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Sample records for dopaminergic nigrostriatal lesions

  1. Motor impairments and neurochemical changes after unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Apicella, P; Trouche, E; Nieoullon, A; Legallet, E; Dusticier, N

    1990-01-01

    Unilateral lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system were induced in five monkeys by intranigral injections of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. Following the lesion, all monkeys showed a transient reluctance in using the contralateral forelimb, accompanied, in two monkeys by semi-flexed posture of the disabled forelimb. Three of the monkeys that had been conditioned to perform a visually triggered goal-directed arm movement, showed an increase in latency and duration of contralateral arm movements. Task performance recovered spontaneously to preoperative levels within four months in two monkeys despite significant reductions of endogenous dopamine and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid contents in the caudate nucleus, putamen and globus pallidus ipsilateral to the neurotoxic nigral injection. The third monkey exhibited a persistent increase in movement latency associated with a near complete loss of dopamine in both the putamen and the caudate nucleus. In all cases, an increase the dihydroxyphenyl-acetic acid to dopamine ratio was detected in the striatum and pallidum suggesting a compensatory increase in dopamine turnover in remaining intact dopaminergic nerve terminals. The level of serotonin was changed in all monkeys consisting of either a decrease or an increase, depending on the striatopallidal regions studied. Changes in choline acetyltransferase and glutamic acid decarboxylase activities in the same regions were only seen in some cases. The present results show that 6-hydroxydopamine-induced partial unilateral lesion of nigral dopaminergic neurons produced predominantly contralateral hypokinesia, accompanied by reductions of dopamine content in the ipsilateral striatum and pallidum. The use of this locally applied neurotoxin appears to be a suitable method for investigating neurophysiological mechanisms underlying hypokinesia since deficits in both initiating and executing movements can be expressed independently of other behavioral symptoms. The results

  2. Iron Chelators and Antioxidants Regenerate Neuritic Tree and Nigrostriatal Fibers of MPP+/MPTP-Lesioned Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Pabla; Mena, Natalia P.; Carrasco, Carlos M.; Muñoz, Yorka; Pérez-Henríquez, Patricio; Morales, Rodrigo A.; Cassels, Bruce K.; Méndez-Gálvez, Carolina; García-Beltrán, Olimpo; González-Billault, Christian; Núñez, Marco T.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal death in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is often preceded by axodendritic tree retraction and loss of neuronal functionality. The presence of non-functional but live neurons opens therapeutic possibilities to recover functionality before clinical symptoms develop. Considering that iron accumulation and oxidative damage are conditions commonly found in PD, we tested the possible neuritogenic effects of iron chelators and antioxidant agents. We used three commercial chelators: DFO, deferiprone and 2.2’-dypyridyl, and three 8-hydroxyquinoline-based iron chelators: M30, 7MH and 7DH, and we evaluated their effects in vitro using a mesencephalic cell culture treated with the Parkinsonian toxin MPP+ and in vivo using the MPTP mouse model. All chelators tested promoted the emergence of new tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive processes, increased axodendritic tree length and protected cells against lipoperoxidation. Chelator treatment resulted in the generation of processes containing the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. The antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and dymetylthiourea also enhanced axodendritic tree recovery in vitro, an indication that reducing oxidative tone fosters neuritogenesis in MPP+-damaged neurons. Oral administration to mice of the M30 chelator for 14 days after MPTP treatment resulted in increased TH- and GIRK2-positive nigra cells and nigrostriatal fibers. Our results support a role for oral iron chelators as good candidates for the early treatment of PD, at stages of the disease where there is axodendritic tree retraction without neuronal death. PMID:26658949

  3. Naringin: a protector of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Un Ju; Leem, Eunju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and a biochemical reduction of striatal dopamine levels. Despite the lack of fully understanding of the etiology of Parkinson's disease, accumulating evidences suggest that Parkinson's disease may be caused by the insufficient support of neurotrophic factors, and by microglial activation, resident immune cells in the brain. Naringin, a major flavonone glycoside in grapefruits and citrus fruits, is considered as a protective agent against neurodegenerative diseases because it can induce not only anti-oxidant effects but also neuroprotective effects by the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways and the induction of neurotrophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. We have recently reported that naringin has neuroprotective effects in a neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease. Our observations show that intraperitoneal injection of naringin induces increases in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor expression and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity in dopaminergic neurons of rat brains with anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, the production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor by naringin treatment contributes to the protection of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection in a neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease. Although the effects of naringin on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in human brains are largely unknown, these results suggest that naringin may be a beneficial natural product for the prevention of dopaminergic degeneration in the adult brain. PMID:24963276

  4. Gdf-15 deficiency does not alter vulnerability of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in MPTP-intoxicated mice.

    PubMed

    Machado, Venissa; Gilsbach, Ralf; Das, Richa; Schober, Andreas; Bogatyreva, Lioudmila; Hauschke, Dieter; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Unsicker, Klaus; Spittau, Björn

    2016-08-01

    Growth/differentiation factor-15 (Gdf-15) is a member of the transforming growth factor-β (Tgf-β) superfamily and has been shown to be a potent neurotrophic factor for midbrain dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Gdf-15 has also been shown to be involved in inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to identify the role of endogenous Gdf-15 in the MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD) by comparing Gdf-15 (+/+) and Gdf-15 (-/-) mice. At 4 days and 14 days post-MPTP administration, both Gdf-15 (+/+) and Gdf-15 (-/-) mice showed a similar decline in DAergic neuron numbers and in striatal dopamine (DA) levels. This was followed by a comparable restorative phase at 90 days and 120 days, indicating that the absence of Gdf-15 does not affect the susceptibility or the recovery capacity of the nigrostriatal system after MPTP administration. The MPTP-induced microglial and astrocytic response was not significantly altered between the two genotypes. However, pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine profiling revealed the differential expression of markers in Gdf-15 (+/+) and Gdf-15 (-/-) mice after MPTP administration. Thus, the MPTP mouse model fails to uncover a major role of endogenous Gdf-15 in the protection of MPTP-lesioned nigrostriatal DAergic neurons, in contrast to its capacity to protect the 6-hydroxydopamine-intoxicated nigrostriatal system. PMID:27115420

  5. GDNF Overexpression from the Native Locus Reveals its Role in the Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic System Function.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anmol; Kopra, Jaakko; Varendi, Kärt; Porokuokka, Lauriina L; Panhelainen, Anne; Kuure, Satu; Marshall, Pepin; Karalija, Nina; Härma, Mari-Anne; Vilenius, Carolina; Lilleväli, Kersti; Tekko, Triin; Mijatovic, Jelena; Pulkkinen, Nita; Jakobson, Madis; Jakobson, Maili; Ola, Roxana; Palm, Erik; Lindahl, Maria; Strömberg, Ingrid; Võikar, Vootele; Piepponen, T Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle

    2015-12-01

    Degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system is the principal lesion in Parkinson's disease. Because glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes survival of dopamine neurons in vitro and in vivo, intracranial delivery of GDNF has been attempted for Parkinson's disease treatment but with variable success. For improving GDNF-based therapies, knowledge on physiological role of endogenous GDNF at the sites of its expression is important. However, due to limitations of existing genetic model systems, such knowledge is scarce. Here, we report that prevention of transcription of Gdnf 3'UTR in Gdnf endogenous locus yields GDNF hypermorphic mice with increased, but spatially unchanged GDNF expression, enabling analysis of postnatal GDNF function. We found that increased level of GDNF in the central nervous system increases the number of adult dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the number of dopaminergic terminals in the dorsal striatum. At the functional level, GDNF levels increased striatal tissue dopamine levels and augmented striatal dopamine release and re-uptake. In a proteasome inhibitor lactacystin-induced model of Parkinson's disease GDNF hypermorphic mice were protected from the reduction in striatal dopamine and failure of dopaminergic system function. Importantly, adverse phenotypic effects associated with spatially unregulated GDNF applications were not observed. Enhanced GDNF levels up-regulated striatal dopamine transporter activity by at least five fold resulting in enhanced susceptibility to 6-OHDA, a toxin transported into dopamine neurons by DAT. Further, we report how GDNF levels regulate kidney development and identify microRNAs miR-9, miR-96, miR-133, and miR-146a as negative regulators of GDNF expression via interaction with Gdnf 3'UTR in vitro. Our results reveal the role of GDNF in nigrostriatal dopamine system postnatal development and adult function, and highlight the importance of correct spatial

  6. 1-Methyl-4-Phenylpyridinium Stereotactic Infusion Completely and Specifically Ablated the Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Pathway in Rhesus Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Baihui; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Liqi; Liu, Li; Wu, Jing; Lü, Longbao; Wang, Zhengbo; Hu, Yingzhou; Le, Weidong; Deng, Xingli; Li, Jiali; Yao, Yonggang; Xu, Lin; Hu, Xintian; Zhang, Baorong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complete and specific ablation of a single dopaminergic (DA) pathway is a critical step to distinguish the roles of DA pathways in vivo. However, this kind of technique has not been reported in non-human primates. This study aimed to establish a lesioning method with a complete and specific ablation. Method A carefully designed infusion route based on a MRI stereotactic technique was developed to deliver the highly selective dopaminergic toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) unilaterally into multiple sites of compact part of substantia nigra (SNc) and striatum in monkeys. The nigrostriatal DA pathway was selected because lesioning of this pathway may induce symptoms that are suitable for evaluation. The pathological, behavioral, neuropharmacological, and clinical laboratorial data were collected to evaluate the lesioning effects. Result Pathological examination revealed a complete ablation of tyrosine hydroxylase positive (TH+) neurons in the SNc, while preserving intact TH+ neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) nearby. TH+ projections in the striatum were also unilaterally lost. The monkeys displayed stable (>28 weeks) rotations and symptoms which were expected with loss of DA neurons in the SNc, with rest tremor being an exception. No item implied the presence of a severe side effect caused by the operation or the intracerebral MPP+ infusion. The results suggested that rest tremor may not directly rely on the nigrostriatal pathway. Conclusion Taken together, in addition to providing a specific nigrostriatal DA lesioned model, this method, combined with brain stimulation or other techniques, can be applied as a powerful tool for the complete lesion of any desired DA pathway in order to study its specific functions in the brain. PMID:26010745

  7. GDNF Overexpression from the Native Locus Reveals its Role in the Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic System Function

    PubMed Central

    Porokuokka, Lauriina L.; Panhelainen, Anne; Kuure, Satu; Marshall, Pepin; Karalija, Nina; Härma, Mari-Anne; Vilenius, Carolina; Lilleväli, Kersti; Tekko, Triin; Mijatovic, Jelena; Pulkkinen, Nita; Jakobson, Madis; Jakobson, Maili; Ola, Roxana; Palm, Erik; Lindahl, Maria; Strömberg, Ingrid; Võikar, Vootele; Piepponen, T. Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system is the principal lesion in Parkinson’s disease. Because glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes survival of dopamine neurons in vitro and in vivo, intracranial delivery of GDNF has been attempted for Parkinson’s disease treatment but with variable success. For improving GDNF-based therapies, knowledge on physiological role of endogenous GDNF at the sites of its expression is important. However, due to limitations of existing genetic model systems, such knowledge is scarce. Here, we report that prevention of transcription of Gdnf 3’UTR in Gdnf endogenous locus yields GDNF hypermorphic mice with increased, but spatially unchanged GDNF expression, enabling analysis of postnatal GDNF function. We found that increased level of GDNF in the central nervous system increases the number of adult dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the number of dopaminergic terminals in the dorsal striatum. At the functional level, GDNF levels increased striatal tissue dopamine levels and augmented striatal dopamine release and re-uptake. In a proteasome inhibitor lactacystin-induced model of Parkinson’s disease GDNF hypermorphic mice were protected from the reduction in striatal dopamine and failure of dopaminergic system function. Importantly, adverse phenotypic effects associated with spatially unregulated GDNF applications were not observed. Enhanced GDNF levels up-regulated striatal dopamine transporter activity by at least five fold resulting in enhanced susceptibility to 6-OHDA, a toxin transported into dopamine neurons by DAT. Further, we report how GDNF levels regulate kidney development and identify microRNAs miR-9, miR-96, miR-133, and miR-146a as negative regulators of GDNF expression via interaction with Gdnf 3’UTR in vitro. Our results reveal the role of GDNF in nigrostriatal dopamine system postnatal development and adult function, and highlight the importance of correct

  8. Associated degeneration of ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons in the rat nigrostriatal lactacystin model of parkinsonism and their neuroprotection by valproate

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Ian F.; Anis, Hiba K.; Dexter, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) manifests clinically as bradykinesia, rigidity, and development of a resting tremor, primarily due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathways in the brain. Intranigral administration of the irreversible ubiquitin proteasome system inhibitor, lactacystin, has been used extensively to model nigrostriatal degeneration in rats, and study the effects of candidate neuroprotective agents on the integrity of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system. Recently however, adjacent extra-nigral brain regions such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) have been noted to also become affected in this model, yet their integrity in studies of candidate neuroprotective agents in the model have largely been overlooked. Here we quantify the extent and distribution of dopaminergic degeneration in the VTA of rats intranigrally lesioned with lactacystin, and quantify the extent of VTA dopaminergic neuroprotection after systemic treatment with an epigenetic therapeutic agent, valproate, shown previously to protect dopaminergic SNpc neurons in this model. We found that unilateral intranigral administration of lactacystin resulted in a 53.81% and 31.72% interhemispheric loss of dopaminergic SNpc and VTA neurons, respectively. Daily systemic treatment of lactacystin lesioned rats with valproate however resulted in dose-dependant neuroprotection of VTA neurons. Our findings demonstrate that not only is the VTA also affected in the intranigral lactacystin rat model of PD, but that this extra-nigral brain region is substrate for neuroprotection by valproate, an agent shown previously to induce neuroprotection and neurorestoration of SNpc dopaminergic neurons in this model. Our results therefore suggest that valproate is a candidate for extra-nigral as well as intra-nigral neuroprotection. PMID:26742637

  9. Associated degeneration of ventral tegmental area dopaminergic neurons in the rat nigrostriatal lactacystin model of parkinsonism and their neuroprotection by valproate.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ian F; Anis, Hiba K; Dexter, David T

    2016-02-12

    Parkinson's disease (PD) manifests clinically as bradykinesia, rigidity, and development of a resting tremor, primarily due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathways in the brain. Intranigral administration of the irreversible ubiquitin proteasome system inhibitor, lactacystin, has been used extensively to model nigrostriatal degeneration in rats, and study the effects of candidate neuroprotective agents on the integrity of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system. Recently however, adjacent extra-nigral brain regions such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) have been noted to also become affected in this model, yet their integrity in studies of candidate neuroprotective agents in the model have largely been overlooked. Here we quantify the extent and distribution of dopaminergic degeneration in the VTA of rats intranigrally lesioned with lactacystin, and quantify the extent of VTA dopaminergic neuroprotection after systemic treatment with an epigenetic therapeutic agent, valproate, shown previously to protect dopaminergic SNpc neurons in this model. We found that unilateral intranigral administration of lactacystin resulted in a 53.81% and 31.72% interhemispheric loss of dopaminergic SNpc and VTA neurons, respectively. Daily systemic treatment of lactacystin lesioned rats with valproate however resulted in dose-dependant neuroprotection of VTA neurons. Our findings demonstrate that not only is the VTA also affected in the intranigral lactacystin rat model of PD, but that this extra-nigral brain region is substrate for neuroprotection by valproate, an agent shown previously to induce neuroprotection and neurorestoration of SNpc dopaminergic neurons in this model. Our results therefore suggest that valproate is a candidate for extra-nigral as well as intra-nigral neuroprotection. PMID:26742637

  10. Minocycline Rescues from Zinc-Induced Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration: Biochemical and Molecular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Brajesh Kumar; Chauhan, Amit Kumar; Singh, Deepali; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Chetna

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of zinc (Zn) in dopaminergic neurons is implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD), and microglial activation plays a critical role in toxin-induced Parkinsonism. Oxidative stress is accused in Zn-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration; however, its connection with microglial activation is still not known. This study was undertaken to elucidate the role and underlying mechanism of microglial activation in Zn-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Male Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally with/without zinc sulphate (20 mg/kg) in the presence/absence of minocycline (30 mg/kg), a microglial activation inhibitor, for 2-12 weeks. While neurobehavioral and biochemical indexes of PD and number of dopaminergic neurons were reduced, the number of microglial cells was increased in the substantia nigra of the Zn-exposed animals. Similarly, Zn elevated lipid peroxidation (LPO) and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase; however, catalase activity was reduced. Besides, Zn increased an association of NADPH oxidase subunit p67(phox) with membrane, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and cleavage of pro-caspase 3. Zn attenuated the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) while augmented the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Minocycline alleviated Zn-induced behavioural impairments, loss of TH-positive neurons, activated microglial cells and biochemical indexes and modulated the expression of studied genes/proteins towards normalcy. The results demonstrate that minocycline reduces the number of activated microglial cells and oxidative stress, which rescue from Zn-induced changes in the expression of monoamine transporter and nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration. PMID:25764516

  11. Effects of HZE particle on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in a future Mars mission.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yu; Frey, M A; Sahiar, F; Dodge, R; Mohler, S

    2005-02-01

    Because of long duration travel outside the Earth's magnetic field, the effect of iron-rich high charge and energy (HZE) particles in Galactic Cosmic Rays on human body is the major concern in radiation protection. Recently attention has been directed to effects on the central nervous system in addition to mutagenic effects. In particular, a reduction in striatal dopamine content on nigrostriatal dopaminergic system has been reported by investigators using accelerated iron ions in ground-based mammalian studies. In addition, studies of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease demonstrated that excess iron cause a reduction in the dopamine content in the substantia nigra. This suggests an intriguing possibility to explain the selective detrimental effects of HZE particles on the dopaminergic system. Should these particles have biochemical effects, possible options for countermeasures are: (1) nutritional prevention, (2) medication, and (3) surgical placement of a stimulator electrode at a specific anatomic site in the basal ganglia. PMID:15754475

  12. Changes in dopamine availability in the nigrostriatal and mesocortical dopaminergic systems by gait in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Y; Kanno, T; Okada, H; Yoshikawa, E; Futatsubashi, M; Nobezawa, S; Torizuka, T; Tanaka, K

    2001-04-01

    The basal ganglia play a role in controlling movement during gait. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in the striatum and extrastriatal region in association with walking exercise in six normal subjects and seven age-matched unmedicated patients with Parkinson's disease. This was done by comparing DAT radioligand uptake in the dopaminergic projection areas after gait with that under the resting condition using a DAT probe, 11C-labelled 2-beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane ([11C]CFT) and PET. Physiological parameters were stable during and after gait in both groups. The regions of interest method for measuring differences in [11C]CFT uptake level and voxel-based statistical parametric mapping (SPM96) showed that [11C]CFT uptake in the striatum (specifically the putamen) was decreased by gait to a greater extent in normal subjects, whereas a significant reduction in [11C]CFT uptake was not found in the putamen but in the caudate and orbitofrontal cortex in Parkinson's disease patients. These results are the first in vivo evidence that DAT availability is reduced in the nigrostriatal projection area by basic human behaviour, i.e. gait. Alterations in this availability in Parkinson's disease suggested that shifted activation in the medial striatum and the mesocortical dopaminergic system might reflect the pathophysiology of parkinsonian gait. PMID:11287377

  13. Progressive Axonal Degeneration of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurons in Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2β Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Goichi; Shinzawa, Koei; Hayakawa, Hideki; Baba, Kousuke; Sumi-Akamaru, Hisae; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β, PLA2G6) is essential for the remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids. Mutations in this gene are responsible for autosomal recessive, young onset, L-dopa-responsive parkinsonism (PARK14), suggesting a neurodegenerative condition in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in patients with PLA2G6 mutations. We previously observed slowly progressive motor deficits in iPLA2β-knockout (KO) mice. To clarify whether a deficiency of iPLA2β leads to the degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, we analyzed the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice. At all clinical stages, nerve terminals in the striatum were immunopositive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in wild-type (WT) control mice. In iPLA2β-KO mice, focal loss of nerve terminals positive for TH and DAT was found from 56 weeks (early clinical stage), although iPLA2β-KO mice at 56 weeks showed no significant decrease in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra compared with age-matched WT mice, as reported previously. At 100 weeks (late clinical stage), greater decreases in DAT immunoreactivity were observed in the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice. Moreover, strongly TH-positive structures, presumed to be deformed axons, were observed in the neuropils of the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice starting at 15 weeks (preclinical stage) and increased with age. These results suggest that the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons occurs mainly in the distal region of axons in iPLA2β-KO mice. PMID:27078024

  14. Progressive Axonal Degeneration of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurons in Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2β Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Beck, Goichi; Shinzawa, Koei; Hayakawa, Hideki; Baba, Kousuke; Sumi-Akamaru, Hisae; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2β (iPLA2β, PLA2G6) is essential for the remodeling of membrane glycerophospholipids. Mutations in this gene are responsible for autosomal recessive, young onset, L-dopa-responsive parkinsonism (PARK14), suggesting a neurodegenerative condition in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in patients with PLA2G6 mutations. We previously observed slowly progressive motor deficits in iPLA2β-knockout (KO) mice. To clarify whether a deficiency of iPLA2β leads to the degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, we analyzed the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice. At all clinical stages, nerve terminals in the striatum were immunopositive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in wild-type (WT) control mice. In iPLA2β-KO mice, focal loss of nerve terminals positive for TH and DAT was found from 56 weeks (early clinical stage), although iPLA2β-KO mice at 56 weeks showed no significant decrease in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra compared with age-matched WT mice, as reported previously. At 100 weeks (late clinical stage), greater decreases in DAT immunoreactivity were observed in the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice. Moreover, strongly TH-positive structures, presumed to be deformed axons, were observed in the neuropils of the striatum of iPLA2β-KO mice starting at 15 weeks (preclinical stage) and increased with age. These results suggest that the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons occurs mainly in the distal region of axons in iPLA2β-KO mice. PMID:27078024

  15. The nigrostriatal dopaminergic system assessed in vivo by positron emission tomography in healthy volunteer subjects and patients with Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leenders, K.L.; Salmon, E.P.; Tyrrell, P.; Perani, D.; Brooks, D.J.; Sager, H.; Jones, T.; Marsden, C.D.; Frackowiak, R.S. )

    1990-12-01

    A group of healthy control subjects and patients with Parkinson's disease were investigated using positron emission tomography and two tracers as indicators of different specific properties of the presynaptic dopaminergic system in caudate nucleus and putamen. The first tracer, 6-L-(18F)-fluorodopa, was used as an analog of levodopa to assess its regional brain uptake, conversion into, and retention as dopamine and further metabolites. The second tracer, (11C)-nomifensine was employed as an indicator of striatal monaminergic reuptake sites that are principally dopaminergic. We have used this tracer to assess dopaminergic nerve terminal density. In patients with Parkinson's disease, striatal uptake of both tracers was decreased, putamen being significantly more affected than caudate. Side-to-side differences of uptake in putamen, but not caudate, correlated with corresponding left-right differences of scored clinical motor performance. Both 6-L(18F)-fluorodopa and (11C)-nomifensine tracer uptake in putamen was decreased on average to 40% of normal values, suggesting that a substantial part of the cellular elements of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system is still intact in living parkinsonian patients. This is in contrast to the generally extreme depletion of endogenous dopamine in the putamen of patients found at postmortem. Our results lend support to the search for drug treatments that protect against further nigrostriatal cell loss and that could be exhibited as soon as the disease manifests clinically. If successful, a sufficient striatal nerve terminal pool would remain so that the effectiveness of levodopa as a dopamine repletor could persist.

  16. Differential effects of selective lesions of cholinergic and dopaminergic neurons on serotonin-type 1 receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, R.; Richard, J.

    1987-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)-type1 receptor binding sites are discretely distributed in rat brain. High densities of (3H)5-HT1 binding sites are especially located in areas enriched with cholinergic and dopaminergic innervation, such as the substantia innominata/ventral pallidum, striatum, septal nuclei, hippocampus and substantia nigra. The possible association of (3H)5-HT1 binding sites with cholinergic or dopaminergic cell bodies and/or nerve fiber terminals was investigated by selective lesions of the substantia innominata/ventral pallidum-cortical and septohippocampal cholinergic pathways and the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection. (3H)5-HT1 receptor binding sites are possibly located on cholinergic cell bodies in the ventral pallidum-cortical pathway since (3H)5-HT1 binding in the substantia innominata/ventral pallidal area was markedly decreased following kainic acid lesions. Fimbriaectomies markedly decreased (3H)5-HT1 binding in the hippocampus, suggesting the presence of 5-HT1 binding sites on cholinergic nerve fiber terminals in the septohippocampal pathway. Lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection did not modify (3H)5-HT1 binding in the substantia nigra and the striatum, suggesting that 5-HT1 receptors are not closely associated with dopaminergic cell bodies and nerve terminals in this pathway. These results demonstrate differential association between 5-HT1 receptors and cholinergic and dopaminergic innervation in rat brain.

  17. Progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons induced by inflammatory responses to fipronil.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Park, Youn Sun; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory responses are involved in mechanisms of neuronal cell damage in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the mechanisms whereby inflammatory responses contribute to loss of dopaminergic neurons in fipronil (FPN)-treated rats. After stereotaxic injection of FPN in the substantia nigra (SN), the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons and the levels of TH expression in the SN decreased at 7days, and a significant decrease was observed at 14days with a subsequent reduction in striatal TH expression. Decreases in dopamine (DA) levels, however, began at 3days post-injection, preceding the changes in TH expression. In contrast, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was significantly increased at 3days and persisted for up to 14days post-lesion; these changes in GFAP expression appeared to be inversely correlated with TH expression. Furthermore, we found that FPN administration induced an inflammatory response characterized by increased levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which was mediated by activated microglia following infusion of FPN unilaterally into the SN. Intranigral injection of FPN underwent an inflammatory response with a resultant ongoing loss of dopaminergic neurons, indicating that pesticides may have important implication for the study of PD. PMID:27313094

  18. Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Component Cyclophilin D Distinguishes Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Death Paradigms in the MPTP Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rebecca; Starkova, Natalia N.; Zhang, Steven F.; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Yang, Lichuan; Wille, Elizabeth; Lorenzo, Beverly J.; Ho, Daniel J.; Beal, M. Flint

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Mitochondrial damage due to Ca2+ overload-induced opening of permeability transition pores (PTP) is believed to play a role in selective degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Genetic ablation of mitochondrial matrix protein cyclophilin D (CYPD) has been shown to increase Ca2+ threshold of PTP in vitro and to prevent cell death in several in vivo disease models. We investigated the role of CYPD in a mouse model of MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine)-induced PD. Results: We demonstrate that in vitro, brain mitochondria isolated from CYPD knockout mice were less sensitive to MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium ion)-induced membrane depolarization, and free radical generation compared to wild-type mice. CYPD knockout mitochondria isolated from ventral midbrain of mice treated with MPTP in vivo exhibited less damage as judged from respiratory chain Complex I activity, State 3 respiration rate, and respiratory control index than wild-type mice, whereas assessment of apoptotic markers showed no differences between the two genotypes. However, CYPD knockout mice were significantly resistant only to an acute regimen of MPTP neurotoxicity in contrast to the subacute and chronic MPTP paradigms. Innovation: Inactivation of CYPD is beneficial in preserving mitochondrial functions only in an acute insult model of MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Conclusion: Our results suggest that CYPD deficiency distinguishes the modes of dopaminergic neurodegeneration in various regimens of MPTP-neurotoxicity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 855–868. PMID:21529244

  19. Ether-à-go-go 1 (Eag1) potassium channel expression in dopaminergic neurons of basal ganglia is modulated by 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, N R; Mitkovski, M; Stühmer, W; Pardo, L A; Del Bel, E A

    2012-04-01

    The ether à go-go (Eag) gene encodes the voltage-gated potassium (K(+)) ion channel Kv10.1, whose function still remains unknown. As dopamine may directly affect K(+) channels, we evaluated whether a nigrostriatal dopaminergic lesion induced by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) would alter Eag1-K(+) channel expression in the rat basal ganglia and related brain regions. Male Wistar rats received a microinjection of either saline or 6-OHDA (unilaterally) into the medial forebrain bundle. The extent of the dopaminergic lesion induced by 6-OHDA was evaluated by apomorphine-induced rotational behavior and by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity. The 6-OHDA microinjection caused a partial or complete lesion of dopaminergic cells, as well as a reduction of Eag1+ cells in a manner proportional to the extent of the lesion. In addition, we observed a decrease in TH immunoreactivity in the ipsilateral striatum. In conclusion, the expression of the Eag1-K(+)-channel throughout the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain, its co-localization with dopaminergic cells and its reduction mirroring the extent of the lesion highlight a physiological circuitry where the functional role of this channel can be investigated. The Eag1-K(+) channel expression in dopaminergic cells suggests that these channels are part of the diversified group of ion channels that generate and maintain the electrophysiological activity pattern of dopaminergic midbrain neurons. PMID:22048886

  20. Endogenous dynorphin protects against neurotoxin-elicited nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron damage and motor deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The striato-nigral projecting pathway contains the highest concentrations of dynorphin in the brain. The functional role of this opioid peptide in the regulation of mesencephalic dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons is not clear. We reported previously that exogenous dynorphin exerts potent neuroprotective effects against inflammation-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in vitro. The present study was performed to investigate whether endogenous dynorphin has neuroprotective roles in vivo. Methods 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and methamphetamine (MA), two commonly used neurotoxins in rodent models of Parkinson’s disease, were administered to wild-type (Dyn+/+) and prodynorphin-deficient mice (Dyn−/−). We examined dopaminergic neurotoxicity by using an automated video tracking system, HPLC, immunocytochemistry, and reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results Treatment with MPTP resulted in behavioral impairments in both strains. However, these impairments were more pronounced in Dyn-l- than in Dyn+/+. Dyn−/− showed more severe MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and striatum than Dyn+/+. Similarly, the levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum were depleted to a greater extent in Dyn−/− than in Dyn+/+. Additional mechanistic studies revealed that MPTP treatment caused a higher degree of microglial activation and M1 phenotype differentiation in Dyn−/− than in Dyn+/+. Consistent with these observations, prodynorphin deficiency also exacerbated neurotoxic effects induced by MA, although this effect was less pronounced than that of MPTP. Conclusions The in vivo results presented here extend our previous in vitro findings and further indicate that endogenous dynorphin plays a critical role in protecting dopaminergic neurons through its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:22695044

  1. A positron emission tomography study of nigro-striatal dopaminergic mechanisms underlying attention: implications for ADHD and its treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Tim D.; Hong, Young T.; Smith, Rob; Brichard, Laurent; Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Tait, Roger; Izquierdo, David; Regenthal, Ralf; Dowson, Jonathan; Suckling, John; Baron, Jean-Claude; Aigbirhio, Franklin I.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Müller, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Through the combined use of 18F-fallypride positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging this study examined the neural mechanisms underlying the attentional deficits associated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and their potential reversal with a single therapeutic dose of methylphenidate. Sixteen adult patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and 16 matched healthy control subjects were positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scanned and tested on a computerized sustained attention task after oral methylphenidate (0.5 mg/kg) and placebo administration in a within-subject, double-blind, cross-over design. Although patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder as a group showed significant attentional deficits and reduced grey matter volume in fronto-striato-cerebellar and limbic networks, they had equivalent D2/D3 receptor availability and equivalent increases in endogenous dopamine after methylphenidate treatment to that observed in healthy control subjects. However, poor attentional performers drawn from both the attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and the control groups had significantly reduced left caudate dopamine activity. Methylphenidate significantly increased dopamine levels in all nigro-striatal regions, thereby normalizing dopamine levels in the left caudate in low performers. Behaviourally, methylphenidate improved sustained attention in a baseline performance-dependent manner, irrespective of diagnosis. This finding was accompanied by an equally performance-dependent effect of the drug on dopamine release in the midbrain, whereby low performers showed reduced dopamine release in this region. Collectively, these findings support a dimensional model of attentional deficits and underlying nigro-striatal dopaminergic mechanisms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder that extends into the healthy population. Moreover, they confer midbrain dopamine autoreceptors a hitherto

  2. A positron emission tomography study of nigro-striatal dopaminergic mechanisms underlying attention: implications for ADHD and its treatment.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Natalia; Fryer, Tim D; Hong, Young T; Smith, Rob; Brichard, Laurent; Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Chamberlain, Samuel R; Tait, Roger; Izquierdo, David; Regenthal, Ralf; Dowson, Jonathan; Suckling, John; Baron, Jean-Claude; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Robbins, Trevor W; Sahakian, Barbara J; Müller, Ulrich

    2013-11-01

    Through the combined use of (18)F-fallypride positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging this study examined the neural mechanisms underlying the attentional deficits associated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and their potential reversal with a single therapeutic dose of methylphenidate. Sixteen adult patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and 16 matched healthy control subjects were positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scanned and tested on a computerized sustained attention task after oral methylphenidate (0.5 mg/kg) and placebo administration in a within-subject, double-blind, cross-over design. Although patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder as a group showed significant attentional deficits and reduced grey matter volume in fronto-striato-cerebellar and limbic networks, they had equivalent D2/D3 receptor availability and equivalent increases in endogenous dopamine after methylphenidate treatment to that observed in healthy control subjects. However, poor attentional performers drawn from both the attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and the control groups had significantly reduced left caudate dopamine activity. Methylphenidate significantly increased dopamine levels in all nigro-striatal regions, thereby normalizing dopamine levels in the left caudate in low performers. Behaviourally, methylphenidate improved sustained attention in a baseline performance-dependent manner, irrespective of diagnosis. This finding was accompanied by an equally performance-dependent effect of the drug on dopamine release in the midbrain, whereby low performers showed reduced dopamine release in this region. Collectively, these findings support a dimensional model of attentional deficits and underlying nigro-striatal dopaminergic mechanisms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder that extends into the healthy population. Moreover, they confer midbrain dopamine autoreceptors a hitherto

  3. Dramatic differences in susceptibility to l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia between mice that are aged before or after a nigrostriatal dopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Bez, Francesco; Francardo, Veronica; Cenci, M Angela

    2016-10-01

    Mice with striatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions are widely used as a model to study the effects of neurorestorative, symptomatic, or antidyskinetic treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD). The standard praxis is to utilize young adult mice with relatively acute 6-OHDA lesions. However, long post-lesion intervals may be required for longitudinal studies of treatment interventions, and the long-term stability of the model's behavioral and cellular phenotypes is currently unknown. In this study, C57Bl/6J mice sustained unilateral striatal 6-OHDA lesions at approx. 2months of age, and were allowed to survive for 1, 10 or 22months. Another group of mice sustained the lesion at the age of 23months and survived for one month thereafter. Baseline and drug-induced motor behaviors were examined using a battery of tests (utilizing also a novel video-based methodology). The extent of nigral dopamine cell loss was stable across post-lesion intervals and ages. However, a prominent sprouting of both dopaminergic and serotonergic fibers was detected in the caudate-putamen in animals that survived until 10 and 22months post-lesion. This phenomenon was associated with a recovery of baseline motor deficits, and with a lack of dyskinetic responses upon treatment with either l-DOPA or apomorphine. By contrast, mice sustaining the lesion at 23months of age showed a striking susceptibility to the dyskinetic effects of both l-DOPA and apomorphine, which was associated with a pronounced drug-induced upregulation of ∆FosB in the ventrolateral striatum. The results reveal a remarkable compensatory capacity of a damaged nigrostriatal pathway in ageing mice, and how this impacts on the response to dopaminergic therapies for PD. PMID:27312773

  4. The Toll-like receptor-3 agonist poly(I:C) triggers nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Deleidi, Michela; Hallett, Penelope J.; Koprich, James B.; Chung, Chee-Yeun; Isacson, Ole

    2010-01-01

    In Parkinson’s disease (PD), loss of striatal dopaminergic (DA) terminals and degeneration of DA neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) are associated with glial reactions. Such inflammatory processes are commonly considered an epiphenomenon of neuronal degeneration. However, there is increasing recognition of the role of neuroinflammation as an initiation factor of DA neuron degeneration. To investigate this issue, we established a new model of brain inflammation by injecting the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR-3) agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] in the SN of adult rats. Poly(I:C) injection induced a sustained inflammatory reaction in the SN and in the dorsolateral striatum. Significant changes were detected in proteins relevant to synaptic transmission and axonal transport. In addition, cytoplasmic mislocalization of neuronal TDP-43 was observed. Poly(I:C) injection increased the susceptibility of midbrain DA neurons to a subsequent neurotoxic trigger (low dose 6-hydroxydopamine). Systemic delivery of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL1-ra) protected SN DA neurons exposed to combined poly(I:C) induced inflammatory and neurotoxic oxidative stress. These data indicate that viral-like neuroinflammation induces predegenerative changes in the DA system, which lowers the set point toward neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. New powerful neuroprotective therapies for PD might be considered by targeting critical inflammatory mechanisms, including cytokine-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:21123556

  5. Small molecule TrkB agonist deoxygedunin protects nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA and MPTP induced neurotoxicity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuke; Xu, Yan; Chen, Guiqin; Ma, Kai; Han, Chao; Guo, Zhenli; Zhang, Zhentao; Ye, Keqiang; Cao, Xuebing

    2015-12-01

    Dopaminergic neurons loss in the substantia nigra (SN) and dopamine (DA) content loss in the striatum correlate well with disease severity in Parkinson's disease (PD). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of neurotrophin family and is necessary for the survival and development of DA neurons in the SN. Deficits in BDNF/TrkB receptors signaling contribute to the dysfunction of PD. Deoxygedunin, a derivative of gedunin produced from Indian neem tree, binds TrkB receptor and activates TrkB and its downstream signaling cascades in a BDNF-independent manner, and possesses neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested the neuroprotective effects of deoxygedunin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mice model of Parkinson's disease. Rats were treated with deoxygedunin 5 mg/kg (i.p.) for one month started two weeks before 6-OHDA lesion (pre-treatment), or for two weeks right after lesion (post-treatment), with isovolumetric vehicle as control and normal. Mice were given deoxygedunin 5 mg/kg (i.p.) for 2 weeks and administrated with MPTP twice at the dose of 20 mg/kg (i.p.) on day 7. The results revealed that pretreatment with deoxygedunin improved PD models' behavioral performance and reduced dopaminergic neurons loss in SN, associated with the activation of TrkB receptors and its two major signaling cascades involving mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Thus, our current study indicates that deoxygedunin, as a small molecule TrkB agonist, displays prominent neuroprotective properties, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for treating Parkinson's disease. PMID:26282118

  6. Presynaptic and postsynaptic dopaminergic binding densities in the nigrostriatal and mesocortical systems in early Parkinson's disease: a double-tracer positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Y; Kanno, T; Okada, H; Yoshikawa, E; Futatsubashi, M; Nobezawa, S; Torizuka, T; Sakamoto, M

    1999-11-01

    To investigate changes in the relation between presynaptic and postsynaptic dopaminergic functions in vivo in both nigrostriatal and mesocortical systems in Parkinson's disease (PD), 10 drug-naive early PD patients were studied twice using positron emission tomography with [11C]CFT (dopamine transporter probe) followed by [11C]SCH 23390 (D1 receptor probe). Regional binding potentials (k3/k4) of [11C]CFT and [11C]SCH 23390 in the striatum (nigrostriatal system) and the orbitofrontal cortex (mesocortical system) were estimated by compartment analyses. Levels of [11C]CFT k3/k4 in the two projection areas were shown to be significantly lower in PD, whereas [11C]SCH 23390 levels remained unchanged. Regression analysis showed that estimates of CFT k3/k4 were positively correlated with those of SCH 23390 k3/k4 in the striatum in normal control, whereas the two binding estimates were less positively correlated in the caudate and inversely correlated in the putamen in PD. No significant correlation was observed in the orbitofrontal cortex in both groups. These results indicated that dopamine transporters and D1 receptors change in parallel in the normal striatal synapses, but the association becomes asymmetrical because of reduction in presynaptic and relative elevation in postsynaptic markers in PD. Alterations in synaptic parallel regulation in the nigrostriatal system might reflect early pathophysiology in the parkinsonian brain. PMID:10553989

  7. Sub-chronic treatment with classical but not atypical antipsychotics produces morphological changes in rat nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons directly related to "early onset" vacuous chewing.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Giorgio; Casu, Maria Antonietta; Bartholini, Francesco; Ruiu, Stefania; Saba, Pierluigi; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Pani, Luca

    2002-04-01

    In the present work, we investigated if an impairment of dopaminergic neurons after subchronic haloperidol treatment might be a possible physiopathologic substrate of the "early onset" vacuous chewing movements (VCMs) in rats. For this purpose, different antipsychotics were used to analyse a possible relationship between VCMs development and morphological alterations of tyrosine-hydroxylase-immunostained (TH-IM) neurons. Rats treated twice a day with haloperidol displayed a significant increase of VCMs that was both time- (2-4 weeks) and dose (0.1-1 mg/kg) dependent. Immunocytochemical analysis showed a shrinkage of TH-IM cell bodies in substantia nigra pars compacta and reticulata and a reduction of TH-immunostaining in the striatum of haloperidol treated rats with the arising of VCMs. No differences were observed in TH-IM neurons of ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens vs. control rats. The atypical antipsychotics risperidone (2 mg/kg, twice a day), amisulpride (20 mg/kg, twice a day) and clozapine (10 mg/kg, twice a day) did not produce any nigro-striatal morphological changes or VCMs. TH-IM nigro-striatal neuron morphological alterations and VCMs were still present after three days of withdrawal in rats treated for four weeks with haloperidol (1 mg/kg). Both the main morphological changes and the behavioural correlate disappeared after three weeks of withdrawal. These results suggest that haloperidol induces a morphological impairment of the dopaminergic nigro-striatal neurons which is directly associated with the arising, permanency and disappearance of VCMs in rats. PMID:11982629

  8. Microglia-Derived Cytokines/Chemokines Are Involved in the Enhancement of LPS-Induced Loss of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurons in DJ-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chia-Hung; Lee, Ming-Jen; Liou, Houng-Chi; Liou, Horng-Huei; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of DJ-1 (PARK7) has been linked to the development of early-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. This study is aimed to compare the sensitivity of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge between DJ-1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice, and explore the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Our results found that the basal levels of interferon (IFN)-γ (the hub cytokine) and interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC) (a downstream mediator) were elevated in the substantia nigra of DJ-1 KO mice and in microglia cells with DJ-1 deficiency, and the release of cytokine/chemokine was greatly enhanced following LPS administration in the DJ-1 deficient conditions. In addition, direct intranigral LPS challenge caused a greater loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine content in DJ-1 KO mice than in WT mice. Furthermore, the sensitization of microglia cells to LPS challenge to release IFN-γ and I-TAC was via the enhancement of NF-κB signaling, which was antagonized by NF-κB inhibitors. LPS-induced increase in neuronal death in the neuron-glia co-culture was enhanced by DJ-1 deficiency in microglia, which was antagonized by the neutralizing antibodies against IFN-γ or I-TAC. These results indicate that DJ-1 deficiency sensitizes microglia cells to release IFN-γ and I-TAC and causes inflammatory damage to dopaminergic neurons. The interaction between the genetic defect (i.e. DJ-1) and inflammatory factors (e.g. LPS) may contribute to the development of PD. PMID:26982707

  9. GDNF-based therapies, GDNF-producing interneurons, and trophic support of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. Implications for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    d’Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Pascual, Alberto; López-Barneo, José

    2015-01-01

    The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a well-established trophic agent for dopaminergic (DA) neurons in vitro and in vivo. GDNF is necessary for maintenance of neuronal morphological and neurochemical phenotype and protects DA neurons from toxic damage. Numerous studies on animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD) have reported beneficial effects of GDNF on nigrostriatal DA neuron survival. However, translation of these observations to the clinical setting has been hampered so far by side effects associated with the chronic continuous intra-striatal infusion of recombinant GDNF. In addition, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials have not reported any clinically relevant effect of GDNF on PD patients. In the past few years, experiments with conditional Gdnf knockout mice have suggested that GDNF is necessary for maintenance of DA neurons in adulthood. In parallel, new methodologies for exogenous GDNF delivery have been developed. Recently, it has been shown that a small population of scattered, electrically interconnected, parvalbumin positive (PV+) GABAergic interneurons is responsible for most of the GDNF produced in the rodent striatum. In addition, cholinergic striatal interneurons appear to be also involved in the modulation of striatal GDNF. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on brain GDNF delivery, homeostasis, and its effects on nigrostriatal DA neurons. Special attention is paid to the therapeutic potential of endogenous GDNF stimulation in PD. PMID:25762899

  10. Deficits in coordinated motor behavior and in nigrostriatal dopaminergic system ameliorated and VMAT2 expression up-regulated in aged male rats by administration of testosterone propionate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Kang, Yunxiao; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Yingbo; Cui, Rui; Yan, Wensheng; Tan, Huibing; Li, Shuangcheng; Wu, Baiyila; Cui, Huixian; Shi, Geming

    2016-06-01

    The effects of testosterone propionate (TP) supplements on the coordinated motor behavior and nigrostriatal dopaminergic (NSDA) system were analyzed in aged male rats. The present study showed the coordinated motor behavioral deficits, the reduced activity of NSDA system and the decreased expression of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in 24month-old male rats. Long term TP treatment improved the motor coordination dysfunction with aging. Increased tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter, as well as dopamine and its metabolites were found in the NSDA system of TP-treated 24month-old male rats, indicative of the amelioratory effects of TP supplements on NSDA system of aged male rats. The enhancement of dopaminergic (DAergic) activity of NSDA system by TP supplements might underlie the amelioration of the coordinated motor dysfunction in aged male rats. TP supplements up-regulated VMAT2 expression in NSDA system of aged male rats. Up-regulation of VMAT2 expression in aged male rats following chronic TP treatment might be involved in the maintenance of DAergic function of NSDA system in aged male rats. PMID:26956479

  11. Chronic administration of cholesterol oximes in mice increases transcription of cytoprotective genes and improves transcriptome alterations induced by alpha-synuclein overexpression in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Richter, Franziska; Gao, Fuying; Medvedeva, Vera; Lee, Patrick; Bove, Nicholas; Fleming, Sheila M; Michaud, Magali; Lemesre, Vincent; Patassini, Stefano; De La Rosa, Krystal; Mulligan, Caitlin K; Sioshansi, Pedrom C; Zhu, Chunni; Coppola, Giovanni; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca M; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2014-09-01

    Cholesterol-oximes TRO19622 and TRO40303 target outer mitochondrial membrane proteins and have beneficial effects in preclinical models of neurodegenerative diseases leading to their advancement to clinical trials. Dopaminergic neurons degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD) and are prone to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In order to provide insights into the neuroprotective potential of TRO19622 and TRO40303 for dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we assessed their effects on gene expression in laser captured nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons of wildtype mice and of mice that over-express alpha-synuclein, a protein involved in both familial and sporadic forms of PD (Thy1-aSyn mice). Young mice were fed the drugs in food pellets or a control diet from 1 to 4months of age, approximately 10months before the appearance of striatal dopamine loss in this model. Unbiased weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of transcriptional changes revealed effects of cholesterol oximes on transcripts related to mitochondria, cytoprotection and anti-oxidant response in wild-type and transgenic mice, including increased transcription of stress defense (e.g. Prdx1, Prdx2, Glrx2, Hspa9, Pink1, Drp1, Trak1) and dopamine-related (Th, Ddc, Gch1, Dat, Vmat2, Drd2, Chnr6a) genes. Even at this young age transgenic mice showed alterations in transcripts implicated in mitochondrial function and oxidative stress (e.g. Bcl-2, Bax, Casp3, Nos2), and both drugs normalized about 20% of these alterations. Young Thy1-aSyn mice exhibit motor deficits that differ from parkinsonism and are established before the onset of treatment; these deficits were not improved by cholesterol oximes. However, high doses of TRO40303 improved olfaction and produced the same effects as dopamine agonists on a challenging beam test, specifically an increase in footslips, an observation congruent with its effects on transcripts involved in dopamine synthesis. High doses of TRO19622 increased alpha

  12. Chronic administration of cholesterol oximes in mice increases transcription of cytoprotective genes and improves transcriptome alterations induced by alpha-synuclein overexpression in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Franziska; Gao, Fuying; Medvedeva, Vera; Lee, Patrick; Bove, Nicholas; Fleming, Sheila M.; Michaud, Magali; Lemesre, Vincent; Patassini, Stefano; De La Rosa, Krystal; Mulligan, Caitlin K.; Sioshansi, Pedrom; Zhu, Chunni; Coppola, Giovanni; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol-oximes TRO19622 and TRO40303 target outer mitochondrial membrane proteins and have beneficial effects in preclinical models of neurodegenerative diseases leading to their advancement to clinical trials. Dopaminergic neurons degenerate in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and are prone to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In order to provide insights into the neuroprotective potential of TRO19622 and TRO40303 for dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we assessed their effects on gene expression in laser captured nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons of wildtype mice and of mice that over-express alpha-synuclein, a protein involved in both familial and sporadic forms of PD (Thy1-aSyn mice). Young mice were fed the drugs in food pellets or a control diet from 1 to 4 months of age, approximately 10 months before the appearance of striatal dopamine loss in this model. Unbiased weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) of transcriptional changes revealed effects of cholesterol oximes on transcripts related to mitochondria, cytoprotection and anti-oxidant response in wild-type and transgenic mice, including increased transcription of stress defense (e.g. Prdx1, Prdx2, Glrx2, Hspa9, Pink1, Drp1, Trak1) and dopamine-related (Th, Ddc, Gch1, Dat, Vmat2, Drd2, Chnr6a) genes. Even at this young age transgenic mice showed alterations in transcripts implicated in mitochondrial function and oxidative stress (e.g. Bcl-2, Bax, Casp3, Nos2), and both drugs normalized about 20% of these alterations. Young Thy1-aSyn mice exhibit motor deficits that differ from parkinsonism and are established before the onset of treatment; these deficits were not improved by cholesterol oximes. However, high doses of TRO40303 improved olfaction and produced the same effects as dopamine agonists on a challenging beam test, specifically an increase in footslips, an observation congruent with its effects on transcripts involved in dopamine synthesis. High doses of TRO19622 increased

  13. The Amygdalo-Nigrostriatal Network Is Critical for an Optimal Temporal Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Es-seddiqi, Mouna; El Massioui, Nicole; Samson, Nathalie; Brown, Bruce L.; Doyère, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The amygdalo-nigrostriatal (ANS) network plays an essential role in enhanced attention to significant events. Interval timing requires attention to temporal cues. We assessed rats having a disconnected ANS network, due to contralateral lesions of the medial central nucleus of the amygdala (CEm) and dopaminergic afferents to the lateral striatum,…

  14. Repeated exposure to the herbicide atrazine alters locomotor activity and the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of the albino rat.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Verónica M; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge H; Mendoza-Trejo, Maria Soledad; González-Gallardo, Adriana; Hernández-Plata, Isela; Giordano, Magda

    2013-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is used as a pre- and post-emergent herbicide; although banned in several countries of the European Community, it is still used extensively around the world. A recent study in rats has shown that chronic, daily exposure to 10 mg ATR/kg BW causes hyperactivity, disrupts motor coordination and learning of behavioral tasks, and decreases dopamine levels in the brain. In order to evaluate the short-term effect of ATR exposure on locomotor activity, monoamine markers, and antioxidants, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received six IP injections of 100 mg ATR/kg BW or vehicle over two weeks. After every ATR injection we found hypoactivity that lasted up to five days, and it was accompanied by reductions in levels of striatal DA, DOPAC, and HVA without any alteration in the striatal expression of the mRNAs for Mn-SOD, Trx-1, DAR-D(1), or DAR-D(2). In contrast, in the nucleus accumbens no changes in monoamine markers were observed, and a down-regulation of Trx-1 expression was detected shortly after the ATR treatment. Moreover, in the ventral midbrain, we found that ATR induced a down-regulation of mRNA for Th and DAT, but it increased VMAT2 mRNA expression. Decreases of monoamine levels and of locomotor activity disappeared three months after ATR treatment; however, an amphetamine challenge (1 mg/kg) given two months after the ATR treatment resulted in a significant stimulation in the exposed group, revealing hidden effects of ATR on dopaminergic systems. These results indicate that ATR exposure differentially modifies the dopaminergic systems, and these modifications may underlie the behavioral changes observed. PMID:23123945

  15. Suppression of endogenous PPARγ increases vulnerability to methamphetamine –induced injury in mouse nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong-Jin; Airavaara, Mikko; Shen, Hui; Chou, Jenny; Harvey, Brandon K.; Wang, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Methamphetamine is a commonly abused drug and dopaminergic neurotoxin. Repeated administration of high doses of methamphetamine induces programmed cell death, suppression of dopamine release, and reduction in locomotor activity. Previous studies have shown that pretreatment with Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist reduced Methamphetamine -induced neurodegeneration. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the role of endogenous PPARγ in protecting against methamphetamine toxicity. Methods Adeno-associated virus (AAV) encoding the Cre recombinase gene was unilaterally injected into the left substantia nigra of loxP-PPARγ or control wild type mice. Animals were treated with high doses of methamphetamine 1-month after viral injection. Behavioral tests were examined using Rotarod and rotometer. In vivo voltammetry was used to examine dopamine release/clearance and at 2 months after methamphetamine injection. Results Administration of AAV-Cre selectively removed PPARγ in left nigra in loxP-PPARγ mice but not in the wild type mice. The loxP-PPARγ/AAV-Cre mice that received methamphetamine showed a significant reduction in time on the rotarod and exhibited increased ipislateral rotation using a rotometer. The peak of dopamine release induced by local application of KCl and the rate of dopamine clearance were significantly attenuated in the left striatum of loxP-PPARγ/AAV-Cre animals. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was reduced in the left, compared to right, nigra and dorsal striatum in loxP-PPARγ/AAV-Cre mice receiving high doses of methamphetamine. Conclusion A deficiency in PPARγ increases vulnerability to high doses of methamphetamine. Endogenous PPARγ may play an important role in reducing methamphetamine toxicity in vivo. PMID:22160138

  16. Naringin treatment induces neuroprotective effects in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease in vivo, but not enough to restore the lesioned dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Deok; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-02-01

    We recently reported that treatment with naringin, a major flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, attenuated neurodegeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) in vivo. In order to investigate whether its effects are universally applied to a different model of PD and whether its treatment induces restorative effects on the lesioned nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) projection, we observed the effects of pre-treatment or post-treatment with naringin in a mouse model of PD. For neuroprotective effects, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was unilaterally injected into the striatum of mouse brains for a neurotoxin model of PD in the presence or absence of naringin by daily intraperitoneal injection. Our results showed that naringin protected the nigrostriatal DA projection from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, similar to the effects in rat brains, this treatment induced the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is well known as an important survival factor for DA neurons, and inhibited microglial activation in the substantia nigra (SN) of mouse brains treated with 6-OHDA. However, there was no significant change of DA phenotypes in the SN and striatum post-treated with naringin compared with 6-OHDA-lesioned mice, despite the treatment being continued for 12 weeks. These results suggest that post-treatment with naringin alone may not be enough to restore the nigrostriatal DA projection in a mouse model of PD. However, our results apparently suggest that naringin is a beneficial natural product to prevent DA degeneration, which is involved in PD. PMID:26878791

  17. Behavioural impact of a double dopaminergic and serotonergic lesion in the non-human primate.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin-Gobert, Maude; Epinat, Justine; Météreau, Elise; Duperrier, Sandra; Neumane, Sara; Ballanger, Bénédicte; Lavenne, Franck; Liger, François; Tourvielle, Christian; Bonnefoi, Frédéric; Costes, Nicolas; Bars, Didier Le; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Thobois, Stéphane; Tremblay, Léon; Sgambato-Faure, Véronique

    2015-09-01

    Serotonergic (5-HT) neurons degenerate in Parkinson's disease. To determine the role of this 5-HT injury-besides the dopaminergic one in the parkinsonian symptomatology-we developed a new monkey model exhibiting a double dopaminergic/serotonergic lesion by sequentially using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methamphetamine (MDMA, better known as ecstasy). By positron emission tomography imaging and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that MDMA injured 5-HT nerve terminals in the brain of MPTP monkeys. Unexpectedly, this injury had no impact on tremor or on bradykinesia, but altered rigidity. It abolished the l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and neuropsychiatric-like behaviours, without altering the anti-parkinsonian response. These data demonstrate that 5-HT fibres play a critical role in the expression of both motor and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease, and highlight that an imbalance between the 5-HT and dopaminergic innervating systems is involved in specific basal ganglia territories for different symptoms. PMID:26117365

  18. Separation of the motor consequences from other actions of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in the nigrostriatal neurones of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M H; Garcia-Munoz, M; Arbuthnott, G W

    1985-12-01

    Male rats showed a clear preference for one forepaw when they were trained to press a lever for food reward. The preference was then changed by training, by local anaesthetic injection into the preferred paw, by lesions in the striatal output pathways in the brain, or by neurotoxin injection into the striatum contralateral to the side of the preferred paw. The pressing rate was not changed in spite of the change in paw use in any of these operations. This result is in marked contrast to the effect of reducing the dopamine concentration on the side contralateral to the preferred paw; in this case a marked reduction in responding is seen as well as the change in paw use. Thus medial forebrain bundle 6-hydroxydopamine lesions are more debilitating than either striatal damage or peripheral paralysis at least in the short term. PMID:3907747

  19. Intranasally applied L-DOPA alleviates parkinsonian symptoms in rats with unilateral nigro-striatal 6-OHDA lesions.

    PubMed

    Chao, Owen Y; Mattern, Claudia; Silva, Angelica M De Souza; Wessler, Janet; Ruocco, Lucia A; Nikolaus, Susanne; Huston, Joseph P; Pum, Martin E

    2012-02-10

    l-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) remains the most effective drug for therapy of Parkinson's disease. However, the current clinical route of L-DOPA administration is variable and unreliable because of problems with drug absorption and first-pass metabolism. Administration of drugs via the nasal passage has been proven an effective alternate route for a number of medicinal substances. Here we examined the acute behavioral and neurochemical effects of intranasally (IN) applied L-DOPA in rats bearing unilateral lesions of the medial forebrain bundle, with severe depletion (97%) of striatal dopamine. Turning behavior in an open field, footslips on a horizontal grid and postural motor asymmetry in a cylinder were assessed following IN L-DOPA or vehicle administration with, or without, benserazide pre-treatment. IN L-DOPA without benserazide pre-treatment mildly decreased ipsilateral turnings and increased contralateral turnings 10-20 min after the treatment. IN L-DOPA with saline pre-treatment reduced contralateral forelimb-slips on the grid while no effects were evident in the cylinder test. These results support the hypothesis that L-DOPA can bypass the blood-brain barrier by the IN route and alleviate behavioral impairments in the hemiparkinsonian animal model. PMID:22108632

  20. Ultrastructure of an arterial lesion induced in rats by fenoldopam mesylate, a dopaminergic vasodilator.

    PubMed Central

    Bugelski, P. J.; Vockley, C. M.; Sowinski, J. M.; Arena, E.; Berkowitz, B. A.; Morgan, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Fenoldopam mesylate (FM) is a dopaminergic vasodilator with demonstrated efficacy and a favourable safety profile in hypertensive and congestive heart failure patients. FM produced a novel arterial lesion in renal and splanchnic arteries of rats, but not dogs or monkeys. The studies reported here were undertaken to investigate the ultrastructure of the arterial lesion induced in rats by FM in an attempt to shed light on its pathogenesis. Rats were infused intravenously with FM, either 50 micrograms/kg/min for 1 or 4 h, or 5 or 100 micrograms/kg/min for 24 h. Control rats were infused for 4 or 24 h with vehicle alone. Perfusion-fixed tissue from the stomach and pancreas of control and drug-treated rats was examined by transmission electron microscopy. No arterial lesions were seen in rats infused with the drug for 1 or 4 h, or in control rats. All drug-treated rats infused with 5 or 100 micrograms/kg/min of FM for 24 h had lesions in subserosal gastric arteries and interlobular pancreatic arteries. In areas of mild arterial damage, medial smooth muscle cells contained intracytoplasmic pseudovacuoles, autophagic vacuoles, and electron-dense, myofilamentous inclusions. More severe lesions were characterized by overt medial necrosis and haemorrhage. The endothelium of affected arteries was invariably intact, except in areas of severe medial damage. The internal elastic lamina and connective tissue elements within the arterial wall were unaffected. These findings suggest that medial smooth muscle cells are the primary site of damage caused by fenoldopam mesylate in splanchnic arteries of the rat. This iatrogenic arterial lesion could provide an interesting model to study the response of medial smooth muscle to pharmacologically mediated injury. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 5 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:2567179

  1. Anatomical and functional reconstruction of the nigrostriatal pathway by intranigral transplants.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Afsaneh; Decressac, Mickael; Frappé, Isabelle; Fernagut, Pierre Olivier; Prestoz, Laetitia; Besnard, Stephan; Jaber, Mohamed

    2009-09-01

    The main transplantation strategy in Parkinson's disease has been to place dopaminergic grafts not in their ontogenic site, the substantia nigra, but in their target area, the striatum with contrasting results. Here we have used green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse embryos as donors of ventral mesencephalic cells for transplantation into the pre-lesioned substantia nigra of an adult wild-type host. This allows distinguishing the transplanted cells and their projections from those of the host. Grafted cells integrated within the host mesencephalon and expressed the dopaminergic markers tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and dopamine transporter. Most of the dopaminergic cells within the transplant expressed the substantia nigra marker Girk2 while a lesser proportion expressed the ventral tegmental area marker calbindin. Mesencephalic transplants developed projections through the medial forebrain bundle to the striatum, increased striatal dopamine levels and restored normal behavior. Interestingly, only mesencephalic transplants were able to restore the nigrostriatal projections as dopamine neurons originating from embryonic olfactory bulb transplants send projections only in the close vicinity of the transplantation site that did not reach the striatum. Our results show for the first time the ability of intranigral foetal dopaminergic neurons grafts to restore the damaged nigrostriatal pathway in adult mice. Together with our previous findings of efficient embryonic transplantation within the pre-lesioned adult motor cortex, these results demonstrate that the adult brain is permissive to specific and long distance axonal growth. They further open new avenues in cell transplantation therapies applied for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:19616502

  2. Running wheel exercise enhances recovery from nigrostriatal dopamine injury without inducing neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, S J; Gross, N B; Fricks, A N; Casiano, B D; Nguyen, T B; Marshall, J F

    2007-02-01

    Forced use of the forelimb contralateral to a unilateral injection of the dopaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine can promote recovery of motor function in that limb and can significantly decrease damage to dopamine terminals. The present study was conducted to determine (1) whether a form of voluntary exercise, wheel running, would improve motor performance in rats with such lesions, and (2) whether any beneficial effects of wheel running are attributable to ameliorating the dopaminergic damage. In experiment 1, rats were allowed to run in exercise wheels or kept in home cages for 2 1/2 weeks, then given stereotaxic infusions of 6-hydroxydopamine into the left striatum. The rats were replaced into their original environments (wheels or home cages) for four additional weeks, and asymmetries in forelimb use were quantified at 3, 10, 17, and 24 days postoperatively. After killing, dopaminergic damage was assessed by both quantifying 3 beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125)I]RTI-55) binding to striatal dopamine transporters and counting tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the substantia nigra. Exercised 6-hydroxydopamine-infused rats showed improved motor outcomes relative to sedentary lesioned controls, effects that were most apparent at postoperative days 17 and 24. Despite this behavioral improvement, 6-hydroxydopamine-induced loss of striatal dopamine transporters and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive nigral cells in exercised and sedentary groups did not differ. Since prior studies suggested that forced limb use improves motor performance by sparing nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine damage, experiment 2 used a combined regimen of forced plus voluntary wheel running. Again, we found that the motor performance of exercised rats improved more rapidly than that of sedentary controls, but that there were no differences between these groups in the damage produced by 6-hydroxydopamine. It appears that voluntary

  3. Evidence for a dopaminergic deficit in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis on positron emission scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hirohide; Snow, B.J.; Bhatt, M.H.; Peppard, R.; Eisen, A.; Calne, D.B. )

    1993-10-23

    Although rare, the chronic neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and idiopathic parkinsonism coexist to a greater degree than expected by chance. This suggests that patients with ALS may have subclinical lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. To study this hypothesis, the authors did positron emission tomography with 6-fluorodopa on 16 patients with sporadic ALS and without extrapyramidal disease, and compared the results with age-matched controls. They found a significant progressive fall in 6-fluorodopa uptake with time since diagnosis, and reduced dopaminergic function in 3 patients with ALS of long duration. This supports the hypothesis that ALS and IP may share pathogenesis, and, perhaps, etiology.

  4. Are Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons Dopaminergic?

    PubMed Central

    Xenias, Harry S.; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Striatal GABAergic interneurons that express the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) have been identified previously by several methods. Although generally assumed to be dopaminergic, possibly serving as a compensatory source of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's disease, this assumption has never been tested directly. In TH–Cre mice whose nigrostriatal pathway had been eliminated unilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine, we injected a Cre-dependent virus coding for channelrhodopsin-2 and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein unilaterally into the unlesioned midbrain or bilaterally into the striatum. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slices revealed that both optical and electrical stimulation readily elicited DA release in control striata but not from contralateral striata when nigrostriatal neurons were transduced. In contrast, neither optical nor electrical stimulation could elicit striatal DA release in either the control or lesioned striata when the virus was injected directly into the striatum transducing only striatal TH interneurons. This demonstrates that striatal TH interneurons do not release DA. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)–TH mice revealed colocalization of DA, l-amino acid decarboxylase, the DA transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 with EGFP in midbrain dopaminergic neurons but not in any of the striatal EGFP–TH interneurons. Optogenetic activation of striatal EGFP–TH interneurons produced strong GABAergic inhibition in all spiny neurons tested. These results indicate that striatal TH interneurons are not dopaminergic but rather are a type of GABAergic interneuron that expresses TH but none of the other enzymes or transporters necessary to operate as dopaminergic neurons and exert widespread GABAergic inhibition onto direct and indirect spiny neurons. PMID:25904808

  5. Pleiotrophin over-expression provides trophic support to dopaminergic neurons in parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pleiotrophin is known to promote the survival and differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in vitro and is up-regulated in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients. To establish whether pleiotrophin has a trophic effect on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in vivo, we injected a recombinant adenovirus expressing pleiotrophin in the substantia nigra of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Results The viral vector induced pleiotrophin over-expression by astrocytes in the substantia nigra pars compacta, without modifying endogenous neuronal expression. The percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cells as well as the area of their projections in the lesioned striatum was higher in pleiotrophin-treated animals than in controls. Conclusions These results indicate that pleiotrophin over-expression partially rescues tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cell bodies and terminals of dopaminergic neurons undergoing 6-hydroxydopamine-induced degeneration. PMID:21649894

  6. Visualization of multiple opioid-receptor types in rat striatum after specific mesencephalic lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Eghbali, M.; Santoro, C.; Paredes, W.; Gardner, E.L.; Zukin, R.S.

    1987-09-01

    In order to gain insight into a possible modulatory role for ..mu.., delta, and kappa opioid receptors of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway, the authors investigated the topographical organization of the receptors with respect to pre- and postsynaptic membranes. Dopaminergic terminals projecting from the substantia nigra to the corpus striatum were destroyed by unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the susbstantia nigra. Quantitative receptor assays using highly specific radioligands were used to measure the density of striatal ..mu.., delta, and kappa receptors before and after denervation. Quantitative in vitro autoradiography was used to visualize the neuroanatomical pattern of receptors on lesioned and nonlesioned sides of the brain under the light microscope. Loss of ..mu.. receptors in striatal patches was striking in the ventro-lateral areas of the striatum, whereas the most notable loss of delta receptors was found in the central striatum. Other brain areas did not differ significantly in ..mu.. receptor density between the lesioned and nonlesioned sides, as determined by autoradiography. These findings suggest that a high percentage of ..mu.. and delta receptors in the striatum are located on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals and support the concept of a modulatory role for ..mu.. and delta opioid peptides in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway.

  7. Functional properties and synaptic integration of genetically labelled dopaminergic neurons in intrastriatal grafts.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Andreas Toft; Thompson, Lachlan; Kirik, Deniz; Björklund, Anders; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Merab

    2005-05-01

    Intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue, rich in dopaminergic neurons, can reverse symptoms in Parkinson's disease. For development of effective cell replacement therapy, other sources of dopaminergic neurons, e.g. derived from stem cells, are needed. However, the electrophysiological properties grafted cells need to have in order to induce substantial functional recovery are poorly defined. It has not been possible to prospectively identify and record from dopaminergic neurons in fetal transplants. Here we used transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein under control of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase promoter for whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of endogenous and grafted dopaminergic neurons. We transplanted ventral mesencephalic tissue from E12.5 transgenic mice into striatum of neonatal rats with or without lesions of the nigrostriatal dopamine system. The transplanted cells exhibited intrinsic electrophysiological properties typical of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons, i.e. broad action potentials, inward rectifying currents with characteristic 'sag', and spontaneous action potentials. The grafted dopaminergic neurons also received functional excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs from the host brain, as shown by the presence of both spontaneous and stimulation-evoked excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Occurrence of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory currents was lower, and of spontaneous action potentials was higher, in neurons placed in the dopamine-depleted striatum than of those in the intact striatum. Our findings define specific electrophysiological characteristics of transplanted fetal dopaminergic neurons, and we provide the first direct evidence of functional synaptic integration of these neurons into host neural circuitries. PMID:15926926

  8. The effects of neurochemical lesioning of dopaminergic terminals in early ontogenesis on behavior in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shabanov, P D; Lebedev, A A; Meshcherov, Sh K; Strel'tsov, V F

    2005-06-01

    6-Hydroxydopamine, which induces selective degeneration of the dopaminergic system of the brain, was given intraamniotically to rats on days 13 and 17 of intrauterine development at a dose of 75 microg/fetus. Similar experiments were performed with 6-hydroxydopamine on days 4 and 10 of neonatal life. Rats were subsequently reared and motor and emotional (dopamine-dependent) types of behavior were studied in adulthood, addressing behavior in the open field test, rotatory behavior, anxiety in an elevated cross maze, a place-preference conditioned response, acquisition of the ability to differentiate new and old arms in a Y maze, aggressivity in the "foreigner-resident" test, and self-stimulation in a Skinner box. Prenatal exposure, to a lesser extent than postnatal exposure, initiated rotatory and stereotypical behavior, decreased the level of anxiety (fear) in the elevated maze, and reinforced the effects of phenamine in the conditioned place-preference test, impaired the differentiation of old and new Y-maze arms, impaired aggressivity in the "foreigner-resident" test, and impaired self-stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus. It is concluded that the early postnatal period of development is more sensitive to the action of this neurotoxin than the prenatal period. This is associated with the critical periods of the formation of the dopaminergic system during ontogenesis, which depend on synaptogenesis. PMID:16033202

  9. The rat striatum responds to nigro-striatal degeneration via the increased expression of proteins associated with growth and regeneration of neuronal circuitry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease is marked by degeneration of dopamine neurons projecting from the substantia nigra to the striatum. Although proteins expressed by the target striatum can positively affect the viability and growth of dopaminergic neurons, very little is known about the molecular response of the striatum as nigro-striatal denervation progresses. Here, iTRAQ labelling and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry have been used to quantitatively compare the striatal proteome of rats before, during, and after 6-OHDA induced dopamine denervation. Results iTRAQ analysis revealed the differential expression of 50 proteins at 3 days, 26 proteins at 7 days, and 34 proteins at 14 days post-lesioning, compared to the unlesioned striatum. While the denervated striatum showed a reduced expression of proteins associated with the loss of dopaminergic input (e.g., TH and DARPP-32), there was an increased expression of proteins associated with regeneration and growth of neurites (e.g., GFAP). In particular, the expression of guanine deaminase (GDA, cypin) – a protein known to be involved in dendritic branching – was significantly increased in the striatum at 3, 7 and 14 days post-lesioning (a finding verified by immunohistochemistry). Conclusions Together, these findings provide evidence to suggest that the response of the normal mammalian striatum to nigro-striatal denervation includes the increased expression of proteins that may have the capacity to facilitate repair and growth of neuronal circuitry. PMID:24834013

  10. Non-invasive evaluation of nigrostriatal neuropathology in a proteasome inhibitor rodent model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Predominantly, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) have focused on alterations in T2 water 1H relaxation or 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS), whilst potential morphological changes and their relationship to histological or behavioural outcomes have not been appropriately addressed. Therefore, in this study we have utilised MRI to scan in vivo brains from rodents bearing a nigrostriatal lesion induced by intranigral injection of the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. Results Lactacystin induced parkinsonian-like behaviour, characterised by impaired contralateral forelimb grip strength and increased contralateral circling in response to apomorphine. T2-weighted MRI, 3-weeks post-lesion, revealed significant morphological changes in PD-relevant brain areas, including the striatum and ventral midbrain in addition to a decrease in T2 water 1H relaxation in the substantia nigra (SN), but not the striatum. Post-mortem histological analyses revealed extensive dopaminergic neuronal degeneration and α-synuclein aggregation in the SN. However, extensive neuronal loss could also be observed in extra-nigral areas, suggesting non-specific toxicity of lactacystin. Iron accumulation could also be observed throughout the midbrain reflecting changes in T2. Importantly, morphological, but not T2 relaxivity changes, were significantly associated with both behavioural and histological outcomes in this model. Conclusions A pattern of morphological changes in lactacystin-lesioned animals has been identified, as well as alterations in nigral T2 relaxivity. The significant relationship of morphological changes with behavioural and histological outcomes in this model raises the possibility that these may be useful non-invasive surrogate markers of nigrostriatal degeneration in vivo. PMID:20051106

  11. Dopaminergic lesioning impairs adult hippocampal neurogenesis by distinct modification of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Grimm, Thomas; Schlachetzki, Zinayida; Ben Abdallah, Nada M B; Ettle, Benjamin; Vöhringer, Patrizia; Ferger, Boris; Winner, Beate; Nuber, Silke; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms of cognitive and affective nature are present in premotor and motor stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Neurogenesis, the generation of new neurons, persists throughout the mammalian life span in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be severely affected in the course of PD, accounting for some of the neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression and cognitive impairment. Two important PD-related pathogenic factors have separately been attributed to contribute to both PD and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: dopamine depletion and accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn). In the acute 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model, altered neurogenesis has been linked merely to a reduced dopamine level. Here, we seek to determine whether a distinct endogenous α-syn expression pattern is associated, possibly contributing to the hippocampal neurogenic deficit. We observed a persistent reduction of striatal dopamine and a loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta in contrast to a complete recovery of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive dopaminergic fibers within the striatum. However, dopamine levels in the hippocampus were significantly decreased. Survival of newly generated neurons was significantly reduced and paralleled by an accumulation of truncated, membrane-associated, insoluble α-syn within the hippocampus. Specifically, the presence of truncated α-syn species was accompanied by increased activity of calpain-1, a calcium-dependent protease. Our results further substantiate the broad effects of dopamine loss in PD-susceptible brain nuclei, gradually involved in the PD course. Our findings also indicate a detrimental synergistic interplay between dopamine depletion and posttranslational modification of α-syn, contributing to impaired hippocampal plasticity in PD. PMID:26451750

  12. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in rats with dopaminergic lesion: Possible application for early detection of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Khatib, S; Finberg, J P M; Artoul, F; Lavner, Y; Mahmood, S; Tisch, U; Haick, H; Aluf, Y; Vaya, J

    2014-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by dopaminergic (DA) neuron depletion. Early detection of PD may help in selecting the appropriate treatment. Biomarkers of PD have been suggested, however none of these is currently in clinical use. The aim of this study was to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as early biomarkers of PD. Our hypothesis was that during PD progression, specific VOCs are generated that are linked to the biochemical pathways characterizing PD. These VOCs can be detected by GC-MS combined with solid-phase microextraction (SPME) technique. Three groups of rats were studied: DA-lesioned rats injected with 6-hydroxydopamine (HDA; 250μg/rat n=11); control rats injected with saline (n=9), and control rats injected with DSP-4 (n=8), a specific noradrenergic neuron toxin. Blood and striatal tissue homogenate were analyzed. In the blood, 1-octen-3-ol and 2-ethylhexanol were found at significantly higher concentrations in HDA versus sham rats. In the striatal homogenate 1-octen-3-ol and other four compounds were found at significantly lower concentrations in HDA versus sham rats. 1-Octen-3-ol is a cytotoxic compound. These results may lead to the development of an early diagnostic test for PD based on profiling of VOCs in body fluids. PMID:25034982

  13. Adjunctive use of the non-ionic surfactant Poloxamer 188 improves fetal dopaminergic cell survival and reinnervation in a neural transplantation strategy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Quinn, M; Mukhida, K; Sadi, D; Hong, M; Mendez, I

    2008-01-01

    Although neural transplantation of fetal dopaminergic cells is a promising therapy for Parkinson's disease, poor transplanted cell survival limits its efficacy. In the present study it was hypothesized that the use of Poloxamer 188 (P188), a non-ionic surfactant, during cell preparation and transplantation may protect cells from associated mechanical injury and thus improve transplanted cell survival in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Fetal rat dopaminergic tissue was dissociated in media with or without P188 and then cultured for 1 week or transplanted into the striatum of rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Fetal dopaminergic cell survival and reinnervation of the host brain were examined using tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry and stereological quantification. The number of surviving tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive cells in vitro and in vivo was significantly increased by 2.2-fold by incubating fetal dopaminergic cells with P188 during tissue dissociation. Furthermore, the striatal reinnervation in parkinsonian rats that received intrastriatal transplants of P188-exposed dopaminergic cells was significantly enhanced (1.8-fold increase) compared with rats that received non-P188-treated cells. In conclusion, P188 protects fetal dopaminergic cells from mechanical injury by increasing cell survival and enhances dopaminergic fibre outgrowth into the transplanted striatum. Use of P188 may thus be an important adjunct to improve the clinical efficacy of neural transplantation for Parkinson's disease. PMID:18093176

  14. A partial lesion model of Parkinson's disease in mice--characterization of a 6-OHDA-induced medial forebrain bundle lesion.

    PubMed

    Boix, Jordi; Padel, Thomas; Paul, Gesine

    2015-05-01

    The most frequently used animal models for Parkinson's disease (PD) utilize unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), which results in total denervation of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. However, neuroprotective interventions in PD require models resembling earlier stages of PD, where some dopaminergic cells and fibres remain. The aim of the present study was therefore to establish a MFB partial lesion model in mice. We tested four different 6-OHDA doses, and our results show a dose-dependent loss of nigral dopaminergic cells and striatal fibres that correlated with behavioural impairment in several behavioural tests. Specifically, doses of 0.7 μg and 1 μg of 6-OHDA induced a partial denervation of the nigrostriatal pathway, associated with a mild but quantifiable behavioural impairment. We identified the amphetamine-induced rotation, stepping, corridor and cylinder test to be sensitive enough to select partial lesion animals. Based on our data, we proposed a range of cut-off values for these different behavioural tests to select partial lesion mice. Using a statistical prediction model we identified two behavioural tests (the stepping test and amphetamine-induced rotation test) that with a high sensitivity and specificity predict the extent of nigral dopaminergic cell loss and select mice with a partial nigrostriatal lesion prior to further interventions. This model can serve as an important tool to study neuroprotective therapies for PD in mouse models, especially when the treatment targets the substantia nigra and/or the striatum. PMID:25698603

  15. Chronic low-dose melatonin treatment maintains nigrostriatal integrity in an intrastriatal rotenone model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Carriere, Candace H; Kang, Na Hyea; Niles, Lennard P

    2016-02-15

    Parkinson's disease is a major neurodegenerative disorder which primarily involves the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and related projections in the striatum. The pesticide/neurotoxin, rotenone, has been shown to cause systemic inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity in nigral dopaminergic neurons, with consequent degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway, as observed in Parkinson's disease. A novel intrastriatal rotenone model of Parkinson's disease was used to examine the neuroprotective effects of chronic low-dose treatment with the antioxidant indoleamine, melatonin, which can upregulate neurotrophic factors and other protective proteins in the brain. Sham or lesioned rats were treated with either vehicle (0.04% ethanol in drinking water) or melatonin at a dose of 4 µg/mL in drinking water. The right striatum was lesioned by stereotactic injection of rotenone at three sites (4 μg/site) along its rostrocaudal axis. Apomorphine administration to lesioned animals resulted in a significant (p<0.001) increase in ipsilateral rotations, which was suppressed by melatonin. Nine weeks post-surgery, animals were sacrificed by transcardial perfusion. Subsequent immunohistochemical examination revealed a decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity within the striatum and substantia nigra of rotenone-lesioned animals. Melatonin treatment attenuated the decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase in the striatum and abolished it in the substantia nigra. Stereological cell counts indicated a significant (p<0.05) decrease in dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra of rotenone-lesioned animals, which was confirmed by Nissl staining. Importantly, chronic melatonin treatment blocked the loss of dopamine neurons in rotenone-lesioned animals. These findings strongly support the therapeutic potential of long-term and low-dose melatonin treatment in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26740407

  16. Nigrostriatal alterations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor II dominant negative mice

    PubMed Central

    Chou, J.; Harvey, B. K.; Ebendal, T.; Hoffer, B.; Wang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background We previously demonstrated that exogenous application of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) reduced 6-hydroxydopamine-mediated neurodegeneration in a rodent model of Parkinson’s disease. The purpose of this study is to examine the endogenous neurotrophic properties of BMP Receptor II in dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. Methods Adult male BMPRII dominant negative (BMPRIIDN) mice and their wild type controls (WT) were placed in the activity chambers for 3 days to monitor locomotor activity. Animals were sacrificed for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining. A subgroup of BMPRIIDN and WT mice were injected with high doses of methamphetamine (MA) and were sacrificed for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) histochemistry at 4 days after injection. Results BMPRIIDN mice had lower locomotor activity than the WT. There is a significant decrease in TH neuronal number in substantia nigra compacta, TH fiber density in the substantia nigra reticulata, and TH immunoreactivity in striatum in the BMPRIIDN mice, suggesting that deficiency in endogenous BMP signaling reduces dopaminergic innervation and motor function in the nigrostriatal pathway. Administration of MA increased TUNEL labeling in the substantia nigra in the BMPRIIDN mice. Conclusions Endogenous BMPs have trophic effects on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Deficiency in BMP signaling increases vulnerability to insults induced by high doses of MA. PMID:18642641

  17. Localization of nigrostriatal dopamine receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390, (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)-forskolin was used to assess the effects of single and combined neurotoxin lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain on dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase (AC), respectively. Ibotenic acid (IA) lesions of the caudate-putamen (CPu) resulted in near total loss of both (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 and of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding in the ipsilateral CPu and substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu was only partially removed by this same lesion, and nigral (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding was virtually unchanged. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and IA lesions of the substantia nigra compacta (SNC) did not affect (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 or (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding, but largely removed (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the SNC. A 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway followed by an ipsilateral IA injection of the CPu failed to further reduce (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic DA receptors in the CPu are of both the D1 and D2 variety; however, a portion of D2 receptors in the CPu may be presynaptic on afferent nerve terminals to this structure. D1 receptors in the SNR are presynaptic on striatonigral terminals, whereas the D2 receptors of the SNC are autoreceptors on nigral DA neurons. The existence of presynaptic D2 receptors on nigrostriatal DA-ergic terminals could not be confirmed by this study. Co-localization of D1 receptors and AC occurs in both the CPu and SNR.

  18. Counteraction by nitric oxide synthase inhibitor of neurochemical alterations of dopaminergic system in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats under L-DOPA treatment.

    PubMed

    Del-Bel, Elaine; Padovan-Neto, Fernando Eduardo; Szawka, Raphael Escorsim; da-Silva, Célia Aparecida; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Anselmo-Franci, Janete; Romano-Dutra, Angélica Caroline; Guimaraes, Francisco Silveira

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors reduce L-3, (Del-Bel et al., Cell Mol Neurobiol 25(2):371-392, 2005) 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced abnormal motor effects subsequent to depletion of dopaminergic neurons in rodents and non-human primates. The present study used quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography to analyze, for the first time, dopamine metabolism in striatum of rats in order to elucidate the mechanism of action of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Adult male Wistar rats received unilateral microinjection of saline (sham) or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-lesioned) in the medial forebrain bundle. Past 3 weeks, rats were treated during 21 days with L-DOPA/benserazide (30 mg/kg/7.5 mg/kg, respectively, daily). On the 22nd day rats received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either vehicle or 7-nitroindazole, a preferential neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor before L-DOPA. Abnormal involuntary movements and rotarod test were assessed as behavioral correlate of motor responses. Lesion intensity was evaluated through tyrosine hydroxylase immunohystochemical reaction. Dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and an extent of dopamine striatal tissue levels/dopamine metabolism were measured in the striatum. Lesion with 6-OHDA decreased dopamine, DOPAC, and DOPAC/dopamine ratio in the lesioned striatum. L-DOPA treatment induced abnormal involuntary movements and increased DOPAC/dopamine ratio (nearly five times) in the lesioned striatum. L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia was mitigated by 7-nitroindazole, which also decreased dopamine turnover, dopamine and DOPAC levels. Our results revealed an almost two times increase in dopamine content in the non-lesioned striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Reduction of striatal DOPAC/dopamine ratio in dyskinetic rats may suggest an increase in the dopamine availability. Our data confirm contribution of nitrergic transmission in the pathogenesis of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia with potential

  19. Temporal Dissociation of Striatum and Prefrontal Cortex Uncouples Anhedonia and Defense Behaviors Relevant to Depression in 6-OHDA-Lesioned Rats.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Filipe C; Rial, Daniel; Real, Joana I; Lemos, Cristina; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Bertoglio, Leandro J; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-08-01

    The dorsolateral striatum (DLS) processes motor and non-motor functions and undergoes extensive dopaminergic degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). The nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration also affects other brain areas including the pre-frontal cortex (PFC), which has been associated with the appearance of anhedonia and depression at pre-motor phases of PD. Using behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological approaches, we investigated the temporal dissociation between the role of the DLS and PFC in the appearance of anhedonia and defense behaviors relevant to depression in rats submitted to bilateral DLS lesions with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 10 μg/hemisphere). 6-OHDA induced partial dopaminergic nigrostriatal damage with no gross motor impairments. Anhedonic-like behaviors were observed in the splash and sucrose consumption tests only 7 days after 6-OHDA lesion. By contrast, defense behaviors relevant to depression evaluated in the forced swimming test and social withdrawal only emerged 21 days after 6-OHDA lesion when anhedonia was no longer present. These temporally dissociated behavioral alterations were coupled to temporal- and structure-dependent alterations in dopaminergic markers such as dopamine D1 and D2 receptors and dopamine transporter, leading to altered dopamine sensitivity in DLS and PFC circuits, evaluated electrophysiologically. These results provide the first demonstration of a dissociated involvement of the DLS and PFC in anhedonic-like and defense behaviors relevant to depression in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, which was linked with temporal fluctuations in dopaminergic receptor density, leading to altered dopaminergic system sensitivity in these two brain structures. This sheds new light to the duality between depressive and anhedonic symptoms in PD. PMID:26164273

  20. Functional Reorganization of the Presynaptic Dopaminergic Terminal in Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Bergstrom, Brian P.; Sanberg, Stefan G.; Andersson, Magnus; Mithyantha, Jahnavi; Carroll, F. Ivy; Garris, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Whether dopamine release is compensated during the presymptomatic phase of Parkinson's disease is controversial. Here we use in vivo voltammetry in the parkinsonian rat and an electrical stimulation protocol established to fatigue nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons to investigate the plasticity of dopamine release mechanisms. Amplitudes of evoked voltammetric signals recorded in intact rat striata decreased with repetitive, high-frequency stimulation (60 Hz, every 5 min. / 60 min.). Strikingly, dopamine levels were maintained during an identical “fatiguing” protocol in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned (<40% denervation) striata in the absence of enhanced dopamine synthesis. In contrast, more severely lesioned striata (>55% denervation) also appeared to sustain DA release, however, this was demonstrated in the presence of enhanced synthesis. Sustained release was replicated in intact animals after irreversible blockade of the dopamine transporter via RTI-76, implicating neuronal uptake as a trigger. We further demonstrate through kinetic analysis that lesions and compromised uptake target a “long-term” (time constant of minutes) presynaptic depression, which underlies the maintenance of release. Taken together, our findings identify a denervation-induced maintenance of dopamine release that was independent of activated synthesis and driven by altered uptake. This novel neuroadaptation may contribute to early preclinical normalization of function and help resolve discrepant findings regarding compensatory changes in dopamine release during progression of the parkinsonian state. PMID:21787843

  1. Transcription factor Six2 mediates the protection of GDNF on 6-OHDA lesioned dopaminergic neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Kang, X-y; Sun, S; Li, L; Zhang, B-l; Li, Y-q; Gao, D-s

    2016-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has strong neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the expression level of transcription factor Six2 was increased in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of Six2 resulted in decreased cell viability and increased the apoptosis of damaged DA neurons after GDNF treatment in vitro. In contrast, Six2 overexpression increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis. Furthermore, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) indicated that Six2 directly bound to the promoter CAGCTG sequence of smad ubiquitylation regulatory factor 1 (Smurf1). ChIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis showed that Smurf1 expression was significantly upregulated after GDNF rescue. Moreover, knockdown of Six2 decreased Smurf1 expression, whereas overexpression of Six2 increased Smurf1 expression in damaged DA neurons after GDNF rescue. Meanwhile, knockdown and overexpression of Smurf1 increased and decreased p53 expression, respectively. Taken together, our results from in vitro and in vivo analysis indicate that Six2 mediates the protective effects of GDNF on damaged DA neurons by regulating Smurf1 expression, which could be useful in identifying potential drug targets for injured DA neurons. PMID:27148690

  2. Bridging nigrostriatal pathway with fibroblast growth factor-primed peripheral nerves and fetal ventral mesencephalon transplant recuperates from deficits in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Zhou, Feng C

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) pathway can be reconstructed in hemiparkinsonian rats with a bridge transplantation technique involving fetal ventral mesencephalic transplants and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. In this study, we examined if the nigrostriatal pathway can be restored by combining peripheral nervous tissue with the fetal ventral mesencephalon transplants. Adult rats were injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into left median forebrain bundle. Those with marked rotational behavior, which has been previously shown to indicate complete DA dennervtion, were used for transplant treatments. One month after the lesion, fetal ventral mesencephalic cells were transplanted into the nigral region followed by nigral-striatal grafting of peripheral nerves as a bridge. The bridging nerves (sciatic or intercostals) were pretreated with basic fibrous growth factor (nerve+bFGF+) or Hank's saline (nerve+bFGF-). We found that (a) animals receiving transplants of VM and bFGF+ nerve had a reduction in rotational behavior; (b) animals receiving bFGF-- nerve bridge only had a partial improvement in rotation. Reinnervation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive (ir) fibers into the striatum was found in both of the above groups with more innervation in the former than in the latter. No TH-ir fibers in lesioned striatum or reduction in rotational behavior were found in animals receiving VM only, or VM plus bFGF. Taken together, our data indicate that peripheral nerve, with the aid of bFGF, greatly facilitates the reconstitution of the TH pathway from nigra to striatum and improves motor function in hemiparkinsonian rats. PMID:17121158

  3. Characterization of liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, in rat partial and full nigral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Jelsing, Jacob; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, have been demonstrated to promote neuroprotection in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxin model of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron loss. In this report, we characterized the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist, liraglutide (500µg/kg/day, s.c.) in the context of a partial or advanced (full) 6-OHDA induced nigral lesion in the rat. Rats received a low (3µg, partial lesion) or high (13.5µg, full lesion) 6-OHDA dose stereotaxically injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (n=17-20 rats per experimental group). Six weeks after induction of a partial nigral dopaminergic lesion, vehicle or liraglutide was administered for four weeks. In the full lesion model, vehicle dosing or liraglutide treatment was applied for a total of six weeks starting three weeks pre-lesion, or administered for three weeks starting on the lesion day. Quantitative stereology was applied to assess the total number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive dopaminergic neurons. As compared to vehicle controls, liraglutide had no effect on the rotational responsiveness to d-amphetamine or apomorphine, respectively. In correspondence, while numbers of TH-positive nigral neurons were significantly reduced in the lesion side (partial lesion ≈55%; full lesion ≈90%) liraglutide administration had no influence dopaminergic neuronal loss in either PD model setting. In conclusion, liraglutide showed no neuroprotective effects in the context of moderate or substantial midbrain dopaminergic neuronal loss and associated functional motor deficits in the rat 6-OHDA lesion model of PD. PMID:27233809

  4. Differential Contribution of Lipoxygenase Isozymes to Nigrostriatal Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Vivian P.; Holman, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    The 5- and 12/15- lipoxygenase (LOX) isozymes have been implicated to contribute to disease development in CNS disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. These LOX isozymes are distinct in function, with differential effects on neuroinflammation, and the impact of the distinct isozymes in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has not as yet been evaluated. To determine whether the isozymes contribute differently to nigrostriatal vulnerability, the effects of 5- and 12/15-LOX deficiency on dopaminergic tone under na ve and toxicant-challenged conditions were tested. In na ve mice deficient in 5-LOX expression, a modest but significant reduction (18.0% reduction vs. wildtype (WT)) in striatal dopamine (DA) was detected (n=6-8 per genotype). A concomitant decline in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) enzyme was also revealed in null 5-LOX vs. WT mice (26.2%); however, no changes in levels of DA or TH immunoreactivity were observed in null 12/15-LOX vs. WT mice. When challenged with the selective dopaminergic toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), WT mice showed marked reduction in DA (31.9%) and robust astrocytic and microglial activation as compared to saline-treated animals. In contrast, null 5-LOX littermates demonstrated no significant striatal DA depletion or astrogliosis (as noted by Western blot analyses for GFAP immunoreactivity). In na ve null 12/15-LOX mice, no significant change in striatal DA values was observed compared to WT, and following MPTP treatment, the transgenics revealed striatal DA reduction similar to the challenged WT mice. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that: (i) LOX isozymes are involved in the maintenance of normal dopaminergic function in the striatum, and (ii) the 5- and 12/15-LOX isozymes contribute differentially to striatal vulnerability in response to neurotoxicant challenge. PMID:23079635

  5. Hemispheric differences in the mesostriatal dopaminergic system

    PubMed Central

    Molochnikov, Ilana; Cohen, Dana

    2014-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopaminergic system, which comprises the mesolimbic and the nigrostriatal pathways, plays a major role in neural processing underlying motor and limbic functions. Multiple reports suggest that these processes are influenced by hemispheric differences in striatal dopamine (DA) levels, DA turnover and its receptor activity. Here, we review studies which measured the concentration of DA and its metabolites to examine the relationship between DA imbalance and animal behavior under different conditions. Specifically, we assess evidence in support of endogenous, inter-hemispheric DA imbalance; determine whether the known anatomy provides a suitable substrate for this imbalance; examine the relationship between DA imbalance and animal behavior; and characterize the symmetry of the observed inter-hemispheric laterality in the nigrostriatal and the mesolimbic DA systems. We conclude that many studies provide supporting evidence for the occurrence of experience-dependent endogenous DA imbalance which is controlled by a dedicated regulatory/compensatory mechanism. Additionally, it seems that the link between DA imbalance and animal behavior is better characterized in the nigrostriatal than in the mesolimbic system. Nonetheless, a variety of brain and behavioral manipulations demonstrate that the nigrostriatal system displays symmetrical laterality whereas the mesolimbic system displays asymmetrical laterality which supports hemispheric specialization in rodents. The reciprocity of the relationship between DA imbalance and animal behavior (i.e., the capacity of animal training to alter DA imbalance for prolonged time periods) remains controversial, however, if confirmed, it may provide a valuable non-invasive therapeutic means for treating abnormal DA imbalance. PMID:24966817

  6. Primary Culture of Mouse Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gaven, Florence; Marin, Philippe; Claeysen, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons represent less than 1% of the total number of neurons in the brain. This low amount of neurons regulates important brain functions such as motor control, motivation, and working memory. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). This progressive neuronal loss is unequivocally associated with the motors symptoms of the pathology (bradykinesia, resting tremor, and muscular rigidity). The main agent responsible of dopaminergic neuron degeneration is still unknown. However, these neurons appear to be extremely vulnerable in diverse conditions. Primary cultures constitute one of the most relevant models to investigate properties and characteristics of dopaminergic neurons. These cultures can be submitted to various stress agents that mimic PD pathology and to neuroprotective compounds in order to stop or slow down neuronal degeneration. The numerous transgenic mouse models of PD that have been generated during the last decade further increased the interest of researchers for dopaminergic neuron cultures. Here, the video protocol focuses on the delicate dissection of embryonic mouse brains. Precise excision of ventral mesencephalon is crucial to obtain neuronal cultures sufficiently rich in dopaminergic cells to allow subsequent studies. This protocol can be realized with embryonic transgenic mice and is suitable for immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, second messenger quantification, or neuronal death/survival assessment. PMID:25226064

  7. Rho kinase inhibition by fasudil in the striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tatenhorst, Lars; Tönges, Lars; Saal, Kim-Ann; Koch, Jan C; Szegő, Éva M; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Chronic degeneration of nigrostriatal projections, followed by nigral dopaminergic cell death, is a key feature of Parkinson disease (PD). This study examines the neuroprotective potential of the rho kinase inhibitor fasudil in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mouse model of PD in vivo. C57Bl/6 mice were lesioned by striatal stereotactic injections with 4 μg of 6-OHDA and treated with fasudil 30 or 100 mg/kg body weight via drinking water. Motor behavior was tested biweekly; histologic and biochemical analyses were performed at 4 and 12 weeks after lesion. Motor behavior was severely impaired after 6-OHDA lesion and was not improved by fasudil treatment. Fasudil 100 mg/kg did not significantly increase the number of dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra after 12 weeks versus lesion controls. Interestingly, however, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of dopamine metabolites revealed that striatal levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid were significantly increased after 12 weeks, suggesting a regenerative response. In contrast to recent findings in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin model, fasudil effects seem limited in this severe 6-OHDA model of PD. Nevertheless, high therapeutic concentrations of fasudil are suggestive of a proregenerative potential for dopaminergic neurons, making further evaluations of rho kinase inhibition as a proregenerative therapeutic strategy in PD promising. PMID:25003236

  8. LPA signaling is required for dopaminergic neuron development and is reduced through low expression of the LPA1 receptor in a 6-OHDA lesion model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Yun; Zhao, Ethan Y; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Sun, Feng-Xiang; Han, Hai-Lin; Han, Hui-Rong; Lin, Zhi-Juan; Pan, Zhi-Fang; Qu, Mei-Hua; Zeng, Xian-Wei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2015-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that activates at least five known G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): LPA1-LPA5. The nervous system is a major locus for LPA1 expression. LPA has been shown to regulate neuronal proliferation, migration, and differentiation during central nervous system development as well as neuronal survival. Furthermore, deficient LPA signaling has been implicated in several neurological disorders including neuropathic pain and schizophrenia. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder that results from the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). The specific molecular pathways that lead to DA neuron degeneration, however, are poorly understood. The influence of LPA in the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into DA neurons in vitro and LPA1 expression in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of PD in vivo were examined in the present study. LPA induced neuronal differentiation in 80.2 % of the MSC population. These MSCs developed characteristic neuronal morphology and expressed the neuronal marker, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), while expression of the glial marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was absent. Moreover, 27.6 % of differentiated MSCs were positive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a marker for DA neurons. In the 6-OHDA PD rat model, LPA1 expression in the substantia nigra was significantly reduced compared to control. These results suggest LPA signaling via activation of LPA1 may be necessary for DA neuron development and survival. Furthermore, reduced LPA/LPA1 signaling may be involved in DA neuron degeneration thus contributing to the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:26169757

  9. Regulation of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors following neurotoxin-induced striatal and medial forebrain bundle lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, H.S.I.

    1985-01-01

    GABA, a major inhibitory transmitter, is used by many projection neurons of the striatum. To investigate the role of GABA in striatal function, the GABA receptor complex was studied after lesions of the striatum or the nigrostriatal neurons. Quantitative receptor autoradiography using thaw-mounted tissue slices was developed for the study of GABA and benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors. With the technique established, binding to GABA and BDZ receptors after unilateral striatal kainate lesions was examined. Subsequently, changes in GABA and BDZ receptors were studied following the destruction of dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In summary, quantitative receptor autoradiography allowed the detection of GABA and BDZ receptor changes in multiple small areas in each lesioned brain. This technique made it feasible to carry out kinetic saturation, and competition studies using less than 1 mg of tissue. The data suggest that dopamine is functionally inhibitory on striatopallidal neurons but is functionally excitatory on striatoentopeduncular and striatonigral cells which in turn inhibit the thalamus. This quantitative autoradiographic technique can be generalized to study other transmitter receptors and can be combined with 2-deoxyglucose uptake studies.

  10. SIRT3 attenuates MPTP-induced nigrostriatal degeneration via enhancing mitochondrial antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Peritore, Carina; Ginsberg, Jessica; Kayhan, Merve; Donmez, Gizem

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, which is characterized by progressive degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. There is a growing consensus that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress play a crucial role in PD pathogenesis. Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) is the major mitochondria NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that acts as a regulator of mitochondrial protein function; it is essential for maintaining mitochondrial integrity. Although SIRT3 was reported to have anti-oxidative stress activity in an in vitro study, there is no explicit in vivo evidence for the involvement of SIRT3 in the etiology of PD. The present study shows that SIRT3 null mice do not exhibit motor and non-motor deficits compared with wild-type controls. However, SIRT3 deficiency dramatically exacerbated the degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD mice. SIRT3 null mice exposed to MPTP also exhibited decreased superoxide dismutase 2, a specific mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, and reduced glutathione peroxidase expression compared with wild-type controls. Taken together, these findings strongly support that SIRT3 has a possible role in MPTP-induced neurodegeneration via preserving free radical scavenging capacity in mitochondria. PMID:25555707

  11. In vivo measures of nigrostriatal neuronal response to unilateral MPTP treatment.

    PubMed

    Tian, LinLin; Karimi, Morvarid; Brown, Chris A; Loftin, Susan K; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2014-07-01

    A single unilateral intracarotid infusion of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) into non-human primates causes injury to the nigrostriatal pathway including nigral cell bodies, axons and striatal terminal fields. In this model, motor parkinsonism correlates well with the loss of nigral dopaminergic cell bodies but only correlates with in vitro measures of nigrostriatal terminal fields when nigral cell loss does not exceed 50%. The goals of this study are to determine the relationship of motor parkinsonism with the degree of injury to nigrostriatal axons, as reflected by in vitro fiber length density measures, and compare in vivo with in vitro measures of striatal terminal fields. We determined axon integrity by measuring fiber length density with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistology and dopamine transporter (DAT) density with DAT immunohistology. We then calculated the terminal arbor size and compared these measures with previously published data of quantified in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) measures of presynaptic dopaminergic neurons, autoradiographic measures of DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2), striatal dopamine, nigral cell counts, and parkinsonian motor ratings in the same animals. Our data demonstrate that in vivo and in vitro measures of striatal terminal fields correlate with each other regardless of the method of measurement. PET-based in vivo striatal measures accurately reflect in vitro measures of DAT and VMAT2. Terminal arbor size and other terminal field measures correlate with nigral TH immunoreactive (TH-ir) cell counts only when nigral TH-ir cell loss does not exceed 50%. Fiber length density was the only striatal measure that linearly correlated with motor ratings (Spearman: r=-0.81, p<0.001, n=16). PMID:24845719

  12. Monoaminergic PET imaging and histopathological correlation in unilateral and bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat models of Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal in-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Gago, Belén; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Juri, Carlos; Collantes, María; Delgado, Mercedes; Prieto, Elena; Ecay, Margarita; Iglesias, Elena; Marín, Concepció; Peñuelas, Iván; Obeso, José A

    2015-05-01

    Carbon-11 labeled dihydrotetrabenazine ((11)C-DTBZ) binds to the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 and has been used to assess nigro-striatal integrity in animal models and patients with Parkinson's disease. Here, we applied (11)C-DTBZ positron emission tomography (PET) to obtain longitudinally in-vivo assessment of striatal dopaminergic loss in the classic unilateral and in a novel bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion rat model. Forty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 sub-groups: 1. 6-OHDA-induced unilateral lesion in the medial forebrain bundle, 2. bilateral lesion by injection of 6-OHDA in the third ventricle, and 3. vehicle injection in either site. (11)C-DTBZ PET studies were investigated in the same animals successively at baseline, 1, 3 and 6weeks after lesion using an anatomically standardized volumes-of-interest approach. Additionally, 12 rats had PET and Magnetic Resonance Imaging to construct a new (11)C-DTBZ PET template. Behavior was characterized by rotational, catalepsy and limb-use asymmetry tests and dopaminergic striatal denervation was validated post-mortem by immunostaining of the dopamine transporter (DAT). (11)C-DTBZ PET showed a significant decrease of striatal binding (SB) values one week after the unilateral lesion. At this point, there was a 60% reduction in SB in the affected hemisphere compared with baseline values in 6-OHDA unilaterally lesioned animals. A 46% symmetric reduction over baseline SB values was found in bilaterally lesioned rats at the first week after lesion. SB values remained constant in unilaterally lesioned rats whereas animals with bilateral lesions showed a modest (22%) increase in binding values at the 3rd and 6th weeks post-lesion. The degree of striatal dopaminergic denervation was corroborated histologically by DAT immunostaining. Statistical analysis revealed a high correlation between (11)C-DTBZ PET SB and striatal DAT immunostaining values (r=0.95, p<0.001). The data presented here indicate

  13. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB has neurorestorative effects and modulates the pericyte response in a partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Padel, Thomas; Özen, Ilknur; Boix, Jordi; Barbariga, Marco; Gaceb, Abderahim; Roth, Michaela; Paul, Gesine

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease where the degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway leads to specific motor deficits. There is an unmet medical need for regenerative treatments that stop or reverse disease progression. Several growth factors have been investigated in clinical trials to restore the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway damaged in PD. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), a molecule that recruits pericytes to stabilize microvessels, was recently investigated in a phase-1 clinical trial, showing a dose-dependent increase in dopamine transporter binding in the putamen of PD patients. Interestingly, evidence is accumulating that PD is paralleled by microvascular changes, however, whether PDGF-BB modifies pericytes in PD is not known. Using a pericyte reporter mouse strain, we investigate the functional and restorative effect of PDGF-BB in a partial 6-hydroxydopamine medial forebrain bundle lesion mouse model of PD, and whether this restorative effect is accompanied by changes in pericyte features. We demonstrate that a 2-week treatment with PDGF-BB leads to behavioural recovery using several behavioural tests, and partially restores the nigrostriatal pathway. Interestingly, we find that pericytes are activated in the striatum of PD lesioned mice and that these changes are reversed by PDGF-BB treatment. The modulation of brain pericytes may contribute to the PDGF-BB-induced neurorestorative effects, PDGF-BB allowing for vascular stabilization in PD. Pericytes might be a new cell target of interest for future regenerative therapies. PMID:27288154

  14. Impaired water maze learning performance without altered dopaminergic function in mice heterozygous for the GDNF mutation.

    PubMed

    Gerlai, R; McNamara, A; Choi-Lundberg, D L; Armanini, M; Ross, J; Powell-Braxton, L; Phillips, H S

    2001-10-01

    Exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) exhibits potent survival-promoting effects on dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway that is implicated in Parkinson's disease and also protects neurons in forebrain ischemia of animal models. However, a role for endogenous GDNF in brain function has not been established. Although mice homozygous for a targeted deletion of the GDNF gene have been generated, these mice die within hours of birth because of deficits in kidney morphogenesis, and, thus, the effect of the absence of GDNF on brain function could not be studied. Herein, we sought to determine whether adult mice, heterozygous for a GDNF mutation on two different genetic backgrounds, demonstrate alterations in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system or in cognitive function. While both neurochemical and behavioural measures suggested that reduction of GDNF gene expression in the mutant mice does not alter the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system, it led to a significant and selective impairment of performance in the spatial version of the Morris water maze. A standard panel of blood chemistry tests and basic pathological analyses did not reveal alterations in the mutants that could account for the observed performance deficit. These results suggest that endogenous GDNF may not be critical for the development and functioning of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system but it plays an important role in cognitive abilities. PMID:11683907

  15. Subthalamic 6-OHDA-induced lesion attenuates levodopa-induced dyskinesias in the rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marin, C; Bonastre, M; Mengod, G; Cortés, R; Rodríguez-Oroz, M C; Obeso, J A

    2013-12-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives direct dopaminergic innervation from the substantia nigra pars compacta that degenerates in Parkinson's disease. The present study aimed to investigate the role of dopaminergic denervation of STN in the origin of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Rats were distributed in four groups which were concomitantly lesioned with 6-OHDA or vehicle (sham) in the STN and in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) as follows: a) MFB-sham plus STN-sham, b) MFB-sham plus STN-lesion, c) MFB-lesion plus STN-sham, and d) MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion. Four weeks after lesions, animals were treated with levodopa (6mg/kg with 15mg/kg benserazide i.p.) twice daily for 22 consecutive days. Abnormal involuntary movements were measured. In situ hybridization was performed measuring the expression of striatal preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin, STN cytochrome oxidase (CO) and nigral GAD67 mRNAs. STN 6-OHDA denervation did not induce dyskinesias in levodopa-treated MFB-sham animals but attenuated axial (p<0.05), limb (p<0.05) and orolingual (p<0.01) dyskinesias in rats with a concomitant lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway. The attenuation of dyskinesias was associated with a decrease in the ipsilateral STN CO mRNA levels (p<0.05). No significant differences between MFB-lesion plus STN-sham and MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion groups in the extent of STN dopaminergic denervation were observed. Moreover, intrasubthalamic microinfusion of dopamine in the MFB-lesion plus STN-lesion group triggered orolingual (p<0.01), but not axial or limb, dyskinesias. These results suggest that dopaminergic STN innervation influences the expression of levodopa-induced dyskinesias but also the existence of non dopaminergic-mediated mechanisms. STN noradrenergic depletion induced by 6-OHDA in the STN needs to be taken in account as a possible mechanism explaining the attenuation of dyskinesias in the combined lesion group. PMID:24140562

  16. Brain renin-angiotensin system and dopaminergic cell vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Labandeira-García, Jose L.; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Rodriguez-Pallares, Jannette; Valenzuela, Rita; Borrajo, Ana; Rodríguez-Perez, Ana I.

    2014-01-01

    Although the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was classically considered as a circulating system that regulates blood pressure, many tissues are now known to have a local RAS. Angiotensin, via type 1 receptors, is a major activator of the NADPH-oxidase complex, which mediates several key events in oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory processes involved in the pathogenesis of major aging-related diseases. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of RAS components in the basal ganglia, and particularly in the nigrostriatal system. In the nigrostriatal system, RAS hyperactivation, via NADPH-oxidase complex activation, exacerbates OS and the microglial inflammatory response and contributes to progression of dopaminergic degeneration, which is inhibited by angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Several factors may induce an increase in RAS activity in the dopaminergic system. A decrease in dopaminergic activity induces compensatory upregulation of local RAS function in both dopaminergic neurons and glia. In addition to its role as an essential neurotransmitter, dopamine may also modulate microglial inflammatory responses and neuronal OS via RAS. Important counterregulatory interactions between angiotensin and dopamine have also been observed in several peripheral tissues. Neurotoxins and proinflammatory factors may also act on astrocytes to induce an increase in RAS activity, either independently of or before the loss of dopamine. Consistent with a major role of RAS in dopaminergic vulnerability, increased RAS activity has been observed in the nigra of animal models of aging, menopause and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, which also showed higher dopaminergic vulnerability. Manipulation of the brain RAS may constitute an effective neuroprotective strategy against dopaminergic vulnerability and progression of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25071471

  17. Behavioural Assessment of the A2a/NR2B Combination in the Unilateral 6-OHDA-Lesioned Rat Model: A New Method to Examine the Therapeutic Potential of Non-Dopaminergic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anne; Downey, Patrick; Van Damme, Xavier; De Wolf, Catherine; Schwarting, Rainer; Scheller, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), dopaminergic therapies are often associated with the development of motor complications. Attention has therefore been focused on the use of non-dopaminergic drugs. This study developed a new behavioural method capable of demonstrating the added value of combining adenosinergic and glutamatergic receptor antagonists in unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Rats were dosed orally with Tozadenant, a selective A2A receptor antagonist, and three different doses of Radiprodil, an NR2B-selective NMDA receptor antagonist. The drugs were given alone or in combination and rats were placed in an open-field for behavioural monitoring. Video recordings were automatically analysed. Five different behaviours were scored: distance traveled, ipsi- and contraversive turns, body position, and space occupancy. The results show that A2A or NR2B receptor antagonists given alone or in combination did not produce enhanced turning as observed with an active dose of L-Dopa/benserazide. Instead the treated rats maintained a straight body position, were able to shift from one direction to the other and occupied a significantly larger space in the arena. The highest "Tozadenant/Radiprodil" dose combination significantly increased all five behavioural parameters recorded compared to rats treated with vehicle or the same doses of the drugs alone. Our data suggest that the A2A/NR2B antagonist combination may be able to stimulate motor activity to a similar level as that achieved by L-Dopa but in the absence of the side-effects that are associated with dopaminergic hyperstimulation. If these results translate into the clinic, this combination could represent an alternative symptomatic treatment option for PD. PMID:26322641

  18. Comparison of Transduction Efficiency of Recombinant AAV Serotypes 1, 2, 5, and 8 in the Rat Nigrostriatal System

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Nikolaus R.; Lee, Jeng-Shin; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced delivery and expression of genes in specific neuronal systems is critical for the development of genetic models of neurodegenerative disease and potential gene therapy. Recent discovery of new recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) capsid serotypes has resulted in improved transduction efficiency, but expression levels, spread of transgene, and potential toxicity can differ depending on brain region and among species. We compared the transduction efficiency of titer-matched rAAV 2/1, 2/5 and 2/8 to the commonly used rAAV2/2 in the rat nigrostriatal system via expression of the reporter transgene, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Newer rAAV serotypes 2/1, 2/5 and 2/8 demonstrated marked increase in transduction and spread of EGFP expression in dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons and projections to the striatum and globus pallidus compared to rAAV2/2 at 2 weeks post injection. The number of nigral cells transduced was greatest for rAAV2/1, but for serotypes 2/5 and 2/8 was still 2 to 3-fold higher than that for 2/2. Enhanced transduction did not cause an increase in glial cell response or toxicity. New rAAV serotypes thus promise improved gene delivery to nigrostriatal system with the potential for better models and therapeutics for Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19250335

  19. Direct Differentiation of Adult Ocular Progenitors into Striatal Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Zhao, Xing; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Destache, Christopher J.; Rodriguez-Sierra, Jorge; Thoreson, Wallace B.; Ahmad, Hiba; Sorrentino, John; Balasubramanian, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease, characterized by motor dysfunction due to the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, is one of the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Given there is no current cure, the stem cell approach has emerged as a viable therapeutic option to replace the dopaminergic neurons that are progressively lost to the disease. The success of the approach is likely to depend upon accessible, renewable, immune compatible, and non-tumorigenic sources of neural progenitors from which stable dopaminergic neurons can be generated efficaciously. Here, we demonstrate that neural progenitors derived from limbus, a regenerative and accessible ocular tissue, represent a safe source of dopaminergic neurons. When the limbus-derived neural progenitors were subjected to a well-established protocol of directed differentiation under the influence of Shh and FGF8, they acquired the biochemical and functional phenotype of dopaminergic neurons that included the ability to synthesize dopamine. Their intrastriatal transplantation in the rat model of hemi-Parkinsonism was associated with a reduction in the amphetamine-induced rotation. No tumor formation was observed 6 weeks post-transplantation. Together, these observations posit limbus-derived neural progenitors as an accessible and safe source of dopaminergic neurons for a potential autologous ex-vivo stem cell approach to Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26019760

  20. Direct differentiation of adult ocular progenitors into striatal dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Zhao, Xing; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Destache, Christopher J; Rodriguez-Sierra, Jorge; Thoreson, Wallace B; Ahmad, Hiba; Sorrentino, John; Balasubramanian, Sudha

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease, characterized by motor dysfunction due to the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, is one of the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Given there is no current cure, the stem cell approach has emerged as a viable therapeutic option to replace the dopaminergic neurons that are progressively lost to the disease. The success of the approach is likely to depend upon accessible, renewable, immune compatible, and non-tumorigenic sources of neural progenitors from which stable dopaminergic neurons can be generated efficaciously. Here, we demonstrate that neural progenitors derived from limbus, a regenerative and accessible ocular tissue, represent a safe source of dopaminergic neurons. When the limbus-derived neural progenitors were subjected to a well-established protocol of directed differentiation under the influence of Shh and FGF8, they acquired the biochemical and functional phenotype of dopaminergic neurons that included the ability to synthesize dopamine. Their intrastriatal transplantation in the rat model of hemi-Parkinsonism was associated with a reduction in the amphetamine-induced rotation. No tumor formation was observed 6 weeks post-transplantation. Together, these observations posit limbus-derived neural progenitors as an accessible and safe source of dopaminergic neurons for a potential autologous ex-vivo stem cell approach to Parkinson's disease. PMID:26019760

  1. Investigation of the therapeutic potential of N-acetyl cysteine and the tools used to define nigrostriatal degeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nouraei, Negin; Zarger, Lauren; Weilnau, Justin N; Han, Jimin; Mason, Daniel M; Leak, Rehana K

    2016-04-01

    The glutathione precursor N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) is currently being tested on Parkinson's patients for its neuroprotective properties. Our studies have shown that NAC can elicit protection in glutathione-independent manners in vitro. Thus, the goal of the present study was to establish an animal model of NAC-mediated protection in which to dissect the underlying mechanism. Mice were infused intrastriatally with the oxidative neurotoxicant 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 4μg) and administered NAC intraperitoneally (100mg/kg). NAC-treated animals exhibited higher levels of the dopaminergic terminal marker tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the striatum 10d after 6-OHDA. As TH expression is subject to stress-induced modulation, we infused the tracer FluoroGold into the striatum to retrogradely label nigrostriatal projection neurons. As expected, nigral FluoroGold staining and cell counts of FluoroGold(+) profiles were both more sensitive measures of nigrostriatal degeneration than measurements relying on TH alone. However, NAC failed to protect dopaminergic neurons 3weeks following 6-OHDA, an effect verified by four measures: striatal TH levels, nigral TH levels, nigral TH(+) cell counts, and nigral FluoroGold levels. Some degree of mild toxicity of FluoroGold and NAC was evident, suggesting that caution must be exercised when relying on FluoroGold as a neuron-counting tool and when designing experiments with long-term delivery of NAC-such as clinical trials on patients with chronic disorders. Finally, the strengths and limitations of the tools used to define nigrostriatal degeneration are discussed. PMID:26879220

  2. Increased Mitochondrial Calcium Sensitivity and Abnormal Expression of Innate Immunity Genes Precede Dopaminergic Defects in Pink1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Akundi, Ravi S.; Huang, Zhenyu; Eason, Joshua; Pandya, Jignesh D.; Zhi, Lianteng; Cass, Wayne A.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Büeler, Hansruedi

    2011-01-01

    Background PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) is linked to recessive Parkinsonism (EOPD). Pink1 deletion results in impaired dopamine (DA) release and decreased mitochondrial respiration in the striatum of mice. To reveal additional mechanisms of Pink1-related dopaminergic dysfunction, we studied Ca2+ vulnerability of purified brain mitochondria, DA levels and metabolism and whether signaling pathways implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) display altered activity in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1−/− mice. Methods and Findings Purified brain mitochondria of Pink1−/− mice showed impaired Ca2+ storage capacity, resulting in increased Ca2+ induced mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) that was rescued by cyclosporine A. A subpopulation of neurons in the substantia nigra of Pink1−/− mice accumulated phospho-c-Jun, showing that Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity is increased. Pink1−/− mice 6 months and older displayed reduced DA levels associated with increased DA turnover. Moreover, Pink1−/− mice had increased levels of IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-10 in the striatum after peripheral challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and Pink1−/− embryonic fibroblasts showed decreased basal and inflammatory cytokine-induced nuclear factor kappa-β (NF-κB) activity. Quantitative transcriptional profiling in the striatum revealed that Pink1−/− mice differentially express genes that (i) are upregulated in animals with experimentally induced dopaminergic lesions, (ii) regulate innate immune responses and/or apoptosis and (iii) promote axonal regeneration and sprouting. Conclusions Increased mitochondrial Ca2+ sensitivity and JNK activity are early defects in Pink1−/− mice that precede reduced DA levels and abnormal DA homeostasis and may contribute to neuronal dysfunction in familial PD. Differential gene expression in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1−/− mice supports early dopaminergic dysfunction and shows that Pink1 deletion causes aberrant

  3. Dopaminergic Contributions to Vocal Learning

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Lukas A.; Saravanan, Varun; Wood, Alynda N.; He, Li

    2016-01-01

    Although the brain relies on auditory information to calibrate vocal behavior, the neural substrates of vocal learning remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that lesions of the dopaminergic inputs to a basal ganglia nucleus in a songbird species (Bengalese finches, Lonchura striata var. domestica) greatly reduced the magnitude of vocal learning driven by disruptive auditory feedback in a negative reinforcement task. These lesions produced no measureable effects on the quality of vocal performance or the amount of song produced. Our results suggest that dopaminergic inputs to the basal ganglia selectively mediate reinforcement-driven vocal plasticity. In contrast, dopaminergic lesions produced no measurable effects on the birds' ability to restore song acoustics to baseline following the cessation of reinforcement training, suggesting that different forms of vocal plasticity may use different neural mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT During skill learning, the brain relies on sensory feedback to improve motor performance. However, the neural basis of sensorimotor learning is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the role of the neurotransmitter dopamine in regulating vocal learning in the Bengalese finch, a songbird with an extremely precise singing behavior that can nevertheless be reshaped dramatically by auditory feedback. Our findings show that reduction of dopamine inputs to a region of the songbird basal ganglia greatly impairs vocal learning but has no detectable effect on vocal performance. These results suggest a specific role for dopamine in regulating vocal plasticity. PMID:26888928

  4. Minocycline enhances MPTP toxicity to dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lichuan; Sugama, Shuei; Chirichigno, Jason W; Gregorio, Jason; Lorenzl, Stefan; Shin, Dong H; Browne, Susan E; Shimizu, Yoshinori; Joh, Tong H; Beal, M Flint; Albers, David S

    2003-10-15

    Minocycline has been shown previously to have beneficial effects against ischemia in rats as well as neuroprotective properties against excitotoxic damage in vitro, nigral cell loss via 6-hydroxydopamine, and to prolong the life-span of transgenic mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We investigated whether minocycline would protect against toxic effects of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), a toxin that selectively destroys nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons and produces a clinical state similar to Parkinson's disease (PD) in rodents and primates. We found that although minocycline inhibited microglial activation, it significantly exacerbated MPTP-induced damage to DA neurons. We present evidence suggesting that this effect may be due to inhibition of DA and 1-methyl-4-phenylpridium (MPP+) uptake into striatal vesicles. PMID:14515357

  5. Differential sensitivity of cranial and limb motor function to nigrostriatal dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Plowman, Emily K; Maling, Nicholas; Rivera, Benjamin J; Larson, Krista; Thomas, Nagheme J; Fowler, Stephen C; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Shrivastav, Rahul; Kleim, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-15

    The present study determined the differential effects of unilateral striatal dopamine depletion on cranial motor versus limb motor function. Forty male Long Evans rats were first trained on a comprehensive motor testing battery that dissociated cranial versus limb motor function and included: cylinder forepaw placement, single pellet reaching, vermicelli pasta handling; sunflower seed opening, pasta biting acoustics, and a licking task. Following baseline testing, animals were randomized to either a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (n=20) or control (n=20) group. Animals in the 6-OHDA group received unilateral intrastriatal 6-OHDA infusions to induce striatal dopamine depletion. Six-weeks following infusion, all animals were re-tested on the same battery of motor tests. Near infrared densitometry was performed on sections taken through the striatum that were immunohistochemically stained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Animals in the 6-OHDA condition showed a mean reduction in TH staining of 88.27%. Although 6-OHDA animals were significantly impaired on all motor tasks, limb motor deficits were more severe than cranial motor impairments. Further, performance on limb motor tasks was correlated with degree of TH depletion while performance on cranial motor impairments showed no significant correlation. These results suggest that limb motor function may be more sensitive to striatal dopaminergic depletion than cranial motor function and is consistent with the clinical observation that therapies targeting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in Parkinson's disease are more effective for limb motor symptoms than cranial motor impairments. PMID:23018122

  6. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Increases Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Nigrostriatal System and Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Spieles-Engemann, Anne L.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Behbehani, Michael M.; Collier, Timothy J.; Wohlgenant, Susan L.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Levine, Nathan D.; Gombash, Sara E.; Thompson, Valerie B.; Lipton, Jack W.; Sortwell, Caryl E.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) as a therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) remain poorly understood. The present study examined whether functionally effective, long-term STN DBS modulates glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in both unlesioned and unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Lesioned rats that received two weeks of continuous unilateral STN DBS exhibited significant improvements in parkinsonian motor behaviors in tests of forelimb akinesia and rearing activity. Unilateral STN DBS did not increase GDNF in the nigrostriatal system, primary motor cortex (M1), or hippocampus of unlesioned rats. In contrast, unilateral STN DBS increased BDNF protein 2–3 fold bilaterally in the nigrostriatal system with the location (substantia nigra vs. striatum) dependent upon lesion status. Further, BDNF protein was bilaterally increased in M1 cortex by as much as 2 fold regardless of lesion status. STN DBS did not impact cortical regions that receive less input from the STN. STN DBS also was associated with bilateral increases in BDNF mRNA in the substantia nigra (SN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi). The increase observed in GPi was completely blocked by pretreatment with 5-Methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801), suggesting that the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors was involved in this phenomenon. The upregulation of BDNF associated with long term STN DBS suggest that this therapy may exert pronounced and underappreciated effects on plasticity in the basal ganglia circuitry that may play a role in the symptomatic effects of this therapy as well as support the neuroprotective effect of stimulation documented in this rat model. PMID:22328911

  7. Activation of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway by hRheb(S16H) transduction of dopaminergic neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Nam, Jin Han; Jin, Byung Kwan; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of representative neurotrophic factors for the survival of dopaminergic neurons. Its effects are primarily mediated via CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα). It is still unclear whether the levels of CNTFRα change in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, but CNTF expression shows the remarkable decrease in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), suggesting that the support of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway may be a useful neuroprotective strategy for the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection in the adult brain. Here, we report that transduction of rat SNpc dopaminergic neurons by adeno-associated virus with a gene encoding human ras homolog enriched in brain (hRheb), with an S16H mutation [hRheb(S16H)], significantly upregulated the levels of both CNTF and CNTFRα in dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, the hRheb(S16H)-activated CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway was protective against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced neurotoxicity in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projections. These results suggest that activation of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway by specific gene delivery such as hRheb(S16H) may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of PD. PMID:25799580

  8. HUMAN NEURAL STEM CELLS MIGRATE ALONG THE NIGROSTRIATAL PATHWAY IN A PRIMATE MODEL OF PARKINSON’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Bjugstad, Kimberly B.; Teng, Yang D.; Redmond, D. Eugene; Elsworth, John D.; Roth, Robert H,; Cornelius, Shannon K.; Sladek, John. R.; Snyder, Evan Y.

    2008-01-01

    Although evidence of damage-directed neural stem cell (NSC) migration has been well-documented in the rodent, to our knowledge it has never been confirmed or quantified using human NSC (hNSC) in an adult non-human primate modeling a human neurodegenerative disease state. In this report, we attempt to provide that confirmation, potentially advancing basic stem cell concepts toward clinical relevance. hNSC were implanted into the caudate nucleus (bilaterally) and substantia nigra (unilaterally) of 7, adult St. Kitts African green monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus) with previous exposure to systemic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), a neurotoxin that disrupts the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. A detailed quantitative analysis of hNSC migration patterns at two time points (4 and 7 months) following transplantation was performed. Density contour mapping of hNSCs along the dorsal-ventral and medial-lateral axes of the brain suggested that >80% of hNSCs migrated from the point of implantation to and along the impaired nigrostriatal pathway. Although 2/3 of hNSC were transplanted within the caudate, <1% of 3×106 total injected donor cells were identified at this site. The migrating hNSC did not appear to be pursuing a neuronal lineage. In the striatum and nigrostriatal pathway, but not in the substantia nigra, some hNSC were found to have taken a glial lineage. The property of neural stem cells to allign themselves along a neural pathway rendered dysfunctional by a given disease is potentially a valuable clinical tool. PMID:18394605

  9. Basal ganglia cholinergic and dopaminergic function in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Warren, Naomi M; Piggott, Margaret A; Greally, Elizabeth; Lake, Michelle; Lees, Andrew J; Burn, David J

    2007-08-15

    Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. In contrast to Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), replacement therapy with dopaminergic and cholinergic agents in PSP has been disappointing. The neurochemical basis for this is unclear. Our objective was to measure dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors in the basal ganglia of PSP and control brains. We measured, autoradiographically, dopaminergic (dopamine transporter, 125I PE2I and dopamine D2 receptors, 125I epidepride) and cholinergic (nicotinic alpha4beta2 receptors, 125I 5IA85380 and muscarinic M1 receptors, 3H pirenzepine) parameters in the striatum and pallidum of pathologically confirmed PSP cases (n=15) and controls (n=32). In PSP, there was a marked loss of dopamine transporter and nicotinic alpha4beta2 binding in the striatum and pallidum, consistent with loss of nigrostriatal neurones. Striatal D2 receptors were increased in the caudate and muscarinic M1 receptors were unchanged compared with controls. These results do not account for the poor response to dopaminergic and cholinergic replacement therapies in PSP, and suggest relative preservation of postsynaptic striatal projection neurones bearing D2/M1 receptors. PMID:17534953

  10. Metformin Prevents Nigrostriatal Dopamine Degeneration Independent of AMPK Activation in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Jacqueline A.; Lemus, Moyra B.; Santos, Vanessa V.; Deo, Minh; Davies, Jeffrey S.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Elsworth, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is a widely prescribed drug used to treat type-2 diabetes, although recent studies show it has wide ranging effects to treat other diseases. Animal and retrospective human studies indicate that Metformin treatment is neuroprotective in Parkinson’s Disease (PD), although the neuroprotective mechanism is unknown, numerous studies suggest the beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis may be through AMPK activation. In this study we tested whether or not AMPK activation in dopamine neurons was required for the neuroprotective effects of Metformin in PD. We generated transgenic mice in which AMPK activity in dopamine neurons was ablated by removing AMPK beta 1 and beta 2 subunits from dopamine transporter expressing neurons. These AMPK WT and KO mice were then chronically exposed to Metformin in the drinking water then exposed to MPTP, the mouse model of PD. Chronic Metformin treatment significantly attenuated the MPTP-induced loss of Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) neuronal number and volume and TH protein concentration in the nigrostriatal pathway. Additionally, Metformin treatment prevented the MPTP-induced elevation of the DOPAC:DA ratio regardless of genotype. Metformin also prevented MPTP induced gliosis in the Substantia Nigra. These neuroprotective actions were independent of genotype and occurred in both AMPK WT and AMPK KO mice. Overall, our studies suggest that Metformin’s neuroprotective effects are not due to AMPK activation in dopaminergic neurons and that more research is required to determine how metformin acts to restrict the development of PD. PMID:27467571

  11. [Polygraphical sleep study on typical absence: relationship between the effect of sodium valproate and nigrostriatal function].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Shimohira, M; Itoh, M; Hayashi, M; Kohyama, J; Kumada, S; Iwakawa, Y

    1994-05-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of the effect of sodium valproate (VPA) on absence seizures, we performed sleep polygraph recordings in 10 patients with typical absence. VPA was effective in six cases (group A), partially effective in two (group B), and ineffective in two (group C). In 5 of 9 cases, the tonic sleep components were abnormal. In 4 cases, the percentage of slow wave sleep increased before administration of VPA, and did not change remarkably by its administration. In group A and B, twitch movements (TM), one of the phasic sleep components detected in the mentalis muscle on surface EMG, decreased or were unchanged after administration of VPA, especially during the REM period. In contrast, TM increased in group C. We speculate that the changes of TM (especially in the REM periods) after administration of VPA are well related to its effectiveness. Since TMs are thought to be controlled by the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway, the different response of basal ganglia to VPA among cases with absence epilepsy would have some relation to the different effectiveness of VPA in controlling seizures. PMID:8185977

  12. Dopaminergic correlates of metabolic network activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Holtbernd, Florian; Ma, Yilong; Peng, Shichun; Schwartz, Frank; Timmermann, Lars; Kracht, Lutz; Fink, Gereon R; Tang, Chris C; Eidelberg, David; Eggers, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with distinct metabolic covariance patterns that relate to the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disorder. It is not known, however, how the expression of these patterns relates to measurements of nigrostriatal dopaminergic activity from the same individuals. To explore these associations, we studied 106 PD subjects who underwent cerebral PET with both (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and (18) F-fluoro-L-dopa (FDOPA). Expression values for the PD motor- and cognition-related metabolic patterns (PDRP and PDCP, respectively) were computed for each subject; these measures were correlated with FDOPA uptake on a voxel-by-voxel basis. To explore the relationship between dopaminergic function and local metabolic activity, caudate and putamen FDOPA PET signal was correlated voxel-wise with FDG uptake over the entire brain. PDRP expression correlated with FDOPA uptake in caudate and putamen (P < 0.001), while PDCP expression correlated with uptake in the anterior striatum (P < 0.001). While statistically significant, the correlations were only of modest size, accounting for less than 20% of the overall variation in these measures. After controlling for PDCP expression, PDRP correlations were significant only in the posterior putamen. Of note, voxel-wise correlations between caudate/putamen FDOPA uptake and whole-brain FDG uptake were significant almost exclusively in PDRP regions. Overall, the data indicate that PDRP and PDCP expression correlates significantly with PET indices of presynaptic dopaminergic functioning obtained in the same individuals. Even so, the modest size of these correlations suggests that in PD patients, individual differences in network activity cannot be explained solely by nigrostriatal dopamine loss. PMID:26037537

  13. Acute and Long-Term Response of Dopamine Nigrostriatal Synapses to a Single Low Dose Episode of 3-Nitropropionic Acid-Mediated Chemical Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cynthia A.; Akopian, Garnik; Ring, Justin; Jakowec, Michael W.; Petzinger, Giselle M.; Andersen, Julie K.; Vittozzi-Wong, Philip; Wang, Kristie; Farley, Cristal M.; Charntikov, Sergios; Mitroi, Danut; Beal, M. Flint; Chow, Robert; Walsh, John P.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present investigation was to determine the persistence of striatal dopaminergic dysfunction after a mild chemically-induced hypoxic event in Fisher 344 rats. To this end, we gave a single injection of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP; 16.5 mg/kg, i.p.) to 2 month old male F344 rats and measured various indices of striatal dopaminergic functioning and lipid peroxidation over a 3 month span. Separate groups of rats were used to measure rod walking, evoked dopamine (DA) release, DA content, MDA accumulation, DA receptor binding, and tyrosine hydroxylase activity. The results showed that 3-NP exposure reduced most measures of DA functioning including motoric ability, DA release, and D2 receptor densities for 1 to 3 months post drug administration. Interestingly, DA content was reduced 1 week after 3-NP exposure, but rose to 147% of control values 1 month after 3-NP treatment. MDA accumulation, a measure of lipid peroxidation activity, was increased 24 hr and 1 month after 3-NP treatment. 3-NP did not affect tyrosine hydroxylase activity, suggesting that alterations in DA functioning were not the result of nigrostriatal terminal loss. These data demonstrate that a brief mild hypoxic episode caused by 3-NP exposure has long-term detrimental effects on the functioning of the nigrostriatal DA system. PMID:20730800

  14. Protective role of SIRT5 against motor deficit and dopaminergic degeneration in MPTP-induced mice model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Peritore, Carina; Ginsberg, Jessica; Shih, Jennifer; Arun, Siddharth; Donmez, Gizem

    2015-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons that results in motor deficits including resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. Despite decades of intensive study, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress contribute to neuronal death, which is the key feature of neurodegeneration. Mitochondria are pivotal organelles that host essential functions in neuronal viability including energy production, oxidative phosphorylation, calcium buffering, redox homeostasis and apoptosis. SIRT5, which localizes in the mitochondrial matrix, is nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent histone deacetylase. The physiological and pathophysiological functions of SIRT5 in vivo remain elusive although it is known to be an important energy sensor. Here, we investigated the role of SIRT5 in the pathogenesis of PD mice induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). We present evidence that SIRT5 deficiency, by itself, does not affect motor and non-motor functions; however, lack of SIRT5 exacerbates MPTP-induced motor deficits. Consistently, MPTP-exposed SIRT5 knockout mice exhibited more severe nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration than that observed in wild-type controls. Furthermore, deletion of SIRT5 leads to a larger decrease, relative to control, in the expression level of manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2), a mitochondria-specific antioxidant enzyme, after MPTP induction. These findings indicate that SIRT5 ameliorates MPTP-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration via preserving mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. PMID:25541039

  15. Murine model for Parkinson's disease: from 6-OH dopamine lesion to behavioral test.

    PubMed

    da Conceição, Fabio S L; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Houzel, Jean-Christophe; Rehen, Stevens K

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects at least 6.5 million people worldwide, irrespective of gender, social, ethnic, economic, or geographic boundaries. Key symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity and bradikinesia, develop when about 3/4 of dopaminergic cells are lost in the substantia nigra, and fail to provide for the smooth, coordinated regulation of striatal motor circuits. Depression and hallucinations are common, and dementia eventually occurs in 20% of patients. At this time, there is no treatment to delay or stop the progression of PD. Rather, the medications currently available aim more towards the alleviation of these symptoms. New surgical strategies may reversibly switch on the functionally damaged circuits through the electrical stimulation of deep brain structures, but although deep brain stimulation is a major advance, it is not suitable for all patients. It remains therefore necessary to test new cell therapy approaches in preclinical models. Selective neurotoxic disruption of dopaminergic pathways can be reproduced by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tertahydropyridine) whereas depleting drugs and oxidative-damaging chemicals may also reproduce specific features of PD in rodents. Unlike MPTP, 6-OHDA lesions cause massive irreversible neuronal loss, and can be uni- or bilateral. The 6-OHDA lesion model is reliable, leads to robust motor deficits, and is the most widely used after 40 years of research in rats. As interactions between grafted cells and host can now be studied more thoroughly in mice rather than in rats, the model has been transposed to mice, where it has been recently characterized. In this video, we demonstrate how to lesion the left nigro-striatal pathway of anesthetized mice by slowly delivering 2.0 microL of 6-OHDA through a stereotaxically inserted micro-syringe needle. The loss of dopaminergic input occurs within days, and the functional impairments can be monitored over post-operative weeks and

  16. Quantitative morphological comparison of axon-targeting strategies for gene therapies directed to the nigro-striatal projection.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, S; Kareva, T; Kholodilov, N; Burke, R E

    2014-02-01

    Cellular targeting of mRNAs and proteins to axons is essential for axon growth during development and is likely to be important for adult maintenance as well. Given the importance and potency of these axon-targeting motifs to the biology of axons, it seems possible that they can be used in the design of transgenes that are intended to enhance axon growth or maintenance, so as to improve potency and minimize off-target effects. To investigate this possibility, it is first essential to assess known motifs for their efficacy. We have therefore evaluated four axon-targeting motifs, using adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene delivery in the nigro-striatal dopaminergic system, a projection that is predominantly affected in Parkinson's disease. We have tested two mRNA axonal zipcodes, the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of β-actin and 3' UTR of tau, and two axonal-targeting protein motifs, the palmitoylation signal sequence in GAP-43 and the last 15 amino acids in the amyloid precursor protein, to direct the expression of the fluorescent protein Tomato in axons. These sequences, fused to Tomato, were able to target its expression to dopaminergic axons. Based on quantification of Tomato-positive axons, and the density of striatal innervation, we conclude that the C-terminal of the amyloid precursor protein is the most effective axon-targeting motif. PMID:24305419

  17. Dynamic Trk and G Protein Signalings Regulate Dopaminergic Neurodifferentiation in Human Trophoblast Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tony Tung-Yin; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lai, Feng-Jie; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lee, Jau-nan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms in the generation of neural stem cells from pluripotent stem cells is a fundamental step towards successful management of neurodegenerative diseases in translational medicine. Albeit all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been associated with axon outgrowth and nerve regeneration, the maintenance of differentiated neurons, the association with degenerative disease like Parkinson's disease, and its regulatory molecular mechanism from pluripotent stem cells to neural stem cells remain fragmented. We have previously reported that RA is capable of differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to dopamine (DA) committed progenitor cells. Intracranial implantation of such neural progenitor cells into the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra pars compacta successfully regenerates dopaminergic neurons and integrity of the nigrostriatal pathway, ameliorating the behavioral deficits in the Parkinson’s disease rat model. Here, we demonstrated a dynamic molecular network in systematic analysis by addressing spatiotemporal molecular expression, intracellular protein-protein interaction and inhibition, imaging study, and genetic expression to explore the regulatory mechanisms of RA induction in the differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to DA committed progenitor cells. We focused on the tyrosine receptor kinase (Trk), G proteins, canonical Wnt2B/β-catenin, genomic and non-genomic RA signaling transductions with Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression as the differentiation endpoint. We found that at the early stage, integration of TrkA and G protein signalings aims for axonogenesis and morphogenesis, involving the novel RXRα/Gαq/11 and RARβ/Gβ signaling pathways. While at the later stage, five distinct signaling pathways together with epigenetic histone modifications emerged to regulate expression of TH, a precursor of dopamine. RA induction generated DA committed progenitor cells in one day. Our results provided substantial mechanistic

  18. Dynamic Trk and G Protein Signalings Regulate Dopaminergic Neurodifferentiation in Human Trophoblast Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Eing-Mei; Wang, Yu-Chih; Lee, Tony Tung-Yin; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Hung-Sheng; Lai, Feng-Jie; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Lee, Jau-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms in the generation of neural stem cells from pluripotent stem cells is a fundamental step towards successful management of neurodegenerative diseases in translational medicine. Albeit all-trans retinoic acid (RA) has been associated with axon outgrowth and nerve regeneration, the maintenance of differentiated neurons, the association with degenerative disease like Parkinson's disease, and its regulatory molecular mechanism from pluripotent stem cells to neural stem cells remain fragmented. We have previously reported that RA is capable of differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to dopamine (DA) committed progenitor cells. Intracranial implantation of such neural progenitor cells into the 6-OHDA-lesioned substantia nigra pars compacta successfully regenerates dopaminergic neurons and integrity of the nigrostriatal pathway, ameliorating the behavioral deficits in the Parkinson's disease rat model. Here, we demonstrated a dynamic molecular network in systematic analysis by addressing spatiotemporal molecular expression, intracellular protein-protein interaction and inhibition, imaging study, and genetic expression to explore the regulatory mechanisms of RA induction in the differentiation of human trophoblast stem cells to DA committed progenitor cells. We focused on the tyrosine receptor kinase (Trk), G proteins, canonical Wnt2B/β-catenin, genomic and non-genomic RA signaling transductions with Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression as the differentiation endpoint. We found that at the early stage, integration of TrkA and G protein signalings aims for axonogenesis and morphogenesis, involving the novel RXRα/Gαq/11 and RARβ/Gβ signaling pathways. While at the later stage, five distinct signaling pathways together with epigenetic histone modifications emerged to regulate expression of TH, a precursor of dopamine. RA induction generated DA committed progenitor cells in one day. Our results provided substantial mechanistic

  19. The systemic administration of oleoylethanolamide exerts neuroprotection of the nigrostriatal system in experimental Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Aparicio, Ramiro; Blanco, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Pavon, Francisco Javier; Parsons, Loren H; Maldonado, Rafael; Robledo, Patricia; Fernandez-Espejo, Emilio; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodriguez

    2014-03-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and has been described to exhibit neuroprotective properties when administered locally in animal models of several neurological disorder models, including stroke and Parkinson's disease. However, there is little information regarding the effectiveness of systemic administration of OEA on Parkinson's disease. In the present study, OEA-mediated neuroprotection has been tested on in vivo and in vitro models of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OH-DA)-induced degeneration. The in vivo model was based on the intrastriatal infusion of the neurotoxin 6-OH-DA, which generates Parkinsonian symptoms. Rats were treated 2 h before and after the 6-OH-DA treatment with systemic OEA (0.5, 1, and 5 mg/kg). The Parkinsonian symptoms were evaluated at 1 and 4 wk after the development of lesions. The functional status of the nigrostriatal system was studied through tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH) and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1, oxidation marker) immunostaining as well as by monitoring the synaptophysin content. In vitro cell cultures were also treated with OEA and 6-OH-DA. As expected, our results revealed 6-OH-DA induced neurotoxicity and behavioural deficits; however, these alterations were less severe in the animals treated with the highest dose of OEA (5 mg/kg). 6-OH-DA administration significantly reduced the striatal TH-immunoreactivity (ir) density, synaptophysin expression, and the number of nigral TH-ir neurons. Moreover, 6-OH-DA enhanced striatal HO-1 content, which was blocked by OEA (5 mg/kg). In vitro, 0.5 and 1 μM of OEA exerted significant neuroprotection on cultured nigral neurons. These effects were abolished after blocking PPARα with the selective antagonist GW6471. In conclusion, systemic OEA protects the nigrostriatal circuit from 6-OH-DA-induced neurotoxicity through a PPARα-dependent mechanism. PMID:24169105

  20. Chronic Amitriptyline Treatment Attenuates Nigrostriatal Degeneration and Significantly Alters Trophic Support in a Rat Model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Paumier, Katrina L; Sortwell, Caryl E; Madhavan, Lalitha; Terpstra, Brian; Celano, Stephanie L; Green, Joshua J; Imus, Nastassja M; Marckini, Nathan; Daley, Brian; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Collier, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    In addition to alleviating depression, long-term adaptive changes induced by antidepressants may regulate neural plasticity in the diseased brain, providing symptomatic and disease-modifying effects in Parkinson's disease. The present study investigated whether chronic treatment with a frequently prescribed tricyclic antidepressant was neuroprotective in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of parkinsonism. In lesioned animals, chronic amitriptyline (AMI; 5 mg/kg) treatment resulted in a significant sparing of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (THir) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) compared with saline treatment. Additionally, striatal fibers were preserved and functional motor deficits were attenuated. Although 6-OHDA lesions did not induce anhedonia in our model, the dose of AMI utilized had antidepressant activity as demonstrated by reduced immobility. Recent in vitro and in vivo data provide evidence that trophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) may be key mediators of the therapeutic response to antidepressants. Therefore, we investigated whether AMI mediates changes in these specific trophic factors in the intact and degenerating nigrostriatal system. Chronic AMI treatment mediates an increase in nigral BDNF both before and during ongoing degeneration, suggesting it may contribute to neuroprotection observed in vivo. However, over time, AMI reduced BDNF levels in the striatum, indicating tricyclic therapy differentially regulates trophic factors within the nigrostriatal system. Combined, these results suggest that AMI treatment attenuates dopamine neuron loss and elicits significant trophic changes relevant to dopamine neuron survival. PMID:25267343

  1. Organotypic slice co-culture systems to study axon regeneration in the dopaminergic system ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Heine, Claudia; Franke, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Organotypic slice co-cultures are suitable tools to study axonal regeneration and development (growth or regrowth) of different projection systems of the CNS under ex vivo conditions.In this chapter, we describe in detail the reconstruction of the mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection system culturing tissue slices from the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra (VTA/SN) with the prefrontal cortex (PFC) or the striatum (STR). The protocol includes the detailed slice preparation and incubation. Moreover, different application possibilities of the ex vivo model are mentioned; as an example, the substance treatment procedure and biocytin tracing are described to reveal the effect of applied substances on fiber outgrowth. PMID:24838961

  2. Grooved Pegboard Test as a Biomarker of Nigrostriatal Denervation in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Constantine, Gregory M; Mathis, Chester A.; Moore, Robert Y.

    2009-01-01

    Recent pharmacotherapy trials in Parkinson' disease (PD) using dopaminergic neuroimaging as outcome parameter failed to show significant relationships between imaging and clinical results. One possible explanation is that there is a non-linear relationship between striatal denervation and motor performance reflecting a statistical "floor" effect in the imaging data with advanced disease. Both the motor manifestations and the striatal dopamine denervation of idiopathic PD, however, are typically asymmetric and more meaningful associations may be found by comparing data from the least denervated striatum with motor performance in the corresponding body side. PD patients (n=28) underwent [11C]β-CFT dopamine transporter (DAT) positron emission tomography (PET) and grooved pegboard testing. Voxel-based analysis of DAT PET and bimanual pegboard scores demonstrated significant correlation clusters within the bilateral striata (P<0.001). However, findings were most prominent in the least denervated striatum. There was a significant inverse correlation between pegboard scores of the least affected arm and DAT binding of the least denervated striatum (Rs = −0.69, P<0.0001) but no significant correlation between pegboard scores of the clinically most affected arm and DAT binding of the most denervated striatum (Rs = −0.15, ns). These data indicate that the robustness of the grooved pegboard test as a biomarker for nigrostriatal denervation in PD mainly reflects the relationship between test performance of the clinically least affected limb and the least denervated striatum. These findings indicate that there is both a statistical "floor" and "ceiling" effect for the most affected striatal and body sides that must be considered when employing imaging as an outcome measure in clinical trials in PD. PMID:17714864

  3. 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease-like degeneration generates acute microgliosis and astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system but no bioluminescence imaging-detectable alteration in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Inga B; Viel, Thomas; Worlitzer, Maik M; Collmann, Franziska M; Vrachimis, Alexis; Faust, Andreas; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Faber, Cornelius; Dollé, Frédéric; Kuhlmann, Michael T; Schäfers, Klaus; Hermann, Sven; Schwamborn, Jens C; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is a slowly progressing neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), leading to severe impairment in motor and non-motor functions. Endogenous subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem cells constantly give birth to new cells that might serve as a possible source for regeneration in the adult brain. However, neurodegeneration is accompanied by neuroinflammation and dopamine depletion, potentially compromising regeneration. We therefore employed in vivo imaging methods to study striatal deafferentation (N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-[(123) I]iodophenyl)nortropane single photon emission computed tomography, DaTscan(™) ) and neuroinflammation in the SN and striatum (N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2-[(18) F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide positron emission tomography, [(18) F]DPA-714 PET) in the intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine Parkinson's disease mouse model. Additionally, we transduced cells in the SVZ with a lentivirus encoding firefly luciferase and followed migration of progenitor cells in the SVZ-olfactory bulb axis via bioluminescence imaging under disease and control conditions. We found that activation of microglia in the SN is an acute process accompanying the degeneration of dopaminergic cell bodies in the SN. Dopaminergic deafferentation of the striatum does not influence the generation of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts in the SVZ, but generates chronic astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:26950181

  4. The atypical homeoprotein Pbx1a participates in the axonal pathfinding of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The pre B-cell leukemia transcription factor 1 (Pbx1) genes belong to the three amino acid loop extension family of homeodomain proteins that form hetero-oligomeric complexes with other homeodomain transcription factors, thereby modulating target specificity, DNA binding affinity and transcriptional activity of their molecular associates. Results Here, we provide evidence that Pbx1 is expressed in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons from embryonic day 11 into adulthood and determines some of the cellular properties of this neuronal population. In Pbx1-deficient mice, the mesencephalic dopaminergic axons stall during mid-gestation at the border between di- and telencephalon before entering the ganglionic eminence, leading to a loose organization of the axonal bundle and partial misrouting. In Pbx1-deficient dopaminergic neurons, the high affinity netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colon cancer (DCC), is down-regulated. Interestingly, we found several conserved Pbx1 binding sites in the first intron of DCC, suggesting a direct regulation of DCC transcription by Pbx1. Conclusions The expression of Pbx1 in dopaminergic neurons and its regulation of DCC expression make it an important player in defining the axonal guidance of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons, with possible implications for the normal physiology of the nigro-striatal system as well as processes related to the degeneration of neurons during the course of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:22748019

  5. Neonatal chlorpyrifos exposure induces loss of dopaminergic neurons in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Dai, Hongmei; Deng, Yuanying; Tian, Jing; Zhang, Chen; Hu, Zhiping; Bing, Guoying; Zhao, Lingling

    2015-10-01

    Increasing epidemiological and toxicological evidence suggests that pesticides and other environmental exposures may be associated with the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorous pesticide with developmental neurotoxicity. Its neurotoxicity, notably on the monoamine system, suggests that exposure of CPF may induce dopaminergic neuronal injury. We investigated whether neonatal exposure to CPF contributes to initiation and progression of dopaminergic neurotoxicity and explored the possible underlying mechanisms. The newborn rats were administrated 5 mg/kg CPF subcutaneously from postnatal day (PND) 11 to PND 14 daily. The effect of CPF on dopaminergic neurons, microglia, astrocyte, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p. 65 and p. 38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways was analyzed in the substantia nigra of rats at 12h, 24h, 72 h, 16d and 46 d after exposure. CPF-treated rats exhibited significant reduction of dopaminergic neurons at 16d and 46 d after exposure, and a significant increase in the expression of microglia and astrocytes in the substantia nigra after CPF exposure. Intense activation of NF-κB p. 65 and p. 38 MAPK inflammatory signaling pathways was observed. Our findings indicate that neonatal exposure to CPF may induce long-term dopaminergic neuronal damage in the substantia nigra mediated by the activation of inflammatory response via NF-κB p. 65 and p. 38 MAPK pathways in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:26215101

  6. Dopamine-Dependent Compensation Maintains Motor Behavior in Mice with Developmental Ablation of Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    DeMaro, Joseph A.; Knoten, Amanda; Hoshi, Masato; Pehek, Elizabeth; Johnson, Eugene M.; Gereau, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and consequent depletion of striatal dopamine are known to underlie the motor deficits observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). Adaptive changes in dopaminergic terminals and in postsynaptic striatal neurons can compensate for significant losses of striatal dopamine, resulting in preservation of motor behavior. In addition, compensatory changes independent of striatal dopamine have been proposed based on PD therapies that modulate nondopaminergic circuits within the basal ganglia. We used a genetic strategy to selectively destroy dopaminergic neurons in mice during development to determine the necessity of these neurons for the maintenance of normal motor behavior in adult and aged mice. We find that loss of 90% of SNc dopaminergic neurons and consequent depletion of >95% of striatal dopamine does not result in changes in motor behavior in young-adult or aged mice as evaluated by an extensive array of motor behavior tests. Treatment of aged mutant mice with the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol precipitated motor behavior deficits in aged mutant mice, indicating that <5% of striatal dopamine is sufficient to maintain motor function in these mice. We also found that mutant mice exhibit an exaggerated response to l-DOPA compared with control mice, suggesting that preservation of motor function involves sensitization of striatal dopamine receptors. Our results indicate that congenital loss of dopaminergic neurons induces remarkable adaptions in the nigrostriatal system where limited amounts of dopamine in the dorsal striatum can maintain normal motor function. PMID:24155314

  7. The effect of dopamine D1 receptor stimulation on the up-regulation of histamine H3-receptors following destruction of the ascending dopaminergic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, J. H.; Yanai, K.; Zhao, X. L.; Watanabe, T.

    1996-01-01

    1. The binding of [3H]-(R)alpha-methylhistamine and [3H]-N alpha-methylhistamine to histamine H3-receptors, [3H]-SCH23390 to dopamine D1-receptors, and [3H]-YM09151-2 to dopamine D2-receptors was investigated by quantitative receptor autoradiography in the rat brain following 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the substantia nigra. 2. The levels of [3H]-(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites in the denervated striatum and substantia nigra were significantly higher than those in the contralateral side from 1 week to 12 weeks after nigral lesions. The H3-receptor binding was maximal at 3 weeks after nigral lesions and maintained until 12 weeks. 3. The increased number of histamine H3-receptors was decreased to the level of the contralateral side by chronic treatment with a selective dopamine D1 agonist, SKF38393, but not modified by a selective dopamine D2 agonist, quinpirole. 4. Dopamine D1- and D2-receptors in the striatum were similarly up-regulated after unilateral nigral lesion. On the other hand, the number of dopamine D2-receptors in the substantia nigra was markedly decreased after administration of 6-hydroxydopamine. 5. The treatment with (S)alpha-fluoromethylhistidine increased the H3-receptor binding in both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides. As a result, the magnitude of the ratio of the H3-receptor binding between ipsilateral and contralateral sides was partially attenuated by treatment with (S)-alpha-fluoromethylhistidine. 6. These results strongly suggest that the expression of histamine H3-receptors in the striatum and substantia nigra is influenced through D1-receptors by tonic nigrostriatal dopaminergic inputs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8762081

  8. α4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulated by galantamine on nigrostriatal terminals regulates dopamine receptor-mediated rotational behavior.

    PubMed

    Inden, Masatoshi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Ashihara, Eishi; Tooyama, Ikuo; Shimohama, Shun; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    significant effect on rotational behavior. These results suggest that galantamine can enhance striatal dopamine release through allosteric modulation of α4 nAChRs on nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals. PMID:26911419

  9. The role of growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) in the induction and survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurones: relevance to Parkinson's disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Aideen M; O'Keeffe, Gerard W

    2005-09-01

    Growth/differentiation factor-5 (GDF5) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily which has potent effects on dopaminergic neurones in vitro and in vivo. GDF5 is under investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for Parkinson's disease (PD), which is caused by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurones projecting from the substantia nigra (SN) to the striatum. In the rat ventral mesencephalon (VM; the developing SN), GDF5 expression peaks at embryonic day 14, the time at which dopaminergic neurones undergo terminal differentiation. Addition of GDF5 protein to cultures of embryonic rat VM increases the survival and improves the morphology of dopaminergic neurones in these cultures. GDF5 treatment also increases the number of cells which adopt a dopaminergic phenotype in cultures of VM progenitor cells. Intracerebral administration of GDF5 has potent neuroprotective and restorative effects on the nigrostriatal pathway in animal models of PD. Furthermore, addition of GDF5 protein to embryonic rat dopaminergic neuronal transplants improves their survival and function in a rat model of PD. Thus, GDF5 has potential applications to PD therapy as a dopaminergic neuroprotective agent and as a factor that may induce a dopaminergic neuronal fate in unrestricted progenitor cells. PMID:16185246

  10. Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions within dopaminergic neurons triggers neuroprotective mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Perier, Celine; Bender, Andreas; García-Arumí, Elena; Melià, Ma Jesus; Bové, Jordi; Laub, Christoph; Klopstock, Thomas; Elstner, Matthias; Mounsey, Ross B; Teismann, Peter; Prolla, Tomas; Andreu, Antoni L; Vila, Miquel

    2013-08-01

    Acquired alterations in mitochondrial DNA are believed to play a pathogenic role in Parkinson's disease. In particular, accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions has been observed in substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons from patients with Parkinson's disease and aged individuals. Also, mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma result in multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions that can be associated with levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and severe substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, whether mitochondrial DNA deletions play a causative role in the demise of dopaminergic neurons remains unknown. Here we assessed the potential pathogenic effects of mitochondrial DNA deletions on the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system by using mutant mice possessing a proofreading-deficient form of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLGD257A), which results in a time-dependent accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in several tissues, including the brain. In these animals, we assessed the occurrence of mitochondrial DNA deletions within individual substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons, by laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and determined the potential deleterious effects of such mitochondrial DNA alterations on mitochondrial function and dopaminergic neuronal integrity, by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry and quantitative morphology. Nigral dopaminergic neurons from POLGD257A mice accumulate mitochondrial DNA deletions to a similar extent (∼40-60%) as patients with Parkinson's disease and aged individuals. Despite such high levels of mitochondrial DNA deletions, the majority of substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons from these animals did not exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction or degeneration. Only a few individual substantia nigra pars compacta neurons appeared as cytochrome c oxidase-negative, which exhibited higher levels of mitochondrial DNA

  11. Lanosterol induces mitochondrial uncoupling and protects dopaminergic neurons from cell death in a model for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, L; Jackson-Lewis, V; Wong, L C; Shui, G H; Goh, A X H; Kesavapany, S; Jenner, A M; Fivaz, M; Przedborski, S; Wenk, M R

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder marked by the selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. Several lines of evidence indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to its etiology. Other studies have suggested that alterations in sterol homeostasis correlate with increased risk for PD. Whether these observations are functionally related is, however, unknown. In this study, we used a toxin-induced mouse model of PD and measured levels of nine sterol intermediates. We found that lanosterol is significantly (∼50%) and specifically reduced in the nigrostriatal regions of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated mice, indicative of altered lanosterol metabolism during PD pathogenesis. Remarkably, exogenous addition of lanosterol rescued dopaminergic neurons from 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced cell death in culture. Furthermore, we observed a marked redistribution of lanosterol synthase from the endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria in dopaminergic neurons exposed to MPP+, suggesting that lanosterol might exert its survival effect by regulating mitochondrial function. Consistent with this model, we find that lanosterol induces mild depolarization of mitochondria and promotes autophagy. Collectively, our results highlight a novel sterol-based neuroprotective mechanism with direct relevance to PD. PMID:21818119

  12. Development of a Unilaterally-lesioned 6-OHDA Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Sherri L.; Warre, Ruth; Nash, Joanne E.

    2012-01-01

    The unilaterally lesioned 6-hyroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) has proved to be invaluable in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying parkinsonian symptoms, since it recapitulates the changes in basal ganglia circuitry and pharmacology observed in parkinsonian patients1-4. However, the precise cellular and molecular changes occurring at cortico-striatal synapses of the output pathways within the striatum, which is the major input region of the basal ganglia remain elusive, and this is believed to be site where pathological abnormalities underlying parkinsonian symptoms arise3,5. In PD, understanding the mechanisms underlying changes in basal ganglia circuitry following degeneration of the nigro-striatal pathway has been greatly advanced by the development of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mice over-expressing green fluorescent proteins driven by promoters specific for the two striatal output pathways (direct pathway: eGFP-D1; indirect pathway: eGFP-D2 and eGFP-A2a)8, allowing them to be studied in isolation. For example, recent studies have suggested that there are pathological changes in synaptic plasticity in parkinsonian mice9,10. However, these studies utilised juvenile mice and acute models of parkinsonism. It is unclear whether the changes described in adult rats with stable 6-OHDA lesions also occur in these models. Other groups have attempted to generate a stable unilaterally-lesioned 6-OHDA adult mouse model of PD by lesioning the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), unfortunately, the mortality rate in this study was extremely high, with only 14% surviving the surgery for 21 days or longer11. More recent studies have generated intra-nigral lesions with both a low mortality rate >80% loss of dopaminergic neurons, however expression of L-DOPA induced dyskinesia11,12,13,14 was variable in these studies. Another well established mouse model of PD is the MPTP-lesioned mouse15. Whilst this model has proven

  13. R-apomorphine protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostriatal damage in rat.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Liang, Li-Wu; Chen, Zheng-Jing; Ji, Hui-Ru; Wang, Mei-Kang; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Li, Cao; Xu, Jian-Yang

    2006-11-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was not only to assess the retrograde degenerative changes in the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) after injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum, but also to use this 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease to explore the possible neuroprotective effect of R-apomorphine (R-APO). Methods The partial lesion was obtained by intrastriatal administration of 6-OHDA. R-APO administration (10 mg/kg, s.c.) started 15 min prior to lesioning and continued daily for another 22 days post surgery. Testing was carried out 5 weeks after lesioning. We investigated the histology and associated behavior and neurochemical changes. Structural and functional deficits were quantified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) / Nissl-staining cell number counting, striatal dopamine (DA) content determination and amphetamine-induced rotation analysis. Results R-APO-treatment attenuated the amphetamine-induced ipsiversive rotation 5 weeks after the lesion induction. R-APO administration for 22 days significantly reduced the size of the lesion at the level of the SN from 50% (control group) to 69%. Moreover, the cell shape resembled that observed in the intact animals. R-APO treatment significantly increased the number of cells in both the lesion and the intact sides of VTA by 60%, suggesting selective neurotrophic effect of R-APO in this area. Finally, R-APO-treatment significantly attenuated the 6-OHDA-induced striatal DA depletion and normalized dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/DA ratios. Conclusion We conclude that R-APO has neuroprotective and possible neurotrophic effect on a striatal lesion with 6-OHDA, suggesting that this drug may have rescuing properties in patients with early stage Parkinson's disease. These effects are more pronounced in VTA and enhance with duration of treatment. PMID:17690718

  14. Recent Advances in Imaging of Dopaminergic Neurons for Evaluation of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lie-Hang; Liao, Mei-Hsiu; Tseng, Yu-Chin

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine is the most intensely studied monoaminergic neurotransmitter. Dopaminergic neurotransmission plays an important role in regulating several aspects of basic brain function, including motor, behavior, motivation, and working memory. To date, there are numerous positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracers available for targeting different steps in the process of dopaminergic neurotransmission, which permits us to quantify dopaminergic activity in the living human brain. Degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system causes Parkinson's disease (PD) and related Parkinsonism. Dopamine is the neurotransmitter that has been classically associated with the reinforcing effects of drug abuse. Abnormalities within the dopamine system in the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Dopamine receptors play an important role in schizophrenia and the effect of neuroleptics is through blockage of dopamine D2 receptors. This review will concentrate on the radiotracers that have been developed for imaging dopaminergic neurons, describe the clinical aspects in the assessment of neuropsychiatric disorders, and suggest future directions in the diagnosis and management of such disorders. PMID:22570524

  15. An update on the connections of the ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic complex

    PubMed Central

    Yetnikoff, Leora; Lavezzi, Heather N.; Reichard, Rhett A.; Zahm, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    This review covers the intrinsic organization and afferent and efferent connections of the midbrain dopaminergic complex, comprising the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area and retrorubral field, which house, respectively, the A9, A10 and A8 groups of nigrostriatal, mesolimbic and mesocortical dopaminergic neurons. In addition, A10dc (dorsal, caudal) and A10rv (rostroventral) extensions into, respectively, the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and supramammillary nucleus are discussed. Associated intrinsic and extrinsic connections of the midbrain dopaminergic complex that utilize gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and neuropeptides and various co-expressed combinations of these compounds are considered in conjunction with the dopamine-containing systems. A framework is provided for understanding the organization of masssive afferent systems descending and ascending to the midbrain dopaminergic complex from the telencephalon and brainstem, respectively. Within the context of this framework, the basal ganglia direct and indirect output pathways are treated in some detail. Findings from rodent brain are briefly compared with those from primates, including human. Recent literature is emphasized, including traditional experimental neuroanatomical and modern gene transfer and optogenetic studies. An attempt was made to provide sufficient background and cite a representative sampling of earlier primary papers and reviews so that people new to the field may find this to be a relatively comprehensive treatment of the subject. PMID:24735820

  16. An update on the connections of the ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic complex.

    PubMed

    Yetnikoff, L; Lavezzi, H N; Reichard, R A; Zahm, D S

    2014-12-12

    This review covers the intrinsic organization and afferent and efferent connections of the midbrain dopaminergic complex, comprising the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area and retrorubral field, which house, respectively, the A9, A10 and A8 groups of nigrostriatal, mesolimbic and mesocortical dopaminergic neurons. In addition, A10dc (dorsal, caudal) and A10rv (rostroventral) extensions into, respectively, the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and supramammillary nucleus are discussed. Associated intrinsic and extrinsic connections of the midbrain dopaminergic complex that utilize gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and neuropeptides and various co-expressed combinations of these compounds are considered in conjunction with the dopamine-containing systems. A framework is provided for understanding the organization of massive afferent systems descending and ascending to the midbrain dopaminergic complex from the telencephalon and brainstem, respectively. Within the context of this framework, the basal ganglia direct and indirect output pathways are treated in some detail. Findings from rodent brain are briefly compared with those from primates, including humans. Recent literature is emphasized, including traditional experimental neuroanatomical and modern gene transfer and optogenetic studies. An attempt was made to provide sufficient background and cite a representative sampling of earlier primary papers and reviews so that people new to the field may find this to be a relatively comprehensive treatment of the subject. PMID:24735820

  17. Phosphodiesterase 7 Inhibition Preserves Dopaminergic Neurons in Cellular and Rodent Models of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Garcia, Jose A.; Redondo, Miriam; Alonso-Gil, Sandra; Gil, Carmen; Perez, Concepción; Martinez, Ana; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Background Phosphodiesterase 7 plays a major role in down-regulation of protein kinase A activity by hydrolyzing cAMP in many cell types. This cyclic nucleotide plays a key role in signal transduction in a wide variety of cellular responses. In the brain, cAMP has been implicated in learning, memory processes and other brain functions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show a novel function of phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal death. We found that S14, a heterocyclic small molecule inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 7, conferred significant neuronal protection against different insults both in the human dopaminergic cell line SH-SY5Y and in primary rat mesencephalic cultures. S14 treatment also reduced microglial activation, protected dopaminergic neurons and improved motor function in the lipopolysaccharide rat model of Parkinson disease. Finally, S14 neuroprotective effects were reversed by blocking the cAMP signaling pathways that operate through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition can protect dopaminergic neurons against different insults, and they provide support for the therapeutic potential of phosphodiesterase 7 inhibitors in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Parkinson disease. PMID:21390306

  18. Mitoapocynin Treatment Protects Against Neuroinflammation and Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in a Preclinical Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Anamitra; Langley, Monica R; Harischandra, Dilshan S; Neal, Matthew L; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Joseph, Joy; Brenza, Timothy; Narasimhan, Balaji; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation have been implicated as key mediators contributing to the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Currently, we lack a pharmacological agent that can intervene in all key pathological mechanisms, which would offer better neuroprotective efficacy than a compound that targets a single degenerative mechanism. Herein, we investigated whether mito-apocynin (Mito-Apo), a newly-synthesized and orally available derivative of apocynin that targets mitochondria, protects against oxidative damage, glial-mediated inflammation and nigrostriatal neurodegeneration in cellular and animal models of PD. Mito-Apo treatment in primary mesencephalic cultures significantly attenuated the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neuronal cells and neurites. Mito-Apo also diminished MPP(+)-induced increases in glial cell activation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Additionally, Mito-Apo decreased nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and 4-hydroxynonenol (4-HNE) levels in primary mesencephalic cultures. Importantly, we assessed the neuroprotective property of Mito-Apo in the MPTP mouse model of PD, wherein it restored the behavioral performance of MPTP-treated mice. Immunohistological analysis of nigral dopaminergic neurons and monoamine measurement further confirmed the neuroprotective effect of Mito-Apo against MPTP-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal loss. Mito-Apo showed excellent brain bioavailability and also markedly attenuated MPTP-induced oxidative markers in the substantia nigra (SN). Furthermore, oral administration of Mito-Apo significantly suppressed MPTP-induced glial cell activation, upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, iNOS and gp91phox in IBA1-positive cells of SN. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the novel mitochondria-targeted compound Mito-Apo exhibits profound neuroprotective effects in

  19. Buspirone requires the intact nigrostriatal pathway to reduce the activity of the subthalamic nucleus via 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Sagarduy, A; Llorente, J; Miguelez, C; Morera-Herreras, T; Ruiz-Ortega, J A; Ugedo, L

    2016-03-01

    The most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), l-DOPA, induces dyskinesia after prolonged use. We have previously shown that in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats rendered dyskinetic by prolonged l-DOPA administration, lesion of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) reduces not only dyskinesias but also buspirone antidyskinetic effect. This study examined the effect of buspirone on STN neuron activity. Cell-attached recordings in parasagittal slices from naïve rats showed that whilst serotonin excited the majority of STN neurons, buspirone showed an inhibitory main effect but only in 27% of the studied cells which was prevented by the 5-HT1A receptor selective antagonist WAY-100635. Conversely, single-unit extracellular recordings were performed in vivo on STN neurons from four different groups, i.e., control, chronically treated with l-DOPA, 6-OHDA lesioned and lesioned treated with l-DOPA (dyskinetic) rats. In control animals, systemic-buspirone administration decreased the firing rate in a dose-dependent manner in every cell studied. This effect, prevented by WAY-100635, was absent in 6-OHDA lesioned rats and was not modified by prolonged l-DOPA administration. Altogether, buspirone in vivo reduces consistently the firing rate of the STN neurons through 5-HT1A receptors whereas ex vivo buspirone seems to affect only a small population of STN neurons. Furthermore, the lack of effect of buspirone in 6-OHDA lesioned rats, suggests the requirement of not only the activation of 5-HT1A receptors but also an intact nigrostriatal pathway for buspirone to inhibit the STN activity. PMID:26687972

  20. Tricyclic antidepressant treatment evokes regional changes in neurotrophic factors over time within the intact and degenerating nigrostriatal system

    PubMed Central

    Paumier, Katrina L.; Sortwell, Caryl E.; Madhavan, Lalitha; Terpstra, Brian; Daley, Brian F.; Collier, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to alleviating depression, trophic responses produced by antidepressants may regulate neural plasticity in the diseased brain, providing not only symptomatic benefit but potentially slowing the rate of disease progression in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Recent in vitro and in vivo data provide evidence that neurotrophic factors such as brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) may be key mediators of the therapeutic response to antidepressants. As such, we conducted a cross-sectional time-course study to determine whether antidepressant-mediated changes in neurotrophic factors occur in relevant brain regions in response to amitriptyline (AMI) treatment before and after intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA). Adult male Wistar rats were divided into seven cohorts and given daily injections (i.p.) of AMI (5mg/kg) or saline throughout the duration of the study. In parallel, various cohorts of intact or parkinsonian animals were sacrificed at specific time points to determine the impact of AMI treatment on trophic factor levels in the intact and degenerating nigrostriatal system. The left and right hemispheres of the substantia nigra, striatum, frontal cortex, piriform cortex, hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex were dissected and BDNF and GDNF levels were measured with ELISA. Results show that chronic AMI treatment elicits effects in multiple brain regions and differentially regulates levels of BDNF and GDNF depending on the region. Additionally, AMI halts the progressive degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons elicited by an intrastriatal 6-OHDA lesion. Taken together, these results suggest that AMI treatment elicits significant trophic changes important to DA neuron survival within both the intact and degenerating nigrostriatal system. PMID:25681575

  1. Retrograde axonal transport of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in the adult nigrostriatal system suggests a trophic role in the adult.

    PubMed Central

    Tomac, A; Widenfalk, J; Lin, L F; Kohno, T; Ebendal, T; Hoffer, B J; Olson, L

    1995-01-01

    The recently cloned, distant member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), has potent trophic actions on fetal mesencephalic dopamine neurons. GDNF also has protective and restorative activity on adult mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons and potently protects motoneurons from axotomy-induced cell death. However, evidence for a role for endogenous GDNF as a target-derived trophic factor in adult midbrain dopaminergic circuits requires documentation of specific transport from the sites of synthesis in the target areas to the nerve cell bodies themselves. Here, we demonstrate that GDNF is retrogradely transported by mesencephalic dopamine neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. The pattern of retrograde transport following intrastriatal injections indicates that there may be subpopulations of neurons that are GDNF responsive. Retrograde axonal transport of biologically active 125I-labeled GDNF was inhibited by an excess of unlabeled GDNF but not by an excess of cytochrome c. Specificity was further documented by demonstrating that another TGF-beta family member, TGF-beta 1, did not appear to affect retrograde transport. Retrograde transport was also demonstrated by immunohistochemistry by using intrastriatal injections of unlabeled GDNF. GDNF immunoreactivity was found specifically in dopamine nerve cell bodies of the substantia nigra pars compacta distributed in granules in the soma and proximal dendrites. Our data implicate a specific receptor-mediated uptake mechanism operating in the adult. Taken together, the present findings suggest that GDNF acts endogenously as a target-derived physiological survival/maintenance factor for dopaminergic neurons. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7667281

  2. Correlation between automated writing movements and striatal dopaminergic innervation in patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Wieland; Eggers, Birk; Barthel, Henryk; Clark, Daniel; Villmann, Thomas; Hesse, Swen; Grahmann, Friedrich; Kühn, Hans-Jürgen; Sabri, Osama; Wagner, Armin

    2002-08-01

    Handwriting defects are an early sign of motor impairment in patients with Wilson's disease. The basal ganglia being the primary site of copper accumulation in the brain suggests a correlation with lesions in the nigrostiatal dopaminergic system. We have analysed and correlated striatal dopaminergic innervation using [(123)I]beta-CIT-SPECT and automated handwriting movements in 37 patients with Wilson's disease. There was a significant correlation of putaminal dopaminergic innervation with fine motor ability (p < 0,05 for NIV [number of inversion in velocity], NIA [number of inversion in acceleration], frequency). These data suggest that loss of dorsolateral striatal dopaminergic innervation has a pathophysiological function for decreased automated motor control in Wilson's disease. Furthermore analysis of automated handwriting movements could be useful for therapy monitoring and evaluation of striatal dopaminergic innervation. PMID:12195459

  3. Selenoprotein T Exerts an Essential Oxidoreductase Activity That Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boukhzar, Loubna; Hamieh, Abdallah; Cartier, Dorthe; Tanguy, Yannick; Alsharif, Ifat; Castex, Matthieu; Arabo, Arnaud; Hajji, Sana El; Bonnet, Jean-Jacques; Errami, Mohammed; Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Chagraoui, Abdeslam; Lihrmann, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Oxidative stress is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the mechanisms involved in the control of this stress in dopaminergic cells are not fully understood. There is increasing evidence that selenoproteins play a central role in the control of redox homeostasis and cell defense, but the precise contribution of members of this family of proteins during the course of neurodegenerative diseases is still elusive. Results: We demonstrated first that selenoprotein T (SelT) whose gene disruption is lethal during embryogenesis, exerts a potent oxidoreductase activity. In the SH-SY5Y cell model of dopaminergic neurons, both silencing and overexpression of SelT affected oxidative stress and cell survival. Treatment with PD-inducing neurotoxins such as 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) or rotenone triggered SelT expression in the nigrostriatal pathway of wild-type mice, but provoked rapid and severe parkinsonian-like motor defects in conditional brain SelT-deficient mice. This motor impairment was associated with marked oxidative stress and neurodegeneration and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase activity and dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal system. Finally, in PD patients, we report that SelT is tremendously increased in the caudate putamen tissue. Innovation: These results reveal the activity of a novel selenoprotein enzyme that protects dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and prevents early and severe movement impairment in animal models of PD. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that selenoproteins such as SelT play a crucial role in the protection of dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and cell death, providing insight into the molecular underpinnings of this stress in PD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 557–574. PMID:26866473

  4. Pharmacological challenge and synaptic response - assessing dopaminergic function in the rat striatum with small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Larisch, Rolf; Vosberg, Henning; Beu, Markus; Wirrwar, Andreas; Antke, Christina; Kley, Konstantin; Silva, Maria Angelica De Souza; Huston, Joseph P; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm

    2011-01-01

    Disturbances of dopaminergic neurotransmission may be caused by changes in concentrations of synaptic dopamine (DA) and/or availabilities of pre- and post-synaptic transporter and receptor binding sites. We present a series of experiments which focus on the regulatory mechanisms of the dopamin(DA)ergic synapse in the rat striatum. In these studies, DA transporter (DAT) and/or D(2) receptor binding were assessed with either small animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) after pharmacological challenge with haloperidol, L-DOPA and methylphenidate, and after nigrostriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. Investigations of DAT binding were performed with [(123)I]N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane ([(123)I]FP-CIT). D(2) receptor bindingd was assessed with either [(123)I](S)-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6-methoxy-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]benzamide ([(123)I]IBZM) or [(18)F]1[3-(4'fluorobenzoyl)propyl]-4-(2-keto-3-methyl-1-benzimidazolinyl)piperidine ([(18)F]FMB). Findings demonstrate that in vivo investigations of transporter and/or receptor binding are feasible with small animal SPECT and PET. Therefore, tracers that are radiolabeled with isotopes of comparatively long half-lives such as (123)I may be employed. Our approach to quantify DAT and/or D(2) receptor binding at baseline and after pharmacological interventions inducing DAT blockade, D(2) receptor blockade, and increases or decreases of endogenous DA concentrations holds promise for the in vivo assessment of synaptic function. This pertains to animal models of diseases associated with pre- or postsynaptic DAergic deficiencies such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia or drug abuse. PMID:22103308

  5. Neural ablation of the PARK10 candidate Plpp3 leads to dopaminergic transmission deficits without neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Gómez-López, Sandra; Martínez-Silva, Ana Valeria; Montiel, Teresa; Osorio-Gómez, Daniel; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico; Massieu, Lourdes; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder, characterised by the progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and a variety of motor symptoms. The gene coding for the phospholipid phosphatase 3, PLPP3 (formerly PPAP2B or LPP3), maps within the PARK10 locus, a region that has been linked with increased risk to late-onset PD. PLPP3 modulates the levels of a range of bioactive lipids controlling fundamental cellular processes within the central nervous system. Here we show that PLPP3 is enriched in astroglial cells of the adult murine ventral midbrain. Conditional inactivation of Plpp3 using a Nestin::Cre driver results in reduced mesencephalic levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1), a well-known mediator of pro-survival responses. Yet, adult PLPP3-deficient mice exhibited no alterations in the number of dopaminergic neurons or in the basal levels of striatal extracellular dopamine (DA). Potassium-evoked DA overflow in the striatum, however, was significantly decreased in mutant mice. Locomotor evaluation revealed that, although PLPP3-deficient mice exhibit motor impairment, this is not progressive or responsive to acute L-DOPA therapy. These findings suggest that disruption of Plpp3 during early neural development leads to dopaminergic transmission deficits in the absence of nigrostriatal degeneration, and without causing an age-related locomotor decline consistent with PD. PMID:27063549

  6. Silibinin prevents dopaminergic neuronal loss in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease via mitochondrial stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujeong; Park, Hee Ra; Chun, Hye Jeong; Lee, Jaewon

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. The lipophile 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) can cross the blood-brain barrier and is subsequently metabolized into toxic1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP(+) ), which causes mitochondrial dysfunction and the selective cell death of dopaminergic neurons. The present article reports the neuroprotective effects of silibinin in a murine MPTP model of PD. The flavonoid silibinin is the major active constituent of silymarin, an extract of milk thistle seeds, and is known to have hepatoprotective, anticancer, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. In the present study, silibinin effectively attenuated motor deficit and dopaminergic neuronal loss caused by MPTP. Furthermore, in vitro study confirmed that silibinin protects primary cultured neurons against MPP(+) -induced cell death and mitochondrial membrane disruption. The findings of the present study indicate that silibinin has neuroprotective effects in MPTP-induced models of PD rather than antioxidative or anti-inflammatory effects and that the neuroprotection afforded might be mediated by the stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, these findings suggest that silibinin protects mitochondria in MPTP-induced PD models and that it offers a starting point for the development of treatments that ameliorate the symptoms of PD. PMID:25677261

  7. Neural ablation of the PARK10 candidate Plpp3 leads to dopaminergic transmission deficits without neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-López, Sandra; Martínez-Silva, Ana Valeria; Montiel, Teresa; Osorio-Gómez, Daniel; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico; Massieu, Lourdes; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder, characterised by the progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and a variety of motor symptoms. The gene coding for the phospholipid phosphatase 3, PLPP3 (formerly PPAP2B or LPP3), maps within the PARK10 locus, a region that has been linked with increased risk to late-onset PD. PLPP3 modulates the levels of a range of bioactive lipids controlling fundamental cellular processes within the central nervous system. Here we show that PLPP3 is enriched in astroglial cells of the adult murine ventral midbrain. Conditional inactivation of Plpp3 using a Nestin::Cre driver results in reduced mesencephalic levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1), a well-known mediator of pro-survival responses. Yet, adult PLPP3-deficient mice exhibited no alterations in the number of dopaminergic neurons or in the basal levels of striatal extracellular dopamine (DA). Potassium-evoked DA overflow in the striatum, however, was significantly decreased in mutant mice. Locomotor evaluation revealed that, although PLPP3-deficient mice exhibit motor impairment, this is not progressive or responsive to acute L-DOPA therapy. These findings suggest that disruption of Plpp3 during early neural development leads to dopaminergic transmission deficits in the absence of nigrostriatal degeneration, and without causing an age-related locomotor decline consistent with PD. PMID:27063549

  8. Prothrombin Kringle-2: A Potential Inflammatory Pathogen in the Parkinsonian Dopaminergic System

    PubMed Central

    Leem, Eunju; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Won, So-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Although accumulating evidence suggests that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation may be crucial for the initiation and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD), and that the control of neuroinflammation may be a useful strategy for preventing the degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) projections in the adult brain, it is still unclear what kinds of endogenous biomolecules initiate microglial activation, consequently resulting in neurodegeneration. Recently, we reported that the increase in the levels of prothrombin kringle-2 (pKr-2), which is a domain of prothrombin that is generated by active thrombin, can lead to disruption of the nigrostriatal DA projection. This disruption is mediated by neurotoxic inflammatory events via the induction of microglial Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in vivo , thereby resulting in less neurotoxicity in TLR4-deficient mice. Moreover, inhibition of microglial activation following minocycline treatment, which has anti-inflammatory activity, protects DA neurons from pKr-2-induced neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra (SN) in vivo. We also found that the levels of pKr-2 and microglial TLR4 were significantly increased in the SN of PD patients compared to those of age-matched controls. These observations suggest that there may be a correlation between pKr-2 and microglial TLR4 in the initiation and progression of PD, and that inhibition of pKr-2-induced microglial activation may be protective against the degeneration of the nigrostriatal DA system in vivo. To describe the significance of pKr-2 overexpression, which may have a role in the pathogenesis of PD, we have reviewed the mechanisms of pKr-2-induced microglial activation, which results in neurodegeneration in the SN of the adult brain. PMID:27574481

  9. Prothrombin Kringle-2: A Potential Inflammatory Pathogen in the Parkinsonian Dopaminergic System.

    PubMed

    Leem, Eunju; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Won, So-Yoon; Shin, Won-Ho; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-08-01

    Although accumulating evidence suggests that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation may be crucial for the initiation and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD), and that the control of neuroinflammation may be a useful strategy for preventing the degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) projections in the adult brain, it is still unclear what kinds of endogenous biomolecules initiate microglial activation, consequently resulting in neurodegeneration. Recently, we reported that the increase in the levels of prothrombin kringle-2 (pKr-2), which is a domain of prothrombin that is generated by active thrombin, can lead to disruption of the nigrostriatal DA projection. This disruption is mediated by neurotoxic inflammatory events via the induction of microglial Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in vivo , thereby resulting in less neurotoxicity in TLR4-deficient mice. Moreover, inhibition of microglial activation following minocycline treatment, which has anti-inflammatory activity, protects DA neurons from pKr-2-induced neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra (SN) in vivo. We also found that the levels of pKr-2 and microglial TLR4 were significantly increased in the SN of PD patients compared to those of age-matched controls. These observations suggest that there may be a correlation between pKr-2 and microglial TLR4 in the initiation and progression of PD, and that inhibition of pKr-2-induced microglial activation may be protective against the degeneration of the nigrostriatal DA system in vivo. To describe the significance of pKr-2 overexpression, which may have a role in the pathogenesis of PD, we have reviewed the mechanisms of pKr-2-induced microglial activation, which results in neurodegeneration in the SN of the adult brain. PMID:27574481

  10. Dopaminergic differentiation of stem cells from human deciduous teeth and their therapeutic benefits for Parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hiromi; Matsubara, Kohki; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ito, Mikako; Ohno, Kinji; Ueda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-07-10

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons and the depletion of striatal dopamine. Here we show that DAergic-neuron-like cells could be efficiently induced from stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), and that these induced cells had therapeutic benefits in a 6-OHDA-induced Parkinsonian rat model. In our protocol, EGF and bFGF signaling activated the SHED's expression of proneural genes, Ngn2 and Mash1, and subsequent treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoted their maturation into DAergic neuron-like SHEDs (dSHEDs). A hypoxic DAergic differentiation protocol improved cell viability and enhanced the expression of multiple neurotrophic factors, including BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and HGF. Engrafted dSHEDs survived in the striatum of Parkinsonian rats, improved the DA level more efficiently than engrafted undifferentiated SHEDs, and promoted the recovery from neurological deficits. Our findings further suggested that paracrine effects of dSHEDs contributed to neuroprotection against 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration and to nigrostriatal tract restoration. In addition, we found that the conditioned medium derived from dSHEDs protected primary neurons against 6-OHDA toxicity and accelerated neurite outgrowth in vitro. Thus, our data suggest that stem cells derived from dental pulp may have therapeutic benefits for PD. PMID:25863132

  11. Metalloproteinase-9 contributes to inflammatory glia activation and nigro-striatal pathway degeneration in both mouse and monkey models of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Annese, V; Herrero, María-Trinidad; Di Pentima, M; Gomez, A; Lombardi, L; Ros, C M; De Pablos, V; Fernandez-Villalba, E; De Stefano, Maria Egle

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation is a predominant aspect of neurodegenerative diseases, manifested by glia activation and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. Studies on animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) suggest that sustained neuroinflammation exacerbates degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) nigro-striatal pathway. Therefore, insights into the inflammatory mechanisms of PD may help the development of novel therapeutic strategies against this disease. As extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) could be major players in the progression of Parkinsonism, we investigated, in the substantia nigra and striatum of mice acutely injected with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), changes in mRNA expression, protein levels, and cell localization of MMP-9. This protease is mainly neuronal, but early after MPTP injection its mRNA and protein levels, as well as the number of MMP-9-expressing microglia and astrocytes, increase concomitantly to a prominent inflammation. Neuroinflammation and MMP-9(+) glia begin to decline within 2 weeks, although protein levels remain higher than control, in association with a partial recovery of DA nigro-striatal circuit. Comparable quantitative studies on MMP-9 knock-out mice, show a significant decrease in both glia activation and loss of DA neurons and fibers, with respect to wild-type. Moreover, in a parallel study on chronically MPTP-injected macaques, we observed that perpetuation of inflammation and high levels of MMP-9 are associated to DA neuron loss. Our data suggest that MMP-9 released by injured neurons favors glia activation; glial cells in turn reinforce their reactive state via autocrine MMP-9 release, contributing to nigro-striatal pathway degeneration. Specific modulation of MMP-9 activity may, therefore, be a strategy to ameliorate harmful inflammatory outcomes in Parkinsonism. PMID:24558048

  12. Dopaminergic function and intertemporal choice.

    PubMed

    Joutsa, J; Voon, V; Johansson, J; Niemelä, S; Bergman, J; Kaasinen, V

    2015-01-01

    The discounting of delayed rewards, also known as temporal or delay discounting, is intrinsic to everyday decisions and can be impaired in pathological states such as addiction disorders. Preclinical and human studies suggest a role for dopaminergic function in temporal discounting but this relationship has not yet been verified using molecular imaging of the living human brain. Here, we evaluated dopaminergic function in temporal discounting using positron emission tomography (PET) with two different dopaminergic ligands assessing three populations in whom temporal discounting has been shown to be impaired. First, we show using [11C]raclopride PET that in pathological gamblers, greater temporal discounting correlates with decreased ventral striatal binding potential, convergent with translational findings of lower nucleus accumbens D2/D3 receptor density in high-impulsive rodents. Temporal discounting also correlates with lower ventral striatal dopamine release in response to high-reward magnitude suggesting that dopamine-mediated devaluation of larger delayed rewards may drive choice preferences. Second, we show using [18F]fluorodopa PET that in Parkinson's disease, temporal discounting correlates with greater left caudate dopaminergic terminal function. Finally, in subjects with Parkinson's disease and dopamine medication-induced behavioral addictions, temporal discounting is further correlated with greater dopaminergic terminal function in the anterior putamen. These findings provide insights into the relationship between striatal dopamine function and temporal discounting, and its potential role in pathological disorders and mechanisms underlying treatment interventions. PMID:25562841

  13. Environmental neurotoxic challenge of conditional alpha-synuclein transgenic mice predicts a dopaminergic olfactory-striatal interplay in early PD.

    PubMed

    Nuber, Silke; Tadros, Daniel; Fields, Jerel; Overk, Cassia Rose; Ettle, Benjamin; Kosberg, Kori; Mante, Michael; Rockenstein, Edward; Trejo, Margarita; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-04-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is one of the first brain regions in Parkinson's disease (PD) to contain alpha-synuclein (α-syn) inclusions, possibly associated with nonmotor symptoms. Mechanisms underlying olfactory synucleinopathy, its contribution to progressive aggregation pathology and nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss observed at later stages, remain unclear. A second hit, such as environmental toxins, is suggestive for α-syn aggregation in olfactory neurons, potentially triggering disease progression. To address the possible pathogenic role of olfactory α-syn accumulation in early PD, we exposed mice with site-specific and inducible overexpression of familial PD-linked mutant α-syn in OB neurons to a low dose of the herbicide paraquat. Here, we found that olfactory α-syn per se elicited structural and behavioral abnormalities, characteristic of an early time point in models with widespread α-syn expression, including hyperactivity and increased striatal dopaminergic marker. Suppression of α-syn reversed the dopaminergic phenotype. In contrast, paraquat treatment synergistically induced degeneration of olfactory dopaminergic cells and opposed the higher reactive phenotype. Neither neurodegeneration nor behavioral abnormalities were detected in paraquat-treated mice with suppressed α-syn expression. By increasing calpain activity, paraquat induced a pathological cascade leading to inhibition of autophagy clearance and accumulation of calpain-cleaved truncated and insoluble α-syn, recapitulating biochemical and structural changes in human PD. Thus our results underscore the primary role of proteolytic failure in aggregation pathology. In addition, we provide novel evidence that olfactory dopaminergic neurons display an increased vulnerability toward neurotoxins in dependence to presence of human α-syn, possibly mediating an olfactory-striatal dopaminergic network dysfunction in mouse models and early PD. PMID:24509835

  14. Environmental neurotoxic challenge of conditional alpha-synuclein transgenic mice predicts a dopaminergic olfactory-striatal interplay in early PD

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Daniel; Fields, Jerel; Overk, Cassia Rose; Ettle, Benjamin; Kosberg, Kori; Mante, Michael; Rockenstein, Edward; Trejo, Margarita; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is one of the first brain regions in Parkinson’s disease (PD) to contain alpha-synuclein (α-syn) inclusions, possibly associated with nonmotor symptoms. Mechanisms underlying olfactory synucleinopathy, its contribution to progressive aggregation pathology and nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss observed at later stages, remain unclear. A second hit, such as environmental toxins, is suggestive for α-syn aggregation in olfactory neurons, potentially triggering disease progression. To address the possible pathogenic role of olfactory α-syn accumulation in early PD, we exposed mice with site-specific and inducible overexpression of familial PD-linked mutant α-syn in OB neurons to a low dose of the herbicide paraquat. Here, we found that olfactory α-syn per se elicited structural and behavioral abnormalities, characteristic of an early time point in models with widespread α-syn expression, including hyperactivity and increased striatal dopaminergic marker. Suppression of α-syn reversed the dopaminergic phenotype. In contrast, paraquat treatment synergistically induced degeneration of olfactory dopaminergic cells and opposed the higher reactive phenotype. Neither neurodegeneration nor behavioral abnormalities were detected in paraquat-treated mice with suppressed α-syn expression. By increasing calpain activity, paraquat induced a pathological cascade leading to inhibition of autophagy clearance and accumulation of calpain-cleaved truncated and insoluble α-syn, recapitulating biochemical and structural changes in human PD. Thus our results underscore the primary role of proteolytic failure in aggregation pathology. In addition, we provide novel evidence that olfactory dopaminergic neurons display an increased vulnerability toward neurotoxins in dependence to presence of human α-syn, possibly mediating an olfactory-striatal dopaminergic network dysfunction in mouse models and early PD. PMID:24509835

  15. Sigma-1 receptor deficiency reduces MPTP-induced parkinsonism and death of dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, J; Sha, S; Zhou, L; Wang, C; Yin, J; Chen, L

    2015-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (σ1R) has been reported to be decreased in nigrostriatal motor system of Parkinson's disease patients. Using heterozygous and homozygous σ1R knockout (σ1R+/− and σ1R−/−) mice, we investigated the influence of σ1R deficiency on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-impaired nigrostriatal motor system. The injection of MPTP for 5 weeks in wild-type mice (MPTP-WT mice), but not in σ1R+/− or σ1R−/− mice (MPTP-σ1R+/− or MPTP-σ1R−/− mice), caused motor deficits and ~40% death of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta with an elevation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) NR2B phosphorylation. The σ1R antagonist NE100 or the NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 could alleviate the motor deficits and the death of dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-WT mice. By contrast, MPTP-σ1R+/− mice treated with the σ1R agonist PRE084 or MPTP-σ1R−/− mice treated with the NMDAr agonist NMDA appeared to have similar motor deficits and loss of dopaminergic neurons as MPTP-WT mice. The pharmacological or genetic inactivation of σ1R suppressed the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) in substantia nigra, which was corrected by NMDA. The activation of σ1R by PRE084 enhanced the DAT expression in WT mice or σ1R+/− mice. By contrast, the level of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in σ1R+/− mice or σ1R−/− mice had no difference from WT mice. Interestingly, MPTP-WT mice showed the reduction in the levels of DAT and VMAT2, but MPTP-σ1R−/− mice did not. The inactivation of σ1R by NE100 could prevent the reduction of VMAT2 in MPTP-WT mice. In addition, the activation of microglia cells in substantia nigra was equally enhanced in MPTP-WT mice and MPTP-σ1R−/− mice. The number of activated astrocytes in MPTP-σ1R−/− mice was less than that in MPTP-WT mice. The findings indicate that the σ1R deficiency through suppressing NMDAr function and DAT expression can reduce MPTP-induced death of

  16. The role of the MYD88-dependent pathway in MPTP-induced brain dopaminergic degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence supports a significant role of inflammation in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathophysiology, with several inflammatory pathways being suggested as playing a role in the dopaminergic degeneration seen in humans and animal models of the disease. These include tumor necrosis factor, prostaglandins and oxidative-related stress components. However, the role of innate immunity has not been established in PD. Methods Based on the fact that the myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) is the most common adaptor protein implicated in toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, critical in the innate immune response, we undertook a study to investigate the potential contribution of this specific pathway to MPTP-induced brain dopaminergic degeneration using MyD88 knock out mice (MyD88-/-), following our observations that the MyD88-dependent pathway was critical for MPTP dopaminergic toxicity in the enteric nervous system. Post-mortem analyses assessing nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration and inflammation were performed using HPLC, western blots, autoradiography and immunofluorescence. Results Our results demonstrate that MyD88-/- mice are as vulnerable to MPTP-induced dopamine and DOPAC striatal depletion as wild type mice. Furthermore, MyD88-/- mice show similar striatal dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase loss, as well as dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta in response to MPTP. To evaluate the extent of the inflammatory response created by the MPTP regimen utilized, we further performed bioluminescence imaging using TLR2-luc/gfp transgenic mice and microglial density analysis, which revealed a modest brain microglial response following MPTP. This was accompanied by a significant astrocytic reaction in the striatum, which was of similar magnitude both in wild type and MyD88-/- mice. Conclusions Our results suggest that subacute MPTP-induced dopaminergic degeneration observed in the central nervous

  17. Cognitive executive impairment and dopaminergic deficits in de novo Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Siepel, Françoise J; Brønnick, Kolbjørn S; Booij, Jan; Ravina, Bernard M; Lebedev, Alexander V; Pereira, Joana B; Grüner, Renate; Aarsland, Dag

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) is common and does directly impact patients' everyday functioning. However, the underlying mechanisms of early cognitive decline are not known. This study explored the association between striatal dopaminergic deficits and cognitive impairment within a large cohort of early, drug-naïve PD patients and tested the hypothesis that executive dysfunction in PD is associated with striatal dopaminergic depletion. A cross-sectional multicenter cohort of 339 PD patients and 158 healthy controls from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative study was analyzed. Each individual underwent cerebral single-photon emission CT (SPECT) and a standardized neuropsychological assessment with tests of memory as well as visuospatial and executive function. SPECT imaging was performed with [(123) I]FP-CIT, and specific binding ratios in left and right putamen and caudate nucleus were calculated. The association between specific binding ratios, cognitive domain scores, and age was analyzed using Pearson's correlations, partial correlation, and conditional process analysis. A small, but significant, positive association between total striatal dopamine transporter binding and the attention/executive domain was found (r = 0.141; P = 0.009) in PD, but this was not significant after adjusting for age. However, in a moderated mediation model, we found that cognitive executive differences between controls and patients with PD were mediated by an age-moderated striatal dopaminergic deficit. Our findings support the hypothesis that nigrostriatal dopaminergic deficit is associated with executive impairment, but not to memory or visuospatial impairment, in early PD. PMID:25284687

  18. Abnormal Striatal Dopaminergic Neurotransmission during Rest and Task Production in Spasmodic Dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Brian D.; Herscovitch, Peter; Hallett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia is a primary focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles during speech production. The pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia is thought to involve structural and functional abnormalities in the basal ganglia–thalamo-cortical circuitry; however, neurochemical correlates underpinning these abnormalities as well as their relations to spasmodic dysphonia symptoms remain unknown. We used positron emission tomography with the radioligand [11C]raclopride (RAC) to study striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission at the resting state and during production of symptomatic sentences and asymptomatic finger tapping in spasmodic dysphonia patients. We found that patients, compared to healthy controls, had bilaterally decreased RAC binding potential (BP) to striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors on average by 29.2%, which was associated with decreased RAC displacement (RAC ΔBP) in the left striatum during symptomatic speaking (group average difference 10.2%), but increased RAC ΔBP in the bilateral striatum during asymptomatic tapping (group average difference 10.1%). Patients with more severe voice symptoms and subclinically longer reaction time to initiate the tapping sequence had greater RAC ΔBP measures, while longer duration of spasmodic dysphonia was associated with a decrease in task-induced RAC ΔBP. Decreased dopaminergic transmission during symptomatic speech production may represent a disorder-specific pathophysiological trait involved in symptom generation, whereas increased dopaminergic function during unaffected task performance may be explained by a compensatory adaptation of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system possibly due to decreased striatal D2/D3 receptor availability. These changes can be linked to the clinical and subclinical features of spasmodic dysphonia and may represent the neurochemical basis of basal ganglia alterations in this disorder. PMID:24027271

  19. Abnormal striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission during rest and task production in spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Kristina; Berman, Brian D; Herscovitch, Peter; Hallett, Mark

    2013-09-11

    Spasmodic dysphonia is a primary focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles during speech production. The pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia is thought to involve structural and functional abnormalities in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry; however, neurochemical correlates underpinning these abnormalities as well as their relations to spasmodic dysphonia symptoms remain unknown. We used positron emission tomography with the radioligand [(11)C]raclopride (RAC) to study striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission at the resting state and during production of symptomatic sentences and asymptomatic finger tapping in spasmodic dysphonia patients. We found that patients, compared to healthy controls, had bilaterally decreased RAC binding potential (BP) to striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors on average by 29.2%, which was associated with decreased RAC displacement (RAC ΔBP) in the left striatum during symptomatic speaking (group average difference 10.2%), but increased RAC ΔBP in the bilateral striatum during asymptomatic tapping (group average difference 10.1%). Patients with more severe voice symptoms and subclinically longer reaction time to initiate the tapping sequence had greater RAC ΔBP measures, while longer duration of spasmodic dysphonia was associated with a decrease in task-induced RAC ΔBP. Decreased dopaminergic transmission during symptomatic speech production may represent a disorder-specific pathophysiological trait involved in symptom generation, whereas increased dopaminergic function during unaffected task performance may be explained by a compensatory adaptation of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system possibly due to decreased striatal D2/D3 receptor availability. These changes can be linked to the clinical and subclinical features of spasmodic dysphonia and may represent the neurochemical basis of basal ganglia alterations in this disorder. PMID:24027271

  20. Mitoapocynin Treatment Protects Against Neuroinflammation and Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in a Preclinical Animal Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anamitra; Langley, Monica R; Harischandra, Dilshan; Neal, Matthew L; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Joseph, Joy; Brenza, Timothy; Narasimhan, Balaji; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation have been implicated as key mediators contributing to the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Currently, we lack a pharmacological agent that can intervene in all key pathological mechanisms, which would offer better neuroprotective efficacy than a compound that targets a single degenerative mechanism. Herein, we investigated whether mito-apocynin (Mito-Apo), a newly-synthesized and orally available derivative of apocynin that targets mitochondria, protects against oxidative damage, glial-mediated inflammation and nigrostriatal neurodegeneration in cellular and animal models of PD. Mito-Apo treatment in primary mesencephalic cultures significantly attenuated the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neuronal cells and neurites. Mito-Apo also diminished MPP+-induced increases in glial cell activation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Additionally, Mito-Apo decreased nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and 4-hydroxynonenol (4-HNE) levels in primary mesencephalic cultures. Importantly, we assessed the neuroprotective property of Mito-Apo in the MPTP mouse model of PD, wherein it restored the behavioral performance of MPTP-treated mice. Immunohistological analysis of nigral dopaminergic neurons and monoamine measurement further confirmed the neuroprotective effect of Mito-Apo against MPTP-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal loss. Mito-Apo showed excellent brain bioavailability and also markedly attenuated MPTP-induced oxidative markers in the substantia nigra (SN). Furthermore, oral administration of Mito-Apo significantly suppressed MPTP-induced glial cell activation, upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, iNOS and gp91phox in IBA1-positive cells of SN. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the novel mitochondria-targeted compound Mito-Apo exhibits profound neuroprotective effects in

  1. Striatal vessels receive phosphorylated tyrosine hydroxylase-rich innervation from midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Afonso-Oramas, Domingo; Cruz-Muros, Ignacio; Castro-Hernández, Javier; Salas-Hernández, Josmar; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; García-Hernández, Sonia; Lanciego, José L.; González-Hernández, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is assumed that besides its roles in neuronal processing, dopamine (DA) is also involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow. However, studies on the hemodynamic actions of DA have been mainly focused on the cerebral cortex, but the possibility that vessels in deeper brain structures receive dopaminergic axons and the origin of these axons have not been investigated. Bearing in mind the evidence of changes in the blood flow of basal ganglia in Parkinson’s disease (PD), and the pivotal role of the dopaminergic mesostriatal pathway in the pathophysiology of this disease, here we studied whether striatal vessels receive inputs from midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The injection of an anterograde neuronal tracer in combination with immunohistochemistry for dopaminergic, vascular and astroglial markers, and dopaminergic lesions, revealed that midbrain dopaminergic axons are in close apposition to striatal vessels and perivascular astrocytes. These axons form dense perivascular plexuses restricted to striatal regions in rats and monkeys. Interestingly, they are intensely immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylated at Ser19 and Ser40 residues. The presence of phosphorylated TH in vessel terminals indicates they are probably the main source of basal TH activity in the striatum, and that after activation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, DA release onto vessels precedes that onto neurons. Furthermore, the relative weight of this “vascular component” within the mesostriatal pathway suggests that it plays a relevant role in the pathophysiology of PD. PMID:25206324

  2. Selective blockade of mGlu5 metabotropic glutamate receptors is protective against hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction in 6-OHDA lesioned Parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Andrea; Vairetti, Mariapia; Ambrosi, Giulia; Rizzo, Vittoria; Richelmi, Plinio; Blandini, Fabio; Fuzzati-Armentero, Marie-Therese

    2015-06-01

    Non-motor symptoms including those involving the splanchnic district are present in Parkinson's disease (PD). The authors previously reported that PD-like rats, bearing a lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway induced by the injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), have impaired hepatic mitochondrial function. Glutamate intervenes at multiple levels in PD and liver pathophysiologies. The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is abundantly expressed in brain and liver and may represent a pharmacological target for PD therapy. This study investigated whether and how chronic treatment with 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), a well-characterized mGluR5 antagonist, may influence hepatic function with regard to neuronal cell loss in PD-like rats. Chronic treatment with MPEP was started immediately (Early) or 4 weeks after (Delayed) intrastriatal injection of 6-OHDA and lasted 4 weeks. Early MPEP treatment significantly prevented the decrease in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production/content and counteracted increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in isolated hepatic mitochondria of PD-like animals. Early MPEP administration also reduced the toxin-induced neurodegenerative process; improved survival of nigral dopaminergic neurons correlated with enhanced mitochondrial ATP content and production. ATP content/production, in turn, negatively correlated with ROS formation suggesting that the MPEP-dependent improvement in hepatic function positively influenced neuronal cell survival. Delayed MPEP treatment had no effect on hepatic mitochondrial function and neuronal cell loss. Antagonizing mGluR5 may synergistically act against neuronal cell loss and PD-related hepatic mitochondrial alterations and may represent an interesting alternative to non-dopaminergic therapeutic strategies for the treatment of PD. PMID:25904005

  3. Transplantation of ventral mesencephalic anlagen to hosts with genetic nigrostriatal dopamine deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Triarhou, L C; Low, W C; Ghetti, B

    1986-01-01

    Attempts to reconstruct the damaged nigrostriatal pathway in experimental models of Parkinson disease have thus far been carried out in animals with neurotoxically induced dopamine deficiency. The present study establishes the weaver (wv/wv) mutant mouse as a genetic model of chronic striatal dopamine denervation by demonstrating a marked decrease of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Moreover, grafts of embryonic ventral mesencephalon taken from genetically normal mice and transplanted into the lateral ventricle of adult weaver mutants can survive and grow in the mutant host environment, express tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, and reinnervate the target regions of the recipient. These results provide evidence of integration of graft and host tissue and suggest that transplantation of dopamine neurons may be effectively applied to overcome nigrostriatal degeneration of genetic etiology. Images PMID:2877463

  4. Withania somnifera alleviates parkinsonian phenotypes by inhibiting apoptotic pathways in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jay; Chouhan, Shikha; Yadav, Satyndra Kumar; Westfall, Susan; Rai, Sachchida Nand; Singh, Surya Pratap

    2014-12-01

    Maneb (MB) and paraquat (PQ) are environmental toxins that have been experimentally used to induce selective damage of dopaminergic neurons leading to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the mechanism of this selective neuronal toxicity in not fully understood, oxidative stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of PD. The present study investigates the mechanisms of neuroprotection elicited by Withania somnifera (Ws), a herb traditionally recognized by the Indian system of medicine, Ayurveda. An ethanolic root extract of Ws was co-treated with the MB-PQ induced mouse model of PD and was shown to significantly rescue canonical indicators of PD including compromised locomotor activity, reduced dopamine in the substantia nigra and various aspects of oxidative damage. In particular, Ws reduced the expression of iNOS, a measure of oxidative stress. Ws also significantly improved the MB + PQ mediated induction of a pro-apoptotic state by reducing Bax and inducing Bcl-2 protein expression, respectively. Finally, Ws reduced expression of the pro-inflammatory marker of astrocyte activation, GFAP. Altogether, the present study suggests that Ws treatment provides nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuroprotection against MB-PQ induced Parkinsonism by the modulation of oxidative stress and apoptotic machinery possibly accounting for the behavioural effects. PMID:25403619

  5. A progressive dopaminergic phenotype associated with neurotoxic conversion of α-synuclein in BAC-transgenic rats

    PubMed Central

    Harmuth, Florian; Kohl, Zacharias; Adame, Anthony; Trejo, Margaritha; Schönig, Kai; Zimmermann, Frank; Bauer, Claudia; Casadei, Nicolas; Giel, Christiane; Calaminus, Carsten; Pichler, Bernd J.; Jensen, Poul H.; Müller, Christian P.; Amato, Davide; Kornhuber, Johannes; Teismann, Peter; Yamakado, Hodaka; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Winkler, Juergen; Masliah, Eliezer; Riess, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Conversion of soluble α-synuclein into insoluble and fibrillar inclusions is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease and other synucleinopathies. Accumulating evidence points towards a relationship between its generation at nerve terminals and structural synaptic pathology. Little is known about the pathogenic impact of α-synuclein conversion and deposition at nigrostriatal dopaminergic synapses in transgenic mice, mainly owing to expression limitations of the α-synuclein construct. Here, we explore whether both the rat as a model and expression of the bacterial artificial chromosome construct consisting of human full-length wild-type α-synuclein could exert dopaminergic neuropathological effects. We found that the human promoter induced a pan-neuronal expression, matching the rodent α-synuclein expression pattern, however, with prominent C-terminally truncated fragments. Ageing promoted conversion of both full-length and C-terminally truncated α-synuclein species into insolube and proteinase K-resistant fibres, with strongest accumulation in the striatum, resembling biochemical changes seen in human Parkinson’s disease. Transgenic rats develop early changes in novelty-seeking, avoidance and smell before the progressive motor deficit. Importantly, the observed pathological changes were associated with severe loss of the dopaminergic integrity, thus resembling more closely the human pathology. PMID:23413261

  6. A progressive dopaminergic phenotype associated with neurotoxic conversion of α-synuclein in BAC-transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Nuber, Silke; Harmuth, Florian; Kohl, Zacharias; Adame, Anthony; Trejo, Margaritha; Schönig, Kai; Zimmermann, Frank; Bauer, Claudia; Casadei, Nicolas; Giel, Christiane; Calaminus, Carsten; Pichler, Bernd J; Jensen, Poul H; Müller, Christian P; Amato, Davide; Kornhuber, Johannes; Teismann, Peter; Yamakado, Hodaka; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Winkler, Juergen; Masliah, Eliezer; Riess, Olaf

    2013-02-01

    Conversion of soluble α-synuclein into insoluble and fibrillar inclusions is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. Accumulating evidence points towards a relationship between its generation at nerve terminals and structural synaptic pathology. Little is known about the pathogenic impact of α-synuclein conversion and deposition at nigrostriatal dopaminergic synapses in transgenic mice, mainly owing to expression limitations of the α-synuclein construct. Here, we explore whether both the rat as a model and expression of the bacterial artificial chromosome construct consisting of human full-length wild-type α-synuclein could exert dopaminergic neuropathological effects. We found that the human promoter induced a pan-neuronal expression, matching the rodent α-synuclein expression pattern, however, with prominent C-terminally truncated fragments. Ageing promoted conversion of both full-length and C-terminally truncated α-synuclein species into insolube and proteinase K-resistant fibres, with strongest accumulation in the striatum, resembling biochemical changes seen in human Parkinson's disease. Transgenic rats develop early changes in novelty-seeking, avoidance and smell before the progressive motor deficit. Importantly, the observed pathological changes were associated with severe loss of the dopaminergic integrity, thus resembling more closely the human pathology. PMID:23413261

  7. Intrastriatal injection of pre-formed mouse α-synuclein fibrils into rats triggers α-synuclein pathology and bilateral nigrostriatal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Paumier, Katrina L; Luk, Kelvin C; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Kanaan, Nicholas M; Lipton, Jack W; Collier, Timothy J; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Kemp, Christopher J; Celano, Stephanie; Schulz, Emily; Sandoval, Ivette M; Fleming, Sheila; Dirr, Elliott; Polinski, Nicole K; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M; Sortwell, Caryl E

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that intrastriatal injections of fibrillar alpha-synuclein (α-syn) into mice induce Parkinson's disease (PD)-like Lewy body (LB) pathology formed by aggregated α-syn in anatomically interconnected regions and significant nigrostriatal degeneration. The aim of the current study was to evaluate whether exogenous mouse α-syn pre-formed fibrils (PFF) injected into the striatum of rats would result in accumulation of LB-like intracellular inclusions and nigrostriatal degeneration. Sprague-Dawley rats received unilateral intrastriatal injections of either non-fibrillized recombinant α-syn or PFF mouse α-syn in 1- or 2- sites and were euthanized at 30, 60 or 180 days post-injection (pi). Both non-fibrillized recombinant α-syn and PFF α-syn injections resulted in phosphorylated α-syn intraneuronal accumulations (i.e., diffuse Lewy neurite (LN)- and LB-like inclusions) with significantly greater accumulations following PFF injection. LB-like inclusions were observed in several areas that innervate the striatum, most prominently the frontal and insular cortices, the amygdala, and the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). α-Syn accumulations co-localized with ubiquitin, p62, and were thioflavin-S-positive and proteinase-k resistant, suggesting that PFF-induced pathology exhibits properties similar to human LBs. Although α-syn inclusions within the SNpc remained ipsilateral to striatal injection, we observed bilateral reductions in nigral dopamine neurons at the 180-day time-point in both the 1- and 2-site PFF injection paradigms. PFF injected rats exhibited bilateral reductions in striatal dopaminergic innervation at 60 and 180 days and bilateral decreases in homovanillic acid; however, dopamine reduction was observed only in the striatum ipsilateral to PFF injection. Although the level of dopamine asymmetry in PFF injected rats at 180 days was insufficient to elicit motor deficits in amphetamine-induced rotations or forelimb use in the

  8. Non-dopaminergic neurons in ventral mesencephalic transplants make widespread axonal connections in the host brain.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lachlan H; Kirik, Deniz; Björklund, Anders

    2008-09-01

    Motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) can be effectively alleviated through intra-striatal transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue. The success of this approach is dependent on the survival, axonal outgrowth and synaptic integration of newly grafted dopamine neurons with the host striatum. The functional outcome of transplantation therapy has, however, been highly variable, particularly in PD patients, but also in animal models of PD, and thus there is a need for a deeper understanding of possible mechanisms underlying this variability such as graft composition and the resulting graft-host connectivity. Here we describe a series of transplantation experiments whereby mouse VM tissue has been grafted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Six weeks after grafting immunohistochemical analysis using the mouse specific 'M2M6' antibodies revealed both dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic components of graft-derived fibre outgrowth into the host brain. We report here that while dopaminergic outgrowth was predominately confined to the striatum, there was also a significant degree of non-dopaminergic outgrowth to extra-striatal structures including the thalamus, cortex and midbrain. Retrograde tracing experiments showed that grafted neurons of GABAergic identity contribute to this non-dopaminergic outgrowth. In line with our recent findings on the function of serotonergic neurons in fetal VM grafts, these results further underscore the potential impact that non-dopaminergic neurons may have on the functional outcome of intrastriatal fetal VM grafts. PMID:18602916

  9. Dopaminergic imaging of nonmotor manifestations in a rat model of Parkinson's disease by fMRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Chi V; Shih, Yen-Yu I; Chang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Nonmotor manifestations determine the life quality of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Identification of the nonmotor symptoms in PD as definite changes will represent a milestone in its diagnosis. Outcome measures that characterize nonmotor manifestations with specificity for dopaminergic deficiency are essential to that goal. Pain is a prevalent sensory disturbance in PD patients. The prevalence was reported to be up to 83%. Nociceptive stimuli under normal conditions elicit decreases in cerebral blood volume (CBV) in the striatum via dopaminergic neurotransmission. This nociception-induced CBV response is potentially to be defined as a characteristic of the pain symptom of PD. To validate this concept, steady-state CBV-weighted functional magnetic resonance imaging with iron oxide nanoparticles was employed to measure CBV changes in parkinsonian rats. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistology was used to identify the dopaminergic integrity to corroborate the imaging findings. Additional experiments that tested pain responses in parkinsonism were also carried out. The results revealed that the lesioned striatum exhibited a weakened CBV decrease in response to the nociceptive stimulus. This weakened CBV response occurred mainly in areas with dopaminergic denervation. A strong correspondence was observed between the distributions of the nociception-induced CBV responses and dopaminergic innervation. The persisting CBV signals in the striatum were abolished by the D2/D3 antagonist eticlopride. The findings of these behavioral, neuroimaging, immunohistological, and pharmacological experiments demonstrate that pain in a rat model of PD can be characterized by nociception induced striatal CBV signal changes with specificity for dopaminergic dysfunction. PMID:22842018

  10. Histone Hyperacetylation Up-regulates Protein Kinase Cδ in Dopaminergic Neurons to Induce Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Kondru, Naveen; Ghosh, Anamitra; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Rana, Ajay; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stress-sensitive protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) has been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms regulating PKCδ expression in neurons. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which the PKCδ gene can be regulated by histone acetylation. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaBu) induced PKCδ expression in cultured neurons, brain slices, and animal models. Several other HDAC inhibitors also mimicked NaBu. The chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that hyperacetylation of histone H4 by NaBu is associated with the PKCδ promoter. Deletion analysis of the PKCδ promoter mapped the NaBu-responsive element to an 81-bp minimal promoter region. Detailed mutagenesis studies within this region revealed that four GC boxes conferred hyperacetylation-induced PKCδ promoter activation. Cotransfection experiments and Sp inhibitor studies demonstrated that Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 regulated NaBu-induced PKCδ up-regulation. However, NaBu did not alter the DNA binding activities of Sp proteins or their expression. Interestingly, a one-hybrid analysis revealed that NaBu enhanced transcriptional activity of Sp1/Sp3. Overexpression of the p300/cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP) potentiated the NaBu-mediated transactivation potential of Sp1/Sp3, but expressing several HDACs attenuated this effect, suggesting that p300/CBP and HDACs act as coactivators or corepressors in histone acetylation-induced PKCδ up-regulation. Finally, using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that NaBu up-regulation of PKCδ sensitizes neurons to cell death in a human dopaminergic cell model and brain slice cultures. Together, these results indicate that histone acetylation regulates PKCδ expression to augment nigrostriatal dopaminergic cell death, which could contribute to the progressive neuropathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:25342743

  11. Adolescent exposure to MDMA induces dopaminergic toxicity in substantia nigra and potentiates the amyloid plaque deposition in the striatum of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice.

    PubMed

    Abad, Sonia; Ramon, Carla; Pubill, David; Camarasa, Jorge; Camins, Antonio; Escubedo, Elena

    2016-09-01

    MDMA is one of the most used drugs by adolescents and its consumption has been associated with many psychobiological problems, among them psychomotor problems. Moreover, some authors described that early exposure to MDMA may render the dopaminergic neurons more vulnerable to the effects of future neurotoxic insults. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the main cause of dementia in the elderly and a percentage of the patients have predisposition to suffer nigrostriatal alterations, developing extrapyramidal signs. Nigrostriatal dysfunction in the brain of aged APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1), a mouse model of familiar AD (FAD), has also been described. The aim of the present study was to investigate the consequences of adolescent exposure to MDMA in APP/PS1 mice, on nigrostriatal function on early adulthood. We used a MDMA schedule simulating weekend binge abuse of this substance. Our MDMA schedule produced a genotype-independent decrease in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that remained at least 3months. Shortly after the injury, wild-type animals showed a decrease in the locomotor activity and apparent DA depletion in striatum, however in the APP/PS1 mice neither the locomotor activity nor the DA levels were modified, but a reduction in dopamine transporter (DAT) expression and a higher levels of oxidative stress were observed. We found that these disturbances are age-related characteristics that this APP/PS1 mice develops spontaneously much later. Therefore, MDMA administration seems to anticipate the striatal dopaminergic dysfunction in this FAD model. The most important outcome lies in a potentiation, by MDMA, of the amyloid beta deposition in the striatum. PMID:27344237

  12. Epothilone D prevents binge methamphetamine-mediated loss of striatal dopaminergic markers.

    PubMed

    Killinger, Bryan A; Moszczynska, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to binge methamphetamine (METH) can result in a permanent or transient loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) markers such as dopamine (DA), dopamine transporter, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the striatum. We hypothesized that the METH-induced loss of striatal DAergic markers was, in part, due to a destabilization of microtubules (MTs) in the nigrostriatal DA pathway that ultimately impedes anterograde axonal transport of these markers. To test this hypothesis, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with binge METH or saline in the presence or absence of epothilone D (EpoD), a MT-stabilizing compound, and assessed 3 days after the treatments for the levels of several DAergic markers as well as for the levels of tubulins and their post-translational modifications (PMTs). Binge METH induced a loss of stable long-lived MTs within the striatum but not within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Treatment with a low dose of EpoD increased the levels of markers of stable MTs and prevented METH-mediated deficits in several DAergic markers in the striatum. In contrast, administration of a high dose of EpoD appeared to destabilize MTs and potentiated the METH-induced deficits in several DAergic markers. The low-dose EpoD also prevented the METH-induced increase in striatal DA turnover and increased behavioral stereotypy during METH treatment. Together, these results demonstrate that MT dynamics plays a role in the development of METH-induced losses of several DAergic markers in the striatum and may mediate METH-induced degeneration of terminals in the nigrostriatal DA pathway. Our study also demonstrates that MT-stabilizing drugs such as EpoD have a potential to serve as useful therapeutic agents to restore function of DAergic nerve terminals following METH exposure when administered at low doses. Administration of binge methamphetamine (METH) negatively impacts neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. The effects of METH include

  13. Prenatal cocaine exposure decreases nigrostriatal dopamine release in vitro: effects of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Glatt, Stephen J; Trksak, George H; Cohen, Ori S; Simeone, Benjamin P; Jackson, Denise

    2004-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine (PCOC) exposure, age, sex, and estrous phase on the functional development of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons. Striatal tissue was obtained from prepubescent and adult rats of both sexes after bidaily exposure to saline (1 ml/kg) or cocaine (20 mg/kg/ml saline) from embryonic days 15-21. Tissue levels, basal release, and electrically evoked (1 or 8 Hz) overflow of endogenous DA and its metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), as well as their efflux in response to superfusion with the DA transport blocker, nomifensine (10 microM), were measured from superfused striatal slices. Generally, these measures were highest in tissue from males and adults. Tissue DA and DOPAC levels and the rate of DA turnover were unaffected by PCOC exposure. Slices from PCOC-exposed juvenile and adult male rats exhibited significantly reduced basal and electrically evoked DA release at both stimulation intensities, in conjunction with higher levels of presynaptic DA reuptake. Female rats were largely spared from the effects of PCOC exposure, and measures did not vary with estrous phase. These findings demonstrate that the effects of PCOC exposure on various parameters of nigrostriatal DA neuronal function are not uniform across age, sex, or phases of the estrous cycle. These novel alterations in nigrostriatal DA transmission are in need of independent replication, but they may have profound implications for behavioral activities regulated by these neurons and, thus, may provide a basis for sex-selective effects of PCOC in exposed humans. Possible mechanisms of deleterious effects of PCOC exposure in select groups are discussed. PMID:15170820

  14. Prevalence of impaired odor identification in Parkinson disease with imaging evidence of nigrostriatal denervation.

    PubMed

    Haugen, Jacob; Müller, Martijn L T M; Kotagal, Vikas; Albin, Roger L; Koeppe, Robert A; Scott, Peter J H; Frey, Kirk A; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2016-04-01

    There is wide variability in the reported prevalence rates of abnormal smell in Parkinson disease (PD). This study assessed the prevalence of abnormal smell, using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), in 183 patients with PD with confirmed PET imaging evidence of nigrostriatal denervation. Impaired olfaction in this sample was nearly universal (97.8 %). Wide-ranging prior olfactory impairment estimates may reflect not only uncertainty regarding diagnostic classification, but also the use of inaccurate normative data and differences in olfactory tests used. PMID:26911386

  15. Protection of dichlorvos induced oxidative stress and nigrostriatal neuronal death by chronic Coenzyme Q{sub 10} pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Binukumar, BK; Gupta, Nidhi; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2011-10-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown an association between pesticide exposure and increased risk of developing Parkinson's diseases. Oxidative stress generated as a result of mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as an important factor in the etiology of Parkinson's disease. Previously, we reported that chronic dichlorvos exposure causes mitochondrial impairments and nigrostriatal neuronal death in rats. The present study was designed to test whether Coenzyme Q{sub 10} (CoQ{sub 10}) administration has any neuroprotective effect against dichlorvos mediated nigrostriatal neuronal death, {alpha}-synuclein aggregation, and motor dysfunction. Male albino rats were administered dichlorvos by subcutaneous injection at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight over a period of 12 weeks. Results obtained there after showed that dichlorvos exposure leads to enhanced mitochondrial ROS production, {alpha}-synuclein aggregation, decreased dopamine and its metabolite levels resulting in nigrostriatal neurodegeneration. Pretreatment by Coenzyme Q{sub 10} (4.5 mg/kg ip for 12 weeks) to dichlorvos treated animals significantly attenuated the extent of nigrostriatal neuronal damage, in terms of decreased ROS production, increased dopamine and its metabolite levels, and restoration of motor dysfunction when compared to dichlorvos treated animals. Thus, the present study shows that Coenzyme Q{sub 10} administration may attenuate dichlorvos induced nigrostriatal neurodegeneration, {alpha}-synuclein aggregation and motor dysfunction by virtue of its antioxidant action. - Highlights: > CoQ{sub 10} administration attenuates dichlorvos induced nigrostriatal neurodegenaration. > CoQ{sub 10} pre treatment leads to preservation of TH-IR neurons. > CoQ{sub 10} may decrease oxidative damage and {alpha}-synuclin aggregation. > CoQ{sub 10} treatment enhances motor function and protects rats from catalepsy.

  16. Effects of GDF5 overexpression on embryonic rat dopaminergic neurones in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, David B; Harrison, Patrick T; Sullivan, Aideen M

    2010-05-01

    Transplantation of embryonic dopaminergic neurones has shown promise for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but this approach is limited by the poor survival of the transplanted cells. Exogenous dopaminergic neurotrophic factors such as growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) have been found to enhance the survival of transplanted dopaminergic neurones. However, this approach is limited by the rapid degradation of such factors in vivo; thus, methods for long-term delivery of these factors are under investigation. The present study shows, using optimised lipid-mediated transfection procedures, that overexpression of GDF5 significantly improves the survival of dopaminergic neurones in cultures of embryonic day (E) 13 rat ventral mesencephalon (VM) and protects them against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced toxicity. In another experiment, E13 VM cells were transfected with GDF5 after 1 day in vitro (DIV), then transplanted into 6-OHDA-lesioned adult rat striata after 2 DIV. The survival of these E13 VM dopaminergic neurones after transfection and transplantation was as least as high as that of freshly dissected E14 VM dopaminergic neurones, demonstrating that transfection was not detrimental to these cells. Furthermore, GDF5-overexpressing E13 VM transplants significantly reduced amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry in the lesioned rats. This study shows that lipid-mediated transfection in vitro prior to transplantation is a valid approach for the introduction of neurotrophic proteins such as GDF5, as well as lending further support to the potential use of GDF5 in neuroprotective therapy for PD. PMID:20349094

  17. Dieldrin exposure induces oxidative damage in the mouse nigrostriatal dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Jaime M; Richardson, Jason R; Guillot, Thomas S; McCormack, Alison L; Di Monte, Donato A; Jones, Dean P; Pennell, Kurt D; Miller, Gary W

    2007-04-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown an association between pesticide exposure and an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we provide evidence that the insecticide dieldrin causes specific oxidative damage in the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. We report that exposure of mice to low levels of dieldrin for 30 days resulted in alterations in dopamine-handling as evidenced by a decrease in dopamine metabolites, DOPAC (31.7% decrease) and HVA (29.2% decrease) and significantly increased cysteinyl-catechol levels in the striatum. Furthermore, dieldrin resulted in a 53% decrease in total glutathione, an increase in the redox potential of glutathione, and a 90% increase in protein carbonyls. Alpha-synuclein protein expression was also significantly increased in the striatum (25% increase). Finally, dieldrin caused a significant decrease in striatal expression of the dopamine transporter as measured by (3)H-WIN 35,428 binding and (3)H-dopamine uptake. These alterations occurred in the absence of dopamine neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta. These effects represent the ability of low doses of dieldrin to increase the vulnerability of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons by inducing oxidative stress and suggest that pesticide exposure may act as a promoter of PD. PMID:17291500

  18. Dieldrin exposure induces oxidative damage in the mouse nigrostriatal dopamine system

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Jaime M.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; McCormack, Alison L.; Di Monte, Donato A.; Jones, Dean P.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Miller, Gary W.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown an association between pesticide exposure and an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here, we provide evidence that the insecticide dieldrin causes specific oxidative damage in the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. We report that exposure of mice to low levels of dieldrin for 30 days resulted in alterations in dopamine-handling as evidenced by a decrease in dopamine metabolites, DOPAC (31.7% decrease) and HVA (29.2% decrease) and significantly increased cysteinyl-catechol levels in the striatum. Furthermore, dieldrin resulted in a 53% decrease in total glutathione, an increase in the redox potential of glutathione, and a 90% increase in protein carbonyls. α-Synuclein protein expression was also significantly increased in the striatum (25% increase). Finally, dieldrin caused a significant decrease in striatal expression of the dopamine transporter as measured by 3H-WIN 35,428 binding and 3H-dopamine uptake. These alterations occurred in the absence of dopamine neuron loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta. These effects represent the ability of low doses of dieldrin to increase the vulnerability of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons by inducing oxidative stress and suggest that pesticide exposure may act as a promoter of PD. PMID:17291500

  19. Mapping track density changes in nigrostriatal and extranigral pathways in Parkinson's disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Erik; Rouillard, Maud; André, Elodie; Coolen, Tim; Stender, Johan; Balteau, Evelyne; Phillips, Christophe; Garraux, Gaëtan

    2014-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) the demonstration of neuropathological disturbances in nigrostriatal and extranigral brain pathways using magnetic resonance imaging remains a challenge. Here, we applied a novel diffusion-weighted imaging approach—track density imaging (TDI). Twenty-seven non-demented Parkinson's patients (mean disease duration: 5 years, mean score on the Hoehn & Yahr scale = 1.5) were compared with 26 elderly controls matched for age, sex, and education level. Track density images were created by sampling each subject's spatially normalized fiber tracks in 1 mm isotropic intervals and counting the fibers that passed through each voxel. Whole-brain voxel-based analysis was performed and significance was assessed with permutation testing. Statistically significant increases in track density were found in the Parkinson's patients, relative to controls. Clusters were distributed in disease-relevant areas including motor, cognitive, and limbic networks. From the lower medulla to the diencephalon and striatum, clusters encompassed the known location of the locus coeruleus and pedunculopontine nucleus in the pons, and from the substantia nigra up to medial aspects of the posterior putamen, bilaterally. The results identified in brainstem and nigrostriatal pathways show a large overlap with the known distribution of neuropathological changes in non-demented PD patients. Our results also support an early involvement of limbic and cognitive networks in Parkinson's disease. PMID:24956065

  20. Dopaminergic Circuitry Underlying Mating Drive.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Stephen X; Rogulja, Dragana; Crickmore, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    We develop a new system for studying how innate drives are tuned to reflect current physiological needs and capacities, and how they affect sensory-motor processing. We demonstrate the existence of male mating drive in Drosophila, which is transiently and cumulatively reduced as reproductive capacity is depleted by copulations. Dopaminergic activity in the anterior of the superior medial protocerebrum (SMPa) is also transiently and cumulatively reduced in response to matings and serves as a functional neuronal correlate of mating drive. The dopamine signal is transmitted through the D1-like DopR2 receptor to P1 neurons, which also integrate sensory information relevant to the perception of females, and which project to courtship motor centers that initiate and maintain courtship behavior. Mating drive therefore converges with sensory information from the female at the point of transition to motor output, controlling the propensity of a sensory percept to trigger goal-directed behavior. PMID:27292538

  1. NEONATAL DESTRUCTION OF DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rats treated as neonates with 6-hydroxydopamine are proposed to model the dopamine deficiency associated with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS). o understand the neurobiological basis of specific behaviors in LNS, investigations were undertaken in these neonatally lesioned rats. everal ...

  2. Cystamine/cysteamine rescues the dopaminergic system and shows neurorestorative properties in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cisbani, G; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Gibrat, C; Saint-Pierre, M; Lagacé, M; Badrinarayanan, S; Lavallée-Bourget, M H; Charest, J; Chabrat, A; Boivin, L; Lebel, M; Bousquet, M; Lévesque, M; Cicchetti, F

    2015-10-01

    The neuroprotective properties of cystamine identified in pre-clinical studies have fast-tracked this compound to clinical trials in Huntington's disease, showing tolerability and benefits on motor symptoms. We tested whether cystamine could have such properties in a Parkinson's disease murine model and now provide evidence that it can not only prevent the neurodegenerative process but also can reverse motor impairments created by a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion 3 weeks post-surgery. Importantly, we report that cystamine has neurorestorative properties 5 weeks post-lesion as seen on the number of nigral dopaminergic neurons which is comparable with treatments of cysteamine, the reduced form of cystamine used in the clinic, as well as rasagiline, increasingly prescribed in early parkinsonism. All three compounds induced neurite arborization of the remaining dopaminergic cells which was further confirmed in ex vivo dopaminergic explants derived from Pitx3-GFP mice. The disease-modifying effects displayed by cystamine/cysteamine would encourage clinical testing. PMID:26232588

  3. Escin, a novel triterpene, mitigates chronic MPTP/p-induced dopaminergic toxicity by attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Govindasamy Pushpavathi; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Rekha, Karamkolly R; Jayaraj, Richard L; Elangovan, Namasivayam

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, chronic, and debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons due to unknown factors. In the present study, we have evaluated if escin, a triterpene saponin from seeds of horse chestnut tree (Aesculus hippocastanum), offers neuroprotection against chronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid (MPTP/p)-induced toxicity using a mouse model. Chronic administration of MPTP/p deteriorated the loss of TH immunoreactivity in striatum. Subsequently, MPTP/p also enhanced oxidative stress by mitochondrial complex I inhibition, thereby ensuing dopaminergic denervation via modulation of Bcl-2, Bax, Cyto-C, and cleaved caspases expressions. However, we observed that pretreatment with escin (4 mg/kg) significantly attenuated MPTP/p-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Furthermore, behavioral studies and ultrastructural analysis of mitochondria and intracellular components were in support of these findings. Therefore, we speculate that escin might be a promising candidate for the prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction-induced apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as PD. PMID:24788336

  4. Targeting Wnt signaling at the neuroimmune interface for dopaminergic neuroprotection/repair in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    L’Episcopo, Francesca; Tirolo, Cataldo; Caniglia, Salvo; Testa, Nuccio; Morale, Maria Concetta; Serapide, Maria Francesca; Pluchino, Stefano; Marchetti, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    During the past three decades, the Wingless-type MMTV integration site (Wnt) signaling cascade has emerged as an essential system regulating multiple processes in developing and adult brain. Accumulating evidence points to a dysregulation of Wnt signaling in major neurodegenerative pathologies including Parkinson’s disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons and deregulated activation of astrocytes and microglia. This review highlights the emerging link between Wnt signaling and key inflammatory pathways during mDA neuron damage/repair in PD progression. In particular, we summarize recent evidence documenting that aging and neurotoxicant exposure strongly antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mDA neurons and subventricular zone (SVZ) neuroprogenitors via astrocyte–microglial interactions. Dysregulation of the crosstalk between Wnt/β-catenin signaling and anti-oxidant/anti-inflammatory pathways delineate novel mechanisms driving the decline of SVZ plasticity with age and the limited nigrostriatal dopaminergic self-repair in PD. These findings hold a promise in developing therapies that target Wnt/β-catenin signaling to enhance endogenous restoration and neuronal outcome in age-dependent diseases, such as PD. PMID:24431301

  5. The Role of Parkin in the Differential Susceptibility of Tuberoinfundibular and Nigrostriatal Dopamine Neurons to Acute Toxicant Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Benskey, Matthew J.; Manfredsson, Fredric P.; Lookingland, Keith J.; Goudreau, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson Disease causes degeneration of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons, while tuberoinfundibular DA neurons remain unaffected. A similar pattern is observed following exposure to 1-methy-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyradine (MPTP). The mechanism of tuberoinfundibular neuronal recovery from MPTP is associated with up-regulation of parkin protein. Here we tested if parkin mediates tuberoinfundibular neuronal recovery from MPTP by knocking-down parkin in tuberoinfundibular neurons using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV), expressing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed toward parkin. Following knockdown, axon terminal DA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) concentrations were analyzed 24 hours post-MPTP administration. rAAV-shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous parkin rendered tuberoinfundibular neurons susceptible to MPTP induced terminal DA loss, but not TH loss, within 24 hours post-MPTP. To determine if the neuroprotective benefits of parkin up-regulation could be translated to nigrostriatal neurons, rAAV expressing human parkin was injected into the substantia nigra of mice and axon terminal DA and TH concentrations were analyzed 24 hours post-MPTP. Nigral parkin over-expression prevented loss of TH in the axon terminals and soma of nigrostriatal neurons, but had no effect on terminal DA loss within 24h post-MPTP. These data show that parkin is necessary for the recovery of terminal DA concentrations within tuberoinfundibular neurons following acute MPTP administration, and parkin can rescue MPTP-induced decreases in TH within nigrostriatal neurons. PMID:25447324

  6. The Effect of Exposure to Atrazine on Dopaminergic Development in Pubertal Male SD Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Shu; He, Xi; Ma, Kun; Wu, Yan-Ping; Li, Bai-Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Atrazine (ATR, 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) is used worldwide as a herbicide, and its presence in the environment has resulted in documented human exposure. A lack of strong evidence for genetic heritability of idiopathic Parkinson's disease has focused attention on environmental toxicants in the disease etiology, particularly agrichemicals. Parkinson's disease is associated with advanced age and is characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, but it is unclear whether specific neuronal damage could result from insults during development. The juvenile period is particularly vulnerable to environmental agent, therefore, we evaluated the effects of a 28-day exposure to ATR on the dopaminergic system in pubertal rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated orally with ATR at 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg bw, daily from postnatal days 27 to 54. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that pubertal exposure to ATR would disrupt the development of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. The content of DA and levodopa (L-DA) were examined in striatum samples by HPLC-FL, and the mRNA and protein expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, orphan nuclear hormone receptor (Nurr1), Nurr1 interacting protein (NuIP), and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors of the Cip̲Kip family (p57kip2) were examined in samples of the nigrostriatum by use of fluorescence Real-Time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Exposure of juvenile rats to the high dose of ATR led to reduced levels of DA and L-DA, genes expression of NuIP, Nurr1, and p57kip2 in animals. PMID:26331294

  7. Parkinson's disease-linked mutations in VPS35 induce dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Tsika, Elpida; Glauser, Liliane; Moser, Roger; Fiser, Aris; Daniel, Guillaume; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Lees, Andrew; Troncoso, Juan C; Lewis, Patrick A; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Schneider, Bernard L; Moore, Darren J

    2014-09-01

    Mutations in the vacuolar protein sorting 35 homolog (VPS35) gene at the PARK17 locus, encoding a key component of the retromer complex, were recently identified as a new cause of late-onset, autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we explore the pathogenic consequences of PD-associated mutations in VPS35 using a number of model systems. VPS35 exhibits a broad neuronal distribution throughout the rodent brain, including within the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. In the human brain, VPS35 protein levels and distribution are similar in tissues from control and PD subjects, and VPS35 is not associated with Lewy body pathology. The common D620N missense mutation in VPS35 does not compromise its protein stability or localization to endosomal and lysosomal vesicles, or the vesicular sorting of the retromer cargo, sortilin, SorLA and cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, in rodent primary neurons or patient-derived human fibroblasts. In yeast we show that PD-linked VPS35 mutations are functional and can normally complement VPS35 null phenotypes suggesting that they do not result in a loss-of-function. In rat primary cortical cultures the overexpression of human VPS35 induces neuronal cell death and increases neuronal vulnerability to PD-relevant cellular stress. In a novel viral-mediated gene transfer rat model, the expression of D620N VPS35 induces the marked degeneration of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons and axonal pathology, a cardinal pathological hallmark of PD. Collectively, these studies establish that dominant VPS35 mutations lead to neurodegeneration in PD consistent with a gain-of-function mechanism, and support a key role for VPS35 in the development of PD. PMID:24740878

  8. Suppression of Parkin enhances nigrostriatal and motor neuron lesion in mice over-expressing human-mutated tau protein.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, J; Rodríguez-Navarro, J A; Solano, R M; Casarejos, M J; Rodal, I; Guerrero, R; Sánchez, M P; Avila, J; Mena, M A; de Yébenes, J G

    2006-07-01

    Abnormal deposition of protein tau takes place in the brain of patients with several neurodegenerative diseases. Few of these patients present frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism and amyotrophy (FTDPA-17), an autosomal dominant tauopathy related to mutations of the gene that codes for protein tau, localized in chromosome 17. The great majority of patients with tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, sporadic frontotemporal dementia or progressive supranuclear palsy do not show a Mendelian pattern of inheritance. We have occasionally seen tauopathies in patients with parkin mutations and, therefore, hypothesized that the protein tau interacts with parkin. We have tested that hypothesis in mice with combined genetic modifications of tau (over-expression of human tau with three mutations known to produce FTDPA-17) and parkin (deleted) proteins. Homozygote parkin null or over-expressing mutated-human tau mice have subtle behavioral and molecular abnormalities but do not express a clinical phenotype of neurodegenerative disease. Mice with combined homozygous mutations of these two genes show progressively abnormal walking already noticeable at 3 months of age, loss of dopamine and dopamine markers in striatum, nuclear tau immunoreactive deposits in motor neurons of the spinal cord, abnormal expression of glial markers and enhanced levels of pro-apoptotic proteins; findings that were absent or less pronounced in homozygote animals with deletions of parkin or over-expression of tau. The double transgenic mice do not express normal mechanisms of adaptation to stress such as increased levels of GSH and Hsp-70. In addition, they have reduced levels of CHIP-Hsc70, a complex known to attenuate aggregation of tau and to enhance ubiquitination of phosphorylated tau. We have found high levels of phosphorylated tau in parkin-/-+tau(VLW) mice and a relative decrease of the inactivated pSer9 to total GSK-3 levels. Our data reveal that there are interactions between tau and parkin that could be relevant for the pathogenesis and treatment of tauopathies. Similarly, we hope that the double transgenic parkin-/-+tau(VLW) mice could be useful for testing of compounds with putative therapeutic value in human tauopathies. PMID:16698879

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of the Nigrostriatal System: Biomarkers of Parkinson’s Disease Stages?

    PubMed Central

    Hopes, Lucie; Grolez, Guillaume; Moreau, Caroline; Lopes, Renaud; Ryckewaert, Gilles; Carrière, Nicolas; Auger, Florent; Laloux, Charlotte; Petrault, Maud; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Bordet, Regis; Defebvre, Luc; Jissendi, Patrice; Delmaire, Christine; Devos, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to identify biomarkers in Parkinson’s disease (PD); R2* values reflect iron content related to high levels of oxidative stress, whereas volume and/or shape changes reflect neuronal death. We sought to assess iron overload in the nigrostriatal system and characterize its relationship with focal and overall atrophy of the striatum in the pivotal stages of PD. Methods Twenty controls and 70 PD patients at different disease stages (untreated de novo patients, treated early-stage patients and advanced-stage patients with L-dopa-related motor complications) were included in the study. We determined the R2* values in the substantia nigra, putamen and caudate nucleus, together with striatal volume and shape analysis. We also measured R2* in an acute MPTP mouse model and in a longitudinal follow-up two years later in the early-stage PD patients. Results The R2* values in the substantia nigra, putamen and caudate nucleus were significantly higher in de novo PD patients than in controls. Early-stage patients displayed significantly higher R2* values in the substantia nigra (with changes in striatal shape), relative to de novo patients. Measurements after a two-year follow-up in early-stage patients and characterization of the acute MPTP mouse model confirmed that R2* changed rapidly with disease progression. Advanced-stage patients displayed significant atrophy of striatum, relative to earlier disease stages. Conclusion Each pivotal stage in PD appears to be characterized by putative nigrostriatal MRI biomarkers: iron overload at the de novo stage, striatal shape changes at early-stage disease and generalized striatal atrophy at advanced disease. PMID:27035571

  10. The preferential nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole and the non-selective one N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester administered alone or jointly with L-DOPA differentially affect motor behavior and monoamine metabolism in sham-operated and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna; Konieczny, Jolanta; Lenda, Tomasz; Lorenc-Koci, Elżbieta

    2015-11-01

    Reciprocal interactions between nitrergic and dopaminergic systems play a key role in the control of motor behavior. In the present study, we performed a comparative analysis of motor behavior (locomotor activity, catalepsy, rotational behavior) and monoamine metabolism in the striatum and substantia nigra of unilaterally sham-operated and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats treated with the preferential neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) or the non-selective one N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), alone or in combination with L-DOPA. Each NOS inhibitor given alone (50mg/kg) induced a distinct catalepsy 30 min after injection but only 7-NI impaired spontaneous locomotion after 10 min. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, chronic L-DOPA (25mg/kg) induced 2.5-h long contralateral rotations. 7-NI (30 and 50mg/kg) markedly reduced the intensity of L-DOPA-induced contralateral rotations while extending their duration until 4.5h whereas L-NAME (50 and 100mg/kg) only tended to attenuate their intensity without affecting the duration. 7-NI but not L-NAME significantly increased endogenous tissue DA levels in the nigrostriatal system of both sham-operated and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. In L-DOPA-treated group, 7-NI significantly enhanced the L-DOPA-derived tissue DA content in this system and decreased the level of the intracellular DA metabolite DOPAC produced by monoamine oxidase (MAO). In contrast to 7-NI, L-NAME decreased markedly DA content and did not affect DOPAC level in the ipsilateral striatum. It means that the differences in 7-NI and L-NAME-mediated modulation of L-DOPA-induced behavioral and biochemical effects resulted not only from the inhibition of NOS activity but also from differences in their ability to inhibit MAO. PMID:26319690

  11. Pathway-specific dopaminergic deficits in a mouse model of Angelman syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Riday, Thorfinn T.; Dankoski, Elyse C.; Krouse, Michael C.; Fish, Eric W.; Walsh, Paul L.; Han, Ji Eun; Hodge, Clyde W.; Wightman, R. Mark; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Malanga, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by maternal deletions or mutations of the ubiquitin ligase E3A (UBE3A) allele and characterized by minimal verbal communication, seizures, and disorders of voluntary movement. Previous studies have suggested that abnormal dopamine neurotransmission may underlie some of these deficits, but no effective treatment currently exists for the core features of AS. A clinical trial of levodopa (l-DOPA) in AS is ongoing, although the underlying rationale for this treatment strategy has not yet been thoroughly examined in preclinical models. We found that AS model mice lacking maternal Ube3a (Ube3am–/p+ mice) exhibit behavioral deficits that correlated with abnormal dopamine signaling. These deficits were not due to loss of dopaminergic neurons or impaired dopamine synthesis. Unexpectedly, Ube3am–/p+ mice exhibited increased dopamine release in the mesolimbic pathway while also exhibiting a decrease in dopamine release in the nigrostriatal pathway, as measured with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. These findings demonstrate the complex effects of UBE3A loss on dopamine signaling in subcortical motor pathways that may inform ongoing clinical trials of l-DOPA therapy in patients with AS. PMID:23143301

  12. Myricitrin Ameliorates 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss in the Substantia Nigra of Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Deok; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, resulting from the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) pathway. The cause of DA neuronal loss in PD is still unclear; however, accumulating evidence suggests that treatment with certain flavonoids can induce neuroprotective properties, such as activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models of PD. The bioflavonoid myricitrin is well known for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. However, it is unclear whether systemic treatment with myricitrin can protect neurons against neurotoxin-induced DA degeneration in vivo via the preservation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the induction of mTORC1 activation. Our results found no significant neuroprotective effect of 30 mg/kg myricitrin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra (SN) of mice. However, myricitrin treatment with 60 mg/kg protected DA neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, myricitrin treatment preserved TH enzyme activity and mTORC1 activation in nigral DA neurons in the SN of 6-OHDA-treated mice, and its treatment suppressed an increase in tumor necrosis factor-α expression in activated microglia. These results suggest that myricitrin may have neuroprotective properties linked to mTORC1 activation, preservation of TH enzyme activity, and anti-neuroinflammation for preventing DA neuronal degeneration in vivo. PMID:26991235

  13. The TaClo concept: 1-trichloromethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline (TaClo), a new toxin for dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Bringmann, G; God, R; Feineis, D; Wesemann, W; Riederer, P; Rausch, W D; Reichmann, H; Sontag, K H

    1995-01-01

    Due to its structural analogy to the neurotoxin MPTP, "TaClo" (1-trichloromethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-beta-carboline), a compound readily originating in vitro from tryptamine ("Ta") and chloral ("Clo"), is discussed as a potential natural inducer of parkinsonian-like symptoms. Its spontaneous formation in man has to be taken into account after application of the drug chloral hydrate or after exposure to the solvent trichloroethylene. This first representative of chloral-derived heterocycles could now indeed be demonstrated to be formed in vivo after application of its putative precursors to rats. In vivo analysis of the nigrostriatal dopamine metabolism, behavioural studies, and histochemical findings as well as a strong inhibition of the complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain revealed the neurotoxic potential of TaClo on the dopaminergic system. PMID:8821060

  14. Dopaminergic Dysregulation, Artistic Expressiveness, and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    López-Pousa, S.; Lombardía-Fernández, C.; Olmo, J. Garre; Monserrat-Vila, S.; Vilalta-Franch, J.; Calvó-Perxas, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The most frequent behavioral manifestations in Parkinson's disease (PD) are attributed to the dopaminergic dysregulation syndrome (DDS), which is considered to be secondary to the iatrogenic effects of the drugs that replace dopamine. Over the past few years some cases of patients improving their creative abilities after starting treatment with dopaminergic pharmaceuticals have been reported. These effects have not been clearly associated to DDS, but a relationship has been pointed out. Methods Case study of a patient with PD. The evolution of her paintings along medication changes and disease advance has been analyzed. Results The patient showed a compulsive increase of pictorial production after the diagnosis of PD was made. She made her best paintings when treated with cabergolide, and while painting, she reported a feeling of well-being, with loss of awareness of the disease and reduction of physical limitations. Conclusions Dopaminergic antagonists (DA) trigger a dopaminergic dysfunction that alters artistic creativity in patients having a predisposition for it. The development of these skills might be due to the dopaminergic overstimulation due to the therapy with DA, which causes a neurophysiological alteration that globally determines DDS. PMID:23185168

  15. Disruption in dopaminergic innervation during photoreceptor degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Elena; Yee, Christopher W; Sagdullaev, Botir T

    2016-04-15

    Dopaminergic amacrine cells (DACs) release dopamine in response to light-driven synaptic inputs, and are critical to retinal light adaptation. Retinal degeneration (RD) compromises the light responsiveness of the retina and, subsequently, dopamine metabolism is impaired. As RD progresses, retinal neurons exhibit aberrant activity, driven by AII amacrine cells, a primary target of the retinal dopaminergic network. Surprisingly, DACs are an exception to this physiological change; DACs exhibit rhythmic activity in healthy retina, but do not burst in RD. The underlying mechanism of this divergent behavior is not known. It is also unclear whether RD leads to structural changes in DACs, impairing functional regulation of AII amacrine cells. Here we examine the anatomical details of DACs in three mouse models of human RD to determine how changes to the dopaminergic network may underlie physiological changes in RD. By using rd10, rd1, and rd1/C57 mice we were able to dissect the impacts of genetic background and the degenerative process on DAC structure in RD retina. We found that DACs density, soma size, and primary dendrite length are all significantly reduced. Using a novel adeno-associated virus-mediated technique to label AII amacrine cells in mouse retina, we observed diminished dopaminergic contacts to AII amacrine cells in RD mice. This was accompanied by changes to the components responsible for dopamine synthesis and release. Together, these data suggest that structural alterations of the retinal dopaminergic network underlie physiological changes during RD. PMID:26356010

  16. Olfactory impairment in the rotenone model of Parkinson’s disease is associated with bulbar dopaminergic D2 activity after REM sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Lais S.; Targa, Adriano D. S.; Noseda, Ana Carolina D.; Aurich, Mariana F.; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Lima, Marcelo M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deficits are commonly found in untreated subjects with a recent diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Additionally, different studies report declines in olfactory performance during a short period of sleep deprivation. Mechanisms underlying these clinical manifestations are poorly understood, and impairment of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the olfactory bulb and the nigrostriatal pathway may have important roles in olfaction and REM sleep disturbances. Therefore, we hypothesized that modulation of the dopaminergic D2 receptors in the olfactory bulb could provide a more comprehensive understanding of the olfactory deficits in PD and REM sleep deprivation (REMSD). We decided to investigate the olfactory, neurochemical, and histological alterations generated through the administration of piribedil (a selective D2 agonist) or raclopride (a selective D2 antagonist) within the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb, in rats subjected to intranigral rotenone and REMSD. Our findings provide evidence of the occurrence of a negative correlation (r = −0.52, P = 0.04) between the number of periglomerular TH-ir neurons and the bulbar levels of DA in the rotenone, but not sham, groups. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.34, P = 0.03) was observed between nigrostriatal DA levels and olfactory discrimination index (DI) for the sham groups, indicating that increased DA levels in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) are associated with enhanced olfactory discrimination performance. Also, increased levels in bulbar and striatal DA were induced by piribedil in the rotenone control and rotenone REMSD groups, consistent with reductions in the DI. The present evidence reinforce the idea that DA produced by periglomerular neurons, particularly the bulbar dopaminergic D2 receptors, is an essential participant in olfactory discrimination processes, as the SNpc, and the striatum. PMID:25520618

  17. [Impact of opiates on dopaminergic neurons].

    PubMed

    Kaufling, Jennifer; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Since the work of Johnson and North, it is known that opiates increase the activity of dopaminergic neurons by a GABA neuron-mediated desinhibition. This model should however be updated based on recent advances. Thus, the neuroanatomical location of the GABA neurons responsible for this desinhibition has been recently detailed: they belong to a brain structure in continuity with the posterior part of the ventral tegmental area and discovered this past decade. Other data also highlighted the critical role played by glutamatergic transmission in the opioid regulation of dopaminergic neuron activity. During protracted opiate withdrawal, the inhibitory/excitatory balance exerted on dopaminergic neurons is altered. These results are now leading to propose an original hypothesis for explaining the impact of protracted opiate withdrawal on mood. PMID:27406773

  18. Mesocortical dopaminergic function and human cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, D.R.; Berman, K.F.; Chase, T.N.

    1988-01-01

    In summary, we have reviewed rCBF data in humans that suggest that mesoprefrontal dopaminergic activity is involved in human cognition. In patients with Parkinson's disease and possibly in patients with schizophrenia, prefrontal physiological activation during a cognitive task that appears to depend on prefrontal neural systems correlates positively with cognitive performance on the task and with clinical signs of dopaminergic function. It may be possible in the future to examine prefrontal dopamine metabolism directly during prefrontal cognition using positron emission tomography and tracers such as F-18 DOPA. 21 references.

  19. Induction of A9 dopaminergic neurons from neural stem cells improves motor function in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Fiona E; Scott, Sarah A; Tyers, Pam; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Zufferey, Romain; Caldwell, Maeve A

    2008-03-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are widely endorsed as a cell source for replacement strategies in neurodegenerative disease. However, their usefulness is currently limited by the inability to induce specific neurotransmitter phenotypes in these cells. In order to direct dopaminergic neuronal fate, we overexpressed Pitx3 in NSCs that were then exposed to E11 developing ventral mesencephalon (VM) in explant culture. This resulted in a significant potentiation of dopaminergic differentiation of the cells. When transplanted into the 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Parkinsonian rats, these cografts of VM and Pitx3 overexpressing NSCs resulted in a significant restitution of motor function. In addition, there were greater numbers of Girk2 positive A9 neurons in the periphery of the transplants that were NSC derived. This demonstrates that given the correct signals, NSCs can be induced to become dopaminergic neurons that can differentiate into the correct nigrastriatal phenotype required for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:18202103

  20. Reconstruction of the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lachlan H; Grealish, Shane; Kirik, Deniz; Björklund, Anders

    2009-08-01

    Transplants of fetal dopamine neurons can be used to restore dopamine neurotransmission in animal models of Parkinson's disease, as well as in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. In these studies the cells are placed in the striatum rather than in the substantia nigra where they normally reside, which may limit their ability to achieve full restoration of motor function. Using a microtransplantation approach, which allows precise placement of small cell deposits directly into the host substantia nigra, and fetal donor cells that express green fluorescent protein under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter, we show that dopamine neuroblasts implanted into the substantia nigra of adult mice are capable of generating a new nigrostriatal pathway with an outgrowth pattern that matches the anatomy of the intrinsic system. This target-directed regrowth was closely aligned with the intrinsic striatonigral fibre projection and further enhanced by over-expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in the striatal target. Results from testing of amphetamine-induced rotational behaviour suggest, moreover, that dopamine neurons implanted into the substantia nigra are also capable of integrating into the host circuitry at the functional level. PMID:19674082

  1. Deterministic Tractography of the Nigrostriatal-Nigropallidal Pathway in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wen-Qi; Yeoh, Chooi-Sum; Rumpel, Helmut; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Lye, Weng-Kit; Tan, Eng-King; Chan, Ling-Ling

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that deterministic tractography is practical and sensitive to changes in the complex nigrostriatal and nigropallidal pathway (NSP) in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, we investigated the NSP to evaluate differences between PD patients and controls, and examined their clinico-radiologic correlation. Structural and DTI brain scans were obtained in 40 subjects (21 PD patients and 19 healthy controls). We isolated the NSP using a user-friendly DTI toolkit based on deterministic brute-force tractography. DTI parameters of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, axial, and radial diffusivity, and streamline count of the NSP were measured. Average FA (p < 0.01) and streamline count (p < 0.001) were significantly lower in the PD compared to control group. Mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were significantly higher in the PD group (p < 0.05). Average streamline count correlated with the United Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale motor score (p < 0.05). Point-to-point FA profiles of the tract demonstrated peak divergence between PD and control towards the tract midpoint rather than the distal grey matter. Our findings demonstrated a clinically and radiologically practical application of DTI tractography to the NSP in PD, without requiring complex imaging sequences for anatomical localization or segmentation software. PMID:26619969

  2. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 interactions with adrenergic and dopaminergic systems in mucosal protection in stress.

    PubMed

    Sikirić, P; Mazul, B; Seiwerth, S; Grabarević, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagić, V; Turković, B; Rotkvić, I; Mise, S; Zoricić, I; Jurina, L; Konjevoda, P; Hanzevacki, M; Gjurasin, M; Separović, J; Ljubanović, D; Artuković, B; Bratulić, M; Tisljar, M; Miklić, P; Sumajstorcić, J

    1997-03-01

    Since superior protection against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions and antiinflammatory and analgesic activities were noted for pentadecapeptide BPC (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice protein named BPC), the beneficial mechanism of BPC 157 and its likely interactions with other systems were studied. Hence its beneficial effects would be abolished by adrenal gland medullectomy, the influence of different agents affecting alpha, beta, and dopamine receptors on BPC 157 gastroprotection in 48 h restraint stress was further investigated. Animals were pretreated (1 hr before stress) with saline (controls) or BPC 157 (dissolved in saline) (10 microg or 10 ng/kg body wt intraperitoneally or intragastrically) applied either alone to establish basal conditions or, when manipulating the adrenergic or dopaminergic system, a simultaneous administration was carried out with various agents with specific effects on adrenergic or dopaminergic receptors [given in milligrams per kilogram intraperitoneally except for atenolol, which was given subcutaneously] phentolamine (10.0), prazosin (0.5), yohimbine (5.0), clonidine (0.1) (alpha-adrenergic domain), propranolol (1.0), atenolol (20.0) (beta-adrenergic domain), domperidone (5.0), and haloperidol (5.0) (peripheral/central dopamine system). Alternatively, agents stimulating adrenergic or dopaminergic systems--adrenaline (5.0) or bromocriptine (10.0)--were applied. A strong protection, noted following intragastric or intraperitoneal administration of BPC 157, was fully abolished by coadministration of phentolamine, clonidine, and haloperidol, and consistently not affected by prazosin, yohimbine, or domperidone. Atenolol abolished only intraperitoneal BPC 157 protection, whereas propranolol affected specifically intragastric BPC 157 protection. Interestingly, the severe course of lesion development obtained in basal conditions, unlike BPC 157 gastroprotection, was not influenced by the application of

  3. Extrastriatal Dopaminergic Circuits of the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Rommelfanger, Karen S.; Wichmann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The basal ganglia are comprised of the striatum, the external and internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPe and GPi, respectively), the subthalamic nucleus (STN), and the substantia nigra pars compacta and reticulata (SNc and SNr, respectively). Dopamine has long been identified as an important modulator of basal ganglia function in the striatum, and disturbances of striatal dopaminergic transmission have been implicated in diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), addiction and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, recent evidence suggests that dopamine may also modulate basal ganglia function at sites outside of the striatum, and that changes in dopaminergic transmission at these sites may contribute to the symptoms of PD and other neuropsychiatric disorders. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the anatomy, functional effects and behavioral consequences of the dopaminergic innervation to the GPe, GPi, STN, and SNr. Further insights into the dopaminergic modulation of basal ganglia function at extrastriatal sites may provide us with opportunities to develop new and more specific strategies for treating disorders of basal ganglia dysfunction. PMID:21103009

  4. Metabolic Covariant Network in Relation to Nigrostriatal Degeneration in Carbon Monoxide Intoxication-Related Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Huang, Shu-Hua; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Nai-Ching; Lui, Chun-Chung; Lee, Chen-Chang; Hsu, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Presence of parkinsonian features after carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication is well known and the severity was found to relate to the pre-synaptic dopaminergic deficits. There is no systemic study to analyse the functional network involved in CO-related Parkinsonism. Forty-five CO-related parkinsonism patients and 25 aged-matched controls completed the 3D T1-weighted imaging and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was performed to assess the structural and functional brain differences between the patients and controls. Spatial covariant networks responsible for distinguishing patients and controls were constructed using independent component analysis. For validation, the pre-synaptic dopaminergic functional network was established by regression model using striatal TRODAT-1 SPECT as the independent variable. The clinical significance of both networks was determined by correlation with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Compared with controls, the spatial covariant signals of FDG-PET were significantly lower in the medial and lateral frontal, caudate nucleus, dorsomedial prefrontal areas, and temporal-parietal regions while the spatial intensities correlated significantly with UPDRS total scores. The functional network that correlated with striatum pre-synaptic dopaminergic uptakes included the midbrain, thalamus, caudate, lateral frontal cortex, ventral striatum, ventral, or dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Both networks overlapped considerably and the topographies reflected structural damage pattern. Our study provides evidence that glucose metabolism in CO-parkinsonism patients pertains to an organized covariant pattern in the cortical regions that is spatially coherent with the cortical map of pre-synaptic dopamine deficits. As the fronto-temporal, striatum, and temporal-parietal areas were involved, the unique metabolic covariant network suggests a different pathophysiology in CO

  5. Protein kinase Cδ upregulation in microglia drives neuroinflammatory responses and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in experimental models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard; Singh, Neeraj; Lawana, Vivek; Ghosh, Anamitra; Harischandra, Dilshan S; Jin, Huajun; Hogan, Colleen; Sarkar, Souvarish; Rokad, Dharmin; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-09-01

    Chronic microglial activation has been linked to the progressive degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons evidenced in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The exact etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Although both oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are identified as co-contributors in PD pathogenesis, signaling mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative processes have yet to be defined. Indeed, we recently identified that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) activation is critical for induction of dopaminergic neuronal loss in response to neurotoxic stressors. However, it remains to be defined whether PKCδ activation contributes to immune signaling events driving microglial neurotoxicity. In the present study, we systematically investigated whether PKCδ contributes to the heightened microglial activation response following exposure to major proinflammatory stressors, including α-synuclein, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We report that exposure to the aforementioned inflammatory stressors dramatically upregulated PKCδ with a concomitant increase in its kinase activity and nuclear translocation in both BV-2 microglial cells and primary microglia. Importantly, we also observed a marked upregulation of PKCδ in the microglia of the ventral midbrain region of PD patients when compared to age-matched controls, suggesting a role for microglial PKCδ in neurodegenerative processes. Further, shRNA-mediated knockdown and genetic ablation of PKCδ in primary microglia blunted the microglial proinflammatory response elicited by the inflammogens, including ROS generation, nitric oxide production, and proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release. Importantly, we found that PKCδ activated NFκB, a key mediator of inflammatory signaling events, after challenge with inflammatory stressors, and that transactivation of NFκB led to translocation of the p65 subunit to the nucleus, IκBα degradation and phosphorylation of p65

  6. Protein Kinase Cδ Upregulation in Microglia Drives Neuroinflammatory Responses and Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Experimental Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Richard; Singh, Neeraj; Lawana, Vivek; Ghosh, Anamitra; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Jin, Huajun; Hogan, Colleen; Sarkar, Souvarish; Rokad, Dharmin; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-01-01

    Chronic microglial activation has been linked to the progressive degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons evidenced in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The exact etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Although both oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are identified as co-contributors in PD pathogenesis, signaling mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative processes have yet to be defined. Indeed, we recently identified that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) activation is critical for induction of dopaminergic neuronal loss in response to neurotoxic stressors. However, it remains to be defined whether PKCδ activation contributes to immune signaling events driving microglial neurotoxicity. In the present study, we systematically investigated whether PKCδ contributes to the heightened microglial activation response following exposure to major proinflammatory stressors, including α-synuclein, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We report that exposure to the aforementioned inflammatory stressors dramatically upregulated PKCδ with a concomitant increase in its kinase activity and nuclear translocation in both BV-2 microglial cells and primary microglia. Importantly, we also observed a marked upregulation of PKCδ in the microglia of the ventral midbrain region of PD patients when compared to age-matched controls, suggesting a role for microglial PKCδ in neurodegenerative processes. Further, shRNA-mediated knockdown and genetic ablation of PKCδ in primary microglia blunted the microglial proinflammatory response elicited by the inflammogens, including ROS generation, nitric oxide production, and proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release. Importantly, we found that PKCδ activated NFκB, a key mediator of inflammatory signaling events, after challenge with inflammatory stressors, and that transactivation of NFκB led to translocation of the p65 subunit to the nucleus, IκBα degradation and phosphorylation of p65

  7. Efficient generation of dopaminergic-like neurons by overexpression of Nurr1 and Pitx3 in mouse induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Salemeh; Baktash, Parvaneh; Rajaei, Bahareh; Noori, Mehri; Amini, Hossein; Shamsara, Mehdi; Massumi, Mohammad

    2016-07-28

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, in which the nigro-striatal Dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons are selectively lost. Treatment of neurodegenerative diseases with Pluripotent Stem Cells (PSCs) is a big interest in cell therapy. Here, we used induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) expressing two master Dopaminergic (DAergic) transcription factors, i.e. Nurr1 and Pitx3, to generate functional in vitro DAergic-like neurons. After establishment and characterization of Doxycycline-inducible iPSCs from mouse fibroblasts, the cells were transduced by NURR1- and PITX3-harboring lentiviruses. The Nurr1/Pitx3 -iPSCs were differentiated through a five-stage protocol to generate DAergic-like neurons. The results confirmed the efficient expression of DAergic neuron markers in the end of protocol. Beside, the generated cells could exclusively synthesize and secrete Dopamine in response to secretagogues. In conclusion, overexpression of Nurr1 and Pitx3 in iPSCs could efficiently program iPSCs into functional DAergic-like neurons. This finding may have an impact on future stem cell therapy of PD. PMID:27208834

  8. Hydrogen in Drinking Water Reduces Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kyota; Seike, Toshihiro; Yutsudo, Noriko; Ohno, Mizuki; Yamada, Hidetaka; Yamaguchi, Hiroo; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Yamakawa, Yukiko; Kido, Mizuho A.; Takaki, Atsushi; Katafuchi, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that molecular hydrogen (H2) acts as a therapeutic antioxidant and suppresses brain injury by buffering the effects of oxidative stress. Chronic oxidative stress causes neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we show that drinking H2-containing water significantly reduced the loss of dopaminergic neurons in PD model mice using both acute and chronic administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). The concentration-dependency of H2 showed that H2 as low as 0.08 ppm had almost the same effect as saturated H2 water (1.5 ppm). MPTP-induced accumulation of cellular 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a marker of DNA damage, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a marker of lipid peroxidation were significantly decreased in the nigro-striatal dopaminergic pathway in mice drinking H2-containing water, whereas production of superoxide (O2•−) detected by intravascular injection of dihydroethidium (DHE) was not reduced significantly. Our results indicated that low concentration of H2 in drinking water can reduce oxidative stress in the brain. Thus, drinking H2-containing water may be useful in daily life to prevent or minimize the risk of life style-related oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. PMID:19789628

  9. Hydrogen in drinking water reduces dopaminergic neuronal loss in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kyota; Seike, Toshihiro; Yutsudo, Noriko; Ohno, Mizuki; Yamada, Hidetaka; Yamaguchi, Hiroo; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Yamakawa, Yukiko; Kido, Mizuho A; Takaki, Atsushi; Katafuchi, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Noda, Mami

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that molecular hydrogen (H(2)) acts as a therapeutic antioxidant and suppresses brain injury by buffering the effects of oxidative stress. Chronic oxidative stress causes neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we show that drinking H(2)-containing water significantly reduced the loss of dopaminergic neurons in PD model mice using both acute and chronic administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). The concentration-dependency of H(2) showed that H(2) as low as 0.08 ppm had almost the same effect as saturated H(2) water (1.5 ppm). MPTP-induced accumulation of cellular 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a marker of DNA damage, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a marker of lipid peroxidation were significantly decreased in the nigro-striatal dopaminergic pathway in mice drinking H(2)-containing water, whereas production of superoxide (O(2)*(-)) detected by intravascular injection of dihydroethidium (DHE) was not reduced significantly. Our results indicated that low concentration of H(2) in drinking water can reduce oxidative stress in the brain. Thus, drinking H(2)-containing water may be useful in daily life to prevent or minimize the risk of life style-related oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. PMID:19789628

  10. Increased dopaminergic neuron sensitivity to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in transgenic mice expressing mutant A53T alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wai Haung; Matsuoka, Yasuji; Sziráki, István; Hashim, Audrey; Lafrancois, John; Sershen, Henry; Duff, Karen E

    2008-05-01

    Familial Parkinson's disease (PD) has been linked to point mutations and duplication of the alpha-synuclein gene and mutant alpha-synuclein expression increases the vulnerability of neurons to exogenous insults. In this study, we analyzed the levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the olfactory bulb (OB), and nigrostriatal regions of transgenic mice expressing human, mutant A53T alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn tg) and their non-transgenic (ntg) littermates using a sub-toxic, moderate dose of MPTP to determine if mutant human alpha-synuclein sensitizes the central dopaminergic systems to oxidative stress. We observed that after a single, sub-lethal MPTP injection, dopamine levels were reduced in striatum and SN in both the alpha-syn tg and ntg mice. In the olfactory bulb, a region usually resistant to MPTP toxicity, levels were reduced only in the alpha-syn tg mice. In addition, we identified a significant increase in dopamine metabolism in the alpha-syn transgenic, but not ntg mice. Finally, MPTP treatment of alpha-syn tg mice was associated with a marked elevation in the oxidative product, 3-nitrotyrosine that co-migrated with alpha-synuclein. Cumulatively, the data support the hypothesis that mutant alpha-synuclein sensitizes dopaminergic neurons to neurotoxic insults and is associated with greater oxidative stress. The alpha-syn tg line is therefore useful to study the genetic and environmental inter-relationship in PD. PMID:17999181

  11. Effect of dopaminergic denervation and transplant-derived reinnervation on a marker of striatal GABAergic function.

    PubMed

    Segovia, J; Meloni, R; Gale, K

    1989-07-24

    Solid grafts of dopamine-containing fetal mesencephalon were placed adjacent to the striatum of rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of ascending dopaminergic projections. These grafts resulted in a significant, although partial, reversal of the lesion-induced increase in striatal glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) when measured 3-4 months after the lesion. These results suggest that the grafted neurons can partly restore inhibitory control over striatal GABA neurons. In the same rats, the grafts partially reversed apomorphine-induced turning although amphetamine-induced turning was nearly abolished. It is likely that both apomorphine-induced behavior and striatal GAD activity reflect the sustained chronic influence of the graft on target neurons in striatum. PMID:2505886

  12. Human neuromelanin: an endogenous microglial activator for dopaminergic neuron death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zecca, Luigi; Wilson, Belinda; Ren, RW; Wang, Yong-jun; Wang, Xiao-min; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that neuroinflammation caused by over-activation of microglial in the substantia nigra is critical in the pathogenesis of dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Increasing data demonstrates that environmental factors such as rotenone, paraquat play pivotal roles in the death of dopaminergic neurons. Here, potential role and mechanism of neuromelanin (NM), a major endogenous component in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra, on microglial activation and associated dopaminergic neurotoxicity were investigated. Using multiple well-established primary mesencephalic cultures, we tested whether human NM (HNM) could activate microglia, thereby provoking dopaminergic neurodegeneration. The results demonstrated that in primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures, HNM caused dopaminergic neuronal damage characterized by the decreased dopamine uptake and reduced numbers and shorted dendrites of dopaminergic neurons. HNM-induced degeneration was relatively selective to dopaminergic neurons since the other types of neurons determined by either gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake and total neuronal numbers after staining showed smaller decrease. We demonstrated that HNM produced modest dopaminergic neurotoxicity in neuron-enriched cultures; in contrast, much greater neurotoxicity was observed in the presence of microglia. HNM-induced microglial activation was shown by morphological changes and production of proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors. These results suggest that HNM, once released from damaged dopaminergic neurons, can be an potent endogenous activator involved in the reactivation of microglia, which may mediate disease progression. Thus, inhibition of reactive microglia can be a useful strategy for PD therapy. PMID:23276965

  13. How to make a mesodiencephalic dopaminergic neuron.

    PubMed

    Smidt, Marten P; Burbach, J Peter H

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons located in the ventral mesodiencephalon are essential for the control of voluntary movement and the regulation of emotion, and are severely affected in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Recent advances in molecular biology and mouse genetics have helped to unravel the mechanisms involved in the development of mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA) neurons, including their specification, migration and differentiation, as well as the processes that govern axonal pathfinding and their specific patterns of connectivity and maintenance. Here, we follow the developmental path of these neurons with the goal of generating a molecular code that could be exploited in cell-replacement strategies to treat diseases such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:17180160

  14. Differential involvement of brainstem noradrenergic and midbrain dopaminergic nuclei in cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Stefanie; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Wagner, Gerd

    2016-06-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), the parietal cortex, and the thalamus are central cortical nodes in a network underlying cognitive control. However, the role of catecholamine producing midbrain and brainstem structures has rarely been addressed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We hypothesized differential activation patterns in the ventral tegmental area (VTA)/substantia nigra (SN) and locus coeruleus (LC) with respect to the degree of cognitive control during a Stroop task in healthy subjects. Forty-five healthy subjects were investigated by the manual version of the Stroop task in an event-related fMRI design. We observed significant BOLD activation of both the SN/VTA and LC during the Stroop interference condition (incongruent vs. congruent condition). LC, but not SN/VTA activation significantly correlated with the Stroop interference. Interestingly, a significant linear decrease in BOLD activation during the incongruent condition during the experiment was mainly observed in the fronto-cingulo-striatal network, but not in SN/VTA and LC. Using psychophysiological (PPI) analyses, a significant functional connectivity during cognitive control was observed between SN/VTA and the nigrostriatal/mesolimbic dopaminergic system. For the LC, distinct functional connectivity pattern was observed mainly to the dorsolateral and ventrolateral PFC. Both regions revealed significant functional connectivity to the dACC, parietal and occipital regions. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that functional activation patterns in the SN/VTA and the LC are modulated by different demands of cognitive control. In addition, these nuclei exhibit distinguishable functional connectivity patterns to cortical brain networks. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2305-2318, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26970351

  15. Neuroprotective potential of pleiotrophin overexpression in the striatonigral pathway compared with overexpression in both the striatonigral and nigrostriatal pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gombash, SE; Manfredsson, FP; Mandel, RJ; Collier, TJ; Fischer, DL; Kemp, CJ; Kuhn, NM; Wohlgenant, SL; Fleming, SM; Sortwell, CE

    2015-01-01

    Intrastriatal injection of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector serotype 2/1 (rAAV2/1) to overexpress the neurotrophic factor pleiotrophin (PTN) provides neuroprotection for tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THir) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), increases THir neurite density in the striatum (ST) and reverses functional deficits in forepaw use following 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) toxic insult. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene transfer studies suggest that optimal neuroprotection is dependent on the site of nigrostriatal overexpression. The present study was conducted to determine whether enhanced neuroprotection could be accomplished via simultaneous rAAV2/1 PTN injections into the ST and SN compared with ST injections alone. Rats were unilaterally injected in the ST alone or injected in both the ST and SN with rAAV2/1 expressing either PTN or control vector. Four weeks later, all rats received intrastriatal injections of 6-OHDA. Rats were euthanized 6 or 16 weeks relative to 6-OHDA injection. A novel selective total enumeration method to estimate nigral THir neuron survival was validated to maintain the accuracy of stereological assessment. Long-term nigrostriatal neuroprotection and functional benefits were only observed in rats in which rAAV2/1 PTN was injected into the ST alone. Results suggest that superior preservation of the nigrostriatal system is provided by PTN overexpression delivered to the ST and restricted to the ST and SN pars reticulata and is not improved with overexpression of PTN within SNpc neurons. PMID:24807806

  16. Dopaminergic System Dysfunction in Recreational Dexamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Schrantee, Anouk; Václavů, Lena; Heijtel, Dennis F R; Caan, Matthan W A; Gsell, Willy; Lucassen, Paul J; Nederveen, Aart J; Booij, Jan; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2015-01-01

    Dexamphetamine (dAMPH) is a stimulant drug that is widely used recreationally as well as for the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although animal studies have shown neurotoxic effects of dAMPH on the dopaminergic system, little is known about such effects on the human brain. Here, we studied the dopaminergic system at multiple physiological levels in recreational dAMPH users and age, gender, and IQ-matched dAMPH-naïve healthy controls. We assessed baseline D2/3 receptor availability, in addition to changes in dopamine (DA) release using single-photon emission computed tomography and DA functionality using pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging, following a dAMPH challenge. Also, the subjective responses to the challenge were determined. dAMPH users displayed significantly lower striatal DA D2/3 receptor binding compared with healthy controls. In dAMPH users, we further observed a blunted DA release and DA functionality to an acute dAMPH challenge, as well as a blunted subjective response. Finally, the lower D2/3 availability, the more pleasant the dAMPH administration was experienced by control subjects, but not by dAMPH users. Thus, in agreement with preclinical studies, we show that the recreational use of dAMPH in human subjects is associated with dopaminergic system dysfunction. These findings warrant further (longitudinal) investigations and call for caution when using this drug recreationally and for ADHD. PMID:25394786

  17. Noradrenergic-Dopaminergic Interactions Due to DSP-4-MPTP Neurotoxin Treatments: Iron Connection.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The investigations of noradrenergic lesions and dopaminergic lesions have established particular profiles of functional deficits and accompanying alterations of biomarkers in brain regions and circuits. In the present account, the focus of these lesions is directed toward the effects upon dopaminergic neurotransmission and expression that are associated with the movement disorders and psychosis-like behavior. In this context, it was established that noradrenergic denervation, through administration of the selective noradrenaline (NA) neurotoxin, DSP-4, should be performed prior to the depletion of dopamine (DA) with the selective neurotoxin, MPTP. Employing this regime, it was shown that (i) following DSP-4 (50 mg/kg) pretreatment of C57/Bl6 mice, both the functional and neurochemical (DA loss) effects of MPTP (2 × 20 and 2 × 40 mg/kg) were markedly exacerbated, and (ii) following postnatal iron (Fe(2+), 7.5 mg/kg, on postnatal days 19-12), pretreatment with DSP-4 followed by the lower 2 × 20 mg/kg MPTP dose induced even greater losses of motor behavior and striatal DA. As yet, the combination of NA-DA depletions, and even more so Fe(2+)-NA-DA depletion, has been considered to present a movement disorder aspect although studies exploring cognitive domains are lacking. With intrusion of iron overload into this formula, the likelihood of neuropsychiatric disorder, as well, unfolds. PMID:26718588

  18. Neutralization of RANTES and Eotaxin Prevents the Loss of Dopaminergic Neurons in a Mouse Model of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Goutam; Rangasamy, Suresh B; Roy, Avik; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-07-15

    Parkinson disease (PD) is second only to Alzheimer disease as the most common human neurodegenerative disorder. Despite intense investigation, no interdictive therapy is available for PD. Recent studies indicate that both innate and adaptive immune processes are active in PD. Accordingly, we found a rapid increase in RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) and eotaxin, chemokines that are involved in T cell trafficking, in vivo in the substantia nigra pars compacta and the serum of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-intoxicated mice. RANTES and eotaxin were also up-regulated in the substantia nigra pars compacta of post-mortem PD brains as compared with age-matched controls. Therefore, we investigated whether neutralization of RANTES and eotaxin could protect against nigrostriatal degeneration in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Interestingly, after peripheral administration, functional blocking antibodies against RANTES and eotaxin reduced the infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells into the nigra, attenuated nigral expression of proinflammatory molecules, and suppressed nigral activation of glial cells. These findings paralleled dopaminergic neuronal protection, normalized striatal neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Therefore, we conclude that attenuation of the chemokine-dependent adaptive immune response may be of therapeutic benefit for PD patients. PMID:27226559

  19. Lateral habenula as a link between dopaminergic and serotonergic systems contributes to depressive symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao Feng; Zhang, Bei Lin; Li, Ji Cheng; Yang, Ying Ying; Sun, Yan Fei; Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons is a key pathological change of Parkinson's disease (PD), and its motor consequences have been widely recognized. Recently, mood disorders associated with PD have begun to attract a great deal of interest, however, their pathogenesis remains unclear. PD is associated with not only degenerative changes in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra but also changes in serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei. The abnormalities in central 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neurotransmission are thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of depression. The lateral habenula (LHb) is closely related to the substantia nigra and raphe nuclei, and its hyperactivity is closely related to the pathogenesis of depression. In this study, we screened rats with depressive-like behaviors from PD model animals and found that cytochrome c oxidase activity in the LHb of these rats was twice that seen in the control rats. In the forced swim test, LHb lesions caused a decrease in depressive-like behavior of PD rats as indexed by decreased immobility times and increased climbing times. Additionally, LHb lesions caused an enhance in 5-HT levels in the raphe nuclei. These results suggest that LHb lesions may improve depressive-like behavior in PD rats by increasing 5-HT levels in the raphe nuclei. Thus, LHb contributes to the depressive-like behavior in PD rats via mediating the effects of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra on serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei. PMID:25499570

  20. Dopaminergic neurons promote hippocampal reactivation and spatial memory persistence

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Colin G; Tejero-Cantero, Álvaro; Trouche, Stéphanie; Campo-Urriza, Natalia; Dupret, David

    2014-01-01

    Here we found that optogenetic burst stimulation of hippocampal dopaminergic fibers from midbrain neurons in mice exploring novel environments enhanced the reactivation of pyramidal cell assemblies during subsequent sleep/rest. When applied during spatial learning of new goal locations, dopaminergic photostimulation improved the later recall of neural representations of space and stabilized memory performance. These findings reveal that midbrain dopaminergic neurons promote hippocampal network dynamics associated with memory persistence. PMID:25326690

  1. Evolutionarily conserved organization of the dopaminergic system in lamprey: SNc/VTA afferent and efferent connectivity and D2 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, Juan; Stephenson-Jones, Marcus; Suryanarayana, Shreyas M; Robertson, Brita; Grillner, Sten

    2014-12-01

    The dopaminergic system influences motor behavior, signals reward and novelty, and is an essential component of the basal ganglia in all vertebrates including the lamprey, one of the phylogenetically oldest vertebrates. The intrinsic organization and function of the lamprey basal ganglia is highly conserved. For instance, the direct and indirect pathways are modulated through dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in lamprey and in mammals. The nucleus of the tuberculum posterior, a homologue of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc)/ventral tegmental area (VTA) is present in lamprey, but only scarce data exist about its connectivity. Likewise, the D2 receptor is expressed in the striatum, but little is known about its localization in other brain areas. We used in situ hybridization and tracer injections, both in combination with tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry, to characterize the SNc/VTA efferent and afferent connectivity, and to relate its projection pattern with D2 receptor expression in particular. We show that most features of the dopaminergic system are highly conserved. As in mammals, the direct pallial (cortex in mammals) input and the basal ganglia connectivity with the SNc/VTA are present as part of the evaluation system, as well as input from the tectum as the evolutionary basis for salience/novelty detection. Moreover, the SNc/VTA receives sensory information from the olfactory bulbs, optic tectum, octavolateral area, and dorsal column nucleus, and it innervates, apart from the nigrostriatal pathway, several motor-related areas. This suggests that the dopaminergic system also contributes to the control of different motor centers at the brainstem level. PMID:24942187

  2. Simvastatin inhibits the activation of p21ras and prevents the loss of dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anamitra; Roy, Avik; Matras, Joanna; Brahmachari, Saurav; Gendelman, Howard E.; Pahan, Kalipada

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is second only to Alzheimer's disease as the most common devastating human neurodegenerative disorder. Despite intense investigation, no interdictive therapy is available for PD. We investigated whether simvastatin, an FDA-approved cholesterol-lowering drug, could protect against nigrostriatal degeneration following 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) intoxication to model PD in mice. First, MPP+ induced the activation of p21ras and NF-κB in mouse microglial cells. Inhibition of MPP+-induced activation of NF-κB by Δp21ras, a dominant-negative mutant of p21ras, supported the involvement of p21ras in MPP+-induced microglial activation of NF-κB. Interestingly, simvastatin attenuated activation of both p21ras and NF-κB in MPP+-stimulated microglial cells. Consistently, we found a very rapid activation of p21ras in vivo in the substantia nigra pars compacta of MPTP-intoxicated mice. However, after oral administration, simvastatin entered into the nigra, reduced nigral activation of p21ras, attenuated nigral activation of NF-κB, inhibited nigral expression of proinflammatory molecules, and suppressed nigral activation of glial cells. These findings paralleled dopaminergic neuronal protection, normalized striatal neurotransmitters, and improved motor functions in MPTP-intoxicated mice. Similarly, pravastatin, another cholesterol-lowering drug, suppressed microglial inflammatory responses and protected dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-intoxicated mice; but at levels less than simvastatin. Furthermore, both the statins administered 2 days after initiation of the disease were still capable of inhibiting the demise of dopaminergic neurons and concomitant loss of neurotransmitters suggesting that statins are capable of slowing down the progression of neuronal loss in the MPTP mouse model. Therefore, we conclude that statins may be of therapeutic benefit for PD patients. PMID:19864567

  3. Autologous transplants of Adipose-Derived Adult Stromal (ADAS) cells afford dopaminergic neuroprotection in a model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Melissa K; Martinez, Terina N; Ruhn, Kelly A; Wrage, Philip C; Keefer, Edward W; Botterman, Barry R; Tansey, Keith E; Tansey, Malú G

    2008-03-01

    Adult adipose contains stromal progenitor cells with neurogenic potential. However, the stability of neuronal phenotypes adopted by Adipose-Derived Adult Stromal (ADAS) cells and whether terminal neuronal differentiation is required for their consideration as alternatives in cell replacement strategies to treat neurological disorders is largely unknown. We investigated whether in vitro neural induction of ADAS cells determined their ability to neuroprotect or restore function in a lesioned dopaminergic pathway. In vitro-expanded naïve or differentiated ADAS cells were autologously transplanted into substantia nigra 1 week after an intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine injection. Neurochemical and behavioral measures demonstrated neuroprotective effects of both ADAS grafts against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopaminergic neuron death, suggesting that pre-transplantation differentiation of the cells does not determine their ability to survive or neuroprotect in vivo. Therefore, we investigated whether equivalent protection by naïve and neurally-induced ADAS grafts resulted from robust in situ differentiation of both graft types into dopaminergic fates. Immunohistological analyses revealed that ADAS cells did not adopt dopaminergic cell fates in situ, consistent with the limited ability of these cells to undergo terminal differentiation into electrically active neurons in vitro. Moreover, re-exposure of neurally-differentiated ADAS cells to serum-containing medium in vitro confirmed ADAS cell phenotypic instability (plasticity). Lastly, given that gene expression analyses of in vitro-expanded ADAS cells revealed that both naïve and differentiated ADAS cells express potent dopaminergic survival factors, ADAS transplants may have exerted neuroprotective effects by production of trophic factors at the lesion site. ADAS cells may be ideal for ex vivo gene transfer therapies in Parkinson's disease treatment. PMID:18061169

  4. Continuous exposure to glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor to mature dopaminergic transplants impairs the graft's ability to improve spontaneous motor behavior in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Winkler, C; Georgievska, B; Carlsson, T; Lacar, B; Kirik, D

    2006-08-11

    Functional recovery following intrastriatal transplantation of fetal dopaminergic neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease is, at least in part, dependent on the number of surviving dopaminergic neurons and the degree of graft-derived dopaminergic reinnervation of the host striatum. In the present study, we analyzed whether continuous exposure of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to mature dopaminergic grafts could further boost the functional outcome of widespread intrastriatal dopaminergic grafts. Rats with dopamine-denervating lesions received multiple intrastriatal transplants of fetal dopaminergic cells and graft-induced behavioral effects were analyzed in drug-induced and spontaneous motor behaviors. At three months after grafting, animals received intrastriatal injections of recombinant lentiviral vectors encoding for either human GDNF or the green fluorescent protein. Continuous exposure of GDNF to the grafts did not boost the functional recovery beyond what was observed in the control animals. Rather, in some of the spontaneous motor behaviors, animals in the GDNF-group showed deterioration as compared with control animals, and this negative effect of GDNF was associated with a down-regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme. Based on these and our earlier results, we propose that intrastriatal administration of GDNF at the time of or shortly after grafting is highly effective in initially promoting the cell survival and fiber outgrowth from the grafts. However, once the grafts are mature, GDNF's ability to boost dopaminergic neurotransmission follows the same dynamics as for the native nigral dopaminergic neurons, which appears to be dependent on the concentration of GDNF. Since rather low doses of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor at nanogram levels appear to saturate these effects, it may be critical to adjust GDNF levels using tightly regulated gene expression systems. PMID:16697115

  5. Cross interaction of melanocortinergic and dopaminergic systems in neural modulation

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Bao-Wen; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Melanocortinergic and dopaminergic systems are widely distributed in the CNS and have been established as a crucial regulatory component in diverse physiological functions. The pharmacology of both melanocortinergic and dopaminergic systems including their individual receptors, signaling mechanisms, agonists and antagonists has been extensively studied. Several lines of evidence showed that there existed a cross interaction between the receptors of melanocortinergic and dopaminergic systems. The data available at present had expanded our understanding of melanocortinergic and dopaminergic system interaction in neural modulation, which will be main discussed in this paper. PMID:26823964

  6. Involvement of nigral oxytocin in locomotor activity: A behavioral, immunohistochemical and lesion study in male rats.

    PubMed

    Angioni, Laura; Cocco, Cristina; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Argiolas, Antonio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Sanna, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    Oxytocin is involved in the control of different behaviors, from sexual behavior and food consumption to empathy, social and affective behaviors. An imbalance of central oxytocinergic neurotransmission has been also associated with different mental pathologies, from depression, anxiety and anorexia/bulimia to schizophrenia, autism and drug dependence. This study shows that oxytocin may also play a role in the control of locomotor activity. Accordingly, intraperitoneal oxytocin (0.5-2000μg/kg) reduced locomotor activity of adult male rats. This effect was abolished by d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist, given into the lateral ventricles at the dose of 2μg/rat, which was ineffective on locomotor activity. Oxytocin (50-200ng/site) also reduced and d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin (2μg/site) increased locomotor activity when injected bilaterally into the substantia nigra, a key area in the control of locomotor activity. Conversely, the destruction of nigral neurons bearing oxytocin receptors by the recently characterized neurotoxin oxytocin-saporin injected into the substantia nigra, increased basal locomotor activity. Since oxytocin-saporin injected into the substantia nigra caused a marked reduction of neurons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (e.g., nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons) and for vesicular glutamate transporters VGluT1, VGluT2 and VGluT3 (e.g., glutamatergic neurons), but not for glutamic acid decarboxylase (e.g., GABAergic neurons), together these findings suggest that oxytocin influences locomotor activity by acting on receptors localized presynaptically in nigral glutamatergic nerve terminals (which control the activity of nigral GABAergic efferent neurons projecting to brain stem nuclei controlling locomotor activity), rather than on receptors localized in the cell bodies/dendrites of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. PMID:27189764

  7. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  8. Transcriptional regulation by nicotine in dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Beverley M.; Williams, Brian A.; Srinivasan, Rahul; Cohen, Bruce N.; Xiao, Cheng; Mackey, Elisha D.W.; Wold, Barbara J.; Lester, Henry A.

    2013-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) degenerate in Parkinson’s disease. These neurons robustly express several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes. Smoking appears to be neuroprotective for Parkinson’s disease but the mechanism is unknown. To determine whether chronic nicotine-induced changes in gene expression contribute to the neuroprotective effects of smoking, we develop methods to measure the effect of prolonged nicotine exposure on the SNc neuronal transcriptome in an unbiased manner. Twenty neurons were collected using laser-capture microscopy and transcriptional changes were assessed using RNA deep sequencing. These results are the first whole-transcriptome analyses of chronic nicotine treatment in SNc neurons. Overall, 129 genes were significantly regulated: 67 upregulated, 62 downregulated. Nicotine-induced relief of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been postulated as a potential mechanism for the neuroprotective effects of smoking. Chronic nicotine did not significantly affect the expression of ER stress-related genes, nor of dopamine-related or nAChR genes, but it did modulate expression of 129 genes that could be relevant to the neuroprotective effects of smoking, including genes involved in (1) the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway, (2) cell cycle regulation, (3) chromatin modification, and (4) DNA binding and RNA regulation. We also report preliminary transcriptome data for single-cell dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons isolated from midbrain cultures. These novel techniques will facilitate advances in understanding the mechanisms taking place at the cellular level and may have applications elsewhere in the fields of neuroscience and molecular biology. The results give an emerging picture of the role of nicotine on the SNc and on dopaminergic neurons. PMID:23939186

  9. Involvement of the dopaminergic system in the consolidation of fear conditioning in hippocampal CA3 subregion.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jia-Ling; Xue, Li; Wang, Run-Hua; Chen, Zi-Xiang; Shi, Yan-Wei; Zhao, Hu

    2015-02-01

    The hippocampus, the primary brain structure related to learning and memory, receives sparse but comprehensive dopamine innervations and contains dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Systematic hippocampal dopaminergic dysfunction can cause deficits in spatial working memory and impair consolidation of contextual fear memories. CA3 is involved in the rapid acquisition of new memories and has extensive nerve fibre connections with other brain structures such as CA1, the amygdala, and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). A bidirectional fibrous connection between CA3 and the amygdala reflects the importance of CA3 in fear conditioning. The present study evaluated the effects of a 6-OHDA lesion in CA3 on the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear. The results showed CA3 involvement in the expression but not the acquisition of conditioned fear. Injection of SCH23390 and quinpirole into the bilateral CA3 attenuated a conditioned fear-related freezing response, whereas SKF38393 and sulpiride were not associated with this effect. The present study found that a 6-OHDA lesion in CA3 up-regulated the expression of GluR1 in BLA and down-regulated NR2B in CA1 and the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Our data suggest that dopamine depletion in hippocampal subdivision CA3 may not be necessary for the acquisition of conditioned fear, but the expression of conditioned fear is likely dependent on the integrity of mesohippocampal dopaminergic connections. It is probable that both D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors modulate the expression of conditioned fear. Changes in the expression of NR2B and GluR1 indicate that CA3 may modulate the activities of other brain structures. PMID:25446753

  10. Nigrostriatal dopamine-independent resting-state functional networks in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ham, Jee Hyun; Cha, Jungho; Lee, Jae Jung; Baek, Gwang-Min; Sunwoo, Mun Kyung; Hong, Jin Yong; Shin, Na-Young; Sohn, Young Ho; Lee, Jong-Min; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2015-10-01

    As an indicator of synchronous neural activity, resting-state functional networks are influenced by neuropathological and neurochemical changes in degenerative diseases. To further advance understanding about neurochemical and neuropathological basis for resting-state functional maps, we performed a comparative analysis of resting-state functional connectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and drug induced parkinsonism (DIP). Resting-state neuroimaging data were analyzed with a seed-based approach to investigate striatocortical functional connectivity and cortical functional connectivity within the default mode network, executive control network, and the dorsal attention network. The striatal subregions were divided into the more or less affected sides in terms of dopamine transporter uptake. Compared with DIP, PD exhibited an increased cerebellar connectivity from the more affected side of the caudate and the less affected sides of the anterior and the posterior putamen. Additionally, PD showed increased functional connectivity in the anterior prefrontal areas from the more affected side of the anterior putamen and from the less affected side of the posterior putamen. However, PD exhibited decreased cortical functional connectivity from the posterior cingulate cortex in the left temporal area. Finally, DIP patients showed decreased cortical functional connectivity from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in frontal and parietal areas compared with PD patients. In summary, the present study demonstrates that PD patients exhibited a unique resting state functional connectivity that may be associated with PD-related pathological changes beyond the dopaminergic system, whereas DIP patients showed altered functional connectivity within executive control network. PMID:26143204

  11. Establishing diversity in the dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Bodea, Gabriela O; Blaess, Sandra

    2015-12-21

    Midbrain dopaminergic neurons (MbDNs) modulate cognitive processes, regulate voluntary movement, and encode reward prediction errors and aversive stimuli. While the degeneration of MbDNs underlies the motor defects in Parkinson's disease, imbalances in dopamine levels are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression, schizophrenia and substance abuse. In recent years, progress has been made in understanding how MbDNs, which constitute a relatively small neuronal population in the brain, can contribute to such diverse functions and dysfunctions. In particular, important insights have been gained regarding the distinct molecular, neurochemical and network properties of MbDNs. How this diversity of MbDNs is established during brain development is only starting to be unraveled. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the diversity in MbDN progenitors and differentiated MbDNs in the developing rodent brain. We discuss the signaling pathways, transcription factors and transmembrane receptors that contribute to setting up these diverse MbDN subpopulations. A better insight into the processes that establish diversity in MbDNs will ultimately improve the understanding of the architecture and function of the dopaminergic system in the adult brain. PMID:26431946

  12. The Dopaminergic System in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Rodrigo; Contreras, Francisco; Zouali, Moncef

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional interactions between the immune and the nervous systems are of considerable interest both for deciphering their functioning and for designing novel therapeutic strategies. The past decade has brought a burst of insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in neuroimmune communications mediated by dopamine. Studies of dendritic cells (DCs) revealed that they express the whole machinery to synthesize and store dopamine, which may act in an autocrine manner to stimulate dopamine receptors (DARs). Depending on specific DARs stimulated on DCs and T cells, dopamine may differentially favor CD4+ T cell differentiation into Th1 or Th17 inflammatory cells. Regulatory T cells can also release high amounts of dopamine that acts in an autocrine DAR-mediated manner to inhibit their suppressive activity. These dopaminergic regulations could represent a driving force during autoimmunity. Indeed, dopamine levels are altered in the brain of mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and lupus, and in inflamed tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The distorted expression of DARs in peripheral lymphocytes of lupus and MS patients also supports the importance of dopaminergic regulations in autoimmunity. Moreover, dopamine analogs had beneficial therapeutic effects in animal models, and in patients with lupus or RA. We propose models that may underlie key roles of dopamine and its receptors in autoimmune diseases. PMID:24711809

  13. Disrupted iron homeostasis causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Pavle; Matak, Andrija; Moustafa, Sarah; Aryal, Dipendra K.; Benner, Eric J.; Wetsel, William; Andrews, Nancy C.

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted brain iron homeostasis is a common feature of neurodegenerative disease. To begin to understand how neuronal iron handling might be involved, we focused on dopaminergic neurons and asked how inactivation of transport proteins affected iron homeostasis in vivo in mice. Loss of the cellular iron exporter, ferroportin, had no apparent consequences. However, loss of transferrin receptor 1, involved in iron uptake, caused neuronal iron deficiency, age-progressive degeneration of a subset of dopaminergic neurons, and motor deficits. There was gradual depletion of dopaminergic projections in the striatum followed by death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Damaged mitochondria accumulated, and gene expression signatures indicated attempted axonal regeneration, a metabolic switch to glycolysis, oxidative stress, and the unfolded protein response. We demonstrate that loss of transferrin receptor 1, but not loss of ferroportin, can cause neurodegeneration in a subset of dopaminergic neurons in mice. PMID:26929359

  14. Allopregnanolone Reinstates Tyrosine Hydroxylase Immunoreactive Neurons and Motor Performance in an MPTP-Lesioned Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adeosun, Samuel O.; Hou, Xu; Jiao, Yun; Zheng, Baoying; Henry, Sherry; Hill, Rosanne; He, Zhi; Pani, Amar; Kyle, Patrick; Ou, Xiaoming; Mosley, Thomas; Farley, Jerry M.; Stockmeier, Craig; Paul, Ian; Bigler, Steven; Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Smeyne, Richard; Wang, Jun Ming

    2012-01-01

    Restorative/protective therapies to restore dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) are greatly needed to effectively change the debilitating course of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we tested the therapeutic potential of a neurogenic neurosteroid, allopregnanolone, in the restoration of the components of the nigrostriatal pathway in MPTP-lesioned mice by measuring striatal dopamine levels, total and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neuron numbers and BrdU-positive cells in the SNpc. An acute treatment (once/week for two weeks) with allopregnanolone restored the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive and total cell numbers in the SNpc of MPTP-lesioned mice, even though this did not increase striatal dopamine. It was also noted that MPTP treated mice to which allopregnanolone was administered had an increase in BrdU-positive cells in the SNpc. The effects of allopregnanolone in MPTP-lesioned mice were more apparent in mice that underwent behavioral tests. Interestingly, mice treated with allopregnanolone after MPTP lesion were able to perform at levels similar to that of non-lesioned control mice in a rotarod test. These data demonstrate that allopregnanolone promotes the restoration of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons and total cells in the nigrostriatal tract, improves the motor performance in MPTP-treated mice, and may serve as a therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease. PMID:23209637

  15. In vivo extracellular recording of striatal neurons in the awake rat following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions.

    PubMed

    Chen, M T; Morales, M; Woodward, D J; Hoffer, B J; Janak, P H

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to further understand the functional effects of dopaminergic input to the dorsal striatum and to compare the effects of dopaminergic lesions in awake and anesthetized animals. We examined the effects of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the ascending dopaminergic bundle on the firing properties of dorsal striatal neurons in the awake freely moving rat using chronically implanted microwire electrode arrays. We recorded extracellular activity of striatal neurons under baseline conditions and following the systemic injection of apomorphine in awake and anesthetized subjects. Firing rates were higher in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion compared to rates of neurons from the contralateral unlesioned hemisphere. Striatal firing rates from sham and no-surgery control rats were, in general, higher than those from the contralateral unlesioned striatum of experimental subjects. Apomorphine (0.05 mg/kg, sc) normalized the differences in firing rates in lesioned animals by increasing firing of neurons within the contralateral unlesioned side, while simultaneously decreasing firing of neurons within the ipsilateral lesioned side. Mean firing rates were substantially higher in awake animals than in subjects anesthetized with chloral hydrate, perhaps reflecting anesthesia-induced decreases in excitatory input to striatal neurons. Chloral hydrate anesthesia decreased firing rates of neurons in the lesioned, unlesioned, and control striata to a similar degree, although absolute firing rates of neurons from the 6-OHDA-lesioned striata remained elevated over all other groups. Unilateral 6-OHDA lesions also altered the pattern of spike output in the awake animal as indicated by an increase in the number of bursts per minute following dopaminergic deafferentation. This and other burst parameters were altered by apomorphine. Our findings show that effects of dopaminergic deafferentation can be measured in the awake behaving

  16. [Foot lesions].

    PubMed

    Stelzner, C; Schellong, S; Wollina, U; Machetanz, J; Unger, L

    2013-11-01

    The foot is the target organ of a variety of internal diseases. Of upmost importance is the diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Its complex pathophysiology is driven by the diabetic neuropathy, a vastly worsening effect is contributed by infection and ischemia. Seemingly localised lesions have the potential for phlegmone and septicaemia if not diagnosed and drained early. The acral lesions of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) have unique features as well. However, their life-threatening potential is lower than that of DFS even if the limb is critical. Notably, isolated foot lesions with a mere venous cause may arise from insufficient perforator veins; the accompanying areas of haemosiderosis will lead the diagnostic path. Cholesterol embolization (blue toe syndrome, trash foot) elicits a unique clinical picture and will become more frequent with increasing numbers of catheter-based procedures. Finally, descriptions are given of podagra and of foot mycosis as disease entities not linked to perfusion. The present review focuses on the depiction of disease and its diagnosis, leaving therapeutic considerations untouched. PMID:24114468

  17. Renalase regulates peripheral and central dopaminergic activities

    PubMed Central

    Serrão, Maria Paula; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Pinho, Maria João; Remião, Fernando; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Desir, Gary V.; Pestana, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Renalase is a recently identified FAD/NADH-dependent amine oxidase mainly expressed in kidney that is secreted into blood and urine where it was suggested to metabolize catecholamines. The present study evaluated central and peripheral dopaminergic activities in the renalase knockout (KO) mouse model and examined the changes induced by recombinant renalase (RR) administration on plasma and urine catecholamine levels. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, KO mice presented increased plasma levels of epinephrine (Epi), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) that were accompanied by increases in the urinary excretion of Epi, NE, DA. In addition, the KO mice presented an increase in urinary DA-to-l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) ratios without changes in renal tubular aromatic-l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity. By contrast, the in vivo administration of RR (1.5 mg/kg sc) to KO mice was accompanied by significant decreases in plasma levels of Epi, DA, and l-DOPA as well as in urinary excretion of Epi, DA, and DA-to-l-DOPA ratios notwithstanding the accompanied increase in renal AADC activity. In addition, the increase in renal DA output observed in renalase KO mice was accompanied by an increase in the expression of the L-type amino acid transporter like (LAT) 1 that is reversed by the administration of RR in these animals. These results suggest that the overexpression of LAT1 in the renal cortex of the renalase KO mice might contribute to the enhanced l-DOPA availability/uptake and consequently to the activation of the renal dopaminergic system in the presence of renalase deficiency. PMID:25411385

  18. Thyrotoxic and dopaminergic effects of polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Perturbations in the developing nervous system have been associated with perinatal exposures to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). To determine which PCBs accumulate in brain following perinatal exposure, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by gavage to Aroclor 1242 (4 or 16 mg/kg/day) during days 10-16 of gestation. At weaning (day 21), analysis of pup brain (frontal cortex, hippocampus, and caudate putamen) by gas chromatography revealed ten peaks representing 10-14 congeners in PCB-exposed animals. Brain PCB concentrations were greatest in high-dose pups for all congeners except for 2,4,4[prime]-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB 28) which had a higher concentration in the low-dose group. Congeners differed significantly in their degree of bioaccumulation, but no significant differences among brain regions were found. A lack of regionalization of PCB residues in the brain was also demonstrated by autoradiography in weanling rats treated iv with [[sup 14]C]-3,3[prime],4,4[prime]-tetrachlorobiphenyl or [[sup 14]C]-2,2[prime],4,4[prime]-tetrachlorobiphenyl. Time-mated Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed on days 10-16 of gestation to three environmentally-relevant PCBs: 2,4,4[prime]-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB 28), 8 or 32 mg/kg/day; 2,3[prime],4,4[prime],5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 118), 4 or 16 mg/kg/day; or 2,2[prime],4,4[prime],5,5[prime]-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), 16 or 64 mg/kg/day. At weaning, serum total thyroxin, but not triiodothyronine, was markedly depressed in pups exposed perinatally to PCB 118 or 153; and thyroid glands from PCB 118-treated pups revealed histologic changes suggestive of sustained TSH stimulation. No significant PCB-induced changes were detected in the activity of the rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamines, tyrosine hydroxylase, in the caudate putamen at weaning or in adulthood. Likewise no significant changes were detected in dopamine receptor (D1 and D2) concentrations in several regions in the mesocortical and nigrostriatal pathways.

  19. Continuous High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Improves Cell Survival and Functional Recovery Following Dopaminergic Cell Transplantation in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Furlanetti, Luciano L; Cordeiro, Joacir Graciolli; Cordeiro, Karina Kohn; García, Joanna A; Winkler, Christian; Lepski, Guilherme A; Coenen, Volker A; Nikkhah, Guido; Döbrössy, Máté D

    2015-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) high-frequency stimulation (HFS) is a routine treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD), with confirmed long-term benefits. An alternative, but still experimental, treatment is cell replacement and restorative therapy based on transplanted dopaminergic neurons. The current experiment evaluated the potential synergy between neuromodulation and grafting by studying the effect of continuous STN-HFS on the survival, integration, and functional efficacy of ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic precursors transplanted into a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine medial forebrain bundle lesioned rodent PD model. One group received continuous HFS of the ipsilateral STN starting a week prior to intrastriatal dopaminergic neuron transplantation, whereas the sham-stimulated group did not receive STN-HFS but only dopaminergic grafts. A control group was neither lesioned nor transplanted. Over the following 7 weeks, the animals were probed on a series of behavioral tasks to evaluate possible graft and/or stimulation-induced functional effects. Behavioral and histological data suggest that STN-HFS significantly increased graft cell survival, graft-host integration, and functional recovery. These findings might open an unexplored road toward combining neuromodulative and neuroregenerative strategies to treat severe neurologic conditions. PMID:25857428

  20. [Psychopathological correlates of dopaminergic dysfunction in alcoholic and schizophrenic patients].

    PubMed

    Heinz, A

    1999-05-01

    It has been suggested that anhedonia, the loss of pleasure, is associated with a dysfunction of the dopaminergic reward system in schizophrenic and alcohol-dependent patients. In a series of neuroendocrinological and brain imaging studies, we examined pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms of dopaminergic neurotransmission in non-human primates and in schizophrenic and alcohol-dependent patients. Among alcoholics, we found indicators of a sensitization of dopaminergic neurotransmission, which was associated with the relapse risk, but not with anhedonia or depression. Schizophrenics with neuroleptic blockade of striatal dopamine D2 receptors displayed psychomotor slowing and reduced motivation, but not anhedonia. Primate studies pointed to the importance of a temporocortical dysfunction in the pathogenesis of phasic dopaminergic dysregulation in the striatum. These observations indicate that a dysfunction of stimulus-dependent dopamine release may be associated with motivational deficits caused by a reduction in incentive salience, but not with anhedonia. PMID:10407835

  1. Assessment of the Protection of Dopaminergic Neurons by an α7 Nicotinic Receptor Agonist, PHA 543613 Using [(18)F]LBT-999 in a Parkinson's Disease Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Sérrière, Sophie; Doméné, Aurélie; Vercouillie, Johnny; Mothes, Céline; Bodard, Sylvie; Rodrigues, Nuno; Guilloteau, Denis; Routier, Sylvain; Page, Guylène; Chalon, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    The inverse association between nicotine intake and Parkinson's disease (PD) is well established and suggests that this molecule could be neuroprotective through anti-inflammatory action mediated by nicotinic receptors, including the α7-subtype (α7R). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of an agonist of α7R, PHA 543613, on striatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation in a rat model of PD induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion. Adult male Wistar rats were lesioned in the right striatum and assigned to either the PHA group (n = 7) or the Sham group (n = 5). PHA 543613 hydrochloride at the concentration of 6 mg/kg (PHA group) or vehicle (Sham group) was intra-peritoneally injected 2 h before 6-OHDA lesioning and then at days 2, 4, and 6 post-lesion. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 7 days post-lesion using [(18)F]LBT-999 to quantify the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT). After PET imaging, neuroinflammation was evaluated in same animals in vitro through the measurement of the microglial activation marker 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) by quantitative autoradiography with [(3)H]PK-11195. The DAT density reflecting the integrity of dopaminergic neurons was significantly decreased while the intensity of neuroinflammation measured by TSPO density was significantly increased in the lesioned compared to intact striatum in both groups. However, these both modifications were partially reversed in the PHA group compared to Sham. In addition, a significant positive correlation between the degree of lesion and the intensity of neuroinflammation was evidenced. These findings indicate that PHA 543613 exerts neuroprotective effects on the striatal dopaminergic neurons associated with a reduction in microglial activation in this model of PD. This reinforces the hypothesis that an α7R agonist could provide beneficial effects for the treatment of PD. PMID:26389120

  2. Ursolic acid attenuates oxidative stress in nigrostriatal tissue and improves neurobehavioral activity in MPTP-induced Parkinsonian mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rai, Sachchida Nand; Yadav, Satyndra Kumar; Singh, Divakar; Singh, Surya Pratap

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a slow and progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) region of brain. Oxidative stress and inflammation plays important role in the neurodegeneration and development of PD. Ursolic Acid (UA: 3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid) is a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid found in various medicinal plants. Its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity is a well-established fact. In this paper, the neuroprotective efficiency of UA in MPTP induced PD mouse model has been explored. For this purpose, we divided 30 mice into 5 different groups; first was control, second was MPTP-treated, third, fourth and fifth were different doses of UA viz., 5 mg/kg, 25 mg/kg, and 50 mg/kg body weight (wt) respectively, along with MPTP. After 21 days of treatment, different behavioral parameters and biochemical assays were conducted. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining of SN dopaminergic neurons as well as HPLC quantification of dopamine and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) were also performed. Our results proved that, UA improves behavioral deficits, restored altered dopamine level and protect dopaminergic neurons in the MPTP intoxicated mouse. Among three different doses, 25 mg/kg body wt was the most effective dose for the PD. This work reveals the potential of UA as a promising drug candidate for PD treatment. PMID:26686287

  3. Desire, disease, and the origins of the dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Sillitoe, Roy V; Vogel, Michael W

    2008-03-01

    The dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain region of the central nervous system project an extensive network of connections throughout the forebrain, including the neocortex. The midbrain-forebrain dopaminergic circuits are thought to regulate a diverse set of behaviors, from the control of movement to modulation of cognition and desire--because they relate to mood, attention, reward, and addiction. Defects in these pathways, including neurodegeneration, are implicated in a variety of psychiatric and neurological diseases, such as schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, drug addiction, and Parkinson disease. Based on the importance of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons to normal and pathological brain function, there is considerable interest in the molecular mechanisms that regulate their development. The goal of this short review is to outline new methods and recent advances in identifying the molecular networks that regulate midbrain dopaminergic neuron differentiation and fate. Midbrain dopaminergic neurons are descended from progenitor cells located near the ventral midline of the neural tube floor plate around the cephalic flexure. It is now clear that their initial formation is dependent on interactions between the signaling molecules Sonic hedgehog, WINGLESS 1, and FIBROBLAST growth factor 8, but there is still an extensive wider network of molecular interactions that must be resolved before the complete picture of dopaminergic neuron development can be described. PMID:18283047

  4. Dopaminergic Modulation of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in Parkinson Depression.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Anders H; Smith, Charles D; Slevin, John T; Kryscio, Richard J; Martin, Catherine A; Schmitt, Frederick A; Blonder, Lee X

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with emotional abnormalities. Dopaminergic medications ameliorate Parkinsonian motor symptoms, but less is known regarding the impact of dopaminergic agents on affective processing, particularly in depressed PD (dPD) patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on brain activation to emotional stimuli in depressed versus nondepressed Parkinson disease (ndPD) patients. Participants included 18 ndPD patients (11 men, 7 women) and 10 dPD patients (7 men, 3 women). Patients viewed photographs of emotional faces during functional MRI. Scans were performed while the patient was taking anti-Parkinson medication and the day after medication had been temporarily discontinued. Results indicate that dopaminergic medications have opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex depending upon depression status. DPD patients show greater deactivation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) on dopaminergic medications than off, while ndPD patients show greater deactivation in this region off drugs. The VMPFC is in the default-mode network (DMN). DMN activity is negatively correlated with activity in brain systems used for external visual attention. Thus dopaminergic medications may promote increased attention to external visual stimuli among dPD patients but impede normal suppression of DMN activity during external stimulation among ndPD patients. PMID:26793404

  5. Dopaminergic modulation of memory and affective processing in Parkinson depression.

    PubMed

    Blonder, Lee X; Slevin, John T; Kryscio, Richard J; Martin, Catherine A; Andersen, Anders H; Smith, Charles D; Schmitt, Frederick A

    2013-11-30

    Depression is common in Parkinson's disease and is associated with cognitive impairment. Dopaminergic medications are effective in treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease; however, little is known regarding the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on cognitive function in depressed Parkinson patients. This study examines the neuropsychological effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy in Parkinsonian depression. We compared cognitive function in depressed and non-depressed Parkinson patients at two time-points: following overnight withdrawal and after the usual morning regimen of dopaminergic medications. A total of 28 non-demented, right-handed patients with mild to moderate idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated. Ten of these patients were depressed according to DSM IV criteria. Results revealed a statistically significant interaction between depression and medication status on three measures of verbal memory and a facial affect naming task. In all cases, depressed Parkinson's patients performed significantly more poorly while on dopaminergic medication than while off. The opposite pattern emerged for the non-depressed Parkinson's group. The administration of dopaminergic medication to depressed Parkinson patients may carry unintended risks. PMID:23838419

  6. Dopaminergic modulation of memory and affective processing in Parkinson depression

    PubMed Central

    Blonder, Lee X.; Slevin, John T.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Martin, Catherine A.; Andersen, Anders H.; Smith, Charles D.; Schmitt, Frederick A.

    2013-01-01

    Depression is common in Parkinson’s disease and is associated with cognitive impairment. Dopaminergic medications are effective in treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease; however, little is known regarding the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on cognitive function in depressed Parkinson patients. This study examines the neuropsychological effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy in Parkinsonian depression. We compared cognitive function in depressed and non-depressed Parkinson patients at two time-points: following overnight withdrawal and after the usual morning regimen of dopaminergic medications. A total of 28 non-demented, right-handed patients with mild to moderate idiopathic Parkinson’s disease participated. Ten of these patients were depressed according to DSM IV criteria. Results revealed a statistically significant interaction between depression and medication status on three measures of verbal memory and a facial affect naming task. In all cases, depressed Parkinson’s patients performed significantly more poorly while on dopaminergic medication than while off. The opposite pattern emerged for the non-depressed Parkinson’s group. The administration of dopaminergic medication to depressed Parkinson patients may carry unintended risks. PMID:23838419

  7. Dopaminergic neurotoxins require excitotoxic stimulation in organotypic cultures.

    PubMed

    Kress, Geraldine J; Reynolds, Ian J

    2005-12-01

    We have investigated the properties of the dopaminergic neurotoxins 6-hydroxydopamine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and rotenone using an organotypic culture that included slices of substantia nigra, striatum and cortex maintained for about 20 days in vitro. At this age, the organotypic culture contains dopaminergic neurons, visualized using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry, that project into the striatal slice and extend up to 1 mm into the cortical slice. Using TH immunohistochemistry to assess survival of dopaminergic neurons, we found that the three dopaminergic toxins alone were not selectively neurotoxic. However, the addition of a low concentration of N-methyl-d-aspartate together with each individual toxin resulted in profound injury to the dopaminergic neurons, reflected by the loss of cell bodies and the fragmentation of processes. The combined toxicity was completely blocked by MK801. To assess the specificity of the injury, we measured the diameter of cell nuclei in the organotypic culture stained with Hoechst 33342 because the nucleus shrinks when neurons are injured. These measurements showed that the combined toxin treatment selectively injured only the TH immunoreactive cells. Thus, in a model culture system where dopaminergic neurons innervate appropriate targets, excitotoxicity appears to be essential for the manifestation of the toxic actions of 6-hydroxydopamine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and rotenone. PMID:15996475

  8. Discovery of nigral dopaminergic neurogenesis in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brad E.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. As a result, intensive efforts have focused upon mechanisms that facilitate the death of mature dopaminergic neurons. Unfortunately, these efforts have been unsuccessful in providing an effective treatment to address neurodegeneration in this disease. Therefore, alternative theories of pathogenesis are being explored. Adult neurogenesis of dopaminergic neurons is an attractive concept that would provide a possible mechanism of neurodegeneration as well as offer an endogenous means to replenish affected neurons. To determine whether dopaminergic neurons experience neurogenesis in adult mice we developed a novel cell lineage tracing model that permitted detection of neurogenesis without many of the issues associated with popular techniques. Remarkably, we discovered that dopaminergic neurons are replenished in adult mice by Nestin+/Sox2- progenitor cells. What's more, the rate of neurogenesis is similar to the rate of dopaminergic neuron loss reported using a chronic, systemic inflammatory response mouse model. This observation may indicate that neuron loss in Parkinson's disease results from inhibition of neurogenesis. PMID:27482200

  9. Dopaminergic Modulation of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Deactivation in Parkinson Depression

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Anders H.; Smith, Charles D.; Slevin, John T.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Martin, Catherine A.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Blonder, Lee X.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with emotional abnormalities. Dopaminergic medications ameliorate Parkinsonian motor symptoms, but less is known regarding the impact of dopaminergic agents on affective processing, particularly in depressed PD (dPD) patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dopaminergic pharmacotherapy on brain activation to emotional stimuli in depressed versus nondepressed Parkinson disease (ndPD) patients. Participants included 18 ndPD patients (11 men, 7 women) and 10 dPD patients (7 men, 3 women). Patients viewed photographs of emotional faces during functional MRI. Scans were performed while the patient was taking anti-Parkinson medication and the day after medication had been temporarily discontinued. Results indicate that dopaminergic medications have opposite effects in the prefrontal cortex depending upon depression status. DPD patients show greater deactivation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) on dopaminergic medications than off, while ndPD patients show greater deactivation in this region off drugs. The VMPFC is in the default-mode network (DMN). DMN activity is negatively correlated with activity in brain systems used for external visual attention. Thus dopaminergic medications may promote increased attention to external visual stimuli among dPD patients but impede normal suppression of DMN activity during external stimulation among ndPD patients. PMID:26793404

  10. Development of intracerebral dopaminergic grafts: a combined immunohistochemical and autoradiographic study of its time course and environmental influences

    SciTech Connect

    Abrous, N.; Guy, J.; Vigny, A.; Calas, A.; Le Moal, M.; Herman, J.P.

    1988-07-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain a description of some aspects of the development of intracerebral dopaminergic grafts, namely, the time course of the glial reaction and its relation to cell division on one hand, and the development of graft-originated innervation and its dependence on adequate matching of the implanted neurons and target site on the other hand. Cell suspensions obtained from the mesencephalon or hypothalamus of embryonic day (ED) 14 rat embryos were implanted into the striatum or lateral hypothalamus of adult rats following the destruction of the nigrostriatal system of the hosts. Animals were sacrificed at different postimplantation times, and the development of the graft was followed by immunohistochemistry by using antisera directed against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA). Furthermore, the existence of cell division at various times following implantation was examined by performing autoradiography on immunostained sections after prior intraventricular administration of 3H-thymidine to the host. The first stage of the development of intracerebral grafts was characterized by the existence of intense cell division within the grafted tissue, lasting about 2 weeks, and also in the host tissue surrounding the graft, lasting only about 6 days. The cell division in the host tissue was paralleled by the existence of a strong glial reaction which, however, did not extend into the graft itself. Glial reaction in the host tissue gradually decreased at later times and disappeared by 4 weeks postimplantation without leaving behind a noticeable glial scar. The graft itself was, however, transiently filled with a population of reactive astroglial cells between 3 and 6 weeks postimplantation. Within grafts of mesencephalic tissue located in the striatum TH-positive neurons were distributed evenly at short times postimplantation (2-6 days).

  11. Increased L-DOPA-derived dopamine following selective MAO-A or-B inhibition in rat striatum depleted of dopaminergic and serotonergic innervation

    PubMed Central

    Sader-Mazbar, O; Loboda, Y; Rabey, M J; Finberg, J P M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Selective MAO type B (MAO-B) inhibitors are effective in potentiation of the clinical effect of L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease, but dopamine (DA) is deaminated mainly by MAO type A (MAO-A) in rat brain. We sought to clarify the roles of MAO-A and MAO-B in deamination of DA formed from exogenous L-DOPA in rat striatum depleted of dopaminergic, or both dopaminergic and serotonergic innervations. We also studied the effect of organic cation transporter-3 (OCT-3) inhibition by decinium-22 on extracellular DA levels following L-DOPA. Experimental Approach Striatal dopaminergic and/or serotonergic neuronal innervations were lesioned by 6-hydroxydopamine or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine respectively. Microdialysate DA levels after systemic L-DOPA were measured after inhibition of MAO-A or MAO-B by clorgyline or rasagiline respectively. MAO subtype localization in the striatum was determined by immunofluorescence. Key Results Rasagiline increased DA extracellular levels following L-DOPA to a greater extent in double-than in single-lesioned rats (2.8-and 1.8-fold increase, respectively, relative to saline treatment); however, clorgyline elevated DA levels in both models over 10-fold. MAO-A was strongly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in intact and lesioned striata, while MAO-B was localized in glia and to a small extent in MSNs. Inhibition of OCT-3 increased DA levels in the double-more than the single-lesion animals. Conclusions and Implications In striatum devoid of dopaminergic and serotonergic inputs, most deamination of L-DOPA-derived DA is mediated by MAO-A in MSN and a smaller amount by MAO-B in both MSN and glia. OCT-3 plays a significant role in uptake of DA from extracellular space. Inhibitors of OCT-3 are potential future targets for anti-Parkinsonian treatments. PMID:23992249

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist protects dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons from degeneration in MPTP-treated monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bogenpohl, James W.; Alagille, David; Delevich, Kristen; Tamagnan, Gilles; Votaw, John R.; Wichmann, Thomas; Smith, Yoland

    2011-01-01

    Degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system and of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus are important pathological features of Parkinson’s disease. There is an urgent need to develop therapies that slow down the progression of neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease. In the present study, we tested whether the highly specific metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist, 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl) ethynyl] pyridine, reduces dopaminergic and noradrenergic neuronal loss in monkeys rendered parkinsonian by chronic treatment with low doses of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Weekly intramuscular 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine injections (0.2–0.5 mg/kg body weight), in combination with daily administration of 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl) ethynyl] pyridine or vehicle, were performed until the development of parkinsonian motor symptoms in either of the two experimental groups (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl) ethynyl] pyridine versus 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/vehicle). After 21 weeks of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine treatment, all 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/vehicle-treated animals displayed parkinsonian symptoms, whereas none of the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl) ethynyl] pyridine-treated monkeys were significantly affected. These behavioural observations were consistent with in vivo positron emission tomography dopamine transporter imaging data, and with post-mortem stereological counts of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, as well as striatal intensity measurements of dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, which were all significantly higher in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl) ethynyl] pyridine-treated animals than in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/vehicle-treated monkeys. The 3-[(2-methyl-1

  13. Dietary administration of diquat for 13 weeks does not result in a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Minnema, Daniel J; Travis, Kim Z; Breckenridge, Charles B; Sturgess, Nicholas C; Butt, Mark; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Zadory, Dan; Herberth, Mark T; Watson, Scott L; Cook, Andrew R; Botham, Philip A

    2016-03-01

    Male and female C57BL/6J mice were administered diquat dibromide (DQ∙Br2) in their diets at concentrations of 0 (control), 12.5 and 62.5 ppm for 13 weeks to assess the potential effects of DQ on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. Achieved dose levels at 62.5 ppm were 6.4 and 7.6 mg DQ (ion)/kg bw/day for males and females, respectively. A separate group of mice was administered 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) ip as a positive control. The comparative effects of DQ and MPTP on the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and/or striatum were assessed using neurochemical, neuropathological and stereological endpoints. Morphological and stereological assessments were performed by investigators who were "blinded" to dose group. DQ had no effect on striatal dopamine concentration or dopamine turnover. There was no evidence of neuronal degeneration, astrocytic or microglial activation, or a reduction in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase positive (TH(+)) neurons in the SNpc or neuronal processes in the striatum of DQ-treated mice. These results are consistent with the rapid clearance of DQ from the brain following a single dose of radiolabeled DQ. In contrast, MPTP-treated mice exhibited decreased striatal dopamine concentration, reduced numbers of TH(+) neurons in the SNpc, and neuropathological changes, including neuronal necrosis, as well as astrocytic and microglial activation in the striatum and SNpc. PMID:26683030

  14. Physiological Characterisation of Human iPS-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Fernandes, Hugo J.; Vowles, Jane; James, William S.; Cowley, Sally A.; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer the potential to study otherwise inaccessible cell types. Critical to this is the directed differentiation of hiPSCs into functional cell lineages. This is of particular relevance to research into neurological disease, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), in which midbrain dopaminergic neurons degenerate during disease progression but are unobtainable until post-mortem. Here we report a detailed study into the physiological maturation over time of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro. We first generated and differentiated hiPSC lines into midbrain dopaminergic neurons and performed a comprehensive characterisation to confirm dopaminergic functionality by demonstrating dopamine synthesis, release, and re-uptake. The neuronal cultures include cells positive for both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and G protein-activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2 (Kir3.2, henceforth referred to as GIRK2), representative of the A9 population of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons vulnerable in PD. We observed for the first time the maturation of the slow autonomous pace-making (<10 Hz) and spontaneous synaptic activity typical of mature SNc dopaminergic neurons using a combination of calcium imaging and electrophysiology. hiPSC-derived neurons exhibited inositol tri-phosphate (IP3) receptor-dependent release of intracellular calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in neuronal processes as calcium waves propagating from apical and distal dendrites, and in the soma. Finally, neurons were susceptible to the dopamine neuron-specific toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) which reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and altered mitochondrial morphology. Mature hiPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons provide a neurophysiologically-defined model of previously inaccessible vulnerable SNc dopaminergic neurons to bridge the gap between clinical PD and animal models. PMID:24586273

  15. Physiological characterisation of human iPS-derived dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hartfield, Elizabeth M; Yamasaki-Mann, Michiko; Ribeiro Fernandes, Hugo J; Vowles, Jane; James, William S; Cowley, Sally A; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer the potential to study otherwise inaccessible cell types. Critical to this is the directed differentiation of hiPSCs into functional cell lineages. This is of particular relevance to research into neurological disease, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), in which midbrain dopaminergic neurons degenerate during disease progression but are unobtainable until post-mortem. Here we report a detailed study into the physiological maturation over time of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro. We first generated and differentiated hiPSC lines into midbrain dopaminergic neurons and performed a comprehensive characterisation to confirm dopaminergic functionality by demonstrating dopamine synthesis, release, and re-uptake. The neuronal cultures include cells positive for both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and G protein-activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2 (Kir3.2, henceforth referred to as GIRK2), representative of the A9 population of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons vulnerable in PD. We observed for the first time the maturation of the slow autonomous pace-making (<10 Hz) and spontaneous synaptic activity typical of mature SNc dopaminergic neurons using a combination of calcium imaging and electrophysiology. hiPSC-derived neurons exhibited inositol tri-phosphate (IP3) receptor-dependent release of intracellular calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in neuronal processes as calcium waves propagating from apical and distal dendrites, and in the soma. Finally, neurons were susceptible to the dopamine neuron-specific toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) which reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and altered mitochondrial morphology. Mature hiPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons provide a neurophysiologically-defined model of previously inaccessible vulnerable SNc dopaminergic neurons to bridge the gap between clinical PD and animal models. PMID:24586273

  16. Sonic Hedgehog Controls the Phenotypic Fate and Therapeutic Efficacy of Grafted Neural Precursor Cells in a Model of Nigrostriatal Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Lalitha; Daley, Brian F.; Davidson, Beverly L.; Boudreau, Ryan L.; Lipton, Jack W.; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Collier, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of soluble growth and survival promoting factors by neural precursor cells (NPCs) is suggested to be a prominent mechanism underlying the protective and regenerative effects of these cells after transplantation. Nevertheless, how and to what extent specific NPC-expressed factors contribute to therapeutic effects is not well understood. Using RNA silencing, the current study investigated the roles of two donor NPC molecules, namely glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and sonic hedgehog (SHH), in the protection of substantia nigra dopamine neurons in rats treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Analyses indicate that as opposed to the knock-down of GDNF, SHH inhibition caused a profound decline in nigrostriatal neuroprotection. Further, SHH silencing also curbed endogenous neurogenesis and the migration of host brdU+/dcx+ neural precursors into the striatum, which was present in the animals receiving control or GDNF silenced NPCs. A change in graft phenotype, mainly reflected by a reduced proportion of undifferentiated nestin+ cells, as well as a significantly greater host microglial activity, suggested an important role for these processes in the attenuation of neuroprotection and neurogenesis upon SHH silencing. Overall these studies reveal core mechanisms fundamental to grafted NPC-based therapeutic effects, and delineate the particular contributions of two graft-expressed molecules, SHH and GDNF, in mediating midbrain dopamine neuron protection, and host plasticity after NPC transplantation. PMID:26340267

  17. Adult Born Olfactory Bulb Dopaminergic Interneurons: Molecular Determinants and Experience-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Gendusa, Claudio; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is a highly plastic brain region involved in the early processing of olfactory information. A remarkably feature of the OB circuits in rodents is the constitutive integration of new neurons that takes place during adulthood. Newborn cells in the adult OB are mostly inhibitory interneurons belonging to chemically, morphologically and functionally heterogeneous types. Although there is general agreement that adult neurogenesis in the OB plays a key role in sensory information processing and olfaction-related plasticity, the contribution of each interneuron subtype to such functions is far to be elucidated. Here, we focus on the dopaminergic (DA) interneurons: we highlight recent findings about their morphological features and then describe the molecular factors required for the specification/differentiation and maintenance of the DA phenotype in adult born neurons. We also discuss dynamic changes of the DA interneuron population related to age, environmental stimuli and lesions, and their possible functional implications. PMID:27199651

  18. Adult Born Olfactory Bulb Dopaminergic Interneurons: Molecular Determinants and Experience-Dependent Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Gendusa, Claudio; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is a highly plastic brain region involved in the early processing of olfactory information. A remarkably feature of the OB circuits in rodents is the constitutive integration of new neurons that takes place during adulthood. Newborn cells in the adult OB are mostly inhibitory interneurons belonging to chemically, morphologically and functionally heterogeneous types. Although there is general agreement that adult neurogenesis in the OB plays a key role in sensory information processing and olfaction-related plasticity, the contribution of each interneuron subtype to such functions is far to be elucidated. Here, we focus on the dopaminergic (DA) interneurons: we highlight recent findings about their morphological features and then describe the molecular factors required for the specification/differentiation and maintenance of the DA phenotype in adult born neurons. We also discuss dynamic changes of the DA interneuron population related to age, environmental stimuli and lesions, and their possible functional implications. PMID:27199651

  19. Dysfunctional dopaminergic neurotransmission in asocial BTBR mice

    PubMed Central

    Squillace, M; Dodero, L; Federici, M; Migliarini, S; Errico, F; Napolitano, F; Krashia, P; Di Maio, A; Galbusera, A; Bifone, A; Scattoni, M L; Pasqualetti, M; Mercuri, N B; Usiello, A; Gozzi, A

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by pronounced social and communication deficits and stereotyped behaviours. Recent psychosocial and neuroimaging studies have highlighted reward-processing deficits and reduced dopamine (DA) mesolimbic circuit reactivity in ASD patients. However, the neurobiological and molecular determinants of these deficits remain undetermined. Mouse models recapitulating ASD-like phenotypes could help generate hypotheses about the origin and neurophysiological underpinnings of clinically relevant traits. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), behavioural and molecular readouts to probe dopamine neurotransmission responsivity in BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J mice (BTBR), an inbred mouse line widely used to model ASD-like symptoms owing to its robust social and communication deficits, and high level of repetitive stereotyped behaviours. C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used as normosocial reference comparators. DA reuptake inhibition with GBR 12909 produced significant striatal DA release in both strains, but failed to elicit fMRI activation in widespread forebrain areas of BTBR mice, including mesolimbic reward and striatal terminals. In addition, BTBR mice exhibited no appreciable motor responses to GBR 12909. DA D1 receptor-dependent behavioural and signalling responses were found to be unaltered in BTBR mice, whereas dramatic reductions in pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 and adenosine A2A receptor function was observed in these animals. Overall these results document profoundly compromised DA D2-mediated neurotransmission in BTBR mice, a finding that is likely to have a role in the distinctive social and behavioural deficits exhibited by these mice. Our results call for a deeper investigation of the role of dopaminergic dysfunction in mouse lines exhibiting ASD-like phenotypes, and possibly in ASD patient populations. PMID:25136890

  20. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecules on the Neurite Outgrowth of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Peng, Su-Ping; Schachner, Melitta; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-04-01

    Intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons has been shown to be a potentially very effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). With the detection of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), an unlimited source of autologous dopaminergic (DA) neurons became available. Although the iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons exhibited most of the fundamental dopaminergic characteristics, detailed analysis and comparison with primary DA neurons have shown some aberrations in the expression of genes involved in neuronal development and neurite outgrowth. The limited outgrowth of the iPSC-derived DA neurons may hamper their potential application in cell transplantation therapy for PD. In the present study, we examined whether the forced expression of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) and polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), via gene transduction, can promote the neurite formation and outgrowth of iPSC-derived DA neurons. In cultures on astrocyte layers, both adhesion factors significantly increased neurite formation of the adhesion factor overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons in comparison to control iPSC-derived DA neurons. The same tendency was observed when the DA neurons were plated on postnatal organotypic striatal slices; however, this effect did not reach statistical significance. Next, we examined the neurite outgrowth of the L1CAM- or PSA-NCAM-overexpressing iPSC-derived DA neurons after implantation in the striatum of unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, the animal model for PD. Like the outgrowth on the organotypic striatal slices, no significant L1CAM- and PSA-NCAM-enforced neurite outgrowth of the implanted DA neurons was observed. Apparently, induced expression of L1CAM or PSA-NCAM in the iPSC-derived DA neurons cannot completely restore the neurite outgrowth potential that was reduced in these DA neurons as a consequence of epigenetic aberrations resulting from the i

  1. Tiagabine Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Neurotoxins by Inhibiting Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Tong, Jiabin; Wang, Zishan; Huang, Li; Yang, Yufang; Bai, Xiaochen; Wang, Pan; Suo, Haiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yu, Mei; Fei, Jian; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation and inflammation are associated with progressive neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has recently been shown to play an inhibitory role in the immune system. Tiagabine, a piperidine derivative, enhances GABAergic transmission by inhibiting GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1). In the present study, we found that tiagabine pretreatment attenuated microglial activation, provided partial protection to the nigrostriatal axis and improved motor deficits in a methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. The protective function of tiagabine was abolished in GAT 1 knockout mice that were challenged with MPTP. In an alternative PD model, induced by intranigral infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglial suppression and subsequent neuroprotective effects of tiagabine were demonstrated. Furthermore, the LPS-induced inflammatory activation of BV-2 microglial cells and the toxicity of conditioned medium toward SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited by pretreatment with GABAergic drugs. The attenuation of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the inhibition of the generation of inflammatory mediators were the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggest that tiagabine acts as a brake for nigrostriatal microglial activation and that it might be a novel therapeutic approach for PD. PMID:26499517

  2. Amphetamine- type reinforcement by dopaminergic agonists in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yokel, R A; Wise, R A

    1978-07-19

    Intravenous self-administration of d-amphetamine (0.25 mg/kg/injection) decreased in a dose-related fashion after injections of the dopaminergic agonists apomorphine and piribedil. The dopaminergic agonists appear to suppress amphetamine intake in the same way as do 'free' amphetamine injections, by extending drug satiation in a given interresponse period. Clonidine, an alpha noradrenergic agonist, did not have similar effects. Apomorphine and piribedil did not increase 14C-amphetamine levels in rat brains, nor did they retard disappearance of 14C-amphetamine; thus their amphetamine-like effects are not due to alterations of amphetamine metabolism. Rats responding for amphetamine continued to respond for apomorphine or peribedil when the latter drugs were substituted for the former. Rats experienced in amphetamine self-administration readily initiated and maintained responding for apomorphine and piribedil. The dopaminergic blocker (+)-butaclamol disrupted responding for apomorphine and piribedil, although it produced no marked increase in responding for the dopaminergic agonists, as it does for amphetamine. These data add to the evidence that actions in the dopaminergic synapse account for amphetamine's reinforcing properties. PMID:98800

  3. No parkinsonism in SCA2 and SCA3 despite severe neurodegeneration of the dopaminergic substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Schöls, Ludger; Reimold, Matthias; Seidel, Kay; Globas, Christoph; Brockmann, Kathrin; Hauser, Till Karsten; Auburger, Georg; Bürk, Katrin; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Reischl, Gerald; Korf, Horst-Werner; Brunt, Ewout R; Rüb, Udo

    2015-11-01

    See Klockgether (doi:10.1093/awv253) for a scientific commentary on this article.The spinocerebellar ataxias types 2 (SCA2) and 3 (SCA3) are autosomal dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxias which are caused by CAG trinucleotide repeat expansions in the coding regions of the disease-specific genes. Although previous post-mortem studies repeatedly revealed a consistent neurodegeneration of the dopaminergic substantia nigra in patients with SCA2 and with SCA3, parkinsonian motor features evolve only rarely. As the pathophysiological mechanism how SCA2 and SCA3 patients do not exhibit parkinsonism is still enigmatic, we performed a positron emission tomography and a post-mortem study of two independent cohorts of SCA2 and SCA3 patients with and without parkinsonian features. Positron emission tomography revealed a significant reduction of dopamine transporter levels in the striatum as well as largely unaffected postsynaptic striatal D2 receptors. In spite of this remarkable pathology in the motor mesostriatal pathway, only 4 of 19 SCA2 and SCA3 patients suffered from parkinsonism. The post-mortem investigation revealed, in addition to an extensive neuronal loss in the dopaminergic substantia nigra of all patients with spinocerebellar ataxia, a consistent affection of the thalamic ventral anterior and ventral lateral nuclei, the pallidum and the cholinergic pedunculopontine nucleus. With the exception of a single patient with SCA3 who suffered from parkinsonian motor features during his lifetime, the subthalamic nucleus underwent severe neuronal loss, which was clearly more severe in its motor territory than in its limbic or associative territories. Our observation that lesions of the motor territory of the subthalamic nucleus were consistently associated with the prevention of parkinsonism in our SCA2 and SCA3 patients matches the clinical experience that selective targeting of the motor territory of the subthalamic nucleus by focal lesions or deep brain stimulation

  4. [Evaluation of central dopaminergic tone in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Mainini, E; Martinelli, I; Scarsi, G; Mazzi, C

    1991-01-01

    The role of dopaminergic ways in human copulatory activity and the high frequency of impotence in diabetes mellitus are well known. In order to study the involvement of the central dopaminergic tone in diabetic impotence we have evaluated the PRL and TSH response to metoclopramide (MCP 10 mg ev) in 28 diabetic male patients (15 ID including 6 impotent and 13 NID including 5 impotent ) compared with 9 healthy controls. All subjects were investigated for the presence of neuropathy, retinopathy, macroangiopathy, gonadal and thyroid diseases. The PRL response to MCP was greater (p less than 0.05) in impotent patients than in controls at 60' and 90' in ID, and at 30' and 120' in NID. There was no significant difference in TSH increase and in PRL and TSH response areas between the groups considered. In conclusion, the dopaminergic tone is substantially normal in diabetic patients, while some PRL hyperresponsiveness to MCP exists in impotent diabetics. PMID:1815118

  5. Dopaminergic modulation of sucrose acceptance behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Marella, Sunanda; Mann, Kevin; Scott, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    For an animal to survive in a constantly changing environment, its behavior must be shaped by the complex milieu of sensory stimuli it detects, its previous experience and its internal state. Although taste behaviors in the fly are relatively simple, with sugars eliciting acceptance behavior and bitter compounds avoidance, these behaviors are also plastic and modified by intrinsic and extrinsic cues such as hunger and sensory stimuli. Here, we show that dopamine modulates a simple taste behavior, proboscis extension to sucrose. Conditional silencing of dopaminergic neurons reduces proboscis extension probability and increased activation of dopaminergic neurons increases extension to sucrose but not to bitter compounds or water. One dopaminergic neuron with extensive branching in the primary taste relay, the subesophageal ganglion, triggers proboscis extension and its activity is altered by satiety state. These studies demonstrate the marked specificity of dopamine signaling and provide a foundation to examine neural mechanisms of feeding modulation in the fly. PMID:22405204

  6. Influence of Dopaminergically Mediated Reward on Somatosensory Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Pleger, Burkhard; Ruff, Christian C.; Blankenburg, Felix; Klöppel, Stefan; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2009-01-01

    Reward-related dopaminergic influences on learning and overt behaviour are well established, but any influence on sensory decision-making is largely unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while participants judged electric somatosensory stimuli on one hand or other, before being rewarded for correct performance at trial end via a visual signal, at one of four anticipated financial levels. Prior to the procedure, participants received either placebo (saline), a dopamine agonist (levodopa), or an antagonist (haloperidol). Principal findings: higher anticipated reward improved tactile decisions. Visually signalled reward reactivated primary somatosensory cortex for the judged hand, more strongly for higher reward. After receiving a higher reward on one trial, somatosensory activations and decisions were enhanced on the next trial. These behavioural and neural effects were all enhanced by levodopa and attenuated by haloperidol, indicating dopaminergic dependency. Dopaminergic reward-related influences extend even to early somatosensory cortex and sensory decision-making. PMID:19636360

  7. [Dopaminergic neuroprotection and reconstruction of neural network tiara].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder in whose brain massive loss of dopaminergic neurons and formation of Lewy bodies occur in the substantia nigra (SN). L-Dihydroxyphenylamine (L-DOPA) substitution is still considered the gold standard of antiparkinsonian drug therapy. However, there has been little information available on neuroprotective and regenerative therapies. Recently, we have found that pramipexole and talipexole (D(2)/D(3)-dopaminergic agonists) inhibit dopaminergic neurotoxin-induced production of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic cell death. In addition, treatment with these drugs induces enhancement of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression and inhibition of α-synuclein aggregation. Interestingly, recent study suggests that pramipexole treatment delays the progression of early PD symptom. On the other hand, we investigated the transplantation strategy for PD by assessing whether double-transplants of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neurons in the striatum (ST) and SN, or subthalamic nucleus (STN), induce functional recovery in rat hemi-parkinsonian model. The study indicates that both the involvement of ST as a place of transplantation and the number of ES cell-derived neurons are essential factors for efficacy on PD animal model. Interestingly, an invertebrate planarian can regenerate complete organs, including a well-organized central nervous system (brain), within about 7 days. The regeneration process of the planarian dopaminergic neural network (tiara) may be divided into five steps: 1) anterior blastema formation, 2) brain rudiment formation, 3) brain pattern formation, 4) the formation of dopaminergic tiara, and 5) functional recovery of dopaminergic motor regulation, with several kinds of genes and molecular cascades acting at each step. PMID:20930477

  8. Effects of dopaminergic and subthalamic stimulation on musical performance.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Floris T; Schüpbach, Michael; Altenmüller, Eckart; Bardinet, Eric; Yelnik, Jérôme; Hälbig, Thomas D

    2013-05-01

    Although subthalamic-deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is an efficient treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on fine motor functions are not clear. We present the case of a professional violinist with PD treated with STN-DBS. DBS improved musical articulation, intonation and emotional expression and worsened timing relative to a timekeeper (metronome). The same effects were found for dopaminergic treatment. These results suggest that STN-DBS, mimicking the effects of dopaminergic stimulation, improves fine-tuned motor behaviour whilst impairing timing precision. PMID:23232663

  9. Posterior fossa lesions associated with neuropsychiatric symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Pollak, L; Klein, C; Rabey, J M; Schiffer, J

    1996-11-01

    We reviewed 7 cases with posterior fossa structural abnormalities (3 tumors, 2 megacisterna magna and 2 Dandy-Walker syndrome) presenting with neuropsychiatric symptomatology. Derangement in the balance of dopamine, serotonin and noradrenergic networks has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, affective and even personality disorders. Disruption of the cerebellar output to mesial dopaminergic areas, locus coeruleus and raphe nuclei, or deafferentation of the thalamolimbic circuits by a cerebellar lesion may lead to behavioral changes. Seven patients (pts) (comprising 4 men and 3 women with mean age 22 years) were diagnosed as suffering from psychosis (2 pts), major depression (1 pt), personality disorders (2 pts) and somatoform disorders (2 pts) (DSM-IV criteria). Brain CT scan (7 pts) and MRI (4 pts) revealed tumors of the posterior fossa (2 pts), megacisterna magna (2 pts) and Dandy-Walker variant (2 pts). In one patient a IVth ventricle tumor was removed in childhood. PMID:9003973

  10. 6-Hydroxydopamine and radiofrequency lesions of the lateral entorhinal cortex facilitate an operant appetitive conditioning task in mice.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1981-07-01

    The entorhinal cortex seems heterogeneous as dopaminergic terminals are present only in the anterior part of the lateral entorhinal cortex. In order to clarify the interaction of this cortex with the hippocampus in memory processes, the effects of either 6-hydroxydopamine or radiofrequency bilateral lesions were compared. Both lesions enhance the retention of a Skinner task with continuous reinforcement schedule. Involvement of dopamine in memory processes is discussed. PMID:7254716

  11. Anterograde Degeneration of the Nigrostriatal Pathway Visualized by 123I-FP-CIT SPECT in a Patient With Artery of Percheron Infarction.

    PubMed

    Nakadate, Masashi; Miyamoto, Norikazu; Starkey, Jay; Toriihara, Akira; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2016-06-01

    I-FP-CIT SPECT is widely used for diagnosis in patients with parkinsonism. Vascular parkinsonism usually has nonspecific findings from normal uptake to radiotracer decrease in the infarcted region. Infarction of the substantia nigra has been reported as a rare cause of vascular parkinsonism. We present a case of artery of Percheron infarction involving the substantia nigra unilaterally with ipsilateral reduction of striatal uptake on I-FP-CIT SPECT, suggesting anterograde degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway. Infarction of the substantia nigra should be considered in cases of decreased striatal uptake with marked laterality on I-FP-CIT SPECT. PMID:26914571

  12. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nevue, Alexander A; Elde, Cameron J; Perkel, David J; Portfors, Christine V

    2015-01-01

    The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC), is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF). All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing. PMID:26834578

  13. Pharmacological imaging as a tool to visualise dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Schrantee, A; Reneman, L

    2014-09-01

    Dopamine abnormalities underlie a wide variety of psychopathologies, including ADHD and schizophrenia. A new imaging technique, pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI), is a promising non-invasive technique to visualize the dopaminergic system in the brain. In this review we explore the clinical potential of phMRI in detecting dopamine dysfunction or neurotoxicity, assess its strengths and weaknesses and identify directions for future research. Preclinically, phMRI is able to detect severe dopaminergic abnormalities quite similar to conventional techniques such as PET and SPECT. phMRI benefits from its high spatial resolution and the possibility to visualize both local and downstream effects of dopaminergic neurotransmission. In addition, it allows for repeated measurements and assessments in vulnerable populations. The major challenge is the complex interpretation of phMRI results. Future studies in patients with dopaminergic abnormalities need to confirm the currently reviewed preclinical findings to validate the technique in a clinical setting. Eventually, based on the current review we expect that phMRI can be of use in a clinical setting involving vulnerable populations (such as children and adolescents) for diagnosis and monitoring treatment efficacy. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'. PMID:23851258

  14. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nevue, Alexander A.; Elde, Cameron J.; Perkel, David J.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2016-01-01

    The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC), is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF). All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing. PMID:26834578

  15. The dopaminergic system and aggression in laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dopaminergic system regulates aggression in humans and other mammals. To investigate if birds with genetic propensity for high and low aggressiveness may exhibit distinctly different aggressive mediation via dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptor pathways, two high aggressive (DXL and LGPS) and one lo...

  16. Exposure to Mitochondrial Genotoxins and Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bodhicharla, Rakesh K.; McKeever, Madeline G.; Arrant, Andrew E.; Margillo, Kathleen M.; Ryde, Ian T.; Cyr, Derek D.; Kosmaczewski, Sara G.; Hammarlund, Marc; Meyer, Joel N.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration has been correlated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and exposure to environmental toxins, but causation is unclear. We investigated the ability of several known environmental genotoxins and neurotoxins to cause mtDNA damage, mtDNA depletion, and neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that paraquat, cadmium chloride and aflatoxin B1 caused more mitochondrial than nuclear DNA damage, and paraquat and aflatoxin B1 also caused dopaminergic neurodegeneration. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) caused similar levels of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage. To further test whether the neurodegeneration could be attributed to the observed mtDNA damage, C. elegans were exposed to repeated low-dose ultraviolet C radiation (UVC) that resulted in persistent mtDNA damage; this exposure also resulted in dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Damage to GABAergic neurons and pharyngeal muscle cells was not detected. We also found that fasting at the first larval stage was protective in dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration. Finally, we found that dopaminergic neurons in C. elegans are capable of regeneration after laser surgery. Our findings are consistent with a causal role for mitochondrial DNA damage in neurodegeneration, but also support non mtDNA-mediated mechanisms. PMID:25486066

  17. Dopaminergic modulation of motor network dynamics in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Michely, Jochen; Volz, Lukas J; Barbe, Michael T; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Viswanathan, Shivakumar; Timmermann, Lars; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Although characteristic motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease such as bradykinesia typically improve under dopaminergic medication, deficits in higher motor control are less responsive. We here investigated the dopaminergic modulation of network dynamics underlying basic motor performance, i.e. finger tapping, and higher motor control, i.e. internally and externally cued movement preparation and selection. Twelve patients, assessed ON and OFF medication, and 12 age-matched healthy subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic causal modelling was used to assess effective connectivity in a motor network comprising cortical and subcortical regions. In particular, we investigated whether impairments in basic and higher motor control, and the effects induced by dopaminergic treatment are due to connectivity changes in (i) the mesial premotor loop comprising the supplementary motor area; (ii) the lateral premotor loop comprising lateral premotor cortex; and (iii) cortico-subcortical interactions. At the behavioural level, we observed a marked slowing of movement preparation and selection when patients were internally as opposed to externally cued. Preserved performance during external cueing was associated with enhanced connectivity between prefrontal cortex and lateral premotor cortex OFF medication, compatible with a context-dependent compensatory role of the lateral premotor loop in the hypodopaminergic state. Dopaminergic medication significantly improved finger tapping speed in patients, which correlated with a drug-induced coupling increase of prefrontal cortex with the supplementary motor area, i.e. the mesial premotor loop. In addition, only in the finger tapping condition, patients ON medication showed enhanced excitatory influences exerted by cortical premotor regions and the thalamus upon the putamen. In conclusion, the amelioration of bradykinesia by dopaminergic medication seems to be driven by enhanced connectivity within the mesial

  18. CX3CR1 Disruption Differentially Influences Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration in Parkinsonian Mice Depending on the Neurotoxin and Route of Administration.

    PubMed

    Tristão, Fabrine Sales Massafera; Lazzarini, Márcio; Martin, Sabine; Amar, Majid; Stühmer, Walter; Kirchhoff, Frank; Gomes, Lucas Araújo Caldi; Lanfumey, Laurance; Prediger, Rui D; Sepulveda, Julia E; Del-Bel, Elaine A; Raisman-Vozari, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons accompanied by an inflammatory reaction. The neuron-derived chemokine fractalkine (CX3CL1) is an exclusive ligand for the receptor CX3CR1 expressed on microglia. The CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling is important for sustaining microglial activity. Using a recently developed PD model, in which the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) toxin is delivered intranasally, we hypothesized that CX3CR1 could play a role in neurotoxicity and glial activation. For this, we used CX3CR1 knock-in mice and compared results with those obtained using the classical PD models through intraperitonal MPTP or intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The striatum from all genotypes (CX3CR1(+/+), CX3CR1(+/GFP) and CX3CR1-deficient mice) showed a significant dopaminergic depletion after intranasal MPTP inoculation. In contrast to that, we could not see differences in the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of CX3CR1-deficient animals. Similarly, after 6-OHDA infusion, the CX3CR1 deletion decreased the amphetamine-induced turning behavior observed in CX3CR1(+/GFP) mice. After the 6-OHDA inoculation, a minor dopaminergic neuronal loss was observed in the substantia nigra from CX3CR1-deficient mice. Distinctly, a more extensive neuronal cell loss was observed in the substantia nigra after the intraperitoneal MPTP injection in CX3CR1 disrupted animals, corroborating previous results. Intranasal and intraperitoneal MPTP inoculation induced a similar microgliosis in CX3CR1-deficient mice but a dissimilar change in the astrocyte proliferation in the substantia nigra. Nigral astrocyte proliferation was observed only after intraperitoneal MPTP inoculation. In conclusion, intranasal MPTP and 6-OHDA lesion in CX3CR1-deficient mice yield no nigral dopaminergic neuron loss, linked to the absence of astroglial proliferation. PMID:26403659

  19. Estradiol in the Preoptic Area Regulates the Dopaminergic Response to Cocaine in the Nucleus Accumbens.

    PubMed

    Tobiansky, Daniel J; Will, Ryan G; Lominac, Kevin D; Turner, Jonathan M; Hattori, Tomoko; Krishnan, Krittika; Martz, Julia R; Nutsch, Victoria L; Dominguez, Juan M

    2016-06-01

    The sex-steroid hormone estradiol (E2) enhances the psychoactive effects of cocaine, as evidenced by clinical and preclinical studies. The medial preoptic area (mPOA), a region in the hypothalamus, is a primary neural locus for neuroendocrine integration, containing one of the richest concentrations of estrogen receptors in the CNS and also has a key role in the regulation of naturally rewarding behaviors. However, whether estradiol enhances the neurochemical response to cocaine by acting in the mPOA is still unclear. Using neurotoxic lesions and microdialysis, we examined whether the mPOA modulates cocaine-induced neurochemical activity in the nucleus accumbens. Tract tracing and immunohistochemical staining were used to determine whether projections from the mPOA to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are sensitive to estrogen signaling. Finally, estradiol microinjections followed by microdialysis were used to determine whether estrogenic signaling in the mPOA modulates cocaine-induced changes of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. Results showed that lesions of the mPOA or microinjections of estradiol directly into the mPOA increased cocaine-induced release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the mPOA modulates cocaine responsiveness via projections to both dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons in the VTA, and that these projections are sensitive to estrogenic stimulation. Taken together, these findings point to a novel estradiol-dependent pathway that modulates cocaine-induced neurochemical activity in the mesolimbic system. PMID:26647972

  20. Dopaminergic projections to the medial preoptic area of postpartum rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stephanie M.; Lonstein, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine receptor activity in the rodent medial preoptic area (mPOA) is crucial for the display of maternal behaviors, as well as numerous other physiological and behavioral functions. However, the origin of dopaminergic input to the mPOA has not been identified through neuroanatomical tracing. To accomplish this, the retrograde tracer Fluorogold was iontophoretically applied to the mPOA of postpartum laboratory rats, and dual-label immunocytochemistry for Fluorogold and tyrosine hydroxylase later performed to identify dopaminergic cells of the forebrain and midbrain projecting to the mPOA. Results indicate that the number of dopaminergic cells projecting to the mPOA is moderate (~90 cells to one hemisphere), and that these cells have an unexpectedly wide distribution. Even so, more than half of the dual-labeled cells were found in what has been considered extensions of the A10 dopamine group (particularly the ventrocaudal posterior hypothalamus and adjacent medial supramammillary nucleus), or in the A10 cells of the ventral tegmental area. The rostral hypothalamus and surrounding region also contained numerous dual-labeled cells, with the greatest number found within the mPOA itself (including in the AVPV and PVpo). Notably, dual-labeled cells were rare in the zona incerta (A13), a site previously suggested to provide dopaminergic input to the mPOA. This study is the first to use anatomical tracing to detail the dopaminergic projections to the mPOA in the laboratory rat, and indicates that much of this projection originates more caudally than previously suggested. PMID:19409227

  1. Effect of parasitic infection on dopamine biosynthesis in dopaminergic cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, H.L.; Alsaady, I.; Howell, G.; Prandovszky, E.; Peers, C.; Robinson, P.; McConkey, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the neurotropic agent Toxoplasma gondii alters rodent behavior and can result in neuropsychiatric symptoms in humans. Little is understood regarding the effects of infection on host neural processes but alterations to dopaminergic neurotransmission are implicated. We have previously reported elevated levels of dopamine (DA) in infected dopaminergic cells however the involvement of the host enzymes and fate of the produced DA were not defined. In order to clarify the effects of infection on host DA biosynthetic enzymes and DA packaging we examined enzyme levels and activity and DA accumulation and release in T. gondii-infected neurosecretory cells. Although the levels of the host tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DOPA decarboxylase and AADC (DDC) did not change significantly in infected cultures, DDC was found within the parasitophorous vacuole (PV), the vacuolar compartment where the parasites reside, as well as in the host cytosol in infected dopaminergic cells. Strikingly, DDC was found within the intracellular parasite cysts in infected brain tissue. This finding could provide some explanation for observations of DA within tissue cysts in infected brain as a parasite-encoded enzyme with TH activity was also localized within tissue cysts. In contrast, cellular DA packaging appeared unchanged in single-cell microamperometry experiments and only a fraction of the increased DA was accessible to high potassium-induced release. This study provides some understanding of how this parasite produces elevated DA within dopaminergic cells without the toxic ramifications of free cytosolic DA. The mechanism for synthesis and packaging of DA by T. gondii-infected dopaminergic cells may have important implications for the effects of chronic T. gondii infection on humans and animals. PMID:26297895

  2. The 6-OHDA mouse model of Parkinson's disease - Terminal striatal lesions provide a superior measure of neuronal loss and replacement than median forebrain bundle lesions.

    PubMed

    Bagga, V; Dunnett, S B; Fricker, R A

    2015-07-15

    Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway produce side-biased motor impairments that reflect the motor deficits seen in Parkinson's disease (PD). This toxin-induced model in the rat has been used widely, to evaluate possible therapeutic strategies, but has not been well established in mice. With the advancements in mouse stem cell research we believe the requirement for a mouse model is essential for the therapeutic potential of these and other mouse-derived cells to be efficiently assessed. This aim of this study focused on developing a mouse model of PD using the 129 P2/OLA Hsd mouse strain as this is widely used in the generation of mouse embryonic stem cells. Both unilateral 6-OHDA medial forebrain bundle (MFB) and striatal lesion protocols were compared, with mice analysed for appropriate drug-induced rotational bias. Results demonstrated that lesioned mice responded to d-amphetamine with peak rotation dose at 5mg/kg and 10mg/kg for MFB and striatal lesions respectively. Apomorphine stimulation produced no significant rotational responses, at any dose, in either the MFB or striatal 6-OHDA lesioned mice. Analysis of dopamine neuron loss revealed that the MFB lesion was unreliable with little correlation between dopamine neuron loss and rotational asymmetry. Striatal lesions however were more reliable, with a strong correlation between dopamine neuron loss and rotational asymmetry. Functional recovery of d-amphetamine-induced rotational bias was shown following transplantation of E13 mouse VM tissue into the lesioned striatum; confirming the validity of this mouse model. PMID:25841616

  3. Investigating the dopaminergic synapse in vivo. II. Molecular imaging studies in small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Larisch, Rolf; Beu, Markus; Antke, Christina; Kley, Konstantin; Forutan, Farhad; Wirrwar, Andreas; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic synaptic function may be assessed either at the presynaptic terminal or at the postsynaptic binding sites using molecular in vivo imaging methods. Apart from the density of binding sites, parameters such as alterations in dopamine synthesis, dopamine storage or dopamine release can be quantified either by application of specific radiotracers or by assessing the competition between the exogenous radioligand and endogenous dopamine. The performance of animal studies allows the induction of specific short-term or long-term synaptic conditions via pharmacological challenges or infliction of neurotoxic lesions. Therefore, small laboratory animals such as rats and mice have become invaluable models for a variety of human disorders. This article gives an overview of those small animal studies which have been performed so far on dopaminergic neurotransmission using in vivo imaging methods, with a special focus on the relevance of findings within the functional entity of the dopaminergic synapse. Taken together, in vivo investigations on animal models of Parkinson's disease showed decreases of dopamine storage, dopamine release and dopamine transporter binding, no alterations of dopamine synthesis and DA release, and either increases or no alterations of D2 receptor binding, while in vivo investigations of animal models of Huntington's disease. showed decreases of DAT and D1 receptor binding. For D2 receptor binding, both decreases and increases have been reported, dependent on the radioligand employed. Substances of abuse, such as alcohol, amphetamine and methylphenidate, led to an increase of dopamine release in striatal regions. This held for the acute application of substances to both healthy animals and animal models of drug abuse. Findings also showed that chronic application of cocaine induced long-term reductions of both D1 and D2 receptor binding, which disappeared after several weeks of withdrawal. Finally, preliminary results yielded the first

  4. Functional enhancement and protection of dopaminergic terminals by RAB3B overexpression.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chee Yeun; Koprich, James B; Hallett, Penelope J; Isacson, Ole

    2009-12-29

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN, A9) are particularly vulnerable, compared to adjacent DA neurons within the ventral tegmental area (VTA, A10). Here, we show that in rat and human, one RAB3 isoform, RAB3B, has higher expression levels in A10 compared to A9 neurons. RAB3 is a monomeric GTPase protein that is highly enriched in synaptic vesicles and is involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking and synaptic transmission, disturbances of which have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. These findings prompted us to further investigate the biology and neuroprotective capacity of RAB3B both in vitro and in vivo. RAB3B overexpression in human dopaminergic BE (2)-M17 cells increased neurotransmitter content, [(3)H] dopamine uptake, and levels of presynaptic proteins. AAV-mediated RAB3B overexpression in A9 DA neurons of the rat SN increased striatal dopamine content, number and size of synaptic vesicles, and levels of the presynaptic proteins, confirming in vitro findings. Measurement of extracellular DOPAC, a dopamine metabolite, following l-DOPA injection supported a role for RAB3B in enhancing the dopamine storage capacity of synaptic terminals. RAB3B overexpression in BE (2)-M17 cells was protective against toxins that simulate aspects of PD in vitro, including an oxidative stressor 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and a proteasome inhibitor MG-132. Furthermore, RAB3B overexpression in rat SN both protected A9 DA neurons and resulted in behavioral improvement in a 6-OHDA retrograde lesion model of PD. These results suggest that RAB3B improves dopamine handling and storage capacity at presynaptic terminals, and confers protection to vulnerable DA neurons. PMID:20007772

  5. Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in the Mouse Is Associated with Decrease of Viscoelasticity of Substantia Nigra Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hain, Elisabeth G.; Klein, Charlotte; Munder, Tonia; Braun, Juergen; Riek, Kerstin; Mueller, Susanne; Sack, Ingolf; Steiner, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of brain tissue are altered by histopathological changes due to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease (PD). Such alterations can be measured by magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) as a non-invasive technique to determine viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Until now, the correlation between histopathological mechanisms and observed alterations in tissue viscoelasticity in neurodegenerative diseases is still not completely understood. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate (1) the validity of MRE to detect viscoelastic changes in small and specific brain regions: the substantia nigra (SN), midbrain and hippocampus in a mouse model of PD, and (2) if the induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration and inflammation in the SN is reflected by local changes in viscoelasticity. Therefore, MRE measurements of the SN, midbrain and hippocampus were performed in adult female mice before and at five time points after 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin hydrochloride (MPTP) treatment specifically lesioning dopaminergic neurons in the SN. At each time point, additional mice were utilized for histological analysis of the SN. After treatment cessation, we observed opposed viscoelastic changes in the midbrain, hippocampus and SN with the midbrain showing a gradual rise and the hippocampus a distinct transient increase of viscous and elastic parameters, while viscosity and–to a lesser extent—elasticity in the SN decreased over time. The decrease in viscosity and elasticity in the SN was paralleled by a reduced number of neurons due to the MPTP-induced neurodegeneration. In conclusion, MRE is highly sensitive to detect local viscoelastic changes in specific and even small brain regions. Moreover, we confirmed that neuronal cells likely constitute the backbone of the adult brain mainly accounting for its viscoelasticity. Therefore, MRE could be established as a new potential instrument for clinical evaluation and

  6. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to dopaminergic neurons in serum-free suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Thomas C; Noggle, Scott A; Palmarini, Gail M; Weiler, Deb A; Lyons, Ian G; Pensa, Kate A; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Davidson, Bruce P; Lambert, Nevin A; Condie, Brian G

    2004-01-01

    The use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a source of dopaminergic neurons for Parkinson's disease cell therapy will require the development of simple and reliable cell differentiation protocols. The use of cell cocultures, added extracellular signaling factors, or transgenic approaches to drive hESC differentiation could lead to additional regulatory as well as cell production delays for these therapies. Because the neuronal cell lineage seems to require limited or no signaling for its formation, we tested the ability of hESCs to differentiate to form dopamine-producing neurons in a simple serum-free suspension culture system. BG01 and BG03 hESCs were differentiated as suspension aggregates, and neural progenitors and neurons were detectable after 2-4 weeks. Plated neurons responded appropriately to electrophysiological cues. This differentiation was inhibited by early exposure to bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-4, but a pulse of BMP-4 from days 5 to 9 caused induction of peripheral neuronal differentiation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and whole-mount immunocytochemistry demonstrated the expression of multiple markers of the midbrain dopaminergic phenotype in serum-free differentiations. Neurons expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were killed by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a neurotoxic catecholamine. Upon plating, these cells released dopamine and other catecholamines in response to K+ depolarization. Surviving TH+ neurons, derived from the cells differentiated in serum-free suspension cultures, were detected 8 weeks after transplantation into 6-OHDA-lesioned rat brains. This work suggests that hESCs can differentiate in simple serum-free suspension cultures to produce the large number of cells required for transplantation studies. PMID:15579641

  7. Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in the Mouse Is Associated with Decrease of Viscoelasticity of Substantia Nigra Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hain, Elisabeth G; Klein, Charlotte; Munder, Tonia; Braun, Juergen; Riek, Kerstin; Mueller, Susanne; Sack, Ingolf; Steiner, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of brain tissue are altered by histopathological changes due to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease (PD). Such alterations can be measured by magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) as a non-invasive technique to determine viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Until now, the correlation between histopathological mechanisms and observed alterations in tissue viscoelasticity in neurodegenerative diseases is still not completely understood. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate (1) the validity of MRE to detect viscoelastic changes in small and specific brain regions: the substantia nigra (SN), midbrain and hippocampus in a mouse model of PD, and (2) if the induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration and inflammation in the SN is reflected by local changes in viscoelasticity. Therefore, MRE measurements of the SN, midbrain and hippocampus were performed in adult female mice before and at five time points after 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin hydrochloride (MPTP) treatment specifically lesioning dopaminergic neurons in the SN. At each time point, additional mice were utilized for histological analysis of the SN. After treatment cessation, we observed opposed viscoelastic changes in the midbrain, hippocampus and SN with the midbrain showing a gradual rise and the hippocampus a distinct transient increase of viscous and elastic parameters, while viscosity and-to a lesser extent-elasticity in the SN decreased over time. The decrease in viscosity and elasticity in the SN was paralleled by a reduced number of neurons due to the MPTP-induced neurodegeneration. In conclusion, MRE is highly sensitive to detect local viscoelastic changes in specific and even small brain regions. Moreover, we confirmed that neuronal cells likely constitute the backbone of the adult brain mainly accounting for its viscoelasticity. Therefore, MRE could be established as a new potential instrument for clinical evaluation and diagnostics

  8. Nigrostriatal α-synucleinopathy induced by viral vector-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein: A new primate model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kirik, Deniz; Annett, Lucy E.; Burger, Corinna; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Mandel, Ronald J.; Björklund, Anders

    2003-01-01

    We used a high-titer recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector to express WT or mutant human α-synuclein in the substantia nigra of adult marmosets. The α-synuclein protein was expressed in 90–95% of all nigral dopamine neurons and distributed by anterograde transport throughout their axonal and dendritic projections. The transduced neurons developed severe neuronal pathology, including α-synuclein-positive cytoplasmic inclusions and granular deposits; swollen, dystrophic, and fragmented neuritis; and shrunken and pyknotic, densely α-synuclein-positive perikarya. By 16 wk posttransduction, 30–60% of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons were lost, and the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive innervation of the caudate nucleus and putamen was reduced to a similar extent. The rAAV-α-synuclein-treated monkeys developed a type of motor impairment, i.e., head position bias, compatible with this magnitude of nigrostriatal damage. rAAV vector-mediated α-synuclein gene transfer provides a transgenic primate model of nigrostriatal α-synucleinopathy that is of particular interest because it develops slowly over time, like human Parkinson's disease (PD), and expresses neuropathological features (α-synuclein-positive inclusions and dystrophic neurites, in particular) that are similar to those seen in idiopathic PD. This model offers new opportunities for the study of pathogenetic mechanisms and exploration of new therapeutic targets of particular relevance to human PD. PMID:12601150

  9. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  10. Chronic Nicotine Exposure Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic Deficits.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Brock, Paula L; McFadden, Lisa M; Nielsen, Shannon M; Ellis, Jonathan D; Walters, Elliot T; Stout, Kristen A; McIntosh, J Michael; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2015-12-01

    Repeated methamphetamine (METH) administrations cause persistent dopaminergic deficits resembling aspects of Parkinson's disease. Many METH abusers smoke cigarettes and thus self-administer nicotine; yet few studies have investigated the effects of nicotine on METH-induced dopaminergic deficits. This interaction is of interest because preclinical studies demonstrate that nicotine can be neuroprotective, perhaps owing to effects involving α4β2 and α6β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study revealed that oral nicotine exposure beginning in adolescence [postnatal day (PND) 40] through adulthood [PND 96] attenuated METH-induced striatal dopaminergic deficits when METH was administered at PND 89. This protection did not appear to be due to nicotine-induced alterations in METH pharmacokinetics. Short-term (i.e., 21-day) high-dose nicotine exposure also protected when administered from PND 40 to PND 61 (with METH at PND 54), but this protective effect did not persist. Short-term (i.e., 21-day) high-dose nicotine exposure did not protect when administered postadolescence (i.e., beginning at PND 61, with METH at PND 75). However, protection was engendered if the duration of nicotine exposure was extended to 39 days (with METH at PND 93). Autoradiographic analysis revealed that nicotine increased striatal α4β2 expression, as assessed using [(125)I]epibatidine. Both METH and nicotine decreased striatal α6β2 expression, as assessed using [(125)I]α-conotoxin MII. These findings indicate that nicotine protects against METH-induced striatal dopaminergic deficits, perhaps by affecting α4β2 and/or α6β2 expression, and that both age of onset and duration of nicotine exposure affect this protection. PMID:26391161

  11. Neuromelanin Imaging and Dopaminergic Loss in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Isaias, Ioannis U; Trujillo, Paula; Summers, Paul; Marotta, Giorgio; Mainardi, Luca; Pezzoli, Gianni; Zecca, Luigi; Costa, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which the major pathologic substrate is a loss of dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra. Our main objective was to determine the correspondence between changes in the substantia nigra, evident in neuromelanin and iron sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dopaminergic striatal innervation loss in patients with PD. Eighteen patients and 18 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Using neuromelanin-MRI, we measured the volume of the substantia nigra and the contrast-to-noise-ratio between substantia nigra and a background region. The apparent transverse relaxation rate and magnetic susceptibility of the substantia nigra were calculated from dual-echo MRI. Striatal dopaminergic innervation was measured as density of dopamine transporter (DAT) by means of single-photon emission computed tomography and [(123)I] N-ω-fluoropropyl-2b-carbomethoxy-3b-(4-iodophenyl) tropane. Patients showed a reduced volume of the substantia nigra and contrast-to-noise-ratio and both positively correlated with the corresponding striatal DAT density. The apparent transverse relaxation rate and magnetic susceptibility values of the substantia nigra did not differ between patients and healthy controls. The best predictor of DAT reduction was the volume of the substantia nigra. Clinical and imaging correlations were also investigated for the locus coeruleus. Our results suggest that neuromelanin-MRI can be used for quantifying substantia nigra pathology in PD where it closely correlates with dopaminergic striatal innervation loss. Longitudinal studies should further explore the role of Neuromelanin-MRI as an imaging biomarker of PD, especially for subjects at risk of developing the disease. PMID:27597825

  12. Neuromelanin Imaging and Dopaminergic Loss in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Isaias, Ioannis U.; Trujillo, Paula; Summers, Paul; Marotta, Giorgio; Mainardi, Luca; Pezzoli, Gianni; Zecca, Luigi; Costa, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which the major pathologic substrate is a loss of dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra. Our main objective was to determine the correspondence between changes in the substantia nigra, evident in neuromelanin and iron sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dopaminergic striatal innervation loss in patients with PD. Eighteen patients and 18 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Using neuromelanin-MRI, we measured the volume of the substantia nigra and the contrast-to-noise-ratio between substantia nigra and a background region. The apparent transverse relaxation rate and magnetic susceptibility of the substantia nigra were calculated from dual-echo MRI. Striatal dopaminergic innervation was measured as density of dopamine transporter (DAT) by means of single-photon emission computed tomography and [123I] N-ω-fluoropropyl-2b-carbomethoxy-3b-(4-iodophenyl) tropane. Patients showed a reduced volume of the substantia nigra and contrast-to-noise-ratio and both positively correlated with the corresponding striatal DAT density. The apparent transverse relaxation rate and magnetic susceptibility values of the substantia nigra did not differ between patients and healthy controls. The best predictor of DAT reduction was the volume of the substantia nigra. Clinical and imaging correlations were also investigated for the locus coeruleus. Our results suggest that neuromelanin-MRI can be used for quantifying substantia nigra pathology in PD where it closely correlates with dopaminergic striatal innervation loss. Longitudinal studies should further explore the role of Neuromelanin-MRI as an imaging biomarker of PD, especially for subjects at risk of developing the disease. PMID:27597825

  13. A Guide to Neurotoxic Animal Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurological movement disorder primarily resulting from damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. To elucidate the pathogenesis, mechanisms of cell death, and to evaluate therapeutic strategies for PD, numerous animal models have been developed. Understanding the strengths and limitations of these models can significantly impact the choice of model, experimental design, and data interpretation. The primary objectives of this article are twofold: First, to assist new investigators who are contemplating embarking on PD research to navigate through the available animal models. Emphasis will be placed on common neurotoxic murine models in which toxic molecules are used to lesion the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. And second, to provide an overview of basic technical requirements for assessing the pathology, structure, and function of the nigrostriatal pathway. PMID:22229125

  14. Emotion recognition in early Parkinson’s disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation or dopaminergic therapy: a comparison to healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Lindsey G.; Mannava, Sishir; Camalier, Corrie R.; Folley, Bradley S.; Albritton, Aaron; Konrad, Peter E.; Charles, David; Park, Sohee; Neimat, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is traditionally regarded as a neurodegenerative movement disorder, however, nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration is also thought to disrupt non-motor loops connecting basal ganglia to areas in frontal cortex involved in cognition and emotion processing. PD patients are impaired on tests of emotion recognition, but it is difficult to disentangle this deficit from the more general cognitive dysfunction that frequently accompanies disease progression. Testing for emotion recognition deficits early in the disease course, prior to cognitive decline, better assesses the sensitivity of these non-motor corticobasal ganglia-thalamocortical loops involved in emotion processing to early degenerative change in basal ganglia circuits. In addition, contrasting this with a group of healthy aging individuals demonstrates changes in emotion processing specific to the degeneration of basal ganglia circuitry in PD. Early PD patients (EPD) were recruited from a randomized clinical trial testing the safety and tolerability of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in early-staged PD. EPD patients were previously randomized to receive optimal drug therapy only (ODT), or drug therapy plus STN-DBS (ODT + DBS). Matched healthy elderly controls (HEC) and young controls (HYC) also participated in this study. Participants completed two control tasks and three emotion recognition tests that varied in stimulus domain. EPD patients were impaired on all emotion recognition tasks compared to HEC. Neither therapy type (ODT or ODT + DBS) nor therapy state (ON/OFF) altered emotion recognition performance in this study. Finally, HEC were impaired on vocal emotion recognition relative to HYC, suggesting a decline related to healthy aging. This study supports the existence of impaired emotion recognition early in the PD course, implicating an early disruption of fronto-striatal loops mediating emotional function. PMID:25653616

  15. Parkinson's Disease Severity and Use of Dopaminergic Medications

    PubMed Central

    Fang, John Y.; Pérez, Adriana; Christine, Chadwick W.; Leehey, Maureen; Aminoff, Michael J.; Boyd, James T.; Morgan, John C.; Dhall, Rohit; Nicholas, Anthony P; Bodis-Wollner, Ivan; Zweig, Richard M.; Goudreau, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The effects of dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) can vary depending on the class of medication selected. Objective The aim of this post hoc study was to determine if the class of dopaminergic therapy correlated with disease severity in persons with early, treated PD. Methods A non-parametric global statistical test (GST) was used to assess the status of participants treated with dopamine agonist (DA) monotherapy, levodopa (LD) monotherapy or combined LD and DA therapy on multiple PD outcomes encompassing motor, cognitive, psychiatric and autonomic function, as well as disability and quality of life. Results The outcomes measured at the beginning of the study showed lower disease burden for participants on initial DA monotherapy compared to those taking combined LD and DA therapy after controlling for age, education, taking cogmeds and amantadine. Conclusion This observation suggests that clinicians treating early PD patients favor combined LD and DA therapy in patients with more disabling features over DA monotherapy. As such, studies of PD progression in treated PD patients may be affected by the class of symptomatic dopaminergic therapy. PMID:25541182

  16. Methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic deficits and refractoriness to subsequent treatment.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jarom E; Birdsall, Elisabeth; Seferian, Kristi S; Crosby, Marcus A; Keefe, Kristen A; Gibb, James W; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2009-04-01

    Repeated high-dose methamphetamine administrations can cause persistent dopaminergic deficits. As individuals abusing methamphetamine are often exposed to recurrent high-dose administration, the impact of its repeated exposure merits investigation. Accordingly, rats were pretreated with repeated high-dose injections of methamphetamine, and subsequently "challenged" with the same neurotoxic regimen 7 or 30 days later. Results revealed that the initial methamphetamine treatment caused persistent deficits in striatal dopamine levels, dopamine transporter function, and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function. The subsequent methamphetamine challenge treatment was without further persistent effects on these parameters, as assessed 7 days after the challenge, regardless of the interval (7 or 30 days) between the initial and challenge drug exposures. Similarly, a methamphetamine challenge treatment administered 7 days after the initial drug treatment was without further acute effect on dopamine transporter or VMAT-2 function, as assessed 1 h later. Thus, this study describes a model of resistance, possibly explained by: 1) the existence of dopaminergic neurons that are a priori refractory to deficits caused by methamphetamine; 2) the existence of dopaminergic neurons made persistently resistant consequent to a neurotoxic methamphetamine exposure; and/or 3) altered activation of post-synaptic basal ganglia systems necessary for the elaboration of methamphetamine-induced dopamine neurotoxicity. PMID:19326567

  17. Rapid signalling in distinct dopaminergic axons during locomotion and reward.

    PubMed

    Howe, M W; Dombeck, D A

    2016-07-28

    Dopaminergic projection axons from the midbrain to the striatum are crucial for motor control, as their degeneration in Parkinson disease results in profound movement deficits. Paradoxically, most recording methods report rapid phasic dopamine signalling (~100-ms bursts) in response to unpredicted rewards, with little evidence for movement-related signalling. The leading model posits that phasic signalling in striatum-targeting dopamine neurons drives reward-based learning, whereas slow variations in firing (tens of seconds to minutes) in these same neurons bias animals towards or away from movement. However, current methods have provided little evidence to support or refute this model. Here, using new optical recording methods, we report the discovery of rapid phasic signalling in striatum-targeting dopaminergic axons that is associated with, and capable of triggering, locomotion in mice. Axons expressing these signals were largely distinct from those that responded to unexpected rewards. These results suggest that dopaminergic neuromodulation can differentially impact motor control and reward learning with sub-second precision, and indicate that both precise signal timing and neuronal subtype are important parameters to consider in the treatment of dopamine-related disorders. PMID:27398617

  18. Decoding of dopaminergic mesolimbic activity and depressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Alexander; Deri, Ilana; Friedman, Yaakov; Dremencov, Eliyahu; Goutkin, Sophia; Kravchinsky, Elizabeth; Mintz, Matti; Levi, Dino; Overstreet, David H; Yadid, Gal

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic mesolimbic and mesocortical systems are involved in hedonia and motivation, two core symptoms of depression. However, their role in the pathophysiology of depression and their manipulation to treat depression has received little attention. Previously, we showed decreased limbic dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in an animal model of depression, Flinder sensitive line (FSL) rats. Here we describe a high correlation between phase-space algorithm of bursting-like activity of DA cells in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and efficiency of DA release in the accumbens. This bursting-like activity of VTA DA cells of FSL rats is characterized by a low dimension complexity. Treatment with the antidepressant desipramine affected both the dimension complexity of cell firing in the VTA and rate of DA release in the accumbens, as well as alleviating depressive-like behavior. Our findings indicate the potential usefulness of monitoring limbic dopaminergic dynamics in combination with non-linear analysis. Decoding the functionality of the dopaminergic system may help in development of future antidepressant drugs. PMID:17873290

  19. Protective Effects of Valproic Acid on the Nigrostriatal Dopamine System in an MPTP Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Sarah K.; Schneider, Jay S.

    2011-01-01

    The use of animal models (including the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model) to mimic dopaminergic (DAergic) cell loss and striatal DA depletion, as seen in Parkinson’s disease (PD), has implicated a multitude of factors that might be associated with DAergic cell death in PD including excitotoxicity, inflammation, and oxidative stress. All of these factors have been shown to be reduced by administration of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACis) resulting in some degree of neuroprotection in various models of neurodegenerative disease including in Huntington’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, there is limited information of effects of HDACis in PD models. We have previously shown HDACis to be partially protective against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) mediated cell loss in vitro. The present study was conducted to extend these findings to an in vivo PD model. The HDACi valproic acid (VPA) was co-administered with MPTP for 5 days to male FVBn mice and continued for an additional 2 weeks, throughout the period of active neurodegeneration associated with MPTP-mediated DAergic cell loss. VPA was able to partially prevent striatal dopamine depletion and almost completely protect against substantia nigra DAergic cell loss. These results suggest that VPA may be a potential disease modifying therapy for PD. PMID:21846494

  20. Deferoxamine-mediated up-regulation of HIF-1α prevents dopaminergic neuronal death via the activation of MAPK family proteins in MPTP-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuang; Hao, Li-Juan; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Chai, Rui; Zhang, Shuai; Gu, Yu; Gao, Hui-Ling; Zhong, Man-Li; Wang, Tao; Li, Jia-Yi; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that an abnormal accumulation of iron in the substantia nigra (SN) is one of the defining characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD). Accordingly, the potential neuroprotection of Fe chelators is widely acknowledged for the treatment of PD. Although desferrioxamine (DFO), an iron chelator widely used in clinical settings, has been reported to improve motor deficits and dopaminergic neuronal survival in animal models of PD, DFO has poor penetration to cross the blood-brain barrier and elicits side effects. We evaluated whether an intranasal administration of DFO improves the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal axis and investigated the molecular mechanisms of intranasal DFO treatment in preventing MPTP-induced neurodegeneration. Treatment with DFO efficiently alleviated behavioral deficits, increased the survival of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons, and decreased the action of astrocytes in the SN and striatum in an MPTP-induced PD mouse model. Interestingly, we found that DFO up-regulated the expression of HIF-1α protein, TH, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and down-regulated the expression of α-synuclein, divalent metal transporter with iron-responsive element (DMT1+IRE), and transferrin receptor (TFR). This was accompanied by a decrease in iron-positive cells in the SN and striatum of the DFO-treated group. We further revealed that DFO treatment significantly inhibited the MPTP-induced phosphorylation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and differentially enhanced the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/P38 kinase. Additionally, the effects of DFO on increasing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio were further validated in vitro and in vivo. In SH-SY5Y cells, the DFO-mediated up-regulation of HIF-1α occurred via the activation of

  1. Glucocorticoid receptor is involved in the neuroprotective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 against inflammation-induced dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian-Chang; Ren, Xiao-Fan; Chen, Lei; Gao, Xian-Qi; Xie, Jun-Xia; Chen, Wen-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating clinical and experimental evidence suggests that chronic neuroinflammation is associated with dopaminergic neuronal death in Parkinson's disease (PD). Ginsenoside Rg1, the most active components of ginseng, possesses a variety of biological effects on the central nervous system, cardiovascular system and immune system. The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglia activation and dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in rat substantia nigra (SN) and its potential mechanisms. Treatment with Rg1 could ameliorate the apomorphine-induced rotational behavior in LPS-lesioned rats. GR antagonist RU486 partly abolished the protective effect of Rg1. Rg1 treatment significantly attenuated LPS-induced loss of tyrosin hydroxlase (TH) positive neurons in substantial nigra par compacta (SNpc) and decreased content of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites in striatum of the lesioned side. Meanwhile, Rg1 significantly inhibited LPS-induced microglial activation and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and nitric oxide (NO). These effects were abolished by co-treatment with RU486. In addition, Rg1 treatment significantly inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in the lesioned side of substantial nigra. These effect could be also partly blocked by RU486. Taken together, these data indicate that Rg1 has protective effects on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons from LPS-induced microglia inflammation. GR signaling pathway might be involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of Rg1. PMID:26455404

  2. Neuroimaging Analysis of the Dopamine Basis for Apathetic Behaviors in an MPTP-Lesioned Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Hubert P.; Campbell, Meghan C.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2015-01-01

    Apathy commonly occurs in Parkinson disease (PD) patients; however, the role of dopamine in the pathophysiology of apathy remains elusive. We previously demonstrated that dopaminergic dysfunction within the ventral tegmental area (VTA)-nucleus accumbens (NAcc) pathway contributes to the manifestation of apathetic behaviors in monkeys treated with the selective dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). We now extend these studies to identify dopaminergic dysfunction in cortical regions that correlate with development of apathetic behaviors. Specifically, we measured the effects of MPTP on monkeys' willingness to attempt goal directed behaviors, which is distinct from their ability to perform tasks. A total of 16 monkeys had baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), using 6-[18F]fluorodopa (FD), [11C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ), and 2β-[11C]carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (CFT). The monkeys received unilateral infusion of different doses of MPTP (0 – 0.31mg/kg) to produce a wide range of severity of motor parkinsonism. Eight weeks after MPTP, PET scans were repeated and animals were euthanized. Apathetic behavior and motor impairments were assessed blindly both pre- and post-MPTP infusion. Apathy scores were compared to in vitro and in vivo dopaminergic measures. Apathy scores increased following MPTP and correlated with PET measures of dopaminergic terminals (DTBZ or CFT) in dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC), and insular cortex (IC). Among all the cortical regions assessed, forward step-wise regression analyses indicated that only stereologic cell counts in VTA, and not counts in the substantia nigra (SN), predict dopamine transporter changes in IC. Our findings suggest that dopaminergic dysfunction within the VTA–IC pathway plays a role in the manifestation of apathetic behaviors in MPTP-lesioned primates. PMID:26135399

  3. Neuroimaging Analysis of the Dopamine Basis for Apathetic Behaviors in an MPTP-Lesioned Primate Model.

    PubMed

    Tian, LinLin; Xia, Yuanxuan; Flores, Hubert P; Campbell, Meghan C; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2015-01-01

    Apathy commonly occurs in Parkinson disease (PD) patients; however, the role of dopamine in the pathophysiology of apathy remains elusive. We previously demonstrated that dopaminergic dysfunction within the ventral tegmental area (VTA)-nucleus accumbens (NAcc) pathway contributes to the manifestation of apathetic behaviors in monkeys treated with the selective dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). We now extend these studies to identify dopaminergic dysfunction in cortical regions that correlate with development of apathetic behaviors. Specifically, we measured the effects of MPTP on monkeys' willingness to attempt goal directed behaviors, which is distinct from their ability to perform tasks. A total of 16 monkeys had baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), using 6-[18F]fluorodopa (FD), [11C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ), and 2β-[11C]carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (CFT). The monkeys received unilateral infusion of different doses of MPTP (0 - 0.31mg/kg) to produce a wide range of severity of motor parkinsonism. Eight weeks after MPTP, PET scans were repeated and animals were euthanized. Apathetic behavior and motor impairments were assessed blindly both pre- and post-MPTP infusion. Apathy scores were compared to in vitro and in vivo dopaminergic measures. Apathy scores increased following MPTP and correlated with PET measures of dopaminergic terminals (DTBZ or CFT) in dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC), and insular cortex (IC). Among all the cortical regions assessed, forward step-wise regression analyses indicated that only stereologic cell counts in VTA, and not counts in the substantia nigra (SN), predict dopamine transporter changes in IC. Our findings suggest that dopaminergic dysfunction within the VTA-IC pathway plays a role in the manifestation of apathetic behaviors in MPTP-lesioned primates. PMID:26135399

  4. Acupuncture inhibits oxidative stress and rotational behavior in 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-Peng; Ju, Wei-Ping; Li, Zhen-Guang; Wang, Dao-Zhen; Wang, Yuan-Chen; Xie, An-Mu

    2010-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the beneficial effects of acupuncture on Parkinson's disease (PD). Although clinical evidence for the acupuncture anti-Parkinson's disease effect has been demonstrated, the precise mechanism still remains elusive. It has been suggested a relationship between PD and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can result in neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the status of oxidative stress, as well as the antioxidant enzyme response, and the role of acupuncture stimulation at GB34 (Yanglingquan), LR3 (Taichong), ST36 (Zusanli) and SP10 (Xuehai) acupoints on regulating oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal system in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat. Two weeks after unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the left medial forebrain bundle (MFB), an apomorphine induced rotational behavior test was performed. The levels of enzymatic, viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT), and nonenzymatic, viz., reduced glutathione (GSH), and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in the nigrostriatal system were measured to assess the oxidative stress status. Brain MDA levels significantly increased, while GSH levels were decreased in impaired groups with 6-OHDA injection only, accompanied by a marked reduction in the level of SOD and GSH-Px. The levels of oxidative stress related parameters except CAT, as well as the rotational asymmetry, were reversed by acupuncture stimulation. These results showed that acupuncture treatment displayed antioxidative and/or neuroprotective properties in the 6-OHDA lesioned rat and these protective properties might be mediated, at least in part, by involving regulation of the antioxidant defense system. PMID:20399757

  5. Enhanced nigrostriatal neuron-specific, long-term expression by using neural-specific promoters in combination with targeted gene transfer by modified helper virus-free HSV-1 vector particles

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Haiyan; Zhang, Guo-rong; Wang, Xiaodan; Kong, Lingxin; Geller, Alfred I

    2008-01-01

    Background Direct gene transfer into neurons has potential for developing gene therapy treatments for specific neurological conditions, and for elucidating neuronal physiology. Due to the complex cellular composition of specific brain areas, neuronal type-specific recombinant gene expression is required for many potential applications of neuronal gene transfer. One approach is to target gene transfer to a specific type of neuron. We developed modified Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) particles that contain chimeric glycoprotein C (gC) – glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) proteins. HSV-1 vector particles containing either gC – GDNF or gC – BDNF target gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons, which contain specific receptors for GDNF or BDNF. A second approach to achieve neuronal type-specific expression is to use a cell type-specific promoter, and we have used the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter to restrict expression to catecholaminergic neurons or a modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter to restrict expression to neurons, and both of these promoters support long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors. To both improve nigrostriatal-neuron specific expression, and to establish that targeted gene transfer can be followed by long-term expression, we performed targeted gene transfer with vectors that support long-term, neuronal-specific expression. Results Helper virus-free HSV-1 vector packaging was performed using either gC – GDNF or gC – BDNF and vectors that contain either the TH promoter or the modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter. Vector stocks were injected into the midbrain proximal to the substantia nigra, and the rats were sacrificed at either 4 days or 1 month after gene transfer. Immunofluorescent costaining was performed to detect both recombinant gene products and nigrostriatal neurons. The combination of targeted gene transfer with neuronal-specific promoters improved nigrostriatal

  6. [Anhedonia--a general nosology surmounting correlate of a dysfunctional dopaminergic reward system?].

    PubMed

    Heinz, A

    1999-05-01

    The dopaminergic reward system is activated by primary rewarding factors such as food, sexual activity and parental care. Its activation enhances the occurrence of behaviors which induced the stimulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Indications of a dysfunction of the dopaminergic reward system are found in major depression, schizophrenia, and addictive disorders. It has been hypothesized that dysfunction of the dopaminergic reward system is associated with anhedonia, the inability to experience pleasure. However, animal studies indicate that a reduction of central dopaminergic neurotransmission is associated with a decrease in incentive salience of reward-indicating stimuli and not with anhedonia per se. Sensitization of dopaminergic neurotransmission, on the other hand, seems to induce cue-dependent craving in addicted patients. In schizophrenia, phasic, stimulus-dependent dopamine release in the striatum may play a role in the abnormal attribution of salience to previously neutral stimuli. PMID:10407834

  7. The importance of A9 dopaminergic neurons in mediating the functional benefits of fetal ventral mesencephalon transplants and levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Wei-Li; Lin, Rachel; Tyers, Pam; Barker, Roger A

    2007-03-01

    Intrastriatal transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM) tissue provides the potential to alleviate motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). However, the degree of recovery varies among individuals with an incidence of "off-phase", graft-induced dyskinesia (GID) in some patients. We hypothesised that this variability is due to the heterogeneous nature of dopaminergic neurons in the transplant. We therefore investigated this in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of PD. These animals were primed to develop LID and then transplanted with fetal VM into the caudal aspects of the striatum. No GID was observed but in a significant number of animals the transplants ameliorated LID. There was a correlation between the degree of behavioural and LID recovery with the number of A9 dopaminergic neurons in the transplant, based on their expression of a G-protein-coupled inward rectifying current potassium channel (Girk2). Furthermore, we showed that LID development is related to an abnormal expression profile of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) in the striatum and that intrastriatal VM transplants normalised both Cdk5 expression and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in animals exhibiting functional improvement. These results suggest that an A9 dopaminergic neuron-enriched transplant may be the key to an effective PD cell replacement therapy through normalisation of the altered striatal expression of Cdk5/DARPP-32. PMID:17188499

  8. [Effects of psychotropic drugs on lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation behavior in rats: correlation between self-stimulation behavior inhibition and striatal dopaminergic blockade by neuroleptic drugs].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, T; Tsumagari, T

    1984-06-01

    The effects of neuroleptic drugs on self-stimulation behavior were investigated in rats with electrodes chronically implanted in the lateral hypothalamus. Except for sulpiride and carpipramine, the neuroleptic drugs chlorpromazine, thioridazine, perphenazine, haloperidol, floropipamide, pimozide, clocapramine and oxypertine all suppressed self-stimulation behavior dose-dependently. The anti-anxiety drugs chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, clotiazepam and etizolam facilitated this behavior. The antidepressant drugs imipramine and amitriptyline suppressed this behavior slightly at the dose of 40 mg/kg. The alpha-antagonist phenoxybenzamine also suppressed this behavior, but the slope of its dose-response curve was gentle compared with those of the neuroleptic drugs. The inhibition produced by the neuroleptic drugs is considered to be mediated primarily at the dopaminergic receptors. Turning behavior induced by methamphetamine in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the caudate nucleus was used to assess the striatal dopaminergic blocking potency of the neuroleptic drugs. No correlation was found between the ED50 values for the turning behavior inhibition and the ED50 values for the self-stimulation behavior inhibition produced by these drugs, so the dopaminergic receptors in the striatum are apparently not involved in the mediation of self-stimulation behavior. PMID:6149172

  9. Dopaminergic control of 125I-labeled neurotensin binding site density in corticolimbic structures of the rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Herve, D; Tassin, J P; Studler, J M; Dana, C; Kitabgi, P; Vincent, J P; Glowinski, J; Rostene, W

    1986-01-01

    In the rat brain, destruction of dopaminergic cell groups by injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the ventral mesencephalic tegmentum results in large decreases in the number of neurotensin binding sites in the mesencephalon and the striatum. In contrast, these lesions produce an increase in the number of 125I-labeled neurotensin binding sites in the lateral part of the prefrontal cortex despite a large decrease in cortical dopamine levels. Increases in the number of 125I-labeled neurotensin binding sites in this cortical area as well as in the entorhinal cortex, the nucleus accumbens, and the central part of the striatum were also obtained after chronic blockade of dopamine neurotransmission by a long-acting neuroleptic pipotiazine palmitic ester. We propose that dopamine inputs regulate the density of postsynaptic neurotensin binding sites through cortical and subcortical dopamine receptors. Therefore, some of the clinical effects of neuroleptics in schizophrenic patients could be partly related to changes in neurotensin neurotransmission. Images PMID:3016745

  10. Arterial medial necrosis and hemorrhage induced in rats by intravenous infusion of fenoldopam mesylate, a dopaminergic vasodilator.

    PubMed Central

    Yuhas, E. M.; Morgan, D. G.; Arena, E.; Kupp, R. P.; Saunders, L. Z.; Lewis, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    Fenoldopam mesylate, a selective, postsynaptic, dopaminergic vasodilator, was administered to rats for assessment of its clinical, toxicologic, and pathologic effects. Groups of 8 male and 8 female rats received 5, 25, 50, or 100 micrograms/kg/min by intravenous infusion for 24 hours. Groups of 12 male and 12 female rats received 2, 8, 16, or 20 mg/kg/day by intravenous injection once daily for 12 days. Tissues were examined by light microscopy. Rats infused for 24-hours with 5-100 micrograms/kg/min of fenoldopam had lesions of renal and splanchnic arteries characterized by medial necrosis and hemorrhage. None were seen in control rats or those administered the compound by intravenous injection. Arteries with four to five layers of medial smooth-muscle cells were most severely and frequently affected. Lesions were particularly severe in interlobular pancreatic arteries and subserosal gastric arteries. They occurred first at 4 hours, were present at low incidence at 8 hours, were induced in unrestrained rats, and were not caused by the experimental procedures employed. The nature and disposition of this novel arterial lesion in the rat suggests that its pathogenesis may be related to the pharmacologic activity of fenoldopam mesylate at the dopamine receptor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2858975

  11. Restricting dopaminergic signaling to either dorsolateral or medial striatum facilitates cognition.

    PubMed

    Darvas, Martin; Palmiter, Richard D

    2010-01-20

    Dopaminergic projections to the ventral and dorsomedial striatum are important for reward, motivation, and goal-directed learning, whereas projections to the dorsolateral striatum are implicated in motor control, habitual enactment of motor skills, visuospatial learning, and memory. These conclusions are derived from studies of rodents with lesions or pharmacological blockade of dopamine signaling to specific brain regions. In contrast, we investigated the behavioral abilities of dopamine-deficient mice in which dopamine signaling was restored to only the medial striatum by viral rescue. These mice displayed intact spatial memory, visuospatial and discriminatory learning. However, acquisition of operant behavior was delayed, and their motivation to obtain food rewards was blunted. We compare these behavioral results with our published results obtained from mice with dopamine signaling restored only to the dorsolateral striatum. We observe that most behaviors are restored with dopamine signaling restored to either brain region and conclude that the action of dopamine in either one of these nonoverlapping striatal areas can support cognitive processes independently of dopamine signaling in the other area. PMID:20089924

  12. Restricting Dopaminergic Signaling to Either Dorsolateral or Medial Striatum Facilitates Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Darvas, Martin; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Dopaminergic projections to the ventral and dorsomedial striatum are important for reward, motivation and goal-directed learning, whereas projections to the dorsolateral striatum are implicated in motor control, habitual enactment of motor skills, visuospatial learning and memory. These conclusions are derived from studies of rodents with lesions or pharmacological blockade of dopamine signaling to specific brain regions. In contrast, we investigated the behavioral abilities of dopamine-deficient (DD) mice in which with dopamine signaling was restored to only the medial striatum by viral rescue. These mice displayed intact spatial memory, visuospatial and discriminatory learning. However, acquisition of operant behavior was delayed and their motivation to obtain food rewards was blunted. We compare these behavioral results with our published results obtained from mice with dopamine signaling restored only to the dorsolateral striatum. We observe that most behaviors are restored with dopamine signaling restored to either brain region and conclude that the action of dopamine in either one of these non-overlapping striatal areas can support cognitive processes independently of dopamine-signaling in the other area. PMID:20089924

  13. Ghost cell lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, E.; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Balachander, N.

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms. PMID:26015694

  14. [Surprising white lesions].

    PubMed

    Nolte, J W; van der Waal, I

    2011-09-01

    A 46-year-old man appeared with white lesions of the oral cavity. A previously taken biopsy revealed no classifying diagnosis and treatment with mouth rinse produced no improvement. A new biopsy was taken, on which the pathologist performed additional tests. This resulted in the diagnosis 'syphilis'. The patient was treated with benzylpenicillin and the oral white lesions disappeared. Although nowadays syphilis is rare, special attention is required when noticing these kinds of lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:21957637

  15. The effects of dihydropyridine compounds in behavioural tests of dopaminergic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bourson, A.; Gower, A. J.; Mir, A. K.; Moser, P. C.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker nifedipine and the activator Bay K 8644 were investigated in different behavioural tests involving dopaminergic systems. These were the discriminative stimulus induced by amphetamine, rotational behaviour in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions and apomorphine-induced yawning in rats. 2. The yawning induced by apomorphine (40 micrograms kg-1 s.c.) was significantly potentiated by nifedipine (5-10 mgkg-1 i.p.). Bay K 8644 (0.05-0.5 mgkg-1 i.p.) dose-dependently inhibited yawning induced by apomorphine (80 micrograms kg-1 s.c.) and, at 0.4 mgkg-1, inhibited the nifedipine potentiation of apomorphine-induced yawning. In contrast to their effects on apomorphine-induced yawning, nifedipine and Bay K 8644 had no effect on apomorphine-induced penile erection. 3. Bay K 8644 (0.06-0.5 mgkg-1 i.p.) and nifedipine (5-20 mgkg-1 i.p.) had no dose-related effect on the discrimination performance of rats trained to discriminate amphetamine from saline. However, nifedipine dose-dependently reduced the response rate of amphetamine-treated rats. Bay K 8644 had no effect on this measure except at high doses that also caused disruption. 4. Neither nifedipine (5-10 mgkg-1 i.p.) nor Bay K 8644 (0.06-0.5 mgkg-1 i.p.) affected the turning behaviour induced by amphetamine (1 mgkg-1 i.p.) in rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the medial forebrain bundle, and did not induce turning themselves. 5. As the dihydropyridine compounds affected apomorphine-induced yawning but not penile erection, and did not affect amphetamine-induced rotation or drug discrimination, it seems unlikely that they are affecting dopamine release in vivo. PMID:2482105

  16. Modulating tobacco smoking rates by dopaminergic stimulation and blockade.

    PubMed

    Caskey, Nicholas H; Jarvik, Murray E; Wirshing, William C; Madsen, Damian C; Iwamoto-Schaap, Paula N; Eisenberger, Naomi I; Huerta, Lorena; Terrace, Scott M; Olmstead, Richard E

    2002-08-01

    This study was designed to demonstrate that dopaminergic stimulation would result in decreased smoking behavior and nicotine intake, whereas dopaminergic blockade would result in increased smoking behavior and nicotine intake, in the same subjects. In prior human studies, a dopaminergic antagonist, haloperidol, increased smoking and/or nicotine intake, and a dopamine agonist, bromocriptine, decreased smoking. The smoking behavior of 20 heavy smokers was observed on two separate visits in a randomized, double-blind, repeated-measures-within-subject design. In the drug-reversal design, either bromocriptine (2.5 mg) or haloperidol (2.0 mg) was administered at each 5-h session, during which subjects smoked their own cigarettes ad libitum. Smoking topography was measured using a thermistor flow detector apparatus. Subjects smoked their cigarettes faster (p<0.05) and total puffing time was greater (p<0.05) with haloperidol than with bromocriptine. There was a trend for both a shorter latency to smoke (p<0.10, one-tailed) during time of expected peak drug concentration and for a shorter inter-cigarette interval with haloperidol than with bromocriptine (p<0.10, one-tailed). Shiffman-Jarvik Withdrawal Scale craving subscale scores increased significantly more with haloperidol than with bromocriptine (p<0.05). Mean Profile of Mood States (POMS) scores differed significantly for only one subscale (Confusion: bromocriptine>haloperidol; p<0.05). These data support the hypothesis that nicotine mediates reinforcement from smoking via dopamine, and that smoking behavior can be manipulated within the same subjects in opposite directions by alternately stimulating and blocking dopamine. PMID:12215234

  17. Dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic deficits in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Buddhala, Chandana; Loftin, Susan K; Kuley, Brandon M; Cairns, Nigel J; Campbell, Meghan C; Perlmutter, Joel S; Kotzbauer, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    Objective People with Parkinson disease (PD) frequently develop dementia, which is associated with neocortical deposition of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) in Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. In addition, neuronal loss and deposition of aggregated α-syn also occur in multiple subcortical nuclei that project to neocortical, limbic, and basal ganglia regions. Therefore, we quantified regional deficits in innervation from these PD-affected subcortical nuclei, by measuring the neurotransmitters and neurotransmitter transporter proteins originating from projections of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta, serotonergic neurons in dorsal raphé nuclei, noradrenergic neurons in locus coeruleus, and cholinergic neurons in nucleus basalis of Meynert. Methods High-performance liquid chromatography and novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to quantify dopaminergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and cholinergic innervation in postmortem brain tissue. Eight brain regions from 15 PD participants (with dementia and Braak stage 6 α-syn deposition) and six age-matched controls were tested. Results PD participants compared to controls had widespread reductions of dopamine transporter in caudate, amygdala, hippocampus, inferior parietal lobule (IPL), precuneus, and visual association cortex (VAC) that exceeded loss of dopamine, which was only significantly reduced in caudate and amygdala. In contrast, PD participants had comparable deficits of both serotonin and serotonin transporter in caudate, middle frontal gyrus, IPL, and VAC. PD participants also had significantly reduced norepinephrine levels for all eight brain regions tested. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter levels were only quantifiable in caudate and hippocampus and did not differ between PD and control groups. Interpretation These results demonstrate widespread deficits in dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic innervation of neocortical, limbic, and basal ganglia regions in advanced

  18. Exendin-4 reverses biochemical and behavioral deficits in a pre-motor rodent model of Parkinson's disease with combined noradrenergic and serotonergic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rampersaud, N; Harkavyi, A; Giordano, G; Lever, R; Whitton, J; Whitton, P S

    2012-10-01

    Research on Parkinson's disease (PD) has mainly focused on the degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons of nigro-striatal pathway; however, post-mortem studies have demonstrated that other brain regions such as the locus coeruleus (LC) and raphe nuclei (RN) are significantly affected as well. Degeneration of these crucial neuronal cell bodies may be responsible for depressive behavior and cognitive decline present in the pre-motor stage of PD. We have thus set out to create a pre-motor rodent model of PD which mimics the early stages of the condition. N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4), a selective noradrenergic neurotoxin, and parachloroampetamine (pCA), a selective serotonergic neurotoxin, were utilized concomitantly with bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injections into the striatum to produce a pre-motor rodent model of PD with partial deficits in the dopaminergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic systems. Our model exhibited a depressive/anhedonic condition as assessed using sucrose preference testing and the forced swim test. Our model also demonstrated deficits in object memory. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by a decline in both tissue and extracellular levels of all three neurotransmitters in both the frontal cortex and striatum. Immunohistochemistry also revealed a decrease in TH+ cells in the LC and substantia nigra. Exendin-4 (EX-4), a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, promoted recovery of both the biochemical and behavioral dysfunction exhibited by our model. EX-4 was able to preserve the functional integrity of the dopaminergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic systems. In conclusion, we have generated a novel animal model of PD that recapitulates certain pre-motor symptomology. These symptoms and causative physiology are ameliorated upon treatment with EX-4 and thus it could be used as a possible therapy for the non-motor symptoms prominent in the early stages of PD. PMID:22921965

  19. Preinvasive lesions

    Cancer.gov

    This definition is for allocation of lesions with preinvasive/borderline properties. It is currently aimed at newly identified neoplasms, which may be similar to those described in humans. In mouse pathology, many adenomas may be preinvasive/borderline lesions. However, their inclusion in the preinvasive category can be justified only upon development of better diagnostic criteria.

  20. Noninfectious penile lesions.

    PubMed

    Teichman, Joel M H; Sea, Jason; Thompson, Ian M; Elston, Dirk M

    2010-01-15

    Family physicians commonly diagnose and manage penile cutaneous lesions. Noninfectious lesions may be classified as inflammatory and papulosquamous (e.g., psoriasis, lichen sclerosus, angiokeratomas, lichen nitidus, lichen planus), or as neoplastic (e.g., carcinoma in situ, invasive squamous cell carcinoma). The clinical presentation and appearance of the lesions guide the diagnosis. Psoriasis presents as red or salmon-colored plaques with overlying scales, often with systemic lesions. Lichen sclerosus presents as a phimotic, hypopigmented prepuce or glans penis with a cellophane-like texture. Angiokeratomas are typically asymptomatic, well-circumscribed, red or blue papules, whereas lichen nitidus usually produces asymptomatic pinhead-sized, hypopigmented papules. The lesions of lichen planus are pruritic, violaceous, polygonal papules that are typically systemic. Carcinoma in situ should be suspected if the patient has velvety red or keratotic plaques of the glans penis or prepuce, whereas invasive squamous cell carcinoma presents as a painless lump, ulcer, or fungating irregular mass. Some benign lesions, such as psoriasis and lichen planus, can mimic carcinoma in situ or squamous cell carcinoma. Biopsy is indicated if the diagnosis is in doubt or neoplasm cannot be excluded. The management of benign penile lesions usually involves observation or topical corticosteroids; however, neoplastic lesions generally require surgery. PMID:20082512

  1. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  2. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  3. Extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, James; Galea, Samuel; Galea, Joseph; Schembri, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man on warfarin for aortic valve replacement presented with recurrent episodes of melaena. An initial oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) was normal, as were red cell scanning and colonoscopy. It was a third OGD that revealed the cause of the melaena—a vascular lesion in the duodenum, at the junction between D1 and D2. An extragastric Dieulafoy's lesion was diagnosed, and the lesion was injected with epinephrine and tattooed. Over the following months, episodes of bleeding recurred despite further attempts at injection. Percutaneous radiologically assisted embolisation of the gastroduodenal artery, and eventually duodenotomy and oversuturing of the lesion were performed to no avail. The patient has undergone over 10 endoscopies, and has received over 70 units of packed red cells to date, since his initial presentation 6 years ago. Attempts to stop the bleeding permanently have been difficult, highlighting the complexity of managing such a lesion. PMID:25216921

  4. Effect of dopaminergic medication on speech dysfluency in Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Tykalová, Tereza; Rusz, Jan; Čmejla, Roman; Klempíř, Jiří; Růžičková, Hana; Roth, Jan; Růžička, Evžen

    2015-08-01

    Although speech dysfluencies have been hypothesized to be associated with abnormal function of dopaminergic system, the effects of dopaminergic medication on speech fluency in Parkinson's disease (PD) have not been systematically studied. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to investigate the long-term effect of dopaminergic medication on speech fluency in PD. Fourteen de novo PD patients with no history of developmental stuttering and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC) were recruited. PD subjects were examined three times; before the initiation of dopaminergic treatment and twice in following 6 years. The percentage of dysfluent words was calculated from reading passage and monolog. The amount of medication was expressed by cumulative doses of L-dopa equivalent. After 3-6 years of dopaminergic therapy, PD patients exhibited significantly more dysfluent events compared to healthy subjects as well as to their own speech performance before the introduction of dopaminergic therapy (p < 0.05). In addition, we found a strong positive correlation between the increased occurrence of dysfluent words and the total cumulative dose of L-dopa equivalent (r = 0.75, p = 0.002). Our findings indicate an adverse effect of prolonged dopaminergic therapy contributing to the development of stuttering-like dysfluencies in PD. These findings may have important implication in clinical practice, where speech fluency should be taken into account to optimize dopaminergic therapy. PMID:25583417

  5. Representation of spontaneous movement by dopaminergic neurons is cell-type selective and disrupted in parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Paul D; Dreyer, Jakob K; Jennings, Katie A; Syed, Emilie C J; Wade-Martins, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie J; Bolam, J Paul; Magill, Peter J

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopaminergic neurons are essential for appropriate voluntary movement, as epitomized by the cardinal motor impairments arising in Parkinson's disease. Understanding the basis of such motor control requires understanding how the firing of different types of dopaminergic neuron relates to movement and how this activity is deciphered in target structures such as the striatum. By recording and labeling individual neurons in behaving mice, we show that the representation of brief spontaneous movements in the firing of identified midbrain dopaminergic neurons is cell-type selective. Most dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), but not in ventral tegmental area or substantia nigra pars lateralis, consistently represented the onset of spontaneous movements with a pause in their firing. Computational modeling revealed that the movement-related firing of these dopaminergic neurons can manifest as rapid and robust fluctuations in striatal dopamine concentration and receptor activity. The exact nature of the movement-related signaling in the striatum depended on the type of dopaminergic neuron providing inputs, the striatal region innervated, and the type of dopamine receptor expressed by striatal neurons. Importantly, in aged mice harboring a genetic burden relevant for human Parkinson's disease, the precise movement-related firing of SNc dopaminergic neurons and the resultant striatal dopamine signaling were lost. These data show that distinct dopaminergic cell types differentially encode spontaneous movement and elucidate how dysregulation of their firing in early Parkinsonism can impair their effector circuits. PMID:27001837

  6. The Transcription Factor Orthodenticle Homeobox 2 Influences Axonal Projections and Vulnerability of Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Chee Yeun; Licznerski, Pawel; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Simeone, Antonio; Lin, Zhicheng; Martin, Eden; Vance, Jeffery; Isacson, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Two adjacent groups of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, A9 (substantia nigra pars compacta) and A10 (ventral tegmental area), have distinct projections and exhibit differential vulnerability in Parkinson's disease. Little is known about transcription factors that influence midbrain dopaminergic subgroup phenotypes or their potential role in disease.…

  7. Dopamine release in rat striatum - Physiological coupling to tyrosine supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    During, Matthew J.; Acworth, Ian N.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor dopamine release in rat striatal extracellular fluid following the intraperitoneal administration of dopamine's precursor amino acid, L-tyrosine. Dopamine concentrations in dialysates increased transiently after tyrosine (50-100 mg/kg) administration. Pretreatment with haloperidol or the partial lesioning of nigrostriatal neurons enhanced the effect of tyrosine on dopamine release, and haloperidol also prolonged this effect. These data suggest that nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are responsive to changes in precursor availability under basal conditions, but that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms limit the magnitude and duration of this effect.

  8. Differential Susceptibility to Prevention: GABAergic, Dopaminergic, and Multilocus Effects

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Gene H.; Chen, Yi-fu; Beach, Steven R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Randomized prevention trials provide a unique opportunity to test hypotheses about the interaction of genetic predispositions with contextual processes to create variations in phenotypes over time. Methods Using two longitudinal, randomized prevention trials, molecular genetic and alcohol use outcome data were gathered from more than 900 youths to determine whether prevention program participation would, across 2 years, moderate genetic risk for increased alcohol use conferred by the dopaminergic and GABAergic systems. Results We found that (a) variance in dopaminergic (DRD2, DRD4, ANKK1) and GABAergic (GABRG1, GABRA2) genes forecast increases in alcohol use across 2 years, and (b) youths at genetic risk who were assigned to the control condition displayed greater increases in alcohol use across 2 years than did youths at genetic risk who were assigned to the prevention condition or youths without genetic risk who were assigned to either condition. Conclusions This study is unique in combining data from two large prevention trials to test hypotheses regarding genetic main effects and gene × prevention interactions. Focusing on gene systems purported to confer risk for alcohol use and abuse, the study demonstrated that participation in efficacious prevention programs can moderate genetic risk. The results also support the differential susceptibility hypothesis that some youths, for genetic reasons, are more susceptible than others to both positive and negative contextual influences. PMID:23294086

  9. Advances in non-dopaminergic treatments for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Stayte, Sandy; Vissel, Bryce

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1960's treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) have traditionally been directed to restore or replace dopamine, with L-Dopa being the gold standard. However, chronic L-Dopa use is associated with debilitating dyskinesias, limiting its effectiveness. This has resulted in extensive efforts to develop new therapies that work in ways other than restoring or replacing dopamine. Here we describe newly emerging non-dopaminergic therapeutic strategies for PD, including drugs targeting adenosine, glutamate, adrenergic, and serotonin receptors, as well as GLP-1 agonists, calcium channel blockers, iron chelators, anti-inflammatories, neurotrophic factors, and gene therapies. We provide a detailed account of their success in animal models and their translation to human clinical trials. We then consider how advances in understanding the mechanisms of PD, genetics, the possibility that PD may consist of multiple disease states, understanding of the etiology of PD in non-dopaminergic regions as well as advances in clinical trial design will be essential for ongoing advances. We conclude that despite the challenges ahead, patients have much cause for optimism that novel therapeutics that offer better disease management and/or which slow disease progression are inevitable. PMID:24904259

  10. Dopaminergic genes predict individual differences in susceptibility to confirmation bias

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Bradley B.; Hutchison, Kent E.; Frank, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The striatum is critical for the incremental learning of values associated with behavioral actions. The pre-frontal cortex (PFC) represents abstract rules and explicit contingencies to support rapid behavioral adaptation in the absence of cumulative experience. Here we test two alternative models of the interaction between these systems, and individual differences thereof, when human subjects are instructed with prior information about reward contingencies that may or may not be accurate. Behaviorally, subjects are overly influenced by prior instructions, at the expense of learning true reinforcement statistics. Computational analysis found that this pattern of data is best accounted for by a confirmation bias mechanism in which prior beliefs - putatively represented in PFC - influence the learning that occurs in the striatum such that reinforcement statistics are distorted. We assessed genetic variants affecting prefrontal and striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission. A polymorphism in the COMT gene (rs4680), associated with prefrontal dopaminergic function, was predictive of the degree to which participants persisted in responding in accordance with prior instructions even as evidence against their veracity accumulated. Polymorphisms in genes associated with striatal dopamine function (DARPP-32, rs907094, and DRD2, rs6277), were predictive of learning from positive and negative outcomes. Notably, these same variants were predictive of the degree to which such learning was overly inflated or neglected when outcomes are consistent or inconsistent with prior instructions. These findings indicate dissociable neurocomputational and genetic mechanisms by which initial biases are strengthened by experience. PMID:21508242

  11. Tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons of the hypothalamus are progestin target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sar, M.

    1986-03-01

    To find out a direct relationship between progestin target neurons and tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons colocalization of /sup 3/H ORG 2058 (a synthetic progestin) and tyrosine hydroxylase, TH, antibodies were studied by combined autoradiography and immunohistochemistry. Eight 23 day-old ovariectomized and adrenalectomized rats were injected s.c. 17-beta estradiol, daily for 4 days. On the 5th day each animal was injected i.v. 1.0 ug per 100g b.w. of /sup 3/H ORG 2058. Two animals each received 1mg of unlabeled ORG 2058 15 min prior to the injection of /sup 3/H ORG 2058 to show the specificity of localization. Animals were sacrificed after 15 or 30 min, brains were dissected, frozen and processed for autoradiography. The autoradiograms were stained immunohistochemically with antibodies to TH. TH-containing cells in the arcuate nucleus and in the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus (Group A12) showed concentration of radioactivity in their nuclei, while TH cells in Group A11, A13, A14, and in the substantia nigra (Group A9), and ventral tegmental area (Group A10) did not show nuclear concentration of /sup 3/H ORG 2058. Competition studies with unlabeled ORG 2058 abolished the nuclear uptake of radioactivity in TH containing neurons. The results suggest a direct affect of progestin on tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neurons.

  12. Dopaminergic involvement during mental fatigue in health and cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, S J; Tomasi, D; Honorio, J; Volkow, N D; Goldstein, R Z

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine modulates executive function, including sustaining cognitive control during mental fatigue. Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the color-word Stroop task, we aimed to model mental fatigue with repeated task exposures in 33 cocaine abusers and 20 healthy controls. During such mental fatigue (indicated by increased errors, and decreased post-error slowing and dorsal anterior cingulate response to error as a function of time-on-task), healthy individuals showed increased activity in the dopaminergic midbrain to error. Cocaine abusers, characterized by disrupted dopamine neurotransmission, showed an opposite pattern of response. This midbrain fMRI activity with repetition was further correlated with objective indices of endogenous motivation in all subjects: a state measure (task reaction time) and a trait measure (dopamine D2 receptor availability in caudate, as revealed by positron emission tomography data collected in a subset of this sample, which directly points to a contribution of dopamine to these results). In a second sample of 14 cocaine abusers and 15 controls, administration of an indirect dopamine agonist, methylphenidate, reversed these midbrain responses in both groups, possibly indicating normalization of response in cocaine abusers because of restoration of dopamine signaling but degradation of response in healthy controls owing to excessive dopamine signaling. Together, these multimodal imaging findings suggest a novel involvement of the dopaminergic midbrain in sustaining motivation during fatigue. This region might provide a useful target for strengthening self-control and/or endogenous motivation in addiction. PMID:23092980

  13. Dopaminergic genes predict individual differences in susceptibility to confirmation bias.

    PubMed

    Doll, Bradley B; Hutchison, Kent E; Frank, Michael J

    2011-04-20

    The striatum is critical for the incremental learning of values associated with behavioral actions. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) represents abstract rules and explicit contingencies to support rapid behavioral adaptation in the absence of cumulative experience. Here we test two alternative models of the interaction between these systems, and individual differences thereof, when human subjects are instructed with prior information about reward contingencies that may or may not be accurate. Behaviorally, subjects are overly influenced by prior instructions, at the expense of learning true reinforcement statistics. Computational analysis found that this pattern of data is best accounted for by a confirmation bias mechanism in which prior beliefs--putatively represented in PFC--influence the learning that occurs in the striatum such that reinforcement statistics are distorted. We assessed genetic variants affecting prefrontal and striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission. A polymorphism in the COMT gene (rs4680), associated with prefrontal dopaminergic function, was predictive of the degree to which participants persisted in responding in accordance with prior instructions even as evidence against their veracity accumulated. Polymorphisms in genes associated with striatal dopamine function (DARPP-32, rs907094, and DRD2, rs6277) were predictive of learning from positive and negative outcomes. Notably, these same variants were predictive of the degree to which such learning was overly inflated or neglected when outcomes are consistent or inconsistent with prior instructions. These findings indicate dissociable neurocomputational and genetic mechanisms by which initial biases are strengthened by experience. PMID:21508242

  14. Diversity of Dopaminergic Neural Circuits in Response to Drug Exposure.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Barbara; Han, Ming-Hu

    2016-09-01

    Addictive substances are known to increase dopaminergic signaling in the mesocorticolimbic system. The origin of this dopamine (DA) signaling originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which sends afferents to various targets, including the nucleus accumbens, the medial prefrontal cortex, and the basolateral amygdala. VTA DA neurons mediate stimuli saliency and goal-directed behaviors. These neurons undergo robust drug-induced intrinsic and extrinsic synaptic mechanisms following acute and chronic drug exposure, which are part of brain-wide adaptations that ultimately lead to the transition into a drug-dependent state. Interestingly, recent investigations of the differential subpopulations of VTA DA neurons have revealed projection-specific functional roles in mediating reward, aversion, and stress. It is now critical to view drug-induced neuroadaptations from a circuit-level perspective to gain insight into how differential dopaminergic adaptations and signaling to targets of the mesocorticolimbic system mediates drug reward. This review hopes to describe the projection-specific intrinsic characteristics of these subpopulations, the differential afferent inputs onto these VTA DA neuron subpopulations, and consolidate findings of drug-induced plasticity of VTA DA neurons and highlight the importance of future projection-based studies of this system. PMID:26934955

  15. Diversity of Dopaminergic Neural Circuits in Response to Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Barbara; Han, Ming-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Addictive substances are known to increase dopaminergic signaling in the mesocorticolimbic system. The origin of this dopamine (DA) signaling originates in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which sends afferents to various targets, including the nucleus accumbens, the medial prefrontal cortex, and the basolateral amygdala. VTA DA neurons mediate stimuli saliency and goal-directed behaviors. These neurons undergo robust drug-induced intrinsic and extrinsic synaptic mechanisms following acute and chronic drug exposure, which are part of brain-wide adaptations that ultimately lead to the transition into a drug-dependent state. Interestingly, recent investigations of the differential subpopulations of VTA DA neurons have revealed projection-specific functional roles in mediating reward, aversion, and stress. It is now critical to view drug-induced neuroadaptations from a circuit-level perspective to gain insight into how differential dopaminergic adaptations and signaling to targets of the mesocorticolimbic system mediates drug reward. This review hopes to describe the projection-specific intrinsic characteristics of these subpopulations, the differential afferent inputs onto these VTA DA neuron subpopulations, and consolidate findings of drug-induced plasticity of VTA DA neurons and highlight the importance of future projection-based studies of this system. PMID:26934955

  16. Orosensory self-stimulation by sucrose involves brain dopaminergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schneider, L H

    1989-01-01

    The most convincing body of evidence supporting a role for brain dopaminergic mechanisms in sweet taste reward has been obtained using the sham-feeding rat. In rats prepared with a chronic gastric fistula and tested with the cannula open, intake is a direct function of the palatability of the solution offered as well as of the state of food deprivation. Because essentially none of the ingested fluid passes on to the intestine, negative postingestive feedback is eliminated. Thus, the relative orosensory/hedonic potency of the food determines and sustains the rate of sham intake; long periods of food deprivation are not required. In this way, the sham feeding of sweet solutions may be considered a form of oral self-stimulation behavior and afford a preparation through which the neurochemical and neuranatomical substrates of sweet taste reward may be identified. The results obtained in the series of experiments summarized in this paper clearly indicate that central D-1 and D-2 receptor mechanisms are critical for the orosensory self-stimulation by sucrose in the rat. In conclusion, I suggest that such investigations of the roles of brain dopaminergic mechanisms in the sucrose sham-feeding rat preparation may further our understanding of normal and aberrant attractions to sweet fluids in humans (see Cabanac, Drewnowski, and Halmi, this volume), as an innate, positive affective response of human neonates to sucrose and the sustained positive hedonic ratings for glucose when tasted but not when consumed have demonstrated. PMID:2699194

  17. Dopaminergic Genetic Polymorphisms Predict Rule-based Category Learning.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Kaileigh A; Davis, Tyler; Worthy, Darrell A

    2016-07-01

    Dopaminergic genes play an important role in cognitive function. DRD2 and DARPP-32 dopamine receptor gene polymorphisms affect striatal dopamine binding potential, and the Val158Met single-nucleotide polymorphism of the COMT gene moderates dopamine availability in the pFC. Our study assesses the role of these gene polymorphisms on performance in two rule-based category learning tasks. Participants completed unidimensional and conjunctive rule-based tasks. In the unidimensional task, a rule along a single stimulus dimension can be used to distinguish category members. In contrast, a conjunctive rule utilizes a combination of two dimensions to distinguish category members. DRD2 C957T TT homozygotes outperformed C allele carriers on both tasks, and DARPP-32 AA homozygotes outperformed G allele carriers on both tasks. However, we found an interaction between COMT and task type where Met allele carriers outperformed Val homozygotes in the conjunctive rule task, but both groups performed equally well in the unidimensional task. Thus, striatal dopamine binding may play a critical role in both types of rule-based tasks, whereas prefrontal dopamine binding is important for learning more complex conjunctive rule tasks. Modeling results suggest that striatal dopaminergic genes influence selective attention processes whereas cortical genes mediate the ability to update complex rule representations. PMID:26918585

  18. Therapies for dopaminergic-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Gottwald, Mildred D; Aminoff, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Existing and emerging strategies for managing L-dopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs) in patients with Parkinson disease have involved either delaying the introduction of L-dopa therapy, treatment with an antidyskinetic agent, using a therapy or delivery system that can provide continuous dopaminergic stimulation, or using novel agents that target receptors implicated in the mechanisms underlying LIDs. Treatment with dopamine agonists such as pramipexole or ropinirole allows levodopa to be delayed, but once levodopa is added to the drug regimen the usual course of onset of dyskinesias is observed. Amantadine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, is so far the only approved compound with evidence of providing a sustained antidyskinetic benefit in the absence of unacceptable side effects. These findings support the hypothesis of glutamate overactivity in the development of dyskinesias. More continuous delivery of dopaminergic medication, such as through intraintestinal or subcutaneous routes, is promising but invasive and associated with injection site reactions. As a result of molecular research and elucidation of the role of a variety of neurotransmitters in the mechanism of LIDs, new compounds have been identified, including those that modulate the direct and indirect striatal output pathways; some of these new agents are in the early stages of development or undergoing proof-of-concept evaluation as antidyskinetic agents. PMID:21681795

  19. Is there room for new non-dopaminergic treatments in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Pilleri, Manuela; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Antonini, Angelo

    2013-02-01

    The contribution of non-dopaminergic degeneration to disability in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still debated. It has been argued that no additional advance can be expected in the management of PD by the development of new dopaminergic agents and suggested that future research should mainly focus on therapies targeting the non-dopaminergic systems involved in the pathogenesis of levodopa resistant motor and non-motor symptoms. We believe this is only partially true and the achievement of a stable dopaminergic restoration and modulation of the dopaminergic system is still an important, unmet need of current pharmacological therapies in PD. Currently available oral levodopa and dopamine agonist medications provide insufficient benefit, as the therapeutic window progressively narrows and motor fluctuations eventually develop in most patients. Conversely, the application of infusion and surgical therapies is limited by selective indications and possible irreversible adverse events and device-related problems. Research of new, safer and less invasive strategies, able to modulate the dopaminergic circuits, would certainly improve the management of motor complications, and most importantly such treatments would be also beneficial to axial and non-motor symptoms, which are universally regarded as the major cause of PD functional disability. Indeed, gait and balance problems may improve with dopaminergic treatment in most patients and they become unresponsive only at the very late stages of the disease. Moreover, several non-motor disturbances, including cognition and depression are often linked to oscillation of dopamine concentrations, and are frequently relieved by treatments providing continuous dopaminergic delivery. Finally, drug trials testing non-dopaminergic treatments for motor and non-motor symptoms of PD provided so far disappointing results. Despite the impressive advances of PD therapeutic strategy, we think there is still need for safe, non-invasive and easily

  20. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  1. Oral Lesions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  2. Retinal lesions in septicemia.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, M; Barnea, Y; Geyer, O; Siegman-Igra, Y

    1993-12-15

    We explored the association between septicemia and specific retinal lesions in a prospective controlled study. Hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, or Roth's spots were found in 24 of 101 septicemic patients (24%), compared to four of 99 age- and gender-matched control patients (4%) (P = .0002). There was no significant association between types of organisms or focus of infection and the presence of specific lesions. Histologic examination of affected eyes disclosed cytoid bodies in the nerve fiber layer without inflammation. A definite association between septicemia and retinal lesions was found and indicates the need for routine ophthalmoscopy in septicemic patients. PMID:8250076

  3. Talar Dome Lesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... be helpful in reducing the pain and inflammation. Physical therapy . Range-of-motion and strengthening exercises are beneficial once the lesion is adequately healed. Physical therapy may also include techniques to reduce pain and ...

  4. Hypervascular liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Kamaya, Aya; Maturen, Katherine E; Tye, Grace A; Liu, Yueyi I; Parti, Naveen N; Desser, Terry S

    2009-10-01

    Hypervascular hepatocellular lesions include both benign and malignant etiologies. In the benign category, focal nodular hyperplasia and adenoma are typically hypervascular. In addition, some regenerative nodules in cirrhosis may be hypervascular. Malignant hypervascular primary hepatocellular lesions include hepatocellular carcinoma, fibrolamellar carcinoma, and peripheral cholangiocarcinoma. Vascular liver lesions often appear hypervascular because they tend to follow the enhancement of the blood pool; these include hemangiomas, arteriovenous malformations, angiosarcomas, and peliosis. While most gastrointestinal malignancies that metastasize to the liver will appear hypovascular on arterial and portal-venous phase imaging, certain cancers such as metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, carcinoid, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors) tend to produce hypervascular metastases due to the greater recruitment of arterial blood supply. Finally, rare hepatic lesions such as glomus tumor and inflammatory pseudotumor may have a hypervascular appearance. PMID:19842564

  5. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  6. Evaluation of Parotid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Mallen-St Clair, Jon; St John, Maie A

    2016-04-01

    The differential diagnosis of a parotid lesion is broad, and the otolaryngologist must consider inflammatory, neoplastic, autoimmune, traumatic, infectious, or congenital causes. A comprehensive history and physical examination, in conjunction with judicious use of radiographic imaging (MRI, computed tomography, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine studies), laboratory studies, and pathologic analysis (fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, incisional biopsy), facilitates making an accurate diagnosis. This article reviews the key history and physical elements and adjunctive diagnostic tools available for working up parotid lesions. PMID:26902978

  7. Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayachandran, Divya; Sankarapandian, Sathasivasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Several systemic diseases initially present with various oral manifestations. Investigation of these oral symptoms may at times lead to the diagnosis of grave underlying life-threatening conditions. We present one such case, where the patient manifested with gross enlargement of the mandible, along with lesions in the lower limbs. These lesions were the initial manifestation and on further investigations the patient was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. PMID:24516769

  8. Petrous Apex Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Amedee, Ronald G.; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Mann, Wolf J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to detail our experience in treating 69 patients over the past 6 years with pathologic processes involving the petrous apex. These included 25 (36%) primary petrous apex lesions, 40 (58%) lesions that involved the petrous apex by direct invasion from an adjacent region, and four (6%) lesions that were the result of metastatic spread from a distant site. Although lesions of the petrous apex are uncommon, they may present significant morbidity to the patient. The symptoms elicited by these lesions are usually vague and nonlocalizing in the early stages but may progress to include multiple cranial neuropathies. Successful results are contingent on early diagnosis, which requires a high index of suspicion and use of appropriate imaging modalities. Thorough preoperative assessment with use of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and carotid arteriography is essential to plan the surgical approach. We present this collection of patients in order to aid in the further preoperative characterization of the differences in primary and secondary lesions of the petrous apex. PMID:17170919

  9. Colorectal Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most of subepithelial lesion (SEL) being identified was accidentally discovered as small bulging lesion covered with normal mucosa from endoscopic screening. The type of treatment and prognosis vary depending on the type of tumor, it would be crucial to perform an accurate differential diagnosis. Since the differentiation of SEL relied on the indirect findings observed from the mucosal surface using an endoscopy only in the past, it was able to confirm the presence of lesion only but difficult to identify complex detailed nature of the lesion. However, after the endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was introduced, it became possible to identify extrinsic compression, and size of intramural tumors, internal properties and contour so that it gets possible to have differential diagnosis of lesions and prediction on the lesion whether it is malignant or benign. In addition, the use of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration and EUS-guided core biopsy made it possible to make histological differential diagnosis. This study intended to investigate endoscopic and EUS findings, histological diagnosis, treatment regimen and impression of colorectal SELs. PMID:26240803

  10. The effect of different durations of morphine exposure on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons in morphine dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Weibo; Ma, Chunling; Qi, Qian; Liu, Lizhe; Bi, Haitao; Cong, Bin; Li, Yingmin

    2015-12-01

    Mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons are heavily involved in the development of drug dependence. Thyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, plays an important role in the survival of dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, this study investigated TH changes in dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN), as well as the morphine effects on dopaminergic neurons induced by different durations of morphine dependence. Models of morphine dependence were established in rats, and paraffin-embedded sections, immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to observe the changes in the expression of TH protein. Fluoro-Jade B staining was used to detect degeneration and necrosis, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL) detected the apoptosis of mesencephalic dopaminergic nerve cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting showed that the number of TH positive cells and the protein levels in the VTA and SN were significantly decreased in the rats with a long period of morphine dependency. With prolonged morphine exposure, the dopaminergic nerve cells in the VTA and SN showed degeneration and necrosis, while apoptotic cells were not observed. The number of VTA and SN dopaminergic nerve cells decreased with increasing periods of morphine dependence, which was most likely attributable to the degeneration and necrosis of nerve cells induced by morphine toxicity. PMID:26386147

  11. The Influence of Dopaminergic Striatal Innervation on Upper Limb Locomotor Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Isaias, Ioannis U.; Volkmann, Jens; Marzegan, Alberto; Marotta, Giorgio; Cavallari, Paolo; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of striatal dopaminergic innervation on upper limb synergies during walking, we measured arm kinematics in 13 subjects with Parkinson disease. Patients were recruited according to several inclusion criteria to represent the best possible in vivo model of dopaminergic denervation. Of relevance, we included only subjects with normal spatio-temporal parameters of the stride and gait speed to avoid an impairment of upper limbs locomotor synergies as a consequence of gait impairment per se. Dopaminergic innervation of the striatum was measured by FP-CIT and SPECT. All patients showed a reduction of gait-associated arms movement. No linear correlation was found between arm ROM reduction and contralateral dopaminergic putaminal innervation loss. Still, a partition analysis revealed a 80% chance of reduced arm ROM when putaminal dopamine content loss was >47%. A significant correlation was described between the asymmetry indices of the swinging of the two arms and dopaminergic striatal innervation. When arm ROM was reduced, we found a positive correlation between upper-lower limb phase shift modulation (at different gait velocities) and striatal dopaminergic innervation. These findings are preliminary evidence that dopaminergic striatal tone plays a modulatory role in upper-limb locomotor synergies and upper-lower limb coupling while walking at different velocities. PMID:23236504

  12. Abuse potential and dopaminergic effect of alkyl nitrites.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seo Young; Kim, Yun Ji; Kim, Young-Hoon; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung Soo; Cha, Hye Jin

    2016-08-26

    The abuse of alkyl nitrites is common among adolescents and young adults worldwide. However, the information regarding the effects of alkyl nitrites on the central nervous system and the associated psychological abuse potential is scarce. The abuse potential of 3 representative alkyl nitrites - isobutyl nitrite, isoamyl nitrite, and butyl nitrite - was evaluated in mice using conditioned place preference tests with an unbiased method. The dopamine levels released by synaptosomes extracted from the striatal region were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with the test substances (50mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a significantly increased drug-paired place preference. Moreover, greater levels of dopamine were released by striatal region synaptosomes in response to isobutyl nitrite treatment in mice. Thus, our findings suggest that alkyl nitrites could lead to psychological dependence and dopaminergic effects. Furthermore, these results provide scientific evidence to support the regulation of alkyl nitrites as psychoactive substances in the future. PMID:27369324

  13. Renal dopaminergic system: Pathophysiological implications and clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Marcelo Roberto; Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás Martín; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia Lucía; Kravetz, María Cecilia; Rosón, María Inés; Rodríguez Fermepin, Martín; Fernández, Belisario Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Fluid homeostasis, blood pressure and redox balance in the kidney are regulated by an intricate interaction between local and systemic anti-natriuretic and natriuretic systems. Intrarenal dopamine plays a central role on this interactive network. By activating specific receptors, dopamine promotes sodium excretion and stimulates anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory pathways. Different pathological scenarios where renal sodium excretion is dysregulated, as in nephrotic syndrome, hypertension and renal inflammation, can be associated with impaired action of renal dopamine including alteration in biosynthesis, dopamine receptor expression and signal transduction. Given its properties on the regulation of renal blood flow and sodium excretion, exogenous dopamine has been postulated as a potential therapeutic strategy to prevent renal failure in critically ill patients. The aim of this review is to update and discuss on the most recent findings about renal dopaminergic system and its role in several diseases involving the kidneys and the potential use of dopamine as a nephroprotective agent. PMID:25949933

  14. Dopaminergic control of cognitive flexibility in humans and animals

    PubMed Central

    Klanker, Marianne; Feenstra, Matthijs; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-01-01

    Striatal dopamine (DA) is thought to code for learned associations between cues and reinforcers and to mediate approach behavior toward a reward. Less is known about the contribution of DA to cognitive flexibility—the ability to adapt behavior in response to changes in the environment. Altered reward processing and impairments in cognitive flexibility are observed in psychiatric disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Patients with this disorder show a disruption of functioning in the frontostriatal circuit and alterations in DA signaling. In this review we summarize findings from animal and human studies that have investigated the involvement of striatal DA in cognitive flexibility. These findings may provide a better understanding of the role of dopaminergic dysfunction in cognitive inflexibility in psychiatric disorders, such as OCD. PMID:24204329

  15. The dopaminergic projection system, basal forebrain macrosystems, and conditioned stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    This review begins with a description of some problems that in recent years have beset an influential circuit model of fear-conditioning and goes on to look at neuroanatomy that might subserve conditioning viewed in a broader perspective, including not only fear, but also appetitive, conditioning. The paper then focuses on basal forebrain functional-anatomical systems, or macrosystems, as they have come to be called, which Lennart Heimer and colleagues described beginning in the 1970’s. Yet more specific attention is then given to the relationships of the dorsal and ventral striatopallidal systems and extended amygdala with the dopaminergic mesotelencephalic projection systems, culminating with the hypothesis that all macrosystems contribute to behavioral conditioning. PMID:18204412

  16. Disrupted Functional Connectivity with Dopaminergic Midbrain in Cocaine Abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, D.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.; Carrillo, J.; Maloney, T.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-06-01

    Chronic cocaine use is associated with disrupted dopaminergic neurotransmission but how this disruption affects overall brain function (other than reward/motivation) is yet to be fully investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that cocaine addicted subjects will have disrupted functional connectivity between the midbrain (where dopamine neurons are located) and cortical and subcortical brain regions during the performance of a sustained attention task. We measured brain activation and functional connectivity with fMRI in 20 cocaine abusers and 20 matched controls. When compared to controls, cocaine abusers had lower positive functional connectivity of midbrain with thalamus, cerebellum, and rostral cingulate, and this was associated with decreased activation in thalamus and cerebellum and enhanced deactivation in rostral cingulate. These findings suggest that decreased functional connectivity of the midbrain interferes with the activation and deactivation signals associated with sustained attention in cocaine addicts.

  17. Fenpropathrin, a Widely Used Pesticide, Causes Dopaminergic Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jing; Zhang, Xiaowei; Huang, Jinsha; Chen, Chunnuan; Chen, Zhenzhen; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guoxin; Yang, Jiaolong; Zhang, Zhentao; Zhang, Zhaohui; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Fenpropathrin is one of the widely used pyrethroids in agriculture and household and also reported to have neurotoxic effects in rodent models. In our Parkinson's disease (PD) clinic, there was a unique patient with a history of daily exposure to fenpropathrin for 6 months prior to developing Parkinsonian symptoms progressively. Since whether fenpropathrin is related to any dopaminergic degeneration was unknown, we aimed in this study to evaluate the neurotoxic effects of fenpropathrin on the dopaminergic system and associated mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. In cultured SH-SY5Y cells, fenpropathrin caused cell death, reactive oxygen species generation, Lewy body-associated proteins aggregation, and Lewy body-like intracytoplasmic inclusions formation. In rodent animals, two different injections of fenpropathrin were used for administrations, intraperitoneal (i.p), or stereotaxical (ST). The rats exhibited lower number of pokes 60 days after first i.p injection, while the rats in ST group showed a significant upregulation of apomorphine-evoked rotations 60 days after first injection. Decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) immunoreactivity, while increased dopamine transporter (DAT) immunoreactivity were observed in rats of either i.p or ST group 60 days after the last exposure to fenpropathrin. However, the number of TH-positive cells in the substantia nigra was more reduced 120 days after the first i.p injection than those of 60 days. Our data demonstrated that exposure to fenpropathrin could mimic the pathologic and pathogenetic features of PD especially in late onset cases. These results imply fenpropathrin as a DA neurotoxin and a possible environmental risk factor for PD. PMID:25575680

  18. Dopaminergic modulation of emotional conflict in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Vanessa; Cousin, Emilie; Czernecki, Virginie; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Lhommée, Eugénie; Poncet, Antoine; Fraix, Valérie; Troprès, Irène; Pollak, Pierre; Krainik, Alexandre; Krack, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric fluctuations in Parkinson's disease (PD) are frequent and disabling. One way to investigate them is to assess the ability to inhibit distractive emotional information by a modified emotional Stroop (ES) task. We compared non-depressed, non-demented PD patients with healthy controls. During an acute levodopa challenge, patients performed a modified ES task during functional MRI and a neuropsychological assessment including Visual Analog Mood (VAMS) and Apathy scales. Ten patients and 12 controls completed the study. The VAMS scores were significantly improved by the acute intake of levodopa (p = 0.02), as was the apathy score (p = 0.03). Negative ES task (i.e. fearful facial expressions with the words “happy” or “fear” written across them), induced a lengthening of the mean reaction time during the incongruent trials compared with the congruent trials in controls (relative difference = 2.7%, p < 0.001) and in ON patients (relative difference = 5.9%, p < 0.001), but not in OFF patients (relative difference = 1.7%, p = 0.28). Controls and ON patients displayed greater activation than OFF patients within the right pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC), an area specifically involved in emotional conflict resolution (p < 0.001 and p < 0.008 respectively, k > 5 uncorrected). No difference in the activation of the pACC was found between controls and ON patients, suggesting a normalization of the activation following levodopa administration. These results suggest that emotional conflict processes could be dopamine-dependent. Pregenual ACC hypoactivation could be directly due to the degeneration of dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic pathway. Our results propose that neuropsychiatric fluctuations in PD patients could be partially explained by pACC hypoactivation and that adjustments of dopaminergic medication might be helpful for their treatment. PMID:25100991

  19. α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine reward and anxiety relief.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Tresa M; Patzlaff, Natalie E; Grady, Sharon R; Heinemann, Stephen F; Booker, T K

    2011-07-27

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco, and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the α4β2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and thereby, modifies certain normal as well as nicotine-induced behaviors. Although α4-containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midbrain dopaminergic regions involved in drug addiction, mental illness, and movement control in humans. We developed a unique model system to examine the role of α4-nAChRs within dopaminergic neurons by a targeted genetic deletion of the α4 subunit from dopaminergic neurons in mice. The loss α4 mRNA and α4β2-nAChRs from dopaminergic neurons was confirmed, as well as selective loss of α4β2-nAChR function from dopaminergic but not GABAergic neurons. Two behaviors central to nicotine dependence, reward and anxiety relief, were examined. α4-nAChRs specifically on dopaminergic neurons were demonstrated to be necessary for nicotine reward as measured by nicotine place preference, but not for another drug of addiction, cocaine. α4-nAChRs are necessary for the anxiolytic effects of nicotine in the elevated plus maze, and elimination of α4β2-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons decreased sensitivity to the anxiolytic effects of nicotine. Deletion of α4-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons also increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced locomotor depression; however, nicotine-induced hypothermia was unaffected. This is the first work to develop a dopaminergic specific deletion of a nAChR subunit and examine resulting changes in nicotine-related behaviors. PMID:21795541

  20. alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine reward and anxiety relief

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Tresa M.; Patzlaff, Natalie E.; Grady, Sharon R.; Heinemann, Stephen F.; Booker, T.K.

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary psychoactive substance in tobacco and it exerts its effects by interaction with various subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain. One of the major subtypes expressed in brain, the alpha4beta2-nAChR, endogenously modulates neuronal excitability and thereby, modifies certain normal, as well as nicotine-induced, behaviors. Although alpha4-containing nAChRs are widely expressed across the brain, a major focus has been on their roles within midbrain dopaminergic regions involved in drug addition, mental illness and movement control in humans. We developed a unique model system to examine the role of alpha4-nAChRs within dopaminergic neurons by a targeted genetic deletion of the alpha4 subunit from dopaminergic neurons in mice. The loss alpha4 mRNA and alpha4beta2-nAChRs from dopaminergic neurons was confirmed, as well as selective loss of alpha4beta2-nAChR function from dopaminergic but not GABAergic neurons. Two behaviors central to nicotine dependence, reward and anxiety relief, were examined. Alpha4-nAChRs specifically on dopaminergic neurons were demonstrated to be necessary for nicotine reward as measured by nicotine place preference, but not for another drug of addiction, cocaine. Alpha4-nAChRs are necessary for the anxiolytic effects of nicotine in the elevated plus maze and elimination of alpha4-beta2-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons decreased sensitivity to the anxiolytic effects of nicotine. Deletion of alpha4-nAChRs specifically from dopaminergic neurons also increased sensitivity to nicotine-induced locomotor depression, however nicotine-induced hypothermia was unaffected. This is the first work to develop a dopaminergic specific deletion of a nAChR subunit and examine resulting changes in nicotine behaviors. PMID:21795541

  1. Aging-Related Changes in the Nigrostriatal Dopamine System and the Response to MPTP in Nonhuman Primates: Diminished Compensatory Mechanisms as a Prelude to Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Timothy J.; Lipton, Jack; Daley, Brian F.; Palfi, Stephane; Chu, Yaping; Sortwell, Caryl; Bakay, Roy A.E.; Sladek, John R.; Kordower, Jeffrey H.

    2007-01-01

    Aging is the most prominent risk factor for Parkinson’s disease. Yet, consensus of how advancing age may predispose the dopamine (DA) system to parkinsonism is lacking. Three age-ranges of female rhesus monkeys, 8–9, 15–17 and 21–31 years, received unilateral DA depletion with intracarotid 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Morphological and biochemical analyses of DA-depleted and intact hemispheres revealed three primary findings: 1) The intact striatum exhibited age-related declines in dopamine (DA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) that were present by middle-age; 2) In the MPTP-treated striatum, the compensatory increase in DA activity was absent in old monkeys; and, 3) Age-associated morphological changes included declines in the density of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive fibers in striatum, decreased nigral soma size and optical density of TH, but no significant loss of neurons. These findings suggest that aging produces changes in the nigrostriatal DA system that approach the threshold for expression of parkinsonian features, and that progressive impairment of plasticity may be central to the role of aging in development of parkinsonism. PMID:17254792

  2. Influence of glutamate on the content and metabolism of dopamine in the nigrostriatal system of rats distinguished by capacity for learning.

    PubMed

    Karpova, I V; Yakimovskii, A F

    1994-01-01

    The effect of repeated (over the course of nine days) intrastriatal microinjections of glutamate (5 or 0.5 micrograms in 0.75 microliters of physiological solution daily) were investigated in 42 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Twenty-nine rats were preliminarily trained in a Skinner box using food reinforcement. It was demonstrated that the administration of glutamate to rats not subjected to training increases the content of homovanillic acid in the striatum. A similar influence in rats that are capable of learning leads to an increase in the content of dopamine and a decrease in the level of homovanillic acid in this nucleus, while it does not induce changes in the biochemical indicators under investigation in those rats that are incapable of learning. Microinjections of glutamate also do not alter the capacity for learning in any of the groups of animals. The possible causes for the different influence of intrastriatal microinjections of glutamate on the activity of the nigrostriatal system of rats differing by capacity for learning are discussed. PMID:7808643

  3. Transfer of host-derived α synuclein to grafted dopaminergic neurons in rat.

    PubMed

    Kordower, Jeffrey H; Dodiya, Hemraj B; Kordower, Adam M; Terpstra, Brian; Paumier, Katrina; Madhavan, Lalitha; Sortwell, Caryl; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Collier, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Multiple laboratories have recently demonstrated that long-term dopaminergic transplants form Lewy bodies in patients with Parkinson's disease. Debate has arisen as to whether these Lewy bodies form from the transfer of α synuclein from the host to the graft or whether they form from intrinsic responses of the graft from being placed into what was, or became, an inflammatory focus. To test whether the former hypothesis was possible, we grafted fetal rat ventral mesencephalon into the dopamine depleted striatum of rats that had previously received 6-hydroxydopamine lesions. One month after the transplant, rats received viral over expression of human α synuclein (AAV2/6-α synuclein) or green fluorescent protein (AAV2/6-GFP) into the striatum rostral to the grafts. Care was taken to make sure that the AAV injections were sufficiently distal to the graft so no cells would be directly transfected. All rats were sacrificed five weeks after the virus injections. Double label immunohistochemistry combined with confocal microscopy revealed that a small number of grafted tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons (5.7% ± 1.5% (mean ± SEM) of grafted dopamine cells) expressed host derived α synuclein but none of the grafted cells expressed host-derived GFP. The α synuclein in a few of these cells was misfolded and failed to be digested with proteinase K. These data indicate that it is possible for host derived α synuclein to transfer to grafted neurons supporting the concept that this is one possible mechanism by which grafted dopamine neurons form Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease patients. PMID:21600984

  4. Meniscal Ramp Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Mitchell, Justin J.; Cram, Tyler R.; Yacuzzi, Carlos; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal ramp lesions are more frequently associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than previously recognized. Some authors suggest that this entity results from disruption of the meniscotibial ligaments of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus, whereas others support the idea that it is created by a tear of the peripheral attachment of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reported to have a low sensitivity, and consequently, ramp lesions often go undiagnosed. Therefore, to rule out a ramp lesion, an arthroscopic evaluation with probing of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus should be performed. Several treatment options have been reported, including nonsurgical management, inside-out meniscal repair, or all-inside meniscal repair. In cases of isolated ramp lesions, a standard meniscal repair rehabilitation protocol should be followed. However, when a concomitant ACL reconstruction (ACLR) is performed, the rehabilitation should follow the designated ACLR postoperative protocol. The purpose of this article was to review the current literature regarding meniscal ramp lesions and summarize the pertinent anatomy, biomechanics, diagnostic strategies, recommended treatment options, and postoperative protocol. PMID:27504467

  5. Slow oscillations in two pairs of dopaminergic neurons gate long-term memory formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Trannoy, Séverine; Isabel, Guillaume; Aso, Yoshinori; Siwanowicz, Igor; Belliart-Guérin, Ghislain; Vernier, Philippe; Birman, Serge; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Preat, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    A fundamental duty of any efficient memory system is to prevent long-lasting storage of poorly relevant information. However, little is known about dedicated mechanisms that appropriately trigger production of long-term memory (LTM). We examined the role of Drosophila dopaminergic neurons in the control of LTM formation and found that they act as a switch between two exclusive consolidation pathways leading to LTM or anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM). Blockade, after aversive olfactory conditioning, of three pairs of dopaminergic neurons projecting on mushroom bodies, the olfactory memory center, enhanced ARM, whereas their overactivation conversely impaired ARM. Notably, blockade of these neurons during the intertrial intervals of a spaced training precluded LTM formation. Two pairs of these dopaminergic neurons displayed sustained calcium oscillations in naive flies. Oscillations were weakened by ARM-inducing massed training and were enhanced during LTM formation. Our results indicate that oscillations of two pairs of dopaminergic neurons control ARM levels and gate LTM. PMID:22366756

  6. Lesion of the substantia nigra pars compacta downregulates striatal glutamate receptor subunit mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Fan, X D; Li, X M; Ashe, P C; Juorio, A V

    1999-12-11

    This is a study of the effect of the unilateral administration of dopamine (DA) in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra (SN) of the rat on striatal glutamate receptor subunit (GluR1, GluR2 and NMDAR1) gene expression determined by in situ hybridization. The location of the nigral lesion was determined by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry and its extent by the striatal DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) concentrations. The DA-induced lesions produce significant bilateral reductions in the expression of GluR1 and NMDAR1 subunit mRNA in the medio-lateral striatum, whereas the expression of striatal GluR2 receptors was not changed. The reduction in GluR1 and NMDAR1 subunit mRNA may be the consequence of glutamatergic hyperactivity developed in the presence of a damaged nigro-striatal system and these may be associated with the genesis of some neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:10629751

  7. JNK-mediated activation of ATF2 contributes to dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoying; Du, Xiaoxiao; He, Xin; Yu, Qing; Hu, Kunhua; Breitwieser, Wolfgang; Shen, Qingyu; Ma, Shanshan; Li, Mingtao

    2016-03-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun pathway is a known critical regulator of dopaminergic neuronal death in Parkinson's disease (PD) and is considered a potential target for neuroprotective therapy. However, whether JNK is activated within dopaminergic neurons remains controversial, and whether JNK acts through downstream effectors other than c-Jun to promote dopaminergic neuronal death remains unclear. In this study, we confirm that JNK but not p38 is activated in dopaminergic neurons after 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-intoxication. Furthermore, within the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra in MPTP-treated mice, JNK2/3 phosphorylates threonine 69 (Thr69) of Activating transcription factor-2 (ATF2), a transcription factor of the ATF/CREB family, whereas the phosphorylation of Thr71 is constitutive and remains unchanged. The increased phosphorylation of ATF2 on Thr69 by JNK in the MPTP mouse model suggests a functional relationship between the transcriptional activation of ATF2 and dopaminergic neuron death. By using dopaminergic neuron-specific conditional ATF2 mutant mice, we found that either partial or complete deletion of the ATF2 DNA-binding domain in dopaminergic neurons markedly alleviates the MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration, indicating that the activation of ATF2 plays a detrimental role in neuropathogenesis in PD. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that JNK-mediated ATF2 activation contributes to dopaminergic neuronal death in an MPTP model of PD. PMID:26515688

  8. Yokukansan, a Traditional Japanese Medicine, Enhances the L-DOPA-Induced Rotational Response in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Lesioned Rats: Possible Inhibition of COMT.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasushi; Ebihara, Kosuke; Tabuchi, Masahiro; Imamura, Sachiko; Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Kase, Yoshio; Koganemaru, Go; Abe, Hiroshi; Ikarashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the traditional Japanese medicine yokukansan (YKS) on the function of dopamine (DA) in the rat nigrostriatal system. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were produced in the rat nigrostriatal system. Despite a marked loss in the striatal immunoreactivity of tyrosine hydroxylase on the lesion side, striatal serotonin (5-HT) immunoreactivity was not affected. Treatment using L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) in conjunction with benserazide for 15 d induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) such as locomotive (rotational response), axial, forelimb, and orolingual movements in the lesioned rats. The L-DOPA-induced locomotive and axial, but not forelimb and orolingual, AIMs were significantly increased and prolonged by the pre-administration of YKS. We next investigated the effects of YKS on the production of DA from L-DOPA in 5-HT synthetic RIN 14B cells. RIN 14B cells produced DA and its metabolite, 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), following L-DOPA treatment. YKS significantly augmented DA production and inhibited its metabolism to 3-MT in a manner similar to the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor entacapone. YKS and some alkaloids (corynoxeine: CX, geissoschizine methyl ether: GM) in Uncaria hook, a constituent herb of YKS, also inhibited COMT activity, indicating that the augmenting effect of YKS on L-DOPA-induced DA production in 5-HT synthetic cells was due to the inhibition of COMT by CX and GM. Our results suggest that YKS facilitates the DA supplemental effect of L-DOPA, and that COMT inhibition by CX and GM contributes, at least in part, to the effects of YKS. PMID:26725433

  9. Genital lesions following bestiality.

    PubMed

    Mittal, A; Shenoi, S D; Kumar, K B; Sharma, P V

    2000-01-01

    A 48-year-old man presented with painful genital lesions with history of bestiality and abnor-mal sexual behaviour. Examination revealed multiple irregular tender ulcers and erosions, with phimosis and left sided tender inguinal adenopathy. VDRL, TPHA, HIV-ELISA were negative. He was treated with ciprofloxacin 500mg b.d. along with saline compresses with complete resolution. PMID:20877040

  10. Reactive microgliosis: extracellular μ-calpain and microglia-mediated dopaminergic neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Shannon; Wilson, Belinda; Gregoria, Vincent; Thorpe, Laura B.; Dallas, Shannon; Polikov, Vadim S.; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the innate immune cells in the brain, can become chronically activated in response to dopaminergic neuron death, fuelling a self-renewing cycle of microglial activation followed by further neuron damage (reactive microgliosis), which is implicated in the progressive nature of Parkinson’s disease. Here, we use an in vitro approach to separate neuron injury factors from the cellular actors of reactive microgliosis and discover molecular signals responsible for chronic and toxic microglial activation. Upon injury with the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, N27 cells (dopaminergic neuron cell line) released soluble neuron injury factors that activated microglia and were selectively toxic to dopaminergic neurons in mixed mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. μ-Calpain was identified as a key signal released from damaged neurons, causing selective dopaminergic neuron death through activation of microglial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and superoxide production. These findings suggest that dopaminergic neurons may be inherently susceptible to the pro-inflammatory effects of neuron damage, i.e. reactive microgliosis, providing much needed insight into the chronic nature of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:20123724

  11. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D

    2016-01-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification. PMID:27193056

  12. Choice of dopaminergic therapy among early, mild Parkinson disease subjects in North America.

    PubMed

    Goudreau, John L; Pérez, Adriana; Aminoff, Michael J; Boyd, James T; Burau, Keith D; Christine, Chadwick W; Leehey, Maureen; Morgan, John C

    2016-07-15

    The choice of dopaminergic therapy in early Parkinson disease (PD) is an important clinical decision, yet factors influencing this decision have not been extensively studied. We sought to investigate the factors that may be associated with the choice of dopaminergic therapy at the NINDS Exploratory Trials in PD (NET-PD) Long-Term Study-1 (LS1). NET-PD LS1 was a clinical trial of creatine versus placebo in participants with early, mild PD on stable doses of dopaminergic therapy. Baseline data from 1616 out of the 1741 participants were evaluated using univariable and multivariable logistic or generalized logit regression analyses for available factors associated with the choice of dopaminergic therapy. The dopaminergic therapy choice was determined as: (i) therapy that subjects recalled taking 180days before the study; (ii) therapy at baseline; and (iii) the longest duration of therapy reported by participants. Younger age, higher education level, longer length of time since PD diagnosis and use of an adjunctive, non-dopaminergic or monoamine oxidase inhibitor medication were associated with more frequent use of dopamine agonist compared to levodopa or combination therapy. PMID:27288780

  13. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D.

    2016-01-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification. PMID:27193056

  14. Sweet Taste and Nutrient Value Subdivide Rewarding Dopaminergic Neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Huetteroth, Wolf; Perisse, Emmanuel; Lin, Suewei; Klappenbach, Martín; Burke, Christopher; Waddell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dopaminergic neurons provide reward learning signals in mammals and insects [1–4]. Recent work in Drosophila has demonstrated that water-reinforcing dopaminergic neurons are different to those for nutritious sugars [5]. Here, we tested whether the sweet taste and nutrient properties of sugar reinforcement further subdivide the fly reward system. We found that dopaminergic neurons expressing the OAMB octopamine receptor [6] specifically convey the short-term reinforcing effects of sweet taste [4]. These dopaminergic neurons project to the β′2 and γ4 regions of the mushroom body lobes. In contrast, nutrient-dependent long-term memory requires different dopaminergic neurons that project to the γ5b regions, and it can be artificially reinforced by those projecting to the β lobe and adjacent α1 region. Surprisingly, whereas artificial implantation and expression of short-term memory occur in satiated flies, formation and expression of artificial long-term memory require flies to be hungry. These studies suggest that short-term and long-term sugar memories have different physiological constraints. They also demonstrate further functional heterogeneity within the rewarding dopaminergic neuron population. PMID:25728694

  15. Sweet taste and nutrient value subdivide rewarding dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Huetteroth, Wolf; Perisse, Emmanuel; Lin, Suewei; Klappenbach, Martín; Burke, Christopher; Waddell, Scott

    2015-03-16

    Dopaminergic neurons provide reward learning signals in mammals and insects [1-4]. Recent work in Drosophila has demonstrated that water-reinforcing dopaminergic neurons are different to those for nutritious sugars [5]. Here, we tested whether the sweet taste and nutrient properties of sugar reinforcement further subdivide the fly reward system. We found that dopaminergic neurons expressing the OAMB octopamine receptor [6] specifically convey the short-term reinforcing effects of sweet taste [4]. These dopaminergic neurons project to the β'2 and γ4 regions of the mushroom body lobes. In contrast, nutrient-dependent long-term memory requires different dopaminergic neurons that project to the γ5b regions, and it can be artificially reinforced by those projecting to the β lobe and adjacent α1 region. Surprisingly, whereas artificial implantation and expression of short-term memory occur in satiated flies, formation and expression of artificial long-term memory require flies to be hungry. These studies suggest that short-term and long-term sugar memories have different physiological constraints. They also demonstrate further functional heterogeneity within the rewarding dopaminergic neuron population. PMID:25728694

  16. Subcellular expression and neuroprotective effects of SK channels in human dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dolga, A M; de Andrade, A; Meissner, L; Knaus, H-G; Höllerhage, M; Christophersen, P; Zischka, H; Plesnila, N; Höglinger, G U; Culmsee, C

    2014-01-01

    Small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel activation is an emerging therapeutic approach for treatment of neurological diseases, including stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and schizophrenia. Our previous studies showed that activation of SK channels exerted neuroprotective effects through inhibition of NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity. In this study, we tested the therapeutic potential of SK channel activation of NS309 (25 μM) in cultured human postmitotic dopaminergic neurons in vitro conditionally immortalized and differentiated from human fetal mesencephalic cells. Quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting analysis showed that differentiated dopaminergic neurons expressed low levels of SK2 channels and high levels of SK1 and SK3 channels. Further, protein analysis of subcellular fractions revealed expression of SK2 channel subtype in mitochondrial-enriched fraction. Mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (0.5 μM) disrupted the dendritic network of human dopaminergic neurons and induced neuronal death. SK channel activation reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, while it preserved the dendritic network, cell viability and ATP levels after rotenone challenge. Mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed dopaminergic cell death were prevented by increasing and/or stabilizing SK channel activity. Overall, our findings show that activation of SK channels provides protective effects in human dopaminergic neurons, likely via activation of both membrane and mitochondrial SK channels. Thus, SK channels are promising therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, where dopaminergic cell loss is associated with progression of the disease. PMID:24434522

  17. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D.

    2016-05-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification.

  18. Early Effects of Reward Anticipation Are Modulated by Dopaminergic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Apitz, Thore; Bunzeck, Nico

    2014-01-01

    The abilities to predict future rewards and assess the value of reward delivery are crucial aspects of adaptive behavior. While the mesolimbic system, including dopaminergic midbrain, ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex have long been associated with reward processing, recent studies also indicate a prominent role of early visual brain regions. However, the precise underlying neural mechanisms still remain unclear. To address this issue, we presented participants with visual cues predicting rewards of high and low magnitudes and probability (2×2 factorial design), while neural activity was scanned using magnetoencephalography. Importantly, one group of participants received 150 mg of the dopamine precursor levodopa prior to the experiment, while another group received a placebo. For the placebo group, neural signals of reward probability (but not magnitude) emerged at ∼100 ms after cue presentation at occipital sensors in the event-related magnetic fields. Importantly, these probability signals were absent in the levodopa group indicating a close link. Moreover, levodopa administration reduced oscillatory power in the high (20–30 Hz) and low (13–20 Hz) beta band during both reward anticipation and delivery. Taken together, our findings indicate that visual brain regions are involved in coding prospective reward probability but not magnitude and that these effects are modulated by dopamine. PMID:25285436

  19. Hypothesizing dopaminergic genetic antecedents in schizophrenia and substance seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Palomo, Tomas; Gold, Mark S

    2014-05-01

    The dopamine system has been implicated in both substance use disorder (SUD) and schizophrenia. A recent meta-analysis suggests that A1 allele of the DRD2 gene imposes genetic risk for SUD, especially alcoholism and has been implicated in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS). We hypothesize that dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene Taq1 A2 allele is associated with a subtype of non-SUD schizophrenics and as such may act as a putative protective agent against the development of addiction to alcohol or other drugs of abuse. Schizophrenics with SUD may be carriers of the DRD2 Taq1 A1 allele, and/or other RDS reward polymorphisms and have hypodopaminergic reward function. One plausible mechanism for alcohol seeking in schizophrenics with SUD, based on previous research, may be a deficiency of gamma type endorphins that has been linked to schizophrenic type psychosis. We also propose that alcohol seeking behavior in schizophrenics, may serve as a physiological self-healing process linked to the increased function of the gamma endorphins, thereby reducing abnormal dopaminergic activity at the nucleus accumbens (NAc). These hypotheses warrant further investigation and cautious interpretation. We, therefore, encourage research involving neuroimaging, genome wide association studies (GWAS), and epigenetic investigation into the relationship between neurogenetics and systems biology to unravel the role of dopamine in psychiatric illness and SUD. PMID:24636783

  20. Hypothesizing Dopaminergic Genetic Antecedents in Schizophrenia and Substance Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Badgaiyan, Rajendra; Palomo, Tomas; Gold, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine system has been implicated in both substance use disorder (SUD) and schizophrenia. A recent meta- analysis suggests that A1 allele of the DRD2 gene imposes genetic risk for SUD, especially alcoholism and has been implicated in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS). We hypothesize that dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene Taq1 A2 allele is associated with a subtype of non- SUD schizophrenics and as such may act as a putative protective agent against the development of addiction to alcohol or other drugs of abuse. Schizophrenics with SUD may be carriers of the DRD2 Taq1 A1 allele, and/or other RDS reward polymorphisms and have hypodopaminergic reward function. One plausible mechanism for alcohol seeking in schizophrenics with SUD, based on previous research, may be a deficiency of gamma type endorphins that has been linked to schizophrenic type psychosis.. We also propose that alcohol seeking behavior in schizophrenics, may serve as a physiological self-healing process linked to the increased function of the gamma endorphins, thereby reducing abnormal dopaminergic activity at the nucleus accumbens (NAc). These hypotheses warrant further investigation and cautious interpretation. We, therefore, encourage research involving neuroimaging, genome wide association studies (GWAS), and epigenetic investigation into the relationship between neurogenetics and systems biology to unravel the role of dopamine in psychiatric illness and SUD. PMID:24636783

  1. Cellular manganese content is developmentally regulated in human dopaminergic neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kevin K.; Lowe, Edward W., Jr.; Aboud, Asad A.; Neely, M. Diana; Redha, Rey; Bauer, Joshua A.; Odak, Mihir; Weaver, C. David; Meiler, Jens; Aschner, Michael; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is both an essential biological cofactor and neurotoxicant. Disruption of Mn biology in the basal ganglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as parkinsonism and Huntington's disease. Handling of other essential metals (e.g. iron and zinc) occurs via complex intracellular signaling networks that link metal detection and transport systems. However, beyond several non-selective transporters, little is known about the intracellular processes regulating neuronal Mn homeostasis. We hypothesized that small molecules that modulate intracellular Mn could provide insight into cell-level Mn regulatory mechanisms. We performed a high throughput screen of 40,167 small molecules for modifiers of cellular Mn content in a mouse striatal neuron cell line. Following stringent validation assays and chemical informatics, we obtained a chemical `toolbox' of 41 small molecules with diverse structure-activity relationships that can alter intracellular Mn levels under biologically relevant Mn exposures. We utilized this toolbox to test for differential regulation of Mn handling in human floor-plate lineage dopaminergic neurons, a lineage especially vulnerable to environmental Mn exposure. We report differential Mn accumulation between developmental stages and stage-specific differences in the Mn-altering activity of individual small molecules. This work demonstrates cell-level regulation of Mn content across neuronal differentiation.

  2. A microfluidic method for dopamine uptake measurements in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Shamsi, Mohtashim H; Krastev, Dimitar L; Dryden, Michael D M; Leung, Yen; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2016-02-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a classical neurotransmitter and dysfunction in its synaptic handling underlies many neurological disorders, including addiction, depression, and neurodegeneration. A key to understanding DA dysfunction is the accurate measurement of dopamine uptake by dopaminergic neurons. Current methods that allow for the analysis of dopamine uptake rely on standard multiwell-plate based ELISA, or on carbon-fibre microelectrodes used in in vivo recording techniques. The former suffers from challenges associated with automation and analyte degradation, while the latter has low throughput and is not ideal for laboratory screening. In response to these challenges, we introduce a digital microfluidic platform to evaluate dopamine homeostasis in in vitro neuron culture. The method features voltammetric dopamine sensors with limit of detection of 30 nM integrated with cell culture sites for multi-day neuron culture and differentiation. We demonstrate the utility of the new technique for DA uptake assays featuring in-line culture and analysis, with a determination of uptake of approximately ∼32 fmol in 10 min per virtual microwell (each containing ∼200 differentiated SH-SY5Y cells). We propose that future generations of this technique will be useful for drug discovery for neurodegenerative disease as well as for a wide range of applications that would benefit from integrated cell culture and electroanalysis. PMID:26725686

  3. Dopaminergic and Cholinergic Modulation of Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Xenias, Harry S.; Tepper, James M.; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The recent electrophysiological characterization of TH-expressing GABAergic interneurons (THINs) in the neostriatum revealed an unexpected degree of diversity of interneurons in this brain area (Ibáñez-Sandoval et al., 2010, Unal et al., 2011, 2013). Despite being relatively few in number, THINs may play a significant role in transmitting and distributing extra- and intrastriatal neuromodulatory signals in the striatal circuitry. Here we investigated the dopaminergic and cholinergic regulation of THINs in vitro. We found that the dominant effect of dopamine was a dramatic enhancement of the ability of THINs to generate long-lasting depolarizing plateau potentials (PPs). Interestingly, the same effect could also be elicited by amphetamine-induced release of endogenous dopamine suggesting that THINs may exhibit similar responses to changes in extracellular dopamine concentration in vivo. The enhancement of PPs in THINs is perhaps the most pronounced effect of dopamine on the intrinsic excitability of neostriatal neurons described to date. Further, we demonstrate that all subtypes of THINSs tested also express nicotinic cholinergic receptors. All THIS responded, albeit differentially, with depolarization, PPs and spiking to brief application of nicotinic agonists. Powerful modulation of the nonlinear integrative properties of THINs by dopamine and the direct depolarization of these neurons by acetylcholine may play important roles in mediating the effects of these neuromodulators in the neostriatum with potentially important implications for understanding the mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia. PMID:25908399

  4. The Dopaminergic Midbrain Encodes the Expected Certainty about Desired Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H. B.; Mathys, Christoph; Dolan, Ray; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine plays a key role in learning; however, its exact function in decision making and choice remains unclear. Recently, we proposed a generic model based on active (Bayesian) inference wherein dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about optimal policies. Put simply, dopamine discharges reflect the confidence that a chosen policy will lead to desired outcomes. We designed a novel task to test this hypothesis, where subjects played a “limited offer” game in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Subjects had to decide how long to wait for a high offer before accepting a low offer, with the risk of losing everything if they waited too long. Bayesian model comparison showed that behavior strongly supported active inference, based on surprise minimization, over classical utility maximization schemes. Furthermore, midbrain activity, encompassing dopamine projection neurons, was accurately predicted by trial-by-trial variations in model-based estimates of precision. Our findings demonstrate that human subjects infer both optimal policies and the precision of those inferences, and thus support the notion that humans perform hierarchical probabilistic Bayesian inference. In other words, subjects have to infer both what they should do as well as how confident they are in their choices, where confidence may be encoded by dopaminergic firing. PMID:25056572

  5. Dopaminergic and cholinergic modulation of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Xenias, Harry S; Tepper, James M; Koós, Tibor

    2015-08-01

    The recent electrophysiological characterization of TH-expressing GABAergic interneurons (THINs) in the neostriatum revealed an unexpected degree of diversity of interneurons in this brain area (Ibáñez-Sandoval et al., 2010, Unal et al., 2011, 2015). Despite being relatively few in number, THINs may play a significant role in transmitting and distributing extra- and intrastriatal neuromodulatory signals in the striatal circuitry. Here we investigated the dopaminergic and cholinergic regulation of THINs in vitro. We found that the dominant effect of dopamine was a dramatic enhancement of the ability of THINs to generate long-lasting depolarizing plateau potentials (PPs). Interestingly, the same effect could also be elicited by amphetamine-induced release of endogenous dopamine suggesting that THINs may exhibit similar responses to changes in extracellular dopamine concentration in vivo. The enhancement of PPs in THINs is perhaps the most pronounced effect of dopamine on the intrinsic excitability of neostriatal neurons described to date. Further, we demonstrate that all subtypes of THINSs tested also express nicotinic cholinergic receptors. All THIS responded, albeit differentially, with depolarization, PPs and spiking to brief application of nicotinic agonists. Powerful modulation of the nonlinear integrative properties of THINs by dopamine and the direct depolarization of these neurons by acetylcholine may play important roles in mediating the effects of these neuromodulators in the neostriatum with potentially important implications for understanding the mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia. PMID:25908399

  6. Applications of SPECT imaging of dopaminergic neurotransmission in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kugaya, A; Fujita, M; Innis, R B

    2000-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers selective for pre- and post-synaptic targets have allowed measurements of several aspects of dopaminergic (DA) neurotransmission. In this article, we will first review our DA transporter imaging in Parkinson's disease. We have developed the in vivo dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with [123I]beta-CIT ((1R)-2beta-Carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropane). This method showed that patients with Parkinson's disease have markedly reduced DAT levels in striatum, which correlated with disease severity and disease progression. Second, we applied DA imaging techniques in patients with schizophrenia. Using amphetamine as a releaser of DA, we observed the enhanced DA release, which was measured by imaging D2 receptors with [123I]IBZM (iodobenzamide), in schizophrenics. Further we developed the measurement of basal synaptic DA levels by AMPT (alpha-methyl-paratyrosine)-induced unmasking of D2 receptors. Finally, we expanded our techniques to the measurement of extrastriatal DA receptors using [123I]epidepride. The findings suggest that SPECT is a useful technique to measure DA transmission in human brain and may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:10770574

  7. Early effects of reward anticipation are modulated by dopaminergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Apitz, Thore; Bunzeck, Nico

    2014-01-01

    The abilities to predict future rewards and assess the value of reward delivery are crucial aspects of adaptive behavior. While the mesolimbic system, including dopaminergic midbrain, ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex have long been associated with reward processing, recent studies also indicate a prominent role of early visual brain regions. However, the precise underlying neural mechanisms still remain unclear. To address this issue, we presented participants with visual cues predicting rewards of high and low magnitudes and probability (2 × 2 factorial design), while neural activity was scanned using magnetoencephalography. Importantly, one group of participants received 150 mg of the dopamine precursor levodopa prior to the experiment, while another group received a placebo. For the placebo group, neural signals of reward probability (but not magnitude) emerged at ∼ 100 ms after cue presentation at occipital sensors in the event-related magnetic fields. Importantly, these probability signals were absent in the levodopa group indicating a close link. Moreover, levodopa administration reduced oscillatory power in the high (20-30 Hz) and low (13-20 Hz) beta band during both reward anticipation and delivery. Taken together, our findings indicate that visual brain regions are involved in coding prospective reward probability but not magnitude and that these effects are modulated by dopamine. PMID:25285436

  8. Antioxidants protect PINK1-dependent dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danling; Qian, Li; Xiong, Hui; Liu, Jiandong; Neckameyer, Wendi S.; Oldham, Sean; Xia, Kun; Wang, Jianzhi; Bodmer, Rolf; Zhang, Zhuohua

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most frequent neurodegenerative movement disorder. Mutations in the PINK1 gene are linked to the autosomal recessive early onset familial form of PD. The physiological function of PINK1 and pathological abnormality of PD-associated PINK1 mutants are largely unknown. We here show that inactivation of Drosophila PINK1 (dPINK1) using RNAi results in progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and in ommatidial degeneration of the compound eye, which is rescued by expression of human PINK1 (hPINK1). Expression of human SOD1 suppresses neurodegeneration induced by dPINK1 inactivation. Moreover, treatment of dPINK1 RNAi flies with the antioxidants SOD and vitamin E significantly inhibits ommatidial degeneration. Thus, dPINK1 plays an essential role in maintaining neuronal survival by preventing neurons from undergoing oxidative stress, thereby suggesting a potential mechanism by which a reduction in PINK1 function leads to PD-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:16938835

  9. Transcriptional comparison of human induced and primary midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ninuo; Zhang, Pengbo; Fang, Fang; Wang, Zhengyuan; Rothstein, Megan; Angulo, Benjamin; Chiang, Rosaria; Taylor, James; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of induced dopaminergic (iDA) neurons may provide a significant step forward towards cell replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD). To study and compare transcriptional programs of induced cells versus primary DA neurons is a preliminary step towards characterizing human iDA neurons. We have optimized a protocol to efficiently generate iDA neurons from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We then sequenced the transcriptomes of iDA neurons derived from 6 different hPSC lines and compared them to that of primary midbrain (mDA) neurons. We identified a small subset of genes with altered expression in derived iDA neurons from patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). We also observed that iDA neurons differ significantly from primary mDA neurons in global gene expression, especially in genes related to neuron maturation level. Results suggest iDA neurons from patient iPSCs could be useful for basic and translational studies, including in vitro modeling of PD. However, further refinement of methods of induction and maturation of neurons may better recapitulate full development of mDA neurons from hPSCs. PMID:26842779

  10. Dopaminergic and cholinergic learning mechanisms in nicotine addiction.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan, Manivannan; Dani, John A

    2015-09-01

    Nicotine addiction drives tobacco use by one billion people worldwide, causing nearly six million deaths a year. Nicotine binds to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are normally activated by the endogenous neurotransmitter acetylcholine. The widespread expression of nicotinic receptors throughout the nervous system accounts for the diverse physiological effects triggered by nicotine. A crucial influence of nicotine is on the synaptic mechanisms underlying learning that contribute to the addiction process. Here, we focus on the acquisition phase of smoking addiction and review animal model studies on how nicotine modifies dopaminergic and cholinergic signaling in key nodes of the reinforcement circuitry: ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens (NAc), amygdala, and hippocampus. Capitalizing on mechanisms that subserve natural rewards, nicotine activates midbrain dopamine neurons directly and indirectly, and nicotine causes dopamine release in very broad target areas throughout the brain, including the NAc, amygdala, and hippocampus. In addition, nicotine orchestrates local changes within those target structures, alters the release of virtually all major neurotransmitters, and primes the nervous system to the influence of other addictive drugs. Hence, understanding how nicotine affects the circuitry for synaptic plasticity and learning may aid in developing reasoned therapies to treat nicotine addiction. PMID:26301866

  11. Mitochondrial complex I inhibition is not required for dopaminergic neuron death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Kruse, Shane E.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Xia, Zhengui

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I is one of the leading hypotheses for dopaminergic neuron death associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). To test this hypothesis genetically, we used a mouse strain lacking functional Ndufs4, a gene encoding a subunit required for complete assembly and function of complex I. Deletion of the Ndufs4 gene abolished complex I activity in midbrain mesencephalic neurons cultured from embryonic day (E) 14 mice, but did not affect the survival of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive than other neurons in these cultures to cell death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat treatments, the absence of complex I activity did not protect the dopaminergic neurons, as would be expected if these compounds act by inhibiting complex 1. In fact, the dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive to rotenone. These data suggest that dopaminergic neuron death induced by treatment with rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat is independent of complex I inhibition. PMID:18812510

  12. Demyelinative chiamal lesions.

    PubMed

    Spector, R H; Glaser, J S; Schatz, N J

    1980-12-01

    To clarify the clinical syndrome of demyelinative chiasmal involvement, six case histories were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. This entitity is characterized by especial predilection for women in the third to fifth decades; visual deficites of a chiasmal pattern that may be modest to marked, with a generallly good prognosis for functional recovery; and other signs and symptoms, not necessarily severe, of scattered lesions of the neuraxis. Neuroradiological studies, especially laminography of the sellar area and computerized tomography, must be employed to rule out a suprasellar mass lesion. The efficacy of systemic corticosteroid therapy is moot, but it seems reasonable to use such agents during acute stages, especially where vision is severely reduced on both sides. PMID:7447764

  13. Novel Method To Differentiate Human Embryonic Stem Cells Into Dopaminergic Nerve Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse's Development and Plasticity Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel methods to differentiate human embryonic stem cells into dopaminergic nerve cells. The invention described here is a novel method of differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into dopaminergic nerve cells, which is preferable to the currently available dopaminergic differentiation techniques.

  14. DeltaA/DeltaD regulate multiple and temporally distinct phases of notch signaling during dopaminergic neurogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Julia; Filippi, Alida; Driever, Wolfgang

    2010-12-01

    Dopaminergic neurons develop at distinct anatomical sites to form some of the major neuromodulatory systems in the vertebrate brain. Despite their relevance in neurodegenerative diseases and the interests in reconstitutive therapies from stem cells, mechanisms of the neurogenic switch from precursor populations to dopaminergic neurons are not well understood. Here, we investigated neurogenesis of different dopaminergic and noradrenergic neuron populations in the zebrafish embryo. Birth-dating analysis by EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) incorporation revealed temporal dynamics of catecholaminergic neurogenesis. Analysis of Notch signaling mutants and stage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Notch processing revealed that dopaminergic neurons form by temporally distinct mechanisms: dopaminergic neurons of the posterior tuberculum derive directly from neural plate cells during primary neurogenesis, whereas other dopaminergic groups form in continuous or wavelike neurogenesis phases from proliferating precursor pools. Systematic analysis of Notch ligands revealed that the two zebrafish co-orthologs of mammalian Delta1, DeltaA and DeltaD, control the neurogenic switch of all early developing dopaminergic neurons in a partially redundant manner. DeltaA/D may also be involved in maintenance of dopaminergic precursor pools, as olig2 expression in ventral diencephalic dopaminergic precursors is affected in dla/dld mutants. DeltaA/D act upstream of sim1a and otpa during dopaminergic specification. However, despite the fact that both dopaminergic and corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons derive from sim1a- and otpa-expressing precursors, DeltaA/D does not act as a lineage switch between these two neuronal types. Rather, DeltaA/D limits the size of the sim1a- and otpa-expressing precursor pool from which dopaminergic neurons differentiate. PMID:21148001

  15. Novel lesion detection aids.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, K W; Longbottom, C; Ellwood, R; Lussi, A

    2009-01-01

    Several non-invasive and novel aids for the detection of (and in some cases monitoring of) caries lesions have been introduced in the field of 'caries diagnostics' over the last 15 years. This chapter focusses on those available to dentists at the time of writing; continuing research is bound to lead to further developments in the coming years. Laser fluorescence is based on measurements of back-scattered fluorescence of a 655-nm light source. It enhances occlusal and (potentially) approximal lesion detection and enables semi-quantitative caries monitoring. Systematic reviews have identified false-positive results as a limitation. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence is another sensitive method to quantitatively detect and measure mineral loss both in enamel and some dentine lesions; again, the trade-offs with lower specificity when compared with clinical visual detection must be considered. Subtraction radiography is based on the principle of digitally superimposing two radiographs with exactly the same projection geometry. This method is applicable for approximal surfaces and occlusal caries involving dentine but is not yet widely available. Electrical caries measurements gather either site-specific or surface-specific information of teeth and tooth structure. Fixed-frequency devices perform best for occlusal dentine caries but the method has also shown promise for lesions in enamel and other tooth surfaces with multi-frequency approaches. All methods require further research and further validation in well-designed clinical trials. In the future, they could have useful applications in clinical practice as part of a personalized, comprehensive caries management system. PMID:19494675

  16. Targeted gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons in the rat brain by helper virus-free HSV-1 vector particles that contain either a chimeric HSV-1 glycoprotein C-GDNF or a gC-BDNF protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaodan; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Sun, Mei; Geller, Alfred I.

    2006-01-01

    Direct gene transfer into neurons has potential for both studying neuronal physiology and for developing gene therapy treatments for specific neurological conditions. Due to the heterogeneous cellular composition of the brain, cell-type-specific recombinant gene expression is required for many potential applications of neuronal gene transfer. The two prevalent approaches for achieving cell-type-specific expression are to use a cell-type-specific promoter to control recombinant gene expression or to modify a virus vector particle to target gene transfer to a specific cell type. Targeted gene transfer to multiple peripheral cell types has been described, but targeted gene transfer to a specific type of neuron in the brain has yet to be reported. Targeted gene transfer approaches with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors have focused on modifying glycoprotein C (gC) to remove the heparin binding domain and add a binding activity for a specific protein on the cell surface. This study was designed to develop HSV-1 vectors that target gene transfer to cells that contain receptors for either glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), such as nigrostriatal neurons. We isolated chimeric gC-GDNF or chimeric gC-BDNF constructs, and the resulting proteins were incorporated into HSV-1 virus particles. We performed helper virus-free HSV-1 vector packaging in the presence of each chimeric protein. The resulting vector stocks supported 2.2- to 5.0-fold targeted gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons in the rat brain, compared to vector particles that contained wild-type (wt) gC. Gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons by vector particles that contained chimeric gC-BDNF was reduced by preincubation with an anti-BDNF antibody. Targeted gene transfer to neurons that contain specific neurotrophic factor receptors may benefit specific physiological and gene therapy studies. PMID:15993510

  17. Left and right 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex differentially affect voluntary ethanol consumption.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, D M; Crosley, K J; Keller, R W; Glick, S D; Carlson, J N

    1999-03-27

    Dopaminergic projections to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to examine how dopamine (DA) asymmetry in the mPFC influences voluntary ethanol consumption. Differences in nucleus accumbens (NAS) DA neurotransmission have been related to individual differences in locomotor activity and in the rewarding efficacy of ethanol. Therefore, differences in locomotor activity were used to further characterize the effects of unilateral mPFC 6-OHDA lesions on ethanol consumption. Male Long Evans rats were assessed for high versus low levels of spontaneous locomotor activity. DA terminals in the left or right mPFC were unilaterally lesioned with 6-OHDA, resulting in an average DA depletion of 54% and 50%, respectively. After a minimum seven-day recovery period, preference for a 10% ethanol solution vs. water was determined in a 24-h 2-bottle home-cage free-choice paradigm. Left mPFC 6-OHDA lesions increased and right lesions decreased ethanol consumption. These differential effects of left and right lesions were primarily attributable to rats exhibiting low locomotor activity prior to surgery. The present data suggest that right greater than left cortical DA asymmetry in combination with low endogenous NAS DA (predicted by low locomotor activity levels) may increase the vulnerability to abuse ethanol. PMID:10095012

  18. A Stem Cell-Derived Platform for Studying Single Synaptic Vesicles in Dopaminergic Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haigang; Lazarenko, Roman M.; Koktysh, Dmitry; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    The exocytotic release of dopamine is one of the most characteristic but also one of the least appreciated processes in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Fluorescence imaging has yielded rich information about the properties of synaptic vesicles and the release of neurotransmitters in excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In contrast, imaging-based studies for in-depth understanding of synaptic vesicle behavior in dopamine neurons are lagging largely because of a lack of suitable preparations. Midbrain culture has been one of the most valuable preparations for the subcellular investigation of dopaminergic transmission; however, the paucity and fragility of cultured dopaminergic neurons limits their use for live cell imaging. Recent developments in stem cell technology have led to the successful production of dopamine neurons from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells. Although the dopaminergic identity of these stem cell-derived neurons has been characterized in different ways, vesicle-mediated dopamine release from their axonal terminals has been barely assessed. We report a more efficient procedure to reliably generate dopamine neurons from embryonic stem cells, and it yields more dopamine neurons with more dopaminergic axon projections than midbrain culture does. Using a collection of functional measurements, we show that stem cell-derived dopamine neurons are indistinguishable from those in midbrain culture. Taking advantage of this new preparation, we simultaneously tracked the turnover of hundreds of synaptic vesicles individually using pH-sensitive quantum dots. By doing so, we revealed distinct fusion kinetics of the dopamine-secreting vesicles, which is consistent within both preparations. Significance For the use of stem cell-derived neurons in clinical applications, improved differentiation efficiency and more careful characterization of resultant cells are needed. A procedure has been refined for differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into

  19. Odour enrichment increases adult-born dopaminergic neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Fasolo, Aldo; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is the first brain region involved in the processing of olfactory information. In adult mice, the OB is highly plastic, undergoing cellular/molecular dynamic changes that are modulated by sensory experience. Odour deprivation induces down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in OB dopaminergic interneurons located in the glomerular layer (GL), resulting in decreased dopamine in the OB. Although the effect of sensory deprivation is well established, little is known about the influence of odour enrichment on dopaminergic cells. Here we report that prolonged odour enrichment on C57BL/6J strain mice selectively increases TH-immunopositive cells in the GL by nearly 20%. Following odour enrichment on TH-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, in which GFP identified both mature TH-positive cells and putative immature dopaminergic cells expressing TH mRNA but not TH protein, we found a similar 20% increase in GFP-expressing cells, with no changes in the ratio between TH-positive and TH-negative cells. These data suggest that enriched conditions induce an expansion in the whole dopaminergic lineage. Accordingly, by using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine injections to label adult-generated cells in the GL of TH-GFP mice, we found an increase in the percentage of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive dopaminergic cells in enriched compared with control conditions, whereas no differences were found for calretinin- and calbindin-positive subtypes. Strikingly, the fraction of newborn cells among the dopaminergic population doubled in enriched conditions. On the whole, our results demonstrate that odour enrichment drives increased integration of adult-generated dopaminergic cells that could be critical to adapt the OB circuits to the environmental incoming information. PMID:25216299

  20. Improving diagnosis of atraumatic splenic lesions, part I: nonneoplastic lesions.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Oh, Sarah K; Chernyak, Victoria; Flusberg, Milana; Rozenblit, Alla M; Kaul, Bindu; Stein, Marjorie W; Mazzariol, Fernanda S

    2016-01-01

    Focal atraumatic splenic lesions often pose a diagnostic challenge on cross-sectional imaging. They can be categorized based on etiology as nonneoplastic (reviewed in Part I), benign neoplastic, and malignant neoplastic lesions. Lesions can also be characterized based on prevalence as common, uncommon, and rare. Familiarity with pertinent clinical parameters, etiology, pathology, prevalence, and ancillary features such as splenomegaly, concomitant hepatic involvement, and extrasplenic findings, in addition to knowledge of imaging spectra of these lesions, can improve diagnostic confidence. Since the nonneoplastic lesions are usually easily recognized, it is critical that the radiologist identifies them avoiding unnecessary work up. PMID:27317223

  1. Tractographic Analysis of Historical Lesion Surgery for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Schoene-Bake, Jan-Christoph; Parpaley, Yaroslav; Weber, Bernd; Panksepp, Jaak; Hurwitz, Trevor A; Coenen, Volker A

    2010-01-01

    Various surgical brain ablation procedures for the treatment of refractory depression were developed in the twentieth century. Most notably, key target sites were (i) the anterior cingulum, (ii) the anterior limb of the internal capsule, and (iii) the subcaudate white matter, which were regarded as effective targets. Long-term symptom remissions were better following lesions of the anterior internal capsule and subcaudate white matter than of the cingulum. It is possible that the observed clinical improvements of these various surgical procedures may reflect shared influences on presently unspecified brain affect-regulating networks. Such possibilities can now be analyzed using modern brain connectivity procedures such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography. We determined whether the shared connectivities of the above lesion sites in healthy volunteers might explain the therapeutic effects of the various surgical approaches. Accordingly, modestly sized historical lesions, especially of the anatomical overlap areas, were ‘implanted' in brain-MRI scans of 53 healthy subjects. These were entered as seed regions for probabilistic DTI connectivity reconstructions. We analyzed for the shared connectivities of bilateral anterior capsulotomy, anterior cingulotomy, subcaudate tractotomy, and stereotactic limbic leucotomy (a combination of the last two lesion sites). Shared connectivities between the four surgical approaches mapped onto the most mediobasal aspects of bilateral frontal lobe fibers, including the forceps minor and the anterior thalamic radiations that contacted subgenual cingulate regions. Anatomically, convergence of these shared connectivities may derive from the superolateral branch of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), a structure that connects these frontal areas to the origin of the mesolimbic dopaminergic ‘reward' system in the midbrain ventral tegmental area. Thus, all four surgical anti-depressant approaches may be promoting positive

  2. Effects of (-)-sesamin on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells and dopaminergic neuronal cells of Parkinson's disease rat models.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jin; Zhao, Ting Ting; Lee, Kyung Sook; Lee, Seung Ho; Shin, Keon Sung; Park, Keun Hong; Choi, Hyun Sook; Lee, Myung Koo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of (-)-sesamin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity using PC12 cells and dopaminergic neuronal cells of 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In PC12 cells, treatment with (-)-sesamin (25 µM) reduced 6-OHDA (100 µM)-induced cell death and induced transient extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and Bad phosphorylation at Ser112 (BadSer112). In contrast, sustained ERK1/2 phosphorylation, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) phosphorylation, and cleaved-caspase-3 activity, all of which were induced by 6-OHDA (100 µM), were inhibited by treatment with (-)-sesamin (25 µM). Furthermore, co-treatment with (-)-sesamin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) once a day for 28 days significantly increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunopositive neuronal cells and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid in the substantia nigra-striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD with or without L-DOPA treatment. These results suggest that (-)-sesamin protects 6-OHDA-induced cytotoxicity via the activation of transient ERK1/2-BadSer112 system and the inhibition of sustained ERK-p38MAPK-JNK1/2-caspase-3 system in PC12 cells. (-)-Sesamin also shows protective effects on long-term L-DOPA therapy in dopaminergic neuronal cells of PD rat models. (-)-Sesamin may serve as adjuvant therapeutics in PD. PMID:25747493

  3. Neurotoxic effects of berberine on long-term L-DOPA administration in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Keon Sung; Choi, Hyun Sook; Zhao, Ting Ting; Suh, Kwang Hoon; Kwon, Ik Hyun; Choi, Soon Ok; Lee, Myung Koo

    2013-06-01

    The effects of berberine on long-term administration of L-DOPA in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) were investigated. Rat models of PD were prepared by 6-OHDA lesions in the ipsilateral sides, and then were treated with berberine (5 and 15 mg/kg) and/or L-DOPA (10 mg/kg) once daily for 21 days. Treatments with either concentration of berberine (5 and 15 mg/kg) in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups decreased the numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunopositive neurons in the substantia nigra and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the striatum as compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned groups. In addition, dopaminergic neuronal cell death of the ipsilateral sides in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups was attenuated by L-DOPA administration. However, both concentrations of berberine in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups treated with L-DOPA aggravated the numbers of TH-immunopositive neurons in the substantia nigra and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, DOPAC and HVA in the striatum as compared to rats not treated with berberine. These results suggest that berberine leads to the degeneration of dopaminergic neuronal cells in the substantia nigra in the rat model of PD with chronic L-DOPA administration. Long-term L-DOPA therapy that may involve possibly neurotoxic isoquinoline agents including berberine should involve monitoring for adverse symptoms. PMID:23539311

  4. Dopaminergic modulation of the caudal photoreceptor in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sosa, Leonardo; Calderón-Rosete, Gabina; Calvillo, Minerva E; Guevara, Jorge; Flores, Gonzalo

    2011-06-01

    In our study we investigated the influence of dopamine (DA) on the caudal photoreceptor (CPR) in crayfish. Here we report the following: (a) the chromatographic determination of DA in the sixth abdominal ganglion (6th AG) shows a variation in the content during a 24-h cycle with the maximum value at dawn. (b) There are possibly dopaminergic neurons in the 6th AG with antityrosine hydroxylase antibodies. Immunopositive neurons (164) were located in the anterior and posterior regions of the 6th AG with the mean (± SE) diameter of their somata 23 ± 1 μm. In addition, there is immunopositive staining in axons, neuropilar fibers, and varicosities. (c) We also identified, using immunohistochemistry, 108 neurons in the sixth AG that contain dopamine D1-like receptors, with the mean (±SE) diameter of their somata 18 ± 1 μm. (d) We examined the exogenous action of DA on the electrical activity of the CPR in the isolated sixth AG by conventional extracellular-recording methods. This CPR displays spontaneous activity and phasic-tonic responses to light pulses. Topical application of dopamine to ganglia kept in the dark increased the spontaneous firing rate of the CPR, whereas the photoresponse of the CPR remained unchanged. The effect on the spontaneous activity is dose-dependent with an ED₅₀ of 33 μM, and is blocked by the dopamine D1-like antagonist SCH23390. These observations suggested that the DA is playing the role of a neurotransmitter or a neuromodulator of the CPR in the 6th AG in both species of crayfish, Procambarus clarkii and Cherax quadricarinatus. PMID:20936686

  5. Dopaminergic modulation of phase reversal in desert locusts.

    PubMed

    Alessi, Ahmad M; O'Connor, Vincent; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Newland, Philip L

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity allows animals to modify their behavior, physiology, and morphology to adapt to environmental change. The global pest, the desert locust, shows two extreme phenotypes; a solitarious phase that is relatively harmless and a gregarious phase that forms swarms and causes extensive agricultural and economic damage. In the field, environmental conditions can drive isolated animals into crowded populations and previous studies have identified the biogenic amine serotonin as a key determinant of this transition. Here we take an integrated approach to investigate the neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral correlates defined by a laboratory based paradigm that mimics facets of swarm break down as gregarious locusts become isolated. Following isolation there was an increased propensity of locusts to avoid conspecifics, and show a reduced locomotion. Changes in choice behavior occurred within 1 h of isolation although isolation-related changes progressed with increased isolation time. Isolation was accompanied by changes in the levels of the biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin within the CNS within 1 h. Dopamine levels were higher in isolated animals and we focused on the role played by this transmitter in synaptic changes that may underpin solitarization. Dopamine reduced synaptic efficacy at a key central synapse between campaniform sensilla (CS) and a fast extensor tibiae motor neuron that is involved in limb movement. We also show that dopamine injection into the haemocoel was sufficient to induce solitarious-like behavior in otherwise gregarious locusts. Further, injection of a dopamine antagonist, fluphenazine, into isolated locusts induced gregarious-like behavior. This highlights that dopaminergic modulation plays an important role in the plasticity underpinning phase transition and sets a context to deepen the understanding of the complementary role that distinct neuromodulators play in polyphenism in locusts. PMID:25426037

  6. The Dopaminergic System in the Aging Brain of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    White, Katherine E.; Humphrey, Dickon M.; Hirth, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila models of Parkinson's disease are characterized by two principal phenotypes: the specific loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the aging brain and defects in motor behavior. However, an age-related analysis of these baseline parameters in wildtype Drosophila is lacking. Here we analyzed the DA system and motor behavior in aging Drosophila. DA neurons in the adult brain can be grouped into bilateral symmetric clusters, each comprising a stereotypical number of cells. Analysis of TH > mCD8::GFP and cell type-specific MARCM clones revealed that DA neurons show cluster-specific, stereotypical projection patterns with terminal arborization in target regions that represent distinct functional areas of the adult brain. Target areas include the mushroom bodies, involved in memory formation and motivation, and the central complex, involved in the control of motor behavior, indicating that similar to the mammalian brain, DA neurons in the fly brain are involved in the regulation of specific behaviors. Behavioral analysis revealed that Drosophila show an age-related decline in startle-induced locomotion and negative geotaxis. Motion tracking however, revealed that walking activity, and exploration behavior, but not centrophobism increase at late stages of life. Analysis of TH > Dcr2, mCD8::GFP revealed a specific effect of Dcr2 expression on walking activity but not on exploratory or centrophobic behavior, indicating that the siRNA pathway may modulate distinct DA behaviors in Drosophila. Moreover, DA neurons were maintained between early- and late life, as quantified by TH > mCD8::GFP and anti-TH labeling, indicating that adult onset, age-related degeneration of DA neurons does not occur in the aging brain of Drosophila. Taken together, our data establish baseline parameters in Drosophila for the study of Parkinson's disease as well as other disorders affecting DA neurons and movement control. PMID:21165178

  7. Dopaminergic modulation of phase reversal in desert locusts

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Ahmad M.; O'Connor, Vincent; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Newland, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity allows animals to modify their behavior, physiology, and morphology to adapt to environmental change. The global pest, the desert locust, shows two extreme phenotypes; a solitarious phase that is relatively harmless and a gregarious phase that forms swarms and causes extensive agricultural and economic damage. In the field, environmental conditions can drive isolated animals into crowded populations and previous studies have identified the biogenic amine serotonin as a key determinant of this transition. Here we take an integrated approach to investigate the neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral correlates defined by a laboratory based paradigm that mimics facets of swarm break down as gregarious locusts become isolated. Following isolation there was an increased propensity of locusts to avoid conspecifics, and show a reduced locomotion. Changes in choice behavior occurred within 1 h of isolation although isolation-related changes progressed with increased isolation time. Isolation was accompanied by changes in the levels of the biogenic amines dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin within the CNS within 1 h. Dopamine levels were higher in isolated animals and we focused on the role played by this transmitter in synaptic changes that may underpin solitarization. Dopamine reduced synaptic efficacy at a key central synapse between campaniform sensilla (CS) and a fast extensor tibiae motor neuron that is involved in limb movement. We also show that dopamine injection into the haemocoel was sufficient to induce solitarious-like behavior in otherwise gregarious locusts. Further, injection of a dopamine antagonist, fluphenazine, into isolated locusts induced gregarious-like behavior. This highlights that dopaminergic modulation plays an important role in the plasticity underpinning phase transition and sets a context to deepen the understanding of the complementary role that distinct neuromodulators play in polyphenism in locusts. PMID:25426037

  8. Alterations in Lipid and Inositol Metabolisms in Two Dopaminergic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Hannah S.; Do, Kieu Trinh; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Wahl, Simone; Adamski, Jerzy; Peters, Annette; Krumsiek, Jan; Suhre, Karsten; Haslinger, Bernhard; Ceballos-Baumann, Andres; Gieger, Christian; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum metabolite profiling can be used to identify pathways involved in the pathogenesis of and potential biomarkers for a given disease. Both restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson`s disease (PD) represent movement disorders for which currently no blood-based biomarkers are available and whose pathogenesis has not been uncovered conclusively. We performed unbiased serum metabolite profiling in search of signature metabolic changes for both diseases. Methods 456 metabolites were quantified in serum samples of 1272 general population controls belonging to the KORA cohort, 82 PD cases and 95 RLS cases by liquid-phase chromatography and gas chromatography separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Genetically determined metabotypes were calculated using genome-wide genotyping data for the 1272 general population controls. Results After stringent quality control, we identified decreased levels of long-chain (polyunsaturated) fatty acids of individuals with PD compared to both RLS (PD vs. RLS: p = 0.0001 to 5.80x10-9) and general population controls (PD vs. KORA: p = 6.09x10-5 to 3.45x10-32). In RLS, inositol metabolites were increased specifically (RLS vs. KORA: p = 1.35x10-6 to 3.96x10-7). The impact of dopaminergic drugs was reflected in changes in the phenylalanine/tyrosine/dopamine metabolism observed in both individuals with RLS and PD. Conclusions A first discovery approach using serum metabolite profiling in two dopamine-related movement disorders compared to a large general population sample identified significant alterations in the polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in PD and implicated the inositol metabolism in RLS. These results provide a starting point for further studies investigating new perspectives on factors involved in the pathogenesis of the two diseases as well as possible points of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26808974

  9. Olfactory input increases visual sensitivity in zebrafish: a possible function for the terminal nerve and dopaminergic interplexiform cells.

    PubMed

    Maaswinkel, Hans; Li, Lei

    2003-07-01

    Centrifugal innervation of the neural retina has been documented in many species. In zebrafish Danio rerio, the only so-far described centrifugal pathway originates from terminal nerve (TN) cell bodies that are located in the olfactory bulb. Most of the TN axons terminate in the forebrain and midbrain, but some project via the optic nerve to the neural retina, where they synapse onto dopaminergic interplexiform cells (DA-IPCs). While the anatomical pathway between the olfactory and visual organs has been described, it is unknown if and how olfactory signals influence visual system functions. We demonstrate here that olfactory input is involved in the modulation of visual sensitivity in zebrafish. As determined by a behavioral assay and by electroretinographic (ERG) recording, zebrafish visual sensitivity was increased upon presentation of amino acids as olfactory stimuli. This effect, however, was observed only in the early morning hours when zebrafish are least sensitive to light. The effect of olfactory input on vision was eliminated after lesion of the olfactory bulbs or after the destruction of DA-IPCs. Intraocular injections of a dopamine D(2) but not a D(1) receptor antagonist blocked the effect of olfactory input on visual sensitivity. Although we cannot exclude the involvement of other anatomical pathways, our data suggest that the TN and DA-IPCs are the prime candidates for olfactory modulation of visual sensitivity. PMID:12771169

  10. Dopaminergic dysfunction is associated with IL-1β-dependent mood alterations in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Antonietta; Fresegna, Diego; Federici, Mauro; Musella, Alessandra; Rizzo, Francesca Romana; Sepman, Helena; Bullitta, Silvia; De Vito, Francesca; Haji, Nabila; Rossi, Silvia; Mercuri, Nicola B; Usiello, Alessandro; Mandolesi, Georgia; Centonze, Diego

    2015-02-01

    Mood disturbances are frequent in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), even in non-disabled patients and in the remitting stages of the disease. It is still largely unknown how the pathophysiological process on MS causes anxiety and depression, but the dopaminergic system is likely involved. Aim of the present study was to investigate depressive-like behavior in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of MS, and its possible link to dopaminergic neurotransmission. Behavioral, amperometric and biochemical experiments were performed to determine the role of inflammation in mood control in EAE. First, we assessed the independence of mood alterations from motor disability during the acute phase of the disease, by showing a depressive-like behavior in EAE mice with mild clinical score and preserved motor skills (mild-EAE). Second, we linked such behavioral changes to the selective increased striatal expression of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in a context of mild inflammation and to dopaminergic system alterations. Indeed, in the striatum of EAE mice, we observed an impairment of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, since DA release was reduced and signaling through DA D1- and D2-like receptors was unbalanced. In conclusion, the present study provides first evidence of the link between the depressive-like behavior and the alteration of dopaminergic system in EAE mice, raising the possibility that IL-1β driven dysfunction of dopaminergic signaling might play a role in mood disturbances also in MS patients. PMID:25511803

  11. Kinematic analysis of dopaminergic effects on skilled handwriting movements in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tucha, O; Mecklinger, L; Thome, J; Reiter, A; Alders, G L; Sartor, H; Naumann, M; Lange, K W

    2006-05-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibit impairments in the execution of highly practiced and skilled motor actions such as handwriting. The analysis of kinematic aspects of handwriting movements has demonstrated that size, speed, acceleration and stroke duration are affected in PD. Although beneficial effects of dopaminergic therapy in regard to execution of movements have been reported, the effects of pharmacological therapy on these measures have not been examined in detail. The present study has compared kinematic aspects of handwriting movements of 27 healthy subjects and 27 patients with PD both on their usual dopaminergic treatment and following withdrawal of dopaminergic medication. Healthy subjects were matched with PD patients according to age, sex, handedness and education level. A digitising tablet was used for the assessment of handwriting movements. Subjects were asked to perform a simple writing task. Movement time, distance, velocity, acceleration and measures of fluency of handwriting movements were measured. Compared with healthy subjects, the kinematics of handwriting movements in PD patients were markedly disturbed following withdrawal of dopaminergic medication. Although dopaminergic treatment in PD patients resulted in marked improvements in the kinematics of handwriting movements, PD patients did not reach an undisturbed level of performance. The results suggest that dopamine medication results in partial restoration of automatic movement execution. PMID:16082511

  12. Effect of total flavonoids from Scutellaria baicalensis on dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Li; Xu, Xiao-Fan; Bu, Qing-Xia; Jin, Wei-Rong; Sun, Qian-Ru; Feng, De-Peng; Zhang, Qing-Jv; Wang, Le-Xin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoid (SSTF) on the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mouse model was established by intravenous injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). SSTF (5 mg/kg) was administered to the mice before or after MPTP injection, and the effects of SSTF on the behavior of the mice and the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra were assessed. In addition, the level of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured. Following injection of MPTP, the number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra was decreased and the neurons appeared atrophic. In addition, the level of serum MDA in the MPTP mice increased. The mean behavioral scores and the number of dopaminergic neurons in the SSTF treatment groups were significantly higher than in the MPTP group (P<0.05), and the mean serum MDA levels were significantly lower (P<0.05). Thus, SSTF improves the behaviors and the numbers of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in MPTP-induced PD in mice. These beneficial effects appear to be associated with the reduction in serum MDA. PMID:27446544

  13. Control of dopaminergic neuron survival by the unfolded protein response transcription factor XBP1

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, Pamela; Mercado, Gabriela; Vidal, Rene L.; Molina, Claudia; Parsons, Geoffrey; Court, Felipe A.; Martinez, Alexis; Galleguillos, Danny; Armentano, Donna; Schneider, Bernard L.; Hetz, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Although growing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a hallmark of PD, its exact contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Here we report that developmental ablation of X-Box binding protein 1 (XBP1) in the nervous system, a key regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), protects dopaminergic neurons against a PD-inducing neurotoxin. This survival effect was associated with a preconditioning condition that resulted from induction of an adaptive ER stress response in dopaminergic neurons of the SNpc, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, silencing XBP1 in adult animals triggered chronic ER stress and dopaminergic neuron degeneration. Supporting this finding, gene therapy to deliver an active form of XBP1 provided neuroprotection and reduced striatal denervation in animals injected with 6-hydroxydopamine. Our results reveal a physiological role of the UPR in the maintenance of protein homeostasis in dopaminergic neurons that may help explain the differential neuronal vulnerability observed in PD. PMID:24753614

  14. GABA-mediated regulation of the activity-dependent olfactory bulb dopaminergic phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Akiba, Yosuke; Sasaki, Hayato; Huerta, Patricio T.; Estevez, Alvaro G.; Baker, Harriet; Cave, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) regulates the proliferation and migration of olfactory bulb (OB) interneuron progenitors derived from the subventricular zone (SVZ), but the role of GABA in the differentiation of these progenitors has been largely unexplored. This study examined the role of GABA in the differentiation of OB dopaminergic interneurons using neonatal forebrain organotypic slice cultures prepared from transgenic mice expressing GFP under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) gene promoter (ThGFP). KCl-mediated depolarization of the slices induced ThGFP expression. The addition of GABA to the depolarized slices further increased GFP fluorescence by inducing ThGFP expression in an additional set of periglomerular cells. These findings showed that GABA promoted differentiation of SVZ-derived OB dopaminergic interneurons and suggested that GABA indirectly regulated Th expression and OB dopaminergic neuron differentiation through an acceleration of the maturation rate for the dopaminergic progenitors. Additional studies revealed that the effect of GABA on ThGFP expression required activation of L- and P/Q-type Ca+2 channels as well as GABAA and GABAB receptors. These voltage-gated Ca+2 channels and GABA receptors have previously been shown to be required for the co-expressed GABAergic phenotype in the OB interneurons. Together, these findings suggest that Th expression and the differentiation of OB dopaminergic interneurons are coupled to the co-expressed GABAergic phenotype, and demonstrate a novel role for GABA in neurogenesis. PMID:19301430

  15. Nicotine-induced acute hyperactivity is mediated by dopaminergic system in a sexually dimorphic manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Guo, Jing; Guo, Aike; Li, Yan

    2016-09-22

    Short-term exposure to nicotine induces positive effects in mice, monkeys and humans, including mild euphoria, hyperactivity, and enhanced cognition. However, the underlying neural basis and molecular mechanisms for these effects remain poorly understood. Here, using a video recording system, we find that acute nicotine administration induces locomotor hyperactivity in Drosophila, similar to observations made in higher model organisms. Suppressing dopaminergic neurons or down-regulating dopamine 1-like receptor (DopR) abolishes this acute nicotine response, but surprisingly, does so only in male flies. Using a GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) approach, we show that dopaminergic neurons possess potential synaptic connections with acetylcholinergic neurons in wide regions of the brain. Furthermore, dopaminergic neurons are widely activated upon nicotine perfusion in both sexes, while the response curve differs significantly between the sexes. Moreover, knockdown of the β1 nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in dopaminergic neurons abolishes the acute nicotine response only in male flies, while panneural knock-down occurs in both sexes. Taken together, our results reveal that in fruit flies, dopaminergic neurons mediate nicotine-induced acute locomotor hyperactivity in a sexually dimorphic manner, and Drosophila β1 nAChR subunit plays a crucial role in this nicotine response. These findings provide important insights into the molecular and neural basis of acute nicotine effects, and the underlying mechanisms may play conserved roles across species. PMID:27365175

  16. Histamine H3 Receptor Regulates Sensorimotor Gating and Dopaminergic Signaling in the Striatum.

    PubMed

    Kononoff Vanhanen, Jenni; Nuutinen, Saara; Tuominen, Mervi; Panula, Pertti

    2016-05-01

    The brain histamine system has been implicated in regulation of sensorimotor gating deficits and in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Histamine also regulates alcohol reward and consumption via H3 receptor (H3R), possibly through an interaction with the brain dopaminergic system. Here, we identified the histaminergic mechanism of sensorimotor gating and the role of histamine H3R in the regulation of dopaminergic signaling. We found that H3R knockout mice displayed impaired prepulse inhibition (PPI), indicating deficiency in sensorimotor gating. Histamine H1 receptor knockout and histidine decarboxylase knockout mice had similar PPI as their controls. Dopaminergic drugs increased PPI of H3R knockout mice to the same level as in control mice, suggesting that changes in dopamine receptors might underlie deficient PPI response when H3R is lacking. Striatal dopamine D1 receptor mRNA level was lower, and D1 and D2 receptor-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 was absent in the striatum of H3R knockout mice, suggesting that H3R is essential for the dopamine receptor-mediated signaling. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that H3R is an important regulator of sensorimotor gating, and the lack of H3R significantly modifies striatal dopaminergic signaling. These data support the usefulness of H3R ligands in neuropsychiatric disorders with preattentional deficits and disturbances in dopaminergic signaling. PMID:26945087

  17. Dynamics of the dopaminergic system as a key component to the understanding of depression.

    PubMed

    Yadid, Gal; Friedman, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    For decades, clinical treatment of depression has usually involved antidepressants that target noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission. Over the past half century, no genuinely ground-breaking progress has been made in the pharmacological development of antidepressant drugs. Dopaminergic mesolimbic and mesocortical systems are involved in hedonia and motivation, two core symptoms of depression. However, their role in the pathophysiology of depression and their manipulation to treat depression has received little attention. Recent findings indicate the potential usefulness of monitoring limbic dopaminergic dynamics in combination with mathematical analysis. In this chapter comprehensive review of data from animal models, genetics, neuroimaging and human clinical trials that strengthen the case for dopaminergic dysfunction in the pathophysiology of major depression. This chapter focuses on recent convergence of data describing the fluctuation in activity of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, and discusses its crucial role in manifestation of depressive-like behavior. Decoding the functionality of the dopaminergic system is important to the understanding of depression and the development of future efficient antidepressant treatments. PMID:18772037

  18. Argument for a non-linear relationship between severity of human obesity and dopaminergic tone.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, A; Fenske, W K; Hankir, M K

    2015-10-01

    Alterations in the dopaminergic system have been implicated in both animal and human obesity. However, to date, a comprehensive model on the nature and functional relevance of this relationship is missing. In particular, human data remain equivocal in that seemingly inconsistent reports exist of positive, negative or even no relationships between dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the striatum and measures of obesity. Further, data on receptor availability have been commonly interpreted as reflecting receptor density, despite the possibility of an alternative interpretation, namely alterations in the basal levels of endogenous dopaminergic tone. Here, we provide a unifying framework that is able to explain the seemingly contradictory findings and offer an alternative and novel perspective on existing data. In particular, we suggest (i) a quadratic relationship between alterations in the dopaminergic system and degree of obesity, and (ii) that the observed alterations are driven by shifts in the balance between general dopaminergic tone and phasic dopaminergic signalling. The proposed model consistently integrates human data on molecular and behavioural characteristics of overweight and obesity. Further, the model provides a mechanistic framework accounting not only for the consistent observation of altered (food) reward-responsivity but also for the differences in reinforcement learning, decision-making behaviour and cognitive performance associated with measures of obesity. PMID:26098597

  19. Adult neurogenesis restores dopaminergic neuronal loss in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Lazarini, Françoise; Gabellec, Marie-Madeleine; Moigneu, Carine; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2014-10-22

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis continuously provides new GABA- and dopamine (DA)-containing interneurons for the olfactory bulb (OB) in most adult mammals. DAergic interneurons are located in the glomerular layer (GL) where they participate in the processing of sensory inputs. To examine whether adult neurogenesis might contribute to regeneration after circuit injury in mice, we induce DAergic neuronal loss by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the dorsal GL or in the right substantia nigra pars compacta. We found that a 6-OHDA treatment of the OB produces olfactory deficits and local inflammation and partially decreases the number of neurons expressing the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) near the injected site. Blockade of inflammation by minocycline treatment immediately after the 6-OHDA administration rescued neither TH(+) interneuron number nor the olfactory deficits, suggesting that the olfactory impairments are most likely linked to TH(+) cell death and not to microglial activation. TH(+) interneuron number was restored 1 month later. This rescue resulted at least in part from enhanced recruitment of immature neurons targeting the lesioned GL area. Seven days after 6-OHDA lesion in the OB, we found that the integration of lentivirus-labeled adult-born neurons was biased: newly formed neurons were preferentially incorporated into glomerular circuits of the lesioned area. Behavioral rehabilitation occurs 2 months after lesion. This study establishes a new model into which loss of DAergic cells could be compensated by recruiting newly formed neurons. We propose that adult neurogenesis not only replenishes the population of DAergic bulbar neurons but that it also restores olfactory sensory processing. PMID:25339754

  20. Cystic Lesions of the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Daniel; Suby-Long, Thomas; Restrepo, Carlos S

    2016-06-01

    Cystic lesions are commonly seen in the mediastinum, and they may arise from virtually any organ. The vast majority of these lesions are benign and result in no symptoms. When large, cysts may produce symptoms related to compression of adjacent structures. The most common mediastinal cysts are pericardial and foregut duplication cysts. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance are routinely used to evaluate these lesions. Although computed tomography offers superior spatial resolution, magnetic resonance is useful in differentiating cysts that contain proteinaceous material from solid lesions. Occasionally, cysts arise from solid lesions, such as thymoma or teratoma. Although cysts are alike in appearance, location helps narrowing the differential diagnoses. PMID:27261346

  1. Postmitotic, postmigrational expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in olfactory bulb dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    McLean, J H; Shipley, M T

    1988-10-01

    The developmental expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TOH) was studied in a large, specific population of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB) of the rat. These DA neurons comprise an anatomically distinctive population that has been well characterized in the adult hamster (Davis and Macrides, 1983) and rat (Halasz et al., 1981; Baker et al., 1983, 1984). We addressed a basic question in developmental neurobiology: What factors regulate the expression of neuronal transmitter phenotype during development? Olfactory bulb DA neurons are born in the ventricular and subependymal zones and migrate through all intervening layers to the most superficial layer in the bulb (Altman, 1969; Bayer, 1983). The time of TOH expression in these neurons was determined using immunohistochemistry and light microscopic image-analysis techniques. The results indicate that TOH phenotype is not expressed when the cells are born in the subependymal zone nor during their migration to the periglomerular region but only after they reached their final destination, the glomerular layer. This suggests that epigenetic factors associated with the glomeruli initiate the expression of the key transmitter synthesizing enzyme in these neurons. Primary olfactory neurons in the nasal epithelium project exclusively to glomeruli of the MOB; removal of this input in adult rats (Kawano and Margolis, 1982; Baker et al., 1983, 1984), mice (Nadi et al., 1981; Baker et al., 1983), dogs (Nadi et al., 1981), and hamsters (Kream et al., 1984) appears to down-regulate the expression of the TOH in periglomerular cells. The present results suggested that the input from the primary olfactory nerve is also necessary for the initial expression of the TOH phenotype. In support of this notion, we found that lesions of the olfactory nerve during the first postnatal week caused a significant reduction in the number of TOH-positive juxtaglomerular neurons in the following weeks. Thus, the olfactory nerve

  2. [Multifocal Vitelliform Retinal Lesion].

    PubMed

    Streicher, T; Špirková, J; Ilavská, M

    2015-06-01

    The authors present retrospective follow up of patient with bilateral multifocal vitelliform retinal lesion during the 18 years period. At this time, spontaneous improvement of objective picture on retina and subjective visual troubles was observed. It is probable, that this case is a part of the same symptom complex as a variant of Best´s hereditary disease. This conclusion was based on initial stadium of phenotypical expressivity and additional evaluations. The course and outcomes of visual functions were different. The hereditary transmission was not confirmed. PMID:26201364

  3. Synthesis, Protein Levels, Activity and Phosphorylation State of Tyrosine Hydroxylase in Mesoaccumbens and Nigrostriatal Dopamine Pathways of Chronically Food-restricted Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yan; Berman, Yemiliya; Haberny, Sandra; Meller, Emanuel; Carr, Kenneth D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic food restriction (FR) enhances the rewarding and motor-activating effects of abused drugs, and is accompanied by changes in dopamine (DA) dynamics and increased D-1 DA receptor-mediated cell signaling and transcriptional responses in nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, little is known about effects of FR on DA synthetic activity in the mesoaccumbens and nigrostriatal pathways. In Experiment 1 of the present study, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression was measured in ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra, using real time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization; no differences were observed between FR and ad libitum fed (AL) rats. In Experiment 2, TH protein levels, determined by Western blot, were found to be elevated in NAc and caudate-putamen (CPu) of FR relative to AL rats. In the absence of increased transcription, this may reflect a slowing of TH degradation. In Experiments 3 and 4, DA synthetic activity was assessed by Western blot measurement of TH phosphorylation at Ser-40, and HPLC measurement of in vivo tyrosine hydroxylation rate, as reflected by DOPA accumulation following administration of a decarboxylase inhibitor (NSD-1015; 100 mg/kg, i.p.). Basal phospho-Ser(40)-TH levels did not differ between groups but DOPA accumulation was decreased by FR. Decreased DOPA synthesis, despite increased levels of TH protein, may reflect the inhibitory effect of increased DA binding to TH protein or decreased concentrations of cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin. Finally, in response to d-amphetamine (0.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, i.p.), phospho-Ser(40)-TH was selectively decreased in NAc of FR rats. This suggests increased feedback inhibition of DA synthesis - a possible consequence of postsynaptic receptor hypersensitivity, or increased extracellular DA concentration. These results indicate that FR increases TH protein levels, but may decrease the capacity for DA synthesis by decreasing TH activity. According to this scheme, the previously observed upregulation of striatal

  4. Levodopa replacement therapy alters enzyme activities in striatum and neuropeptide content in striatal output regions of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Engber, T M; Susel, Z; Kuo, S; Gerfen, C R; Chase, T N

    1991-06-21

    The effects of striatal dopamine denervation and levodopa replacement therapy on neuronal populations in the rat striatum were assessed by measurement of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activities in the striatum, dynorphin and substance P concentrations in the substantia nigra, and enkephalin concentration in the globus pallidus. Rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway were treated for 21 days with levodopa (100 mg/kg/day, i.p., with 25 mg/kg benserazide) on either an intermittent (b.i.d.) or continuous (osmotic pump infusion) regimen and sacrificed following a three day drug washout. In saline-treated control rats, striatal GAD activity and globus pallidus enkephalin content were elevated and nigral substance P content was reduced ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion. Intermittent levodopa treatment further increased GAD activity, decreased CAT activity, restored substance P to control levels, markedly increased dynorphin content, and had no effect on enkephalin. In contrast, continuous levodopa elevated globus pallidus enkephalin beyond the levels occurring with denervation, but had no effect on any of the other neurochemical measures. These results indicate that striatal neuronal populations are differentially affected by chronic levodopa therapy and by the continuous or intermittent nature of the treatment regimen. With the exception of substance P, levodopa did not reverse the effects of the 6-OHDA lesion but, rather, either exacerbated the lesion-induced changes (e.g. GAD and enkephalin) or altered neurochemical markers which had been unaffected by the lesion (e.g. CAT and dynorphin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1717109

  5. Progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons through TRP channel-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Archana; Ning, Ye; Reisner, Kaja; Buraei, Zafir; Larsen, Jan Petter; Hobert, Oliver; Doitsidou, Maria

    2014-04-23

    Progressive neurodegenerative diseases are among the most frequently occurring aging-associated human pathologies. In a screen for Caenorhabditis elegans mutant animals that lack their normal complement of dopaminergic neurons, we identified two strains with progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons during postembryonic life. Through whole-genome sequencing we show that both strains harbor dominant (d), gain-of-function mutations in the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) mechanosensory channel trp-4, a member of the invertebrate and vertebrate TRPN-type of the TRP family channels. Gain-of-function mutations in TRP channels have not been previously implicated in dopaminergic neuronal degeneration. We show that trp-4(d) induces cell death in dopamine neurons through a defined, calcium-related downstream pathway. PMID:24760834

  6. The lifelong maintenance of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons by Nurr1 and engrailed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Specific vulnerability and degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of the midbrain is the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease. A number of transcription factors regulate the birth and development of this set of neurons and some remain constitutively expressed throughout life. These maintenance transcription factors are closely associated with essential neurophysiological functions and are required ultimately for the long-term survival of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons. The current review describes the role of two such factors, Nurr1 and engrailed, in differentiation, maturation, and in normal physiological functions including acquisition of neurotransmitter identity. The review will also elucidate the relationship of these factors with life, vulnerability, degeneration and death of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons in the context of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24685177

  7. Zhichan decoction induces differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease rats after neural stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huifen; Song, Jie; Yang, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to increase the dopamine content and reduce dopaminergic metabolites in the brain of Parkinson's disease rats. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we found that dopamine and dopaminergic metabolite (dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) content in the midbrain of Parkinson's disease rats was increased after neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction, compared with neural stem cell transplantation alone. Our genetic algorithm results show that dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid levels achieve global optimization. Neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction increased dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels up to 10-fold, while transplantation alone resulted in a 3-fold increment. Homovanillic acid levels showed no apparent change. Our experimental findings show that after neural stem cell transplantation in Parkinson's disease rats, Zhichan decoction can promote differentiation of neural stem cells into dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25206914

  8. Dopaminergic therapy affects learning and impulsivity in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiebert, Nole M; Seergobin, Ken N; Vo, Andrew; Ganjavi, Hooman; MacDonald, Penny A

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim was to examine the effect of dopaminergic medication on stimulus-response learning versus performing decisions based on learning. Method To see the effect of dopaminergic therapy on stimulus-response learning and response selection, participants with Parkinson’s disease (PD) were either tested on and/or off their prescribed dose of dopaminergic therapy during different testing days. Forty participants with PD and 34 healthy controls completed the experiment on consecutive days. On Day 1, participants learned to associate abstract images with spoken, “right” or “left” responses via feedback (Session 1). On Day 2, participants recalled these responses (Session 2) and indicated the location (i.e., right or left of center) of previously studied images intermixed with new images (Session 3). Results Participants with PD off medication learned stimulus-response associations equally well compared to healthy controls. Learning was impaired by dopaminergic medication. Regardless of medication status, patients recalled the stimulus-response associations from Day 1 as well as controls. In Session 3 off medication, patients demonstrated enhanced facilitation relative to controls and patients on medication, when the stimulus location was congruent with the spoken response that was learned for the stimulus in Session 1. Interpretation Learning in PD was comparable to that of healthy controls off medication. Learning was worsened by dopaminergic therapy in PD. We interpret greater facilitation in participants with PD off medication for congruent responses as evidence of greater impulsivity. This motor or reflexive impulsivity was normalized by medication in PD. These findings shed light on the cognitive profile of PD and have implications for dopaminergic treatment. PMID:25493274

  9. Fast transmission from the dopaminergic ventral midbrain to the sensory cortex of awake primates.

    PubMed

    Mylius, Judith; Happel, Max F K; Gorkin, Alexander G; Huang, Ying; Scheich, Henning; Brosch, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by the increasing evidence that auditory cortex is under control of dopaminergic cell structures of the ventral midbrain, we studied how the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra affect neuronal activity in auditory cortex. We electrically stimulated 567 deep brain sites in total within and in the vicinity of the two dopaminergic ventral midbrain structures and at the same time, recorded local field potentials and neuronal discharges in cortex. In experiments conducted on three awake macaque monkeys, we found that electrical stimulation of the dopaminergic ventral midbrain resulted in short-latency (~35 ms) phasic activations in all cortical layers of auditory cortex. We were also able to demonstrate similar activations in secondary somatosensory cortex and superior temporal polysensory cortex. The electrically evoked responses in these parts of sensory cortex were similar to those previously described for prefrontal cortex. Moreover, these phasic responses could be reversibly altered by the dopamine D1-receptor antagonist SCH23390 for several tens of minutes. Thus, we speculate that the dopaminergic ventral midbrain exerts a temporally precise, phasic influence on sensory cortex using fast-acting non-dopaminergic transmitters and that their effects are modulated by dopamine on a longer timescale. Our findings suggest that some of the information carried by the neuronal discharges in the dopaminergic ventral midbrain, such as the motivational value or the motivational salience, is transmitted to auditory cortex and other parts of sensory cortex. The mesocortical pathway may thus contribute to the representation of non-auditory events in the auditory cortex and to its associative functions. PMID:25084746

  10. Mapping dopaminergic deficiencies in the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rice, Matthew W; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Perez-Costas, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory showed deficits in tyrosine hydroxylase protein expression within the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA) in schizophrenia. However, little is known about the nature and specific location of these deficits within the SN/VTA. The present study had two aims: (1) test if tyrosine hydroxylase deficits could be explained as the result of neuronal loss; (2) assess if deficits in tyrosine hydroxylase are sub-region specific within the SN/VTA, and thus, could affect specific dopaminergic pathways. To achieve these objectives: (1) we obtained estimates of the number of dopaminergic neurons, total number of neurons, and their ratio in matched SN/VTA schizophrenia and control samples; (2) we performed a qualitative assessment in SN/VTA schizophrenia and control matched samples that were processed simultaneously for tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry. We did not find any significant differences in the total number of neurons, dopaminergic neurons, or their ratio. Our qualitative study of TH expression showed a conspicuous decrease in labeling of neuronal processes and cell bodies within the SN/VTA, which was sub-region specific. Dorsal diencephalic dopaminergic populations of the SN/VTA presented the most conspicuous decrease in TH labeling. These data support the existence of pathway-specific dopaminergic deficits that would affect the dopamine input to the cortex without significant neuronal loss. Interestingly, these findings support earlier reports of decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase labeling in the target areas for this dopaminergic input in the prefrontal and entorhinal cortex. Finally, our findings support that tyrosine hydroxylase deficits could contribute to the hypodopaminergic state observed in cortical areas in schizophrenia. PMID:25269834

  11. Imbalance between thyroid hormones and the dopaminergic system might be central to the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose Carlos; Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia; Lins Pessoa, Hugo de

    2010-05-01

    Data collected from medical literature indicate that dopaminergic agonists alleviate Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms while dopaminergic agonists antagonists aggravate them. Dopaminergic agonists is a physiological regulator of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Dopaminergic agonists infusion diminishes the levels of thyroid hormones, which have the ability to provoke restlessness, hyperkinetic states, tremors, and insomnia. Conditions associated with higher levels of thyroid hormones, such as pregnancy or hyperthyroidism, have a higher prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms. Low iron levels can cause secondary Restless Legs Syndrome or aggravate symptoms of primary disease as well as diminish enzymatic activities that are involved in dopaminergic agonists production and the degradation of thyroid hormones. Moreover, as a result of low iron levels, dopaminergic agonists diminishes and thyroid hormones increase. Iron therapy improves Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms in iron deprived patients. Medical hypothesis. To discuss the theory that thyroid hormones, when not counterbalanced by dopaminergic agonists, may precipitate the signs and symptoms underpinning Restless Legs Syndrome. The main cause of Restless Legs Syndrome might be an imbalance between the dopaminergic agonists system and thyroid hormones. PMID:20535374

  12. Role and Mechanism of Microglial Activation in Iron-Induced Selective and Progressive Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhao-fen; Gao, Jun-hua; Sun, Li; Huang, Xi-yan; Liu, Zhuo; Yu, Shu-yang; Cao, Chen-Jie; Zuo, Li-jun; Chen, Ze-Jie; Hu, Yang; Wang, Fang; Hong, Jau-shyong; Wang, Xiao-min

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have excessive iron depositions in substantia nigra (SN). Neuroinflammation characterized by microglial activation is pivotal for dopaminergic neurodegeneration in PD. However, the role and mechanism of microglial activation in iron-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in SN remain unclear yet. This study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of microglial β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) activation in iron-induced selective and progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Multiple primary midbrain cultures from rat, NOX2+/+ and NOX2−/− mice were used. Dopaminergic neurons, total neurons, and microglia were visualized by immunostainings. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Superoxide (O2·−) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) were determined by measuring SOD-inhibitable reduction of tetrazolium salt WST-1 and DCFH-DA assay. mRNA and protein were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot. Iron induces selective and progressive dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rat neuron–microglia–astroglia cultures and microglial activation potentiates the neurotoxicity. Activated microglia produce a magnitude of O2·− and iROS, and display morphological alteration. NOX2 inhibitor diphenylene iodonium protects against iron-elicited dopaminergic neurotoxicity through decreasing microglial O2·− generation, and NOX2−/− mice are resistant to the neurotoxicity by reducing microglial O2·− production, indicating that iron-elicited dopaminergic neurotoxicity is dependent of NOX2, a O2·−-generating enzyme. NOX2 activation is indicated by the increased mRNA and protein levels of subunits P47 and gp91. Molecules relevant to NOX2 activation include PKC-σ, P38, ERK1/2, JNK, and NF-ΚBP65 as their mRNA and protein levels are enhanced by NOX2 activation. Iron causes selective and progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration, and microglial NOX2 activation potentiates the

  13. Is there room for non-dopaminergic treatment in Parkinson disease?

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Abraham; Krishnamurthi, Narayanan

    2013-02-01

    Although levodopa and dopaminergic drugs remain the mainstay of therapy for the motor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD), they fail to address many of the non-motor symptoms of PD including orthostatic hypotension, freezing of gait (FOG) and difficulty with balance, drug-induced paranoia and hallucinations, and drug-induced dyskinesias. Droxidopa, a drug that increases norepinephrine, treats orthostatic hypotension, cholinomimetic drugs sometimes help with FOG and difficulty with balance, pimavanserin, a drug that blocks serotonin receptors, treats paranoia and hallucinations, and anti-glutaminergic drugs treat dyskinesias. Thus, there are ample opportunities for non-dopaminergic drugs in PD. PMID:23242741

  14. Biochanin A protects dopaminergic neurons against lipopolysaccharide-induced damage and oxidative stress in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; He, Can; Wu, Wang-Yang; Chen, Feng; Wu, Yang-Yang; Li, Wei-Zu; Chen, Han-Qing; Yin, Yan-Yan

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Accumulated evidences have suggested that oxidative stress is closely associated with the dopaminergic neurodegeneration of PD that can be protected by antioxidants. Biochanin A that is an O-methylated isoflavone in chickpea is investigated to explore its protective mechanism on dopaminergic neurons of the unilateral lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected rat. The results showed that biochanin A significantly improved the animal model's behavioral symptoms, prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited the deleterious microglia activation in the LPS-induced rats. Moreover, biochanin A inhibited nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase) activation and malondialdehyde (MDA) production, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in the rat brain. These results suggested that biochanin A might be a natural candidate with protective properties on dopaminergic neurons against the PD. PMID:26394281

  15. Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Dhakad, Urmila; Das, Siddharth K

    2013-01-01

    A middle-aged male patient developed acute back pain and a lumbar vertebral lesion following trivial physical trauma. The lesion was considered as tuberculous on vertebral x-rays and MRI. After biopsy of the lesion and spinal fixation, the patient was kept on empirical antituberculous treatment (ATT) to which he did not respond. On re-evaluation he was diagnosed to have an Andersson lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). ATT was stopped and he was successfully managed by rest, steroids, methotrexate and sulfasalazine. A careful look at the patient's plain x-ray spine and awareness about the lesion can avoid misdiagnosis of this characteristic vertebral lesion found in AS. PMID:23559648

  16. Frontotemporal and dopaminergic control of idea generation and creative drive.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Alice W

    2005-12-01

    This article presents a three-factor anatomical model of human idea generation and creative drive, focusing on interactions between the temporal lobes, frontal lobes, and limbic system. Evidence is drawn from functional imaging, drug studies, and lesion analysis. Temporal lobe changes, as in hypergraphia, often increase idea generation, sometimes at the expense of quality. Frontal lobe deficits may decrease idea generation, in part because of rigid judgments about an idea's worth. These phenomena are clearest in verbal creativity, and roughly parallel the pressured communication of temporal lobe epilepsy, mania, and Wernicke's aphasia-compared to the sparse speech and cognitive inflexibility of depression, Broca's aphasia, and other frontal lobe lesions. The phenomena also shape non-linguistic creativity, as in that of frontotemporal dementia. The appropriate balance between frontal and temporal activity is mediated by mutually inhibitory corticocortical interactions. Mesolimbic dopamine influences novelty seeking and creative drive. Dopamine agonists and antagonists have opposite effects on goal-directed behavior and hallucinations. Creative drive is not identical to skill-the latter depends more on neocortical association areas. However, drive correlates better with successful creative output than skill does. Traditional neuroscientific models of creativity, such as the left brain - right brain hemispheric model, emphasize skills primarily, and stress art and musical skill at the expense of language and mathematics. The three-factor model proposed here predicts findings in a broad range of normal and pathological states and can be tested in many experimental paradigms. PMID:16254989

  17. FRONTOTEMPORAL AND DOPAMINERGIC CONTROL OF IDEA GENERATION AND CREATIVE DRIVE

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Alice W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a three-factor anatomical model of human idea generation and creative drive, focusing on interactions between the temporal lobes, frontal lobes, and limbic system. Evidence is drawn from functional imaging, drug studies, and lesion analysis. Temporal lobe changes, as in hypergraphia, often increase idea generation, sometimes at the expense of quality. Frontal lobe deficits may decrease idea generation, in part because of rigid judgments about an idea's worth. These phenomena are clearest in verbal creativity, and roughly parallel the pressured communication of temporal lobe epilepsy, mania, and Wernicke's aphasia--compared to the sparse speech and cognitive inflexibility of depression, Broca's aphasia, and other frontal lobe lesions. The phenomena also shape non-linguistic creativity, as in that of frontotemporal dementia. The appropriate balance between frontal and temporal activity is mediated by mutually inhibitory corticocortical interactions. Mesolimbic dopamine influences novelty seeking and creative drive. Dopamine agonists and antagonists have opposite effects on goal-directed behavior and hallucinations. Creative drive is not identical to skill—the latter depends more on neocortical association areas. However, drive correlates better with successful creative output than skill does. Traditional neuroscientific models of creativity, such as the left brain – right brain hemispheric model, emphasize skills primarily, and stress art and musical skill at the expense of language and mathematics. The three-factor model proposed here predicts findings in a broad range of normal and pathological states, and can be tested in many experimental paradigms. PMID:16254989

  18. Focal lesions in normal liver.

    PubMed

    Semelka, Richard C; Martin, Diego R; Balci, N Cem

    2005-10-01

    A variety of lesions occur in the normal liver. This review will describe the most common benign, malignant, and infectious lesions. Illustration will be made of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the most common of these. Due to the high accuracy for liver lesion detection and characterization, and the intrinsic safety of the modality, MR should be considered the primary imaging tool to investigate liver diseases. PMID:16174062

  19. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  20. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  1. Pigmented lesion of buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  2. Low doses of single or combined agrichemicals induces α-synuclein aggregation in nigrostriatal system of mice through inhibition of proteasomal and autophagic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Su, Cen; Niu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Alpha synuclein (SNCA) genes and environmental factors are important risk factors of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The agrichemicals paraquat, maneb and chlorpyrifos selectively target dopaminergic neurons, leading to parkinsonism, through ill-defined mechanisms. We analyzed the ability of low dose paraquat, maneb and chlorpyrifos, separately or combined together, to induce synucleinopathy in wild type mice. Paraquat and maneb applied together did not increase α-Synuclein (α-Syn) levels. By contrast, paraquat and chlorpyrifos together resulted in robust accumulation of α-Syn in striata in mice. Therefore, co-treatment with chlorpyrifos enhanced the effects of paraquat. Paraquat, and its co-treatment with maneb or chlorpyrifos, inhibited all soluble proteasomal expression of 26S proteasome subunits. Both paraquat and chlorpyrifos treatments increased levels of the autophagy inhibitor, mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, suggesting impaired axonal autophagy, despite increases in certain autophagic proteins, such as beclin 1 and Atg 12. Autophagic flux was also impaired, as ratios of LC3 II to LC3 I were reduced in all the treated animals. These results suggest that a combination of paraquat and chlorpyrifos is much more toxic than paraquat alone or combined with maneb. These effects are likely via inhibitory effects of these toxins on proteasomes and autophagy, which lead to accumulation of α-Syn. Our study provides a novel insight into the mechanisms of action of these agrichemicals. PMID:26884967

  3. Prevention of the nigrostriatal toxicity of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine by inhibitors of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine transport.

    PubMed

    Mayer, R A; Kindt, M V; Heikkila, R E

    1986-10-01

    The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine (DA, dopamine) uptake inhibitors GBR 13,069, amfonelic acid, WIN-35,065-2, WIN-35,428, nomifensine, mazindol, cocaine, McN-5908, McN-5847, and McN-5292 were effective in preventing [3H]DA and [3H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) uptake in rat and mouse neostriatal tissue slices. These DA uptake inhibitors also were effective in attenuating the MPP+-induced release of [3H]DA in vitro. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) administration to mice (6 X 25 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in a large (70-80%) decrement in neostriatal DA. WIN-35,428 (5 mg/kg), GBR 13,069 (10 mg/kg), McN-5292 (5 mg/kg), McN-5908 (2 mg/kg), and amfonelic acid (2 mg/kg), when administered intraperitoneally 30 min prior to each MPTP injection, fully protected against MPTP-induced neostriatal damage. Other DA uptake inhibitors showed partial protection in vivo at the doses selected. Desmethylimipramine did not prevent [3H]MPP+ uptake or MPP+-induced release of [3H]DA in vitro, and did not protect against MPTP neurotoxicity in vivo. These results support the hypothesis put forth previously by others that the active uptake of MPP+ by dopaminergic neurons is necessary for toxicity. PMID:3489072

  4. Differential action of methamphetamine on tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transport in the nigrostriatal pathway of μ-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Won; He, Zhi; Shen, Xine; Roman, Richard J; Ma, Tangeng

    2012-06-01

    Extensive anatomical and functional interactions exist between central dopaminergic and opioidergic systems and both systems are proposed to be targets for amphetamine-like drugs. We have previously reported that μ-opioid receptor (μ-OR) knockout mice are resistant to the loss of dopamine in the striatum and the development of behavioral sensitization induced by repeated methamphetamine (METH) treatment. The present study assessed whether METH-treated μ-OR knockout mice exhibit a differential response of the expression of dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis and maintaining dopamine levels. Mice daily received intraperitoneal injection of METH (0, 0.6, 2.5, or 10 mg/kg) for 7 days and sacrificed on day 11 (4 days after the last injection). The expression of TH protein in the striatum and the levels of TH mRNA and number of TH positive neurons in the substantia nigra were reduced in wild-type mice treated with METH (2.5 and 10 mg/kg), but not in the μ-OR knockout mice. In contrast, METH exposure at the highest dose (10 mg/kg) reduced dopamine transporter levels in both strains of mice. These results suggest that the μ-OR contributes to METH-induced loss of dopamine and behavioral sensitization by decreasing the expression of TH. PMID:22329540

  5. NEUROFUNCTIONAL DOPAMINERGIC IMPAIRMENT IN ELDERLY AFTER LIFETIME EXPOSURE TO MANGANESE

    PubMed Central

    Lucchini, Roberto G; Guazzetti, Stefano; Zoni, Silvia; Benedetti, Chiara; Fedrighi, Chiara; Peli, Marco; Donna, Filippo; Bontempi, Elza; Borgese, Laura; Micheletti, Serena; Ferri, Roberta; Marchetti, Serena; Smith, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    yielded a lower level confidence interval of 22.7 ng/m3 (median 26.4). For the odor identification score of the Sniffin Stick test, an association was observed with soil Mn (p=0.0006) and with a significant interaction with blood Pb (p=0.0856). Significant dose-responses resulted also for the Raven’s Colored Progressive Matrices with the distance from exposure point source (p=0.0025) and Mn in soil (p=0.09), and for the Trail Making test, with urinary Mn (p=0.0074). Serum prolactin (PRL) levels were associated with air (p=0.061) and urinary (p=0.003) Mn, and with blood Pb (p=0.0303). In most of these associations age played a significant role as an effect modifier. Conclusion Lifelong exposure to Mn was significantly associated with changes in odor discrimination, motor coordination, cognitive abilities and serum PRL levels. These effects are consistent with the hypothesis of a specific mechanism of toxicity of Mn on the dopaminergic system. Lead co-exposure, even at very low levels, can further enhance Mn toxicity. PMID:24881811

  6. Predictors of time to requiring dopaminergic treatment in 2 Parkinson's disease cohorts.

    PubMed

    Marras, Connie; McDermott, Michael P; Marek, Ken; Rochon, Paula; Naglie, Gary; Tanner, Caroline M; Rudolph, Alice; Shoulson, Ira; Lang, Anthony E

    2011-03-01

    The rate of progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) is highly variable. Knowledge of factors associated with disease milestones and commonly used research outcome measures helps with patient counseling and guides the design and interpretation of clinical studies. The objective of the study was to identify prognostic factors for time to acquiring disability requiring dopaminergic therapy that are reproducible within 2 large prospectively followed cohorts. Potential prognostic factors were identified using data from the Deprenyl and Tocopherol Antioxidative Therapy of Parkinsonism (DATATOP) trial, and their reproducibility was examined using data from the Parkinson Research Examination of CEP-1347 trial (PRECEPT). In multivariable analyses of the DATATOP cohort, higher baseline Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores, full-time employment, a lesser smoking history, and onset on the left side were associated with a shorter time to disability requiring dopaminergic therapy. PRECEPT data confirmed the associations of higher baseline UPDRS scores and full-time employment with shorter time to requiring treatment. Any clinical trial using the end point of time to disability requiring dopaminergic therapy should ensure that groups are well balanced with respect to baseline UPDRS scores and the proportion of subjects employed full time and should consider including these variables as covariates in the statistical model for primary analysis of treatment effects. We suspect that individuals employed full time may have a lower threshold for requiring dopaminergic therapy because of occupational demands. PMID:21287602

  7. EFFECTS OF TRIMETHYLTIN ON DOPAMINERGIC AND SEROTONERGIC FUNCTION IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of trimethyltin (TMT) administration on regional concentrations of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and their metabolites were determined. Acute administration of 3 or 7 mg/kg TMT (as the chloride) to adult male Long-Evans rats caused alterations in both dopaminergic ...

  8. EFFECTS OF DOPAMINERGIC DRUGS ON WORKING AND REFERENCE MEMORY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occupational exposure to styrene monomer has been associated with cognitive dysfunction in humans, and changes in dopaminergic function have been suggested to underly effects of repeated exposure to styrene monomer in animals. his study was designed to determine whether styrene a...

  9. Autologous mesenchymal stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons function in parkinsonian macaques.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takuya; Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Ose, Takayuki; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Mitsunaga, Kanae; Matsuse, Dai; Shigemoto, Taeko; Ito, Akihito; Ikeda, Hironobu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Onoe, Hirotaka; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Dezawa, Mari

    2013-01-01

    A cell-based therapy for the replacement of dopaminergic neurons has been a long-term goal in Parkinson's disease research. Here, we show that autologous engraftment of A9 dopaminergic neuron-like cells induced from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) leads to long-term survival of the cells and restoration of motor function in hemiparkinsonian macaques. Differentiated MSCs expressed markers of A9 dopaminergic neurons and released dopamine after depolarization in vitro. The differentiated autologous cells were engrafted in the affected portion of the striatum. Animals that received transplants showed modest and gradual improvements in motor behaviors. Positron emission tomography (PET) using [11C]-CFT, a ligand for the dopamine transporter (DAT), revealed a dramatic increase in DAT expression, with a subsequent exponential decline over a period of 7 months. Kinetic analysis of the PET findings revealed that DAT expression remained above baseline levels for over 7 months. Immunohistochemical evaluations at 9 months consistently demonstrated the existence of cells positive for DAT and other A9 dopaminergic neuron markers in the engrafted striatum. These data suggest that transplantation of differentiated autologous MSCs may represent a safe and effective cell therapy for Parkinson's disease. PMID:23202734

  10. Retinoic acid receptor stimulation protects midbrain dopaminergic neurons from inflammatory degeneration via BDNF-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Emi; Takemori, Sachiko; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Isohama, Yoichiro; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Kume, Toshiaki; Shudo, Koichi; Akaike, Akinori

    2009-07-01

    Functions of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in adult CNS have been poorly characterized. Here we investigated potential neuroprotective action of tamibarotene (Am80), an RARalpha/beta agonist available for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia, on midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Am80 protected dopaminergic neurons in rat midbrain slice culture from injury mediated by lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia, without affecting production of nitric oxide, a key mediator of cell injury. The effect of Am80 was mimicked by another RAR agonist, TAC-101, but not by a retinoid X receptor agonist, HX630, and HX630 did not synergize with Am80. We observed neuronal expression of RARalpha and RARbeta in midbrain slice culture and also found that Am80 increased tissue level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA. Exogenous BDNF prevented dopaminergic neurodegeneration, and the neuroprotective effect of Am80 was suppressed by a TrkB inhibitor, K252a, or by anti-BDNF neutralizing antibody. These results reveal a novel action of RARs mediated by enhancement of BDNF expression. Finally, oral administration of Am80 prevented dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra induced by local injection of lipopolysaccharide in mice, indicating that RARs are a promising target of therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19457078

  11. Catalytic Cyclization of o-Alkynyl Phenethylamines via Osmacyclopropene Intermediates: Direct Access to Dopaminergic 3-Benzazepines.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Pérez, Andrea; González-Rodríguez, Carlos; García-Yebra, Cristina; Varela, Jesús A; Oñate, Enrique; Esteruelas, Miguel A; Saá, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    A novel osmium-catalyzed cyclization of o-alkynyl phenethylamines to give 3-benzazepines is reported. The procedure allows the straightforward preparation of a broad range of dopaminergic 3-benzazepine derivatives. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the process takes place via osmacyclopropene intermediates, which were isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography. PMID:26368394

  12. Catalpol protects dopaminergic neurons from LPS-induced neurotoxicity in mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan-Yuan; An, Li-Jia; Jiang, Lan; Duan, Yan-Long; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Bo

    2006-12-23

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Microglia, the resident immune cells in the central nervous system, are pivotal in the inflammatory reaction. Activated microglia can induce expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and release significant amounts of nitric oxide (NO) and TNF-alpha, which can damage the dopaminergic neurons. Catalpol, an iridoid glycoside, contained richly in the roots of Rehmannia glutinosa, was found to be neuroprotective in gerbils subjected to transient global cerebral ischemia. But the effect of catalpol on inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration has not been examined. In this study, microglia in mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the aim of the study was to examine whether catalpol could protect dopaminergic neurons from LPS-induced neurotoxicity. The results showed that catalpol significantly reduced the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNF-alpha and NO after LPS-induced microglial activation. Further, catalpol attenuated LPS-induced the expression of iNOS. As determined by immunocytochemical analysis, pretreatment by catalpol dose-dependently protected dopaminergic neurons against LPS-induced neurotoxicity. These results suggest that catalpol exerts its protective effect on dopaminergic neurons by inhibiting microglial activation and reducing the production of proinflammatory factors. Thus, catalpol may possess therapeutic potential against inflammation-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:17049947

  13. Chemogenetic ablation of dopaminergic neurons leads to transient locomotor impairments in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Rafael; Noble, Sandra; Yoon, Kevin; Anisman, Hymie; Ekker, Marc

    2015-10-01

    To determine the impact of a controlled loss of dopaminergic neurons on locomotor function, we generated transgenic zebrafish, Tg(dat:CFP-NTR), expressing a cyan fluorescent protein-nitroreductase fusion protein (CFP-NTR) under the control of dopamine transporter (dat) cis-regulatory elements. Embryonic and larval zebrafish express the transgene in several groups of dopaminergic neurons, notably in the olfactory bulb, telencephalon, diencephalon and caudal hypothalamus. Administration of the pro-drug metronidazole (Mtz) resulted in activation of caspase 3 in CFP-positive neurons and in a reduction in dat-positive cells by 5 days post-fertilization (dpf). Loss of neurons coincided with impairments in global locomotor parameters such as swimming distance, percentage of time spent moving, as well as changes in tail bend parameters such as time to maximal bend and angular velocity. Dopamine levels were transiently decreased following Mtz administration. Recovery of some of the locomotor parameters was observed by 7 dpf. However, the total numbers of dat-expressing neurons were still decreased at 7, 12, or 14 dpf, even though there was evidence for production of new dat-expressing cells. Tg(dat:CFP-NTR) zebrafish provide a model to correlate altered dopaminergic neuron numbers with locomotor function and to investigate factors influencing regeneration of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26118896

  14. Effect of non-selective dopaminergic receptor agonist on disrupted maternal behavior in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Tan-No, Koichi; Onogi, Hiroshi; Niijima, Fukie; Tadano, Takeshi

    2010-07-11

    Olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) animals are considered a putative model of depression that produces behavioral, physiological, and neurochemical alterations resembling clinical depression. Depression is a critical cause of child abuse and neglect, and it has been reported that maternal behavior involves dopaminergic neurons of the mesolimbic pathway. In this study, we investigated the effect of apomorphine, a non-selective dopaminergic receptor agonist, on maternal behavior to examine the influence of activated brain dopaminergic function in OBX mice. In addition, we conducted the sucrose preference test to examine the reward system which has a critical relationship to mesolimbic dopaminergic function and maternal behavior. Maternal behavior was observed on postnatal day (PND) 0 and 4. OBX female mice showed a reduction in sucrose preference 2 weeks post surgery. OBX dams showed maternal behavior deficits on PND 0, and these deficits were ameliorated by administration of apomorphine. These results suggest that maternal behavior deficits in OBX dams may involve brain hypodopaminergic function in the central nervous system induced by OBX. PMID:20219556

  15. Influence of olfactory bulbectomy on maternal behavior and dopaminergic function in nucleus accumbens in mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Tan-No, Koichi; Onogi, Hiroshi; Niijima, Fukie; Tadano, Takeshi

    2010-12-20

    Olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) induces behavioral, physiological, and neurochemical alterations resembling clinical depression and is widely used as an animal model of depression. It has been reported that depression is a critical cause of child abuse and neglect and that maternal behavior involves dopaminergic neurons of the mesolimbic pathway. In a previous study we found that OBX mice show maternal behavior deficits which are improved by administration of apomorphine, a non-selective dopamine agonist. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effect of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) on maternal behavior deficits to examine the influence of pre-synaptic dopaminergic function in OBX mice. Furthermore, we measured tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels using microphotometry and quantified dopamine D1- and D2-like receptors using autoradiography in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). As a result, 25mg/kg l-DOPA with 12.5mg/kg benserazide improved disrupted maternal behavior in OBX mice and there are no changes in TH levels or number of D1- and D2-like receptors between sham and OBX mothers. The behavioral data support the hypothesis that changed dopaminergic function may contribute to maternal behavior deficits in OBX mice. However, our findings concerning dopaminergic function suggest that the deficits in OBX mice are not simply due to changes in TH levels or dopamine receptor number in the NAc. PMID:20638419

  16. Substance P Exacerbates Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration through Neurokinin-1 Receptor-Independent Activation of Microglial NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chun-Hsien; Qian, Li; Chen, Shih-Heng; Wilson, Belinda; Oyarzabal, Esteban; Jiang, Lulu; Ali, Syed; Robinson, Bonnie; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Although dysregulated substance P (SP) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), how SP affects the survival of dopaminergic neurons remains unclear. Here, we found that mice lacking endogenous SP (TAC1−/−), but not those deficient in the SP receptor (neurokinin-1 receptor, NK1R), were more resistant to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced nigral dopaminergic neurodegeneration than wild-type controls, suggesting a NK1R-independent toxic action of SP. In vitro dose–response studies revealed that exogenous SP enhanced LPS- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in a bimodal manner, peaking at submicromolar and subpicomolar concentrations, but was substantially less effective at intermediate concentrations. Mechanistically, the actions of submicromolar levels of SP were NK1R-dependent, whereas subpicomolar SP-elicited actions required microglial NADPH oxidase (NOX2), the key superoxide-producing enzyme, but not NK1R. Subpicomolar concentrations of SP activated NOX2 by binding to the catalytic subunit gp91phox and inducing membrane translocation of the cytosolic subunits p47phox and p67phox. The importance of NOX2 was further corroborated by showing that inhibition or disruption of NOX2 blocked subpicomolar SP-exacerbated neurotoxicity. Together, our findings revealed a critical role of microglial NOX2 in mediating the neuroinflammatory and dopaminergic neurodegenerative effects of SP, which may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:25209287

  17. HIV Subtypes B and C gp120 and Methamphetamine Interaction: Dopaminergic System Implicates Differential Neuronal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Rao, Kurapati V K; Salam, Abdul Ajees Abdul; Atluri, Venkata S R; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M; Agudelo, Marisela; Perez, Suray; Yoo, Changwon; Raymond, Andrea D; Ding, Hong; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2015-01-01

    HIV subtypes or clades differentially induce HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and substance abuse is known to accelerate HIV disease progression. The HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 plays a major role in binding and budding in the central nervous system (CNS) and impacts dopaminergic functions. However, the mechanisms utilized by HIV-1 clades to exert differential effects and the methamphetamine (METH)-associated dopaminergic dysfunction are poorly understood. We hypothesized that clade B and C gp120 structural sequences, modeling based analysis, dopaminergic effect, and METH potentiate neuronal toxicity in astrocytes. We evaluated the effect of clade B and C gp120 and/or METH on the DRD-2, DAT, CaMKs and CREBP transcription. Both the structural sequence and modeling studies demonstrated that clade B gp120 in V1-V4, α -2 and N-glycosylated sites are distinct from clade C gp120. The distinct structure and sequence variation of clade B gp120 differentially impact DRD-2, DAT, CaMK II and CaMK IV mRNA, protein and intracellular expression compared to clade C gp120. However, CREB transcription is upregulated by both clade B and C gp120, and METH co-treatment potentiated these effects. In conclusion, distinct structural sequences of HIV-1 clade B and C gp120 differentially regulate the dopaminergic pathway and METH potentiates neurotoxicity. PMID:26057350

  18. NANOMETER DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ARE NEUROTOXIC TO DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS THROUGH MICROGLIAL ACTIVATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    NANOMETER DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ARE NEUROTOXIC TO DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS THROUGH MICROGLIAL ACTIVATION. M.L. Block1,2, X. Wu1, P. Zhong1, G. Li1, T. Wang1, J.S. Hong1 & B.Veronesi.2
    1The Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, NIEHS, RTP, NC and 2 National Health and Envi...

  19. The cellular and Genomic response of rat dopaminergic neurons (N27) to coated nanosilver

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined if nanosilver (nanoAg) of different sizes and coatings were differentially toxic to oxidative stress-sensitive neurons. N27 rat dopaminergic neurons were exposed (0.5-5ppm) to a set of nanoAg of different sizes (10nm, 75nm) and coatings (PVP, citrate) and thei...

  20. HIV Subtypes B and C gp120 and Methamphetamine Interaction: Dopaminergic System Implicates Differential Neuronal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Rao, Kurapati V. K.; Salam, Abdul Ajees Abdul; Atluri, Venkata S. R.; Kaftanovskaya, Elena M.; Agudelo, Marisela; Perez, Suray; Yoo, Changwon; Raymond, Andrea D.; Ding, Hong; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2015-01-01

    HIV subtypes or clades differentially induce HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and substance abuse is known to accelerate HIV disease progression. The HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 plays a major role in binding and budding in the central nervous system (CNS) and impacts dopaminergic functions. However, the mechanisms utilized by HIV-1 clades to exert differential effects and the methamphetamine (METH)-associated dopaminergic dysfunction are poorly understood. We hypothesized that clade B and C gp120 structural sequences, modeling based analysis, dopaminergic effect, and METH potentiate neuronal toxicity in astrocytes. We evaluated the effect of clade B and C gp120 and/or METH on the DRD-2, DAT, CaMKs and CREBP transcription. Both the structural sequence and modeling studies demonstrated that clade B gp120 in V1-V4, α -2 and N-glycosylated sites are distinct from clade C gp120. The distinct structure and sequence variation of clade B gp120 differentially impact DRD-2, DAT, CaMK II and CaMK IV mRNA, protein and intracellular expression compared to clade C gp120. However, CREB transcription is upregulated by both clade B and C gp120, and METH co-treatment potentiated these effects. In conclusion, distinct structural sequences of HIV-1 clade B and C gp120 differentially regulate the dopaminergic pathway and METH potentiates neurotoxicity. PMID:26057350

  1. Parkin cooperates with GDNF/RET signaling to prevent dopaminergic neuron degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meka, Durga Praveen; Müller-Rischart, Anne Kathrin; Nidadavolu, Prakash; Mohammadi, Behnam; Motori, Elisa; Ponna, Srinivas Kumar; Aboutalebi, Helia; Bassal, Mahmoud; Annamneedi, Anil; Finckh, Barbara; Miesbauer, Margit; Rotermund, Natalie; Lohr, Christian; Tatzelt, Jörg; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Kramer, Edgar R.

    2015-01-01

    Parkin and the glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) receptor RET have both been independently linked to the dopaminergic neuron degeneration that underlies Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study, we demonstrate that there is genetic crosstalk between parkin and the receptor tyrosine kinase RET in two different mouse models of PD. Mice lacking both parkin and RET exhibited accelerated dopaminergic cell and axonal loss compared with parkin-deficient animals, which showed none, and RET-deficient mice, in which we found moderate degeneration. Transgenic expression of parkin protected the dopaminergic systems of aged RET-deficient mice. Downregulation of either parkin or RET in neuronal cells impaired mitochondrial function and morphology. Parkin expression restored mitochondrial function in GDNF/RET-deficient cells, while GDNF stimulation rescued mitochondrial defects in parkin-deficient cells. In both cases, improved mitochondrial function was the result of activation of the prosurvival NF-κB pathway, which was mediated by RET through the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Taken together, these observations indicate that parkin and the RET signaling cascade converge to control mitochondrial integrity and thereby properly maintain substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons and their innervation in the striatum. The demonstration of crosstalk between parkin and RET highlights the interplay in the protein network that is altered in PD and suggests potential therapeutic targets and strategies to treat PD. PMID:25822020

  2. Three Dopaminergic Polymorphisms Are Associated with Academic Achievement in Middle and High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Wright, John Paul; DeLisi, Matt; Howard, Matthew O.

    2010-01-01

    Although academic achievement is a heritable construct, to date research has yet to explore its molecular genetic underpinnings. Drawing on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the current longitudinal study investigated the associations between polymorphisms in three dopaminergic genes (DAT1, DRD2, and DRD4) and…

  3. Dopaminergic Polymorphisms and Educational Achievement: Results from a Longitudinal Sample of Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Kevin M.; Wright, John Paul; DeLisi, Matt; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Although educational attainment has been found to be moderately heritable, research has yet to explore candidate genes for it. Drawing on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, in the current study, we examined the association between polymorphisms in three dopaminergic genes (DAT1, DRD2, and DRD4), a dopamine index, and…

  4. Manganese nanoparticle activates mitochondrial dependent apoptotic signaling and autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2011-11-15

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles ({approx} 25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25-400 {mu}g/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin 1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles

  5. Neurotensin Induces Presynaptic Depression of D2 Dopamine Autoreceptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Piccart, Elisabeth; Courtney, Nicholas A.; Branch, Sarah Y.; Ford, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Increased dopaminergic signaling is a hallmark of severe mesencephalic pathologies such as schizophrenia and psychostimulant abuse. Activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons is under strict control of inhibitory D2 autoreceptors. Application of the modulatory peptide neurotensin (NT) to midbrain dopaminergic neurons transiently increases activity by decreasing D2 dopamine autoreceptor function, yet little is known about the mechanisms that underlie long-lasting effects. Here, we performed patch-clamp electrophysiology and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in mouse brain slices to determine the effects of NT on dopamine autoreceptor-mediated neurotransmission. Application of the active peptide fragment NT8–13 produced synaptic depression that exhibited short- and long-term components. Sustained depression of D2 autoreceptor signaling required activation of the type 2 NT receptor and the protein phosphatase calcineurin. NT application increased paired-pulse ratios and decreased extracellular levels of somatodendritic dopamine, consistent with a decrease in presynaptic dopamine release. Surprisingly, we observed that electrically induced long-term depression of dopaminergic neurotransmission that we reported previously was also dependent on type 2 NT receptors and calcineurin. Because electrically induced depression, but not NT-induced depression, was blocked by postsynaptic calcium chelation, our findings suggest that endogenous NT may act through a local circuit to decrease presynaptic dopamine release. The current research provides a mechanism through which augmented NT release can produce a long-lasting increase in membrane excitability of midbrain dopamine neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Whereas plasticity of glutamate synapses in the brain has been studied extensively, demonstrations of plasticity at dopaminergic synapses have been more elusive. By quantifying inhibitory neurotransmission between midbrain dopaminergic neurons in brain slices from mice we have

  6. Fortuitously discovered liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Sharma, Malay; Gibson, Robert N; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jenssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The fortuitously discovered liver lesion is a common problem. Consensus might be expected in terms o