MPTP (50 microM) and MPP+ (10 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner. However, further tests of NMDA-type glutamate receptor involvement proved negative. Responses to MPTP or MPP+ were unaffected by the omission of Mg2+ or Ca2+ and were not reduced by the NMDA receptor antagonists, AP-7 (200 microM) and kynurenic acid (300 microM). In this assay, N-methyl-D-aspartate (even in the absence of Mg2+ and with added glycine and strychnine) did not evoked [3H]-dopamine release. 4. In crude membrane preparations of rat cerebral cortex, MPTP and MPP+ inhibited high-affinity [3H]-nicotine binding to nicotinic cholinoceptors (IC50 1.8 microM and 26 microM, respectively). 5. [3H]-dopamine release evoked by nicotine (1 microM) was blocked by the nicotinic antagonists,mecamylamine and chlorisondamine, and by MK-801 (all at 100 micro M); K+-evoked release was not affected. Release evoked by MPTP and MPP+ was significantly attenuated by MK-801 but not by mecamylamine or chlorisondamine.6. At a high concentration (1O I1M), the selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, nomifensine, completely blocked [3HJ-dopamine

  6. Behavioral pattern analysis and dopamine release in quinpirole-induced repetitive behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    de Haas, Ria; Nijdam, Annelies; Westra, Tjalke A; Kas, Martien J H; Westenberg, Herman G M

    2011-12-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic and disabling psychiatric disease with a lifetime prevalence of 2-3%. People with OCD suffer from intrusive, unwanted and recurrent thoughts (obsessions) and/or repetitive ritualistic behaviors (compulsions). The aim of this study is to quantify the dimensions of ritualistic 'compulsive-like' behavior in quinpirole-induced behavior in rats by using T-pattern behavioral analysis. In addition, we investigated whether the behavioral effects elicited by quinpirole sensitization remained after 2 weeks of cessation of treatment. Finally, to study the neurobiological underpinnings of this 'compulsive-like' behavior, we investigated the effect of quinpirole treatment on the extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. Once established, 'compulsive-like' behavior is dependent upon quinpirole administration, as this behavior rapidly normalized after cessation of treatment. After a single dose of quinpirole the dopamine level decreased more in saline pre-treated animals as compared with animals given quinpirole treatment continuously. Furthermore, T-pattern analysis revealed that quinpirole-induced behavior consists, unlike OCD rituals, of a smaller behavioral repertoire. As seen in patients with OCD, quinpirole-treated animals performed these behaviors with a high rate of repetition. These findings suggest that quinpirole-induced behavior mimics only part of the compulsive behavior as shown in OCD patients. PMID:21148023

  7. Cocaine-induced alterations in dopamine receptor signaling: implications for reinforcement and reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S M; Pierce, R C

    2005-06-01

    The transition from casual drug use to addiction, and the intense drug craving that accompanies it, has been postulated to result from neuroadaptations within the limbic system caused by repeated drug exposure. This review will examine the implications of cocaine-induced alterations in mesolimbic dopamine receptor signaling within the context of several widely used animal models of addiction. Extensive evidence indicates that dopaminergic mechanisms critically mediate behavioral sensitization to cocaine, cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, cocaine self-administration, and the drug prime-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. The propagation of the long-term neuronal changes associated with recurring cocaine use appears to occur at the level of postreceptor signal transduction. Repeated cocaine treatment causes an up-regulation of the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-signaling pathway within the nucleus accumbens, resulting in a dys-regulation of balanced D1/D2 dopamine-like receptor signaling. The intracellular events arising from enhanced D1-like postsynaptic signaling mediate both facilitatory and compensatory responses to the further reinforcing effects of cocaine. PMID:15922019

  8. Repeated resveratrol treatment attenuates methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity and [3H]dopamine overflow in rodents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dennis K; Oelrichs, Clark E; Sage, Andrew S; Sun, Grace Y; Simonyi, Agnes

    2013-10-25

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) has been investigated for its potential as a prophylactic against degenerative diseases. It is a sirtulin activator that has recently been shown to regulate dopaminergic systems that contribute to the behavioral effects of methamphetamine and cocaine. The present study examined the impact of resveratrol on stimulant neuropsychopharmacology in rodents. Acute resveratrol treatment (20-40mg/kg) was ineffective to alter methamphetamine (0.5mg/kg)-induced hyperactivity in mice. Rodents received resveratrol once-daily for seven days to determine the effect of repeated polyphenolic treatment. Repeated resveratrol treatment (1-20mg/kg) decreased methamphetamine (0.5mg/kg)-induced hyperactivity in mice. Methamphetamine's (0.1-60μM) efficacy to evoke [(3)H]overflow from rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine was also attenuated by repeated resveratrol (1mg/kg) treatment. Repeated resveratrol treatment (10-20mg/kg) did not affect cocaine-induced hyperactivity in mice. Overall, these data suggest that resveratrol appears to have metaplastic and prophylactic activity to minimize the effects of methamphetamine to increase locomotor activity and evoke dopamine release. These data encourage future research to further investigate the relationship between polyphenolics and psychostimulant abuse and dependence. PMID:24012682

  9. An unusual case of self-induced electrolyte depletion

    PubMed Central

    Love, D. R.; Brown, J. J.; Fraser, R.; Lever, A. F.; Robertson, J. I. S.; Timbury, G. C.; Thomson, Sheena; Tree, M.

    1971-01-01

    A case of anorexia nervosa, presenting with unexplained hypokalaemia, is described. The patient was also secretly addicted to purgatives and diuretics. During an attempted metabolic balance study she secretly disposed of food and excreta, which were smuggled from the hospital by her sister. The patient induced her husband to bring his own stools into the ward, these then being substituted for her own. The interrelationships of the electrolyte disturbances, elevation of plasma renin, renin substrate, and hyperaldosteronism are discussed, particularly in connexion with the pathogenesis of peripheral oedema in anorexia nervosa. PMID:5574799

  10. An unusual case of self-induced electrolyte depletion.

    PubMed

    Love, D R; Brown, J J; Fraser, R; Lever, A F; Robertson, J I; Timbury, G C; Thomson, S; Tree, M

    1971-04-01

    A case of anorexia nervosa, presenting with unexplained hypokalaemia, is described. The patient was also secretly addicted to purgatives and diuretics. During an attempted metabolic balance study she secretly disposed of food and excreta, which were smuggled from the hospital by her sister. The patient induced her husband to bring his own stools into the ward, these then being substituted for her own. The interrelationships of the electrolyte disturbances, elevation of plasma renin, renin substrate, and hyperaldosteronism are discussed, particularly in connexion with the pathogenesis of peripheral oedema in anorexia nervosa. PMID:5574799

  11. Glutathione prevents ethanol induced gastric mucosal damage and depletion of sulfhydryl compounds in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Loguercio, C; Taranto, D; Beneduce, F; del Vecchio Blanco, C; de Vincentiis, A; Nardi, G; Romano, M

    1993-01-01

    Whether parenteral administration of reduced glutathione prevented ethanol induced damage to and depletion of sulfhydryl compounds in the human gastric mucosa was investigated. Ten healthy volunteers underwent endoscopy on three separate occasions. Gastric mucosal damage was induced by spraying 80% ethanol on to the gastric mucosa through the biopsy channel of the endoscope. The gastric mucosal score, total sulfhydryls, glutathione, and cysteine were evaluated in basal conditions and after ethanol administration with and without pretreatment with parenteral glutathione. Glutathione significantly decreased the extent of ethanol induced macroscopic injury to the mucosa of the gastric body and antrum. Glutathione's protective effect is associated with appreciable inhibition of ethanol induced depletion of gastric sulfhydryl compounds. This is the first report of protection against ethanol induced gastric mucosal damage by a sulfhydryl containing agent in humans. PMID:8432465

  12. Cyclophosphamide-induced apoptosis in COV434 human granulosa cells involves oxidative stress and glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Tsai-Turton, Miyun; Luong, Brian T; Tan, Youming; Luderer, Ulrike

    2007-07-01

    The anticancer drug cyclophosphamide induces granulosa cell apoptosis and is detoxified by glutathione (GSH) conjugation. We previously showed that both cyclophosphamide treatment and GSH depletion induced granulosa cell apoptosis in rats, but the role of GSH in apoptosis in human ovarian cells has not been studied. Using the COV434 human granulosa cell line, we tested the hypotheses that (1) GSH depletion or treatment with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4HC), a preactivated form of cyclophosphamide, induces apoptosis, (2) GSH depletion potentiates 4HC-induced apoptosis, and (3) 4HC-induced apoptosis is mediated by GSH depletion and oxidative stress. Cells were treated with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a specific inhibitor of GSH synthesis, with or without follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) or serum. A significant increase in the number of apoptotic cells, assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxy-uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and Hoechst 33342 staining, occurred with BSO treatment. Treatment with 4HC dose-dependently induced apoptosis by TUNEL, Hoechst staining, and caspase 3 activation. Treatment with 4HC caused an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, measured by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, oxidative DNA damage, measured by 8-hydroxyguanosine immunostaining, and an oxidation of the redox potential for the oxidized glutathione/reduced glutathione couple. Total intracellular GSH declined after 4HC treatment, preceding the onset of cell death. Treatment with antioxidants inhibited 4HC-induced apoptosis. Combined treatment with BSO and 4HC caused greater induction of apoptosis than either treatment alone. These findings are consistent with roles for oxidative stress and GSH depletion in mediating the induction of apoptosis in COV434 cells by cyclophosphamide. PMID:17434952

  13. Neuroprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia ethanol extract on 6-hydroxy dopamine induced Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Kosaraju, Jayasankar; Chinni, Santhivardhan; Roy, Partha Deb; Kannan, Elango; Antony, A. Shanish; Kumar, M. N. Satish

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study investigates the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extract of Tinospora cordifolia aerial parts against 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Materials and Methods: T. cordifolia ethanol extract (TCEE) was standardized with high performance thin layer chromatography using berberine. Experimental PD was induced by intracerebral injection of 6-OHDA (8 μg). Animals were divided into five groups: sham operated, negative control, positive control (levodopa 6 mg/kg) and two experimental groups (n = 6/group). Experimental groups received 200 and 400 mg/kg of TCEE once daily for 30 days by oral gavage. Biochemical parameters including dopamine level, oxidative stress, complex I activity and brain iron asymmetry ratio and locomotor activity including skeletal muscle co-ordination and degree of catatonia were assessed. Results: TCEE exhibited significant neuroprotection by increasing the dopamine levels (1.96 ± 0.20 and 2.45 ± 0.40 ng/mg of protein) and complex I activity (77.14 ± 0.89 and 78.50 ± 0.96 nmol/min/mg of protein) at 200 and 400 mg/kg respectively when compared with negative control group. Iron asymmetry ratio was also significantly attenuated by TCEE at 200 (1.57 ± 0.18) and 400 mg/kg (1.11 ± 0.15) when compared with negative control group. Neuroprotection by TCEE was further supported by reduced oxidative stress and restored locomotor activity in treatment groups. Conclusion: Results show that TCEE possess significant neuroprotection in 6-OHDA induced PD by protecting dopaminergic neurons and reducing the iron accumulation. PMID:24741189

  14. Depletion of white adipocyte progenitors induces beige adipocyte differentiation and suppresses obesity development.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, A C; Tseng, C; Salameh, A; Zhang, Y; Amaya-Manzanares, F; Dadbin, A; Florez, F; Xu, Y; Tong, Q; Kolonin, M G

    2015-02-01

    Overgrowth of white adipose tissue (WAT) in obesity occurs as a result of adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Expansion and renewal of adipocytes relies on proliferation and differentiation of white adipocyte progenitors (WAP); however, the requirement of WAP for obesity development has not been proven. Here, we investigate whether depletion of WAP can be used to prevent WAT expansion. We test this approach by using a hunter-killer peptide designed to induce apoptosis selectively in WAP. We show that targeted WAP cytoablation results in a long-term WAT growth suppression despite increased caloric intake in a mouse diet-induced obesity model. Our data indicate that WAP depletion results in a compensatory population of adipose tissue with beige adipocytes. Consistent with reported thermogenic capacity of beige adipose tissue, WAP-depleted mice display increased energy expenditure. We conclude that targeting of white adipocyte progenitors could be developed as a strategy to sustained modulation of WAT metabolic activity. PMID:25342467

  15. Depletion of white adipocyte progenitors induces beige adipocyte differentiation and suppresses obesity development

    PubMed Central

    Daquinag, A C; Tseng, C; Salameh, A; Zhang, Y; Amaya-Manzanares, F; Dadbin, A; Florez, F; Xu, Y; Tong, Q; Kolonin, M G

    2015-01-01

    Overgrowth of white adipose tissue (WAT) in obesity occurs as a result of adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Expansion and renewal of adipocytes relies on proliferation and differentiation of white adipocyte progenitors (WAP); however, the requirement of WAP for obesity development has not been proven. Here, we investigate whether depletion of WAP can be used to prevent WAT expansion. We test this approach by using a hunter-killer peptide designed to induce apoptosis selectively in WAP. We show that targeted WAP cytoablation results in a long-term WAT growth suppression despite increased caloric intake in a mouse diet-induced obesity model. Our data indicate that WAP depletion results in a compensatory population of adipose tissue with beige adipocytes. Consistent with reported thermogenic capacity of beige adipose tissue, WAP-depleted mice display increased energy expenditure. We conclude that targeting of white adipocyte progenitors could be developed as a strategy to sustained modulation of WAT metabolic activity. PMID:25342467

  16. Herp depletion inhibits zearalenone-induced cell death in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fenglei; Lin, Pengfei; Wang, Nan; Yang, Diqi; Wen, Xin; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Aihua; Jin, Yaping

    2016-04-01

    Herp is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein and strongly induced by the ER stress that not only participates in the unfolded protein response (UPR) under the ER stress, but also in cell autophagy under glucose starvation (GS). However, we do not know whether Herp plays any roles in other responses, such as zearalenone (ZEA). In this study, we constructed recombinant lentiviral vectors for Herp shRNA expression and generated stable Herp knockdown RAW 264.7 macrophages. Flow cytometry analysis showed Herp depletion could inhibit cell death induced by ZEA. Western blot analysis revealed that Herp depletion could up-regulate autophagy-related protein LC3-I conversion into LC3-II and the expression of ER stress-related protein CHOP. These results suggest that Herp depletion inhibits cell death by up-regulating autophagy. PMID:26723276

  17. Activation of D1 dopamine receptors induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Norman E.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND A recent study showed that methylphenidate induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. Methylphenidate inhibits dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake transporters. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that selective dopamine receptor activation induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. METHODS In adult rats, we tested the effects of chloro-APB (D1 agonist) and quinpirole (D2 agonist) on time to emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. We then performed a dose–response study to test for chloro-APB-induced restoration of righting during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. SCH-23390 (D1 antagonist) was used to confirm that the effects induced by chloro-APB are specifically mediated by D1 receptors. In a separate group of animals, spectral analysis was performed on surface electroencephalogram recordings to assess neurophysiological changes induced by chloro-APB and quinpirole during isoflurane general anesthesia. RESULTS Chloro-APB decreased median time to emergence from 330s to 50s. The median difference in time to emergence between the saline control group (n=6) and the chloro-APB group (n = 6) was 222s (95% CI: 77–534s, Mann-Whitney test). This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0082). During continuous isoflurane anesthesia, chloro-APB dose-dependently restored righting (n = 6) and decreased electroencephalogram delta power (n = 4). These effects were inhibited by pretreatment with SCH-23390. Quinpirole did not restore righting (n = 6) and had no significant effect on the electroencephalogram (n = 4) during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. CONCLUSIONS Activation of D1 receptors by chloro-APB decreases time to emergence from isoflurane anesthesia, and produces behavioral and neurophysiological evidence of arousal during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. These findings suggest that selective activation of a D1 receptor-mediated arousal mechanism is sufficient to induce emergence from isoflurane general

  18. Nestin depletion induces melanoma matrix metalloproteinases and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Wei; Zhan, Qian; Lezcano, Cecilia; Frank, Markus H.; Huang, John; Larson, Allison; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Wan, Marilyn T.; Lin, Ping-I; Ma, Jie; Kleffel, Sonja; Schatton, Tobias; Lian, Christine G.; Murphy, George F.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key biological mediators of processes as diverse as wound healing, embryogenesis, and cancer progression. Although MMPs may be induced through multiple signaling pathways, the precise mechanisms for their regulation in cancer are incompletely understood. Because cytoskeletal changes are known to accompany MMP expression, we sought to examine the potential role of the poorly understood cytoskeletal protein, nestin, in modulating melanoma MMPs. Nestin knockdown (KD) upregulated expression of specific MMPs and MMP-dependent invasion both through extracellular matrix barriers in vitro and in peritumoral connective tissue of xenografts in vivo. Development of 3-dimensionsal melanospheres that in vitro partially recapitulate non-invasive tumorigenic melanoma growth was inhibited by nestin KD, although ECM invasion by aberrant melanospheres that did form was enhanced. Mechanistically, nestin KD-dependent melanoma invasion was associated with intracellular redistribution of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK) and increased melanoma cell responsiveness to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), both implicated in pathways of melanoma invasion. The results suggest that the heretofore poorly understood intermediate filament, nestin, may serve as a novel mediator of MMPs critical to melanoma virulence. PMID:25365206

  19. EFFECTS OF SYSTEMIC NEUTROPHIL DEPLETION ON LPS-INDUCED AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Systemic Neutrophil Depletion on LPS-induced Airway Disease
    Jordan D. Savov, Stephen H. Gavett*, David M. Brass, Daniel L. Costa*, David A. Schwartz
    Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Dept of Medicine ? Duke University Medical Center
    * National Health and E...

  20. Palmitate induces ER calcium depletion and apoptosis in mouse podocytes subsequent to mitochondrial oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Nam, S M; Kim, J-H; Das, R; Choi, S-K; Nguyen, T T; Quan, X; Choi, S J; Chung, C H; Lee, E Y; Lee, I-K; Wiederkehr, A; Wollheim, C B; Cha, S-K; Park, K-S

    2015-01-01

    Pathologic alterations in podocytes lead to failure of an essential component of the glomerular filtration barrier and proteinuria in chronic kidney diseases. Elevated levels of saturated free fatty acid (FFA) are harmful to various tissues, implemented in the progression of diabetes and its complications such as proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of palmitate cytotoxicity in cultured mouse podocytes. Incubation with palmitate dose-dependently increased cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential, impaired ATP synthesis and elicited apoptotic cell death. Palmitate not only evoked mitochondrial fragmentation but also caused marked dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Consistently, palmitate upregulated ER stress proteins, oligomerized stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in the subplasmalemmal ER membrane, abolished the cyclopiazonic acid-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) increase due to depletion of luminal ER Ca(2+). Palmitate-induced ER Ca(2+) depletion and cytotoxicity were blocked by a selective inhibitor of the fatty-acid transporter FAT/CD36. Loss of the ER Ca(2+) pool induced by palmitate was reverted by the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor edelfosine. Palmitate-dependent activation of PLC was further demonstrated by following cytosolic translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of PLC in palmitate-treated podocytes. An inhibitor of diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase, which elevates cytosolic DAG, strongly promoted ER Ca(2+) depletion by low-dose palmitate. GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor, partially prevented palmitate-induced ER Ca(2+) loss. Remarkably, the mitochondrial antioxidant mitoTEMPO inhibited palmitate-induced PLC activation, ER Ca(2+) depletion and cytotoxicity. Palmitate elicited cytoskeletal changes in podocytes and increased albumin permeability, which was also blocked by mitoTEMPO. These data suggest that oxidative stress caused by saturated FFA

  1. Palmitate induces ER calcium depletion and apoptosis in mouse podocytes subsequent to mitochondrial oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S; Nam, S M; Kim, J-H; Das, R; Choi, S-K; Nguyen, T T; Quan, X; Choi, S J; Chung, C H; Lee, E Y; Lee, I-K; Wiederkehr, A; Wollheim, C B; Cha, S-K; Park, K-S

    2015-01-01

    Pathologic alterations in podocytes lead to failure of an essential component of the glomerular filtration barrier and proteinuria in chronic kidney diseases. Elevated levels of saturated free fatty acid (FFA) are harmful to various tissues, implemented in the progression of diabetes and its complications such as proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of palmitate cytotoxicity in cultured mouse podocytes. Incubation with palmitate dose-dependently increased cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential, impaired ATP synthesis and elicited apoptotic cell death. Palmitate not only evoked mitochondrial fragmentation but also caused marked dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Consistently, palmitate upregulated ER stress proteins, oligomerized stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in the subplasmalemmal ER membrane, abolished the cyclopiazonic acid-induced cytosolic Ca2+ increase due to depletion of luminal ER Ca2+. Palmitate-induced ER Ca2+ depletion and cytotoxicity were blocked by a selective inhibitor of the fatty-acid transporter FAT/CD36. Loss of the ER Ca2+ pool induced by palmitate was reverted by the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor edelfosine. Palmitate-dependent activation of PLC was further demonstrated by following cytosolic translocation of the pleckstrin homology domain of PLC in palmitate-treated podocytes. An inhibitor of diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase, which elevates cytosolic DAG, strongly promoted ER Ca2+ depletion by low-dose palmitate. GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor, partially prevented palmitate-induced ER Ca2+ loss. Remarkably, the mitochondrial antioxidant mitoTEMPO inhibited palmitate-induced PLC activation, ER Ca2+ depletion and cytotoxicity. Palmitate elicited cytoskeletal changes in podocytes and increased albumin permeability, which was also blocked by mitoTEMPO. These data suggest that oxidative stress caused by saturated FFA leads to

  2. Southwestern Tropical Atlantic coral growth response to atmospheric circulation changes induced by ozone depletion in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelista, H.; Wainer, I.; Sifeddine, A.; Corrège, T.; Cordeiro, R. C.; Lamounier, S.; Godiva, D.; Shen, C.-C.; Le Cornec, F.; Turcq, B.; Lazareth, C. E.; Hu, C.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    Climate changes induced by stratospheric ozone depletion over Antarctica have been recognized as an important consequence of the recently observed Southern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation. Here we present evidences that the Brazilian coast (Southwestern Atlantic) may have been impacted from both winds and sea surface temperature changes derived from this process. Skeleton analysis of massive coral species living in shallow waters off Brazil are very sensitive to air-sea interactions, and seem to record this impact. Growth rates of Brazilian corals show a trend reversal that fits the ozone depletion evolution, confirming that ozone impacts are far reaching and potentially affect coastal ecosystems in tropical environments.

  3. Neutrophil Depletion Attenuates Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Regal, Jean F; Lillegard, Kathryn E; Bauer, Ashley J; Elmquist, Barbara J; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C; Gilbert, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by reduced placental perfusion with placental ischemia and hypertension during pregnancy. Preeclamptic women also exhibit a heightened inflammatory state and greater number of neutrophils in the vasculature compared to normal pregnancy. Since neutrophils are associated with tissue injury and inflammation, we hypothesized that neutrophils are critical to placental ischemia-induced hypertension and fetal demise. Using the reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat, we determined the effect of neutrophil depletion on blood pressure and fetal resorptions. Neutrophils were depleted with repeated injections of polyclonal rabbit anti-rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) antibody (antiPMN). Rats received either antiPMN or normal rabbit serum (Control) on 13.5, 15.5, 17.5, and 18.5 days post conception (dpc). On 14.5 dpc, rats underwent either Sham surgery or clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta to reduce uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP). On 18.5 dpc, carotid arterial catheters were placed and mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured on 19.5 dpc. Neutrophil-depleted rats had reduced circulating neutrophils from 14.5 to 19.5 dpc compared to Control, as well as decreased neutrophils in lung and placenta on 19.5 dpc. MAP increased in RUPP Control vs Sham Control rats, and neutrophil depletion attenuated this increase in MAP in RUPP rats without any effect on Sham rats. The RUPP-induced increase in fetal resorptions and complement activation product C3a were not affected by neutrophil depletion. Thus, these data are the first to indicate that neutrophils play an important role in RUPP hypertension and that cells of the innate immune system may significantly contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:26135305

  4. Dopamine-induced dissociation of BOLD and neural activity in macaque visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Zaldivar, Daniel; Rauch, Alexander; Whittingstall, Kevin; Logothetis, Nikos K; Goense, Jozien

    2014-12-01

    Neuromodulators determine how neural circuits process information during cognitive states such as wakefulness, attention, learning, and memory. fMRI can provide insight into their function and dynamics, but their exact effect on BOLD responses remains unclear, limiting our ability to interpret the effects of changes in behavioral state using fMRI. Here, we investigated the effects of dopamine (DA) injections on neural responses and haemodynamic signals in macaque primary visual cortex (V1) using fMRI (7T) and intracortical electrophysiology. Aside from DA's involvement in diseases such as Parkinson's and schizophrenia, it also plays a role in visual perception. We mimicked DAergic neuromodulation by systemic injection of L-DOPA and Carbidopa (LDC) or by local application of DA in V1 and found that systemic application of LDC increased the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and amplitude of the visually evoked neural responses in V1. However, visually induced BOLD responses decreased, whereas cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses increased. This dissociation of BOLD and CBF suggests that dopamine increases energy metabolism by a disproportionate amount relative to the CBF response, causing the reduced BOLD response. Local application of DA in V1 had no effect on neural activity, suggesting that the dopaminergic effects are mediated by long-range interactions. The combination of BOLD-based and CBF-based fMRI can provide a signature of dopaminergic neuromodulation, indicating that the application of multimodal methods can improve our ability to distinguish sensory processing from neuromodulatory effects. PMID:25456449

  5. Inducible depletion of adult skeletal muscle stem cells impairs the regeneration of neuromuscular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenxuan; Wei-LaPierre, Lan; Klose, Alanna; Dirksen, Robert T; Chakkalakal, Joe V

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle maintenance depends on motor innervation at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Multiple mechanisms contribute to NMJ repair and maintenance; however muscle stem cells (satellite cells, SCs), are deemed to have little impact on these processes. Therefore, the applicability of SC studies to attenuate muscle loss due to NMJ deterioration as observed in neuromuscular diseases and aging is ambiguous. We employed mice with an inducible Cre, and conditionally expressed DTA to deplete or GFP to track SCs. We found SC depletion exacerbated muscle atrophy and type transitions connected to neuromuscular disruption. Also, elevated fibrosis and further declines in force generation were specific to SC depletion and neuromuscular disruption. Fate analysis revealed SC activity near regenerating NMJs. Moreover, SC depletion aggravated deficits in reinnervation and post-synaptic morphology at regenerating NMJs. Therefore, our results propose a mechanism whereby further NMJ and skeletal muscle decline ensues upon SC depletion and neuromuscular disruption. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09221.001 PMID:26312504

  6. Dopamine agonist-induced substance addiction: the next piece of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    Traditional antiparkinson treatment strategies strive to balance the antiparkinson effects of dopaminergic drugs with the avoidance of motor response complications. Dopamine agonists have an established role in delaying the emergence of motor response complications or reducing motor "off" periods. The recent recognition of a range of "behavioural addictions" that are linked to dopamine agonist use has highlighted the role of dopamine in brain reward function and addiction disorders in general. Dopamine agonists have now even been linked occasionally to new substance addictions. The challenge now for the Parkinsonologist is to also balance the net benefits of using dopamine agonists for their motor effects with avoiding the harm from behavioural compulsions. PMID:20980151

  7. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  8. AMPHETAMINE-, SCOPOLAMINE-, AND CAFFEINE-INDUCED LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY FOLLOWING 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE LESIONS OF THE MESOLIMBIC DOPAMINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    As previously reported, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions to the region of the nucleus accumbens blocked the locomotor activation induced by low doses of d-amphetamine, and produced a supersensitive locomotor response to the dopamine (DA) agonist, apomorphine. This same lesion, ...

  9. Positron emission tomography studies of potential mechanisms underlying phencyclidine-induced alterations in striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Wynne K; Logan, Jean; Dewey, Stephen L

    2003-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), in combination with (11)C-raclopride, was used to examine the effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on dopamine (DA) in the primate striatum. In addition, we explored the hypotheses that GABAergic pathways as well as molecular targets beyond the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex (ie dopamine transporter proteins, DAT) contribute to PCP's effects. In the first series of experiments, (11)C-raclopride was administered at baseline and 30 min following intravenous PCP administration. In the second series of studies, gamma-vinyl GABA (GVG) was used to assess whether enhanced GABAergic tone altered NMDA antagonist-induced changes in DA. Animals received an initial PET scan followed by pretreatment with GVG (300 mg/kg), then PCP 30 min prior to a second scan. Finally, we explored the possible contributions of DAT blockade to PCP-induced increases in DA. By examining (11)C-cocaine binding a paradigm in which PCP was coadministered with the radiotracer, we assessed the direct competition between these two compounds for the DAT. At 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg, PCP decreased (11)C-raclopride binding by 2.1, 14.9+/-2.2 and 8.18+/-1.1%, respectively. These effects were completely attenuated by GVG (3.38+/-3.1% decrease in (11)C-raclopride binding). Finally, PCP (0.5 mg/kg) decreased (11)C-cocaine binding by 25.5+/-4.3%, while at 1.0 mg/kg this decrease was 13.5%, consistent with a competitive interaction at the DAT. These results suggest that PCP may be exerting some direct effects through the DAT and that GABA partially modulates NMDA-antagonist-induced increases in striatal DA. PMID:12888780

  10. Duration of drug action of dopamine D2 agonists in mice with 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions.

    PubMed

    Tsuchioka, Akihiro; Oana, Fumiki; Suzuki, Takayuki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Ijiro, Tomoyuki; Kaidoh, Kouichi; Hiratochi, Masahiro

    2015-12-16

    Although 6-hydroxydopamine-induced (6-OHDA-induced) rats are a well-known Parkinson's disease model, the effects of dopamine D2 agonists in mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions are not completely understood. We produced mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions and measured their total locomotion counts following administration of several dopamine D2 agonists (pramipexole, ropinirole, cabergoline, rotigotine, apomorphine, talipexole, and quinelorane). Cabergoline showed the longest duration of drug action, which was in agreement with its long-lived anti-Parkinson effects in rats and humans. In contrast, pramipexole and ropinirole had notably short durations of drug action. We demonstrated that mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions accompanied with significant lesions in the striatum may be reasonable models to predict the action duration of anti-Parkinson drug candidates in humans. PMID:26559726

  11. Antipsychotic-induced alterations in D2 dopamine receptor interacting proteins within the cortex.

    PubMed

    Kabbani, Nadine; Levenson, Robert

    2006-02-27

    Current antipsychotic treatment involves the regulation of D2 dopamine receptor activity in the brain. Here, we examined the effects of chronic haloperidol and clozapine on cortical D2 dopamine receptors and six different dopamine receptor interacting proteins. Using comparative immunoblot analysis, we found that treatment with either haloperidol or clozapine increased D2 dopamine receptors, calcium activator protein for secretion, protein 4.1N, and neuronal calcium sensor-1 expression. Treatment with clozapine increased calmodulin and spinophilin expression, while treatment with haloperidol decreased expression of these two dopamine receptor interacting proteins. Neither antipsychotic drug was found to have an effect on filamin-A expression. These findings underscore a role for cortical D2 dopamine receptor in the mechanism of antipsychotic drug action, and suggest dopamine receptor interacting proteins as novel targets in antipsychotic drug development. PMID:16462601

  12. Effect of Adoptive Transfer or Depletion of Regulatory T Cells on Triptolide-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinzhi; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Luyong; Jiang, Zhenzhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to clarify the role of regulatory T cell (Treg) in triptolide (TP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Female C57BL/6 mice received either adoptive transfer of Tregs or depletion of Tregs, then underwent TP administration and were sacrificed 24 h after TP administration. Liver injury was determined according to alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels in serum and histopathological change in liver tissue. Hepatic frequencies of Treg cells and the mRNA expression levels of transcription factor Forkhead box P3 and retinoid orphan nuclear receptor γt (RORγt), interleukin-10 (IL-10), suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS), and Notch/Notch ligand were investigated. Results: During TP-induced liver injury, hepatic Treg and IL-10 decreased, while T helper 17 cells cell-transcription factor RORγt, SOCS and Notch signaling increased, accompanied with liver inflammation. Adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated the severity of TP-induced liver injury, accompanied with increased levels of hepatic Treg and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs remarkably inhibited the expression of RORγt, SOCS3, Notch1, and Notch3. On the contrary, depletion of Treg cells in TP-administered mice resulted in a notable increase of RORγt, SOCS1, SOCS3, and Notch3, while the Treg and IL-10 of liver decreased. Consistent with the exacerbation of liver injury, higher serum levels of ALT and AST were detected in Treg-depleted mice. Conclusion: These results showed that adoptive transfer or depletion of Tregs attenuated or aggravated TP-induced liver injury, suggesting that Tregs could play important roles in the progression of liver injury. SOCS proteins and Notch signaling affected Tregs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of TP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27148057

  13. Dopamine-dependent neurodegeneration in rats induced by viral vector-mediated overexpression of the parkin target protein, CDCrel-1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhizhong; Ferger, Boris; Paterna, Jean-Charles; Vogel, Denise; Furler, Sven; Osinde, Maribel; Feldon, Joram; Büeler, Hansruedi

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are linked to autosomal-recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP). Parkin functions as a ubiquitin protein ligase in the degradation of several proteins, including the neuron-specific septin CDCrel-1. AR-JP-associated parkin mutations inhibit ubiquitination and degradation of CDCrel-1 and other parkin target proteins. Here we show that recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated CDCrel-1 gene transfer to the substantia nigra of rats results in a rapid onset (6-10 days) of nigral and striatal CDCrel-1 expression that is followed by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and a decline of the striatal dopamine levels. In contrast, neurons of the globus pallidus are spared from CDCrel-1 toxicity. Furthermore, CDCrel-1 inhibits the release of dopamine from stably-transfected PC12 cells, and pharmacological inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine synthesis in rats prevents CDCrel-1-induced nigral neurodegeneration. These results show that CDCrel-1 overexpression exerts dopamine-dependent neurotoxicity and suggest that inhibition of dopamine secretion by CDCrel-1 may contribute to the development of AR-JP. PMID:14530399

  14. Dopamine improves exploration after expectancy violations and induces psychotic-like experiences in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Polner, Bertalan; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Nagy, Helga; Takáts, Annamária; Győrfi, Orsolya; Kéri, Szabolcs

    2016-03-11

    Dopamine neurons are sensitive to novel and rewarding events, and dopamine signals can modulate learning in higher-level brain networks. Additionally, dopamine abnormalities appear to be central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In this study, we investigate the dopaminergic modulation of schizotypal traits and exploration after expectancy violations in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients on dopamine replacement therapy. Exploration after expectancy violations was measured with a latent inhibition and an anomaly categorisation task. Patients with PD had significantly elevated levels of schizotypy and reduced latent inhibition, relative to the controls. Anomaly categorisation was enhanced at trend level among the patients. Dopaminergic antiparkinsonian drugs showed dose-dependent effects: they induced psychotic-like experiences, and at the same time, they disrupted latent inhibition and made categorisation of anomaly more efficient. Most of these findings were replicated in an independent sample of patients with PD. An up-regulated dopamine system in medicated PD patients might tune higher-level brain networks to engage in learning when faced with unexpected information, and therefore hasten the updating of internal models. PMID:26820375

  15. Depletion-induced forces and crowding in polymer-nanoparticle mixtures: Role of polymer shape fluctuations and penetrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wei Kang; Denton, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Depletion forces and macromolecular crowding govern the structure and function of biopolymers in biological cells and the properties of polymer nanocomposite materials. To isolate and analyze the influence of polymer shape fluctuations and penetrability on depletion-induced interactions and crowding by nanoparticles, we model polymers as effective penetrable ellipsoids, whose shapes fluctuate according to the probability distributions of the eigenvalues of the gyration tensor of an ideal random walk. Within this model, we apply Monte Carlo simulation methods to compute the depletion-induced potential of mean force between hard nanospheres and crowding-induced shape distributions of polymers in the protein limit, in which polymer coils can be easily penetrated by smaller nanospheres. By comparing depletion potentials from simulations of ellipsoidal and spherical polymer models with predictions of polymer field theory and free-volume theory, we show that polymer depletion-induced interactions and crowding depend sensitively on polymer shapes and penetrability, with important implications for bulk thermodynamic phase behavior.

  16. Generation of a novel mouse model for the inducible depletion of macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gheryani, Nabeia; Coffelt, Seth B; Gartland, Alison; Rumney, Robin M H; Kiss-Toth, Endre; Lewis, Claire E; Tozer, Gillian M; Greaves, David R; Dear, T Neil; Miller, Gaynor

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in tissue homeostasis, innate immunity, inflammation, and wound repair. Macrophages are also essential during development, severely limiting the use of mouse models in which these cells have been constitutively deleted. Consequently, we have developed a transgenic model of inducible macrophage depletion in which macrophage-specific induction of the cytotoxic diphtheria toxin A chain (DTA) is achieved by administration of doxycycline. Induction of the DTA protein in transgenic animals resulted in a significant 50% reduction in CD68+ macrophages of the liver, spleen, and bone over a period of 6 weeks. Pertinently, the macrophages remaining after doxycycline treatment were substantially smaller and are functionally impaired as shown by reduced inflammatory cytokine production in response to lipopolysaccharide. This inducible model of macrophage depletion can now be utilized to determine the role of macrophages in both development and animal models of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22927121

  17. Reduced vesicular storage of dopamine exacerbates methamphetamine-induced neurodegeneration and astrogliosis

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Thomas S.; Shepherd, Kennie R.; Richardson, Jason R.; Wang, Min Z.; Li, Yingjie; Emson, Piers C.; Miller, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) controls the loading of dopamine (DA) into vesicles and therefore determines synaptic properties such as quantal size, receptor sensitivity, and vesicular and cytosolic DA concentration. Impairment of proper DA compartmentalization is postulated to underlie the sensitivity of DA neurons to oxidative damage and degeneration. It is known that DA can auto-oxidize in the cytosol to form quinones and other oxidative species and that this production of oxidative stress is thought to be a critical factor in DA terminal loss after methamphetamine (METH) exposure. Using a mutant strain of mice (VMAT2 LO), which have only 5–10% of the VMAT2 expressed by wild-type animals, we show that VMAT2 is a major determinant of METH toxicity in the striatum. Subsequent to METH exposure, the VMAT2 LO mice show an exacerbated loss of dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), as well as enhanced astrogliosis and protein carbonyl formation. More importantly, VMAT2 LO mice show massive argyrophilic deposits in the striatum after METH, indicating that VMAT2 is a regulator of METH-induced neurodegeneration. The increased METH neurotoxicity in VMAT2 LO occurs in the absence of any significant difference in basal temperature or METH-induced hyperthermia. Furthermore, primary midbrain cultures from VMAT2 LO mice show more oxidative stress generation and a greater loss of TH positive processes than wild-type cultures after METH exposure. Elevated markers of neurotoxicity in VMAT2 LO mice and cultures suggest that the capacity to store DA determines the amount of oxidative stress and neurodegeneration after METH administration. PMID:18643795

  18. Dopamine-induced α-synuclein oligomers show self- and cross-propagation properties

    PubMed Central

    Planchard, Matthew S; Exley, Sarah E; Morgan, Sarah E; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid aggregates of α-synuclein (αS) protein are the predominant species present within the intracellular inclusions called Lewy bodies in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. Among various aggregates, the low-molecular weight ones broadly ranging between 2 and 30 mers are known to be the primary neurotoxic agents responsible for the impairment of neuronal function. Recent research has indicated that the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is one of the key physiological agents promoting and augmenting αS aggregation, which is thought to be a significant event in PD pathologenesis. Specifically, DA is known to induce the formation of soluble oligomers of αS, which in turn are responsible for inducing several important cellular changes leading to cellular toxicity. In this report, we present the generation, isolation, and biophysical characterization of five different dopamine-derived αS oligomers (DSOs) ranging between 3 and 15 mers, corroborating previously published reports. More importantly, we establish that these DSOs are also capable of replication by self-propagation, which leads to the replication of DSOs upon interaction with αS monomers, a process similar to that observed in mammilian prions. In addition, DSOs are also able to cross-propagate amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Interestingly, while self-propagation of DSOs occur with no net gain in protein structure, cross-propagation proceeds with an overall gain in β-sheet conformation. These results implicate the involvement of DSOs in the progression of PD, and, in part, provide a molecular basis for the observed co-existence of AD-like pathology among PD patients. PMID:25044276

  19. Optogenetically-induced tonic dopamine release from VTA-nucleus accumbens projections inhibits reward consummatory behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Maria A; Bass, Caroline E; Grinevich, Valentina P; Chappell, Ann M; Deal, Alex L; Bonin, Keith D; Weiner, Jeff L; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Budygin, Evgeny A

    2016-10-01

    Recent optogenetic studies demonstrated that phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens may play a causal role in multiple aspects of natural and drug reward-related behaviors. The role of tonic dopamine release in reward consummatory behavior remains unclear. The current study used a combinatorial viral-mediated gene delivery approach to express ChR2 on mesolimbic dopamine neurons in rats. We used optical activation of this dopamine circuit to mimic tonic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and to explore the causal relationship between this form of dopamine signaling within the ventral tegmental area (VTA)-nucleus accumbens projection and consumption of a natural reward. Using a two bottle choice paradigm (sucrose vs. water), the experiments revealed that tonic optogenetic stimulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission significantly decreased reward consummatory behaviors. Specifically, there was a significant decrease in the number of bouts, licks and amount of sucrose obtained during the drinking session. Notably, activation of VTA dopamine cell bodies or dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens resulted in identical behavioral consequences. No changes in water intake were evident under the same experimental conditions. Collectively, these data demonstrate that tonic optogenetic stimulation of VTA-nucleus accumbens dopamine release is sufficient to inhibit reward consummatory behavior, possibly by preventing this circuit from engaging in phasic activity that is thought to be essential for reward-based behaviors. PMID:27421228

  20. No evidence for attenuated stress-induced extrastriatal dopamine signaling in psychotic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hernaus, D; Collip, D; Kasanova, Z; Winz, O; Heinzel, A; van Amelsvoort, T; Shali, S M; Booij, J; Rong, Y; Piel, M; Pruessner, J; Mottaghy, F M; Myin-Germeys, I

    2015-01-01

    Stress is an important risk factor in the etiology of psychotic disorder. Preclinical work has shown that stress primarily increases dopamine (DA) transmission in the frontal cortex. Given that DA-mediated hypofrontality is hypothesized to be a cardinal feature of psychotic disorder, stress-related extrastriatal DA release may be altered in psychotic disorder. Here we quantified for the first time stress-induced extrastriatal DA release and the spatial extent of extrastriatal DA release in individuals with non-affective psychotic disorder (NAPD). Twelve healthy volunteers (HV) and 12 matched drug-free NAPD patients underwent a single infusion [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography scan during which they completed the control and stress condition of the Montreal Imaging Stress Task. HV and NAPD did not differ in stress-induced [18F]fallypride displacement and the spatial extent of stress-induced [18F]fallypride displacement in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and temporal cortex (TC). In the whole sample, the spatial extent of stress-induced radioligand displacement in right ventro-mPFC, but not dorso-mPFC or TC, was positively associated with task-induced subjective stress. Psychotic symptoms during the scan or negative, positive and general subscales of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale were not associated with stress-induced [18F]fallypride displacement nor the spatial extent of stress-induced [18F]fallypride displacement in NAPD. Our results do not offer evidence for altered stress-induced extrastriatal DA signaling in NAPD, nor altered functional relevance. The implications of these findings for the role of the DA system in NAPD and stress processing are discussed. PMID:25871972

  1. The probability distribution of the predicted CFM-induced ozone depletion. [Chlorofluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehhalt, D. H.; Chang, J. S.; Bulter, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    It is argued from the central limit theorem that the uncertainty in model predicted changes of the ozone column density is best represented by a normal probability density distribution. This conclusion is validated by comparison with a probability distribution generated by a Monte Carlo technique. In the case of the CFM-induced ozone depletion, and based on the estimated uncertainties in the reaction rate coefficients alone the relative mean standard deviation of this normal distribution is estimated to be 0.29.

  2. Dopamine is not essential for the development of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jie; Darvas, Martin; Sotak, Bethany; Hatzidimitriou, George; McCann, Una D; Palmiter, Richard D; Ricaurte, George A

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that dopamine (DA) mediates methamphetamine (METH)-induced toxicity to brain dopaminergic neurons, because drugs that interfere with DA neurotransmission decrease toxicity, whereas drugs that increase DA neurotransmission enhance toxicity. However, temperature effects of drugs that have been used to manipulate brain DA neurotransmission confound interpretation of the data. Here we show that the recently reported ability of l-dihydroxyphenylalanine to reverse the protective effect of alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine on METH-induced DA neurotoxicity is also confounded by drug effects on body temperature. Further, we show that mice genetically engineered to be deficient in brain DA develop METH neurotoxicity, as long as the thermic effects of METH are preserved. In addition, we demonstrate that mice genetically engineered to have unilateral brain DA deficits develop METH-induced dopaminergic deficits that are of comparable magnitude on both sides of the brain. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that DA is not essential for the development of METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity and suggest that mechanisms independent of DA warrant more intense investigation. PMID:20533999

  3. Vitamin A depletion induced by cigarette smoke is associated with the development of emphysema in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Molteni, Agostino; Latkovich, Predrag; Castellani, William; Baybutt, Richard C

    2003-08-01

    We showed previously that vitamin A deficiency per se causes emphysema. Benzo(a)pyrene, a constituent in cigarette smoke, induces vitamin A depletion when administered to rats; therefore, we tested the hypothesis that cigarette smoke induces vitamin A depletion, which is associated with the development of emphysema. Male weanling rats were fed a purified AIN-93G diet and divided into two groups. The experimental group was exposed to cigarette smoke from 20 nonfiltered commercial cigarettes/d for 5 d/wk, whereas the control group was exposed to air. After 6 wk, tissues were collected for histological and biochemical analyses. Retinol levels were measured in serum, lung and liver. The trachea, lung and liver were examined for histological changes. Vitamin A levels decreased significantly in serum, lung and liver of smoke-treated rats. Histological examination revealed the presence of interstitial pneumonitis along with severe emphysema. There was a significant inverse relationship between vitamin A concentration in the lung and the severity of emphysema (r = -0.69 and P < 0.03). Detachment or hyperplasia (and metaplasia) of the tracheal epithelium and liver vacuole formation also were evident in the smoke-treated rats. The results of this research indicate that exposure to cigarette smoke induces vitamin A depletion in rats, which is associated with the development of emphysema. PMID:12888649

  4. The Role of Dopamine in Reinforcement: Changes in Reinforcement Sensitivity Induced by D[subscript 1]-Type, D[subscript 2]-Type, and Nonselective Dopamine Receptor Agonists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratcher, Natalie A.; Farmer-Dougan, Valeri; Dougan, James D.; Heidenreich, Byron A.; Garris, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    Dose-dependent changes in sensitivity to reinforcement were found when rats were treated with low, moderate, and high doses of the partial dopamine D[subscript 1]-type receptor agonist SKF38393 and with the nonselective dopamine agonist apomorphine, but did not change when rats were treated with similar doses of the selective dopamine D[subscript…

  5. Inhibition of titanium-particle-induced inflammatory osteolysis after local administration of dopamine and suppression of osteoclastogenesis via D2-like receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huilin; Xu, Yaozeng; Zhu, Mo; Gu, Ye; Zhang, Wen; Shao, Hongguo; Wang, Yijun; Ping, Zichuan; Hu, Xuanyang; Wang, Liangliang; Geng, Dechun

    2016-02-01

    Chronic inflammation and extensive osteoclast formation play critical roles in wear-debris-induced peri-implant osteolysis. We investigated the potential impact of dopamine on titanium-particle-induced inflammatory osteolysis in vivo and in vitro. Twenty-eight C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to four groups: sham control (PBS treatment), titanium (titanium/PBS treatment), low- (titanium/2 μg kg(-1) day(-1) dopamine) and high-dopamine (titanium/10 μg kg(-1) day(-1) dopamine). After 2 weeks, mouse calvariae were collected for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and histomorphometry analysis. Bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were isolated to assess osteoclast differentiation. Dopamine significantly reduced titanium-particle-induced osteolysis compared with the titanium group as confirmed by micro-CT and histomorphometric data. Osteoclast numbers were 34.9% and 59.7% (both p < 0.01) lower in the low- and high-dopamine-treatment groups, respectively, than in the titanium group. Additionally, low RANKL, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 immunochemistry staining were noted in dopamine-treatment groups. Dopamine markedly inhibited osteoclast formation, osteoclastogenesis-related gene expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in BMMs in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the resorption area was decreased with 10(-9) M and 10(-8) M dopamine to 40.0% and 14.5% (both p < 0.01), respectively. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of dopamine was reversed by the D2-like-receptor antagonist haloperidol but not by the D1-like-receptor antagonist SCH23390. These results suggest that dopamine therapy could be developed into an effective and safe method for osteolysis-related disease caused by chronic inflammation and excessive osteoclast formation. PMID:26695376

  6. Serotonin depletion does not alter lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the rat paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Conde, G L; Renshaw, D; Lightman, S L; Harbuz, M S

    1998-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of serotonin depletion on immune-mediated activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA, c-fos mRNA and Fos peptide responses in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) together with circulating levels of corticosterone were assessed in response to i.p. injections of three doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) both in control animals and animals pretreated with p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA). Conscious animals received either an i.p. injection of 0.5 ml saline or 200 mg/kg PCPA in 0.5 ml saline on 2 consecutive days. This treatment resulted in a 93% depletion of serotonin on the fourth day. On day 4, animals received i.p. injections of LPS (2.5 mg/0.5 ml saline, 250 micrograms/0.5 ml or 50 micrograms/0.5 ml; E. coli 055:B5), or saline injections as controls. Pretreatment with PCPA had no effect on the basal levels of corticosterone, or on the elevated levels induced by the three doses, of LPS. Fos peptide and c-fos mRNA were undetectable in control animals, and Fos-like immunoreactivity increased in a dose-dependent manner following i.p. LPS in both control and PCPA-pretreated animals. C-fos mRNA expression induced by LPS was unaffected by serotonin depletion. Following the lowest dose of LPS, CRF mRNA did not change above control levels, however, the medium and high doses of LPS produced a significant (P < 0.05) increase in CRF mRNA levels in both depleted and intact animals. To confirm the temporal effects of serotonin depletion on activation of the HPA axis we collected plasma at 30 min, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h after LPS in both intact and serotonin-depleted animals. No significant differences in plasma corticosterone levels were found at any of the time points between intact and depleted animals. It appears that, at least under these experimental conditions, serotonergic inputs do not seem to play a major role in mediating the effects of LPS on changes in mRNA levels in the PVN or on

  7. The auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system enables versatile conditional protein depletion in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangyu; Ward, Jordan D; Cheng, Ze; Dernburg, Abby F

    2015-12-15

    Experimental manipulation of protein abundance in living cells or organisms is an essential strategy for investigation of biological regulatory mechanisms. Whereas powerful techniques for protein expression have been developed in Caenorhabditis elegans, existing tools for conditional disruption of protein function are far more limited. To address this, we have adapted the auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system discovered in plants to enable conditional protein depletion in C. elegans. We report that expression of a modified Arabidopsis TIR1 F-box protein mediates robust auxin-dependent depletion of degron-tagged targets. We document the effectiveness of this system for depletion of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in diverse somatic and germline tissues throughout development. Target proteins were depleted in as little as 20-30 min, and their expression could be re-established upon auxin removal. We have engineered strains expressing TIR1 under the control of various promoter and 3' UTR sequences to drive tissue-specific or temporally regulated expression. The degron tag can be efficiently introduced by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing. We have harnessed this system to explore the roles of dynamically expressed nuclear hormone receptors in molting, and to analyze meiosis-specific roles for proteins required for germ line proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that the AID system provides a powerful new tool for spatiotemporal regulation and analysis of protein function in a metazoan model organism. PMID:26552885

  8. The auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system enables versatile conditional protein depletion in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangyu; Ward, Jordan D.; Cheng, Ze; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental manipulation of protein abundance in living cells or organisms is an essential strategy for investigation of biological regulatory mechanisms. Whereas powerful techniques for protein expression have been developed in Caenorhabditis elegans, existing tools for conditional disruption of protein function are far more limited. To address this, we have adapted the auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system discovered in plants to enable conditional protein depletion in C. elegans. We report that expression of a modified Arabidopsis TIR1 F-box protein mediates robust auxin-dependent depletion of degron-tagged targets. We document the effectiveness of this system for depletion of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in diverse somatic and germline tissues throughout development. Target proteins were depleted in as little as 20-30 min, and their expression could be re-established upon auxin removal. We have engineered strains expressing TIR1 under the control of various promoter and 3′ UTR sequences to drive tissue-specific or temporally regulated expression. The degron tag can be efficiently introduced by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing. We have harnessed this system to explore the roles of dynamically expressed nuclear hormone receptors in molting, and to analyze meiosis-specific roles for proteins required for germ line proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that the AID system provides a powerful new tool for spatiotemporal regulation and analysis of protein function in a metazoan model organism. PMID:26552885

  9. Pramipexole inhibits MPTP toxicity in mice by dopamine D3 receptor dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Andres D; Wong, Stephen K-F; Menniti, Frank S

    2003-08-15

    The role of dopamine D3 receptors was investigated in mediating the neuroprotective effect of the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist (S)-2-amino-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-6-propylamine-benzothiazole (pramipexole) in vivo. Pramipexole retained the ability to inhibit 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopamine depletion in mice in which the dopamine D3 receptor had been deleted. However, the neuroprotective efficacy was reduced in the dopamine D3 receptor-deleted mice compared to that in littermates expressing the wildtype receptor. Furthermore, the dopamine D3 receptor selective antagonist 2-(3-[4-(2-tert-butyl-6-trifluoromethyl-4-pyrimidinyl)-1-piperazinyl]propylthio)-4-pyrimidinol (A-437203) partially inhibited the neuroprotective effect of pramipexole in dopamine D3 receptor expressing mice but not in receptor-deleted mice. These results indicate that pramipexole protects dopamine neurons from MPTP-induced toxicity by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of an interaction with dopamine D3 receptors. PMID:12954356

  10. An amperometric nanobiosensor for the selective detection of K⁺-induced dopamine released from living cells.

    PubMed

    Mir, Tanveer Ahmad; Akhtar, Mahmood H; Gurudatt, N G; Kim, Jeong-In; Choi, Cheol Soo; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2015-06-15

    A highly sensitive amperometric sensor has been studied for selective monitoring of K(+)-induced dopamine released from dopaminergic cells (PC12) which is based on an EDTA immobilized-poly(1,5-diaminonaphthalne) (poly-DAN) layer comprising graphene oxide (GO) and gold nanoparticles (GO/AuNPs). The integration of a negatively charged probe molecule on the poly-DAN/GO/AuNPs nanohybrid attained the signal enhancement to discriminate dopamine (DA) molecules from foreign species by catalytic effect and surface charge, and hydrogen bonding-based interactions with a probe molecule. The sensor performance and morphology were investigated using voltammetry, impedance spectrometry, SEM, and XPS. Experimental variables affecting the analytical performance of the sensor probe were optimized, and linear response was observed in the range of 10 nM-1 µM with a detection limit of 5.0 nM (±0.01) for DA. Then, the sensor was applied to monitor dopamine released from PC12 cells upon extracellular stimulation of K(+) ions. It was also confirmed that K(+)-induced dopamine release was inhibited by a calcium channel inhibitor (Nifidipine). The results demonstrated that the presented biosensor could be used as an excellent tool for monitoring the effect of exogenous agents on living cells and drug efficacy tests. PMID:25617752

  11. Dopamine-Dependent Compensation Maintains Motor Behavior in Mice with Developmental Ablation of Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    DeMaro, Joseph A.; Knoten, Amanda; Hoshi, Masato; Pehek, Elizabeth; Johnson, Eugene M.; Gereau, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and consequent depletion of striatal dopamine are known to underlie the motor deficits observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). Adaptive changes in dopaminergic terminals and in postsynaptic striatal neurons can compensate for significant losses of striatal dopamine, resulting in preservation of motor behavior. In addition, compensatory changes independent of striatal dopamine have been proposed based on PD therapies that modulate nondopaminergic circuits within the basal ganglia. We used a genetic strategy to selectively destroy dopaminergic neurons in mice during development to determine the necessity of these neurons for the maintenance of normal motor behavior in adult and aged mice. We find that loss of 90% of SNc dopaminergic neurons and consequent depletion of >95% of striatal dopamine does not result in changes in motor behavior in young-adult or aged mice as evaluated by an extensive array of motor behavior tests. Treatment of aged mutant mice with the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol precipitated motor behavior deficits in aged mutant mice, indicating that <5% of striatal dopamine is sufficient to maintain motor function in these mice. We also found that mutant mice exhibit an exaggerated response to l-DOPA compared with control mice, suggesting that preservation of motor function involves sensitization of striatal dopamine receptors. Our results indicate that congenital loss of dopaminergic neurons induces remarkable adaptions in the nigrostriatal system where limited amounts of dopamine in the dorsal striatum can maintain normal motor function. PMID:24155314

  12. Induced lactation with a dopamine antagonist in mares: different responses between ovariectomized and intact mares.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, D; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Combarnous, Y; Duchamp, G; Martinat, N; Nagy, P; Daels, P F

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of treatment with repeated injections of sulpiride (a dopamine D2 antagonist) on prolactin secretion and induced lactation in ovariectomized and intact adult mares and to verify if this induction was possible at the beginning and at the end of the birth season. Two experiments were carried out in September [experiment (expt) 1], and in March (expt 2), in France (48 degrees N). In expt 1, three groups of five mares were tested: intact-control, intact-treated and ovariectomized-treated mares. In expt 2, mares previously subjected to artificial photoperiod were assigned in two groups: four intact-control and five intact-treated mares. The cyclicity of intact mares was previously synchronized with PGF2alpha injections, then all the mares were in the follicular phase at the beginning of treatment. Sulpiride was intramuscularly injected (0.5 mg/kg of BW), twice a day. Mares were milked at 7:30, 11:45, 16:00 and 20:15 hours. Blood samples were collected every day during the treatment for progesterone, total oestrogen and prolactin assays. In the two experiments, only treated intact mares produced milk, with a large inter-animal variability. Prolactin increase after sulpiride treatment was not so great in the ovariectomized-treated mares as in the intact-treated mares. The total correlations between prolactin, progesterone, oestrogen plasma concentrations and daily milk production were significant (0.57, 0.25, 0.17 respectively). This induction of lactation can be performed during the entire birth season in intact mares, but not in ovariectomized mares, indicating that steroids are necessary for this induction in mares treated by dopamine D2 antagonist. PMID:12950692

  13. The antipsychotic aripiprazole induces antinociceptive effects: Possible role of peripheral dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Santos, Ana F; Ferreira, Renata C M; Duarte, Igor D; Aguiar, Daniele C; Romero, Thiago R L; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2015-10-15

    Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic that acts by multiple mechanisms, including partial agonism at dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors. Since these neurotransmitters also modulate pain and analgesia, we tested the hypothesis that systemic or local administration of aripiprazole induces antinociceptive responses. Systemic aripiprazole (0.1-10 mg/kg; i.p.) injection in mice inhibited formalin-induced paw licking and PGE2-induced hyperalgesia in the paw pressure test. This effect was mimicked by intra-plantar administration (12.5-100 µg/paw) in the ipsi, but not contralateral, paw. The peripheral action of aripiprazole (100 µg/paw) was reversed by haloperidol (0.1-10 µg/paw), suggesting the activation of dopamine receptors as a possible mechanism. Accordingly, quinpirole (25-100 µg/paw), a full agonist at D2/D3 receptors, also reduced nociceptive responses.. In line with the partial agoniztic activity of aripiprazole, low dose of this compound inhibited the effect of quinpirole (both at 25 µg/paw). Finally, peripheral administration of NAN-190 (0.1-10 μg/paw), a 5-HT1A antagonist, also prevented aripiprazole-induced antinociception. In conclusion, systemic or local administration of aripiprazole induces antinociceptive effects. Similar to its antipsychotic activity, the possible peripheral mechanism involves dopamine D2 and serotoninergic 5-HT1A receptors. Aripiprazole and other dopaminergic modulators should be further investigated as new treatments for certain types of pain. PMID:26325094

  14. Intracellular NAD+ depletion enhances bortezomib-induced anti-myeloma activity

    PubMed Central

    Cagnetta, Antonia; Calimeri, Teresa; Acharya, Chirag; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Zhong, Mike Y.; Patrone, Franco; Nencioni, Alessio; Gobbi, Marco; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) inhibition depletes intracellular NAD+ content leading, to autophagic multiple myeloma (MM) cell death. Bortezomib has remarkably improved MM patient outcome, but dose-limiting toxicities and development of resistance limit its long-term utility. Here we observed higher Nampt messenger RNA levels in bortezomib-resistant patient MM cells, which correlated with decreased overall survival. We demonstrated that combining the NAD+ depleting agent FK866 with bortezomib induces synergistic anti-MM cell death and overcomes bortezomib resistance. This effect is associated with (1) activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, and downregulation of Mcl-1; (2) enhanced intracellular NAD+ depletion; (3) inhibition of chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like proteasome activities; (4) inhibition of nuclear factor κB signaling; and (5) inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, Nampt knockdown significantly enhances the anti-MM effect of bortezomib, which can be rescued by ectopically overexpressing Nampt. In a murine xenograft MM model, low-dose combination FK866 and Bortezomib is well tolerated, significantly inhibits tumor growth, and prolongs host survival. Taken together, these findings indicate that intracellular NAD+ level represents a major determinant in the ability of bortezomib to induce apoptosis in MM cells and provide proof of concept for the combination with FK866 as a new strategy to enhance sensitivity or overcome resistance to bortezomib. PMID:23823317

  15. Lateral Parabrachial Nucleus Serotonergic Mechanisms and Salt Appetite Induced by Sodium Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menani, Jose Vanderlei; DeLuca, Laurival Antonio, Jr.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of bilateral injections of a serotonin (5-HT) receptor agonist into the lateral parabrachial nucleus on the intake of NaCl and water induced by 24-h water deprivation or by sodium depletion followed by 24 h of sodium deprivation (injection of the diuretic furosemide plus 24 h of d sodium-deficient diet). Rats had stainless steel cannulas implanted bilaterally into the LPBN. Bilateral LPBN injections of the serotonergic 5-HT(1/2) receptor antagonist methysergide (4 micro-g/200 nl at each site) increased hypertonic NaCl intake when tested 24 h after sodium depletion and after 24 h of water deprivation. Water intake also increased after bilateral injections of methysergide into the LPBN. In contrast, the intake of a palatable solution (0.06 M sucrose) under body fluid-replete conditions was not changed after bilateral LPBN methysergide injections. The results show that serotonergic mechanisms in the LPBN modulate water and sodium intake induced by volume depletion and sodium loss. The finding that sucrose intake was not affected by LPBN serotonergic blockade suggests that the effects of the methysergide treatment on the intakes of water and NaCl are not due to a mechanism producing a nonspecific enhancement of all ingestive behaviors.

  16. Intracellular NAD⁺ depletion enhances bortezomib-induced anti-myeloma activity.

    PubMed

    Cagnetta, Antonia; Cea, Michele; Calimeri, Teresa; Acharya, Chirag; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; Zhong, Mike Y; Patrone, Franco; Nencioni, Alessio; Gobbi, Marco; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2013-08-15

    We recently demonstrated that Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) inhibition depletes intracellular NAD⁺ content leading, to autophagic multiple myeloma (MM) cell death. Bortezomib has remarkably improved MM patient outcome, but dose-limiting toxicities and development of resistance limit its long-term utility. Here we observed higher Nampt messenger RNA levels in bortezomib-resistant patient MM cells, which correlated with decreased overall survival. We demonstrated that combining the NAD⁺ depleting agent FK866 with bortezomib induces synergistic anti-MM cell death and overcomes bortezomib resistance. This effect is associated with (1) activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, and downregulation of Mcl-1; (2) enhanced intracellular NAD⁺ depletion; (3) inhibition of chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like proteasome activities; (4) inhibition of nuclear factor κB signaling; and (5) inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, Nampt knockdown significantly enhances the anti-MM effect of bortezomib, which can be rescued by ectopically overexpressing Nampt. In a murine xenograft MM model, low-dose combination FK866 and Bortezomib is well tolerated, significantly inhibits tumor growth, and prolongs host survival. Taken together, these findings indicate that intracellular NAD⁺ level represents a major determinant in the ability of bortezomib to induce apoptosis in MM cells and provide proof of concept for the combination with FK866 as a new strategy to enhance sensitivity or overcome resistance to bortezomib. PMID:23823317

  17. Pyrogallol induces the death of human pulmonary fibroblast cells through ROS increase and GSH depletion.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Pyrogallol (PG) inhibits the growth of various cells via stimulating O2•--mediated death. This study investigated the effects of PG on cell death in human pulmonary fibroblast (HPF) cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) levels. PG inhibited the growth of HPF cells with an IC50 of ~50-100 µM at 24 h. PG induced a G1 phase arrest of the cell cycle and also triggered cell death accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆ψm), Bcl-2 decrease, p53 increase and the activation of caspase-3. PG increased O2•- level in HPF cells and depleted GSH content in these cells. Z-VAD (a pan-caspase inhibitor) did not significantly change cell growth inhibition, death and MMP (∆ψm) loss in PG-treated HPF cells. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuated growth inhibition, death and MMP (∆ψm) loss in PG-treated HPF cells and it decreased O2•- level in these cells as well. However, L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) strongly increased ROS level in PG-treated HPF cells and it intensified growth inhibition, cell death, MMP (∆ψm) loss and GSH depletion in these cells. In conclusion, PG-induced HPF cell death was closely related to increases in ROS level and GSH depletion. PMID:27278810

  18. Depletion of Bmi-1 enhances 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis and autophagy in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Hu, Dong; Zhang, Rongbo

    2012-10-01

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is one of the standard chemoradiotherapy regimens for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (Bmi-1) has been demonstrated to regulate proliferation. Additionally, Bmi-1 overexpression has been identified in HCC cell lines and correlates with the advanced invasive stage of tumor progression and poor prognosis. In this study, we examined the effects of 5-FU treatment on cell growth in HCC cells with or without Bmi-1 depletion. The IC(50) values of 5-FU were significantly decreased to a greater extent in cells with Bmi-1 knockdown. Depletion of Bmi-1 increased sensitivity of the cells to 5-FU and increased apoptosis. Knockdown of endogenous Bmi-1 led to a substantial reduction in the levels of phospho-AKT and Bcl-2 with a concomitant increase in the levels of Bax. Additionally, 5-FU induced the conversion/turnover of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3). Knockdown of endogenous Bmi-1 led to an increase in the levels of Beclin-1 and the accumulation of LC3-II. Together, these findings reveal that Bmi-1 depletion enhanced the chemosensitivity of HCC cells by inducing apoptosis and autophagy, which is associated with the PI3K/AKT and Bcl-2/Beclin-1 pathways. PMID:23205090

  19. ATP depletion does not account for apoptosis induced by inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain in human dopaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Watabe, Masahiko; Nakaki, Toshio

    2007-02-01

    As the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) is necessary for life, its inhibition results in cell death. To date, ETC complex (I-IV) inhibitors (ETCIs) have been thought to induce ATP depletion, triggering cellular apoptosis. To clarify whether the depletion of intracellular ATP is relevant to apoptosis induced by ETCIs, we conducted comparative studies using oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors (OPIs), including a specific F(0)F(1)ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin, an ionophore valinomycin and an uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol, as tools to deplete only ATP without influencing the ETC. In human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells, ETCIs (rotenone, thenoyltrifluoroacetone, antimycin A and potassium cyanide) depleted ATP and induced apoptosis. However, OPIs failed to induce apoptosis despite ATP being decreased to an extent comparable to that observed with ETCIs. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was augmented by ETCIs, but not by OPIs. Furthermore, ETCI-induced apoptosis was inhibited by the addition of an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Apoptosis was induced without ATP depletion by H(2)O(2) at a concentration that generated ROS at an amount comparable to that induced by ETCIs. Our findings demonstrate that ROS production is more relevant than ATP depletion to apoptosis induced by ETCIs. PMID:17027047

  20. Intrinsic vascular dopamine – a key modulator of hypoxia-induced vasodilatation in splanchnic vessels

    PubMed Central

    Pfeil, Uwe; Kuncova, Jitka; Brüggmann, Doerthe; Paddenberg, Renate; Rafiq, Amir; Henrich, Michael; Weigand, Markus A; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter; Mewe, Marco; Middendorff, Ralf; Slavikova, Jana; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine not only is a precursor of the catecholamines noradrenaline and adrenaline but also serves as an independent neurotransmitter and paracrine hormone. It plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and is a potent vasodilator in many mammalian systemic arteries, strongly suggesting an endogenous source of dopamine in the vascular wall. Here we demonstrated dopamine, noradrenaline and adrenaline in rat aorta and superior mesenteric arteries (SMA) by radioimmunoassay. Chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine showed a significant reduction of noradrenaline and adrenaline, while dopamine levels remained unaffected. Isolated endothelial cells were able to synthesize and release dopamine upon cAMP stimulation. Consistent with these data, mRNAs coding for catecholamine synthesizing enzymes, i.e. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase, and dopamine-β-hydroxylase were detected by RT-PCR in cultured endothelial cells from SMA. TH protein was detected by immunohistochemisty and Western blot. Exposure of endothelial cells to hypoxia (1% O2) increased TH mRNA. Vascular smooth muscle cells partially expressed catecholaminergic traits. A physiological role of endogenous vascular dopamine was shown in SMA, where D1 dopamine receptor blockade abrogated hypoxic vasodilatation. Experiments on SMA with endothelial denudation revealed a significant contribution of the endothelium, although subendothelial dopamine release dominated. From these results we conclude that endothelial cells and cells of the underlying vascular wall synthesize and release dopamine in an oxygen-regulated manner. In the splanchnic vasculature, this intrinsic non-neuronal dopamine is the dominating vasodilator released upon lowering of oxygen tension. PMID:24535440

  1. Extended methamphetamine self-administration in rats results in a selective reduction of dopamine transporter levels in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum not accompanied by marked monoaminergic depletion.

    PubMed

    Schwendt, Marek; Rocha, Angelica; See, Ronald E; Pacchioni, Alejandra M; McGinty, Jacqueline F; Kalivas, Peter W

    2009-11-01

    Chronic abuse of methamphetamine leads to cognitive dysfunction and high rates of relapse, paralleled by significant changes of brain dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission. Previously, we found that rats with extended access to methamphetamine self-administration displayed enhanced methamphetamine-primed reinstatement of drug-seeking and cognitive deficits relative to limited access animals. The present study investigated whether extended access to methamphetamine self-administration produced abnormalities in dopamine and serotonin systems in rat forebrain. Rats self-administered methamphetamine (0.02-mg/i.v. infusion) during daily 1-h sessions for 7 to 10 days, followed by either short- (1-h) or long-access (6-h) self-administration for 12 to 14 days. Lever responding was extinguished for 2 weeks before either reinstatement testing or rapid decapitation and tissue dissection. Tissue levels of monoamine transporters and markers of methamphetamine-induced toxicity were analyzed in several forebrain areas. Long-access methamphetamine self-administration resulted in escalation of daily drug intake ( approximately 7 mg/kg/day) and enhanced drug-primed reinstatement compared with the short-access group. Furthermore, long-, but not short-access to self-administered methamphetamine resulted in persistent decreases in dopamine transporter (DAT) protein levels in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum. In contrast, only minor alterations in the tissue levels of dopamine or its metabolites were found, and no changes in markers specific for dopamine terminals or glial cell activation were detected. Our findings suggest that persistent methamphetamine seeking is associated with region-selective changes in DAT levels without accompanying monoaminergic neurotoxicity. Greater understanding of the neuroadaptations underlying persistent methamphetamine seeking and cognitive deficits could yield targets suitable for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:19648469

  2. Rapid Protein Depletion in Human Cells by Auxin-Inducible Degron Tagging with Short Homology Donors.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Saga, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2016-04-01

    Studying the role of essential proteins is dependent upon a method for rapid inactivation, in order to study the immediate phenotypic consequences. Auxin-inducible degron (AID) technology allows rapid depletion of proteins in animal cells and fungi, but its application to human cells has been limited by the difficulties of tagging endogenous proteins. We have developed a simple and scalable CRISPR/Cas-based method to tag endogenous proteins in human HCT116 and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by using donor constructs that harbor synthetic short homology arms. Using a combination of AID tagging with CRISPR/Cas, we have generated conditional alleles of essential nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in HCT116 cells, which can then be depleted very rapidly after the addition of auxin to the culture medium. This approach should greatly facilitate the functional analysis of essential proteins, particularly those of previously unknown function. PMID:27052166

  3. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Thomas H. B.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signaling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behavior. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings. PMID:26581305

  4. Methylone-induced hyperthermia and lethal toxicity: role of the dopamine and serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Piao, Ying-Shan; Hall, Frank Scott; Moriya, Yuki; Ito, Miki; Ohara, Arihisa; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Uhl, George R; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-06-01

    Methylone (2-methylamino-1-[3,4-methylenedioxy-phenyl]propan-1-one), an amphetamine analog, has emerged as a popular drug of abuse worldwide. Methylone induces hyperthermia, which is thought to contribute toward the lethal consequences of methylone overdose. Methylone has been assumed to induce hyperthermic effects through inhibition of serotonin and/or dopamine transporters (SERT and DAT, respectively). To examine the roles of each of these proteins in methylone-induced toxic effects, we used SERT and DAT knockout (KO) mice and assessed the hyperthermic and lethal effects caused by a single administration of methylone. Methylone produced higher rates of lethal toxicity compared with other amphetamine analogs in wild-type mice. Compared with wild-type mice, lethality was significantly lower in DAT KO mice, but not in SERT KO mice. By contrast, only a slight diminution in the hyperthermic effects of methylone was observed in DAT KO mice, whereas a slight enhancement of these effects was observed in SERT KO mice. Administration of the selective D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 and the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride reduced methylone-induced hyperthermia, but these drugs also had hypothermic effects in saline-treated mice, albeit to a smaller extent than the effects observed in methylone-treated mice. In contradistinction to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, which induces its toxicity through SERT and DAT, these data indicate that DAT, but not SERT, is strongly associated with the lethal toxicity produced by methylone, which did not seem to be dependent on the hyperthermic effects of methylone. DAT is therefore a strong candidate molecule for interventions aimed at preventing acute neurotoxic and lethal effects of methylone. PMID:25794333

  5. Polymer-Induced Depletion Interaction and Its Effect on Colloidal Sedimentation in Colloid-Polymer Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Penger

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the polymer-induced depletion attraction and its effect on colloidal sedimentation in colloid-polymer mixtures. We first report a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of the depletion effect in a mixture of hard-sphere-like colloid and non-adsorbing polymer. Then we present results of our recent sedimentation measurements in the same colloid-polymer mixture. A key parameter in controlling the sedimentation of heavy colloidal particles is the interparticle potential U(tau), which is the work required to bring two colloidal particles from infinity to a distance tau under a give solvent condition. This potential is known to affect the average settling velocity of the particles and experimentally one needs to have a way to continuously vary U(tau) in order to test the theory. The interaction potential U(tau) can be altered by adding polymer molecules into the colloidal suspension. In a mixture of colloid and non-adsorbing polymer, the potential U(tau) can develop an attractive well because of the depletion effect, in that the polymer chains are expelled from the region between two colloidal particles when their surface separation becomes smaller than the size of the polymer chains. The exclusion of polymer molecules from the space between the colloidal particles leads to an unbalanced osmotic pressure difference pushing the colloidal particles together, which results in an effective attraction between the two colloidal particles. The polymer-induced depletion attraction controls the phase stability of many colloid-polymer mixtures, which are directly of interest to industry.

  6. PGC-1α overexpression protects against aldosterone-induced podocyte depletion: role of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Yuan, Yanggang; Bai, Mi; Ding, Guixia; Jia, Zhanjun; Huang, Songming; Zhang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence has shown that podocyte number is a critical determinant for the development of glomerulosclerosis and progressive renal failure. We previously reported that mitochondrial dysfunction (MtD) is an early event in podocyte injury. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is an important modulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Here, we investigated the role of PGC-1α overexpression in podocyte depletion and the involvement of mitochondria in this process. Following chronic aldosterone (Aldo) infusion for 14 days, we observed a remarkable podocyte loss, podocyte phenotypic changes, and albuminuria in WT mice. However, all these abnormalities were significantly attenuated in PGC-1α transgenic mice. Next, we examined mitochondrial function in both genotypes with or without Aldo infusion. As expected, Aldo-induced MtD in glomeruli was markedly improved in PGC-1α transgenic mice. In vitro, Aldo induced podocyte detachment and phenotypic changes in line with MtD in dose- and time-dependent manners. Similarly, ethidium bromide, an inducer of MtD, mimicked Aldo effects on podocyte detachment and phenotypic alterations. Notably, overexpression of PGC-1α in podocytes entirely reversed Aldo-induced podocyte detachment, phenotypic changes, and MtD. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that PGC-1α protects against podocyte depletion and phenotypic changes possibly by maintaining normal mitochondrial function. PMID:26943584

  7. Nucleotide Pool Depletion Induces G-Quadruplex-Dependent Perturbation of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Charikleia; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Schiavone, Davide; Sale, Julian E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nucleotide pool imbalance has been proposed to drive genetic instability in cancer. Here, we show that slowing replication forks by depleting nucleotide pools with hydroxyurea (HU) can also give rise to both transient and permanent epigenetic instability of a reporter locus, BU-1, in DT40 cells. HU induces stochastic formation of Bu-1low variants in dividing cells, which have lost the H3K4me3 present in untreated cells. This instability is potentiated by an intragenic G quadruplex, which also promotes local H2Ax phosphorylation and transient heterochromatinization. Genome-wide, gene expression changes induced by HU significantly overlap with those resulting from loss of the G4-helicases FANCJ, WRN, and BLM. Thus, the effects of global replication stress induced by nucleotide pool depletion can be focused by local replication impediments caused by G quadruplex formation to induce epigenetic instability and changes in gene expression, a mechanism that may contribute to selectable transcriptional changes in cancer. PMID:26686635

  8. Effect of sex chromosome complement on sodium appetite and Fos-immunoreactivity induced by sodium depletion.

    PubMed

    Dadam, Florencia M; Caeiro, Ximena E; Cisternas, Carla D; Macchione, Ana F; Cambiasso, María J; Vivas, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies indicate a sex chromosome complement (SCC) effect on the angiotensin II-sexually dimorphic hypertensive and bradycardic baroreflex responses. We sought to evaluate whether SCC may differentially modulate sexually dimorphic-induced sodium appetite and specific brain activity due to physiological stimulation of the rennin angiotensin system. For this purpose, we used the "four core genotype" mouse model, in which the effect of gonadal sex and SCC is dissociated, allowing comparisons of sexually dimorphic traits between XX and XY females as well as in XX and XY males. Gonadectomized mice were sodium depleted by furosemide (50 mg/kg) and low-sodium diet treatment; control groups were administered with vehicle and maintained on normal sodium diet. Twenty-one hours later, the mice were divided into two groups: one group was submitted to the water-2% NaCl choice intake test, while the other group was perfused and their brains subjected to the Fos-immunoreactivity (FOS-ir) procedure. Sodium depletion, regardless of SCC (XX or XY), induced a significantly lower sodium and water intake in females than in males, confirming the existence in mice of sexual dimorphism in sodium appetite and the organizational involvement of gonadal steroids. Moreover, our results demonstrate a SCC effect on induced brain FOS-ir, showing increased brain activity in XX-SCC mice at the paraventricular nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, and lateral parabrachial nucleus, as well as an XX-SCC augmented effect on sodium depletion-induced brain activity at two circumventricular organs, the subfornical organ and area postrema, nuclei closely involved in fluid and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:24259464

  9. Vitamin D3: A Role in Dopamine Circuit Regulation, Diet-Induced Obesity, and Drug Consumption123

    PubMed Central

    Land, Benjamin B.; Wickham, Robert J.; Maldonado-Aviles, Jaime; de Araujo, Ivan E.; Addy, Nii A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The influence of micronutrients on dopamine systems is not well defined. Using mice, we show a potential role for reduced dietary vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) in promoting diet-induced obesity (DIO), food intake, and drug consumption while on a high fat diet. To complement these deficiency studies, treatments with exogenous fully active vitamin D3 (calcitriol, 10 µg/kg, i.p.) were performed. Nondeficient mice that were made leptin resistant with a high fat diet displayed reduced food intake and body weight after an acute treatment with exogenous calcitriol. Dopamine neurons in the midbrain and their target neurons in the striatum were found to express vitamin D3 receptor protein. Acute calcitriol treatment led to transcriptional changes of dopamine-related genes in these regions in naive mice, enhanced amphetamine-induced dopamine release in both naive mice and rats, and increased locomotor activity after acute amphetamine treatment (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Alternatively, mice that were chronically fed either the reduced D3 high fat or chow diets displayed less activity after acute amphetamine treatment compared with their respective controls. Finally, high fat deficient mice that were trained to orally consume liquid amphetamine (90 mg/L) displayed increased consumption, while nondeficient mice treated with calcitriol showed reduced consumption. Our findings suggest that reduced dietary D3 may be a contributing environmental factor enhancing DIO as well as drug intake while eating a high fat diet. Moreover, these data demonstrate that dopamine circuits are modulated by D3 signaling, and may serve as direct or indirect targets for exogenous calcitriol. PMID:27257625

  10. Acetaldehyde sequestering prevents ethanol-induced stimulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission.

    PubMed

    Enrico, Paolo; Sirca, Donatella; Mereu, Maddalena; Peana, Alessandra Tiziana; Lintas, Alessandra; Golosio, Angela; Diana, Marco

    2009-03-01

    Acetaldehyde (ACD) has been postulated to mediate some of the neurobehavioral effects of ethanol (EtOH). In this study we sought to evaluate whether the stimulatory effects of EtOH on mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission are affected by the administration of ACD-sequestering agent D-penicillamine (Dp). To this end we studied the effect of EtOH and ACD in the rat mesoaccumbens pathway by in vivo microdialysis in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAccs), and by single cell extracellular recordings from antidromically identified mesoaccumbens DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Both EtOH (1g/kg) and ACD (20mg/kg) administration increased DA levels in the NAccs and increased the activity of mesoaccumbens DA neurons. Pretreatment with Dp (50mg/kg i.p. 1h before drug challenge) prevented both EtOH- and ACD-induced stimulation of the DA mesolimbic system without affecting morphine stimulatory actions. These observations add further support to the notion that EtOH-derived ACD stimulates the mesolimbic DA system and is essential in EtOH-induced stimulation of the DA mesoaccumbens system. We conclude that modulation of ACD bioavailability may influence the addictive profile of EtOH by decreasing its psychotropic effects and possibly leading the way to new pharmacological treatments of alcoholism. PMID:19070441

  11. Mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, M; Yoshioka, T; Saio, M; Banno, Y; Nagaoka, H; Okano, Y

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, which refers to cell death or its prologue triggered by aberrant mitosis, can be induced by a heterogeneous group of stimuli, including chromosome damage or perturbation of the mitotic apparatus. We investigated the mechanism of mitotic catastrophe and cell death induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization. We transfected cells harboring wild-type or mutated p53 with siRNAs targeting Aurora A, ninein, TOG, TACC3, γ-tubulin, or pericentriolar material-1, and monitored the effects on cell death. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, TOG, and TACC3 led to cell death, regardless of p53 status. Knockdown of Aurora A, ninein, and TOG, led to aberrant spindle formation and subsequent cell death, which was accompanied by several features of apoptosis, including nuclear condensation and Annexin V binding in HeLa cells. During this process, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, caspase-3, and caspase-9 was detected, but cleavage of caspase-8 was not. Cell death, monitored by time-lapse imaging, occurred during both interphase and M phase. In cells depleted of a centrosomal protein (Aurora A, ninein, or TOG), the rate of cell death was higher if the cells were cotransfected with siRNA against BubR1 or Mad2 than if they were transfected with siRNA against Bub1 or a control siRNA. These results suggest that metaphase arrest is necessary for the mitotic catastrophe and cell death caused by depletion of centrosomal proteins. Knockdown of centrosomal proteins led to increased phosphorylation of Chk2. Enhanced p-Chk2 localization was also observed at the centrosome in cells arrested in M phase, as well as in the nuclei of dying cells. Cotransfection of siRNAs against Chk2, in combination with depletion of a centrosomal protein, decreased the amount of cell death. Thus, Chk2 activity is indispensable for apoptosis after mitotic catastrophe induced by depletion of centrosomal proteins that perturbs microtubule organization

  12. Hydroxytyrosol induces phase II detoxifying enzyme expression and effectively protects dopaminergic cells against dopamine- and 6-hydroxydopamine induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guohua; Deng, Ajun; Tang, Wanbin; Ma, Junzhi; Yuan, Chonggang; Ma, Jiyan

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common late-age onset neurodegenerative disease. Except for the symptomatic alleviating treatment, no disease modifying therapy is currently available. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective role of hydroxytyrosol (HT), a major phenolic compound present in olive oil, against dopaminergic cell death. We found that HT effectively protected dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells against dopamine (DA) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced cell death, but had no apparent effect on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we have shown that HT efficiently induced the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Using an NQO1 inhibitor, we revealed that increased NQO1 expression contributed to the protective effect of HT against dopaminergic cell death. Together, our findings suggest that HT has a protective effect against DA- and 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic cell death, supporting the beneficial effect of olive oil in preventing DA-metabolism related dopaminergic neuron dysfunction. PMID:26970393

  13. Purinergic mechanisms of lateral parabrachial nucleus facilitate sodium depletion-induced NaCl intake.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Miguel F; Barbosa, Silas P; De Andrade, Carina A F; Menani, José V; De Paula, Patrícia M

    2011-02-01

    Purinergic receptors are present in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN), a pontine structure involved in the control of sodium intake. In the present study, we investigated the effects of α,β-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (α,β-methylene ATP, selective P2X purinergic agonist) alone or combined with pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS, P2X purinergic antagonist) or suramin (non-selective P2 purinergic antagonist) injected into the LPBN on sodium depletion-induced 1.8% NaCl intake. Male Holtzman rats with stainless steel cannulas implanted into the LPBN were used. Sodium depletion was induced by treating rats with the diuretic furosemide (20mg/kg of body weight) followed by 24h of sodium-deficient diet. Bilateral injections of α,β-methylene ATP (2.0 and 4.0nmol/0.2μl) into the LPBN increased sodium depletion-induced 1.8% NaCl intake (25.3±0.8 and 26.5±0.9ml/120min, respectively, vs. saline: 15.2±1.3ml/120min). PPADS (4nmol/0.2μl) alone into the LPBN did not change 1.8% NaCl intake, however, pretreatment with PPADS into the LPBN abolished the effects of α,β-methylene ATP on 1.8% NaCl intake (16.9±0.9ml/120min). Suramin (2.0nmol/0.2μl) alone into the LPBN reduced sodium depletion-induced 1.8% NaCl intake (5.7±1.9ml/120min, vs. saline: 15.5±1.1ml/120min), without changing 2% sucrose intake or 24h water deprivation-induced water intake. The combination of suramin and α,β-methylene ATP into the LPBN produced no change of 1.8% NaCl intake (15.2±1.2ml/120min). The results suggest that purinergic P2 receptor activation in the LPBN facilitates NaCl intake, probably by restraining LPBN mechanisms that inhibit sodium intake. PMID:21129366

  14. Zinc protects human kidney cells from depleted uranium-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuhui; Ren, Jiong; Liu, Cong; Li, Hong; Liu, Jing; Yang, Zhangyou; Li, Rong; Su, Yongping

    2014-03-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a weak radioactive heavy metal, and zinc (Zn) is an effective antidote to heavy metal poisoning. However, the effect of Zn on DU-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis is not completely understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Zn on DU-induced cell apoptosis in human kidney cells (HK-2) and explore its molecular mechanism. Pre-treatment with Zn significantly inhibited DU-induced apoptosis. It reduced the formation of reactive oxygen species in the cells, increased the catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH) concentrations, suppressed the DU-induced soluble Fas receptor (sFasR) and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL) overexpression, suppressed the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis inhibitor factor (AIF) from mitochondria to cytoplasm, inhibited the activation of caspase-9, caspase-8 and caspase-3, and induced metallothionein (MT) expression. Furthermore, exogenous MT effectively inhibited DU-induced cell apoptosis. In conclusion, mitochondrial and FasR-mediated apoptosis pathways contribute to DU-induced apoptosis in HK-2 cells. Through independent mechanisms, such as indirect antioxidant effects, inhibition of the activation of caspase-9, caspase-8 and caspase-3, and induction of MT expression, Zn inhibits DU-induced apoptosis. PMID:24330236

  15. Sedimentation rapidly induces an immune response and depletes energy stores in a hard coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, C.; Grosjean, Ph.; Leblud, J.; Palmer, C. V.; Kushmaro, A.; Eeckhaut, I.

    2014-12-01

    High sedimentation rates have been linked to reduced coral health within multiple systems; however, whether this is a direct result of compromised coral immunity has not been previously investigated. The potential effects of sedimentation on immunity of the hard coral Montipora patula were examined by comparing physiological responses of coral fragments inoculated with sterilized marine sediments and those under control conditions. Sediments were collected from terrestrial runoff-affected reefs in SW Madagascar and applied cyclically for a total of 24 h at a rate observed during precipitation-induced sedimentation events. Coral health was determined 24 h after the onset of the sedimentation stress through measuring metabolic proxies of O2 budget and lipid ratios. Immune response of the melanin synthesis pathway was measured by quantifying phenoloxidase activity and melanin deposits. Sedimentation induced both immune and metabolic responses in M. patula. Both phenoloxidase activity and melanin deposition were significantly higher in the sediment treatment compared to controls, indicating an induced immune response. Sediment-treated corals also showed a tendency towards increased respiration (during the night) and decreased photosynthesis (during the day) and a significant depletion of energy reserves as compared to controls. These data highlight that short-term (24 h) sedimentation, free of live microorganisms, compromises the health of M. patula. The energetically costly immune response, potentially elicited by residual endotoxins and other inflammatory particles associated with the sterile sediments, likely contributes to the energy depletion. Overall, exposure to sedimentation adversely affects coral health and continued exposure may lead to resource depletion and an increased susceptibility to disease.

  16. ARMS depletion facilitates UV irradiation induced apoptotic cell death in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Hsu, Su-Ming; Huang, Pei-Hsin

    2007-12-15

    Tumor cells often aberrantly reexpress molecules that mediate proper embryonic development for advantageous growth or survival. Here, we report that ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning (ARMS), a transmembrane protein abundant in the developing and adult neural tissues, is overexpressed in melanoma, a tumor ontogenetically originating from neural crest. Immunohistochemical study of 79 melanocytic lesions showed significantly increased expression of ARMS in primary malignant melanomas (92.9%) and metastatic melanoma (60.0%) in comparison with benign nevocellular nevi (26.7%). To investigate the role of ARMS in melanoma formation, murine B16F0 melanoma cells with stable knockdown of ARMS were established by RNA interference. Down-regulation of ARMS resulted in significant inhibition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and restrictive growth of melanoma in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Importantly, depletion of ARMS facilitated UVB-induced apoptosis in melanoma cells through inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK)/ERK. Addition of MEK inhibitor PD98059 further sensitized ARMS-depleted melanoma cells to UVB-induced apoptosis, whereas constitutively active MEK rescued ARMS-depleted cells from apoptosis. We further showed that BRAF, a downstream signaling molecule of ARMS in ERK pathway, is not mutated as a constitutively active form in acral lentiginous melanoma; in contrast, BRAF(T1799A) mutation, which leads to constitutive activation of ERK signaling, was detected in 57.1% of superficial spreading melanoma. Our study suggests that overexpression of ARMS per se serves as one mechanism to promote melanoma formation by preventing stress-induced apoptotic death mediated by the MEK/ERK signaling pathway, especially in acral lentiginous melanoma, most of which does not harbor BRAF mutation. PMID:18089783

  17. Oleic acid-induced lung injury in rabbits: effect of fibrinogen depletion with Arvin

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, M.F.; Doerschuk, C.M.; Brumwell, M.L.; Belzberg, A.; Hogg, J.C.

    1988-03-01

    The role of fibrinogen in the evolution of the increased permeability after oleic acid-induced lung injury was studied in New Zealand White rabbits. Animals depleted of fibrinogen by treatment with Malayan pit viper venom were compared with untreated rabbits immediately and at 1 and 24 h after injury. The increased permeability to albumin and elevated extravascular lung water (EVLW) associated with lung injury returned to control values by 24 h in untreated animals. Fibrinogen-depleted animals had a higher mortality (10/25 vs. 2/17, P less than 0.02) and showed a greater immediate increase in permeability to albumin that returned to control values at 1 and 24 h after injury, as well as trends toward elevated blood-free dry lung weight and larger increases in EVLW that persisted for 24 h. These findings indicate that fibrinogen-related proteins play an important role in controlling the microvascular injury that is produced by oleic acid. However, when these proteins are depleted, other mechanisms partially control the leak at later stages of the repair process.

  18. Multicistronic lentiviral vector-mediated striatal gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GTP cyclohydrolase I induces sustained transgene expression, dopamine production, and functional improvement in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Barber, Robert D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Carter, Emma E; Rohll, Jonathan B; Kingsman, Susan M; Kingsman, Alan J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2002-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This loss leads to complete dopamine depletion in the striatum and severe motor impairment. It has been demonstrated previously that a lentiviral vector system based on equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) gives rise to highly efficient and sustained transduction of neurons in the rat brain. Therefore, a dopamine replacement strategy using EIAV has been investigated as a treatment in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) animal model of PD. A self-inactivating EIAV minimal lentiviral vector that expresses tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic amino acid dopa decarboxylase (AADC), and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (CH1) in a single transcription unit has been generated. In cultured striatal neurons transduced with this vector, TH, AADC, and CH1 proteins can all be detected. After stereotactic delivery into the dopamine-denervated striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat, sustained expression of each enzyme and effective production of catecholamines were detected, resulting in significant reduction of apomorphine-induced motor asymmetry compared with control animals (p < 0.003). Expression of each enzyme in the striatum was observed for up to 5 months after injection. These data indicate that the delivery of three catecholaminergic synthetic enzymes by a single lentiviral vector can achieve functional improvement and thus open the potential for the use of this vector for gene therapy of late-stage PD patients. PMID:12451130

  19. Hydrophobic statins induce autophagy and cell death in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells by depleting geranylgeranyl diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Araki, Makoto; Maeda, Masatomo; Motojima, Kiyoto

    2012-01-15

    Statins are the most common type of medicine used to treat hypercholesterolemia; however, they are associated with a low incidence of myotoxicity such as myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. The mechanisms for the adverse effects remain to be fully elucidated for safer chronic use and drug development. The results of our earlier work suggested that hydrophobic statins induce autophagy in cultured human rhabdomyosarcoma A204 cells. In this study, we first confirmed the statin-induced autophagy by assessing other criteria, including induced expression of the autophagy-related genes, enhanced protein degradation of autophagy marker protein p62 and electron microscopic observation of induced formation of autophagosome. We next demonstrated that the extent of inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase in the cell is parallel with the ability of a statin to induce autophagy. Thus, the primary activity of statins causes autophagy in A204 cells. Considering the mechanism for the induction, we showed that statins induce autophagy by depleting cellular levels of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) mostly through an unknown pathway that does not involve two major small G proteins, Rheb and Ras. Finally, we demonstrated that the ability of statins to induce autophagy parallels their toxicity to A204 cells and that both can be suppressed by GGPP. PMID:22094060

  20. The Role of De Novo Catecholamine Synthesis in Mediating Methylmercury-Induced Vesicular Dopamine Release From Rat Pheochromocytoma (PC12) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Atchison, William D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize methylmercury (MeHg)–induced dopamine (DA) release from undifferentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and to examine the potential role for DA synthesis in this process. MeHg caused a significant increase in DA release that was both concentration- and time-dependent. DA release was significantly increased by 2µM MeHg at 60min and by 5µM MeHg at 30min; 1µM MeHg was without effect. Because DA release induced by 5µM MeHg was associated with a significant percentage of cell death at 60 and 120min, 2µM MeHg was chosen for further characterization of release mechanisms. MeHg-induced DA release was attenuated but not abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium, whereas the vesicular content depleting drug reserpine (50nM) abolished release. Thus, MeHg-induced DA release requires vesicular exocytosis but not extracellular calcium. MeHg also increased intracellular DA and the rate of DA storage utilization, suggesting a role for DA synthesis in MeHg-induced DA release. The tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor α-methyltyrosine (300µM, 24h) completely abolished MeHg-induced DA release. MeHg significantly increased DA precursor accumulation in cells treated with 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine (10µM), revealing that MeHg increases tyrosine hydroxylase activity. Overall, these data demonstrate that MeHg facilitates DA synthesis, increases intracellular DA, and augments vesicular exocytosis. PMID:23425605

  1. Ganglioside GQ1b induces dopamine release through the activation of Pyk2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Chu, Shi-Feng; Mou, Zheng; Gao, Yan; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Wei, Gui-Ning; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence indicates that GQ1b, one of the gangliosides members, contributes to synaptic transmission and synapse formation. Previous studies have shown that GQ1b could enhance depolarization induced neurotransmitter release, while the role of GQ1b in asynchronous release is still largely unknown. Here in our result, we found low concentration of GQ1b, but not GT1b or GD1b (which were generated from GQ1b by plasma membrane-associated sialidases), evoked asynchronous dopamine (DA) release from both clonal rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and rat striatal slices significantly. The release peaked at 2min after GQ1b exposure, and lasted for more than 6min. This effect was caused by the enhancement of intracellular Ca(2+) and the activation of Pyk2. Inhibition of Pyk2 by PF-431396 (a dual inhibitor of Pyk2 and FAK) or Pyk2 siRNA abolished DA release induced by GQ1b. Moreover, Pyk2 Y402, but not other tyrosine site, was phosphorylated at the peaking time. The mutant of Pyk2 Y402 (Pyk2-Y402F) was built to confirm the essential role of Y402 activation. Further studies revealed that activated Pyk2 stimulated ERK1/2 and p-38, while only the ERK1/2 activation was indispensable for GQ1b induced DA release, which interacted with Synapsin I directly and led to its phosphorylation, then depolymerization of F-actin, thus contributed to DA release. In conclusion, low concentration of GQ1b is able to enhance asynchronous DA release through Pyk2/ERK/Synapsin I/actin pathway. Our findings provide new insights into the role of GQ1b in neuronal communication, and implicate the potential application of GQ1b in neurological disorders. PMID:26704905

  2. Dopamine Disposition in the Presynaptic Process Regulates the Severity of Methamphetamine-induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    KUHN, DONALD M.; FRANCESCUTTI-VERBEEM, DINA M.; THOMAS, DAVID M.

    2008-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is well-known for its ability to cause damage to dopamine (DA) nerve endings of the striatum. The mechanisms by which METH causes neurotoxicity are not fully understood but likely candidates are increased oxidative and nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Microglial activation is also emerging as an important element of the METH neurotoxic cascade and it appears that extensive crosstalk between these cells and DA nerve endings is an early event in this process. It may seem paradoxical, but DA itself is also thought to be an essential factor in the neuronal damaging effects of METH, but issues relating to its precise role in this regard remain unanswered. We present in this overview a summary of studies that tested how alterations in the disposition of presynaptic DA (injections of reserpine, L-DOPA, or clorgyline) modulate METH neurotoxicity. In all cases, these drugs significantly increased the magnitude of microglial activation as well as the severity of damage to striatal DA nerve endings caused by METH. The enhancement of METH effects in striatum by reserpine, L-DOPA, and clorgyline persisted for 14 days and showed no evidence of recovery. These data establish that subtle shifts in the newly-synthesized pool of DA can cause substantial changes in the severity of METH-induced neurotoxicity. DA released into the synapse by METH is very likely the source of downstream reactants that provoke microglial activation and the ensuing damage to DA nerve endings. PMID:18991856

  3. Persistent Drug-Induced Parkinsonism in Patients with Normal Dopamine Transporter Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Mun Kyung; Oh, Jungsu S.; Kim, Jae Seung; Sohn, Young H.; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2016-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging for the dopamine transporter (DAT) is used to distinguish drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) from subclinical Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although DIP patients who show a normal DAT image are expected to recover completely, some do not. We investigated whether these patients showed changes in striatal DAT activity using semi-quantitative analysis of 18F-FP-CIT PET data. DIP patients with visually normal DAT images were selected from medical records. The subjects were classified as patients who recovered partially (PR) or completely within 12 months (CR). The 18F-FP-CIT uptake in each striatal subregion was compared between the CR and the PR groups. In total, 41 and 9 patients of the CR and PR groups were assessed, respectively. The two patient groups were comparable in terms of clinical characteristics including age, sex, and severity of parkinsonism. From semi-quantitative analysis of the PET image, the PR patients showed a relatively lower ligand uptake in the ventral striatum, the anterior putamen and the posterior putamen compared with the CR patients. This result suggests that persistent DIP in patients with visually normal DAT imaging may be associated with subtle decrement of DAT activity. PMID:27294367

  4. Pitx3 deficiency produces decreased dopamine signaling and induces motor deficits in Pitx3(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Le, Weidong; Zhang, Lifen; Xie, Wenjie; Li, Song; Dani, John A

    2015-12-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons are involved in cognition, control of motor activity, and emotion-related behaviors. Degeneration of DA neurons particularly in the substantia nigra is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease. The homeobox transcription factor, Pitx3, plays a critical role in the development, function, and maintenance of midbrain DA neurons. We found that in young adult Pitx3-null mice, Pitx3(-/-), there was decreased tyrosine hydroxylase staining, indicating a loss of DA neurons particularly in the substantia nigra. In addition, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and microdialysis assays of DA release indicated that the lack of Pitx3 caused a significant reduction of striatal DA release. Tonic DA release was impaired more significantly than the phasic DA release induced by burst firing of DA neurons. Furthermore, behavioral tests revealed that Pitx3(-/-) mice displayed abnormal motor activities, including impaired motor coordination and decreased locomotion. In summary, these data provide further evidence that Pitx3 is specifically required for DA-related function and, if impaired, Pitx3 could contribute during the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26363812

  5. Tamoxifen counteracts estradiol induced effects on striatal and hypophyseal dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Ferretti, C.; Blengio, M.; Ghi, P.; Racca, S.; Genazzani, E.; Portaleone, P.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the ability of Tamoxifen (TAM), an antiestrogen drug, to counteract the modification induced by estrogens on dopamine (DA) receptors on striatum and on adenohypophysis of ovex female rats. Subacute treatment with 17..beta..-estradiol (E/sub 2/) at both low (0.1 ..mu..g/kg) and high (20 ..mu..g/kg) doses confirmed its ability to increase the number of striatal /sup 3/H-Spiperone (/sup 3/H-SPI) binding sites in a dose dependent manner. By contrast in the pituitary, only high doses of estrogen were effective in reducing the number of DA receptors. We treated ovex female rats for 15 days with TAM alone or associated with E/sub 2/, to see if these estrogenic effects could be suppressed by an antiestrogenic drug. TAM did not affect the number of striatal DA receptors, but significantly increased the adenohypophy-seal DA binding sites, without varying their affinity. No changes were observed in pituitary and striatal DA receptor density, even when TAM was injected in association with estradiol. In conclusions: TAM is able to counteract the effects estrogens have on DA receptors. However there is some evidence that it could influence the pituitary DA systems independently of it antiestrogenic activity.

  6. Depletion of Hepatic Macrophages Aggravates Liver Lesions Induced in Rats by Thioacetamide (TAA).

    PubMed

    Golbar, Hossain M; Izawa, Takeshi; Wijesundera, Kavindra K; Bondoc, Alexandra; Tennakoon, Anusha H; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic macrophages play crucial roles in hepatotoxicity. We investigated immunophenotypes of macrophages in liver injury induced in rats by thioacetamide (TAA; 300 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) after hepatic macrophage depletion; hepatic macrophages were depleted by liposomal clodronate (CLD; 10 ml/kg, i.v.) one day before TAA injection. Samples were obtained on post-TAA injection days 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7. TAA injection induced coagulation necrosis of hepatocytes on days 1 through 3 and subsequent reparative fibrosis on days 5 and 7 in the centrilobular area, accompanied by increased numbers of M1 macrophages (expressing cluster of differentiation [CD]68 and major histocompatibility complex class II) and M2 macrophages (expressing CD163 and CD204) mainly on days 1 through 3. TAA + CLD treatment markedly decreased the numbers of M1 and M2 macrophages mainly on days 1 through 3; CD163(+) Kupffer cells were most sensitive to CLD depletion. In TAA + CLD-treated rats, interestingly, coagulation necrosis of hepatocytes was prolonged with more increased levels of hepatic enzymes (aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and alkaline phosphatase) to TAA-treated rats; reparative fibrosis was incomplete and replaced by dystrophic calcification in the injured area, indicating the aggravated damage. Furthermore, in TAA + CLD-treated rats, inflammatory factors (monocyte chemoattractant protein [MCP]-1, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-10) and fibrosis-related factors (transforming growth factor-β1, matrix metalloproteinase-2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1) were decreased at messenger RNA levels, indicating abnormal macrophage functions. It was clearly demonstrated that hepatic macrophages have important roles in tissue damage and remodeling in hepatotoxicity. PMID:26957569

  7. Amphetamine paradoxically augments exocytotic dopamine release and phasic dopamine signals.

    PubMed

    Daberkow, D P; Brown, H D; Bunner, K D; Kraniotis, S A; Doellman, M A; Ragozzino, M E; Garris, P A; Roitman, M F

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse hijack brain-reward circuitry during the addiction process by augmenting action potential-dependent phasic dopamine release events associated with learning and goal-directed behavior. One prominent exception to this notion would appear to be amphetamine (AMPH) and related analogs, which are proposed instead to disrupt normal patterns of dopamine neurotransmission by depleting vesicular stores and promoting nonexocytotic dopamine efflux via reverse transport. This mechanism of AMPH action, though, is inconsistent with its therapeutic effects and addictive properties, which are thought to be reliant on phasic dopamine signaling. Here we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in freely moving rats to interrogate principal neurochemical responses to AMPH in the striatum and relate these changes to behavior. First, we showed that AMPH dose-dependently enhanced evoked dopamine responses to phasic-like current pulse trains for up to 2 h. Modeling the data revealed that AMPH inhibited dopamine uptake but also unexpectedly potentiated vesicular dopamine release. Second, we found that AMPH increased the amplitude, duration, and frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients, the naturally occurring, nonelectrically evoked, phasic increases in extracellular dopamine. Finally, using an operant sugar reward paradigm, we showed that low-dose AMPH augmented dopamine transients elicited by sugar-predictive cues. However, operant behavior failed at high-dose AMPH, which was due to phasic dopamine hyperactivity and the decoupling of dopamine transients from the reward predictive cue. These findings identify upregulation of exocytotic dopamine release as a key AMPH action in behaving animals and support a unified mechanism of abused drugs to activate phasic dopamine signaling. PMID:23303926

  8. Telomerase abrogates aneuploidy-induced telomere replication stress, senescence and cell depletion

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Jitendra K; Cerutti, Aurora; Beichler, Christine; Morita, Yohei; Bruhn, Christopher; Kumar, Mukesh; Kraus, Johann M; Speicher, Michael R; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Kestler, Hans A; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio; Günes, Cagatay; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard

    2015-01-01

    The causal role of aneuploidy in cancer initiation remains under debate since mutations of euploidy-controlling genes reduce cell fitness but aneuploidy strongly associates with human cancers. Telomerase activation allows immortal growth by stabilizing telomere length, but its role in aneuploidy survival has not been characterized. Here, we analyze the response of primary human cells and murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to aneuploidy induction and the role of telomeres and the telomerase in this process. The study shows that aneuploidy induces replication stress at telomeres leading to telomeric DNA damage and p53 activation. This results in p53/Rb-dependent, premature senescence of human fibroblast, and in the depletion of hematopoietic cells in telomerase-deficient mice. Endogenous telomerase expression in HSCs and enforced expression of telomerase in human fibroblasts are sufficient to abrogate aneuploidy-induced replication stress at telomeres and the consequent induction of premature senescence and hematopoietic cell depletion. Together, these results identify telomerase as an aneuploidy survival factor in mammalian cells based on its capacity to alleviate telomere replication stress in response to aneuploidy induction. PMID:25820263

  9. Norcantharidin induced DU145 cell apoptosis through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and energy depletion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bo; He, Pei-Jie; Shao, Chun-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Norcantharidin (NCTD), a demethylated analog of cantharidin derived from blister beetles, has attracted considerable attentions in recent years due to their definitely toxic properties and the noteworthy advantages in stimulating bone marrow and increasing the peripheral leukocytes. Hence, it is worth studying the anti-tumor effect of NCTD on human prostate cancer cells DU145. It was found that after the treatment of NCTD with different concentrations (25-100 μM), the cell proliferation was significantly inhibited, which led to the appearance of micronucleus (MN). Moreover, the cells could be killed in a dose-/time-dependent manner along with the reduction of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) expression, destruction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), down-regulation of MnSOD, induction of ROS, depletion of ATP, and activation of AMPK (Adenosine 5'-monophosphate -activated protein kinase) . In addition, a remarkable release of cytochrome c was found in the cells exposed to 100 μM NCTD and exogenous SOD-PEG could eliminate the generation of NCTD-induced MN. In conclusion, our studies indicated that NCTD could induce the collapse of MMP and mitochondria dysfunction. Accumulation of intercellular ROS could eventually switch on the apoptotic pathway by causing DNA damage and depleting ATP. PMID:24367681

  10. Carrier-dependent and Ca2+-dependent 5-HT and dopamine release induced by (+)-amphetamine, 3,4-methylendioxy-methamphetamine, p-chloroamphetamine and (+)-fenfluramine

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Daniela; Mennini, Tiziana; Gobbi, Marco

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism underlying 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and/or dopamine release induced by (+)-amphetamine ((+)-Amph), 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), p-chloroamphetamine (pCA) and (+)-fenfluramine ((+)-Fen) was investigated in rat brain superfused synaptosomes preloaded with the 3H neurotransmitters. Their rank order of potency for [3H]-5-HT-releasing activity was the same as for inhibition of 5-HT uptake (pCA⩾MDMA⩾(+)-Fen>>(+)-Amph). Similarly, their rank order as [3H]-dopamine releasers and dopamine uptake inhibitors was the same ((+)-Amph>>pCA=MDMA>>(+)-Fen). We also confirmed that the release induced by these compounds was prevented by selective transporter inhibitors (indalpine or nomifensine). [3H]-5-HT and/or [3H]-dopamine release induced by all these compounds was partially (31–80%), but significantly Ca2+-dependent. Lack of extracellular Ca2+ did not alter uptake mechanisms nor did it modify the carrier-dependent dopamine-induced [3H]-dopamine release. (+)-Amph-induced [3H]-dopamine release and pCA- and MDMA-induced [3H]-5-HT release were significantly inhibited by ω-agatoxin-IVA, a specific blocker of P-type voltage-operated Ca2+-channels, similar to the previous results on (+)-Fen-induced [3H]-5-HT release. Methiothepin inhibited the Ca2+-dependent component of (+)-Amph-induced [3H]-dopamine release with high potency (70 nM), as previously found with (+)-Fen-induced [3H]-5-HT release. The inhibitory effect of methiothepin was not due to its effects as a transporter inhibitor or Ca2+-channel blocker and is unlikely to be due to its antagonist properties on 5-HT1/2, dopamine or any other extracellular receptor. These results indicate that the release induced by these compounds is both ‘carrier-mediated' and Ca2+-dependent (possibly exocytotic-like), with the specific carrier allowing the amphetamines to enter the synaptosome. The Ca2+-dependent release is mediated by Ca2+-influx (mainly through P-type Ca2+-channels), possibly triggered by

  11. p53 induces skin aging by depleting Blimp1+ sebaceous gland cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Nakasaki, M; Todorova, D; Lake, B; Yuan, C-Y; Jamora, C; Xu, Y

    2014-01-01

    p53 is an important inducer of organismal aging. However, its roles in the aging of skin remain unclear. Here we show that mice with chronic activation of p53 develop an aging phenotype in the skin associated with a reduction of subcutaneous fat and loss of sebaceous gland (SG). The reduction in the fat layer may result from the decrease of mammalian TOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity accompanied by elevated expression of energy expenditure genes, and possibly as compensatory effects, leading to the elevation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, an inducer of sebocyte differentiation. In addition, Blimp1+ sebocytes become depleted concomitantly with an increase in cellular senescence, which can be reversed by PPARγ antagonist (BADGE) treatment. Therefore, our results indicate that p53-mediated aging of the skin involves not only thinning through the loss of subdermal fat, but also xerosis or drying of the skin through declining sebaceous gland activity. PMID:24675459

  12. Preprodynorphin mediates locomotion and D2 dopamine and mu-opioid receptor changes induced by chronic 'binge' cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Bailey, A; Yoo, J H; Racz, I; Zimmer, A; Kitchen, I

    2007-09-01

    Evidence suggests that the kappa-opioid receptor (KOP-r) system plays an important role in cocaine addiction. Indeed, cocaine induces endogenous KOP activity, which is a mechanism that opposes alterations in behaviour and brain function resulting from repeated cocaine use. In this study, we have examined the influence of deletion of preprodynorphin (ppDYN) on cocaine-induced behavioural effects and on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Furthermore, we have measured mu-opioid receptor (MOP-r) agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS, dopamine D(1), D(2) receptor and dopamine transporter (DAT) binding. Male wild-type (WT) and ppDYN knockout (KO) mice were injected with saline or cocaine (45 mg/kg/day) in a 'binge' administration paradigm for 14 days. Chronic cocaine produced an enhancement of locomotor sensitisation in KO. No genotype effect was found on stereotypy behaviour. Cocaine-enhanced MOP-r activation in WT but not in KO. There was an overall decrease in D(2) receptor binding in cocaine-treated KO but not in WT mice. No changes were observed in D(1) and DAT binding. Cocaine increased plasma corticosterone levels in WT but not in KO. The data confirms that the endogenous KOP system inhibits dopamine neurotransmission and that ppDYN may mediate the enhancement of MOP-r activity and the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis after chronic cocaine treatment. PMID:17532787

  13. Role for mTOR Signaling and Neuronal Activity in Morphine-Induced Adaptations in Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mazei-Robison, M.S.; Koo, J.W.; Friedman, A.; Lansink, C.S.; Robison, A.J.; Vinish, M.; Krishnan, V.; Kim, S.; Siuta, M.A.; Galli, M. A.; Niswender, K.D.; Appasani, R.; Horvath, M.C.; Neve, R.L.; Worley, P.F.; Snyder, S.H.; Hurd, Y.L.; Cheer, J.F.; Han, M.H.; Russo, S.J.; Nestler, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY While the abuse of opiate drugs continues to rise, the neuroadaptations that occur with long-term drug exposure remain poorly understood. We describe here a series of chronic morphine-induced adaptations in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons, which are mediated via downregulation of AKT-mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex-2). Chronic opiates decrease the size of VTA dopamine neurons in rodents, an effect seen in humans as well, and concomitantly increase the excitability of the cells but decrease dopamine output to target regions. Chronic morphine decreases mTORC2 activity, and overexpression of Rictor, a component of mTORC2, prevents morphine-induced changes in cell morphology and activity. Further, local knock-out of Rictor in VTA decreases DA soma size and reduces rewarding responses to morphine, consistent with the hypothesis that these adaptations represent a mechanism of reward tolerance. Together, these findings demonstrate a novel role for AKT-mTORC2 signaling in mediating neuroadaptations to opiate drugs of abuse. PMID:22196333

  14. Cocaine cue–induced dopamine release in the human prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Michele S.; Fotros, Aryandokht; Gravel, Paul; Casey, Kevin F.; Larcher, Kevin; Verhaeghe, Jeroen A.J.; Cox, Sylvia M.L.; Reader, Andrew J.; Dagher, Alain; Benkelfat, Chawki; Leyton, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence indicates that drug-related cues can induce dopamine (DA) release in the striatum of substance abusers. Whether these same cues provoke DA release in the human prefrontal cortex remains unknown. Methods We used high-resolution positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride to measure cortical and striatal DA D2/3 receptor availability in the presence versus absence of drug-related cues in volunteers with current cocaine dependence. Results Twelve individuals participated in our study. Among participants reporting a craving response (9 of 12), exposure to the cocaine cues significantly decreased [18F]fallypride binding potential (BPND) values in the medial orbitofrontal cortex and striatum. In all 12 participants, individual differences in the magnitude of craving correlated with BPND changes in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, and striatum. Consistent with the presence of autoreceptors on mesostriatal but not mesocortical DA cell bodies, midbrain BPND values were significantly correlated with changes in BPND within the striatum but not the cortex. The lower the midbrain D2 receptor levels, the greater the striatal change in BPND and self-reported craving. Limitations Limitations of this study include its modest sample size, with only 2 female participants. Newer tracers might have greater sensitivity to cortical DA release. Conclusion In people with cocaine use disorders, the presentation of drug-related cues induces DA release within cortical and striatal regions. Both effects are associated with craving, but only the latter is regulated by midbrain autoreceptors. Together, the results suggest that cortical and subcortical DA responses might both influence drug-focused incentive motivational states, but with separate regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26900792

  15. CREB activity in dopamine D1 receptor expressing neurons regulates cocaine-induced behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rieker, Claus; Cannella, Nazzareno; Parlato, Rosanna; Golda, Slawomir; Piechota, Marcin; Korostynski, Michal; Engblom, David; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Schütz, Günther; Spanagel, Rainer; Parkitna, Jan R

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that striatal cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) regulates sensitivity to psychostimulants. To test the cell-specificity of this hypothesis we examined the effects of a dominant-negative CREB protein variant expressed in dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) neurons on cocaine-induced behaviors. A transgenic mouse strain was generated by pronuclear injection of a BAC-derived transgene harboring the A-CREB sequence under the control of the D1R gene promoter. Compared to wild-type, drug-naïve mutants showed moderate alterations in gene expression, especially a reduction in basal levels of activity-regulated transcripts such as Arc and Egr2. The behavioral responses to cocaine were elevated in mutant mice. Locomotor activity after acute treatment, psychomotor sensitization after intermittent drug injections and the conditioned locomotion after saline treatment were increased compared to wild-type littermates. Transgenic mice had significantly higher cocaine conditioned place preference, displayed normal extinction of the conditioned preference, but showed an augmented cocaine-seeking response following priming-induced reinstatement. This enhanced cocaine-seeking response was associated with increased levels of activity-regulated transcripts and prodynorphin. The primary reinforcing effects of cocaine were not altered in the mutant mice as they did not differ from wild-type in cocaine self-administration under a fixed ratio schedule at the training dose. Collectively, our data indicate that expression of a dominant-negative CREB variant exclusively in neurons expressing D1R is sufficient to recapitulate the previously reported behavioral phenotypes associated with virally expressed dominant-negative CREB. PMID:24966820

  16. Modulation of cue-induced firing of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons by leptin and ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    van der Plasse, G; van Zessen, R; Luijendijk, M C M; Erkan, H; Stuber, G D; Ramakers, G M J; Adan, R A H

    2015-01-01

    Background/objectives: The rewarding value of palatable foods contributes to overconsumption, even in satiated subjects. Midbrain dopaminergic activity in response to reward-predicting environmental stimuli drives reward-seeking and motivated behavior for food rewards. This mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system is sensitive to changes in energy balance, yet it has thus far not been established whether reward signaling of DA neurons in vivo is under control of hormones that signal appetite and energy balance such as ghrelin and leptin. Subjects/methods: We trained rats (n=11) on an operant task in which they could earn two different food rewards. We then implanted recording electrodes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and recorded from DA neurons during behavior. Subsequently, we assessed the effects of mild food restriction and pretreatment with the adipose tissue-derived anorexigenic hormone leptin or the orexigenic hormone ghrelin on VTA DA reward signaling. Results: Animals showed an increase in performance following mild food restriction (P=0.002). Importantly, food-cue induced DA firing increased when animals were food restricted (P=0.02), but was significantly attenuated after leptin pretreatment (P=0.00). While ghrelin did affect baseline DA activity (P=0.025), it did not affect cue-induced firing (P⩾0.353). Conclusions: Metabolic signals, such as leptin, affect food seeking, a process that is dependent on the formation of cue-reward outcomes and involves midbrain DA signaling. These data show that food restriction engages the encoding of food cues by VTA DA neurons at a millisecond level and leptin suppresses this activity. This suggests that leptin is a key in linking metabolic information to reward signaling. PMID:26183405

  17. L-theanine inhibits nicotine-induced dependence via regulation of the nicotine acetylcholine receptor-dopamine reward pathway.

    PubMed

    Di, Xiaojing; Yan, Jingqi; Zhao, Yan; Chang, Yanzhong; Zhao, Baolu

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the inhibitory effect of L-theanine, an amino acid derivative of tea, on the rewarding effects of nicotine and its underlying mechanisms of action were studied. We found that L-theanine inhibited the rewarding effects of nicotine in a conditioned place preference (CPP) model of the mouse and reduced the excitatory status induced by nicotine in SH-SY5Y cells to the same extent as the nicotine receptor inhibitor dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHβE). Further studies using high performance liquid chromatography, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining analyses showed that L-theanine significantly inhibited nicotine-induced tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production in the midbrain of mice. L-theanine treatment also reduced the upregulation of the α(4), β(2) and α(7) nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits induced by nicotine in mouse brain regions that related to the dopamine reward pathway, thus decreasing the number of cells that could react to nicotine. In addition, L-theanine treatment inhibited nicotine-induced c-Fos expression in the reward circuit related areas of the mouse brain. Knockdown of c-Fos by siRNA inhibited the excitatory status of cells but not the upregulation of TH induced by nicotine in SH-SY5Y cells. Overall, the present study showed that L-theanine reduced the nicotine-induced reward effects via inhibition of the nAChR-dopamine reward pathway. These results may offer new therapeutic strategies for treatment of tobacco addiction. PMID:23233221

  18. Elimination of extracellular dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex of conscious mice analysed using selective enzyme and uptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tammimaki, A; Aonurm-Helm, A; Kaenmaki, M; Mannisto, P T

    2016-04-01

    We have shown in a previous study that in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of Comt knockout animals, uptake1 followed by oxidation accounts for approximately 50% and uptake2 followed by O-methylation for the remaining 50% of dopamine clearance. However, compensatory mechanisms in genetically modified animals may have affected the result. Therefore, in the present study, we gave a high dose (30 mg/kg) of tolcapone in combination with pargyline and reboxetine to C57BL/6J mice to see whether the earlier findings could be confirmed. The three drugs were also given together. We used intracerebral microdialysis to determine the levels of extracellular dopamine and its metabolites in the mPFC. In addition, we analyzed dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) contents in cortical and striatal synaptosomes to estimate the amount of releasable dopamine and dopamine turnover. In the prefrontal cortex of male C57BL/6J mice, the combination of two drugs (pargyline + tolcapone or reboxetine + tolcapone) generally elevated extracellular dopamine levels more than any single drug. Similar responses, although much weaker, were observed in female mice. Unexpectedly, triple treatment with pargyline, reboxetine and tolcapone did not increase dopamine outflow in the mPFC in either sex, and the treatment actually diminished dopamine outflow in the dorsal striatum. This seems to indicate that such an extensive treatment induces a fast and effective shut-down of dopamine release both in the mPFC and striatum to protect the brain from excess dopaminergic stimulation. The observed decrease in extracellular dopamine levels was not due to the depletion of releasable dopamine because abundant amounts of dopamine were present in synaptosomes. These results imply that the relative proportion of COMT-induced dopamine clearance may be somewhat lower than earlier estimated. PMID:27226189

  19. Dopamine as a potent inducer of cellular glutathione and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 in PC12 neuronal cells: a potential adaptive mechanism for dopaminergic neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenquan; Zhu, Hong; Misra, Bhaba R; Li, Yunbo; Misra, Hara P

    2008-11-01

    Dopamine auto-oxidation and the consequent formation of reactive oxygen species and electrophilic quinone molecules have been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease. We reported here that in PC12 dopaminergic neuronal cells dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations (50-150 muM) potently induced cellular glutathione (GSH) and the phase 2 enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), two critical cellular defenses in detoxification of ROS and electrophilic quinone molecules. Incubation of PC12 cells with dopamine also led to a marked increase in the mRNA levels for gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and NQO1. In addition, treatment of PC12 cells with dopamine resulted in a significant elevation of GSH content in the mitochondrial compartment. To determine whether treatment with dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations, which upregulated the cellular defenses could protect the neuronal cells against subsequent lethal oxidative and electrophilic injury, PC12 cells were pretreated with dopamine (150 muM) for 24 h and then exposed to various cytotoxic concentrations of dopamine or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We found that pretreatment of PC12 cells with dopamine at a noncytotoxic concentration led to a remarkable protection against cytotoxicity caused by dopamine or 6-OHDA at lethal concentrations, as detected by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium reduction assay. In view of the critical roles of GSH and NQO1 in protecting against dopaminergic neuron degeneration, the above findings implicate that upregulation of both GSH and NQO1 by dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations may serve as an important adaptive mechanism for dopaminergic neuroprotection. PMID:18368484

  20. Growth Hormone Induces Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Induced Protein in Podocytes: Implications for Podocyte Depletion and Proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Chitra, P Swathi; Swathi, T; Sahay, Rakesh; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash; Menon, Ram K; Kumar, P Anil

    2015-09-01

    The glomerular podocytes form a major size selective barrier for the filtration of serum proteins and reduced podocyte number is a critical event in the pathogenesis of proteinuria during diabetic nephropathy (DN). An elevated level of growth hormone (GH) is implicated as a causative factor in the development of nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We have previously shown that podocytes express GH receptor and are a target for GH action. To elucidate the molecular basis for the effects of GH on podocyte depletion, we conducted PCR-array analyses for extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in podocytes. Our studies reveal that GH increases expression of a gene that encodes transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) expression. Similarly, microarray data retrieved from the Nephromine database revealed elevation of TGFBIp in patients with DN. Treatment with GH results in increased secretion of extracellular TGFBIp by podocytes. Both GH and TGFBIp induced apoptosis and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of podocytes. Exposure of podocytes to GH and TGFBIp resulted in increased migration of cells and altered podocyte permeability to albumin across podocyte monolayer. Administration of GH to rats induced EMT and apoptosis in the glomerular fraction of the kidney. Therefore, we conclude that the GH-dependent increase in TGFBIp in the podocyte is one of the mechanisms responsible for podocyte depletion in DN. PMID:25740786

  1. A case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure induced by rhabdomyolysis; possible involvement of hypophosphatemia or phosphate depletion.

    PubMed

    Wada, S; Nagase, T; Koike, Y; Kugai, N; Nagata, N

    1992-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl with anorexia nervosa first presented with malnutrition, liver dysfunction, and rhabdomyolysis. Administration of fluid and nutrition saved her from the initial critical state, but acute renal failure followed. Laboratory examination revealed intrinsic renal failure induced by rhabdomyolysis. Latent phosphate depletion and refeeding-induced hypophosphatemia was implicated as the cause of rhabdomyolysis; however coexisting hypotension, dehydration, and liver dysfunction may have contributed to the renal failure. The patient recovered from azotemia by hemodialysis. This is the first reported case of anorexia nervosa with acute renal failure resulting from rhabdomyolysis induced by hypophosphatemia or phosphate depletion. PMID:1633352

  2. Gastric mucosal lesions induced by complete dopamine system failure in rats. The effects of dopamine agents, ranitidine, atropine, omeprazole and pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Separovic, J; Buljat, G; Anic, T; Stancic-Rokotov, D; Mikus, D; Duplancic, B; Marovic, A; Zoricic, I; Prkacin, I; Lovric-Bencic, M; Aralica, G; Ziger, T; Perovic, D; Jelovac, N; Dodig, G; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Seiwerth, S; Turkovic, B; Grabarevic, Z; Petek, M; Rucman, R

    2000-01-01

    Up to now, for gastric lesions potentiation or induction, as well as determination of endogenous dopamine significance, dopamine antagonist or dopamine vesicle depletor were given separately. Therefore, without combination studies, the evidence for dopamine significance remains split on either blockade of dopamine post-synaptic receptor or inhibition of dopamine storage, essentially contrasting with endogenous circumstances, where both functions could be simultaneously disturbed. For this purpose, a co-administration of reserpine and haloperidol, a dopamine granule depletor combined with a dopamine antagonist with pronounced ulcerogenic effect, was tested, and the rats were sacrificed 24 h after injurious agent(s) administration. Haloperidol (5 mg x kg(-1) b.w. i.p.), given alone, produced the lesions in all rats. Reserpine (5 mg x kg(-1) b.w. i.p.), given separately, also produced lesions. When these agents were given together, the lesions were apparently larger than in the groups injured with separate administration of either haloperidol or reserpine alone. Along with our previous results, when beneficial agents were co-administered, all dopaminomimetics (bromocriptine 10 mg, apomophine 1 mg, amphetamine 20 mg x kg(-1) i.p.) apparently attenuated the otherwise consistent haloperidol-gastric lesions. Likewise, an apparent inhibition of the reserpine-lesions was noted as well. However, if they were given in rats injured with combination of haloperidol and reserpine, their otherwise prominent beneficial effects were absent. Ranitidine (10 mg), omeprazole (10 mg), atropine (10 mg), pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (Gly-Glu-Pro-Pro-Pro-Gly-Lys-Pro-Ala-Asp-Asp-Ala-Gly-Leu-Val) (10 microg or 10 ng x kg(-1) i.p.) evidently prevented both haloperidol-gastric lesions and reserpine-gastric lesions. Confronted with potentiated lesions following a combination of haloperidol and reserpine, these agents maintained their beneficial effects, noted in the rats treated with either

  3. A small molecule that induces reactive oxygen species via cellular glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Tatsuro; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Muroi, Makoto; Kawatani, Makoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-01

    Induction of excessive levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by small-molecule compounds has been considered a potentially effective therapeutic strategy against cancer cells, which are often subjected to chronic oxidative stress. However, to elucidate the mechanisms of action of bioactive compounds is generally a time-consuming process. We have recently identified NPD926, a small molecule that induces rapid cell death in cancer cells. Using a combination of two comprehensive and complementary approaches, proteomic profiling and affinity purification, together with the subsequent biochemical assays, we have elucidated the mechanism of action underlying NPD926-induced cell death: conjugation with glutathione mediated by GST, depletion of cellular glutathione and subsequent ROS generation. NPD926 preferentially induced effects in KRAS-transformed fibroblast cells, compared with their untransformed counterparts. Furthermore, NPD926 sensitized cells to inhibitors of system x(c)⁻, a cystine-glutamate antiporter considered to be a potential therapeutic target in cancers including cancer stem cells. These data show the effectiveness of a newly identified ROS inducer, which targets glutathione metabolism, in cancer treatment. PMID:25011393

  4. Glutathione depletion due to copper-induced phytochelatin synthesis causes oxidative stress in Silene cucubalus

    SciTech Connect

    Ric De Vos, C.H.; Vonk, M.J.; Vooijs, R.; Schat, H. )

    1992-03-01

    The relation between loss of glutathione due to metal-induced phytochelatin synthesis and oxidative stress was studied in the roots of copper-sensitive and tolerant Silene cucubalus (L.) Wib., resistant to 1 and 40 micromolar Cu, respectively. The amount of nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds other then glutathione was taken as a measure of phytochelatins. At a supply of 20 micromolar Cu, which is toxic for sensitive plants only, phytochelatin synthesis and loss of total glutathione were observed only in sensitive plants within 6 h of exposure. When the plants were exposed to a range of copper concentrations for 3 d, a marked production of phytochelatins in sensitive plants was already observed at 0.5 micromolar Cu, whereas the production in tolerant plants was negligible at 40 micromolar or lower. The highest production in tolerant plants was only 40% of that in sensitive plants. In both varieties, the synthesis of phytochelatins was coupled to a loss of glutathione. Copper at toxic concentrations caused oxidative stress, as was evidenced by both the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and a shift in the glutathione redox couple to a more oxidized state. Depletion of glutathione by pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine significantly increased the oxidative damage by copper. At a comparably low glutathione level, cadmium had no effect on either lipid peroxidation or the glutathione redox couple in buthionine sulfoximine-treated plants. These results indicate that copper may specifically cause oxidative stress by depletion of the antioxidant glutathione due to phytochelatin synthesis.

  5. Depletion forces induce visco-elasto-capillary thinning of non-Brownian suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harich, R.; Deblais, A.; Colin, A.; Kellay, H.

    2016-06-01

    Droplet pinch-off, which occurs when a drop of liquid detaches from a capillary, can be strongly modified in the presence of complex fluids such as polymer solutions and suspensions giving rise to long and slender filaments that thin slowly in time. While for polymers, the molecular conformations of the molecules in the filament are responsible for such a behavior, in suspensions the mechanisms at play remain to be deciphered. Here we show, experimentally, that while liquid bridges of non-Brownian suspensions of moderate concentrations have a thinning behavior very close to that of the solvent, the addition of short-chain polymers inducing depletion attractions between the particles in the suspension changes the thinning dynamics and gives rise to exponential thinning in time. The characteristic time of this dynamics increases with polymer concentration and therefore the intensity of the depletion forces at play. The tunability of this dynamics may be important for injket and 3D printing applications where short rupture times are sought for or in other situations where drop formation has to be minimized or inhibited.

  6. D-2 dopamine receptor activation reduces free ( sup 3 H)arachidonate release induced by hypophysiotropic peptides in anterior pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Canonico, P.L. )

    1989-09-01

    Dopamine reduces the stimulation of intracellular ({sup 3}H)arachidonate release produced by the two PRL-stimulating peptides angiotensin-II and TRH. This effect is concentration dependent and is mediated by stimulation of D-2 dopamine receptors. D-2 receptor agonists (bromocriptine, dihydroergocryptine, and dihydroergocristine) inhibit the release of fatty acid induced by angiotensin-II with a potency that parallels their ability to inhibit PRL release in vitro. Conversely, the selective D-2 receptor antagonist L-sulpiride completely prevents dopamine's effect, whereas SCH 23390 (a D-1 receptor antagonist) is ineffective. The inhibitory action of dopamine does not seem to be consequent to an action on the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system, as 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM) does not affect either basal or dopamine-inhibited ({sup 3}H)arachidonate release. However, a 24-h pertussis toxin pretreatment significantly reduces the action of dopamine on fatty acid release. Collectively, these results suggest that D-2 dopamine receptor-mediated inhibition of intracellular ({sup 3}H)arachidonate release requires the action of a GTP-binding protein, but is not a consequence of an inhibitory action on cAMP levels.

  7. Speech-induced striatal dopamine release is left lateralized and coupled to functional striatal circuits in healthy humans: A combined PET, fMRI and DTI study

    PubMed Central

    Simonyan, Kristina; Herscovitch, Peter; Horwitz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been recently made in understanding the brain mechanisms underlying speech and language control. However, the neurochemical underpinnings of normal speech production remain largely unknown. We investigated the extent of striatal endogenous dopamine release and its influences on the organization of functional striatal speech networks during production of meaningful English sentences using a combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with the dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand [11C]raclopride and functional MRI (fMRI). In addition, we used diffusion tensor tractography (DTI) to examine the extent of dopaminergic modulatory influences on striatal structural network organization. We found that, during sentence production, endogenous dopamine was released in the ventromedial portion of the dorsal striatum, in its both associative and sensorimotor functional divisions. In the associative striatum, speech-induced dopamine release established a significant relationship with neural activity and influenced the left-hemispheric lateralization of striatal functional networks. In contrast, there were no significant effects of endogenous dopamine release on the lateralization of striatal structural networks. Our data provide the first evidence for endogenous dopamine release in the dorsal striatum during normal speaking and point to the possible mechanisms behind the modulatory influences of dopamine on the organization of functional brain circuits controlling normal human speech. PMID:23277111

  8. Variants of the dopamine D2 receptor and risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Calarge, Chadi A.; Ellingrod, Vicki L.; Acion, Laura; Miller, Del D.; Moline, Jessica; Tansey, Michael J.; Schlechte, Janet A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between hyperprolactinemia and variants of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene in children and adolescents in long-term treatment with risperidone. Methods Medically healthy 7–17-year-old patients chronically treated with risperidone but receiving no other antipsychotics were selected for a cross-sectional evaluation. Four DRD2 variants were genotyped and prolactin concentration was measured. Medication history was obtained from the medical record. The effect of the TaqIA variants of the DRD2 on the risk of risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia was the primary outcome measure. Results Hyperprolactinemia was present in 50% of 107 patients (87% males) treated with risperidone for an average of 2.9 years. Age, stage of sexual development, and the dose of risperidone independently predicted a higher prolactin concentration, whereas the dose of psychostimulants was negatively correlated with it. However, these four predictors became nonsignificant when risperidone serum concentration was entered into the model. Adverse events potentially related to hyperprolactinemia were more common in participants with elevated prolactin concentration in girls (45%) compared with boys (10%). After controlling for risperidone concentration and the dose of psychostimulants, the TaqIA A1 and the A-241G alleles were associated with higher prolactin concentration, whereas the -141C Ins/Del AQ1and C957T variants had no significant effect. In addition, adverse events potentially related to hyperprolactinemia were four times more common in TaqIA A1 allele carriers. Conclusion Prolactin concentration is closely related to central DRD2 blockade, as reflected by risperidone serum concentration. Furthermore, the TaqIA and A-241G variants of the DRD2 gene could be useful in predicting the emergence of hyperprolactinemia and its potential adverse events. PMID:19339912

  9. Neurosteroid Agonist at GABAA Receptor Induces Persistent Neuroplasticity in VTA Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vashchinkina, Elena; Manner, Aino K; Vekovischeva, Olga; Hollander, Bjørnar den; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Aitta-aho, Teemu; Korpi, Esa R

    2014-01-01

    The main fast-acting inhibitory receptors in the mammalian brain are γ-aminobutyric acid type-A (GABAA) receptors for which neurosteroids, a subclass of steroids synthesized de novo in the brain, constitute a group of endogenous ligands with the most potent positive modulatory actions known. Neurosteroids can act on all subtypes of GABAA receptors, with a preference for δ-subunit-containing receptors that mediate extrasynaptic tonic inhibition. Pathological conditions characterized by emotional and motivational disturbances are often associated with perturbation in the levels of endogenous neurosteroids. We studied the effects of ganaxolone (GAN)—a synthetic analog of endogenous allopregnanolone that lacks activity on nuclear steroid receptors—on the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system involved in emotions and motivation. A single dose of GAN in young mice induced a dose-dependent, long-lasting neuroplasticity of glutamate synapses of DA neurons ex vivo in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Increased α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)/N-methyl-D-aspartate ratio and rectification of AMPA receptor responses even at 6 days after GAN administration suggested persistent synaptic targeting of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. This glutamate neuroplasticity was not observed in GABAA receptor δ-subunit-knockout (δ-KO) mice. GAN (500 nM) applied locally to VTA selectively increased tonic inhibition of GABA interneurons and triggered potentiation of DA neurons within 4 h in vitro. Place-conditioning experiments in adult wild-type C57BL/6J and δ-KO mice revealed aversive properties of repeated GAN administration that were dependent on the δ-subunits. Prolonged neuroadaptation to neurosteroids in the VTA might contribute to both the physiology and pathophysiology underlying processes and changes in motivation, mood, cognition, and drug addiction. PMID:24077066

  10. Valproic acid potentiates both typical and atypical antipsychotic-induced prefrontal cortical dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Junji; Chung, Young-Chul; Dai, Jin; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2005-08-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APD)s and anticonvulsant mood-stabilizers are now frequently used in combination with one another in treating both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We have recently reported that the atypical APDs, e.g. clozapine and risperidone, as well as the anticonvulsant mood-stabilizers, valproic acid (VPA), zonisamide, and carbamazepine, but not the typical APD haloperidol, increase dopamine (DA) release in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The increased DA release was partially (atypical APDs) or completely (mood-stabilizers) blocked by the serotonin (5-HT)1A receptor antagonist WAY100635. Diminished prefrontal cortical DA activity may contribute to cognitive impairment in virtually all the patients with schizophrenia and, perhaps, bipolar disorder. Thus, the enhanced release of cortical DA by these agents may be beneficial in this regard. It is, therefore, of considerable interest to determine whether combined administration of these agents augments prefrontal cortical DA release, and if so, whether the increase is dependent upon 5-HT1A receptor activation. VPA (50 mg/kg), which was insufficient by itself to increase prefrontal cortical DA release, potentiated the ability of clozapine (20 mg/kg) and risperidone (1 mg/kg) to increase DA release in the mPFC, but not in the nucleus accumbens (NAC). VPA (50 mg/kg) also potentiated haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg)-induced DA release in the mPFC; this increase was completely abolished by WAY100635 (0.2 mg/kg). These results suggest that, in combination with VPA, both typical and atypical APDs produce greater increases in prefrontal cortical DA release than either type of drug alone via a mechanism dependent upon 5-HT(1A) receptor activation. Furthermore, they provide a strong rationale for testing for possible clinical synergism of an APD and anticonvulsant mood-stabilizer in improving the cognitive deficits present in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. PMID:16061211