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Sample records for dorsal root norm

  1. On the origins of dorsal root potentials.

    PubMed

    LLOYD, D P C; McINTYRE, A K

    1949-03-20

    The "dorsal root potential" consists of five successive deflections designated for convenience, D.R.I, II, III, IV, and V. Of these, D.R.V alone constitutes the dorsal root potential of prior description. A study has been made of the general properties of those deflections not previously described. Dorsal root potentials are electrotonic extensions into the extramedullary root segment, the result of electrical interactions within the cord comparable to those that have been studied in peripheral nerve. Although the anatomical and electrical conditions of interaction are infinitely more complex in the cord than in nerve, it is seen that the fact of parallel distribution of primary afferent fibers pertaining to neighboring dorsal roots provides a sufficient anatomical basis for qualitative analysis in the first approximation of dorsal root potentials. An extension of the theory of interaction between neighboring nerve fibers has been made to include an especial case of interaction between fibers orientated at right angles to one another. The predictions have been tested in a nerve model and found correct. Given this elaboration, and the stated anatomical propositions, existing knowledge of interaction provides an adequate theoretical basis for an elementary understanding of dorsal root potentials. The study of general properties and the analysis of dorsal root potentials have led to the formulation of certain conclusions that follow. D.R.I, II, and III record the electrotonic spread of polarization resulting from the external field of impulses conducted in the intramedullary segment and longitudinal trajects of primary afferent fibers. D.R.IV arises in part as the result of activity in primary afferent fibers, and in part as the result of activity in secondary neurons. In either case the mode of production is the same, and the responsible agent is residual negativity in the active collaterals, or, more precisely, the external field of current flow about the

  2. Calcium Signaling in Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Poroli, Mark J.; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is the dominant second messenger in primary sensory neurons. In addition, disrupted Ca2+ signaling is a prominent feature in pain models involving peripheral nerve injury. Standard cytoplasmic Ca2+ recording techniques use high K+ or field stimulation and dissociated neurons. To compare findings in intact dorsal root ganglia, we used a method of simultaneous electrophysiologic and microfluorimetric recording. Methods Dissociated neurons were loaded by bath-applied Fura-2-AM and subjected to field stimulation. Alternatively, we adapted a technique in which neuronal somata of intact ganglia were loaded with Fura-2 through an intracellular microelectrode that provided simultaneous membrane potential recording during activation by action potentials (APs) conducted from attached dorsal roots. Results Field stimulation at levels necessary to activate neurons generated bath pH changes through electrolysis and failed to predictably drive neurons with AP trains. In the intact ganglion technique, single APs produced measurable Ca2+ transients that were fourfold larger in presumed nociceptive C-type neurons than in nonnociceptive Aβ-type neurons. Unitary Ca2+ transients summated during AP trains, forming transients with amplitudes that were highly dependent on stimulation frequency. Each neuron was tuned to a preferred frequency at which transient amplitude was maximal. Transients predominantly exhibited monoexponential recovery and had sustained plateaus during recovery only with trains of more than 100 APs. Nerve injury decreased Ca2+ transients in C-type neurons, but increased transients in Aβ-type neurons. Conclusions Refined observation of Ca2+ signaling is possible through natural activation by conducted APs in undissociated sensory neurons and reveals features distinct to neuronal types and injury state. PMID:20526180

  3. Conduction in regenerating dorsal root fibres.

    PubMed

    Feasby, T E; Bostock, H; Sears, T A

    1981-03-01

    Rat dorsal roots were crushed and recordings of compound action potentials and single fibre longitudinal currents were made 12-85 days later from the regenerating portions. Maximum conduction velocities rose from 1.3 m/s at day 10 to 25.7 m/s by day 41 and single fibre velocities varied from 1.2 m/s at 12 days postcrush to 23.8 m/s at 85 days. Many fibres appeared to conduct continuously in the early stages, although the resolution of the technique was insufficient to exclude saltatory conduction over short internodes. Two fibres showed internodes of about 200 microns at 9 and 13 days of regeneration, suggesting that "nodal" regions may be formed before significant myelination. At 27 days post-crush and later, internodes were 300-425 microns in length. Many regenerating fibres had branches, both retrograde and orthograde. Reduced conduction velocities in rostral portions of regenerating fibres suggested tapering. PMID:6260903

  4. Neuronal cell lines as model dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kathleen; Baillie, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived immortal cell lines including ND7/23 and F-11 cells have been used extensively as in vitro model systems of native peripheral sensory neurons. However, while it is clear that some sensory neuron-specific receptors and ion channels are present in these cell lines, a systematic comparison of the molecular targets expressed by these cell lines with those expressed in intact peripheral neurons is lacking. Results In this study, we examined the expression of RNA transcripts in the human neuroblastoma-derived cell line, SH-SY5Y, and two dorsal root ganglion hybridoma cell lines, F-11 and ND7/23, using Illumina next-generation sequencing, and compared the results with native whole murine dorsal root ganglions. The gene expression profiles of these three cell lines did not resemble any specific defined dorsal root ganglion subclass. The cell lines lacked many markers for nociceptive sensory neurons, such as the Transient receptor potential V1 gene, but expressed markers for both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. Global gene ontology analysis on whole dorsal root ganglions and cell lines showed similar enrichment of biological process terms across all samples. Conclusions This paper provides insights into the receptor repertoire expressed in common dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived cell lines compared with whole murine dorsal root ganglions, and illustrates the limits and potentials of these cell lines as tools for neuropharmacological exploration. PMID:27130590

  5. Vulnerability of dorsal root neurons and fibers toward methylmercury toxicity: a morphological evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, R.K.; Chang, L.W.

    1981-10-01

    The selective and relative sensitivity of various components (dorsal root neurons, dorsal root fibers, and ventral root fibers) of the dorsal root ganglia toward methylmercury toxicity were investigated. Charles River rats were orally administered methymercury chloride at a daily dose of 2.0 mg/kg body wt for 8 weeks. Dorsal root ganglia (L/sub 1/-S/sub 1/) were examined with light and electron microscopy. Extensive Wallerian-like degeneration was observed in the dorsal root fibers while no significant changes were found in the dorsal root neurons and in the ventral root fibers at the light-microscopic level. At the electron-microscopic level, only minor and possibly reversible changes, such as increase in lysosomes, neurofilamentous proliferation, and disintegration of the Nissl substance, were observed in the neuronal cell bodies while severe and irreversible degenerative changes occurred in the dorsal root fibers. No remarkable pathological changes were observed in the ventral root fibers. Schwann cells became hypertrophied and transformed into actively phagocytosing macrophages. It is concluded that while the dorsal root ganglia are highly vulnerable to the toxicity of methylmercury, the relative sensitivity to the toxic impact is: dorsal root fiber > dorsal root neuron (nerve cell body) > ventral root fibers.

  6. Erythrocyte nuclei resemble dying neurons in embryonic dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, R E; Pover, C M; Kwiat, G C; Fitzgerald, M

    1993-07-01

    Cell death or apoptosis is regarded as an important feature of mammalian neural development, but the evidence for this generalization depends on the assumption that cell death can be clearly recognized. The usual profile of a dying neuron is a deeply stained pyknotic homogeneous sphere. In this paper we present evidence that such profiles in embryonic rat T6 and L4 dorsal root ganglia are not dying neurons but rather nuclei of immature red blood cells. This observation, combined with recent work showing that the methods previously used for counting normal or dying neurons are biased, indicates that the classic work establishing the importance of apoptosis needs to be repeated. PMID:8233029

  7. The tract of Lissauer and the dorsal root potential.

    PubMed Central

    Cervero, F; Iggo, A; Molony, V

    1978-01-01

    1. Intersegmental dorsal root potentials (d.r.p.s) have been recorded in the lumbar spinal cord of spinalized cats under Na pentobarbitone anaesthesia, to investigate the spinal cord structures involved in the intersegmental transmission of d.r.p.s. 2. A technique has been developed for restricted surgical isolation of Lissauer's tract between the segments with subsequent histological verification of the extent of the isolation. 3. Section of the ipsilateral dorsal column resulted in an increase in the latency of the intersegmental d.r.p. and a significant reduction in its amplitude. A further reduction in amplitude was achieved by section of the ipsilateral dorso-lateral funiculus. 4. Neither section of Lissauer's tract after the above lesions were performed nor restricted Lissauer's tractotomies abolished intersegmental d.r.p.s; only a small reduction in the amplitude of the d.r.p. was obtained. 5. It is proposed that intersegmental d.r.p.s are produced by the activaiton of a propriospinal system projecting through pathways other than Lissauer's tract and that primary afferent collaterals from the dorsal columns make a major contribtuion to their generation. The contribution made by Lissauer's tract is probably small. PMID:214544

  8. EVALUATION OF HYPERALGESIA AND HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES OF DORSAL ROOT GANGLION INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Grava, André Luiz de Souza; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the hyperalgesia and histological abnormalities induced by contact between the dorsal root ganglion and the nucleus pulposus. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats were used, divided into two experimental groups. In one of the groups, a fragment of autologous nucleus pulposus was removed from the sacrococcygeal region and deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. In the other group (control), a fragment of adipose tissue was deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated on the third day and the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation. A L5 dorsal root ganglion was removed in the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation for histological study using HE staining and histochemical study using specific labeling for iNOS. Results: Higher intensity of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion. In this group, the histological study showed abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue, characterized by an inflammatory process and axonal degeneration. The histopathological abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue presented increasing intensity with increasing length of observation, and there was a correlation with maintenance of the hyperalgesia observed in the behavioral assessment. Immunohistochemistry using specific labeling for iNOS in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion showed higher expression of this enzyme in the nuclei of the inflammatory cells (glial cells) surrounding the neurons. Conclusion: Contact between the nucleus pulposus and the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and caused histological abnormalities in the dorsal root ganglion components. These abnormalities were characterized by an inflammatory and degenerative process in the structures of the dorsal root

  9. Inhibitory Injury Signaling Represses Axon Regeneration After Dorsal Root Injury.

    PubMed

    Mar, Fernando M; Simões, Anabel R; Rodrigo, Inês S; Sousa, Mónica M

    2016-09-01

    Following injury to peripheral axons, besides increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), the positive injury signals extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3) are locally activated and retrogradely transported to the cell body, where they induce a pro-regenerative program. Here, to further understand the importance of injury signaling for successful axon regeneration, we used dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons that have a central branch without regenerative capacity and a peripheral branch that regrows after lesion. Although injury to the DRG central branch (dorsal root injury (DRI)) activated ERK, JNK, and STAT-3 and increased cAMP levels, it did not elicit gain of intrinsic growth capacity nor the ability to overcome myelin inhibition, as occurred after peripheral branch injury (sciatic nerve injury (SNI)). Besides, gain of growth capacity after SNI was independent of ERK and cAMP. Antibody microarrays of dynein-immunoprecipitated axoplasm from rats with either DRI or SNI revealed a broad differential activation and transport of signals after each injury type and further supported that ERK, JNK, STAT-3, and cAMP signaling pathways are minor contributors to the differential intrinsic axon growth capacity of both injury models. Increased levels of inhibitory injury signals including GSK3β and ROCKII were identified after DRI, not only in axons but also in DRG cell bodies. In summary, our work shows that activation and transport of positive injury signals are not sufficient to promote increased axon growth capacity and that differential modulation of inhibitory molecules may contribute to limited regenerative response. PMID:26298667

  10. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E; Detloff, Megan R; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  11. Expressing Constitutively Active Rheb in Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Enhances the Integration of Sensory Axons that Regenerate Across a Chondroitinase-Treated Dorsal Root Entry Zone Following Dorsal Root Crush

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Kholodilov, Nikolai; Burke, Robert E.; Detloff, Megan R.; Côté, Marie-Pascale; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    While the peripheral branch of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) can successfully regenerate after injury, lesioned central branch axons fail to regrow across the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ), the interface between the dorsal root and the spinal cord. This lack of regeneration is due to the limited regenerative capacity of adult sensory axons and the growth-inhibitory environment at the DREZ, which is similar to that found in the glial scar after a central nervous system (CNS) injury. We hypothesized that transduction of adult DRG neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express a constitutively-active form of the GTPase Rheb (caRheb) will increase their intrinsic growth potential after a dorsal root crush. Additionally, we posited that if we combined that approach with digestion of upregulated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) at the DREZ with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), we would promote regeneration of sensory axons across the DREZ into the spinal cord. We first assessed if this strategy promotes neuritic growth in an in vitro model of the glial scar containing CSPG. ChABC allowed for some regeneration across the once potently inhibitory substrate. Combining ChABC treatment with expression of caRheb in DRG significantly improved this growth. We then determined if this combination strategy also enhanced regeneration through the DREZ after dorsal root crush in adult rats in vivo. After unilaterally crushing C4-T1 dorsal roots, we injected AAV5-caRheb or AAV5-GFP into the ipsilateral C5-C8 DRGs. ChABC or PBS was injected into the ipsilateral dorsal horn at C5-C8 to digest CSPG, for a total of four animal groups (caRheb + ChABC, caRheb + PBS, GFP + ChABC, GFP + PBS). Regeneration was rarely observed in PBS-treated animals, whereas short-distance regrowth across the DREZ was observed in ChABC-treated animals. No difference in axon number or length between the ChABC groups was observed, which may be related to intraganglionic inflammation induced by the

  12. Chronic sciatic nerve compression induces fibrosis in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinwen; Chen, Jianghai; Chen, Yanhua; Cong, Xiaobin; Chen, Zhenbing

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, pathological alterations in neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were investigated in a rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression. The rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression was established by placing a 1 cm Silastic tube around the right sciatic nerve. Histological examination was performed via Masson's trichrome staining. DRG injury was assessed using Fluoro Ruby (FR) or Fluoro Gold (FG). The expression levels of target genes were examined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. At 3 weeks post‑compression, collagen fiber accumulation was observed in the ipsilateral area and, at 8 weeks, excessive collagen formation with muscle atrophy was observed. The collagen volume fraction gradually and significantly increased following sciatic nerve compression. In the model rats, the numbers of FR‑labeled DRG neurons were significantly higher, relative to the sham‑operated group, however, the numbers of FG‑labeled neurons were similar. In the ipsilateral DRG neurons of the model group, the levels of transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were elevated and, surrounding the neurons, the levels of collagen type I were increased, compared with those in the contralateral DRG. In the ipsilateral DRG, chronic nerve compression was associated with significantly higher levels of phosphorylated (p)‑extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2, and significantly lower levels of p‑c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase and p‑p38, compared with those in the contralateral DRGs. Chronic sciatic nerve compression likely induced DRG pathology by upregulating the expression levels of TGF‑β1, CTGF and collagen type I, with involvement of the mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling pathway. PMID:26820076

  13. Chronic sciatic nerve compression induces fibrosis in dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINWEN; CHEN, JIANGHAI; CHEN, YANHUA; CONG, XIAOBIN; CHEN, ZHENBING

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, pathological alterations in neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were investigated in a rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression. The rat model of chronic sciatic nerve compression was established by placing a 1 cm Silastic tube around the right sciatic nerve. Histological examination was performed via Masson's trichrome staining. DRG injury was assessed using Fluoro Ruby (FR) or Fluoro Gold (FG). The expression levels of target genes were examined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. At 3 weeks post-compression, collagen fiber accumulation was observed in the ipsilateral area and, at 8 weeks, excessive collagen formation with muscle atrophy was observed. The collagen volume fraction gradually and significantly increased following sciatic nerve compression. In the model rats, the numbers of FR-labeled DRG neurons were significantly higher, relative to the sham-operated group, however, the numbers of FG-labeled neurons were similar. In the ipsilateral DRG neurons of the model group, the levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were elevated and, surrounding the neurons, the levels of collagen type I were increased, compared with those in the contralateral DRG. In the ipsilateral DRG, chronic nerve compression was associated with significantly higher levels of phosphorylated (p)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and significantly lower levels of p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p-p38, compared with those in the contralateral DRGs. Chronic sciatic nerve compression likely induced DRG pathology by upregulating the expression levels of TGF-β1, CTGF and collagen type I, with involvement of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. PMID:26820076

  14. Intraneuronal angiotensinergic system in rat and human dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Jaspal; Schwab, Alexander; Nussberger, Juerg; Schaffner, Thomas; Saavedra, Juan M.; Imboden, Hans

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the local formation of angiotensin II (Ang II) in the neurons of sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we studied the expression of angiotensinogen (Ang-N)-, renin-, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)- and cathepsin D-mRNA, and the presence of protein renin, Ang II, Substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the rat and human thoracic DRG. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) studies revealed that rat DRG expressed substantial amounts of Ang-N- and ACE mRNA, while renin mRNA as well as the protein renin were untraceable. Cathepsin D-mRNA and cathepsin D-protein were detected in the rat DRG indicating the possibility of existence of pathways alternative to renin for Ang I formation. Angiotensin peptides were successfully detected with high performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay in human DRG extracts. In situ hybridization in rat DRG confirmed additionally expression of Ang-N mRNA in the cytoplasm of numerous neurons. Intracellular Ang II staining could be shown in number of neurons and their processes in both the rat and human DRG. Interestingly we observed neuronal processes with angiotensinergic synapses en passant, colocalized with synaptophysin, within the DRG. In the DRG, we also identified by qRT-PCR, expression of Ang II receptor AT1A and AT2-mRNA while AT1B-mRNA was not traceable. In some neurons Substance P and CGRP were found colocalized with Ang II. The intracellular localization and colocalization of Ang II with Substance P and CGRP in the DRG neurons may indicate a participation and function of Ang II in the regulation of nociception. In conclusion, these results suggest that Ang II may be produced locally in the neurons of rat and human DRG and act as a neurotransmitter. PMID:20346377

  15. An in vitro assay system for studying synapse formation between nociceptive dorsal root ganglion and dorsal horn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Donald J.; Choudhury, Papiya; MacDermott, Amy B.

    2010-01-01

    Synapses between nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and spinal cord dorsal horn neurons represent the first loci for transmission of painful stimuli. Our knowledge of the molecular organization and development of these synapses is sparse due, partly, to a lack of a reliable model system that reconstitutes synaptogenesis between these two neuronal populations. To address this issue, we have established an in vitro assay system consisting of separately purified DRG neurons and dorsal horn neurons on astrocyte micro-islands. Using immunocytochemistry, we have found that 97%, 93%, 98%, 96%, and 94% of DRG neurons on these microislands express markers often associated with nociceptive neurons including Substance P, TRPV1, calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), TrKA, and peripherin, respectively. Triple labeling with these nociceptive-like markers, synaptic vesicle marker Vglut2 and using MAP2 as a dendritic marker revealed the presence of nociceptive-like markers at synaptic terminals. Using this immunocytochemical approach, we counted contact points as overlapping MAP2/Vglut2 puncta and showed that they increased with time in culture. Single and dual patch clamp recordings showed that overlapping Vglut2/MAP2 puncta observed after a few days in culture are likely to be functional synapses between DRG and dorsal horn neurons in our in vitro assay system. Taken together, these data suggest our co-culture microisland model system consists of mostly nociceptive-like DRG neurons that express presynaptic markers and form functional synapses with their dorsal horn partners. Thus, this model system may have direct application for studies on factors regulating development of nociceptive DRG/dorsal horn synapses. PMID:20385165

  16. Imunoreactivity of zinc transporter 7 (ZNT7) in mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present study, we showed for the first time the localization of ZNT7 immunoreactivity in the mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by means of immunohistochemistry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results revealed that ZNT7 immunoreactivity was abundantly expressed in the nerve cells of...

  17. Clinical Results of a Brindley Procedure: Sacral Anterior Root Stimulation in Combination with a Rhizotomy of the Dorsal Roots

    PubMed Central

    Martens, F. M. J.; Heesakkers, J. P. F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Brindley procedure consists of a stimulator for sacral anterior-root stimulation and a rhizotomy of the dorsal sacral roots to abolish neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Stimulation of the sacral anterior roots enables micturition, defecation, and erections. This overview discusses the technique, selection of patients and clinical results of the Brindley procedure. The Brindley procedure is suitable for a selected group of patients with complete spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity. Overall, the Brindley procedure shows good clinical results and improves quality of life. However, to remain a valuable treatment option for the future, the technique needs some adequate changes to enable analysis of the implanted parts, to improve revision techniques of the implanted parts, and to abolish the sacral dorsal rhizotomy. PMID:21738530

  18. Receptor-mediated uptake of labeled transferrin by embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Markelonis, G J; Oh, T H; Park, L P; Azari, P; Max, S R

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin is a growth-promoting plasma protein which is known to occur within developing neurons. Since little information exists on the process by which transferrin is internalized by neurons, we studied this process using dissociated embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. Cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons were incubated in the presence of 3.75 nM (125)I-transferrin at 37°C, the cultures were extensively washed, the neurons were solubilized in a Triton-containing buffer and internalized (125)I-transferrin was quantified with a gamma counter. (125)I-transferrin was internalized in a linear fashion for at least 60 min, and this uptake was abolished by the presence of 1.25 μM unlabeled transferrin. No competition for the uptake of (125)I-transferrin was observed in the presence of 1.25 μM ovalbumin, cytochrome c, hemoglobin, insulin, horseradish peroxidase, aldolase or the carboxyl-terminal fragment ('half-site') of transferrin. By contrast, uptake was inhibited by approximately 50% in the presence of the ammo-terminal fragment ('half-site') of transferrin (1.25 μM) or in the presence of concanavalin A (1.25 μM). The binding of transferrin conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate to neurons at 4°C and its subsequent internalization at 37°C was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy of unfixed cells following incubation of the neurons in the presence of the fluorescently labeled protein. Furthermore, the transferrin receptors were visualized immunocytochemically on the surface membranes of dorsal root ganglion neurons using rabbit antibodies directed against transferrin receptors from chicken reticulocytes. From these data, we conclude that transferrin is internalized by neurons via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and suggest that this protein may serve an important role in the development and survival of dorsal root ganglion neurons. PMID:24874753

  19. Generation of New Neurons in Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Rats after Peripheral Nerve Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The evidence of neurons generated ex novo in sensory ganglia of adult animals is still debated. In the present study, we investigated, using high resolution light microscopy and stereological analysis, the changes in the number of neurons in dorsal root ganglia after 30 days from a crush lesion of the rat brachial plexus terminal branches. Results showed, as expected, a relevant hypertrophy of dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, we reported, for the first time in the literature, that neuronal hypertrophy was accompanied by massive neuronal hyperplasia leading to a 42% increase of the number of primary sensory neurons. Moreover, ultrastructural analyses on sensory neurons showed that there was not a relevant neuronal loss as a consequence of the nerve injury. The evidence of BrdU-immunopositive neurons and neural progenitors labeled with Ki67, nanog, nestin, and sox-2 confirmed the stereological evidence of posttraumatic neurogenesis in dorsal root ganglia. Analysis of morphological changes following axonal damage in addition to immunofluorescence characterization of cell phenotype suggested that the neuronal precursors which give rise to the newly generated neurons could be represented by satellite glial cells that actively proliferate after the lesion and are able to differentiate toward the neuronal lineage. PMID:25722894

  20. Measuring Spinal Presynaptic Inhibition in Mice By Dorsal Root Potential Recording In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Grünewald, Benedikt; Geis, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition is one of the most powerful inhibitory mechanisms in the spinal cord. The underlying physiological mechanism is a depolarization of primary afferent fibers mediated by GABAergic axo-axonal synapses (primary afferent depolarization). The strength of primary afferent depolarization can be measured by recording of volume-conducted potentials at the dorsal root (dorsal root potentials, DRP). Pathological changes of presynaptic inhibition are crucial in the abnormal central processing of certain pain conditions and in some disorders of motor hyperexcitability. Here, we describe a method of recording DRP in vivo in mice. The preparation of spinal cord dorsal roots in the anesthetized animal and the recording procedure using suction electrodes are explained. This method allows measuring GABAergic DRP and thereby estimating spinal presynaptic inhibition in the living mouse. In combination with transgenic mouse models, DRP recording may serve as a powerful tool to investigate disease-associated spinal pathophysiology. In vivo recording has several advantages compared to ex vivo isolated spinal cord preparations, e.g. the possibility of simultaneous recording or manipulation of supraspinal networks and induction of DRP by stimulation of peripheral nerves. PMID:24747664

  1. Dorsal root ganglion transcriptome analysis following peripheral nerve injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shaogen; Marie Lutz, Brianna; Miao, Xuerong; Liang, Lingli; Mo, Kai; Chang, Yun-Juan; Du, Peicheng; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Tian, Bin; Kaufman, Andrew G.; Bekker, Alex; Hu, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve injury leads to changes in gene expression in primary sensory neurons of the injured dorsal root ganglia. These changes are believed to be involved in neuropathic pain genesis. Previously, these changes have been identified using gene microarrays or next generation RNA sequencing with poly-A tail selection, but these approaches cannot provide a more thorough analysis of gene expression alterations after nerve injury. Methods The present study chose to eliminate mRNA poly-A tail selection and perform strand-specific next generation RNA sequencing to analyze whole transcriptomes in the injured dorsal root ganglia following spinal nerve ligation. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay was carried out to verify the changes of some differentially expressed RNAs in the injured dorsal root ganglia after spinal nerve ligation. Results Our results showed that more than 50 million (M) paired mapped sequences with strand information were yielded in each group (51.87 M–56.12 M in sham vs. 51.08 M–57.99 M in spinal nerve ligation). Six days after spinal nerve ligation, expression levels of 11,163 out of a total of 27,463 identified genes in the injured dorsal root ganglia significantly changed, of which 52.14% were upregulated and 47.86% downregulated. The largest transcriptional changes were observed in protein-coding genes (91.5%) followed by noncoding RNAs. Within 944 differentially expressed noncoding RNAs, the most significant changes were seen in long interspersed noncoding RNAs followed by antisense RNAs, processed transcripts, and pseudogenes. We observed a notable proportion of reads aligning to intronic regions in both groups (44.0% in sham vs. 49.6% in spinal nerve ligation). Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we confirmed consistent differential expression of selected genes including Kcna2, Oprm1 as well as lncRNAs Gm21781 and 4732491K20Rik following spinal nerve

  2. A role for Runx transcription factor signaling in dorsal root ganglion sensory neuron diversification.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Ina; Sigrist, Markus; de Nooij, Joriene C; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Jessell, Thomas M; Arber, Silvia

    2006-02-01

    Subpopulations of sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) can be characterized on the basis of sensory modalities that convey distinct peripheral stimuli, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie sensory neuronal diversification remain unclear. Here, we have used genetic manipulations in the mouse embryo to examine how Runx transcription factor signaling controls the acquisition of distinct DRG neuronal subtype identities. Runx3 acts to diversify an Ngn1-independent neuronal cohort by promoting the differentiation of proprioceptive sensory neurons through erosion of TrkB expression in prospective TrkC+ sensory neurons. In contrast, Runx1 controls neuronal diversification within Ngn1-dependent TrkA+ neurons by repression of neuropeptide CGRP expression and controlling the fine pattern of laminar termination in the dorsal spinal cord. Together, our findings suggest that Runx transcription factor signaling plays a key role in sensory neuron diversification. PMID:16446142

  3. Blockade of Nogo receptor ligands promotes functional regeneration of sensory axons after dorsal root crush.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Pamela A; Lee, Daniel H S; Qian, Fang; Weinreb, Paul H; Frank, Eric

    2009-05-13

    A major impediment for regeneration of axons within the CNS is the presence of multiple inhibitory factors associated with myelin. Three of these factors bind to the Nogo receptor, NgR, which is expressed on axons. Administration of exogenous blockers of NgR or NgR ligands promotes the regeneration of descending axonal projections after spinal cord hemisection. A more detailed analysis of CNS regeneration can be made by examining the growth of specific classes of sensory axons into the spinal cord after dorsal root crush injury. In this study, we assessed whether administration of a soluble peptide fragment of the NgR (sNgR) that binds to and blocks all three NgR ligands can promote regeneration after brachial dorsal root crush in adult rats. Intraventricular infusion of sNgR for 1 month results in extensive regrowth of myelinated sensory axons into the white and gray matter of the dorsal spinal cord, but unmyelinated sensory afferents do not regenerate. In concert with the anatomical growth of sensory axons into the cord, there is a gradual restoration of synaptic function in the denervated region, as revealed by extracellular microelectrode recordings from the spinal gray matter in response to stimulation of peripheral nerves. These positive synaptic responses are correlated with substantial improvements in use of the forelimb, as assessed by paw preference, paw withdrawal to tactile stimuli and the ability to grasp. These results suggest that sNgR may be a potential therapy for restoring sensory function after injuries to sensory roots. PMID:19439606

  4. Direct injection into the dorsal root ganglion: Technical, behavioral, and histological observations

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gregory; Kostic, Sandra; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Park, Frank; Sapunar, Damir; Yu, Hongwei; Hogan, Quinn

    2013-01-01

    Direct injection of agents into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) offers the opportunity to manipulate sensory neuron function at a segmental level to explore pathophysiology of painful conditions. However, there is no described method that has been validated in detail for such injections in adult rats. We have found that 2 (µl of dye injected through a pulled glass pipette directly into the distal DRG, exposed by a minimal foraminotomy, produces complete filling of the DRG with limited extension into the spinal roots. Injection into the spinal nerve required 3 µl to achieve comparable DRG filling, produced preferential spread into the ventral root, and was accompanied by substantial leakage of injected solution from the injection site. Injections into the sciatic nerve of volumes up to 10 (µl did not reach the DRG. Transient hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation at threshold (von Frey) and noxious levels (pin) developed after 2 µl saline injection directly into the DRG that was in part attributable to the surgical exposure procedure alone. Only minimal astrocyte activation in the spinal dorsal horn was evident after DRG saline injections. Injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector conveying green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene resulted in expression as soon as 1 day after injection into the DRG, including fibers in the spinal dorsal horn and columns. AAV injection into the DRG produced additional thermal hypersensitivity and withdrawal from the stroke of a brush and compromised motor performance. These findings demonstrate a method for selective injection of agents into single DRGs for anatomically restricted actions. PMID:21540055

  5. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and ectopic neuronal discharge after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Song, X J; Hu, S J; Greenquist, K W; Zhang, J M; LaMotte, R H

    1999-12-01

    Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) was produced in adult rats by implanting a stainless steel rod unilaterally into the intervertebral foramen, one rod at L(4) and another at L(5). Two additional groups of rats received either a sham surgery or an acute injury consisting of a transient compression of the ganglion. Withdrawal of the hindpaw was used as evidence of a nocifensive response to mechanical and thermal stimulation of the plantar surface. In addition, extracellular electrophysiological recordings of spontaneous discharges were obtained from dorsal root fibers of formerly compressed ganglia using an in vitro nerve-DRG-dorsal root preparation. The mean threshold force of punctate indentation and the mean threshold temperature of heating required to elicit a 50% incidence of foot withdrawal ipsilateral to the CCD were significantly lower than preoperative values throughout the 35 days of postoperative testing. The number of foot withdrawals ipsilateral to the CCD during a 20-min contact with a temperature-controlled floor was significantly increased over preoperative values throughout postoperative testing when the floor was 4 degrees C (hyperalgesia) and, to a lesser extent, when it was 30 degrees C (spontaneous pain). Stroking the foot with a cotton wisp never elicited a reflex withdrawal before surgery but did so in most rats tested ipsilateral to the CCD during the first 2 postoperative weeks. In contrast, the CCD produced no changes in responses to mechanical or thermal stimuli on the contralateral foot. The sham operation and acute injury produced no change in behavior other than slight, mechanical hyperalgesia for approximately 1 day, ipsilateral to the acute injury. Ectopic spontaneous discharges generated within the chronically compressed ganglion and, occurring in the absence of blood-borne chemicals and without an intact sympathetic nervous system, were recorded from neurons with intact, conducting, myelinated or unmyelinated

  6. Long-term outcomes of intradural cervical dorsal root rhizotomy for refractory occipital neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Gande, Abhiram V; Chivukula, Srinivas; Moossy, John J; Rothfus, William; Agarwal, Vikas; Horowitz, Michael B; Gardner, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Occipital neuralgia (ON) causes chronic pain in the cutaneous distribution of the greater and lesser occipital nerves. The long-term efficacy of cervical dorsal root rhizotomy (CDR) in the management of ON has not been well described. The authors reviewed their 14-year experience with CDR to assess pain relief and functional outcomes in patients with medically refractory ON. METHODS A retrospective chart review of 75 ON patients who underwent cervical dorsal root rhizotomy, from 1998 to 2012, was performed. Fifty-five patients were included because they met the International Headache Society's (IHS) diagnostic criteria for ON, responded to CT-guided nerve blocks at the C-2 dorsal nerve root, and had at least one follow-up visit. Telephone interviews were additionally used to obtain data on patient satisfaction. RESULTS Forty-two patients (76%) were female, and the average age at surgery was 46 years (range 16-80). Average follow up was 67 months (range 5-150). Etiologies of ON included the following: idiopathic (44%), posttraumatic (27%), postsurgical (22%), post-cerebrovascular accident (4%), postherpetic (2%), and postviral (2%). At last follow-up, 35 patients (64%) reported full pain relief, 11 (20%) partial relief, and 7 (16%) no pain relief. The extent of pain relief after CDR was not significantly associated with ON etiology (p = 0.43). Of 37 patients whose satisfaction-related data were obtained, 25 (68%) reported willingness to undergo repeat surgery for similar pain relief, while 11 (30%) reported no such willingness; a single patient (2%) did not answer this question. Twenty-one individuals (57%) reported that their activity level/functional state improved after surgery, 5 (13%) reported a decline, and 11 (30%) reported no difference. The most common acute postoperative complications were infections in 9% (n = 5) and CSF leaks in 5% (n = 3); chronic complications included neck pain/stiffness in 16% (n = 9) and upper-extremity symptoms in 5% (n = 3

  7. Characterization of A-425619 at native TRPV1 receptors: a comparison between dorsal root ganglia and trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Heath A; Neelands, Torben R; Kort, Michael; Han, Ping; Vos, Melissa H; Faltynek, Connie R; Moreland, Robert B; Puttfarcken, Pamela S

    2008-10-31

    1-isoquinolin-5-yl-3-(4-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)-urea (A-425619), a novel, potent, and selective transient receptor potential type V1 (TRPV1) antagonist, attenuates pain associated with inflammation and tissue injury in rats. The purpose of this study was to extend the in vitro characterization of A-425619 to native TRPV1 receptors and to compare the pharmacological properties of TRPV1 receptors in the dorsal root ganglion with trigeminal ganglion neurons. A robust increase in intracellular Ca(2+) was elicited by a variety of TRPV1 agonists with similar rank order of potency between both cultures: resiniferatoxin>tinyatoxin>capsaicin>N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA). A-425619 blocked the 500 nM capsaicin response in both dorsal root ganglion with trigeminal ganglion cultures with IC(50) values of 78 nM and 115 nM, respectively, whereas capsazepine was significantly less potent (dorsal root ganglia: IC(50)=2.63 microM; trigeminal ganglia: IC(50)=6.31 microM). Furthermore, A-425619 was more potent in blocking the 3 microM NADA-evoked response in both dorsal root ganglia (IC(50)=36 nM) and trigeminal ganglia (IC(50)=37 nM) than capsazepine (dorsal root ganglia, IC(50)=741 nM; trigeminal ganglia, IC(50)=708 nM). Electrophysiology studies showed that 100 nM A-425619 completely inhibited TRPV1-mediated acid activated currents in dorsal root ganglia and trigeminal ganglia neurons. In addition, A-425619 blocked capsaicin- and NADA-evoked calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release in both cultures more effectively than capsazepine. These data show that A-425619 is a potent TRPV1 antagonist at the native TRPV1 receptors, and suggest that the pharmacological profile for TRPV1 receptors on dorsal root ganglia and trigeminal ganglia is very similar. PMID:18755179

  8. Real-time control of walking using recordings from dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Holinski, B J; Everaert, D G; Mushahwar, V K; Stein, R B

    2013-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to decode sensory information from the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in real time, and to use this information to adapt the control of unilateral stepping with a state-based control algorithm consisting of both feed-forward and feedback components. Approach In five anesthetized cats, hind limb stepping on a walkway or treadmill was produced by patterned electrical stimulation of the spinal cord through implanted microwire arrays, while neuronal activity was recorded from the dorsal root ganglia. Different parameters, including distance and tilt of the vector between hip and limb endpoint, integrated gyroscope and ground reaction force were modeled from recorded neural firing rates. These models were then used for closed-loop feedback. Main Results Overall, firing-rate based predictions of kinematic sensors (limb endpoint, integrated gyroscope) were the most accurate with variance accounted for >60% on average. Force prediction had the lowest prediction accuracy (48±13%) but produced the greatest percentage of successful rule activations (96.3%) for stepping under closed-loop feedback control. The prediction of all sensor modalities degraded over time, with the exception of tilt. Significance Sensory feedback from moving limbs would be a desirable component of any neuroprosthetic device designed to restore walking in people after a spinal cord injury. This study provides a proof-of-principle that real-time feedback from the DRG is possible and could form part of a fully implantable neuroprosthetic device with further development. PMID:23928579

  9. Highly efficient method for gene delivery into mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingli; Reynaud, Florie; Falk, Julien; Spencer, Ambre; Ding, Yin-Di; Baumlé, Véronique; Lu, Ruisheng; Castellani, Valérie; Yuan, Chonggang; Rudkin, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    The development of gene transfection technologies has greatly advanced our understanding of life sciences. While use of viral vectors has clear efficacy, it requires specific expertise and biological containment conditions. Electroporation has become an effective and commonly used method for introducing DNA into neurons and in intact brain tissue. The present study describes the use of the Neon® electroporation system to transfect genes into dorsal root ganglia neurons isolated from embryonic mouse Day 13.5-16. This cell type has been particularly recalcitrant and refractory to physical or chemical methods for introduction of DNA. By optimizing the culture condition and parameters including voltage and duration for this specific electroporation system, high efficiency (60-80%) and low toxicity (>60% survival) were achieved with robust differentiation in response to Nerve growth factor (NGF). Moreover, 3-50 times fewer cells are needed (6 × 10(4)) compared with other traditional electroporation methods. This approach underlines the efficacy of this type of electroporation, particularly when only limited amount of cells can be obtained, and is expected to greatly facilitate the study of gene function in dorsal root ganglia neuron cultures. PMID:25698920

  10. Satellite glial cells in dorsal root ganglia are activated in streptozotocin-treated rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hanani, Menachem; Blum, Erez; Liu, Shuangmei; Peng, Lichao; Liang, Shangdong

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a very common complication in diabetes mellitus (DM), and treatment for it is limited. As DM is becoming a global epidemic it is important to understand and treat this problem. The mechanisms of diabetic neuropathic pain are largely obscure. Recent studies have shown that glial cells are important for a variety of neuropathic pain types, and we investigated what are the changes that satellite glial cells (SGCs) in dorsal root ganglia undergo in a DM type 1 model, induced by streptozotocin (STZ) in mice and rats. We carried out immunohistochemical studies to learn about changes in the activation marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in SGCs. We found that after STZ-treatment the number of neurons surrounded with GFAP-positive SGCs in dorsal root ganglia increased 4-fold in mice and 5-fold in rats. Western blotting for GFAP, which was done only on rats because of the larger size of the ganglia, showed an increase of about 2-fold in STZ-treated rats, supporting the immunohistochemical results. These results indicate for the first time that SGCs are activated in rodent models of DM1. As SGC activation appears to contribute to chronic pain, these results suggest that SGCs may participate in the generation and maintenance of diabetic neuropathic pain, and can serve as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25312986

  11. Dorsal root ganglia microenvironment of female BB Wistar diabetic rats with mild neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, D W; Ho, L T; Allison, J A

    1994-12-01

    Abnormalities in the microenvironment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) might play a role in the pathogenesis of sensory abnormalities in human diabetic neuropathy. We examined aspects of DRG microenvironment by measuring local blood flow and oxygen tension in the L4 dorsal root ganglia of female BB Wistar (BBW) diabetic rats with mild neuropathy. The findings were compared with concurrent measurements of local sciatic endoneurial blood flow and oxygen tension. Diabetic rats were treated with insulin and underwent electrophysiological, blood flow and oxygen tension measurements at either 7-11 or 17-23 weeks after the development of glycosuria. Nondiabetic female BB Wistar rats from the same colony served as controls. At both ages, BBW diabetic rats had significant abnormalities in sensory, but not motor conduction compared to nondiabetic controls. Sciatic endoneurial blood flow in the diabetic rats of both ages was similar to control values, but the older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW diabetic rats had a selective reduction in DRG blood flow. Sciatic endoneurial oxygen tensions were not significantly altered in the diabetic rats. DRG oxygen tension appeared lowered in younger (7-11 week diabetic) but not older (17-23 week diabetic) BBW rats. Our findings indicate that there are important changes in the DRG microenvironment of diabetic rats with selective sensory neuropathy. PMID:7699389

  12. MAPK Pathways Are Involved in Neuropathic Pain in Rats with Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lei; Zhang, Xiao; Wei, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the MAPK pathways were involved in the mechanism of neuropathic pain in rats with chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion. We determined the paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) of rats before and after CCD surgery and then after p38, JNK, or ERK inhibitors administration. Western blotting, RT-PCR, and immunofluorescence of dorsal root ganglia were performed to investigate the protein and mRNA level of MAPKs and also the alternation in distributions of positive neurons in dorsal root ganglia. Intrathecal administration of MAPKs inhibitors, SB203580 (p38 inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), and U0126 (ERK inhibitor), resulted in a partial reduction in CCD-induced mechanical allodynia. The reduction of allodynia was associated with significant depression in the level of both MAPKs mRNA and protein expression in CCD rats and also associated with the decreased ratios of large size MAPKs positive neurons in dorsal root ganglia. In conclusion, the specific inhibitors of MAPKs contributed to the attenuation of mechanical allodynia in CCD rats and the large size MAPKs positive neurons in dorsal root ganglia were crucial. PMID:27504140

  13. Direct communication of the spinal subarachnoid space with the rat dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Joukal, Marek; Klusáková, Ilona; Dubový, Petr

    2016-05-01

    The anatomical position of the subarachnoid space (SAS) in relation to dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and penetration of tracer from the SAS into DRG were investigated. We used intrathecal injection of methylene blue to visualize the anatomical position of the SAS in relation to DRG and immunostaining of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) for detecting arachnoid limiting the SAS. Intrathecal administration of fluorescent-conjugated dextran (fluoro-emerald; FE) was used to demonstrate direct communication between the SAS and DRG. Intrathecal injection of methylene blue and DPP-IV immunostaining revealed that SAS delimited by the arachnoid was extended up to the capsule of DRG in a fold-like recess that may reach approximately half of the DRG length. The arachnoid was found in direct contact to the neuronal body-rich area in the angle between dorsal root and DRG as well as between spinal nerve roots at DRG. Particles of FE were found in the cells of DRG capsule, satellite glial cells, interstitial space, as well as in small and medium-sized neurons after intrathecal injection. Penetration of FE from the SAS into the DRG induced an immune reaction expressed by colocalization of FE and immunofluorescence indicating antigen-presenting cells (MHC-II+), activated (ED1+) and resident (ED2+) macrophages, and activation of satellite glial cells (GFAP+). Penetration of lumbar-injected FE into the cervical DRG was greater than that into the lumbar DRG after intrathecal injection of FE into the cisterna magna. Our results demonstrate direct communication between DRG and cerebrospinal fluid in the SAS that can create another pathway for possible propagation of inflammatory and signaling molecules from DRG primary affected by peripheral nerve injury into DRG of remote spinal segments. PMID:26844624

  14. Multiple sodium channels and their roles in electrogenesis within dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Anthony M; Cummins, Theodore R; Waxman, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion neurons express an array of sodium channel isoforms allowing precise control of excitability. An increasing body of literature indicates that regulation of firing behaviour in these cells is linked to their patterns of expression of specific sodium channel isoforms, which have been discovered to possess distinct biophysical characteristics. The pattern of expression of sodium channels differs in different subclasses of DRG neurons and is not fixed but, on the contrary, changes in response to a variety of disease insults. Moreover, modulation of channels by their environment has been found to play an important role in the response of these neurons to stimuli. In this review we illustrate how excitability can be finely tuned to provide contrasting firing templates in different subclasses of DRG neurons by selective deployment of various sodium channel isoforms, by plasticity of expression of these proteins, and by interactions of these sodium channel isoforms with each other and with other modulatory molecules. PMID:17158175

  15. Mechanisms of Varicella-Zoster Virus Neuropathogenesis in Human Dorsal Root Ganglia▿

    PubMed Central

    Reichelt, Mike; Zerboni, Leigh; Arvin, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human alphaherpesvirus that infects sensory ganglia and reactivates from latency to cause herpes zoster. VZV replication was examined in human dorsal root ganglion (DRG) xenografts in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency using multiscale correlative immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. These experiments showed the presence of VZV genomic DNA, viral proteins, and virion production in both neurons and satellite cells within DRG. Furthermore, the multiscale analysis of VZV-host cell interactions revealed virus-induced cell-cell fusion and polykaryon formation between neurons and satellite cells during VZV replication in DRG in vivo. Satellite cell infection and polykaryon formation in neuron-satellite cell complexes provide mechanisms to amplify VZV entry into neuronal cell bodies, which is necessary for VZV transfer to skin in the affected dermatome during herpes zoster. These mechanisms of VZV neuropathogenesis help to account for the often severe neurologic consequences of herpes zoster. PMID:18256143

  16. Control of action potential propagation by intracellular Ca2+ in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lüscher, C; Lipp, P; Lüscher, H R; Niggli, E

    1996-01-01

    1. To assess the role of intracellular Ca2+ in action potential (AP) propagation, whole-cell recordings of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells were carried out while Ca2+ was simultaneously measured with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. 2. Flash photolytic liberation of a Ca2+ buffer during trains of APs which partly failed to invade the DRG cell body immediately lowered intracellular Ca2+ and restored safe AP propagation. Furthermore, the speed of the propagated AP was reduced considerably when intracellular Ca2+ was increased by flash photolysis of caged Ca2+. 3. Both results suggest that intracellular Ca2+ regulates the safety factor for AP propagation and may thus provide a control mechanism for synaptic integration, which acts pre- as well as postsynaptically. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8821131

  17. In Vitro Modeling of Cancerous Neural Invasion: The Dorsal Root Ganglion Model.

    PubMed

    Na'ara, Shorook; Gil, Ziv; Amit, Moran

    2016-01-01

    One way that solid tumors disseminate is through neural invasion. This route is well-known in cancers of the head and neck, prostate, and pancreas. These neurotropic cancer cells have a unique ability to migrate unidirectionally along nerves towards the central nervous system (CNS). The dorsal root ganglia (DRG)/cancer cell model is a three dimensional (3D) in vitro model frequently used for studying the interaction between neural stroma and cancer cells. In this model, mouse or human cancer cell lines are grown in ECM adjacent to preparations of freshly dissociated cultured DRG. In this article, the DRG isolation protocol from mice, and implantation in petri dishes for co-culturing with pancreatic cancer cells are demonstrated. Five days after implantation, the cancer cells made contact with the DRG neurites. Later, these cells formed bridgeheads to facilitate more extensive polarized, neurotropic migration of cancer cells. PMID:27167037

  18. Prokineticin 2 potentiates acid-sensing ion channel activity in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prokineticin 2 (PK2) is a secreted protein and causes potent hyperalgesia in vivo, and is therefore considered to be a new pronociceptive mediator. However, the molecular targets responsible for the pronociceptive effects of PK2 are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that PK2 potentiates the activity of acid-sensing ion channels in the primary sensory neurons. Methods In the present study, experiments were performed on neurons freshly isolated from rat dorsal root ganglion by using whole-cell patch clamp and voltage-clamp recording techniques. Results PK2 dose-dependently enhanced proton-gated currents with an EC50 of 0.22 ± 0.06 nM. PK2 shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 1.81 ± 0.11 fold increase of the maximal current response. PK2 enhancing effect on proton-gated currents was completely blocked by PK2 receptor antagonist. The potentiation was also abolished by intracellular dialysis of GF109203X, a protein kinase C inhibitor, or FSC-231, a protein interacting with C-kinase 1 inhibitor. Moreover, PK2 enhanced the acid-evoked membrane excitability of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons and caused a significant increase in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, PK2 exacerbated nociceptive responses to the injection of acetic acid in rats. Conclusion These results suggest that PK2 increases the activity of acid-sensing ion channels via the PK2 receptor and protein kinase C-dependent signal pathways in rat primary sensory neurons. Our findings support that PK2 is a proalgesic factor and its signaling likely contributes to acidosis-evoked pain by sensitizing acid-sensing ion channels. PMID:22642848

  19. Critical evaluation of the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide in dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Devin M; Li, Hui; Liu, Xian-Yu; Shen, Kai-Feng; Liu, Xue-Ting; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Munanairi, Admire; Chen, Xiao-Jun; Yin, Jun; Sun, Yan-Gang; Li, Yun-Qing

    2016-01-01

    There are substantial disagreements about the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in sensory neurons and whether GRP antibody cross-reacts with substance P (SP). These concerns necessitate a critical revaluation of GRP expression using additional approaches. Here, we show that a widely used GRP antibody specifically recognizes GRP but not SP. In the spinal cord of mice lacking SP (Tac1 KO), the expression of not only GRP but also other peptides, notably neuropeptide Y (NPY), is significantly diminished. We detected Grp mRNA in dorsal root ganglias using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization and RNA-seq. We demonstrated that Grp mRNA and protein are upregulated in dorsal root ganglias, but not in the spinal cord, of mice with chronic itch. Few GRP+ immunostaining signals were detected in spinal sections following dorsal rhizotomy and GRP+ cell bodies were not detected in dissociated dorsal horn neurons. Ultrastructural analysis further shows that substantially more GRPergic fibers form synaptic contacts with gastrin releasing peptide receptor-positive (GRPR+) neurons than SPergic fibers. Our comprehensive study demonstrates that a majority of GRPergic fibers are of primary afferent origin. A number of factors such as low copy number of Grp transcripts, small percentage of cells expressing Grp, and the use of an eGFP GENSAT transgenic as a surrogate for GRP protein have contributed to the controversy. Optimization of experimental procedures facilitates the specific detection of GRP expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons. PMID:27068287

  20. Reversal of neurochemical alterations in the spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia by Mas-related gene (Mrg) receptors in a rat model of spinal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongmei; Xue, Yaping; Yan, Yanhua; Lin, Minjie; Yang, Jiajia; Huang, Jianzhong; Hong, Yanguo

    2016-07-01

    The rodent Mas-related gene (Mrg) receptor subtype C has been demonstrated to inhibit pathological pain. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying the reversal of pain hypersensitivity by the selective MrgC receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22) in a rat model of L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL). Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of BAM8-22 (0.1-10nmol) attenuated mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner on day 10 after SNL. The antiallodynia effect of BAM8-22 was abolished by MrgC receptor antibody, but not by naloxone. I.t. BAM8-22 (10nmol) inhibited SNL-induced upregulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthesis (nNOS) and phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the spinal dorsal horn. The BAM8-22 treatment reversed the SNL-induced astrocyte activation, increase of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in the spinal cord. BAM8-22 also reversed the upregulation of fractalkine and IL-1β in small- and medium-sized dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Furthermore, the BAM8-22 exposure suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase of nNOS and IL-1β in the DRG explant cultures and the BAM8-22-induced suppression disappeared in the presence of MrgC receptor antibody. The present study provides evidence that activation of MrgC receptors inhibits nerve injury-induced increase of pronociceptive molecules in DRG neurons, suppressing astrocyte activation, the upregulation of excitatory mediators and phosphorylation of transcription factors in the spinal dorsal horn. As MrgC receptors are unequally expressed in the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, this study suggests that targeting MrgC receptors could be a new therapy for neuropathic pain with limited unwanted effects. PMID:27018398

  1. Sigma-1 receptor expression in the dorsal root ganglion: Reexamination using a highly specific antibody.

    PubMed

    Mavlyutov, Timur A; Duellman, Tyler; Kim, Hung Tae; Epstein, Miles L; Leese, Charlotte; Davletov, Bazbek A; Yang, Jay

    2016-09-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a unique pluripotent modulator of living systems and has been reported to be associated with a number of neurological diseases including pathological pain. Intrathecal administration of S1R antagonists attenuates the pain behavior of rodents in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. However, the S1R localization in the spinal cord shows a selective ventral horn motor neuron distribution, suggesting the high likelihood of S1R in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) mediating the pain relief by intrathecally administered drugs. Since primary afferents are the major component in the pain pathway, we examined the mouse and rat DRGs for the presence of the S1R. At both mRNA and protein levels, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western confirmed that the DRG contains greater S1R expression in comparison to spinal cord, cortex, or lung but less than liver. Using a custom-made highly specific antibody, we demonstrated the presence of a strong S1R immuno-fluorescence in all rat and mouse DRG neurons co-localizing with the Neuron-Specific Enolase (NSE) marker, but not in neural processes or GFAP-positive glial satellite cells. In addition, S1R was absent in afferent terminals in the skin and in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Using immuno-electron microscopy, we showed that S1R is detected in the nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of DRG cells. In contrast to other cells, S1R is also located directly at the plasma membrane of the DRG neurons. The presence of S1R in the nuclear envelope of all DRG neurons suggests an exciting potential role of S1R as a regulator of neuronal nuclear activities and/or gene expression, which may provide insight toward new molecular targets for modulating nociception at the level of primary afferent neurons. PMID:27339730

  2. Neuroimmune and Neuropathic Responses of Spinal Cord and Dorsal Root Ganglia in Middle Age

    PubMed Central

    Galbavy, William; Kaczocha, Martin; Puopolo, Michelino; Liu, Lixin; Rebecchi, Mario J.

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies of aging and neuropathic injury have focused on senescent animals compared to young adults, while changes in middle age, particularly in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), have remained largely unexplored. 14 neuroimmune mRNA markers, previously associated with peripheral nerve injury, were measured in multiplex assays of lumbar spinal cord (LSC), and DRG from young and middle-aged (3, 17 month) naïve rats, or from rats subjected to chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve (after 7 days), or from aged-matched sham controls. Results showed that CD2, CD3e, CD68, CD45, TNF-α, IL6, CCL2, ATF3 and TGFβ1 mRNA levels were substantially elevated in LSC from naïve middle-aged animals compared to young adults. Similarly, LSC samples from older sham animals showed increased levels of T-cell and microglial/macrophage markers. CCI induced further increases in CCL2, and IL6, and elevated ATF3 mRNA levels in LSC of young and middle-aged adults. Immunofluorescence images of dorsal horn microglia from middle-aged naïve or sham rats were typically hypertrophic with mostly thickened, de-ramified processes, similar to microglia following CCI. Unlike the spinal cord, marker expression profiles in naïve DRG were unchanged across age (except increased ATF3); whereas, levels of GFAP protein, localized to satellite glia, were highly elevated in middle age, but independent of nerve injury. Most neuroimmune markers were elevated in DRG following CCI in young adults, yet middle-aged animals showed little response to injury. No age-related changes in nociception (heat, cold, mechanical) were observed in naïve adults, or at days 3 or 7 post-CCI. The patterns of marker expression and microglial morphologies in healthy middle age are consistent with development of a para-inflammatory state involving microglial activation and T-cell marker elevation in the dorsal horn, and neuronal stress and satellite cell activation in the DRG. These changes, however, did not

  3. Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Progenitors Assist Functional Sensory Axon Regeneration after Dorsal Root Avulsion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hoeber, Jan; Trolle, Carl; Konig, Niclas; Du, Zhongwei; Gallo, Alessandro; Hermans, Emmanuel; Aldskogius, Hakan; Shortland, Peter; Zhang, Su-Chun; Deumens, Ronald; Kozlova, Elena N.

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal root avulsion results in permanent impairment of sensory functions due to disconnection between the peripheral and central nervous system. Improved strategies are therefore needed to reconnect injured sensory neurons with their spinal cord targets in order to achieve functional repair after brachial and lumbosacral plexus avulsion injuries. Here, we show that sensory functions can be restored in the adult mouse if avulsed sensory fibers are bridged with the spinal cord by human neural progenitor (hNP) transplants. Responses to peripheral mechanical sensory stimulation were significantly improved in transplanted animals. Transganglionic tracing showed host sensory axons only in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated animals. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that sensory fibers had grown through the bridge and showed robust survival and differentiation of the transplants. Section of the repaired dorsal roots distal to the transplant completely abolished the behavioral improvement. This demonstrates that hNP transplants promote recovery of sensorimotor functions after dorsal root avulsion, and that these effects are mediated by spinal ingrowth of host sensory axons. These results provide a rationale for the development of novel stem cell-based strategies for functionally useful bridging of the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:26053681

  4. Synaptic plasticity and sensory-motor improvement following fibrin sealant dorsal root reimplantation and mononuclear cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Suzana U.; Barbizan, Roberta; Spejo, Aline B.; Ferreira, Rui S.; Barraviera, Benedito; Góes, Alfredo M.; de Oliveira, Alexandre L. R.

    2014-01-01

    Root lesions may affect both dorsal and ventral roots. However, due to the possibility of generating further inflammation and neuropathic pain, surgical procedures do not prioritize the repair of the afferent component. The loss of such sensorial input directly disturbs the spinal circuits thus affecting the functionality of the injuried limb. The present study evaluated the motor and sensory improvement following dorsal root reimplantation with fibrin sealant (FS) plus bone marrow mononuclear cells (MC) after dorsal rhizotomy. MC were used to enhance the repair process. We also analyzed changes in the glial response and synaptic circuits within the spinal cord. Female Lewis rats (6–8 weeks old) were divided in three groups: rhizotomy (RZ group), rhizotomy repaired with FS (RZ+FS group) and rhizotomy repaired with FS and MC (RZ+FS+MC group). The behavioral tests electronic von-Frey and Walking track test were carried out. For immunohistochemistry we used markers to detect different synapse profiles as well as glial reaction. The behavioral results showed a significant decrease in sensory and motor function after lesion. The reimplantation decreased glial reaction and improved synaptic plasticity of afferent inputs. Cell therapy further enhanced the rewiring process. In addition, both reimplanted groups presented twice as much motor control compared to the non-treated group. In conclusion, the reimplantation with FS and MC is efficient and may be considered an approach to improve sensory-motor recovery following dorsal rhizotomy. PMID:25249946

  5. Effect of low level laser therapy on chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Wang, Chau-Zen; Ho, Mei-Ling; Kuo, Po-Lin; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are vulnerable to physical injury of the intervertebral foramen, and chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) an result in nerve root damage with persistent morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the DRG in a CCD model and to determine the mechanisms underlying these effects. CCD rats had L-shaped stainless-steel rods inserted into the fourth and fifth lumbar intervertebral foramen, and the rats were then subjected to 0 or 8 J/cm2 LLLT for 8 consecutive days following CCD surgery. Pain and heat stimuli were applied to test for hyperalgesia following CCD. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were measured via real-time PCR, and protein expression levels were analyzed through immunohistochemical analyses. Our data indicate that LLLT significantly decreased the tolerable sensitivity to pain and heat stimuli in the CCD groups. The expression levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β were increased following CCD, and we found that these increases could be reduced by the application of LLLT. Furthermore, the expression of GAP-43 was enhanced by LLLT. In conclusion, LLLT was able to enhance neural regeneration in rats following CCD and improve rat ambulatory behavior. The therapeutic effects of LLLT on the DRG during CCD may be exerted through suppression of the inflammatory response and induction of neuronal repair genes. These results suggest potential clinical applications for LLLT in the treatment of compression-induced neuronal disorders. PMID:24594641

  6. CPEB3 Deficiency Elevates TRPV1 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Potentiate Thermosensation.

    PubMed

    Fong, Sitt Wai; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Wu, Meng-Fang; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Shuian

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 3 (CPEB3) is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that downregulates translation of multiple plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) at the glutamatergic synapses. Activity-induced synthesis of PRPs maintains long-lasting synaptic changes that are critical for memory consolidation and chronic pain manifestation. CPEB3-knockout (KO) mice show aberrant hippocampus-related plasticity and memory, so we investigated whether CPEB3 might have a role in nociception-associated plasticity. CPEB3 is widely expressed in the brain and peripheral afferent sensory neurons. CPEB3-KO mice with normal mechanosensation showed hypersensitivity to noxious heat. In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model, CPEB3-KO animals showed normal thermal hyperalgesia and transiently enhanced mechanical hyperalgesia. Translation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) RNA was suppressed by CPEB3 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), whereas CFA-induced inflammation reversed this inhibition. Moreover, CPEB3/TRPV1 double-KO mice behaved like TRPV1-KO mice, with severely impaired thermosensation and thermal hyperalgesia. An enhanced thermal response was recapitulated in non-inflamed but not inflamed conditional-KO mice, with cpeb3 gene ablated mostly but not completely, in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. CPEB3-regulated translation of TRPV1 RNA may play a role in fine-tuning thermal sensitivity of nociceptors. PMID:26915043

  7. Properties of acid-induced currents in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons.

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Zuhal; Yang, Lei; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2016-05-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are cation channels that are activated by protons (H(+)). They are expressed in neurons throughout the nervous system and may play important roles in several neurologic disorders including inflammation, cerebral ischemia, seizures, neurodegeneration, anxiety, depression, and migraine. ASICs generally produce transient currents that desensitize in response to a decrease in extracellular pH Under certain conditions, the inactivation of ASICs can be incomplete and allow them to produce sustained currents. Here, we characterize the properties of both transient and sustained acid-induced currents in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. At pH levels between 7.3 and 7.1 they include "window currents" through ASICs. With stronger acid signals sustained currents are maintained in the absence of extracellular Na(+) or the presence of the ASIC blockers amiloride and Psalmotoxin-1(PcTx1). These sustained responses may have several different origins in these cells, including acid-induced stimulation of inward Cl(-) currents, block of outward K(+) currents, and augmentation of inward H(+) currents, properties that distinguish these novel sustained currents from the well-characterized transient currents. PMID:27173673

  8. Evaluation of Cisplatin Neurotoxicity in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia via Cytosolic Calcium Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Erol, Kevser; Yiğitaslan, Semra; Ünel, Çiğdem; Kaygısız, Bilgin; Yıldırım, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Calcium homeostasis is considered to be important in antineoplastic as well as in neurotoxic adverse effects of cisplatin. Aims: This study aimed to investigate the role of Ca2+ in cisplatin neurotoxicity in cultured rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Study Design: Cell culture study. Methods: DRG cells prepared from 1-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were used to determine the role of Ca2+ in the cisplatin (10–600 μM) neurotoxicity. The cells were incubated with cisplatin plus nimodipine (1–3 μM), dizocilpine (MK-801) (1–3 μM) or thapsigargin (100–300 nM). Toxicity of cisplatinon DRG cells was determined by the MTT assay. Results: The neurotoxicity of cisplatin was significant when used in high concentrations (100–600 μM). Nimodipine (1 μM) but not MK-801 or thapsigargin prevented the neurotoxic effects of 200 μM of cisplatin. Conclusion: Voltage-dependent calcium channels may play a role in cisplatin neurotoxicity. PMID:27403382

  9. Artemin promotes functional long-distance axonal regeneration to the brainstem after dorsal root crush

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Laura Elisabeth; Gibson, Molly E.; Arnold, H. Moore; Pepinsky, Blake; Frank, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Recovery after a spinal cord injury often requires that axons restore synaptic connectivity with denervated targets several centimeters from the site of injury. Here we report that systemic artemin (ARTN) treatment promotes the regeneration of sensory axons to the brainstem after brachial dorsal root crush in adult rats. ARTN not only stimulates robust regeneration of large, myelinated sensory axons to the brainstem, but also promotes functional reinnervation of the appropriate target region, the cuneate nucleus. ARTN signals primarily through the RET tyrosine kinase, an interaction that requires the nonsignaling coreceptor GDNF family receptor (GFRα3). Previous studies reported limited GFRα3 expression on large sensory neurons, but our findings demonstrate that ARTN promotes robust regeneration of large, myelinated sensory afferents. Using a cell sorting technique, we demonstrate that GFRα3 expression is similar in myelinated and unmyelinated adult sensory neurons, suggesting that ARTN likely induces long-distance regeneration by binding GFRα3 and RET. Although ARTN is delivered for just 2 wk, regeneration to the brainstem requires more than 3 mo, suggesting that brief trophic support may initiate intrinsic growth programs that remain active until targets are reached. Given its ability to promote targeted functional regeneration to the brainstem, ARTN may represent a promising therapy for restoring sensory function after spinal cord injury. PMID:25918373

  10. Caspase-Mediated Apoptosis in Sensory Neurons of Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglia in Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Hamid Reza; Soleimani Mehranjani, Malek; Shariatzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Haddadi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) undergo apoptosis after peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study was to investigate sensory neuron death and the mechanism involved in the death of these neurons in cultured DRG. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, L5 DRG from adult mouse were dissected and incubated in culture medium for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Freshly dissected and cultured DRG were then fixed and sectioned using a cryostat. Morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis were investigated using fluorescent staining (Propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342) and the terminal Deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method respectively. To study the role of caspases, general caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD.fmk, 100 μM) and immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-3 were used. Results: After 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours in culture, sensory neurons not only displayed morphological features of apoptosis but also they appeared TUNEL positive. The application of Z-VAD.fmk inhibited apoptosis in these neurons over the same time period. In addition, intense activated caspase-3 immunoreactivity was found both in the cytoplasm and the nuclei of these neurons after 24 and 48 hours. Conclusion: Results of the present study show caspase-dependent apoptosis in the sensory neurons of cultured DRG from adult mouse. PMID:24027661

  11. Neurocalcin-immunoreactive neurons in the mammalian dorsal root ganglia, including humans.

    PubMed

    Galeano, R; Germanà, A; Abbate, F; Calvo, D; Naves, F J; Hidaka, H; Germanà, G; Vega, J A

    2000-07-01

    Neurocalcin (NC) is a recently characterized EF-hand calcium-binding protein present in a discrete population of sensory neurons and their peripheral mechanoreceptors, but its presence in peripheral nervous system neurons other than in the rat is still unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the occurrence of NC in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of several mammalian species (horse, buffalo, cow, sheep, pig, dog, and rat), including humans. DRG were fixed, embedded in paraffin, and processed for immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal antibody against NC. The size of the immunoreactive neurons was measured. In all species examined, NC immunoreactivity (IR) was restricted to neurons but the percentage, as well as the size of the immunoreactive neurons, varied among different species. As a rule, small neurons (diameter <20 microm) lack NC IR. In some species (pig, dog, buffalo, cow), only the largest neurons showed IR, whereas in others (sheep, horse, rat, and humans) they covered the entire range of neuron sizes. The pattern of immunostaining was cytoplasmic, although in some species (cow and buffalo), it formed a peripheral "ring." The present results demonstrate that mammalian DRG contain a subpopulation of NC-positive neurons, which varies from one species to another. Based on the neuron size, the possible function of the NC-containing neurons is discussed. PMID:10861367

  12. Time Course of Substance P Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia Following Complete Spinal Nerve Transection

    PubMed Central

    Weissner, Wendy; Winterson, Barbara J.; Stuart-Tilley, Alan; Devor, Marshall; Bove, Geoffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that substance P (SP) is upregulated in primary sensory neurons following axotomy, and that this change occurs in larger neurons that do not usually produce SP. If so, this upregulation may allow normally neighboring, uninjured, and non-nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to become effective in activating pain pathways. Using immunohistochemistry, we performed a unilateral L5 spinal nerve transection upon male Wistar rats, and measured SP expression in ipsilateral L4 and L5 DRGs and contralateral L5 DRGs, at 1 to 14 days postoperatively (dpo), and in control and sham operated rats. In normal and sham operated DRGs, SP was detectable almost exclusively in small neurons (≤ 800 μm2). Following surgery, the mean size of SP-positive neurons from the axotomized L5 ganglia was greater at 2, 4, 7 and 14 dpo. Among large neurons (> 800 μm2) from the axotomized L5, the percentage of SP-positive neurons increased at 2, 4, 7, and 14 dpo. Among small neurons from the axotomized L5, the percentage of SP-positive neurons was increased at 1 and 3 dpo, but was decreased at 7 and 14 dpo. Thus, SP expression is affected by axonal damage, and the time course of the expression is different between large and small DRG neurons. These data support a role of SP-producing, large DRG neurons in persistent sensory changes due to nerve injury. PMID:16680762

  13. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  14. RNA-Seq Analysis of Human Trigeminal and Dorsal Root Ganglia with a Focus on Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Caroline; Schöbel, Nicole; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Tannapfel, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The chemosensory capacity of the somatosensory system relies on the appropriate expression of chemoreceptors, which detect chemical stimuli and transduce sensory information into cellular signals. Knowledge of the complete repertoire of the chemoreceptors expressed in human sensory ganglia is lacking. This study employed the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq) to conduct the first expression analysis of human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We analyzed the data with a focus on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ion channels, which are (potentially) involved in chemosensation by somatosensory neurons in the human TG and DRG. For years, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been considered the main group of receptors for chemosensation in the trigeminal system. Interestingly, we could show that sensory ganglia also express a panel of different olfactory receptors (ORs) with putative chemosensory function. To characterize OR expression in more detail, we performed microarray, semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments, and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, we analyzed the expression data to identify further known or putative classes of chemoreceptors in the human TG and DRG. Our results give an overview of the major classes of chemoreceptors expressed in the human TG and DRG and provide the basis for a broader understanding of the reception of chemical cues. PMID:26070209

  15. Multielectrode array recordings of bladder and perineal primary afferent activity from the sacral dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Tim M.; Gaunt, Robert A.; Weber, Douglas J.

    2011-10-01

    The development of bladder and bowel neuroprostheses may benefit from the use of sensory feedback. We evaluated the use of high-density penetrating microelectrode arrays in sacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for recording bladder and perineal afferent activity. Arrays were inserted in S1 and S2 DRG in three anesthetized cats. Neural signals were recorded while the bladder volume was modulated and mechanical stimuli were applied to the perineal region. In two experiments, 48 units were observed that tracked bladder pressure with their firing rates (79% from S2). At least 50 additional units in each of the three experiments (274 total; 60% from S2) had a significant change in their firing rates during one or more perineal stimulation trials. This study shows the feasibility of obtaining bladder-state information and other feedback signals from the pelvic region with a sacral DRG electrode interface located in a single level. This natural source of feedback would be valuable for providing closed-loop control of bladder or other pelvic neuroprostheses.

  16. Inflammatory mediators release calcitonin gene-related peptide from dorsal root ganglion neurons of the rat.

    PubMed

    Averbeck, B; Izydorczyk, I; Kress, M

    2000-01-01

    The interactions between the inflammatory mediators bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2) and acid pH were studied in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in culture. For this purpose, the cultures were stimulated by inflammatory mediators (bradykinin, serotonin, prostaglandin E(2), 10(-5)M each) or acid solution (pH 6.1) for 5 min and the content of calcitonin gene-related peptide was determined in the supernatant before, during and after stimulation, using an enzyme immunoassay. Acid solution resulted in a threefold increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was entirely dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. The release could not be blocked by the addition of the capsaicin antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M). Bradykinin (10(-5)M) caused a 50% increase of the basal calcitonin gene-related peptide release which was again dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium, whereas serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) were each ineffective at 10(-5)M concentration. The combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2) led to a fivefold increase of the calcitonin gene-related peptide release which could not be further enhanced by acidification. The competitive capsaicin receptor antagonist capsazepine (10(-5)M) significantly reduced the release induced by the combination of bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin E(2). It is suggested that the inflammatory mediators co-operate and together may act as endogenous agonists at the capsaicin receptor to cause calcium influx and consecutive neuropeptide release. PMID:10858619

  17. Roles of syndecan-4 and relative kinases in dorsal root ganglion neuron adhesion and mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Jou; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Cheng, Chao-Min; Lin, Yi-Wen

    2015-04-10

    Mechanical stimuli elicit a biological response and initiate complex physiological processes, including neural feedback schemes associated with senses such as pain, vibration, touch, and hearing. The syndecans (SDCs), a group of adhesion receptors, can modulate adhesion and organize the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) on controlled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates coated with poly-l-lysine (poly) or fibronectin (FN) to investigate cell adhesion and mechanotransduction mechanisms by mechanical stretching on PDMS using DRG neurons. Our results demonstrated that neuronal density, neurite length, and neurite branching were lower in the PDMS group and could be further reversed through activating SDC-4 by FN. The expression of the SDC-4 pathway decreased but with increased pPKCα in the PDMS-poly group. After mechanical stretching, pPKCα-FAKpTyr397-pERK1/2 expression was increased in both poly- and FN-coated PDMS. These results indicate that SDC4-pPKCα-FAKpTyr397-pERK1/2 may play a crucial role in DRG adhesion and mechanotransduction. PMID:25757361

  18. Riboflavin Arrests Cisplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity by Ameliorating Cellular Damage in Dorsal Root Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Maria; Naseem, Imrana; Khan, Aijaz A.; Alhazza, Ibrahim M.

    2015-01-01

    Cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum II- (CP-) induced neurotoxicity is one of the least explored aspects of this drug. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells are considered as the primary target, and their damage plays a vital role in pathogenesis and etiology of CP-induced neurotoxicity. The present study is aimed at confirming if riboflavin (RF) has any protective role in shielding the DRG from CP-induced toxicity. After conducting the established treatment strategy on mice under photoillumination, it was observed that, despite the fact that RF alone is partially toxic, its combination with CP significantly ameliorated the drug-induced damage in DRG cells as evidenced by histological analysis. In addition, it was interesting to observe that the combination group (RF + CP) was able to induce apoptosis in the target cells up to a significant extent which is considered as the most preferred way of countering cancer cells. Therefore, RF can act as an effective adjuvant compound in CP-based chemoradiotherapy to improve clinical outcomes in the contemporary anticancer treatment regimes. PMID:26759811

  19. Differential transcriptional profiling of damaged and intact adjacent dorsal root ganglia neurons in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, A K; Batti, L; Bilbao, D; Buness, A; Rittner, H L; Heppenstall, P A

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion in the somatosensory system, is a severely impairing mostly chronic disease. While its underlying molecular mechanisms are not thoroughly understood, neuroimmune interactions as well as changes in the pain pathway such as sensitization of nociceptors have been implicated. It has been shown that not only are different cell types involved in generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain, like neurons, immune and glial cells, but, also, intact adjacent neurons are relevant to the process. Here, we describe an experimental approach to discriminate damaged from intact adjacent neurons in the same dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Two fluorescent tracers, Fluoroemerald (FE) and 1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), were used, whose properties allow us to distinguish between damaged and intact neurons. Subsequent sorting permitted transcriptional analysis of both groups. Results and qPCR validation show a strong regulation in damaged neurons versus contralateral controls as well as a moderate regulation in adjacent neurons. Data for damaged neurons reveal an mRNA expression pattern consistent with established upregulated genes like galanin, which supports our approach. Moreover, novel genes were found strongly regulated such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), providing novel targets for further research. Differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and sorting allows for a clear distinction between primarily damaged neuropathic neurons and "bystanders," thereby facilitating a more detailed understanding of their respective roles in neuropathic processes in the DRG. PMID:25880204

  20. An improved method for in vitro morphofunctional analysis of mouse dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Ciglieri, E; Ferrini, F; Boggio, E; Salio, C

    2016-09-01

    Sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) are the first-order neurons along the pathway conveying sensory information from the periphery to the central nervous system. The analysis of the morphological and physiological features of these neurons and their alterations in pathology is the necessary prerequisite to understand pain encoding mechanisms. Here, we describe an in vitro procedure for combined morphofunctional analysis of mouse DRGs. Freshly excised DRGs obtained from adult mice were incubated in collagenase to dissolve the ensheathing connective capsule. The degradation of the connective tissue facilitates both access to the neurons by classical recording glass pipettes and the penetration of primary antibodies for immunohistochemical procedures. The entire DRGs were then imaged using a confocal microscope obtaining a fine 3D representation of their cytoarchitecture without requiring tissue sectioning. Thus, our proposed whole-mount preparation represents a flexible in vitro approach for both functional and phenotypic analysis of DRG neurons by at the same time preserving their neuroanatomical relationships. PMID:27224901

  1. Decreased voltage-gated potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons after chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Wu, Yang; Zhao, Bo; Xia, Zhongyuan

    2016-01-20

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) regulate pain transmission by controlling neuronal excitability. Changes in KV expression patterns may thus contribute toward hyperalgesia following nerve injury. The aim of this study was to characterize KV current density in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the right sciatic nerve, a robust model of post-traumatic neuropathic pain. The study examined changes in small-diameter potassium ion currents (<30 µm) in neurons in the L4-L6 DRG following CCI by whole-cell patch-clamping and the association with post-CCI mechanical and thermal nociceptive thresholds. Compared with the control group, 7 days after CCI, the mechanical force and temperature required to elicit ipsilateral foot withdrawal decreased significantly, indicating tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Post-CCI neurons had a significantly lower rheobase current and depolarized resting membrane potential than controls, suggesting KV current downregulation. Some ipsilateral DRG neurons also had spontaneous action potentials and repetitive firing. There was a 55% reduction in the total KV current density caused by a 55% decrease in the sustained delayed rectifier potassium ion current (IK) density and a 17% decrease in the transient A-type potassium ion current (IA) density. These results indicated that changes in DRG neuron IK and IA current density and concomitant afferent hyperexcitability may contribute toward neuropathic pain following injury. The rat CCI model may prove valuable for examining pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapies, such as KV channel modulators. PMID:26671526

  2. CPEB3 Deficiency Elevates TRPV1 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Potentiate Thermosensation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Shuian

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 3 (CPEB3) is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that downregulates translation of multiple plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) at the glutamatergic synapses. Activity-induced synthesis of PRPs maintains long-lasting synaptic changes that are critical for memory consolidation and chronic pain manifestation. CPEB3-knockout (KO) mice show aberrant hippocampus-related plasticity and memory, so we investigated whether CPEB3 might have a role in nociception-associated plasticity. CPEB3 is widely expressed in the brain and peripheral afferent sensory neurons. CPEB3-KO mice with normal mechanosensation showed hypersensitivity to noxious heat. In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model, CPEB3-KO animals showed normal thermal hyperalgesia and transiently enhanced mechanical hyperalgesia. Translation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) RNA was suppressed by CPEB3 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), whereas CFA-induced inflammation reversed this inhibition. Moreover, CPEB3/TRPV1 double-KO mice behaved like TRPV1-KO mice, with severely impaired thermosensation and thermal hyperalgesia. An enhanced thermal response was recapitulated in non-inflamed but not inflamed conditional-KO mice, with cpeb3 gene ablated mostly but not completely, in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. CPEB3-regulated translation of TRPV1 RNA may play a role in fine-tuning thermal sensitivity of nociceptors. PMID:26915043

  3. Teratogenic effects of pyridoxine on the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia of embryonic chickens.

    PubMed

    Sharp, A A; Fedorovich, Y

    2015-03-19

    Our understanding of the role of somatosensory feedback in regulating motility during chicken embryogenesis and fetal development in general has been hampered by the lack of an approach to selectively alter specific sensory modalities. In adult mammals, pyridoxine overdose has been shown to cause a peripheral sensory neuropathy characterized by a loss of both muscle and cutaneous afferents, but predominated by a loss of proprioception. We have begun to explore the sensitivity of the nervous system in chicken embryos to the application of pyridoxine on embryonic days 7 and 8, after sensory neurons in the lumbosacral region become post-mitotic. Upon examination of the spinal cord, dorsal root ganglion and peripheral nerves, we find that pyridoxine causes a loss of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 3-positive neurons, a decrease in the diameter of the muscle innervating nerve tibialis, and a reduction in the number of large diameter axons in this nerve. However, we found no change in the number of Substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive neurons, the number of motor neurons or the diameter or axonal composition of the femoral cutaneous nerve. Therefore, pyridoxine causes a peripheral sensory neuropathy in embryonic chickens largely consistent with its effects in adult mammals. However, the lesion may be more restricted to proprioception in the chicken embryo. Therefore, pyridoxine lesion induced during embryogenesis in the chicken embryo can be used to assess how the loss of sensation, largely proprioception, alters spontaneous embryonic motility and subsequent motor development. PMID:25592428

  4. Experience with 25 years of dorsal root entry zone lesioning at a single institution

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Ahmed J.; Forbes, Jonathan A.; Jermakowicz, Walter; Eli, Ilyas M.; Blumenkopf, Bennett; Konrad, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background: The authors sought to assess long-term efficacy, surgical morbidity, and postoperative quality of life in patients who have undergone dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) lesioning. Methods: We utilized the electronic chart system at our institution to identify patients who underwent DREZ lesioning since 1986. Of the patients that were able to be identified, 19 (12 males and 7 females) patients were able to be contacted at time of data collection. The mean age was 47 years (ranging from 23 to 70 years) with average preoperative pain duration of 12.5 years and average follow-up of 4.9 years. Results: Of the 19 patients we were able to contact, 7 (37%) patients experienced “excellent” postoperative (complete) pain relief with another 6 (32%) reporting “good” improvement. Three (16%) patients reported “mild” pain relief, while three (16%) patients reported poor results. Sixteen patients (84%) stated they would undergo DREZ lesioning again, if given a choice. Two patients (11%) had objective evidence of a new, mild motor deficit postoperatively. More than half of the patients, who answered, reported “good” quality of life. Two-sample unequal variance t-test showed no statistically significant difference in pain improvement between brachial plexus avulsion and end-zone spinal cord injury pain. Conclusion: With appropriate patient selection, DREZ lesioning is an efficacious and durable procedure that can be performed with low morbidity and good patient outcomes. PMID:23772334

  5. Global analysis of transcriptome in dorsal root ganglia following peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Gong, Leilei; Wu, Jiancheng; Zhou, Songlin; Wang, Yaxian; Qin, Jing; Yu, Bin; Gu, Xiaosong; Yao, Chun

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nervous system has intrinsic regeneration ability after injury, accompanied with the coordination of numerous cells, molecules and signaling pathways. These post-injury biological changes are complex with insufficient understanding. Thus, to obtain a global perspective of changes following nerve injury and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying nerve regeneration are of great importance. By RNA sequencing, we detected transcriptional changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons at 0 h, 3 h, 9 h, 1 d, 4 d and 7 d following sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. Differentially expressed genes were then selected and classified into major clusters according to their expression patterns. Cluster 2 (with genes high expressed before 9 h and then down expressed) and cluster 6 (combination of cluster 4 and 5 with genes low expressed before 1 d and then up expressed) were underwent GO annotation and KEGG pathway analysis. Gene act networks were then constructed for these two clusters and the expression of pivotal genes was validated by quantitative real-time PCR. This study provided valuable information regarding the transcriptome changes in DRG neurons following nerve injury, identified potential genes that could be used for improving axon regeneration after nerve injury, and facilitated to elucidate the biological process and molecular mechanisms underlying peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27450809

  6. Artemin promotes functional long-distance axonal regeneration to the brainstem after dorsal root crush.

    PubMed

    Wong, Laura Elisabeth; Gibson, Molly E; Arnold, H Moore; Pepinsky, Blake; Frank, Eric

    2015-05-12

    Recovery after a spinal cord injury often requires that axons restore synaptic connectivity with denervated targets several centimeters from the site of injury. Here we report that systemic artemin (ARTN) treatment promotes the regeneration of sensory axons to the brainstem after brachial dorsal root crush in adult rats. ARTN not only stimulates robust regeneration of large, myelinated sensory axons to the brainstem, but also promotes functional reinnervation of the appropriate target region, the cuneate nucleus. ARTN signals primarily through the RET tyrosine kinase, an interaction that requires the nonsignaling coreceptor GDNF family receptor (GFRα3). Previous studies reported limited GFRα3 expression on large sensory neurons, but our findings demonstrate that ARTN promotes robust regeneration of large, myelinated sensory afferents. Using a cell sorting technique, we demonstrate that GFRα3 expression is similar in myelinated and unmyelinated adult sensory neurons, suggesting that ARTN likely induces long-distance regeneration by binding GFRα3 and RET. Although ARTN is delivered for just 2 wk, regeneration to the brainstem requires more than 3 mo, suggesting that brief trophic support may initiate intrinsic growth programs that remain active until targets are reached. Given its ability to promote targeted functional regeneration to the brainstem, ARTN may represent a promising therapy for restoring sensory function after spinal cord injury. PMID:25918373

  7. An Approach to Enhance Alignment and Myelination of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Axon regeneration is a chaotic process due largely to unorganized axon alignment. Therefore, in order for a sufficient number of regenerated axons to bridge the lesion site, properly organized axonal alignment is required. Since demyelination after nerve injury strongly impairs the conductive capacity of surviving axons, remyelination is critical for successful functioning of regenerated nerves. Previously, we demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) aligned on a pre-stretch induced anisotropic surface because the cells can sense a larger effective stiffness in the stretched direction than in the perpendicular direction. We also showed that an anisotropic surface arising from a mechanical pre-stretched surface similarly affects alignment, as well as growth and myelination of axons. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for preparing a pre-stretched anisotropic surface, the isolation and culture of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on a pre-stretched surface, and show the myelination behavior of a co-culture of DRG neurons with Schwann cells (SCs) on a pre-stretched surface. PMID:27585118

  8. Development of a spontaneously active dorsal root ganglia assay using multiwell multielectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Kim; Wang, Shuya; Hoque, Nina; Kiss, Laszlo; Ahlijanian, Michael K; Herrington, James; Graef, John D

    2016-06-01

    In vitro phenotypic assays of sensory neuron activity are important tools for identifying potential analgesic compounds. These assays are typically characterized by hyperexcitable and/or abnormally, spontaneously active cells. Whereas manual electrophysiology experiments provide high-resolution biophysical data to characterize both in vitro models and potential therapeutic modalities (e.g., action potential characteristics, the role of specific ion channels, and receptors), these techniques are hampered by their low throughput. We have established a spontaneously active dorsal root ganglia (DRG) platform using multiwell multielectrode arrays (MEAs) that greatly increase the ability to evaluate the effects of multiple compounds and conditions on DRG excitability within the context of a cellular network. We show that spontaneous DRG firing can be attenuated with selective Na(+) and Ca(2+) channel blockers, as well as enhanced with K(+) channel blockers. In addition, spontaneous activity can be augmented with both the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 agonist capsaicin and the peptide bradykinin and completely blocked with neurokinin receptor antagonists. Finally, we validated the use of this assay by demonstrating that commonly used neuropathic pain therapeutics suppress DRG spontaneous activity. Overall, we have optimized primary rat DRG cells on a multiwell MEA platform to generate and characterize spontaneously active cultures that have the potential to be used as an in vitro phenotypic assay to evaluate potential therapeutics in rodent models of pain. PMID:27052585

  9. Differential Transcriptional Profiling of Damaged and Intact Adjacent Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Reinhold, A. K.; Batti, L.; Bilbao, D.; Buness, A.; Rittner, H. L.; Heppenstall, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion in the somatosensory system, is a severely impairing mostly chronic disease. While its underlying molecular mechanisms are not thoroughly understood, neuroimmune interactions as well as changes in the pain pathway such as sensitization of nociceptors have been implicated. It has been shown that not only are different cell types involved in generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain, like neurons, immune and glial cells, but, also, intact adjacent neurons are relevant to the process. Here, we describe an experimental approach to discriminate damaged from intact adjacent neurons in the same dorsal root ganglion (DRG) using differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Two fluorescent tracers, Fluoroemerald (FE) and 1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI), were used, whose properties allow us to distinguish between damaged and intact neurons. Subsequent sorting permitted transcriptional analysis of both groups. Results and qPCR validation show a strong regulation in damaged neurons versus contralateral controls as well as a moderate regulation in adjacent neurons. Data for damaged neurons reveal an mRNA expression pattern consistent with established upregulated genes like galanin, which supports our approach. Moreover, novel genes were found strongly regulated such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), providing novel targets for further research. Differential fluorescent neuronal labelling and sorting allows for a clear distinction between primarily damaged neuropathic neurons and “bystanders,” thereby facilitating a more detailed understanding of their respective roles in neuropathic processes in the DRG. PMID:25880204

  10. The Dorsal Root Ganglion as a Therapeutic Target for Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Liem, Liong; van Dongen, Eric; Huygen, Frank J; Staats, Peter; Kramer, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain is a widespread problem with negative personal and societal consequences. Despite considerable clinical neuroscience research, the goal of developing effective, reliable, and durable treatments has remained elusive. The critical role played by the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the induction and maintenance of chronic pain has been largely overlooked in these efforts, however. It may be that, by targeting this site, robust new options for pain management will be revealed. This review summarizes recent advances in the knowledge base for DRG-targeted treatments for neuropathic pain:• Pharmacological options including the chemical targeting of voltage-dependent calcium channels, transient receptor potential channels, neurotrophin production, potentiation of opioid transduction pathways, and excitatory glutamate receptors.• Ablation or modulation of the DRG via continuous thermal radiofrequency and pulsed radiofrequency treatments.• Implanted electrical neurostimulator technologies.• Interventions involving the modification of DRG cellular function at the genetic level by using viral vectors and gene silencing methods. PMID:27224659

  11. Real-time control of walking using recordings from dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holinski, B. J.; Everaert, D. G.; Mushahwar, V. K.; Stein, R. B.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to decode sensory information from the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in real time, and to use this information to adapt the control of unilateral stepping with a state-based control algorithm consisting of both feed-forward and feedback components. Approach. In five anesthetized cats, hind limb stepping on a walkway or treadmill was produced by patterned electrical stimulation of the spinal cord through implanted microwire arrays, while neuronal activity was recorded from the DRG. Different parameters, including distance and tilt of the vector between hip and limb endpoint, integrated gyroscope and ground reaction force were modelled from recorded neural firing rates. These models were then used for closed-loop feedback. Main results. Overall, firing-rate-based predictions of kinematic sensors (limb endpoint, integrated gyroscope) were the most accurate with variance accounted for >60% on average. Force prediction had the lowest prediction accuracy (48 ± 13%) but produced the greatest percentage of successful rule activations (96.3%) for stepping under closed-loop feedback control. The prediction of all sensor modalities degraded over time, with the exception of tilt. Significance. Sensory feedback from moving limbs would be a desirable component of any neuroprosthetic device designed to restore walking in people after a spinal cord injury. This study provides a proof-of-principle that real-time feedback from the DRG is possible and could form part of a fully implantable neuroprosthetic device with further development.

  12. Action of hallucinogens on raphe-evoked dorsal root potentials (DRPs) in the cat.

    PubMed

    Larson, A A; Anderson, E G

    1986-02-01

    The dorsal root potential (DRP) evoked by stimulation of the inferior central nucleus (ICN) of the cat is affected by administration of a variety of hallucinogenic agents. It has been previously shown that a single low dose of LSD is unique in that it potentiates this DRP, while injections of 5-methoxy-N,N- dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT), ketamine or phencyclidine (PCP) inhibit its production. Tolerance develops to the facilitatory effect of low doses of LSD on the DRP, but not to the inhibitory action of 5-MeODMT. Repeated injections of ketamine every 30 minutes also fail to produce tachyphylaxis to the inhibitory effect of this dissociative anesthetic. The raphe-evoked DRP is a long latency potential that is inhibited by a wide variety of putative serotonin antagonists and has therefore been traditionally thought to be mediated by serotonin. However, in light of the inability of either tryptophan or fluoxetine to potentiate this DRP, and the resistance of this DRP to blockade by parachlorophenylalanine, reserpine or intrathecally administered 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, it appears that this potential may in fact be mediated, at least in part, by a non-serotonergic transmitter. PMID:3952125

  13. Myelination in vitro of rodent dorsal root ganglia by glial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, J; Compston, A

    1994-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes synthesize myelin in the mammalian central nervous system; they develop from glial progenitors which, at least in vitro, are bipotential and also differentiate into astrocytes. Maturation of these O-2A progenitors is known to be influenced by growth factors and by extracellular matrix molecules. We investigated the effect of neurons on glial development by co-culturing highly purified rodent embryonic dorsal root ganglia with neonatal O-2A progenitors. Neurons produce signals, including platelet-derived growth factor BB and basic fibroblast growth factor, which stimulate progenitor cells to synthesize DNA; axonal contact is associated with down-regulation in the expression of complex ganglioside surface molecules on O-2A progenitors; with maturation, many of these cells develop into oligodendrocytes allowing the normal process of myelination to take place, but neurons also promote the differentiation of type 2 astrocytes. This orchestration of proliferation and differentiation in O-2A progenitor cells favours the development of glial-neuronal interactions needed for saltatory conduction of the nerve impulse. PMID:7820570

  14. Cold shock induces apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion neurons plated on infrared windows.

    PubMed

    Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Mattson, Eric C; O'Hara, Crystal L; Smith, Amanda K; Stucky, Cheryl L; Hirschmugl, Carol J

    2015-06-21

    The chemical status of live sensory neurons is accessible with infrared microspectroscopy of appropriately prepared cells. In this paper, individual dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been prepared with two different protocols, and plated on glass cover slips, BaF2 and CaF2 substrates. The first protocol exposes the intact DRGs to 4 °C for between 20-30 minutes before dissociating individual neurons and plating 2 hours later. The second protocol maintains the neurons at 23 °C for the entire duration of the sample preparation. The visual appearance of the neurons is similar. The viability was assessed by means of trypan blue exclusion method to determine the viability of the neurons. The neurons prepared under the first protocol (cold exposure) and plated on BaF2 reveal a distinct chemical signature and chemical distribution that is different from the other sample preparations described in the paper. Importantly, results for other sample preparation methods, using various substrates and temperature protocols, when compared across the overlapping spectral bandwidth, present normal chemical distribution within the neurons. The unusual chemically specific spatial variation is dominated by a lack of protein and carbohydrates in the center of the neurons and signatures of unraveling DNA are detected. We suggest that cold shock leads to apoptosis of DRGs, followed by osmotic stress originating from ion gradients across the cell membrane leading to cell lysis. PMID:26000346

  15. Increased vitamin D receptor expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Filipović, Natalija; Ferhatović, Lejla; Marelja, Ivana; Puljak, Livia; Grković, Ivica

    2013-08-01

    The effects of vitamin D on the nervous system have been studied extensively. In spite of accumulating data about the substantial changes in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling system, during different types of neuroinflammatory diseases, its role in diabetic neuropathy has not been investigated in detail. To assess the role of VDR signaling in diabetic neuropathy, we examined expression of VDRs in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus type 1. Diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 was induced with streptozotocin in male Sprague-Dawley rats. After two months, expression of VDRs was analyzed immunohistochemically in the cytoplasm of L4 and L5 DRG neurons of diabetic rats. Semi-quantitative analysis for the determination of staining in nuclei and plasma-membranes of DRG neurons was performed. A significant increase in VDR expression was observed in DRG neurons of diabetic rats. Expression of VDRs was increased in the cytoplasm, nuclei and in cell membranes of neurons. An increase in VDR expression occurred in all neurons, but the greatest increase of fluorescence intensity in cytoplasm was observed in neurons of small diameter. Results of the present study indicate that the VDR signaling system could be a potential therapeutic target for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:23684983

  16. Selective vulnerability of dorsal root ganglia neurons in experimental rabies after peripheral inoculation of CVS-11 in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, John P; Hsu, Lena; Jackson, Alan C

    2009-08-01

    The involvement of dorsal root ganglia was studied in an in vivo model of experimental rabies virus infection using the challenge virus standard (CVS-11) strain. Dorsal root ganglia neurons infected with CVS in vitro show prolonged survival and few morphological changes, and are commonly used to study the infection. It has been established that after peripheral inoculation of mice with CVS the brain and spinal cord show relatively few neurodegenerative changes, but detailed studies of pathological changes in dorsal root ganglia have not previously been performed in this in vivo experimental model. In this study, adult ICR mice were inoculated in the right hindlimb footpad with CVS. Spinal cords and dorsal root ganglia were evaluated at serial time points for histopathological and ultrastructural changes and for biochemical markers of cell death. Light microscopy showed multifocal mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrates in the sensory ganglia and a spectrum of degenerative neuronal changes. Ultrastructural changes in gangliocytes included features characteristic of the axotomy response, the appearance of numerous autophagic compartments, and aggregation of intermediate filaments, while the neurons retained relatively intact mitochondria and plasma membranes. Later in the process, there were more extensive degenerative neuronal changes without typical features of either apoptosis or necrosis. The degree of degenerative neuronal changes in gangliocytes contrasts with observations in CNS neurons in experimental rabies. Hence, gangliocytes exhibit selective vulnerability in this animal model. This contrasts markedly with the fact that they are, unlike CNS neurons, highly permissive to CVS infection in vitro. Further study is needed to determine mechanisms for this selective vulnerability, which will give us a better understanding of the pathogenesis of rabies. PMID:19252919

  17. Pulsed electrical stimulation protects neurons in the dorsal root and anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bao-an; Zi, Jin-hua; Wu, Li-sheng; Zhang, Cun-hua; Chen, Yun-zhen

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on peripheral nerve injury have focused on repair at the site of injury, but very few have examined the effects of repair strategies on the more proximal neuronal cell bodies. In this study, an approximately 10-mm-long nerve segment from the ischial tuberosity in the rat was transected and its proximal and distal ends were inverted and sutured. The spinal cord was subjected to pulsed electrical stimulation at T10 and L3, at a current of 6.5 mA and a stimulation frequency of 15 Hz, 15 minutes per session, twice a day for 56 days. After pulsed electrical stimulation, the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and anterior horn was increased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. The number of myelinated nerve fibers was increased in the sciatic nerve. The ultrastructure of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord was noticeably improved. Conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve was also increased. These results show that pulsed electrical stimulation protects sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia as well as motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury, and that it promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve fibers. PMID:26692864

  18. Bilateral mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia after chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Gui; Kong, Wei-Wei; Ge, Da-Long; Luo, Ceng; Hu, San-Jue

    2011-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Low back pain is one of the most inextricable problems encountered in clinics. Animal models that imitate symptoms in humans are valuable tools for investigating low back pain mechanisms and the possible therapeutic applications. With the development of genetic technology in pain field, the possibility of mutating specific genes in mice has provided a potent tool for investigating the specific mechanisms of pain. The aim of the present study was to develop a mouse model of chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion (CCD), in which gene mutation can be applied to facilitate the studies of chronic pain. METHODS Chronic compression of L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia was conducted in mice by inserting fine stainless steel rods into the intervertebral foramina, one at L4 and the other at L5. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were examined with von Frey filaments and radiating heat stimulator, respectively. RESULTS The CCD mice displayed dramatic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia as well as tactile allodynia in the hindpaw ipsilateral to CCD. In addition, this mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia as well as tactile allodynia was also found to spread to the contralateral hindpaw. CONCLUSION This model, combined with the possible genetic modification, will strengthen our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of low back pain. It also favors the development of new treatment strategies for pain and hyperalgesia after spinal injury and other disorders which affect the dorsal root ganglion in humans. PMID:21788994

  19. Pulsed electrical stimulation protects neurons in the dorsal root and anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Pei, Bao-An; Zi, Jin-Hua; Wu, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Cun-Hua; Chen, Yun-Zhen

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on peripheral nerve injury have focused on repair at the site of injury, but very few have examined the effects of repair strategies on the more proximal neuronal cell bodies. In this study, an approximately 10-mm-long nerve segment from the ischial tuberosity in the rat was transected and its proximal and distal ends were inverted and sutured. The spinal cord was subjected to pulsed electrical stimulation at T10 and L3, at a current of 6.5 mA and a stimulation frequency of 15 Hz, 15 minutes per session, twice a day for 56 days. After pulsed electrical stimulation, the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and anterior horn was increased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. The number of myelinated nerve fibers was increased in the sciatic nerve. The ultrastructure of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord was noticeably improved. Conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve was also increased. These results show that pulsed electrical stimulation protects sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia as well as motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury, and that it promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve fibers. PMID:26692864

  20. Somatostatin and its 2A receptor in dorsal root ganglia and dorsal horn of mouse and human: expression, trafficking and possible role in pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Somatostatin (SST) and some of its receptor subtypes have been implicated in pain signaling at the spinal level. In this study we have investigated the role of SST and its sst2A receptor (sst2A) in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and spinal cord. Results SST and sst2A protein and sst2 transcript were found in both mouse and human DRGs, sst2A-immunoreactive (IR) cell bodies and processes in lamina II in mouse and human spinal dorsal horn, and sst2A-IR nerve terminals in mouse skin. The receptor protein was associated with the cell membrane. Following peripheral nerve injury sst2A-like immunoreactivity (LI) was decreased, and SST-LI increased in DRGs. sst2A-LI accumulated on the proximal and, more strongly, on the distal side of a sciatic nerve ligation. Fluorescence-labeled SST administered to a hind paw was internalized and retrogradely transported, indicating that a SST-sst2A complex may represent a retrograde signal. Internalization of sst2A was seen in DRG neurons after systemic treatment with the sst2 agonist octreotide (Oct), and in dorsal horn and DRG neurons after intrathecal administration. Some DRG neurons co-expressed sst2A and the neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor on the cell membrane, and systemic Oct caused co-internalization, hypothetically a sign of receptor heterodimerization. Oct treatment attenuated the reduction of pain threshold in a neuropathic pain model, in parallel suppressing the activation of p38 MAPK in the DRGs Conclusions The findings highlight a significant and complex role of the SST system in pain signaling. The fact that the sst2A system is found also in human DRGs and spinal cord, suggests that sst2A may represent a potential pharmacologic target for treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:24521084

  1. Spike propagation through the dorsal root ganglia in an unmyelinated sensory neuron: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Sundt, Danielle; Gamper, Nikita; Jaffe, David B

    2015-12-01

    Unmyelinated C-fibers are a major type of sensory neurons conveying pain information. Action potential conduction is regulated by the bifurcation (T-junction) of sensory neuron axons within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Understanding how C-fiber signaling is influenced by the morphology of the T-junction and the local expression of ion channels is important for understanding pain signaling. In this study we used biophysical computer modeling to investigate the influence of axon morphology within the DRG and various membrane conductances on the reliability of spike propagation. As expected, calculated input impedance and the amplitude of propagating action potentials were both lowest at the T-junction. Propagation reliability for single spikes was highly sensitive to the diameter of the stem axon and the density of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. A model containing only fast voltage-gated Na(+) and delayed-rectifier K(+) channels conducted trains of spikes up to frequencies of 110 Hz. The addition of slowly activating KCNQ channels (i.e., KV7 or M-channels) to the model reduced the following frequency to 30 Hz. Hyperpolarization produced by addition of a much slower conductance, such as a Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) current, was needed to reduce the following frequency to 6 Hz. Attenuation of driving force due to ion accumulation or hyperpolarization produced by a Na(+)-K(+) pump had no effect on following frequency but could influence the reliability of spike propagation mutually with the voltage shift generated by a Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) current. These simulations suggest how specific ion channels within the DRG may contribute toward therapeutic treatments for chronic pain. PMID:26334005

  2. Membrane properties and electrogenesis in the distal axons of small dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vasylyev, Dmytro V; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-08-01

    Although it is generally thought that sensory transduction occurs at or close to peripheral nerve endings, with action potentials subsequently propagating along the axons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons toward the central nervous system, the small diameter of nociceptive axons and their endings have made it difficult to estimate their membrane properties and electrogenic characteristics. Even the resting potentials of nociceptive axons are unknown. In this study, we developed the capability to record directly with patch-clamp electrodes from the small-diameter distal axons of DRG neurons in vitro. We showed using current-clamp recordings that 1) these sensory axons have a resting potential of -60.2 ± 1 mV; 2) both tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive (TTX-S) and TTX-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels are present and available for activation at resting potential, at densities that can support action potential electrogenesis in these axons; 3) TTX-sensitive channels contribute to the amplification of small depolarizations that are subthreshold with respect to the action potential in these axons; 4) TTX-R channels can support the production of action potentials in these axons; and 5) these TTX-R channels can produce repetitive firing, even at depolarized membrane potentials where TTX-S channels are inactivated. Finally, using voltage-clamp recordings with an action potential as the command, we confirmed the presence of both TTX-S and TTX-R channels, which are activated sequentially during action potential in these axons. These results provide direct evidence for the presence of TTX-S and TTX-R Na(+) channels that are functionally available at resting potential and contribute to electrogenesis in small-diameter afferent axons. PMID:22572942

  3. Dorsal root ganglion myeloid zinc finger protein 1 contributes to neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve trauma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lingli; Cao, Jing; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Zhang, Wei; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury-induced changes in gene transcription and translation in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) are considered to contribute to neuropathic pain genesis. Transcription factors control gene expression. Peripheral nerve injury increases the expression of myeloid zinc finger protein 1 (MZF1), a transcription factor, and promotes its binding to the voltage-gated potassium 1.2 (Kv1.2) antisense RNA gene in the injured DRG. However, whether DRG MZF1 participates in neuropathic pain is still unknown. Here, we report that blocking the nerve injury-induced increase of DRG MZF1 through microinjection of MZF1 siRNA into the injured DRG attenuated the initiation and maintenance of mechanical, cold, and thermal pain hypersensitivities in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, without affecting locomotor functions and basal responses to acute mechanical, heat, and cold stimuli. Mimicking the nerve injury-induced increase of DRG MZF1 through microinjection of recombinant adeno-associated virus 5 expressing full-length MZF1 into the DRG produced significant mechanical, cold, and thermal pain hypersensitivities in naïve rats. Mechanistically, MZF1 participated in CCI-induced reductions in Kv1.2 mRNA and protein and total Kv current and the CCI-induced increase in neuronal excitability through MZF1-triggered Kv1.2 antisense RNA expression in the injured DRG neurons. MZF1 is likely an endogenous trigger of neuropathic pain and might serve as a potential target for preventing and treating this disorder. PMID:25630025

  4. Spike propagation through the dorsal root ganglia in an unmyelinated sensory neuron: a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Sundt, Danielle; Gamper, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    Unmyelinated C-fibers are a major type of sensory neurons conveying pain information. Action potential conduction is regulated by the bifurcation (T-junction) of sensory neuron axons within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Understanding how C-fiber signaling is influenced by the morphology of the T-junction and the local expression of ion channels is important for understanding pain signaling. In this study we used biophysical computer modeling to investigate the influence of axon morphology within the DRG and various membrane conductances on the reliability of spike propagation. As expected, calculated input impedance and the amplitude of propagating action potentials were both lowest at the T-junction. Propagation reliability for single spikes was highly sensitive to the diameter of the stem axon and the density of voltage-gated Na+ channels. A model containing only fast voltage-gated Na+ and delayed-rectifier K+ channels conducted trains of spikes up to frequencies of 110 Hz. The addition of slowly activating KCNQ channels (i.e., KV7 or M-channels) to the model reduced the following frequency to 30 Hz. Hyperpolarization produced by addition of a much slower conductance, such as a Ca2+-dependent K+ current, was needed to reduce the following frequency to 6 Hz. Attenuation of driving force due to ion accumulation or hyperpolarization produced by a Na+-K+ pump had no effect on following frequency but could influence the reliability of spike propagation mutually with the voltage shift generated by a Ca2+-dependent K+ current. These simulations suggest how specific ion channels within the DRG may contribute toward therapeutic treatments for chronic pain. PMID:26334005

  5. Adrenomedullin mediates tumor necrosis factor-α-induced responses in dorsal root ganglia in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yajuan; Zhang, Yan; Huo, Yuanhui; Wang, Dongmei; Hong, Yanguo

    2016-08-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), a member of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) family, has been demonstrated to be a pain peptide. This study investigated the possible involvement of AM in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced responses contributing to neuronal plasticity in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Exposure of the DRG explant cultures to TNF-α (5nM) for 48h upregulated the expression of AM mRNA. The treatment with TNF-α also increased the level of CGRP, CCL-2 and MMP-9 mRNA in the cultured DRG. This increase was attenuated by the co-treatment with the selective AM receptor antagonist AM22-52 (2μM). The blockade of AM receptors inhibited TNF-α-induced increase of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) and nuclear factor kappa B (pNF-κB) proteins. On the other hand, the treatment with the AM receptor agonist AM1-50 (10nM) for 96h induced an increase in the level of GFAP, IL-1β, pCREB and pNF-κB proteins. The inhibition of AM activity did not change TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (pERK) while the treatment with AM1-50 still increased the level of pERK in the cultured DRG. Immunofluorescence assay showed the colocalization of AM-like immunoreactivity (IR) with TNF-α-IR in DRG neurons. The present study suggests that the increased AM receptor signaling mediated the many, but not all, TNF-α-induced activities, contributing to peripheral sensitization in neuropathic pain. PMID:27184601

  6. Role of oxidative stress in rabies virus infection of adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alan C; Kammouni, Wafa; Zherebitskaya, Elena; Fernyhough, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Rabies virus infection of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was studied in vitro with cultured adult mouse DRG neurons. Recent in vivo studies of transgenic mice that express the yellow fluorescent protein indicate that neuronal process degeneration, involving both dendrites and axons, occurs in mice infected with the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of rabies virus by footpad inoculation. Because of the similarities of the morphological changes in experimental rabies and in diabetic neuropathy and other diseases, we hypothesize that neuronal process degeneration occurs as a result of oxidative stress. DRG neurons were cultured from adult ICR mice. Two days after plating, they were infected with CVS. Immunostaining was evaluated with CVS- and mock-infected cultures for neuron specific beta-tubulin, rabies virus antigen, and amino acid adducts of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) (marker of lipid peroxidation and hence oxidative stress). Neuronal viability (by trypan blue exclusion), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, and axonal growth were also assessed with the cultures. CVS infected 33 to 54% of cultured DRG neurons. Levels of neuronal viability and TUNEL staining were similar in CVS- and mock-infected DRG neurons. There were significantly more 4-HNE-labeled puncta at 2 and 3 days postinfection in CVS-infected cultures than in mock-infected cultures, and axonal outgrowth was reduced at these time points in CVS infection. Axonal swellings with 4-HNE-labeled puncta were also associated with aggregations of actively respiring mitochondria. We have found evidence that rabies virus infection in vitro causes axonal injury of DRG neurons through oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may be important in vivo in rabies and may explain previous observations of the degeneration of neuronal processes. PMID:20181692

  7. Intracellular calcium regulation among subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shao-Gang; Zhang, Xiulin; Gold, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    Primary afferent neurons are functionally heterogeneous. To determine whether this functional heterogeneity reflects, in part, heterogeneity in the regulation of the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), the magnitude and decay of evoked Ca2+ transients were assessed in subpopulations of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with voltage clamp and fura-2 ratiometric imaging. To determine whether differences in evoked Ca2+ transients among subpopulations of DRG neurons reflected differences in the contribution of Ca2+ regulatory mechanisms, pharmacological techniques were employed to assess the contribution of influx, efflux, release and uptake pathways. Subpopulations of DRG neurons were defined by cell body size, binding of the plant lectin IB4 and responsiveness to the algogenic compound capsaicin (CAP). Ca2+ transients were evoked with 30 mm K+ or voltage steps to 0 mV. There were marked differences between subpopulations of neurons with respect to both the magnitude and decay of the Ca2+ transient, with the largest and most slowly decaying Ca2+ transients in small-diameter, IB4-positive, CAP-responsive neurons. The smallest and most rapidly decaying transients were in large-diameter, IB4-negative and CAP-unresponsive DRG neurons. These differences were not due to a differential distribution of voltage-gated Ca2+ currents. However, these differences did appear to reflect a differential contribution of other influx, efflux, release and uptake mechanisms between subpopulations of neurons. These results suggest that electrical activity in subpopulations of DRG neurons will have a differential influence on Ca2+-regulated phenomena such as spike adaptation, transmitter release and gene transcription. Significantly more activity should be required in large-diameter non-nociceptive afferents than in small-diameter nociceptive afferents to have a comparable influence on these processes. PMID:16945973

  8. Pannexin-1 Up-regulation in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to Neuropathic Pain Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhao; Laumet, Geoffroy; Chen, Shao-Rui; Hittelman, Walter N; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) is a large-pore membrane channel involved in the release of ATP and other signaling mediators. Little is known about the expression and functional role of Panx1 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the development of chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, we determined the epigenetic mechanism involved in increased Panx1 expression in the DRG after nerve injury. Spinal nerve ligation in rats significantly increased the mRNA and protein levels of Panx1 in the DRG but not in the spinal cord. Immunocytochemical labeling showed that Panx1 was primarily expressed in a subset of medium and large DRG neurons in control rats and that nerve injury markedly increased the number of Panx1-immunoreactive DRG neurons. Nerve injury significantly increased the enrichment of two activating histone marks (H3K4me2 and H3K9ac) and decreased the occupancy of two repressive histone marks (H3K9me2 and H3K27me3) around the promoter region of Panx1 in the DRG. However, nerve injury had no effect on the DNA methylation level around the Panx1 promoter in the DRG. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of the Panx1 blockers or Panx1-specific siRNA significantly reduced pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. In addition, siRNA knockdown of Panx1 expression in a DRG cell line significantly reduced caspase-1 release induced by neuronal depolarization. Our findings suggest that nerve injury increases Panx1 expression levels in the DRG through altered histone modifications. Panx1 up-regulation contributes to the development of neuropathic pain and stimulation of inflammasome signaling. PMID:25925949

  9. Altered Purinergic Signaling in Colorectal Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Contributes to Colorectal Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-Ho; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Gebhart, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by pain and hypersensitivity in the relative absence of colon inflammation or structural changes. To assess the role of P2X receptors expressed in colorectal dorsal root ganglion (c-DRG) neurons and colon hypersensitivity, we studied excitability and purinergic signaling of retrogradely labeled mouse thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) c-DRG neurons after intracolonic treatment with saline or zymosan (which reproduces 2 major features of IBS—persistent colorectal hypersensitivity without inflammation) using patch-clamp, immunohistochemical, and RT-PCR techniques. Although whole cell capacitances did not differ between LS and TL c-DRG neurons and were not changed after zymosan treatment, membrane excitability was increased in LS and TL c-DRG neurons from zymosan-treated mice. Purinergic agonist adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) and α,β-methylene ATP [α,β-meATP] produced inward currents in TL c-DRG neurons were predominantly P2X3-like fast (∼70% of responsive neurons); P2X2/3-like slow currents were more common in LS c-DRG neurons (∼35% of responsive neurons). Transient currents were not produced by either agonist in c-DRG neurons from P2X3−/− mice. Neither total whole cell Kv current density nor the sustained or transient Kv components was changed in c-DRG neurons after zymosan treatment. The number of cells expressing P2X3 protein and its mRNA and the kinetic properties of ATP- and α,β-meATP-evoked currents in c-DRG neurons were not changed by zymosan treatment. However, the EC50 of α,β-meATP for the fast current decreased significantly in TL c-DRG neurons. These findings suggest that colorectal hypersensitivity produced by intracolonic zymosan increases excitability and enhances purinergic signaling in c-DRG neurons. PMID:20861433

  10. Dysregulation of Kv3.4 channels in dorsal root ganglia following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ritter, David M; Zemel, Benjamin M; Hala, Tamara J; O'Leary, Michael E; Lepore, Angelo C; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2015-01-21

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients develop chronic pain involving poorly understood central and peripheral mechanisms. Because dysregulation of the voltage-gated Kv3.4 channel has been implicated in the hyperexcitable state of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following direct injury of sensory nerves, we asked whether such a dysregulation also plays a role in SCI. Kv3.4 channels are expressed in DRG neurons, where they help regulate action potential (AP) repolarization in a manner that depends on the modulation of inactivation by protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of the channel's inactivation domain. Here, we report that, 2 weeks after cervical hemicontusion SCI, injured rats exhibit contralateral hypersensitivity to stimuli accompanied by accentuated repetitive spiking in putative DRG nociceptors. Also in these neurons at 1 week after laminectomy and SCI, Kv3.4 channel inactivation is impaired compared with naive nonsurgical controls. At 2-6 weeks after laminectomy, however, Kv3.4 channel inactivation returns to naive levels. Conversely, Kv3.4 currents at 2-6 weeks post-SCI are downregulated and remain slow-inactivating. Immunohistochemistry indicated that downregulation mainly resulted from decreased surface expression of the Kv3.4 channel, as whole-DRG-protein and single-cell mRNA transcript levels did not change. Furthermore, consistent with Kv3.4 channel dysregulation, PKC activation failed to shorten the AP duration of small-diameter DRG neurons. Finally, re-expressing synthetic Kv3.4 currents under dynamic clamp conditions dampened repetitive spiking in the neurons from SCI rats. These results suggest a novel peripheral mechanism of post-SCI pain sensitization implicating Kv3.4 channel dysregulation and potential Kv3.4-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:25609640

  11. Pannexin-1 Up-regulation in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to Neuropathic Pain Development*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhao; Laumet, Geoffroy; Chen, Shao-Rui; Hittelman, Walter N.; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) is a large-pore membrane channel involved in the release of ATP and other signaling mediators. Little is known about the expression and functional role of Panx1 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the development of chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, we determined the epigenetic mechanism involved in increased Panx1 expression in the DRG after nerve injury. Spinal nerve ligation in rats significantly increased the mRNA and protein levels of Panx1 in the DRG but not in the spinal cord. Immunocytochemical labeling showed that Panx1 was primarily expressed in a subset of medium and large DRG neurons in control rats and that nerve injury markedly increased the number of Panx1-immunoreactive DRG neurons. Nerve injury significantly increased the enrichment of two activating histone marks (H3K4me2 and H3K9ac) and decreased the occupancy of two repressive histone marks (H3K9me2 and H3K27me3) around the promoter region of Panx1 in the DRG. However, nerve injury had no effect on the DNA methylation level around the Panx1 promoter in the DRG. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of the Panx1 blockers or Panx1-specific siRNA significantly reduced pain hypersensitivity induced by nerve injury. In addition, siRNA knockdown of Panx1 expression in a DRG cell line significantly reduced caspase-1 release induced by neuronal depolarization. Our findings suggest that nerve injury increases Panx1 expression levels in the DRG through altered histone modifications. Panx1 up-regulation contributes to the development of neuropathic pain and stimulation of inflammasome signaling. PMID:25925949

  12. Dysregulation of Kv3.4 Channels in Dorsal Root Ganglia Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, David M.; Zemel, Benjamin M.; Hala, Tamara J.; O'Leary, Michael E.; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients develop chronic pain involving poorly understood central and peripheral mechanisms. Because dysregulation of the voltage-gated Kv3.4 channel has been implicated in the hyperexcitable state of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons following direct injury of sensory nerves, we asked whether such a dysregulation also plays a role in SCI. Kv3.4 channels are expressed in DRG neurons, where they help regulate action potential (AP) repolarization in a manner that depends on the modulation of inactivation by protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of the channel's inactivation domain. Here, we report that, 2 weeks after cervical hemicontusion SCI, injured rats exhibit contralateral hypersensitivity to stimuli accompanied by accentuated repetitive spiking in putative DRG nociceptors. Also in these neurons at 1 week after laminectomy and SCI, Kv3.4 channel inactivation is impaired compared with naive nonsurgical controls. At 2–6 weeks after laminectomy, however, Kv3.4 channel inactivation returns to naive levels. Conversely, Kv3.4 currents at 2–6 weeks post-SCI are downregulated and remain slow-inactivating. Immunohistochemistry indicated that downregulation mainly resulted from decreased surface expression of the Kv3.4 channel, as whole-DRG-protein and single-cell mRNA transcript levels did not change. Furthermore, consistent with Kv3.4 channel dysregulation, PKC activation failed to shorten the AP duration of small-diameter DRG neurons. Finally, re-expressing synthetic Kv3.4 currents under dynamic clamp conditions dampened repetitive spiking in the neurons from SCI rats. These results suggest a novel peripheral mechanism of post-SCI pain sensitization implicating Kv3.4 channel dysregulation and potential Kv3.4-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:25609640

  13. Cannabinoids Inhibit Acid-Sensing Ion Channel Currents in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chun-Yu; Cai, Qi; Zou, Pengcheng; Wu, Heming; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Local acidosis has been found in various pain-generating conditions such as inflammation and tissue injury. Cannabinoids exert a powerful inhibitory control over pain initiation via peripheral cognate receptors. However, the peripheral molecular targets responsible for the antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that WIN55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, inhibits the activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. WIN55,212-2 dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. WIN55,212-2 shifted the proton concentration–response curve downwards, with an decrease of 48.6±3.7% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the EC50 value. The inhibition of proton-gated current induced by WIN55,212-2 was almost completely blocked by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM 281, but not by the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Pretreatment of forskolin, an AC activator, and the addition of cAMP also reversed the inhibition of WIN55,212-2. Moreover, WIN55,212-2 altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, WIN55,212-2 attenuated nociceptive responses to injection of acetic acid in rats. These results suggest that WIN55,212-2 inhibits the activity of ASICs via CB1 receptor and cAMP dependent pathway in rat primary sensory neurons. Thus, cannabinoids can exert their analgesic action by interaction with ASICs in the primary afferent neurons, which was novel analgesic mechanism of cannabinoids. PMID:23029075

  14. Altered purinergic signaling in colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to colorectal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masamichi; La, Jun-Ho; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Gebhart, G F

    2010-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by pain and hypersensitivity in the relative absence of colon inflammation or structural changes. To assess the role of P2X receptors expressed in colorectal dorsal root ganglion (c-DRG) neurons and colon hypersensitivity, we studied excitability and purinergic signaling of retrogradely labeled mouse thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) c-DRG neurons after intracolonic treatment with saline or zymosan (which reproduces 2 major features of IBS-persistent colorectal hypersensitivity without inflammation) using patch-clamp, immunohistochemical, and RT-PCR techniques. Although whole cell capacitances did not differ between LS and TL c-DRG neurons and were not changed after zymosan treatment, membrane excitability was increased in LS and TL c-DRG neurons from zymosan-treated mice. Purinergic agonist adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and α,β-methylene ATP [α,β-meATP] produced inward currents in TL c-DRG neurons were predominantly P2X(3)-like fast (∼70% of responsive neurons); P2X(2/3)-like slow currents were more common in LS c-DRG neurons (∼35% of responsive neurons). Transient currents were not produced by either agonist in c-DRG neurons from P2X(3)(-/-) mice. Neither total whole cell Kv current density nor the sustained or transient Kv components was changed in c-DRG neurons after zymosan treatment. The number of cells expressing P2X(3) protein and its mRNA and the kinetic properties of ATP- and α,β-meATP-evoked currents in c-DRG neurons were not changed by zymosan treatment. However, the EC(50) of α,β-meATP for the fast current decreased significantly in TL c-DRG neurons. These findings suggest that colorectal hypersensitivity produced by intracolonic zymosan increases excitability and enhances purinergic signaling in c-DRG neurons. PMID:20861433

  15. Carbon disulfide inhibits neurite outgrowth and neuronal migration of dorsal root ganglion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Xiang, Yujuan; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Zhenzhong

    2011-12-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS₂) is a neurotoxic industrial solvent and widely used in the vulcanization of rubber, rayon, cellophane, and adhesives. Although the neurotoxicity of CS₂ has been recognized for over a century, the precise mechanism of neurotoxic action of CS₂ remains unknown. In the present study, a embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants culture model was established. Using the organotypic DRG cultures, the direct neurotoxic effects of CS₂ on outgrowth of neurites and migration of neurons from DRG explants were investigated. The organotypic DRG cultures were exposed to different concentrations of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 0.1 mmol/L, 1 mmol/L). The number of nerve fiber bundles extended from DRG explants decreased significantly in the presence of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 15.00 ± 2.61, p < .05; 0.1 mmol/L, 11.17 ± 1.47, p < .001; 1 mmol/L, 8.00 ± 1.41, p < .001) as compared with that in the absence of CS₂ (17.83 ± 2.48). The number of neurons migrated from DRG explants decreased significantly in the presence of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 79.50 ± 9.40, p < .01; 0.1 mmol/L, 62.50 ± 14.15, p < .001; 1 mmol/L, 34.67 ± 7.58, p < .001) as compared with that in the absence of CS₂ (99.33 ± 15.16). And also, the decreases in the number of nerve fiber bundles and migrated DRG neurons were in a dose-dependent manner of CS₂. These data implicated that CS₂ could inhibit neurite outgrowth and neuronal migration from DRG explants in vitro. PMID:21777162

  16. Characteristics of the electrical oscillations evoked by 4-aminopyridine on dorsal root fibers and their relation to fictive locomotor patterns in the rat spinal cord in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taccola, G; Nistri, A

    2005-01-01

    4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) is suggested to improve symptomatology of spinal injury patients because it may facilitate neuromuscular transmission, spinal impulse flow and the operation of the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG). Since 4-AP can also induce repetitive discharges from dorsal root afferents, this phenomenon might interfere with sensory signals necessary to modulate CPG activity. Using electrophysiological recording from dorsal and ventral roots of the rat isolated spinal cord, we investigated 4-AP-evoked discharges and their relation with fictive locomotor patterns. On dorsal roots 4-AP (5-10 microM) induced sustained synchronous oscillations (3.3+/-0.8 s period) smaller than electrically evoked synaptic potentials, persistent after sectioning off the ventral region and preserved in an isolated dorsal quadrant, indicating their dorsal horn origin. 4-AP oscillations were blocked by tetrodotoxin, or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione and d-amino-phosphonovalerate, or strychnine and bicuculline, suggesting they were network mediated via glutamatergic, glycinergic and GABAergic transmission. Isolated ventral horn areas could not generated 4-AP oscillations, although their intrinsic disinhibited bursting was accelerated by 4-AP. Thus, ventral horn areas contained 4-AP sensitive sites, yet lacked the network for 4-AP induced oscillations. Activation of fictive locomotion by either application of N-methyl-D-aspartate and serotonin or stimulus trains to a single dorsal root reversibly suppressed dorsal root oscillations induced by 4-AP. This suppression was due to depression of dorsal network activity rather than simple block of root discharges. Since dorsal root oscillations evoked by 4-AP were turned off when the fictive locomotor program was initiated, these discharges are unlikely to interfere with proprioceptive signals during locomotor training in spinal patients. PMID:15857720

  17. Confocal imaging reveals three-dimensional fine structure difference between ventral and dorsal nerve roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuxiang; Sui, Tao; Cao, Xiaojian; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun; Sun, Peng

    2011-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injury repair is one of the most challenging problems in neurosurgery, partially due to lack of knowledge of three-dimensional (3-D) fine structure and organization of peripheral nerves. In this paper, we explored the structures of nerve fibers in ventral and dorsal nerves with a laser scanning confocal microscopy. Thick tissue staining results suggested that nerve fibers have a different 3-D structure in ventral and dorsal nerves, and reconstruction from serial sectioning images showed that in ventral nerves the nerve fibers travel in a winding form, while in dorsal nerves, the nerve fibers form in a parallel cable pattern. These structural differences could help surgeons to differentiate ventral and dorsal nerves in peripheral nerve injury repair, and also facilitate scientists to get a deeper understanding about nerve fiber organization.

  18. Anterograde Glycoprotein-Dependent Transport of Newly Generated Rabies Virus in Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Anja; Nolden, Tobias; Schröter, Josephine; Römer-Oberdörfer, Angela; Gluska, Shani; Perlson, Eran

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rabies virus (RABV) spread is widely accepted to occur only by retrograde axonal transport. However, examples of anterograde RABV spread in peripheral neurons such as dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons indicated a possible bidirectional transport by an uncharacterized mechanism. Here, we analyzed the axonal transport of fluorescence-labeled RABV in DRG neurons by live-cell microscopy. Both entry-related retrograde transport of RABV after infection at axon endings and postreplicative transport of newly formed virus were visualized in compartmentalized DRG neuron cultures. Whereas entry-related transport at 1.5 μm/s occurred only retrogradely, after 2 days of infection, multiple particles were observed in axons moving in both the anterograde and retrograde directions. The dynamics of postreplicative retrograde transport (1.6 μm/s) were similar to those of entry-related retrograde transport. In contrast, anterograde particle transport at 3.4 μm/s was faster, indicating active particle transport. Interestingly, RABV missing the glycoproteins did not move anterogradely within the axon. Thus, anterograde RABV particle transport depended on the RABV glycoprotein. Moreover, colocalization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) and glycoprotein in distal axonal regions as well as cotransport of labeled RNPs with membrane-anchored mCherry reporter confirmed that either complete enveloped virus particles or vesicle associated RNPs were transported. Our data show that anterograde RABV movement in peripheral DRG neurons occurs by active motor protein-dependent transport. We propose two models for postreplicative long-distance transport in peripheral neurons: either transport of complete virus particles or cotransport of RNPs and G-containing vesicles through axons to release virus at distal sites of infected DRG neurons. IMPORTANCE Rabies virus retrograde axonal transport by dynein motors supports virus spread over long distances and

  19. Chronic recruitment of primary afferent neurons by microstimulation in the feline dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Lee E.; Ayers, Christopher A.; Ciollaro, Mattia; Ventura, Valérie; Weber, Douglas J.; Gaunt, Robert A.

    2014-06-01

    Objective. This study describes results of primary afferent neural microstimulation experiments using microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of four cats. The goal was to test the stability and selectivity of these microelectrode arrays as a potential interface for restoration of somatosensory feedback after damage to the nervous system such as amputation. Approach. A five-contact nerve-cuff electrode implanted on the sciatic nerve was used to record the antidromic compound action potential response to DRG microstimulation (2-15 µA biphasic pulses, 200 µs cathodal pulse width), and the threshold for eliciting a response was tracked over time. Recorded responses were segregated based on conduction velocity to determine thresholds for recruiting Group I and Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers. Main results. Thresholds were initially low (5.1 ± 2.3 µA for Group I and 6.3 ± 2.0 µA for Group II/Aβ) and increased over time. Additionally the number of electrodes with thresholds less than or equal to 15 µA decreased over time. Approximately 12% of tested electrodes continued to elicit responses at 15 µA up to 26 weeks after implantation. Higher stimulation intensities (up to 30 µA) were tested in one cat at 23 weeks post-implantation yielding responses on over 20 additional electrodes. Within the first six weeks after implantation, approximately equal numbers of electrodes elicited only Group I or Group II/Aβ responses at threshold, but the relative proportion of Group II/Aβ responses decreased over time. Significance. These results suggest that it is possible to activate Group I or Group II/Aβ primary afferent fibers in isolation with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted in the DRG, and that those responses can be elicited up to 26 weeks after implantation, although it may be difficult to achieve a consistent response day-to-day with currently available electrode technology. The DRG are compelling targets

  20. Modulators of Calcium Influx Regulate Membrane Excitability in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lirk, Philipp; Poroli, Mark; Rigaud, Marcel; Fuchs, Andreas; Fillip, Patrick; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Ljubkovic, Marko; Sapunar, Damir; Hogan, Quinn

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic neuropathic pain resulting from neuronal damage remains difficult to treat, in part due to incomplete understanding of underlying cellular mechanisms. We have previously shown that inward Ca2+ flux (ICa) across the sensory neuron plasmalemma is decreased in a rodent model of chronic neuropathic pain, but the direct consequence of this loss of ICa on function of the sensory neuron has not been defined. We therefore examined the extent to which altered membrane properties after nerve injury, especially increased excitability that may contribute to chronic pain, are attributable to diminished Ca2+ entry. Methods Intracellular microelectrode measurements were obtained from A-type neurons of dorsal root ganglia excised from control rats and those with neuropathic pain behavior following spinal nerve ligation. Recording conditions were varied to suppress or promote ICa while biophysical parameters and excitability were determined. Results Both lowered external bath Ca2+ concentration and blockade of ICa with bath cadmium diminished the duration and area of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP), accompanied by decreased current threshold for action potential (AP) initiation and increased repetitive firing during sustained depolarization. Reciprocally, elevated bath Ca2+ increased the AHP and suppressed repetitive firing. Voltage sag during neuronal hyperpolarization, indicative of the cation-nonselective H-current, diminished with lowered bath Ca2+, cadmium application, or chelation of intracellular Ca2+. Additional recordings with selective blockers of ICa subtypes showed that N-, P/Q, L-, and R-type currents each contribute to generation of the AHP, and that blockade of any of these as well as the T-type current slows the AP upstroke, prolongs the AP duration, and (except for L-type current) decreases the current threshold for AP initiation. Conclusions Taken together, our findings show that suppression of ICa decreases the AHP, reduces the

  1. Responses of spinal neurones to cutaneous and dorsal root stimuli in rats with mechanical allodynia after contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Drew, G M; Siddall, P J; Duggan, A W

    2001-03-01

    The firing of neurones in spinal segments adjacent to a contusive T13 spinal cord injury was characterised in anaesthetised rats. Three groups of rats were examined: (1) allodynic spinally injured, (2) non-allodynic spinally injured and (3) normal, uninjured. Spinal cord field potentials evoked by electrical dorsal root stimulation and the responses of 207 dorsal horn neurones to mechanical stimuli applied to the skin were studied. Within the lesioned spinal segment few active neurones were encountered and field potentials were absent. Depolarising field potentials recorded rostral to the lesion were reduced in both allodynic and non-allodynic animals compared to uninjured controls, while those recorded in caudal segments were enhanced in allodynic animals. Neuronal recordings revealed that allodynia was associated with exaggerated responses, including afterdischarges, to innocuous and noxious mechanical stimuli in a proportion of wide dynamic range, but not low threshold, neurones. These changes were observed both rostral and caudal to the site of injury. The results suggest that an increased responsiveness of some dorsal horn neurones in segments neighbouring a contusive spinal cord injury may contribute to the expression of mechanical allodynia. It is proposed that a relative lack of inhibition underlies altered cell responses. PMID:11222993

  2. Kinetic analysis of two types of Na+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, N; Tatebayashi, H

    1993-01-01

    1. The gating properties of two types of Na+ channels were studied in neurones isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia using the whole cell variation of the patch electrode voltage-clamp technique. 2. Two types of Na+ currents (INa) were identified on the basis of their sensitivity to tetrodotoxin (TTX). One type was insensitive to TTX (up to 0.1 mM), while the other type was blocked by 1 nM of TTX. Whereas they were both insensitive to 50 microM Cd2+, a high concentration (2 mM) of Co2+ selectively inhibited the TTX-insensitive type. 3. The activation thresholds were about -60 and -40 mV for the TTX-sensitive and the TTX-insensitive INa, respectively. Activation of the TTX-sensitive INa developed with a sigmoidal time course which was described by m3 kinetics, whereas the activation of the TTX-insensitive INa was described by a single exponential function. A deactivation process, as measured by the tail current upon repolarization, followed an exponential decay in either type of INa. 4. The rate constant of activation indicated that under comparable membrane potential conditions, the TTX-insensitive channels open 4-5 times slower than the TTX-sensitive ones upon depolarization. Likewise, the rate constant of inactivation indicated that the TTX-insensitive channels inactivate 3-7 times more slowly than the TTX-sensitive ones upon repolarization. 5. The steady-state activation curve for the TTX-insensitive INa was shifted about 20 mV in the positive direction from that for the TTX-sensitive INa. 6. The steady-state inactivation curve for the TTX-insensitive INa as obtained with a 0.5 s prepulse was shifted about 26 mV in the positive direction from that for the TTX-sensitive INa, indicating a greater availability for the TTX-insensitive INa in depolarized membrane. However, on increasing the duration of prepulse, the inactivation curve for the TTX-insensitive INa, but not for the TTX-sensitive INa, shifted in the negative direction due to an extremely slow

  3. Action potentials of embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurones in Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed Central

    Baccaglini, P I

    1978-01-01

    1. Several classes of action potentials can be distinguished in dorsal root ganglion cells, studied by intracellular recording techniques in Xenopus laevis tadpoles 4.5--51 days old. The ionic basis of the action potential was investigated by changing the ionic environment of the cells and applying various blocking agents. 2. The Ca2+-dependent action potential is a plateau of relatively long duration (mean 8.7 msec). It is unaffected by removal of Na+ but blocked by mM quantities of Co2+. It is present only in small cells. 3. Ca2+/Na+-dependent action potentials. Type I is a spike followed by a plateau or hump of different durations (mean 8.1 msec). The spike is selectively blocked by removal of Na+, leaving the plateau which is in turn blocked by Co2+. It is present in cells of small and intermediate size. Type II is a spike of short duration (mean 2.0 msec) with only an inflection on the falling phase. The spike is blocked by removal of Na+ and no other components can be elicited. The inflection is blocked by Co2+. It is present in cells of all sizes. Type III is similar to type I but is seen only in solutions in which the outward current is blocked. It was observed only very infrequently. 4. Na+-dependent action potentials. Type I a is a short duration spike (mean 1.1 msec). It is abolished by removal of Na+ or addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX), but largely unaffected by Co2+ or La3+. It is present in cells of all sizes. When the outward current channels are blocked and cells exposed to Na+-free solutions, all cells are capable of producing an action potential in which the inward current is carried by divalent cations. Type I b is a spike with a smooth, more slowly falling phase. It has the same pharmacological properties as type I a action potential and is present in cells of small size. 5. Na+-dependent action potentials. Type II is a spike with an inflection on the falling phase (mean duration 3.4 msec). It is prolonged by Co2+ and La3+. Removal of Na

  4. An experimental model for chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion produced by intervertebral foramen stenosis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hu, S J; Xing, J L

    1998-07-01

    Under anesthesia and sterile surgery, a small stainless steel rod (4 mm in length and 0.5-0.8 mm in diameter) was inserted into the L5 intervertebral foramen in the rat, developing intervertebral foramen stenosis and hence producing a chronic steady compression of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). The hind paw on the injured side exhibited a significant reduction in the latency of foot withdrawal to noxious heat and manifested a persistent heat hyperalgesia 5-35 days after surgery. Injection of 1% carrageenan into the intervertebral foramen, presumably causing inflammation of the DRG, also produced hyperalgesia to heat on the hind paw of the injured side 5-21 days after surgery. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings from myelinated dorsal root fibers were performed in vivo. Spontaneous activity was present in 21.5% of the fibers recorded from DRG neurons injured with chronic compression in contrast to 1.98% from uninjured DRG neurons. The pattern of spontaneous activity was periodic and bursting in 75.3% of the spontaneously active fibers. These neurons had a greatly enhanced sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the injured DRG and a prolonged after discharge. In response to TEA, topically applied to the DRG, excitatory responses were evoked in the injured, but not the uninjured, DRG neurons. Application of this experimental model may further our understanding of the neural mechanisms by which chronic compression of DRG induces low back pain and sciatica. PMID:9755014

  5. Opiate receptor agonists regulate phosphorylation of synapsin I in cocultures of rat spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Nah, S Y; Saya, D; Barg, J; Vogel, Z

    1993-01-01

    Kappa opiate receptor agonists applied to cocultures of spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion neurons have been previously shown to inhibit voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx and adenylate cyclase activity. Here we describe the effect of kappa opiate receptor agonists on phosphorylation of synapsin I, a synaptic-vesicle-associated protein whose phosphorylation was shown to be regulated by cAMP and Ca2+ concentrations. Depolarization of spinal cord-dorsal root ganglion cocultured cells (by high K+ or veratridine) and the addition of forskolin (which activates adenylate cyclase) led to increased phosphorylation of synapsin I. Addition of kappa opiate agonists attenuated both the depolarization- and the forskolin-induced phosphorylation of synapsin I. This attenuation was blocked by the opiate antagonist naloxone. mu and delta opiate receptor agonists had much weaker effects on the depolarization-induced phosphorylation of synapsin I. Similarly, kappa opiate agonists decreased (by 40-60%) the high-K+- or veratridine-induced phosphorylation of synapsin I in spinal cord synaptosomes. These results show that opiate ligands modulate synapsin I phosphorylation. Moreover, the data could explain the reduction in synaptic efficacy observed after opiate treatment. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:8097883

  6. S3 Dorsal Root Ganglion/Nerve Root Stimulation for Refractory Postsurgical Perineal Pain: Technical Aspects of Anchorless Sacral Transforaminal Lead Placement.

    PubMed

    Zuidema, X; Breel, J; Wille, F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic perineal pain limits patients in physical and sexual activities, leading to social and psychological distress. In most cases, this pain develops after surgery in the urogenital area or as a consequence of trauma. Neuromodulation is one of the options in chronic postsurgical perineal pain treatment. We present a case of refractory perineal pain after right sided surgical resection of a Bartholin's cyst which was treated with third sacral nerve root/dorsal root ganglion stimulation using the transforaminal approach. We describe a new anchorless lead placement technique using a unique curved lead delivery sheath. We postulate that this new posterior foraminal technique of lead placement is simple, safe, and reversible and may lower the occurrence of lead related complications. PMID:27123351

  7. S3 Dorsal Root Ganglion/Nerve Root Stimulation for Refractory Postsurgical Perineal Pain: Technical Aspects of Anchorless Sacral Transforaminal Lead Placement

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, X.; Breel, J.; Wille, F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic perineal pain limits patients in physical and sexual activities, leading to social and psychological distress. In most cases, this pain develops after surgery in the urogenital area or as a consequence of trauma. Neuromodulation is one of the options in chronic postsurgical perineal pain treatment. We present a case of refractory perineal pain after right sided surgical resection of a Bartholin's cyst which was treated with third sacral nerve root/dorsal root ganglion stimulation using the transforaminal approach. We describe a new anchorless lead placement technique using a unique curved lead delivery sheath. We postulate that this new posterior foraminal technique of lead placement is simple, safe, and reversible and may lower the occurrence of lead related complications. PMID:27123351

  8. Impacts of anti-nerve growth factor antibody on pain-related behaviors and expressions of opioid receptor in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia of rats with cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zhibin; Ma, Jiaming; Hong, Tao; Zhu, Yongqiang; Li, Hongxi; Pan, Shinong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impacts of anti-nerve growth factor antibody on pain-related behaviors and expressions of μ-opioid receptor in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia of rats with cancer-induced bone pain. Methods The rats were randomly grouped and then injected with 10 μl of phosphate buffer saline or Walker256 tumor cells into the upper segment of left tibia. Thirteen days after the injection, the intrathecal catheterization was performed, followed by the injection of saline, anti-nerve growth factor, nerve growth factor, and naloxone twice a day. The pain ethological changes were measured at the set time points; the expression changes of μ-opioid receptor protein and mRNA in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia were detected on the 18th day. Results After the tumor cells were injected into the tibia, hyperalgesia appeared and the expression of μ-opioid receptor protein and mRNA in spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia was increased, compared with the sham group; after intrathecally injected anti-nerve growth factor, the significant antinociceptive effects appeared, and the μ-opioid receptor expression was increased, compared with the cancer pain group; the μ-opioid receptor expressions in the other groups showed no statistical significance. The naloxone pretreatment could mostly inverse the antinociception effects of anti-nerve growth factor. Conclusions Anti-nerve growth factor could reduce hyperalgesia in the cancer-induced bone pain rats, and the antinociceptive effects were related with the upregulation of μ-opioid receptor. PMID:27118770

  9. CT-guided injection of a TRPV1 agonist around dorsal root ganglia decreases pain transmission in swine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacob D.; Saeed, Maythem; Do, Loi; Braz, Joao; Basbaum, Allan I.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Wilson, David M.; Dillon, William P.

    2016-01-01

    One approach to analgesia is to block pain at the site of origin or along the peripheral pathway by selectively ablating pain-transmitting neurons or nerve terminals directly. The heat/capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) expressed by nociceptive neurons is a compelling target for selective interventional analgesia because it leaves somatosensory and proprioceptive neurons intact. Resiniferatoxin (RTX), like capsaicin, is a TRPV1 agonist but has greater potency. We combine RTX-mediated inactivation with the precision of computed tomography (CT)–guided delivery to ablate peripheral pain fibers in swine. Under CT guidance, RTX was delivered unilaterally around the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and vehicle only was administered to the contralateral side. During a 4-week observation period, animals demonstrated delayed or absent withdrawal responses to infrared laser heat stimuli delivered to sensory dermatomes corresponding to DRG receiving RTX treatment. Motor function was unimpaired as assessed by disability scoring and gait analysis. In treated DRG, TRPV1 mRNA expression was reduced, as were nociceptive neuronal perikarya in ganglia and their nerve terminals in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. CT guidance to precisely deliver RTX to sites of peripheral pain transmission in swine may be an approach that could be tailored to block an array of clinical pain conditions in patients. PMID:26378245

  10. Tityus bahiensis toxin IV-5b selectively affects Na channel inactivation in chick dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Trequattrini, C; Zamudio, F Z; Petris, A; Prestipino, G; Possani, L D; Franciolini, F

    1995-09-01

    A novel toxin was isolated from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus (T.) bahiensis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this toxin was shown to be 80% identical to the corresponding segment of T. serrulatus toxin IV-5. The new toxin was thus named toxin IV-5b. Toxin IV-5b was found to markedly slow inactivation of Na channel in dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryo. By contrast, Na channel activation was only negligibly delayed, and deactivation completely unaffected. Similarly unaffected by the toxin were K and Ca currents. The slowing effect of the toxin starts to appear at concentrations of c. 80 nM, and shows a KD of 143 nM. With a toxin concentration of 2.4 microM, the Na channel inactivation time constant was increased c. 3-fold with respect to the control. The slowing of inactivation was voltage dependent, and increased with depolarization. PMID:7553331

  11. Slit1 promotes regenerative neurite outgrowth of adult dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro via binding to the Robo receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai Ying; Zheng, Lin Feng; Yi, Xi Nan; Chen, Zhi Bin; He, Zhong Ping; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Xian Fang; Ma, Zhi Jian

    2010-07-01

    Secreted Slit proteins have previously been shown to signal through Roundabout (Robo) receptors to negatively regulate axon guidance and cell migration. During vertebrate development, Slit proteins have also been shown to stimulate branching and elongation of sensory axons and cortical dendrites. In this study, Slit1/Robo2 mRNA and protein expressions were detected in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and in cultured DRG neurons. Treatment of both models with recombinant, soluble Slit1 protein was found to promote neurite outgrowth and elongation. In contrast, treatment with a recombinant human Robo2/Fc chimera inhibited neurite outgrowth and elongation. When adult DRG and cultured DRG neurons were pretreated with soluble recombinant human Robo2/Fc chimera, neurite outgrowth and elongation was not induced. These findings indicate that Slit1/Robo2 signaling may have a role in regulating peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:20172023

  12. Modulating nitric oxide levels in dorsal root ganglion neurons of rat with low-level laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-qin; Wang, Yu-hua; He, Yi-peng; Zhou, Jie; Yang, Hong-qin; Zhang, Yan-ding; Xie, Shu-sen

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) have an important role in pain signaling transmission in animal models. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is known to have an analgesic effect, but the mechanism is unclear. The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of LLLT on NO release and NOS synthesis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, in order to find whether LLLI can ameliorate pain through modulating NO production at the cellular level. The results show that in stress conditions, the laser irradiation at 658 nm can modulate NO production in DRG neurons with soma diameter of about 20 μm in a short time after illumination, and affect NOS synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. It is demonstrated that LLLT might treat pain by altering NO release directly and indirectly in DRG neurons.

  13. A comparison of peripheral and central axotomy effects on neurofilament and tubulin gene expression in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.; Oblinger, M.M. )

    1990-07-01

    The expression of major cytoskeletal protein mRNAs was studied in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after crushing either their central or peripheral branch axons. mRNA levels in DRG neurons were examined by quantitative in situ hybridization with radiolabeled cDNA probes specific for the low-molecular-weight neurofilament protein (NF-L) and beta-tubulin. The large-sized (greater than 1000 microns 2) neurons which give rise to myelinated axons in lumbar ganglia (L4 and L5) were studied 1 d through 8 weeks after either dorsal root or sciatic nerve crush. NF-L and beta-tubulin mRNA levels in axotomized DRG neurons were compared to those in contralateral control DRG neurons, as well as to those in normal (completely untreated) DRG cells. In the case of NF-L mRNA, changes were observed after central as well as peripheral branch axotomy and the time course and magnitude of changes were similar after both types of axotomy. NF-L mRNA levels initially decreased (first 2 weeks after crush) and then began to return towards control levels at longer survival times. Similar, but less pronounced, changes in NF-L mRNA levels also occurred in contralateral DRG neurons (which were uninjured); the changes in contralateral neurons were not simply a result of surgical stress since no changes in NF-L mRNA levels were observed in sham-operated DRG neurons. In the case of tubulin mRNA, changes were observed after central as well as peripheral branch axotomy by in situ hybridization, but the time course and magnitude of changes were different after each type of axotomy.

  14. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves. PMID:1960538

  15. Inhibitory Activity of Yokukansankachimpihange against Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Growth in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Chiaki; Watanabe, Shimpei; Nakamura, Motokazu; Norimoto, Hisayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous diseases, however, the treatment remains a challenge in the clinic. The traditional Chinese-Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine) is a conservative and increasingly popular approach to treat chronic pruritus for both patients and medical providers. Yokukansankachimpihange (YKH), a Kampo formula has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of itching of atopic dermatitis in Japan although its pharmacological mechanism is unknown clearly. In an attempt to clarify its pharmacological actions, in this study, we focused on the inhibitory activity of YKH against neurite growth induced with nerve growth factor (NGF) in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons because epidermal hyperinnervation is deeply related to itch sensitization. YKH showed approximately 200-fold inhibitory activity against NGF-induced neurite growth than that of neurotropin (positive control), a drug used clinically for treatment of chronic pruritus. Moreover, it also found that Uncaria hook, Bupleurum root and their chemical constituents rhynchophylline, hirsutine, and saikosaponin a, d showed inhibitory activities against NGF-induced neurite growth, suggesting they should mainly contribute to the inhibitory activity of YKH. Further study on the effects of YKH against epidermal nerve density in "itch-scratch" animal models is under investigation. PMID:26287150

  16. An improved method for patch clamp recording and calcium imaging of neurons in the intact dorsal root ganglion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hayar, Abdallah; Gu, Chunping; Al-Chaer, Elie D.

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been mostly investigated in culture of dissociated cells, and it is uncertain whether these cells maintain the electrophysiological properties of the intact DRG neurons. Few attempts have been made to record from DRG neurons in the intact ganglion using the patch clamp technique. In this study, rat DRGs were dissected and incubated for at least 1 hour at 37°C in collagenase (10 mg/ml). We used oblique epi-illumination to visualize DRG neurons and perform patch clamp recordings. All DRG neurons exhibited strong delayed rectifier potassium current and a high threshold for spike generation (−15 mV) that rendered the cells very weakly excitable, generating only one action potential upon strong current injection (>300 pA). It is therefore possible that cultured DRG neurons, commonly used in studies of pain processing, may be hyperexcitable because they acquired "neuropathic" properties due to the injury induced by their dissociation. Electrical stimulation of the attached root produced an antidromic spike in the soma that could be blocked by intracellular hyperpolarization or high frequency stimulation. Imaging intracellular calcium concentration with Oregon Green BAPTA-1 indicates that antidromic stimulation caused a long-lasting increase in intracellular calcium concentration mostly near the cell membrane. This study describes a simple approach to examine the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties and intracellular calcium signaling in DRG neurons in the intact ganglion where the effects of somatic spike invasion can be studied as well. PMID:18588915

  17. Pharmacological properties of P2X3-receptors present in neurones of the rat dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Rae, M G; Rowan, E G; Kennedy, C

    1998-01-01

    The electrophysiological actions of several agonists which may differentiate between P2X1- and P2X3-receptors were studied under concentration and voltage-clamp conditions in dissociated neurones of 1–4 day old rat dorsal root ganglia.β,γ-Methylene-D-ATP (β,γ-me-D-ATP) (1–300 μM), diadenosine 5′,5′′′-P1,P5-pentaphosphate (AP5A) (100 nM–300 μM), diadenosine 5′,5′′′-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (AP4A) (300 nM–300 μM) and uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP) (1 μM–1 mM) all activated concentration-dependent inward currents with a latency to onset of a few ms.The concentration-response curves for β,γ-me-D-ATP and AP5A and ATP had similar maximum values, while that for AP4A had a lower maximum. The concentration-response curve to UTP was shallow and did not reach a maximum. β,γ-Methylene-L-ATP was virtually inactive. The rank order of agonist potency was ATP>AP5A≈amp;AP4A>β,γ-me-D-ATP>UTP>>β,γ-methylene-L-ATP.The inward currents were inhibited by the P2-receptor antagonists suramin (100 μM) and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulphonic acid (PPADS) (10 μM). PPADS also inhibited responses to ATP (800 nM) and α,β-methylene ATP (2 μM) in a concentration-dependent manner.This study shows that β,γ-me-D-ATP, AP5A, AP4A and UTP all act via a suramin- and PPADS-sensitive P2X-receptor to evoke rapid, transient inward currents in dissociated neurones of rat dorsal root ganglia. The very low activity of β,γ-methylene-L-ATP suggests that the agonists were acting at the P2X3-subtype to produce these effects. PMID:9630357

  18. [DREZ (dorsal root entry zone) surgery for the treatment of the postherpetic intercostal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Spaić, M; Ivanović, S; Slavik, E; Antić, B

    2004-01-01

    Postherpetic intercostal neuralgia proved to be an incapacitating pain often recalcitrant to therapy. Acute pain that accompanied Herpes zoster usually subsides spontaneously but in 10% of patients the pain persists and intensifies. The incidence of postherpetic neuralgia incrises up to 50% among elder patients. We report the case of the two 42 and 48 yers old male patient who were succesfuly relieved from the chronic postherpetic intercostal neuralgia employing the DREZ surgery (Dorzal Root Entry Zone lesion). DREZ surgicall treatment of this pain should be considered when medical therapies failed in controling pain. Subjective sensory nature of the pain should play an important role in setting the indication for DREZ surgical treatment. The most favourable pain pattern for DREZ operation is the pain of intermittent rhythm, confined theritory accompanied with the phenomenon of alodinic pain that could be provoked from the pain theritory. PMID:16018410

  19. Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion Enhances Mechanically Evoked Pain Behavior and the Activity of Cutaneous Nociceptors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hurwitz, Olivia; Shimada, Steven G.; Qu, Lintao; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Pu; Ma, Chao; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Radicular pain in humans is usually caused by intraforaminal stenosis and other diseases affecting the spinal nerve, root, or dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Previous studies discovered that a chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) induced mechanical allodynia in rats and mice, with enhanced excitability of DRG neurons. We investigated whether CCD altered the pain-like behavior and also the responses of cutaneous nociceptors with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers) to a normally aversive punctate mechanical stimulus delivered to the hairy skin of the hind limb of the mouse. The incidence of a foot shaking evoked by indentation of the dorsum of foot with an aversive von Frey filament (tip diameter 200 μm, bending force 20 mN) was significantly higher in the foot ipsilateral to the CCD surgery as compared to the contralateral side on post-operative days 2 to 8. Mechanically-evoked action potentials were electrophysiologically recorded from the L3 DRG, in vivo, from cell bodies visually identified as expressing a transgenically labeled fluorescent marker (neurons expressing either the receptor MrgprA3 or MrgprD). After CCD, 26.7% of MrgprA3+ and 32.1% MrgprD+ neurons exhibited spontaneous activity (SA), while none of the unoperated control neurons had SA. MrgprA3+ and MrgprD+ neurons in the compressed DRG exhibited, in comparison with neurons from unoperated control mice, an increased response to the punctate mechanical stimuli for each force applied (6, 20, 40, and 80 mN). We conclude that CCD produced both a behavioral hyperalgesia and an enhanced response of cutaneous C-nociceptors to aversive punctate mechanical stimuli. PMID:26356638

  20. Regulation of Nav1.7: A Conserved SCN9A Natural Antisense Transcript Expressed in Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Jennifer; Werdehausen, Robert; Linley, John E.; Habib, Abdella M.; Vernon, Jeffrey; Lolignier, Stephane; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Zhao, Jing; Okorokov, Andrei L.; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Wood, John N.; Cox, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The Nav1.7 voltage-gated sodium channel, encoded by SCN9A, is critical for human pain perception yet the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms that regulate this gene are still incompletely understood. Here, we describe a novel natural antisense transcript (NAT) for SCN9A that is conserved in humans and mice. The NAT has a similar tissue expression pattern to the sense gene and is alternatively spliced within dorsal root ganglia. The human and mouse NATs exist in cis with the sense gene in a tail-to-tail orientation and both share sequences that are complementary to the terminal exon of SCN9A/Scn9a. Overexpression analyses of the human NAT in human embryonic kidney (HEK293A) and human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell lines show that it can function to downregulate Nav1.7 mRNA, protein levels and currents. The NAT may play an important role in regulating human pain thresholds and is a potential candidate gene for individuals with chronic pain disorders that map to the SCN9A locus, such as Inherited Primary Erythromelalgia, Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder and Painful Small Fibre Neuropathy, but who do not contain mutations in the sense gene. Our results strongly suggest the SCN9A NAT as a prime candidate for new therapies based upon augmentation of existing antisense RNAs in the treatment of chronic pain conditions in man. PMID:26035178

  1. Autophagy inhibition in endogenous and nutrient-deprived conditions reduces dorsal root ganglia neuron survival and neurite growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Joseph-Patrick; Mearow, Karen

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral neuropathies can result in cytoskeletal changes in axons, ultimately leading to Wallerian degeneration and cell death. Recently, autophagy has been studied as a potential target for improving axonal survival and growth during peripheral nerve damage. This study investigates the influence of autophagy on adult dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron survival and axonal growth under control and nutrient deprivation conditions. Constitutive autophagy was modulated with pharmacological activators (rapamycin; Rapa) and inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin A1) in conjunction with either a nutrient-stable environment (standard culture medium) or a nutrient-deprived environment (Hank's balanced salt solution + Ca(2+) /Mg(2+) ). The results demonstrated that autophagy inhibition decreased cell viability and reduced neurite growth and branching complexity. Although autophagy was upregulated with nutrient deprivation compared with the control, it was not further activated by rapamycin, suggesting a threshold level of autophagy. Overall, both cellular and biochemical approaches combined to show the influence of autophagy on adult DRG neuron survival and growth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018986

  2. Overexpression of GRK6 attenuates neuropathic pain via suppression of CXCR2 in rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Li, Rong-Ji; Li, Meng; Liu, Xuelian; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Ju, Zhong; Miao, Xiuhua; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled kinase (GRK) 6 is a member of the GRK family that mediates agonist-induced desensitization and signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), thus involving in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. Recent studies have indicated that chemokines play an important role in chronic pain via increased expression of respective GPCRs. This study was designed to investigate the role of GRK6 and its interaction with substrate chemokine receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI). Following induction of CCI, GRK6 expression was significantly downregulated in rat DRGs at L4-L6 segments. Overexpression of GRK6 using lentiviral-mediated production strategy via sciatic nerve injection markedly attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. Overexpression of GRK6 also drastically reversed the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons innervating the hind paw and suppressed the enhanced expression of CXCR2 in DRGs of CCI rats. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and correlation analysis supported the interaction between GRK6 and CXCR2. These results suggest that GRK6 might be a key molecular involved in peripheral mechanism of neuropathic pain and that overexpression of GRK6 might be a potential strategy for treatment for neuropathic pain through inhibition of CXCR2 signal pathway. PMID:27145805

  3. Real-time control of hind limb functional electrical stimulation using feedback from dorsal root ganglia recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Tim M.; Wagenaar, Joost B.; Bauman, Matthew J.; Gaunt, Robert A.; Weber, Douglas J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) approaches often utilize an open-loop controller to drive state transitions. The addition of sensory feedback may allow for closed-loop control that can respond effectively to perturbations and muscle fatigue. Approach. We evaluated the use of natural sensory nerve signals obtained with penetrating microelectrode arrays in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) as real-time feedback for closed-loop control of FES-generated hind limb stepping in anesthetized cats. Main results. Leg position feedback was obtained in near real-time at 50 ms intervals by decoding the firing rates of more than 120 DRG neurons recorded simultaneously. Over 5 m of effective linear distance was traversed during closed-loop stepping trials in each of two cats. The controller compensated effectively for perturbations in the stepping path when DRG sensory feedback was provided. The presence of stimulation artifacts and the quality of DRG unit sorting did not significantly affect the accuracy of leg position feedback obtained from the linear decoding model as long as at least 20 DRG units were included in the model. Significance. This work demonstrates the feasibility and utility of closed-loop FES control based on natural neural sensors. Further work is needed to improve the controller and electrode technologies and to evaluate long-term viability.

  4. Upregulation of EMMPRIN (OX47) in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Development of Mechanical Allodynia after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun; Sun, Yanyuan; Ren, Yingna; Gao, Yandong; Tian, Li; Liu, Yang; Pu, Yanan; Gou, Xingchun; Chen, Yanke; Lu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are widely implicated in inflammation and tissue remodeling associated with various neurodegenerative diseases and play an important role in nociception and allodynia. Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer (EMMPRIN) plays a key regulatory role for MMP activities. However, the role of EMMPRIN in the development of neuropathic pain is not clear. Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and immunofluorescence were performed to determine the changes of messenger RNA and protein of EMMPRIN/OX47 and their cellular localization in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after nerve injury. Paw withdrawal threshold test was examined to evaluate the pain behavior in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. The lentivirus containing OX47 shRNA was injected into the DRG one day before SNL. The expression level of both mRNA and protein of OX47 was markedly upregulated in ipsilateral DRG after SNL. OX47 was mainly expressed in the extracellular matrix of DRG. Administration of shRNA targeted against OX47 in vivo remarkably attenuated mechanical allodynia induced by SNL. In conclusion, peripheral nerve injury induced upregulation of OX47 in the extracellular matrix of DRG. RNA interference against OX47 significantly suppressed the expression of OX47 mRNA and the development of mechanical allodynia. The altered expression of OX47 may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain after nerve injury. PMID:26697232

  5. Microsurgical procedures in the peripheral nerves and the dorsal root entry zone for the treatment of spasticity.

    PubMed

    Sindou, M; Keravel, Y

    1988-01-01

    When spasticity becomes severe and harmful, in spite of physical and medical therapy, neurosurgery can give functional improvement. This paper deals with the long term results of Selective Peripheral Neurotomies of the Tibial Nerve and Selective Posterior Rhizotomies in the Dorsal Root Entry Zone, in 123 patients with spastic disorders localized to the limbs. The micro-techniques and intra-operative electro-stimulation for identification of the nervous structures responsible for the spastic components, can give a substantial reduction of the harmful spasticity, without suppressing the useful muscle tone and impairing the residual motor and sensory functions. The results were effective, with a 1 to 13 year follow-up (5 on average), in 89% of 47 Selective Peripheral Neurotomies of the tibial nerve for spastic foot, in 92% of 53 Selective Posterior Rhizotomies for paraplegia and in 87% of 23 Selective Posterior Rhizotomies for hemiplegia. In the most severe situations ("comfort" indications), correction of the abnormal postures and relief of pain facilitated nursing and physiotherapy. Sometimes there was reappearance of some useful voluntary movements. In the less affected patients ("functional" indications), the suppression of the harmful spastic components made the persistant capacities more effective. PMID:3165206

  6. Evaluation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/carbon nanotube neural electrode coatings for stimulation in the dorsal root ganglion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Catt, Kasey; Rost, Erika; Albrecht, Ingrid N.; Bourbeau, Dennis; Du, Zhanhong; Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Luo, Xiliang; Weber, Douglas J.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-02-01

    Objective. The dorsal root ganglion is an attractive target for implanting neural electrode arrays that restore sensory function or provide therapy via stimulation. However, penetrating microelectrodes designed for these applications are small and deliver low currents. For long-term performance of microstimulation devices, novel coating materials are needed in part to decrease impedance values at the electrode-tissue interface and to increase charge storage capacity. Approach. Conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on the electrode surface and doped with the anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. Electrode characteristics and the tissue reaction around neural electrodes as a result of stimulation, coating and drug release were characterized. Hematoxylin and eosin staining along with antibodies recognizing Iba1 (microglia/macrophages), NF200 (neuronal axons), NeuN (neurons), vimentin (fibroblasts), caspase-3 (cell death) and L1 (neural cell adhesion molecule) were used. Quantitative image analyses were performed using MATLAB. Main results. Our results indicate that coated microelectrodes have lower in vitro and in vivo impedance values. Significantly less neuronal death/damage was observed with coated electrodes as compared to non-coated controls. The inflammatory response with the PEDOT/CNT-coated electrodes was also reduced. Significance. This study is the first to report on the utility of these coatings in stimulation applications. Our results indicate PEDOT/CNT coatings may be valuable additions to implantable electrodes used as therapeutic modalities.

  7. The role of miR-146a in dorsal root ganglia neurons of experimental diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chopp, M; Szalad, A; Zhang, Y; Wang, X; Zhang, R L; Liu, X S; Jia, L; Zhang, Z G

    2014-02-14

    Sensory neurons mediate diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Using a mouse model of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (BKS.Cg-m+/+Lepr(db)/J (db/db) mice) and cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, the present study showed that hyperglycemia downregulated miR-146a expression and elevated interleukin-1 receptor-activated kinase (IRAK1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) levels in DRG neurons. In vitro, elevation of miR-146a by miR-146a mimics in DRG neurons increased neuronal survival under high-glucose conditions. Downregulation and elevation of miR-146a in DRG neurons, respectively, were inversely related to IRAK1 and TRAF6 levels. Treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy with sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, augmented miR-146a expression and decreased levels of IRAK1 and TRAF6 in the DRG neurons. In vitro, blockage of miR-146a in DRG neurons abolished the effect of sildenafil on DRG neuron protection and downregulation of IRAK1 and TRAF6 proteins under hyperglycemia. Our data provide the first evidence showing that miR-146a plays an important role in mediating DRG neuron apoptosis under hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:24316060

  8. Anisatin modulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-channel in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Tomoko; Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Okuyama, Emi; Nagata, Keiichi; Honda, Hiroshi; Shono, Toshio; Narahashi, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    Anisatin, a toxic, insecticidally active component of Sikimi plant, is known to act on the GABA system. In order to elucidate the mechanism of anisatin interaction with the GABA system, whole-cell and single-channel patch clamp experiments were performed with rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in primary culture.Repeated co-applications of GABA and anisatin suppressed GABA-induced whole-cell currents with an EC50 of 1.10 μM. No recovery of currents was observed after washout with anisatin-free solution.However, pre-application of anisatin through the bath had no effect on GABA-induced currents. The decay phase of currents was accelerated by anisatin. These results indicate that anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents requires opening of the channels and is use-dependent.Anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents was not voltage dependent.Picrotoxinin attenuated anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents. [3H]-EBOB binding to rat brain membranes was competitively inhibited by anisatin. These data indicated that anisatin bound to the picrotoxinin site.At the single-channel level, anisatin did not alter the open time but prolonged the closed time. The burst duration was reduced and channel openings per burst were decreased indicating that anisatin decreased the probability of openings. PMID:10455311

  9. Real-time control of hind limb functional electrical stimulation using feedback from dorsal root ganglia recordings

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Tim M; Wagenaar, Joost B; Bauman, Matthew J; Gaunt, Robert A; Weber, Douglas J

    2013-01-01

    Objective Functional electrical stimulation (FES) approaches often utilize an open-loop controller to drive state transitions. The addition of sensory feedback may allow for closed-loop control that can respond effectively to perturbations and muscle fatigue. Approach We evaluated the use of natural sensory nerve signals obtained with penetrating microelectrode arrays in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) as real-time feedback for closed-loop control of FES-generated hind limb stepping in anesthetized cats. Main results Leg position feedback was obtained in near real-time at 50 ms intervals by decoding the firing rates of more than 120 DRG neurons recorded simultaneously. Over 5 m of effective linear distance was traversed during closed-loop stepping trials in each of two cats. The controller compensated effectively for perturbations in the stepping path when DRG sensory feedback was provided. The presence of stimulation artifacts and the quality of DRG unit sorting did not significantly affect the accuracy of leg position feedback obtained from the linear decoding model as long as at least 20 DRG units were included in the model. Significance This work demonstrates the feasibility and utility of closed-loop FES control based on natural neural sensors. Further work is needed to improve the controller and electrode technologies and to evaluate long-term viability. PMID:23503062

  10. Expression profile of vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT, SLC17A9) in subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kentaro; Nomura, Yuka; Kawamori, Kanako; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Nagasawa, Kazuki

    2014-09-01

    ATP plays an important role in the signal transduction between sensory neurons and satellite cells in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). In primary cultured DRG neurons, ATP is known to be stored in lysosomes via a vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), and to be released into the intercellular space through exocytosis. DRGs consist of large-, medium- and small-sized neurons, which play different roles in sensory transmission, but there is no information on the expression profiles of VNUT in DRG subpopulations. Here, we obtained detailed expression profiles of VNUT in isolated rat DRG tissues. On immunohistochemical analysis, VNUT was found in DRG neurons, and was predominantly expressed by the small- and medium-sized DRG ones, as judged upon visual inspection, and this was compatible with the finding that the number of VNUT-positive DRG neurons in IB4-positive cells was greater than that in NF200-positive ones. These results suggest that VNUT play a role in ATP accumulation in DRG neurons, especially in small- and medium-sized ones, and might be involved in ATP-mediated nociceptive signaling in DRGs. PMID:25043192

  11. Inhibition of acid-sensing ion channels by levo-tetrahydropalmatine in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Qiu, Fang; Ren, Cuixia; Gan, Xiong; Peng, Fang; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-02-01

    Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP), a main bioactive Chinese herbal constituent from the genera Stephania and Corydalis, has been in use in clinical practice for years in China as a traditional analgesic agent. However, the mechanism underlying the analgesic action of l-THP is poorly understood. This study shows that l-THP can exert an inhibitory effect on the functional activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which are believed to mediate pain caused by extracellular acidification. l-THP dose dependently decreased the amplitude of proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. l-THP shifted the proton concentration-response curve downward, with a decrease of 40.93% ± 8.45% in the maximum current response to protons, with no significant change in the pH0.5 value. Moreover, l-THP can alter the membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons to acid stimuli. It significantly decreased the number of action potentials and the amplitude of the depolarization induced by an extracellular pH drop. Finally, peripherally administered l-THP inhibited the nociceptive response to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. These results indicate that l-THP can inhibit the functional activity of ASICs in dissociated primary sensory neurons and relieve acidosis-evoked pain in vivo, which for the first time provides a novel peripheral mechanism underlying the analgesic action of l-THP. PMID:25395088

  12. Modulation of Spinal GABAergic Inhibition and Mechanical Hypersensitivity following Chronic Compression of Dorsal Root Ganglion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moon Chul; Nam, Taick Sang; Jung, Se Jung; Gwak, Young S.; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion (CCD) results in neuropathic pain. We investigated the role of spinal GABA in CCD-induced pain using rats with unilateral CCD. A stereological analysis revealed that the proportion of GABA-immunoreactive neurons to total neurons at L4/5 laminae I–III on the injured side decreased in the early phase of CCD (post-CCD week 1) and then returned to the sham-control level in the late phase (post-CCD week 18). In the early phase, the rats showed an increase in both mechanical sensitivity of the hind paw and spinal WDR neuronal excitability on the injured side, and such increase was suppressed by spinally applied muscimol (GABA-A agonist, 5 nmol) and baclofen (GABA-B agonist, 25 nmol), indicating the reduced spinal GABAergic inhibition involved. In the late phase, the CCD-induced increase in mechanical sensitivity and neuronal excitability returned to pre-CCD levels, and such recovered responses were enhanced by spinally applied bicuculline (GABA-A antagonist, 15 nmol) and CGP52432 (GABA-B antagonist, 15 nmol), indicating the regained spinal GABAergic inhibition involved. In conclusion, the alteration of spinal GABAergic inhibition following CCD and leading to a gradual reduction over time of CCD-induced mechanical hypersensitivity is most likely due to changes in GABA content in spinal GABA neurons. PMID:26451259

  13. Evaluation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/carbon nanotube neural electrode coatings for stimulation in the dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Catt, Kasey; Rost, Erika; Albrecht, Ingrid N.; Bourbeau, Dennis; Du, Zhanhong; Kozai, Takashi D.Y.; Luo, Xiliang; Weber, Douglas J.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Objective The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is an attractive target for implanting neural electrode arrays that restore sensory function or provide therapy via stimulation. However, penetrating microelectrodes designed for these applications are small and deliver low currents. For long-term performance of microstimulation devices, novel coating materials are needed in part to decrease impedance values at the electrode-tissue interface and to increase charge storage capacity. Approach Conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on the electrode surface and doped with the anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. Electrode characteristics and the tissue reaction around neural electrodes as the result of stimulation, coating and drug release were characterized. Hematoxylin and eosin staining along with antibodies recognizing Iba1 (microglia/macrophages), NF200 (neuronal axons), NeuN (neurons), vimentin (fibroblasts), caspase-3 (cell death) and L1 (neural cell adhesion molecule) were used. Quantitative image analyses were performed using MATLAB. Main Results Our results indicate that coated microelectrodes have lower in vitro and in vivo impedance values. Significantly less neuronal death/damage was observed with coated electrodes as compared to non-coated controls. The inflammatory response with the PEDOT/CNT-coated electrodes was also reduced. Significance This study is the first to report on the utility of these coatings in stimulation applications. Our results indicate PEDOT/CNT coatings may be valuable additions to implantable electrodes used as therapeutic modalities. PMID:25485675

  14. Standardized Profiling of The Membrane-Enriched Proteome of Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRG) Provides Novel Insights Into Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Rouwette, Tom; Sondermann, Julia; Avenali, Luca; Gomez-Varela, David; Schmidt, Manuela

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is a complex disease with limited treatment options. Several profiling efforts have been employed with the aim to dissect its molecular underpinnings. However, generated results are often inconsistent and nonoverlapping, which is largely because of inherent technical constraints. Emerging data-independent acquisition (DIA)-mass spectrometry (MS) has the potential to provide unbiased, reproducible and quantitative proteome maps - a prerequisite for standardization among experiments. Here, we designed a DIA-based proteomics workflow to profile changes in the abundance of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) proteins in two mouse models of chronic pain, inflammatory and neuropathic. We generated a DRG-specific spectral library containing 3067 DRG proteins, which enables their standardized quantification by means of DIA-MS in any laboratory. Using this resource, we profiled 2526 DRG proteins in each biological replicate of both chronic pain models and respective controls with unprecedented reproducibility. We detected numerous differentially regulated proteins, the majority of which exhibited pain model-specificity. Our approach recapitulates known biology and discovers dozens of proteins that have not been characterized in the somatosensory system before. Functional validation experiments and analysis of mouse pain behaviors demonstrate that indeed meaningful protein alterations were discovered. These results illustrate how the application of DIA-MS can open new avenues to achieve the long-awaited standardization in the molecular dissection of pathologies of the somatosensory system. Therefore, our findings provide a valuable framework to qualitatively extend our understanding of chronic pain and somatosensation. PMID:27103637

  15. FGF and BMP derived from dorsal root ganglia regulate blastema induction in limb regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Makanae, Aki; Nishimoto, Yurie; Mitogawa, Kazumasa

    2016-09-01

    Urodele amphibians have a remarkable organ regeneration ability that is regulated by neural inputs. The identification of these neural inputs has been a challenge. Recently, Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) and Bone morphogenic protein (Bmp) were shown to substitute for nerve functions in limb and tail regeneration in urodele amphibians. However, direct evidence of Fgf and Bmp being secreted from nerve endings and regulating regeneration has not yet been shown. Thus, it remained uncertain whether they were the nerve factors responsible for successful limb regeneration. To gather experimental evidence, the technical difficulties involved in the usage of axolotls had to be overcome. We achieved this by modifying the electroporation method. When Fgf8-AcGFP or Bmp7-AcGFP was electroporated into the axolotl dorsal root ganglia (DRG), GFP signals were detectable in the regenerating limb region. This suggested that Fgf8 and Bmp7 synthesized in neural cells in the DRG were delivered to the limbs through the long axons. Further knockdown experiments with double-stranded RNA interference resulted in impaired limb regeneration ability. These results strongly suggest that Fgf and Bmp are the major neural inputs that control the organ regeneration ability. PMID:27432514

  16. Coculture of dorsal root ganglion neurons and differentiated human corneal stromal stem cells on silk-based scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siran; Ghezzi, Chiara E; White, James D; Kaplan, David L

    2015-10-01

    Corneal tissue displays the highest peripheral nerve density in the human body. Engineering of biomaterials to promote interactions between neurons and corneal tissue could provide tissue models for nerve/cornea development, platforms for drug screening, as well as innovative opportunities to regenerate cornea tissue. The focus of this study was to develop a coculture system for differentiated human corneal stromal stem cells (dhCSSCs) and dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) to mimic the human cornea tissue interactions. Axon extension, connectivity, and neuron cell viability were studied. DRG neurons developed longer axons when cocultured with dhCSSCs in comparison to neuron cultures alone. To assess the mechanism involved in the coculture response, nerve growth factors (NGF) secreted by dhCSSCs including NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and neurotrophin-3 were characterized with greater focus on BDNF secretion. DhCSSCs also secreted collagen type I, an extracellular matrix molecule favorable for neuronal outgrowth. This coculture system provides a slowly degrading silk matrix to study neuronal responses in concert with hCSSCs related to innervation of corneal tissue with utility toward human corneal nerve regeneration and associated diseases. PMID:25809662

  17. Surgical extraction of human dorsal root ganglia from organ donors and preparation of primary sensory neuron cultures.

    PubMed

    Valtcheva, Manouela V; Copits, Bryan A; Davidson, Steve; Sheahan, Tayler D; Pullen, Melanie Y; McCall, Jordan G; Dikranian, Krikor; Gereau, Robert W

    2016-10-01

    Primary cultures of rodent sensory neurons are widely used to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pain, itch, nerve injury and regeneration. However, translation of these preclinical findings may be greatly improved by direct validation in human tissues. We have developed an approach to extract and culture human sensory neurons in collaboration with a local organ procurement organization (OPO). Here we describe the surgical procedure for extraction of human dorsal root ganglia (hDRG) and the necessary modifications to existing culture techniques to prepare viable adult human sensory neurons for functional studies. Dissociated sensory neurons can be maintained in culture for >10 d, and they are amenable to electrophysiological recording, calcium imaging and viral gene transfer. The entire process of extraction and culturing can be completed in <7 h, and it can be performed by trained graduate students. This approach can be applied at any institution with access to organ donors consenting to tissue donation for research, and is an invaluable resource for improving translational research. PMID:27606776

  18. Nesfatin-1 increases intracellular calcium concentration by protein kinase C activation in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Gok, Zeynep Betul; Kacar, Emine; Serhatlioglu, Ihsan; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2016-04-21

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently identified anorexigenic hypothalamic polypeptide derived from the posttranslational processing of nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2). Several studies have indicated that this neuropeptide may be participated in somatosensory and visceral transmission including pain signals in addition to energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of nesfatin-1 in the transmission of peripheral neural signals by investigating the effects of nesfatin-1 on intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i in DRG neurons were investigated by using an in vitro calcium imaging system. DRG neurons were grown in primary culture following enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of ganglia from 1-or 2-day-old neonatal Wistar rats. Using the fura-2-based calcium imaging technique, the effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i and role of the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway in nesfatin-1 effect were assessed. Nesfatin-1 elevated [Ca(2+)]i in cultured DRG neurons. The response was prevented by pretreating the cells with pertussis toxin. The protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed nesfatin-1-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. The result shows that nesfatin-1 interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor, leading to an increase of [Ca(2+)]i, which is linked to protein kinase C activation in cultured rat DRG neurons. PMID:26975784

  19. Overexpression of GRK6 attenuates neuropathic pain via suppression of CXCR2 in rat dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Li, Rong-Ji; Li, Meng; Liu, Xuelian; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Ju, Zhong; Miao, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled kinase (GRK) 6 is a member of the GRK family that mediates agonist-induced desensitization and signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), thus involving in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. Recent studies have indicated that chemokines play an important role in chronic pain via increased expression of respective GPCRs. This study was designed to investigate the role of GRK6 and its interaction with substrate chemokine receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI). Following induction of CCI, GRK6 expression was significantly downregulated in rat DRGs at L4-L6 segments. Overexpression of GRK6 using lentiviral-mediated production strategy via sciatic nerve injection markedly attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. Overexpression of GRK6 also drastically reversed the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons innervating the hind paw and suppressed the enhanced expression of CXCR2 in DRGs of CCI rats. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and correlation analysis supported the interaction between GRK6 and CXCR2. These results suggest that GRK6 might be a key molecular involved in peripheral mechanism of neuropathic pain and that overexpression of GRK6 might be a potential strategy for treatment for neuropathic pain through inhibition of CXCR2 signal pathway. PMID:27145805

  20. Effect of nano-hydroxyapatite-coated magnetic nanoparticles on axonal guidance growth of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meili; Zhou, Gang; Hou, Yongzhao; Kuang, Gang; Jia, Zhengtai; Li, Ping; Fan, Yubo

    2015-09-01

    Proper extracellular substrate can stimulate neural regeneration in nerve tissue engineering, including magnetic nanoparticles (iron oxide nanoparticles, Fe3 O4 ), but they are always neurotoxic, with low saturation magnetization and so on. These nanomaterials cannot be used to stimulate the growth and elongation of axons. Therefore, this work attempts to overcome these deficiencies. Nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) coated magnetic nanoparticles were using an ultrasound-assisted co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and chemical composition of the produced samples. These synthesized nanomaterials were added into the primary cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons; our results showed that n-HA-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3 O4 +n-HA) can effectively increase cell viability and promote axonal elongation, which enhanced saturation magnetization. In addition, we demonstrated that axonal guidance cues Netrin-1 increase significantly after n-HA-coated magnetic nanoparticles treatment by Western blots assay. n-HA-coated magnetic particles maybe applied to enhance or accelerate nerve regeneration, and it may provide guidance for regenerating axons in future. PMID:25690555

  1. Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor relieves pain symptoms of diabetic rats by reducing excitability of dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Yu, Ting; Yu, Liling; Li, Haijun; Liu, Yongjuan; Wang, Dongqin

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes lacking of effective treatments. Enhanced excitability of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron plays a crucial role in the progression of diabetic neuropathic hyperalgesia. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known as a neuromodulator of nociception, but whether and how BDNF modulates the excitability of DRG neurons in the development of DPN remain to be clarified. This study investigated the role of exogenous BDNF and its high-affinity tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathic pain. The results showed that continued intrathecal administration of BDNF to diabetic rats dramatically alleviated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, as well as inhibited hyperexcitability of DRG neurons. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with TrkB Fc (a synthetic fusion protein consisting of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the TrkB receptor). The expression of BDNF and TrkB was upregulated in the DRG of diabetic rats. Intrathecal administration of BDNF did not affect this upregulation. These data provide novel information that exogenous BDNF relieved pain symptoms of diabetic rats by reducing hyperexcitability of DRG neurons and might be the potential treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26441011

  2. Pine Oil Effects on Chemical and Thermal Injury in Mice and Cultured Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Clark, SP; Bollag, WB; Westlund, KN; Ma, F; Falls, G; Xie, D; Johnson, M; Isales, CM; Bhattacharyya, MH

    2013-01-01

    A commercial resin-based pine oil derived from Pinus palustris and Pinus elliottii was the major focus of this investigation. Extracts of pine resins, needles and bark are folk medicines commonly used to treat skin ailments, including burns. The American Burn Association estimates that 500,000 people with burn injuries receive medical treatment each year; one-half of US burn victims are children, most with scald burns. This systematic study was initiated as follow-up to personal anecdotal evidence acquired over more than 10 years by MH Bhattacharyya regarding pine oil’s efficacy for treating burns. The results demonstrate that pine oil counteracted dermal inflammation in both a mouse ear model of contact irritant-induced dermal inflammation and a 2nd degree scald burn to the mouse paw. Furthermore, pine oil significantly counteracted the tactile allodynia and soft tissue injury caused by the scald burn. In mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cultures, pine oil added to the medium blocked ATP-activated, but not capsaicin-activated, pain pathways, demonstrating specificity. These results together support the hypothesis that a pine-oil-based treatment can be developed to provide effective in-home care for 2nd degree burns. PMID:23595692

  3. P2X₇ receptor of rat dorsal root ganglia is involved in the effect of moxibustion on visceral hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuangmei; Shi, Qingming; Zhu, Qicheng; Zou, Ting; Li, Guilin; Huang, An; Wu, Bing; Peng, Lichao; Song, Miaomiao; Wu, Qin; Xie, Qiuyu; Lin, Weijian; Xie, Wei; Wen, Shiyao; Zhang, Zhedong; Lv, Qiulan; Zou, Lifang; Zhang, Xi; Ying, Mofeng; Li, Guodong; Liang, Shangdong

    2015-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease often display visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral nociceptors after inflammatory stimulation generate afferent nerve impulses through dorsal root ganglia (DRG) transmitting to the central nervous system. ATP and its activated-purinergic 2X7 (P2X7) receptor play an important role in the transmission of nociceptive signal. Purinergic signaling is involved in the sensory transmission of visceral pain. Moxibustion is a therapy applying ignited mugwort directly or indirectly at acupuncture points or other specific parts of the body to treat diseases. Heat-sensitive acupoints are the corresponding points extremely sensitive to moxa heat in disease conditions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the analgesic effect of moxibustion on a heat-sensitive acupoint "Dachangshu" and the expression levels of P2X7 receptor in rat DRG after chronic inflammatory stimulation of colorectal distension. Heat-sensitive moxibustion at Dachangshu acupoint inhibited the nociceptive signal transmission by decreasing the upregulated expression levels of P2X7 mRNA and protein in DRG induced by visceral pain, and reversed the abnormal expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker of satellite glial cells) in DRG. Consequently, abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) score in a visceral pain model was reduced, and the pain threshold was elevated. Therefore, heat-sensitive moxibustion at Dachangshu acupoint can produce a therapeutic effect on IBS via inhibiting the nociceptive transmission mediated by upregulated P2X7 receptor. PMID:25527178

  4. Controlled release of 6-aminonicotinamide from aligned, electrospun fibers alters astrocyte metabolism and dorsal root ganglia neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Nicholas J.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2011-08-01

    Following central nervous system (CNS) injury, activated astrocytes form a glial scar that inhibits the migration of axons ultimately leading to regeneration failure. Biomaterials developed for CNS repair can provide local delivery of therapeutics and/or guidance mechanisms to encourage cell migration into damaged regions of the brain or spinal cord. Electrospun fibers are a promising type of biomaterial for CNS injury since these fibers can direct cellular and axonal migration while slowly delivering therapy to the injury site. In this study, it was hypothesized that inclusion of an anti-metabolite, 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN), within poly-l-lactic acid electrospun fibers could attenuate astrocyte metabolic activity while still directing axonal outgrowth. Electrospinning parameters were varied to produce highly aligned electrospun fibers that contained 10% or 20% (w/w) 6AN. 6AN release from the fiber substrates occurred continuously over 2 weeks. Astrocytes placed onto drug-releasing fibers were less active than those cultured on scaffolds without 6AN. Dorsal root ganglia placed onto control and drug-releasing scaffolds were able to direct neurites along the aligned fibers. However, neurite outgrowth was stunted by fibers that contained 20% 6AN. These results show that 6AN release from aligned, electrospun fibers can decrease astrocyte activity while still directing axonal outgrowth.

  5. Tentonin 3/TMEM150c Confers Distinct Mechanosensitive Currents in Dorsal-Root Ganglion Neurons with Proprioceptive Function.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gyu-Sang; Lee, Byeongjun; Wee, Jungwon; Chun, Hyeyeon; Kim, Hyungsup; Jung, Jooyoung; Cha, Joo Young; Riew, Tae-Ryong; Kim, Gyu Hyun; Kim, In-Beom; Oh, Uhtaek

    2016-07-01

    Touch sensation or proprioception requires the transduction of mechanical stimuli into electrical signals by mechanoreceptors in the periphery. These mechanoreceptors are equipped with various transducer channels. Although Piezo1 and 2 are mechanically activated (MA) channels with rapid inactivation, MA molecules with other inactivation kinetics have not been identified. Here we report that heterologously expressed Tentonin3 (TTN3)/TMEM150C is activated by mechanical stimuli with distinctly slow inactivation kinetics. Genetic ablation of Ttn3/Tmem150c markedly reduced slowly adapting neurons in dorsal-root ganglion neurons. The MA TTN3 currents were inhibited by known blockers of mechanosensitive ion channels. Moreover, TTN3 was localized in muscle spindle afferents. Ttn3-deficient mice exhibited the loss of coordinated movements and abnormal gait. Thus, TTN3 appears to be a component of a mechanosensitive channel with a slow inactivation rate and contributes to motor coordination. Identification of this gene advances our understanding of the various types of mechanosensations, including proprioception. PMID:27321926

  6. Acrylamide Retards the Slow Axonal Transport of Neurofilaments in Rat Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons and the Corresponding Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    An, Lihong; Li, Guozhen; Si, Jiliang; Zhang, Cuili; Han, Xiaoying; Wang, Shuo; Jiang, Lulu; Xie, Keqin

    2016-05-01

    Chronic acrylamide (ACR) exposure induces peripheral-central axonopathy in occupational workers and laboratory animals, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we first investigated the effects of ACR on slow axonal transport of neurofilaments in cultured rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons through live-cell imaging approach. Then for the underlying mechanisms exploration, the protein level of neurofilament subunits, motor proteins kinesin and dynein, and dynamitin subunit of dynactin in DRG neurons were assessed by western blotting and the concentrations of ATP was detected using ATP Assay Kit. The results showed that ACR treatment results in a dose-dependent decrease of slow axonal transport of neurofilaments. Furthermore, ACR intoxication significantly increases the protein levels of the three neurofilament subunits (NF-L, NF-M, NF-H), kinesin, dynein, and dynamitin subunit of dynactin in DRG neurons. In addition, ATP level decreased significantly in ACR-treated DRG neurons. Our findings indicate that ACR exposure retards slow axonal transport of NF-M, and suggest that the increase of neurofilament cargoes, motor proteins, dynamitin of dynactin, and the inadequate ATP supply contribute to the ACR-induced retardation of slow axonal transport. PMID:26721510

  7. Marked Increase in Nitric Oxide Synthase mRNA in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia after Peripheral Axotomy: In situ Hybridization and Functional Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verge, Valerie M. K.; Xu, Zhang; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Hokfelt, Tomas

    1992-12-01

    Using in situ hybridization, we studied nitric oxide (NO) synthase (EC 1.14.23.-) mRNA in lumbar dorsal root ganglia after peripheral transection of the sciatic nerve in rats. The effect of the NO synthase inhibitor N^ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester on the nociceptive flexor reflex was also studied in axotomized rats. Nerve section induced a dramatic increase in number of NO synthase mRNA-positive cells in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia. In some of these cells the peptides galanin and/or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and/or neuropeptide Y were also strongly up-regulated. Intravenous administration of nitro-L-arginine methyl ester blocked spinal hyperexcitability at much lower dosages in axotomized than in normal animals. The results suggest involvement of NO in the function of lumbar sensory neurons, especially after axotomy, perhaps preferentially at peripheral sites.

  8. Downregulation of miR-219 enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in mouse dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine analgesic tolerance by upregulating CaMKIIγ

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xue-Ming; Cao, Shou-Bin; Zhang, Hai-Long; Lyu, Dong-Mei; Chen, Li-Ping; Xu, Heng; Pan, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs are functionally involved in the initiation and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, including chronic morphine analgesic tolerance, through the posttranscriptional regulation of pain-related genes. We have previously demonstrated that miR-219 regulates inflammatory pain in the spinal cord by targeting calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gamma (CaMKIIγ). However, whether miR-219 regulates CaMKIIγ expression in the dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine tolerance remains unclear. Results MiR-219 expression was downregulated and CaMKIIγ expression was upregulated in mouse dorsal root ganglia following chronic morphine treatment. The changes in miR-219 and CaMKIIγ expression closely correlated with the development of morphine tolerance, which was measured using the reduction of percentage of maximum potential efficiency to thermal stimuli. Morphine tolerance was markedly delayed by upregulating miR-219 expression using miR-219 mimics or downregulating CaMKIIγ expression using CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA. The protein and mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also induced in dorsal root ganglia by prolonged morphine exposure in a time-dependent manner, which were transcriptionally regulated by miR-219 and CaMKIIγ. Scavenging brain-derived neurotrophic factor via tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc partially attenuated morphine tolerance. Moreover, functional inhibition of miR-219 via miR-219-sponge in naive mice elicited thermal hyperalgesia and spinal neuronal sensitization, which were both suppressed by CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA or tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc. Conclusions These results demonstrate that miR-219 contributes to the development of chronic tolerance to morphine analgesia in mouse dorsal root ganglia by targeting CaMKIIγ and enhancing CaMKIIγ-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. PMID:27599867

  9. Venom from the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, induces a calcium-dependent current in cultured dorsal root ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    de Plater, G M; Milburn, P J; Martin, R L

    2001-03-01

    The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus), a uniquely Australian species, is one of the few living venomous mammals. Although envenomation of humans by many vertebrate and invertebrate species results in pain, this is often not the principal symptom of envenomation. However, platypus envenomation results in an immediate excruciating pain that develops into a very long-lasting hyperalgesia. We have previously shown that the venom contains a C-type natriuretic peptide that causes mast cell degranulation, and this probably contributes to the development of the painful response. Now we demonstrate that platypus venom has a potent action on putative nociceptors. Application of the venom to small to medium diameter dorsal root ganglion cells for 10 s resulted in an inward current lasting several minutes when the venom was diluted in buffer at pH 6.1 but not at pH 7.4. The venom itself has a pH of 6.3. The venom activated a current with a linear current-voltage relationship between -100 and -25 mV and with a reversal potential of -11 mV. Ion substitution experiments indicate that the current is a nonspecific cationic current. The response to the venom was blocked by the membrane-permeant Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, and by the tyrosine- and serine-kinase inhibitor, k252a. Thus the response appears to be dependent on calcium release from intracellular stores. The identity of the venom component(s) that is responsible for the responses we have described is yet to be determined but is probably not the C-type natriuretic peptide or the defensin-like peptides that are present in the venom. PMID:11248005

  10. Kv4 Channels Underlie the Subthreshold-Operating A-type K+-current in Nociceptive Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Phuket, Thanawath Ratanadilok Na; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) contains heterogeneous populations of sensory neurons including primary nociceptive neurons and C-fibers implicated in pain signaling. Recent studies have demonstrated DRG hyperexcitability associated with downregulation of A-type K+ channels; however, the molecular correlate of the corresponding A-type K+ current (IA) has remained hypothetical. Kv4 channels may underlie the IA in DRG neurons. We combined electrophysiology, molecular biology (Whole-Tissue and Single-Cell RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry to investigate the molecular basis of the IA in acutely dissociated DRG neurons from 7- to 8-day-old rats. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate a robust tetraethylammonium-resistant (20 mM) and 4-aminopyridine-sensitive (5 mM) IA. Matching Kv4 channel properties, activation and inactivation of this IA occur in the subthreshold range of membrane potentials and the rate of recovery from inactivation is rapid and voltage-dependent. Among Kv4 transcripts, the DRG expresses significant levels of Kv4.1 and Kv4.3 mRNAs. Also, single small-medium diameter DRG neurons (∼30 μm) exhibit correlated frequent expression of mRNAs encoding Kv4.1 and Nav1.8, a known nociceptor marker. In contrast, the expressions of Kv1.4 and Kv4.2 mRNAs at the whole-tissue and single-cell levels are relatively low and infrequent. Kv4 protein expression in nociceptive DRG neurons was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, which demonstrates colocalization of Kv4.3 and Nav1.8, and negligible expression of Kv4.2. Furthermore, specific dominant-negative suppression and overexpression strategies confirmed the contribution of Kv4 channels to IA in DRG neurons. Contrasting the expression patterns of Kv4 channels in the central and peripheral nervous systems, we discuss possible functional roles of these channels in primary sensory neurons. PMID:19668710

  11. The effects of quinolones and NSAIDs upon GABA-evoked currents recorded from rat dorsal root ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, R F; Davey, P G; Lambert, J J

    1991-02-01

    Recent animal studies have demonstrated a proconvulsant effect of certain quinolone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combinations. Radioligand binding experiments have indicated that these actions may be mediated by antagonism of the GABAA receptor. The present study has further investigated this hypothesis in a functional assay by examining the effects of the quinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin alone and in combination with either fenbufen or biphenyl acetic acid (BPAA) upon GABA-evoked currents recorded from voltage-clamped rat dorsal root ganglion neurones (DRG) maintained in cell culture. GABA-evoked whole cell currents were weakly but dose-dependently (30 microM-1 mM) reduced in the presence of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. The IC50 for ciprofloxacin was 100 microM but greater than 1 mM for ofloxacin. Application of either fenbufen (100 microM) or BPAA (100 microM) alone produced little effect on the GABA-evoked currents. However, the inhibitory action of ciprofloxacin was enhanced in the presence of 100 microM fenbufen by approximately five-fold whereas the antagonism of GABA responses by ofloxacin was unaffected. In contrast, BPAA (100 microM) had a dramatic effect on the inhibitory actions of both antibiotics such that the IC50 for ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin was reduced to 0.03 and 0.3 microM respectively. The present results support earlier binding studies and extend them by demonstrating electrophysiologically a potent quinolone/NSAID drug interaction at the GABAA receptor. The mechanism(s) of this novel interaction remains to be determined. These results are commensurate with clinical observations of an increased risk of fits in patients prescribed certain quinolones together with certain NSAIDs. PMID:1647389

  12. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-05-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K⁺ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/ or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin- B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (~9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients. PMID:27133259

  13. Molecular and functional expression of cation-chloride cotransporters in dorsal root ganglion neurons during postnatal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shihong; Garzon-Muvdi, Tomás; Di Fulvio, Mauricio; Chen, Yanfang; Delpire, Eric; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    GABA depolarizes and excites central neurons during early development, becoming inhibitory and hyperpolarizing with maturation. This “developmental shift” occurs abruptly, reflecting a decrease in intracellular Cl− concentration ([Cl−]i) and a hyperpolarizing shift in Cl− equilibrium potential due to upregulation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2b, a neuron-specific Cl− extruder. In contrast, primary afferent neurons (PANs) are depolarized by GABA throughout adulthood because of expression of NKCC1, a Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter that accumulates Cl− above equilibrium. The GABAA-mediated depolarization of PANs determines presynaptic inhibition in the spinal cord, a key mechanism gating somatosensory information. Little is known about developmental changes in Cl− transporter expression and Cl− homeostasis in PANs. Whether NKCC1 is expressed in PANs of all phenotypes or is restricted to subpopulations (e.g., nociceptors) is debatable. Likewise, whether PANs express KCC2s is controversial. We investigated NKCC1 and K+-Cl− cotransporter expression in rat and mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with molecular methods. Using fluorescence imaging microscopy, we measured [Cl−]i in acutely dissociated rat DRG neurons (P0–P21) loaded with N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide and classified with phenotypic markers. DRG neurons of all sizes express two NKCC1 mRNAs, one full-length and a shorter splice variant lacking exon 21. Immunolabeling with validated antibodies revealed ubiquitous expression of NKCC1 in DRG neurons irrespective of postnatal age and phenotype. As maturation progresses [Cl−]i decreases gradually, persisting above equilibrium in >95% mature neurons. DRG neurons express mRNAs for KCC1, KCC3s, and KCC4, but not for KCC2s. Mechanisms underlying PANs' developmental changes in Cl− homeostasis are discussed and compared with those of central neurons. PMID:22457464

  14. Effects of Hindlimb Unweighting on MBP and GDNF Expression and Morphology in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Ren, Ning-Tao; Zhou, Fang-Qiang; Li, Jie; Lei, Wei; Liu, Ning; Bi, Long; Wu, Zi-Xiang; Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Cui, Geng

    2016-09-01

    With the development of technology and space exploration, studies on long-duration space flights have shown that microgravity induces damage to multiple organs, including the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, very little is known about the effects of long-term microgravity on DRG neurons. This study investigated the effects of microgravity on lumbar 5 (L5) DRG neurons in rats using the hindlimb unweighting (HU) model. Male (M) and female (F) Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into M- and F-control (CON) groups and M- and F-HU groups, respectively (n = 10). At the end of HU treatment for 4 weeks, morphological changes were detected. Myelin basic protein (MBP) and degenerated myelin basic protein (dgen-MBP) expressions were analyzed by immunofluorescence and western blot assays. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protein and mRNA expressions were also analyzed by immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analysis, respectively. Compared with the corresponding CON groups, the HU groups exhibited slightly loose junctions between DRG neurons, some separated ganglion cells and satellite cells, and lightly stained Nissl bodies that were of smaller size and had a scattered distribution. High levels of dgen-MBP and low MBP expressions were appeared and GDNF expressions were significantly decreased in both HU groups. Changes were more pronounced in the F-HU group than in the M-HU group. In conclusion, HU treatment induced damage of L5 DRG neurons, which was correlated with decreased total MBP protein expression, increased dgen-MBP expression, and reduced GDNF protein and mRNA expression. Importantly, these changes were more severe in F-HU rats compared with M-HU rats. PMID:27230884

  15. Prostaglandin D2 modulates calcium signals induced by prostaglandin E2 in neurons of rat dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Ott, Daniela; Simm, Björn; Pollatzek, Eric; Gerstberger, Rüdiger; Rummel, Christoph; Roth, Joachim

    2015-06-15

    Fever in response to a localized subcutaneous stimulation with a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can be attenuated by co-administration of a local anesthetic or the non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor diclofenac at doses, which do not exert systemic effects when injected at sites remote from the area of inflammatory stimulation. These results suggest a participation of neuronal afferent signals mediated by COX-products in the manifestation of fever under these conditions. We therefore, measured intracellular Ca(2+)-concentrations in cultured neurons from rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) stimulated with the pyrogenic mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the anti-inflammatory and antipyretic mediator PGD2, mixtures of both PGs, and menthol using the fura-2 ratio imaging technique. Neurons could be grouped according to their size with diameters of about 15μm (small), 35μm (medium sized), or 55μm (large). 96 out of 264 neurons responded to PGE2 with pronounced Ca(2+)-signals, 53 of them being also responsive to menthol, indicative of their function as cold-sensors. 80% of these neurons belonged to the medium sized group. In a next experiment, we tested whether Ca(2+)-signals of PGE2 responsive neurons were modulated by PGD2. In 60% of all neurons investigated (n=57), the strength of the PGE2-induced Ca(2+)-signals was reduced by co-administration of PGD2. This effect was also observed in those neurons that were responsive to PGE2 and menthol (n=23; p<0.001). This observation indicates antagonistic effects of PGE2 and PGD2 on a neuronal pathway that involves cold sensors and is activated during a localized subcutaneous inflammation. This finding might provide an explanation for the reported antipyretic and anti-inflammatory capacities of PGD2. PMID:25912777

  16. Functional expression and axonal transport of α7 nAChRs by peptidergic nociceptors of rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Shelukhina, Irina; Paddenberg, Renate; Kummer, Wolfgang; Tsetlin, Victor

    2015-07-01

    In recent pain studies on animal models, α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists demonstrated analgesic, anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, apparently acting through some peripheral receptors. Assuming possible involvement of α7 nAChRs on nociceptive sensory neurons, we investigated the morphological and neurochemical features of the α7 nAChR-expressing subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and their ability to transport α7 nAChR axonally. In addition, α7 receptor activity and its putative role in pain signal neurotransmitter release were studied. Medium-sized α7 nAChR-expressing neurons prevailed, although the range covered all cell sizes. These cells accounted for one-fifth of total medium and large DRG neurons and <5% of small ones. 83.2% of α7 nAChR-expressing DRG neurons were peptidergic nociceptors (CGRP-immunopositive), one half of which had non-myelinated C-fibers and the other half had myelinated Aδ- and likely Aα/β-fibers, whereas 15.2% were non-peptidergic C-fiber nociceptors binding isolectin B4. All non-peptidergic and a third of peptidergic α7 nAChR-bearing nociceptors expressed TRPV1, a capsaicin-sensitive noxious stimulus transducer. Nerve crush experiments demonstrated that CGRPergic DRG nociceptors axonally transported α7 nAChRs both to the spinal cord and periphery. α7 nAChRs in DRG neurons were functional as their specific agonist PNU282987 evoked calcium rise enhanced by α7-selective positive allosteric modulator PNU120596. However, α7 nAChRs do not modulate neurotransmitter CGRP and glutamate release from DRG neurons since nicotinic ligands affected neither their basal nor provoked levels, showing the necessity of further studies to elucidate the true role of α7 nAChRs in those neurons. PMID:24706047

  17. Comparison of dorsal root ganglion gene expression in rat models of traumatic and HIV-associated neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Maratou, Klio; Wallace, Victoria C.J.; Hasnie, Fauzia S.; Okuse, Kenji; Hosseini, Ramine; Jina, Nipurna; Blackbeard, Julie; Pheby, Timothy; Orengo, Christine; Dickenson, Anthony H.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2009-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying peripheral neuropathic pain in the context of HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy, we measured gene expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rats subjected to systemic treatment with the anti-retroviral agent, ddC (Zalcitabine) and concomitant delivery of HIV-gp120 to the rat sciatic nerve. L4 and L5 DRGs were collected at day 14 (time of peak behavioural change) and changes in gene expression were measured using Affymetrix whole genome rat arrays. Conventional analysis of this data set and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) was performed to discover biological processes altered in this model. Transcripts associated with G protein coupled receptor signalling and cell adhesion were enriched in the treated animals, while ribosomal proteins and proteasome pathways were associated with gene down-regulation. To identify genes that are directly relevant to neuropathic mechanical hypersensitivity, as opposed to epiphenomena associated with other aspects of the response to a sciatic nerve lesion, we compared the gp120 + ddC-evoked gene expression with that observed in a model of traumatic neuropathic pain (L5 spinal nerve transection), where hypersensitivity to a static mechanical stimulus is also observed. We identified 39 genes/expressed sequence tags that are differentially expressed in the same direction in both models. Most of these have not previously been implicated in mechanical hypersensitivity and may represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention. As an external control, the RNA expression of three genes was examined by RT-PCR, while the protein levels of two were studied using western blot analysis. PMID:18606552

  18. Shp-1 dephosphorylates TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion neurons and alleviates CFA-induced inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Xu, Ling-Chi; Yue, Lu-Peng; Liu, Feng-Yu; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Kong, Jin-Ge; Xing, Guo-Gang; Yi, Ming; Wan, You

    2015-04-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are expressed in nociceptive neurons of rat dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) and mediate inflammatory pain. Nonspecific inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) increases the tyrosine phosphorylation of TRPV1 and sensitizes TRPV1. However, less is known about tyrosine phosphorylation's implication in inflammatory pain, compared with that of serine/threonine phosphorylation. Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (Shp-1) is a key phosphatase dephosphorylating TRPV1. In this study, we reported that Shp-1 colocalized with and bound to TRPV1 in nociceptive DRG neurons. Shp-1 inhibitors, including sodium stibogluconate and PTP inhibitor III, sensitized TRPV1 in cultured DRG neurons. In naive rats, intrathecal injection of Shp-1 inhibitors increased both TRPV1 and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1 in DRGs and induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was abolished by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine, BCTC, or AMG9810. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain in rats significantly increased the expression of Shp-1, TRPV1, and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1, as well as the colocalization of Shp-1 and TRPV1 in DRGs. Intrathecal injection of sodium stibogluconate aggravated CFA-induced inflammatory pain, whereas Shp-1 overexpression in DRG neurons alleviated it. These results suggested that Shp-1 dephosphorylated and inhibited TRPV1 in DRG neurons, contributing to maintain thermal nociceptive thresholds in normal rats, and as a compensatory mechanism, Shp-1 increased in DRGs of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, which was involved in protecting against excessive thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:25790452

  19. Neuregulin-1β Regulates the migration of Different Neurochemical Phenotypic Neurons from Organotypically Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion Explants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Liu, Guixiang; Li, Hao; Bi, Yanwen

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin-1β (NRG-1β) has multiple roles in the development and function in the nervous system and exhibits potent neuroprotective properties. In the present study, organotypically cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants were used to evaluate the effects of NRG-1β on migration of two major phenotypic classes of DRG neurons. The signaling pathways involved in these effects were also determined. Organotypically cultured DRG explants were exposed to NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) inhibitor PD98059 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), and LY294002 (10 μmol/L) plus PD98059 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), respectively, for 3 days. The DRG explants were continuously exposed to culture media as a control. After that, all above cultures were processed for detecting the mRNA levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neurofilament-200 (NF-200) by real-time PCR analysis. CGRP and NF-200 expression in situ was determined by fluorescent labeling technique. The results showed that NRG-1β elevated the mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and NF-200. NRG-1β also increased the number and the percentage of CGRP-immunoreactive (IR) migrating neurons and NF-200-IR migrating neurons. Inhibitors (LY294002, PD98059) either alone or in combination blocked the effects of NRG-1β. The contribution of NRG-1β on modulating distinct neurochemical phenotypic plasticity of DRG neurons suggested that NRG-1β signaling system might play an important role on the biological effects of primary sensory neurons. PMID:26093851

  20. The Effects of Target Skeletal Muscle Cells on Dorsal Root Ganglion Neuronal Outgrowth and Migration In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Zhenzhong

    2013-01-01

    Targets of neuronal innervations play a vital role in regulating the survival and differentiation of innervating neurotrophin-responsive neurons. During development, neurons extend axons to their targets, and then their survival become dependent on the trophic substances secreted by their target cells. Sensory endings were present on myoblasts, myotubes, and myofibers in all intrafusal bundles regardless of age. The interdependence of sensory neurons and skeletal muscle (SKM) cells during both embryonic development and the maintenance of the mature functional state has not been fully understood. In the present study, neuromuscular cocultures of organotypic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants and dissociate SKM cells were established. Using this culture system, the morphological relationship between DRG neurons and SKM cells, neurites growth and neuronal migration were investigated. The migrating neurons were determined by fluorescent labeling of microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2) and neurofilament 200 (NF-200) or growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43). The expression of NF-200 and GAP-43 and their mRNAs was evaluated by Western blot assay and real time-PCR analysis. The results reveal that DRG explants showed more dense neurites outgrowth in neuromuscular cocultures as compared with that in the culture of DRG explants alone. The number of total migrating neurons (the MAP-2-expressing neurons) and the percentage NF-200-immunoreactive (IR) and GAP-43-IR neurons increased significantly in the presence of SKM cells. The levels of NF-200 and GAP-43 and their mRNAs increased significantly in neuromuscular cocultures as compared with that in the culture of DRG explants alone. These results suggested that target SKM cells play an important role in regulating neuronal protein synthesis, promoting neuritis outgrowth and neuronal migration of DRG explants in vitro. These results not only provide new clues for a better understanding of the association of SKM cells with

  1. Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy via TRPA1 Stimulation in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglion Is Correlated with Aluminum Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Hee; Chae, Jisook; Roh, Kangsan; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Minji; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat metastatic colorectal, breast, and lung cancers. While oxaliplatin kills cancer cells effectively, it exhibits several side effects of varying severity. Neuropathic pain is commonly experienced during treatment with oxaliplatin. Patients describe symptoms of paresthesias or dysesthesias that are triggered by cold (acute neuropathy), or as abnormal sensory or motor function (chronic neuropathy). In particular, we found that aluminum levels were relatively high in some cancer patients suffering from neuropathic pain based on clinical observations. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that aluminum accumulation in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the course of oxaliplatin treatment exacerbates neuropathic pain. In mice injected with oxaliplatin (three cycles of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest), we detected cold allodynia using the acetone test, but not heat hyperalgesia using a hot plate. However, co-treatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3∙6H2O; 7 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days: equivalent 0.78 mg/kg of elemental Al) and oxaliplatin (1 cycle of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest) synergistically induced cold allodynia as well as increased TRPAl mRNA and protein expression. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis showed a significant increase in aluminum concentrations in the DRG of mice treated with aluminum chloride and oxaliplatin compared to aluminum chloride alone. Similarly, in a mouse induced-tumor model, aluminum concentrations were increased in DRG tissue and tumor cells after oxaliplatin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that aluminum accumulation in the DRG may exacerbate neuropathic pain in oxaliplatin-treated mice. PMID:25928068

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Cultured on Microelectrode Arrays Based on Fluorescence Microscopy Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Mari, João Fernando; Saito, José Hiroki; Neves, Amanda Ferreira; Lotufo, Celina Monteiro da Cruz; Destro-Filho, João-Batista; Nicoletti, Maria do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEA) are devices for long term electrophysiological recording of extracellular spontaneous or evocated activities on in vitro neuron culture. This work proposes and develops a framework for quantitative and morphological analysis of neuron cultures on MEAs, by processing their corresponding images, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. The neurons are segmented from the fluorescence channel images using a combination of segmentation by thresholding, watershed transform, and object classification. The positioning of microelectrodes is obtained from the transmitted light channel images using the circular Hough transform. The proposed method was applied to images of dissociated culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cells. The morphological and topological quantitative analysis carried out produced information regarding the state of culture, such as population count, neuron-to-neuron and neuron-to-microelectrode distances, soma morphologies, neuron sizes, neuron and microelectrode spatial distributions. Most of the analysis of microscopy images taken from neuronal cultures on MEA only consider simple qualitative analysis. Also, the proposed framework aims to standardize the image processing and to compute quantitative useful measures for integrated image-signal studies and further computational simulations. As results show, the implemented microelectrode identification method is robust and so are the implemented neuron segmentation and classification one (with a correct segmentation rate up to 84%). The quantitative information retrieved by the method is highly relevant to assist the integrated signal-image study of recorded electrophysiological signals as well as the physical aspects of the neuron culture on MEA. Although the experiments deal with DRG cell images, cortical and hippocampal cell images could also be processed with small adjustments in the image processing parameter estimation. PMID:26510475

  3. The effect of deep tissue incision on pH responses of afferent fibers and dorsal root ganglia innervating muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Kanta; Gautam, Mamta; Benson, Christopher J.; Gu, He; Brennan, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms underlying deep tissue pain in the postoperative period is critical to improve therapies. Using the in vitro plantar flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle-nerve preparation and patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons innervating incised and unincised muscle, we investigated responses to various pH changes. Methods Incision including the plantar FDB muscle or sham operation was made in the rat hindpaw. On postoperative day one, in vitro single fiber recording was undertaken. Based on previous studies, we recorded from at least 40 fibers per group. Also Di-I labeled DRG innervating muscle from rats undergoing incision and a sham operation were cultured and tested for acid responses using whole cell patch-clamp recordings. Results The prevalence of responsive group IV afferents to lactic acid pH 6.5 in the incision group (15 of 67, 22.3%) was greater than that in the control group (2 of 35, 5.7%, p=0.022). In DRG neurons innervating muscle, incision increased mean current amplitudes of acid-evoked currents; the acid-sensing ion channel blocker, amiloride 300 μM, inhibited more than 75% of the acid-evoked current, whereas the transient receptor vanilloid receptor 1 blocker (AMG9810 1 μM) did not cause significant inhibition. Conclusion Our experiments demonstrated that incision increases the responses of FDB muscle afferent fibers to weak acid solutions, and increased acid-evoked currents in DRG innervating muscle. Our data suggest that upregulation of acid-sensing ion channels might underlie this increased chemosensitivity caused by surgery. PMID:23732174

  4. Vitamin D Receptor and Enzyme Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia of Adult Female Rats: Modulation by Ovarian Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Tague, Sarah E.; Smith, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency impacts sensory processes including pain and proprioception, but little is known regarding vitamin D signaling in adult sensory neurons. We analyzed female rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for vitamin receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D metabolizing enzymes CYP27B1 and CYP24. Western blots and immunofluorescence revealed the presence of these proteins in sensory neurons. Nuclear VDR immunoreactivity was present within nearly all neurons, while cytoplasmic VDR was found preferentially in unmyelinated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-positive neurons, colocalizing with CYP27B1 and CYP24. These data suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 may affect sensory neurons through nuclear or extranuclear signaling pathways. In addition, local vitamin D metabolite concentrations in unmyelinated sensory neurons may be controlled through expression of CYP27B1 and CYP24. Because vitamin D deficiency appears to exacerbate some peri-menopausal pain syndromes, we assessed the effect of ovariectomy on vitamin D-related proteins. Two weeks following ovariectomy, total VDR expression in DRG dropped significantly, owing to a slight decrease in the percentage of total neurons expressing nuclear VDR and a large drop in unmyelinated CGRP-positive neurons expressing cytoplasmic VDR. Total CYP27B1 expression dropped significantly, predominantly due to decreased expression within unmyelinated CGRP-positive neurons. CYP24 expression remained unchanged. Therefore, unmyelinated CGRP-positive neurons appear to have a distinct vitamin D phenotype with hormonally-regulated ligand and receptor levels. These findings imply that vitamin D signaling may play a specialized role in a neural cell population that is primarily nociceptive. PMID:20969950

  5. Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy via TRPA1 Stimulation in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglion Is Correlated with Aluminum Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Kangsan; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Minji; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Lee, Myung-Ah; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug used to treat metastatic colorectal, breast, and lung cancers. While oxaliplatin kills cancer cells effectively, it exhibits several side effects of varying severity. Neuropathic pain is commonly experienced during treatment with oxaliplatin. Patients describe symptoms of paresthesias or dysesthesias that are triggered by cold (acute neuropathy), or as abnormal sensory or motor function (chronic neuropathy). In particular, we found that aluminum levels were relatively high in some cancer patients suffering from neuropathic pain based on clinical observations. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that aluminum accumulation in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the course of oxaliplatin treatment exacerbates neuropathic pain. In mice injected with oxaliplatin (three cycles of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest), we detected cold allodynia using the acetone test, but not heat hyperalgesia using a hot plate. However, co-treatment with aluminum chloride (AlCl3∙6H2O; 7 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days: equivalent 0.78 mg/kg of elemental Al) and oxaliplatin (1 cycle of 3 mg/kg i.p. daily for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest) synergistically induced cold allodynia as well as increased TRPAl mRNA and protein expression. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis showed a significant increase in aluminum concentrations in the DRG of mice treated with aluminum chloride and oxaliplatin compared to aluminum chloride alone. Similarly, in a mouse induced-tumor model, aluminum concentrations were increased in DRG tissue and tumor cells after oxaliplatin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that aluminum accumulation in the DRG may exacerbate neuropathic pain in oxaliplatin-treated mice. PMID:25928068

  6. Different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in stomach and esophagus identified by anterograde tracing from dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nick J; Kyloh, Melinda; Beckett, Elizabeth A; Brookes, Simon; Hibberd, Tim

    2016-10-15

    In visceral organs of mammals, most noxious (painful) stimuli as well as innocuous stimuli are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). One of the major unresolved questions is the location, morphology, and neurochemistry of the nerve endings of spinal afferents that actually detect these stimuli in the viscera. In the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, there have been many anterograde tracing studies of vagal afferent endings, but none on spinal afferent endings. Recently, we developed a technique that now provides selective labeling of only spinal afferents. We used this approach to identify spinal afferent nerve endings in the upper GI tract of mice. Animals were anesthetized, and injections of dextran-amine were made into thoracic DRGs (T8-T12). Seven days post surgery, mice were euthanized, and the stomach and esophagus were removed, fixed, and stained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Spinal afferent axons were identified that ramified extensively through many rows of myenteric ganglia and formed nerve endings in discrete anatomical layers. Most commonly, intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) were identified in myenteric ganglia of the stomach and varicose simple-type endings in the circular muscle and mucosa. Less commonly, nerve endings were identified in internodal strands, blood vessels, submucosal ganglia, and longitudinal muscle. In the esophagus, only IGVEs were identified in myenteric ganglia. No intraganglionic lamellar endings (IGLEs) were identified in the stomach or esophagus. We present the first identification of spinal afferent endings in the upper GI tract. Eight distinct types of spinal afferent endings were identified in the stomach, and most of them were CGRP immunoreactive. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3064-3083, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27019197

  7. G(o) transduces GABAB-receptor modulation of N-type calcium channels in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Menon-Johansson, A S; Berrow, N; Dolphin, A C

    1993-11-01

    High-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channel currents (IBa) were recorded from acutely replated cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. IBa was irreversibly inhibited by 56.9 +/- 2.7% by 1 microM omega-conotoxin-GVIA (omega-CTx-GVIA), whereas the 1,4-dihydropyridine antagonist nicardipine was ineffective. The selective gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist, (-)-baclofen (50 microM), inhibited the HVA IBa by 30.7 +/- 5.4%. Prior application of omega-CTx-GVIA completely occluded inhibition of the HVA IBa by (-)-baclofen, indicating that in this preparation (-)-baclofen inhibits N-type current. To investigate which G protein subtype was involved, cells were replated in the presence of anti-G protein antisera. Under these conditions the antibodies were shown to enter the cells through transient pores created during the replating procedure. Replating DRGs in the presence of anti-G(o) antiserum, raised against the C-terminal decapeptide of the G alpha o subunit, reduced (-)-baclofen inhibition of the HVA IBa, whereas replating DRGs in the presence of the anti-Gi antiserum did not. Using anti-G alpha o antisera (1:2000) and confocal laser microscopy, G alpha o localisation was investigated in both unreplated and replated neurons. G alpha o immunoreactivity was observed at the plasma membrane, neurites, attachment plaques and perinuclear region, and was particularly pronounced at points of cell-to-cell contact. The plasma membrane G alpha o immunoreactivity was completely blocked by preincubation with the immunising G alpha o undecapeptide (1 microgram.ml-1) for 1 h at 37 degrees C. A similar treatment also blocked recognition of G alpha o in brain membranes on immunoblots.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8309795

  8. Enhanced Expression of TREK-1 Is Related with Chronic Constriction Injury of Neuropathic Pain Mouse Model in Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyo Jo; Lee, Seung Wook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Byeonghun; Kang, Dawon; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Seo, Kwang-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a complex state showing increased pain response with dysfunctional inhibitory neurotransmission. The TREK family, one of the two pore domain K+ (K2P) channel subgroups were focused among various mechanisms of neuropathic pain. These channels influence neuronal excitability and are thought to be related in mechano/thermosensation. However, only a little is known about the expression and role of TREK-1 and TREK-2, in neuropathic pain. It is performed to know whether TREK-1 and/or 2 are positively related in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of a mouse neuropathic pain model, the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Following this purpose, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were performed using mouse DRG of CCI model and compared to the sham surgery group. Immunofluorescence staining of isolectin-B4 (IB4) and TREK were performed. Electrophysiological recordings of single channel currents were analyzed to obtain the information about the channel. Interactions with known TREK activators were tested to confirm the expression. While both TREK-1 and TREK-2 mRNA were significantly overexpressed in DRG of CCI mice, only TREK-1 showed significant increase (∼9 fold) in western blot analysis. The TREK-1-like channel recorded in DRG neurons of the CCI mouse showed similar current-voltage relationship and conductance to TREK-1. It was easily activated by low pH solution (pH 6.3), negative pressure, and riluzole. Immunofluorescence images showed the expression of TREK-1 was stronger compared to TREK-2 on IB4 positive neurons. These results suggest that modulation of the TREK-1 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in neuropathic pain patients. PMID:27133259

  9. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-mediated Glycolytic Metabolic Shift in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Drives Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Habibur; Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Kim, Jong-Heon; Nam, Youngpyo; Lee, Maan Gee; Go, Younghoon; Harris, Robert A; Park, Dong Ho; Kook, Hyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Suk, Kyoungho

    2016-03-11

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is a highly vulnerable site in diabetic neuropathy. Under diabetic conditions, the DRG is subjected to tissue ischemia or lower ambient oxygen tension that leads to aberrant metabolic functions. Metabolic dysfunctions have been documented to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of diverse pain hypersensitivities. However, the contribution of diabetes-induced metabolic dysfunctions in the DRG to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy remains ill-explored. In this study, we report that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK2 and PDK4), key regulatory enzymes in glucose metabolism, mediate glycolytic metabolic shift in the DRG leading to painful diabetic neuropathy. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes substantially enhanced the expression and activity of the PDKs in the DRG, and the genetic ablation of Pdk2 and Pdk4 attenuated the hyperglycemia-induced pain hypersensitivity. Mechanistically, Pdk2/4 deficiency inhibited the diabetes-induced lactate surge, expression of pain-related ion channels, activation of satellite glial cells, and infiltration of macrophages in the DRG, in addition to reducing central sensitization and neuroinflammation hallmarks in the spinal cord, which probably accounts for the attenuated pain hypersensitivity. Pdk2/4-deficient mice were partly resistant to the diabetes-induced loss of peripheral nerve structure and function. Furthermore, in the experiments using DRG neuron cultures, lactic acid treatment enhanced the expression of the ion channels and compromised cell viability. Finally, the pharmacological inhibition of DRG PDKs or lactic acid production substantially attenuated diabetes-induced pain hypersensitivity. Taken together, PDK2/4 induction and the subsequent lactate surge induce the metabolic shift in the diabetic DRG, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26769971

  10. Localization of the NBMPR-sensitive equilibrative nucleoside transporter, ENT1, in the rat dorsal root ganglion and lumbar spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Governo, Ricardo J M; Deuchars, Jim; Baldwin, Stephen A; King, Anne E

    2005-10-19

    ENT1 is an equilibrative nucleoside transporter that enables trans-membrane bi-directional diffusion of biologically active purines such as adenosine. In spinal cord dorsal horn and in sensory afferent neurons, adenosine acts as a neuromodulator with complex pro- and anti-nociceptive actions. Although uptake and release mechanisms for adenosine are believed to exist in both the dorsal horn and sensory afferent neurons, the expression profile of specific nucleoside transporter subtypes such as ENT1 is not established. In this study, immunoblot analysis with specific ENT1 antibodies (anti-rENT1(227-290) or anti-hENT1(227-290)) was used to reveal the expression of ENT1 protein in tissue homogenates of either adult rat dorsal horn or dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Immunoperoxidase labeling with ENT1 antibodies produced specific staining in dorsal horn which was concentrated over superficial laminae, especially the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II). Immunofluorescence double-labeling revealed a punctate pattern for ENT1 closely associated, in some instances, with cell bodies of either neurons (confirmed with NeuN) or glia (confirmed with CNPase). Electron microscopy analysis of ENT1 expression in lamina II indicated its presence within pre- and post-synaptic elements, although a number of other structures, including myelinated and unmyelinated, axons were also labeled. In sensory ganglia, ENT1 was localized to a high proportion of cell bodies of all sizes that co-expressed substance P, IB4 or NF, although ENT1 was most highly expressed in the peptidergic population. These data provide the first detailed account of the expression and cellular distribution of ENT1 in rat dorsal horn and sensory ganglia. The functional significance of ENT1 expression with regard to the homeostatic regulation of adenosine at synapses remains to be established. PMID:16226730

  11. Mechanical compression and nucleus pulposus application on dorsal root Ganglia differentially modify evoked neuronal activity in the thalamus.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Elin; Brisby, Helena; Rask, Katarina; Hammar, Ingela

    2013-06-01

    A combination of mechanical compression caused by a protruding disc and leakage of nucleus pulposus (NP) from the disc core is presumed to contribute to intervertebral disc hernia-related pain. Experimental models of disc hernia including both components have resulted in changes in neuronal activity at the level of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord, but changes within the brain have been less well studied. However, acute application of NP to a DRG without mechanical compression rapidly increases neuronal activity in the thalamus, a major brain relay nucleus processing information from sensory pathways including ascending nociceptive tracts. The combination of mechanical compression and NP might therefore result in further increases in central neuronal activity. Using an experimental disc herniation rat model including both mechanical compression and NP the present study aimed to investigate changes in neuronal activity in the contralateral thalamic ventral posterior lateral nucleus in vivo. Measurements were obtained while electrically stimulating the ipsilateral sciatic nerve at Aδ fiber intensities. The L4 DRG was subjected to light mechanical compression and NP exposure, and acute changes in evoked thalamic responses were recorded for up to 40 min. In order to compare effects in naïve animals with effects following a longer period of NP exposure, animals that were either disc-punctured or sham-operated 24 h previously were also included. In all animals, light mechanical compression of the DRG depressed the number of evoked neuronal responses. Prior NP exposure resulted in less potent changes following mechanical compression (80% of baseline) than that observed in naïve animals (50%). During the subsequent NP application, the number of evoked responses compared to baseline increased in pre-exposed animals (to 87%) as well as in naïve animals (72%) in which the removal of the mechanical compression resulted in a further increase (106%). The

  12. Activation of TRPC channels contributes to OA-NO2-induced responses in guinea-pig dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiulin; Beckel, Jonathan M; Daugherty, Stephanie L; Wang, Ting; Woodcock, Stephen R; Freeman, Bruce A; de Groat, William C

    2014-01-01

    Effects of nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) on TRP channels were examined in guinea-pig dissociated dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons using calcium imaging and patch clamp techniques. OA-NO2 increased intracellular Ca2+ in 60–80% DRG neurons. 1-Oleoyl-2acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), a TRPC agonist, elicited responses in 36% of OA-NO2-sensitive neurons while capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) or allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC, TRPA1 agonist) elicited responses in only 16% and 10%, respectively, of these neurons. A TRPV1 antagonist (diarylpiperazine, 5 μm) in combination with a TRPA1 antagonist (HC-030031, 30 μm) did not change the amplitude of the Ca2+ transients or percentage of neurons responding to OA-NO2; however, a reducing agent DTT (50 mm) or La3+ (50 μm) completely abolished OA-NO2 responses. OA-NO2 also induced a transient inward current associated with a membrane depolarization followed by a prolonged outward current and hyperpolarization in 80% of neurons. The reversal potentials of inward and outward currents were approximately −20 mV and −60 mV, respectively. Inward current was reduced when extracellular Na+ was absent, but unchanged by niflumic acid (100 μm), a Cl− channel blocker. Outward current was abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ or a combination of two Ca2+-activated K+ channel blockers (iberiotoxin, 100 nm and apamin, 1 μm). BTP2 (1 or 10 μm), a broad spectrum TRPC antagonist, or La3+ (50 μm) completely abolished OA-NO2 currents. RT-PCR performed on mRNA extracted from DRGs revealed the expression of all seven subtypes of TRPC channels. These results support the hypothesis that OA-NO2 activates TRPC channels other than the TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels already known to be targets in rat and mouse sensory neurons and challenge the prevailing view that electrophilic compounds act specifically on TRPA1 or TRPV1 channels. The modulation of sensory neuron excitability via actions on multiple TRP channels can contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect

  13. NSAIDs modulate GABA-activated currents via Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LEI; LI, LI; MA, KE-TAO; WANG, YANG; LI, JING; SHI, WEN-YAN; ZHU, HE; ZHANG, ZHONG-SHUANG; SI, JUN-QIANG

    2016-01-01

    The ability of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to modulate γ-aminobutyrate (GABA)-activated currents via Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG), was examined in the present study. During the preparation of DRG neurons harvested from Sprague-Dawley rats, the whole-cell recording technique was used to record the effect of NSAIDs on GABA-activated inward currents, and the expression levels of the TMEM16A and TMEM16B subunits were revealed. In the event that DRG neurons were pre-incubated for 20 sec with niflumic acid (NFA) and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) prior to the administration of GABA, the GABA-induced inward currents were diminished markedly in the majority of neurons examined (96.3%). The inward currents induced by 100 µmol/l GABA were attenuated by (0±0.09%; neurons = 4), (5.32±3.51%; neurons = 6), (21.3±4.00%; neurons = 5), (33.8±5.20%; neurons = 17), (52.2±5.10%; neurons = 4) and (61.1±4.12%; neurons = 12) by 0.1, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 µmol/l NFA, respectively. The inward currents induced by 100 µmol/l GABA were attenuated by (13.8±6%; neurons = 6), (23.2±14.7%; neurons = 6) and (29.7±9.1%; neurons = 9) by 3, 10 and 30 µmol/l NPPB, respectively. NFA and NPPB dose-dependently inhibited GABA-activated currents with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 6.7 and 11 µmol/l, respectively. The inhibitory effect of 100 µmol/l NFA on the GABA-evoked inward current were also strongly inhibited by nitrendipine (NTDP; an L-type calcium channel blocker), 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (a highly selective calcium chelating reagent), caffeine (a widely available Ca2+ consuming drug) and calcium-free extracellular fluid, in a concentration-dependent manner. Immunofluorescent staining indicated that TMEM16A and TMEM16B expression was widely distributed in DRG neurons. The results suggest that NSAIDs may be able to regulate Ca2

  14. A computational model for estimating recruitment of primary afferent fibers by intraneural stimulation in the dorsal root ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbeau, D. J.; Hokanson, J. A.; Rubin, J. E.; Weber, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Primary afferent microstimulation has been proposed as a method for activating cutaneous and muscle afferent fibers to restore tactile and proprioceptive feedback after limb loss or peripheral neuropathy. Large populations of primary afferent fibers can be accessed directly by implanting microelectrode arrays in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), which provide a compact and stable target for stimulating a diverse group of sensory fibers. To gain insight into factors affecting the number and types of primary afferents activated, we developed a computational model that simulates the recruitment of fibers in the feline L7 DRG. The model comprises two parts. The first part is a single-fiber model used to describe the current-distance relation and was based on the McIntyre-Richardson-Grill model for excitability. The second part uses the results of the singe-fiber model and published data on fiber size distributions to predict the probability of recruiting a given number of fibers as a function of stimulus intensity. The range of intensities over which exactly one fiber was recruited was approximately 0.5-5 µA (0.1-1 nC per phase); the stimulus intensity at which the probability of recruiting exactly one fiber was maximized was 2.3 µA. However, at 2.3 µA, it was also possible to recruit up to three fibers, albeit with a lower probability. Stimulation amplitudes up to 6 µA were tested with the population model, which showed that as the amplitude increased, the number of fibers recruited increased exponentially. The distribution of threshold amplitudes predicted by the model was similar to that previously reported by in vivo experimentation. Finally, the model suggested that medium diameter fibers (7.3-11.5 µm) may be recruited with much greater probability than large diameter fibers (12.8-16 µm). This model may be used to efficiently test a range of stimulation parameters and nerve morphologies to complement results from electrophysiology experiments and to aid in the

  15. Expression and transport of Angiotensin II AT1 receptors in spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Pavel, Jaroslav; Tang, Hui; Brimijoin, Stephen; Moughamian, Armen; Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Benicky, Julius; Saavedra, Juan M

    2009-01-01

    To clarify the role of Angiotensin II in the regulation of peripheral sensory and motor systems, we initiated a study of the expression, localization and transport of Angiotensin II receptor types in the rat sciatic nerve pathway, including L4–L5 spinal cord segments, the corresponding dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and the sciatic nerve. We used quantitative autoradiography for AT1 and AT2 receptors, and in situ hybridization to detect AT1A, AT1B and AT2 mRNAs. We found substantial expression and discrete localization of Angiotensin II AT1 receptors, with much higher numbers in the grey than in the white matter. A very high AT1 receptor expression was detected in the superficial dorsal horns and in neuronal clusters of the DRGs. Expression of AT1A mRNA was significantly higher than that of AT1B. AT1 receptor binding and AT1A and AT1B mRNAs were especially prominent in ventral horn motor neurons, and in the DRG neuronal cells. Unilateral dorsal rhizotomy significantly reduced AT1 receptor binding in the ipsilateral side of the superficial dorsal horn, indicating that a substantial number of dorsal horn AT1 receptors have their origin in the DRGs. After ligation of the sciatic nerve, there was a high accumulation of AT1 receptors proximal to the ligature, a demonstration of anterograde receptor transport. We found inconsistent levels of AT2 receptor binding and mRNA. Our results suggest multiple roles of Angiotensin II AT1 receptors in the regulation of sensory and motor functions. PMID:18976642

  16. L5 spinal nerve axotomy induces sensitization of cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons in the rat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Djouhri, Laiche

    2016-06-15

    Partial nerve injury often leads to peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP), a major health problem that lacks effective drug treatment. PNP is characterized by ongoing/spontaneous pain, and hypersensitivity to noxious (hyperalgesia) and innocuous (allodynia) stimuli. Preclinical studies using the L5 spinal nerve ligation/axotomy (SNL/SNA) model of PNP suggest that this type of chronic pain results partly from sensitization of ipsilateral L4C-and Aδ-fiber nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, but whether L4 β-nociceptors, which constitute a substantial group of DRG neurons, also become sensitized remains unanswered. To address this issue, intracellular recordings from somata of cutaneous Aβ-nociceptors (classified according to their dorsal root conduction velocities (>6.5m/s), and physiologically based on their responses to noxious (but not innocuous) mechanical stimuli) were made from L4-DRGs in normal (control) rats and in rats seven days after L5 SNA in vivo. Compared with control, cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptive DRG neurons in SNA rats (that developed mechanical hypersensitivity) exhibited sensitization indicated by: a) decreased mean mechanical threshold (from 57.8±7.1 to 10.3±1.7mN), b) decreased mean dorsal root electrical threshold (from 11.4±0.7 to 4.3±0.4V), c) increased mean response to a suprathreshold mechanical stimulus (from 18.5±1.8 to 34±3.7spikes/sec) and d) an obvious, but non-significant, increase in the incidence of ongoing/spontaneous activity (from 3% to 18%). These findings suggest that cutaneous L4 Aβ-nociceptors also become sensitized after L5 SNA, and that sensitization of this subclass of A-fiber nociceptors may contribute both directly and indirectly to nerve injury-induced PNP. PMID:27173166

  17. F-actin links Epac-PKC signaling to purinergic P2X3 receptor sensitization in dorsal root ganglia following inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yanping; Wang, Congying; Li, GuangWen

    2016-01-01

    Sensitization of purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) contributes to the production of exaggerated nociceptive responses following inflammatory injury. We showed previously that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) potentiates P2X3R-mediated ATP currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from both control and complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced inflamed rats. PGE2 potentiation of ATP currents depends only on PKA signaling in control neurons, but it depends on both PKA and PKC signaling in inflamed neurons. We further found that inflammation evokes an increase in exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epacs) in dorsal root ganglions. This increase promotes the activation of PKC to produce a much enhanced PGE2 effect on ATP currents and to elicit Epac-dependent flinch nocifensive behavioral responses in complete Freund’s adjuvant rats. The link between Epac-PKC signaling and P2X3R sensitization remains unexplored. Here, we show that the activation of Epacs promotes the expression of phosphorylated PKC and leads to an increase in the cytoskeleton, F-actin, expression at the cell perimeter. Depolymerization of F-actin blocks PGE2-enhanced ATP currents and inhibits P2X3R-mediated nocifensive responses after inflammation. Thus, F-actin is dynamically involved in the Epac-PKC-dependent P2X3R sensitization. Furthermore, Epacs induce a PKC-dependent increase in the membrane expression of P2X3Rs. This increase is abolished by F-actin depolymerization, suggesting that F-actin mediates Epac-PKC signaling of P2X3R membrane expression. Thus, after inflammation, an Epac-PKC dependent increase in F-actin in dorsal root ganglion neurons enhances the membrane expression of P2X3Rs to bring about sensitization of P2X3Rs and abnormal pain behaviors. PMID:27385722

  18. Interactions between Dorsal and Ventral Root Stimulation on the Generation of Locomotor-Like Activity in the Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Pujala, Avinash; Blivis, Dvir; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether dorsal (DR) and ventral root (VR) stimulus trains engage common postsynaptic components to activate the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion in the neonatal mouse spinal cord. VR stimulation did not activate the first order interneurons mediating the activation of the locomotor CPG by sacrocaudal afferent stimulation. Simultaneous stimulation of adjacent dorsal or ventral root pairs, subthreshold for evoking locomotor-like activity, did not summate to activate the CPG. This suggests that locomotor-like activity is triggered when a critical class of efferent or afferent axons is stimulated and does not depend on the number of stimulated axons or activated postsynaptic neurons. DR- and VR-evoked episodes exhibited differences in the coupling between VR pairs. In DR-evoked episodes, the coupling between the ipsilateral and contralateral flexor/extensor roots was similar and stronger than the bilateral extensor roots. In VR-evoked episodes, ipsilateral flexor/extensor coupling was stronger than both the contralateral flexor/extensor and the bilateral extensor coupling. For both types of stimulation, the coupling was greatest between the bilateral L1/L2 flexor-dominated roots. This indicates that the recruitment and/or the firing pattern of motoneurons differed in DR and VR-evoked episodes. However, the DR and VR trains do not appear to activate distinct CPGs because trains of DR and VR stimuli at frequencies too low to evoke locomotor-like activity did so when they were interleaved. These results indicate that the excitatory actions of VR stimulation converge onto the CPG through an unknown pathway that is not captured by current models of the locomotor CPG. PMID:27419215

  19. Interactions between Dorsal and Ventral Root Stimulation on the Generation of Locomotor-Like Activity in the Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated whether dorsal (DR) and ventral root (VR) stimulus trains engage common postsynaptic components to activate the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion in the neonatal mouse spinal cord. VR stimulation did not activate the first order interneurons mediating the activation of the locomotor CPG by sacrocaudal afferent stimulation. Simultaneous stimulation of adjacent dorsal or ventral root pairs, subthreshold for evoking locomotor-like activity, did not summate to activate the CPG. This suggests that locomotor-like activity is triggered when a critical class of efferent or afferent axons is stimulated and does not depend on the number of stimulated axons or activated postsynaptic neurons. DR- and VR-evoked episodes exhibited differences in the coupling between VR pairs. In DR-evoked episodes, the coupling between the ipsilateral and contralateral flexor/extensor roots was similar and stronger than the bilateral extensor roots. In VR-evoked episodes, ipsilateral flexor/extensor coupling was stronger than both the contralateral flexor/extensor and the bilateral extensor coupling. For both types of stimulation, the coupling was greatest between the bilateral L1/L2 flexor-dominated roots. This indicates that the recruitment and/or the firing pattern of motoneurons differed in DR and VR-evoked episodes. However, the DR and VR trains do not appear to activate distinct CPGs because trains of DR and VR stimuli at frequencies too low to evoke locomotor-like activity did so when they were interleaved. These results indicate that the excitatory actions of VR stimulation converge onto the CPG through an unknown pathway that is not captured by current models of the locomotor CPG. PMID:27419215

  20. Expression of the vesicular glutamate transporters-1 and -2 in adult mouse dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord and their regulation by nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Brumovsky, P; Watanabe, M; Hökfelt, T

    2007-06-29

    The expression of two vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, was studied with immunohistochemistry in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), the lumbar spinal cord and the skin of the adult mouse. About 12% and 65% of the total number of DRG neuron profiles (NPs) expressed VGLUT1 and VGLUT2, respectively. VGLUT1-immunoreactive (IR) NPs were usually medium- to large-sized, in contrast to a majority of small- or medium-sized VGLUT2-IR NPs. Most VGLUT1-IR NPs did not coexpress calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or bound isolectin B4 (IB4). In contrast, approximately 31% and approximately 42% of the VGLUT2-IR DRG NPs were also CGRP-IR or bound IB4, respectively. Conversely, virtually all CGRP-IR and IB4-binding NPs coexpressed VGLUT2. Moderate colocalization between VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 was also observed. Sciatic nerve transection induced a decrease in the overall number of VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-IR NPs (both ipsi- and contralaterally) and, in addition, a parallel, unilateral increase of VGLUT2-like immunoreactivity (LI) in a subpopulation of mostly small NPs. In the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, strong VGLUT1-LI was detected, particularly in deep dorsal horn layers and in the ventral horns. VGLUT2-LI was abundant throughout the gray spinal matter, 'radiating' into/from the white matter. A unilateral dorsal rhizotomy reduced VGLUT1-LI, while apparently leaving unaffected the VGLUT2-LI. Transport through axons for both VGLUTs was confirmed by their accumulation after compression of the sciatic nerve or dorsal roots. In the hind paw skin, abundant VGLUT2-IR nerve fibers were observed, sometimes associated with Merkel cells. Lower numbers of VGLUT1-IR fibers were also detected in the skin. Some VGLUT1-IR and VGLUT2-IR fibers were associated with hair follicles. Based on these data and those by Morris et al. [Morris JL, Konig P, Shimizu T, Jobling P, Gibbins IL (2005) Most peptide-containing sensory neurons lack proteins for exocytotic release and

  1. Dorsal root ganglion neurons innervating skeletal muscle respond to physiological combinations of protons, ATP, and lactate mediated by ASIC, P2X, and TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Light, Alan R; Hughen, Ronald W; Zhang, Jie; Rainier, Jon; Liu, Zhuqing; Lee, Jeewoo

    2008-09-01

    The adequate stimuli and molecular receptors for muscle metaboreceptors and nociceptors are still under investigation. We used calcium imaging of cultured primary sensory dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from C57Bl/6 mice to determine candidates for metabolites that could be the adequate stimuli and receptors that could detect these stimuli. Retrograde DiI labeling determined that some of these neurons innervated skeletal muscle. We found that combinations of protons, ATP, and lactate were much more effective than individually applied compounds for activating rapid calcium increases in muscle-innervating dorsal root ganglion neurons. Antagonists for P2X, ASIC, and TRPV1 receptors suggested that these three receptors act together to detect protons, ATP, and lactate when presented together in physiologically relevant concentrations. Two populations of muscle-innervating DRG neurons were found. One responded to low metabolite levels (likely nonnoxious) and used ASIC3, P2X5, and TRPV1 as molecular receptors to detect these metabolites. The other responded to high levels of metabolites (likely noxious) and used ASIC3, P2X4, and TRPV1 as their molecular receptors. We conclude that a combination of ASIC, P2X5 and/or P2X4, and TRPV1 are the molecular receptors used to detect metabolites by muscle-innervating sensory neurons. We further conclude that the adequate stimuli for muscle metaboreceptors and nociceptors are combinations of protons, ATP, and lactate. PMID:18509077

  2. Developmentally Regulated Expression of HDNF/NT-3 mRNA in Rat Spinal Cord Motoneurons and Expression of BDNF mRNA in Embryonic Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Ernfors, Patrik; Persson, Håkan

    1991-01-01

    Northern blot analysis was used to demonstrate high levels of hippocampus-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin-3 (HDNF/NT-3) mRNA in the embryonic day (E) 13 - 14 and 15 - 16 spinal cord. The level decreased at E18 - 19 and remained the same until postnatal day (P) 1, after which it decreased further to a level below the detection limit in the adult. In situ hybridization revealed that the NT-3 mRNA detected in the developing spinal cord was derived from motoneurons and the decrease seen at E18 - 19 was caused by a reduction in the number of motoneurons expressing NT-3 mRNA. The distribution of NT-3 mRNA-expressing cells in the E15 spinal cord was very similar to the distribution of cells expressing choline acetyltransferase or nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) mRNA. Moreover, a striking similarity between the developmentally regulated expression of NT-3 and NGFR mRNA was noted in spinal cord motoneurons. A subpopulation of all neurons in the dorsal root ganglia expressed brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA from E13, the earliest time examined, to adulthood. These results are consistent with a trophic role of NT-3 for proprioceptive sensory neurons innervating the ventral horn, and imply a local action of BDNF for developing sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia. PMID:12106253

  3. Neurite growth acceleration of adult Dorsal Root Ganglion neurons illuminated by low-level Light Emitting Diode light at 645 nm.

    PubMed

    Burland, Marion; Paris, Lambert; Quintana, Patrice; Bec, Jean-Michel; Diouloufet, Lucie; Sar, Chamroeun; Boukhaddaoui, Hassan; Charlot, Benoit; Braga Silva, Jefferson; Chammas, Michel; Sieso, Victor; Valmier, Jean; Bardin, Fabrice

    2015-06-01

    The effect of a 645 nm Light Emitting Diode (LED) light irradiation on the neurite growth velocity of adult Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) neurons with peripheral axon injury 4-10 days before plating and without previous injury was investigated. The real amount of light reaching the neurons was calculated by taking into account the optical characteristics of the light source and of media in the light path. The knowledge of these parameters is essential to be able to compare results of the literature and a way to reduce inconsistencies. We found that 4 min irradiation of a mean irradiance of 11.3 mW/cm(2) (corresponding to an actual irradiance reaching the neurons of 83 mW/cm(2)) induced a 1.6-fold neurite growth acceleration on non-injured neurons and on axotomized neurons. Although the axotomized neurons were naturally already in a rapid regeneration process, an enhancement was found to occur while irradiating with the LED light, which may be promising for therapy applications. Dorsal Root Ganglion neurons (A) without previous injury and (B) subjected to a conditioning injury. PMID:25077453

  4. Effect of TRPV4-p38 MAPK Pathway on Neuropathic Pain in Rats with Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yu-Juan; Zhang, Xiao; Fan, Zhen-Zhen; Huai, Juan; Teng, Yong-Bo; Zhang, Yang; Yue, Shou-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships among TRPV4, p38, and neuropathic pain in a rat model of chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion. Mechanical allodynia appeared after CCD surgery, enhanced via the intrathecal injection of 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4α-PDD, an agonist of TRPV4) and anisomycin (an agonist of p38), but was suppressed by Ruthenium Red (RR, an inhibitor of TRPV4) and SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38). The protein expressions of p38 and P-p38 were upregulated by 4α-PDD and anisomycin injection but reduced by RR and SB203580. Moreover, TRPV4 was upregulated by 4α-PDD and SB203580 and downregulated by RR and anisomycin. In DRG tissues, the numbers of TRPV4- or p38-positive small neurons were significantly changed in CCD rats, increased by the agonists, and decreased by the inhibitors. The amplitudes of ectopic discharges were increased by 4α-PDD and anisomycin but decreased by RR and SB203580. Collectively, these results support the link between TRPV4 and p38 and their intermediary role for neuropathic pain in rats with chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion. PMID:27366753

  5. Correlation of preoperative MRI with the long-term outcomes of dorsal root entry zone lesioning for brachial plexus avulsion pain.

    PubMed

    Ko, Andrew L; Ozpinar, Alp; Raskin, Jeffrey S; Magill, Stephen T; Raslan, Ahmed M; Burchiel, Kim J

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Lesioning of the dorsal root entry zone (DREZotomy) is an effective treatment for brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) pain. The role of preoperative assessment with MRI has been shown to be unreliable for determining affected levels; however, it may have a role in predicting pain outcomes. Here, DREZotomy outcomes are reviewed and preoperative MRI is examined as a possible prognostic factor. METHODS A retrospective review was performed of an institutional database of patients who had undergone brachial plexus DREZ procedures since 1995. Preoperative MRI was examined to assess damage to the DREZ or dorsal horn, as evidenced by avulsion of the DREZ or T2 hyperintensity within the spinal cord. Phone interviews were conducted to assess the long-term pain outcomes. RESULTS Between 1995 and 2012, 27 patients were found to have undergone cervical DREZ procedures for BPA. Of these, 15 had preoperative MR images of the cervical spine available for review. The outcomes were graded from 1 to 4 as poor (no significant relief), good (more than 50% pain relief), excellent (more than 75% pain relief), or pain free, respectively. Overall, DREZotomy was found to be a safe, efficacious, and durable procedure for relief of pain due to BPA. The initial success rate was 73%, which declined to 66% at a median follow-up time of 62.5 months. Damage to the DREZ or dorsal horn was significantly correlated with poorer outcomes (p = 0.02). The average outcomes in patients without MRI evidence of DREZ or dorsal horn damage was significantly higher than in patients with such damage (3.67 vs 1.75, t-test; p = 0.001). A longer duration of pain prior to operation was also a significant predictor of treatment success (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS Overall, the DREZotomy procedure has a 66% chance of achieving meaningful pain relief on long-term follow-up. Successful pain relief is associated with the lack of damage to the DREZ and dorsal horn on preoperative MRI. PMID:26406799

  6. Neuronal and glial expression of inward rectifier potassium channel subunits Kir2.x in rat dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yuzo; Yasaka, Toshiharu; Takano, Makoto; Ishihara, Keiko

    2016-03-23

    Inward rectifier K(+) channels of the Kir2.x subfamily play important roles in controlling the neuronal excitability. Although their cellular localization in the brain has been extensively studied, only a few studies have examined their expression in the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. In this study, immunohistochemical analyses of Kir2.1, Kir2.2, and Kir2.3 expression were performed in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord using bright-field and confocal microscopy. In DRG, most ganglionic neurons expressed Kir2.1, Kir2.2 and Kir2.3, whereas satellite glial cells chiefly expressed Kir2.3. In the spinal cord, Kir2.1, Kir2.2 and Kir2.3 were all expressed highly in the gray matter of dorsal and ventral horns and moderately in the white matter also. Within the gray matter, the expression was especially high in the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II). Confocal images obtained using markers for neuronal cells, NeuN, and astrocytes, Sox9, showed expression of all three Kir2 subunits in both neuronal somata and astrocytes in lamina I-III of the dorsal horn and the lateral spinal nucleus of the dorsolateral funiculus. Immunoreactive signals other than those in neuronal and glial somata were abundant in lamina I and II, which probably located mainly in nerve fibers or nerve terminals. Colocalization of Kir2.1 and 2.3 and that of Kir2.2 and 2.3 were present in neuronal and glial somata. In the ventral horn, motor neurons and interneurons were also immunoreactive with the three Kir2 subunits. Our study suggests that Kir2 channels composed of Kir2.1-2.3 subunits are expressed in neuronal and glial cells in the DRG and spinal cord, contributing to sensory transduction and motor control. PMID:26854211

  7. Virus-Mediated Knockdown of Nav1.3 in Dorsal Root Ganglia of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Alleviates Tactile Allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Andrew M; Samad, Omar A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain affects a substantial number of people and represents a major public health problem. Available clinical treatments for diabetic neuropathic pain remain only partially effective and many of these treatments carry the burden of side effects or the risk of dependence. The misexpression of sodium channels within nociceptive neurons contributes to abnormal electrical activity associated with neuropathic pain. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.3 produces tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents with rapid repriming kinetics and has been shown to contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability and ectopic firing in injured neurons. Suppression of Nav1.3 activity can attenuate neuropathic pain induced by peripheral nerve injury. Previous studies have shown that expression of Nav1.3 is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of diabetic rats that exhibit neuropathic pain. Here, we hypothesized that viral-mediated knockdown of Nav1.3 in painful diabetic neuropathy would reduce neuropathic pain. We used a validated recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-shRNA-Nav1.3 vector to knockdown expression of Nav1.3, via a clinically applicable intrathecal injection method. Three weeks following vector administration, we observed a significant rate of transduction in DRGs of diabetic rats that concomitantly reduced neuronal excitability of dorsal horn neurons and reduced behavioral evidence of tactile allodynia. Taken together, these findings offer a novel gene therapy approach for addressing chronic diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:26101954

  8. Virus-Mediated Knockdown of Nav1.3 in Dorsal Root Ganglia of STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Alleviates Tactile Allodynia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Samad, Omar A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic pain affects a substantial number of people and represents a major public health problem. Available clinical treatments for diabetic neuropathic pain remain only partially effective and many of these treatments carry the burden of side effects or the risk of dependence. The misexpression of sodium channels within nociceptive neurons contributes to abnormal electrical activity associated with neuropathic pain. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.3 produces tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents with rapid repriming kinetics and has been shown to contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability and ectopic firing in injured neurons. Suppression of Nav1.3 activity can attenuate neuropathic pain induced by peripheral nerve injury. Previous studies have shown that expression of Nav1.3 is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of diabetic rats that exhibit neuropathic pain. Here, we hypothesized that viral-mediated knockdown of Nav1.3 in painful diabetic neuropathy would reduce neuropathic pain. We used a validated recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-shRNA-Nav1.3 vector to knockdown expression of Nav1.3, via a clinically applicable intrathecal injection method. Three weeks following vector administration, we observed a significant rate of transduction in DRGs of diabetic rats that concomitantly reduced neuronal excitability of dorsal horn neurons and reduced behavioral evidence of tactile allodynia. Taken together, these findings offer a novel gene therapy approach for addressing chronic diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:26101954

  9. An Unsorted Spike-Based Pattern Recognition Method for Real-Time Continuous Sensory Event Detection from Dorsal Root Ganglion Recording.

    PubMed

    Han, Sungmin; Chu, Jun-Uk; Kim, Hyungmin; Choi, Kuiwon; Park, Jong Woong; Youn, Inchan

    2016-06-01

    In functional neuromuscular stimulation systems, sensory information-based closed-loop control can be useful for restoring lost function in patients with hemiplegia or quadriplegia. The goal of this study was to detect sensory events from tactile afferent signals continuously in real time using a novel unsorted spike-based pattern recognition method. The tactile afferent signals were recorded with a 16-channel microelectrode in the dorsal root ganglion, and unsorted spike-based feature vectors were extracted as a novel combination of the time and time-frequency domain features. Principal component analysis was used to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vectors, and a multilayer perceptron classifier was used to detect sensory events. The proposed method showed good performance for classification accuracy, and the processing time delay of sensory event detection was less than 200 ms. These results indicated that the proposed method could be applicable for sensory feedback in closed-loop control systems. PMID:26672029

  10. In vivo time-lapse imaging reveals extensive neural crest and endothelial cell interactions during neural crest migration and formation of the dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia.

    PubMed

    George, Lynn; Dunkel, Haley; Hunnicutt, Barbara J; Filla, Michael; Little, Charles; Lansford, Rusty; Lefcort, Frances

    2016-05-01

    During amniote embryogenesis the nervous and vascular systems interact in a process that significantly affects the respective morphogenesis of each network by forming a "neurovascular" link. The importance of neurovascular cross-talk in the central nervous system has recently come into focus with the growing awareness that these two systems interact extensively both during development, in the stem-cell niche, and in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. With respect to the peripheral nervous system, however, there have been no live, real-time investigations of the potential relationship between these two developing systems. To address this deficit, we used multispectral 4D time-lapse imaging in a transgenic quail model in which endothelial cells (ECs) express a yellow fluorescent marker, while neural crest cells (NCCs) express an electroporated red fluorescent marker. We monitored EC and NCC migration in real-time during formation of the peripheral nervous system. Our time-lapse recordings indicate that NCCs and ECs are physically juxtaposed and dynamically interact at multiple locations along their trajectories. These interactions are stereotypical and occur at precise anatomical locations along the NCC migratory pathway. NCCs migrate alongside the posterior surface of developing intersomitic vessels, but fail to cross these continuous streams of motile ECs. NCCs change their morphology and migration trajectory when they encounter gaps in the developing vasculature. Within the nascent dorsal root ganglion, proximity to ECs causes filopodial retraction which curtails forward persistence of NCC motility. Overall, our time-lapse recordings support the conclusion that primary vascular networks substantially influence the distribution and migratory behavior of NCCs and the patterned formation of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia. PMID:26988118

  11. Differential regulation of immune responses and macrophage/neuron interactions in the dorsal root ganglion in young and adult rats following nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain is an apparently spontaneous experience triggered by abnormal physiology of the peripheral or central nervous system, which evolves with time. Neuropathic pain arising from peripheral nerve injury is characterized by a combination of spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia. There is no evidence of this type of pain in human infants or rat pups; brachial plexus avulsion, which causes intense neuropathic pain in adults, is not painful when the injury is sustained at birth. Since infants are capable of nociception from before birth and display both acute and chronic inflammatory pain behaviour from an early neonatal age, it appears that the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain are differentially regulated over a prolonged postnatal period. Results We have performed a microarray analysis of the rat L4/L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG), 7 days post spared nerve injury, a model of neuropathic pain. Genes that are regulated in adult rats displaying neuropathic behaviour were compared to those regulated in young rats (10 days old) that did not show the same neuropathic behaviour. The results show a set of genes, differentially regulated in the adult DRG, that are principally involved in immune system modulation. A functional consequence of this different immune response to injury is that resident macrophages cluster around the large A sensory neuron bodies in the adult DRG seven days post injury, whereas the macrophages in young DRG remain scattered evenly throughout the ganglion, as in controls. Conclusions The results show, for the first time, a major difference in the neuroimmune response to nerve injury in the dorsal root ganglion of young and adult rats. Differential analysis reveals a new set of immune related genes in the ganglia, that are differentially regulated in adult neuropathic pain, and that are consistent with the selective activation of macrophages around adult, but not young large A sensory neurons post injury. These

  12. Upregulation of Chemokine CXCL12 in the Dorsal Root Ganglia and Spinal Cord Contributes to the Development and Maintenance of Neuropathic Pain Following Spared Nerve Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liying; Wang, Xinru; Li, Zhisong; Kong, Cunlong; Zhao, Yonghui; Qian, Jun-Liang; Kan, Quancheng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Ji-Tian

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling is involved in chronic pain. However, few studies have systemically assessed its role in direct nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and the underlying mechanism. Here, we determined that spared nerve injury (SNI) increased the expression of CXCL12 and its cognate receptor CXCR4 in lumbar 5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and satellite glial cells. SNI also induced long-lasting upregulation of CXCL12 and CXCR4 in the ipsilateral L4-5 spinal cord dorsal horn, characterized by CXCL12 expression in neurons and microglia, and CXCR4 expression in neurons and astrocytes. Moreover, SNI-induced a sustained increase in TNF-α expression in the DRG and spinal cord. Intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of the TNF-α synthesis inhibitor thalidomide reduced the SNI-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and inhibited the expression of CXCL12 in the DRG and spinal cord. Intrathecal injection (i.t.) of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, both 30 min before and 7 days after SNI, reduced the behavioral signs of allodynia. Rats given an i.t. or i.p. bolus of AMD3100 on day 8 of SNI exhibited attenuated abnormal pain behaviors. The neuropathic pain established following SNI was also impaired by i.t. administration of a CXCL12-neutralizing antibody. Moreover, repetitive i.t. AMD3100 administration prevented the activation of ERK in the spinal cord. The mechanical hypersensitivity induced in naïve rats by i.t. CXCL12 was alleviated by pretreatment with the MEK inhibitor PD98059. Collectively, our results revealed that TNF-α might mediate the upregulation of CXCL12 in the DRG and spinal cord following SNI, and that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling via ERK activation contributes to the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. PMID:26781879

  13. Axotomy of tributaries of the pelvic and pudendal nerves induces changes in the neurochemistry of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons and the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Carly J; Tomasella, Eugenia; Malet, Mariana; Seroogy, Kim B; Hökfelt, Tomas; Villar, Marcelo J; Gebhart, G F; Brumovsky, Pablo R

    2016-05-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques, we characterized changes in the expression of several neurochemical markers in lumbar 4-sacral 2 (L4-S2) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron profiles (NPs) and the spinal cord of BALB/c mice after axotomy of the L6 and S1 spinal nerves, major tributaries of the pelvic (targeting pelvic visceral organs) and pudendal (targeting perineum and genitalia) nerves. Sham animals were included. Expression of cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor 3 (ATF3), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT) types 1 and -2 was analysed seven days after injury. L6-S1 axotomy induced dramatic de novo expression of ATF3 in many L6-S1 DRG NPs, and parallel significant downregulations in the percentage of CGRP-, TRPV1-, TH- and VGLUT2-immunoreactive (IR) DRG NPs, as compared to their expression in uninjured DRGs (contralateral L6-S1-AXO; sham mice); VGLUT1 expression remained unaltered. Sham L6-S1 DRGs only showed a small ipsilateral increase in ATF3-IR NPs (other markers were unchanged). L6-S1-AXO induced de novo expression of ATF3 in several lumbosacral spinal cord motoneurons and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons; in sham mice the effect was limited to a few motoneurons. Finally, a moderate decrease in CGRP- and TRPV1-like-immunoreactivities was observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn neuropil. In conclusion, injury of a mixed visceral/non-visceral nerve leads to considerable neurochemical alterations in DRGs matched, to some extent, in the spinal cord. Changes in these and potentially other nociception-related molecules could contribute to pain due to injury of nerves in the abdominopelvic cavity. PMID:25749859

  14. TRPV1 channels are functionally coupled with BK(mSlo1) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Yongfeng; Hou, Panpan; Yan, Zonghe; Kong, Wenjuan; Liu, Beiying; Li, Xia; Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuexuan; Qin, Feng; Ding, Jiuping

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) channel is a nonselective cation channel activated by a variety of exogenous and endogenous physical and chemical stimuli, such as temperature (≥42 °C), capsaicin, a pungent compound in hot chili peppers, and allyl isothiocyanate. Large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels regulate the electric activities and neurotransmitter releases in excitable cells, responding to changes in membrane potentials and elevation of cytosolic calcium ions (Ca(2+)). However, it is unknown whether the TRPV1 channels are coupled with the BK channels. Using patch-clamp recording combined with an infrared laser device, we found that BK channels could be activated at 0 mV by a Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 channels not the intracellular calcium stores in submilliseconds. The local calcium concentration around BK is estimated over 10 μM. The crosstalk could be affected by 10 mM BAPTA, whereas 5 mM EGTA was ineffectual. Fluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments also showed that BK and TRPV1 were able to form a TRPV1-BK complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TRPV1-BK coupling also occurs in dosal root ganglion (DRG) cells, which plays a critical physiological role in regulating the "pain" signal transduction pathway in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:24147119

  15. Radiotherapy Suppresses Bone Cancer Pain through Inhibiting Activation of cAMP Signaling in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiqin; Dong, Yanbin; He, Xueming; Zhao, Ping; Yang, Aixing; Zhou, Rubing; Ma, Jianhua; Xie, Zhong; Song, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the major clinical approaches for treatment of bone cancer pain. Activation of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway plays important roles in bone cancer pain. Here, we examined the effects of radiotherapy on bone cancer pain and accompanying abnormal activation of cAMP-PKA signaling. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used and received tumor cell implantation (TCI) in rat tibia (TCI cancer pain model). Some of the rats that previously received TCI treatment were treated with X-ray radiation (radiotherapy). Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were measured and used for evaluating level of pain caused by TCI treatment. PKA mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was detected by RT-PCR. Concentrations of cAMP, IL-1β, and TNF-α as well as PKA activity in DRG and the spinal cord were measured by ELISA. The results showed that radiotherapy significantly suppressed TCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. The level of PKA mRNA in DRG, cAMP concentration and PKA activity in DRG and in the spinal cord, and concentrations of IL-1β and TNF-α in the spinal cord were significantly reduced by radiotherapy. In addition, radiotherapy also reduced TCI-induced bone loss. These findings suggest that radiotherapy may suppress bone cancer pain through inhibition of activation of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in DRG and the spinal cord. PMID:26989332

  16. Mitofusin 2 expression dominates over mitofusin 1 exclusively in mouse dorsal root ganglia - a possible explanation for peripheral nervous system involvement in Charcot-Marie-Tooth 2A.

    PubMed

    Kawalec, Maria; Zabłocka, Barbara; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Neska, Jacek; Beręsewicz, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, is essential for mitochondrial fusion and contributes to the maintenance and operation of the mitochondrial network. Mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene cause axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A (CMT2A), an inherited disease affecting peripheral nerve axons. The precise mechanism by which mutations in MFN2 selectively cause the degeneration of long peripheral axons is not known. There is a hypothesis suggesting the involvement of reduced expression of a homologous protein, mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), in the peripheral nervous system, and less effective compensation of defective mitofusin 2 by mitofusin 1. We therefore aimed to perform an analysis of the mitofusin 1 and mitofusin 2 mRNA and protein expression profiles in different mouse tissues, with special attention paid to dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), as parts of the peripheral nervous system. Quantitative measurement relating to mRNA revealed that expression of the Mfn2 gene dominates over Mfn1 mainly in mouse DRG, as opposed to other nervous system samples and other tissues studied. This result was further supported by Western blot evaluation. Both these sets of data confirm the hypothesis that the cellular consequences of mutations in the mitofusin 2 gene can mostly be manifested in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:25574749

  17. Effects of 14 days of spaceflight and nine days of recovery on cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The cross-sectional areas and succinate dehydrogenase activities of L5 dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after nine days of recovery. The mean and distribution of the cross-sectional areas were similar to age-matched, ground-based controls for both the spaceflight and for the spaceflight plus recovery groups. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in spaceflight compared to aged-matched control rats, whereas the mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was similar in age-matched control and spaceflight plus recovery rats. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity of neurons with cross-sectional areas between 1000 and 2000 microns2 was lower (between 7 and 10%) in both the spaceflight and the spaceflight plus recovery groups compared to the appropriate control groups. The reduction in the oxidative capacity of a subpopulation of sensory neurons having relatively large cross-sectional areas immediately following spaceflight and the sustained depression for nine days after returning to 1 g suggest that the 0 g environment induced significant alterations in proprioceptive function.

  18. Amitriptyline Activates TrkA to Aid Neuronal Growth and Attenuate Anesthesia-Induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaochun; Chen, Feng; Zheng, Ting; Huang, Fengyi; Chen, Jianghu; Tu, Wenshao

    2016-05-01

    Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (AM) has been shown to exert neurotrophic activity on neurons. We thus explored whether AM may aid the neuronal development and protect anesthesia-induced neuro-injury in young spinal cord dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.The DRG explants were prepared from 1-day-old rats. The effect of AM on aiding DRG neural development was examined by immunohistochemistry at dose-dependent manner. AM-induced changes in gene and protein expressions, and also phosphorylation states of tyrosine kinases receptor A (TrkA) and B (TrkB) in DRG, were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The effect of AM on attenuating lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration was examined by immunohistochemistry, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TrkA/B down-regulation.Amitriptyline stimulated DRG neuronal development in dose-dependent manner, but exerted toxic effect at concentrations higher than 10 M. AM activated TrkA in DRG through phosphorylation, whereas it had little effect on TrkB-signaling pathway. AM reduced lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration by regenerating neurites and growth cones. Moreover, the neuroprotection of AM on lidocaine-injured neurodegeneration was blocked by siRNA-mediated TrkA down-regulation, but not by TrkB down-regulation.Amitriptyline facilitated neuronal development and had protective effect on lidocaine-induced neurodegeneration, very likely through the activation of TrkA-signaling pathway in DRG. PMID:27149473

  19. Neuro-fuzzy decoding of sensory information from ensembles of simultaneously recorded dorsal root ganglion neurons for functional electrical stimulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigosa, J.; Weber, D. J.; Prochazka, A.; Stein, R. B.; Micera, S.

    2011-08-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is used to improve motor function after injury to the central nervous system. Some FES systems use artificial sensors to switch between finite control states. To optimize FES control of the complex behavior of the musculo-skeletal system in activities of daily life, it is highly desirable to implement feedback control. In theory, sensory neural signals could provide the required control signals. Recent studies have demonstrated the feasibility of deriving limb-state estimates from the firing rates of primary afferent neurons recorded in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). These studies used multiple linear regression (MLR) methods to generate estimates of limb position and velocity based on a weighted sum of firing rates in an ensemble of simultaneously recorded DRG neurons. The aim of this study was to test whether the use of a neuro-fuzzy (NF) algorithm (the generalized dynamic fuzzy neural networks (GD-FNN)) could improve the performance, robustness and ability to generalize from training to test sets compared to the MLR technique. NF and MLR decoding methods were applied to ensemble DRG recordings obtained during passive and active limb movements in anesthetized and freely moving cats. The GD-FNN model provided more accurate estimates of limb state and generalized better to novel movement patterns. Future efforts will focus on implementing these neural recording and decoding methods in real time to provide closed-loop control of FES using the information extracted from sensory neurons.

  20. 7, 8, 3′-Trihydroxyflavone Promotes Neurite Outgrowth and Protects Against Bupivacaine-Induced Neurotoxicity in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haohong; Luo, Xingjing

    2016-01-01

    Background 7, 8, 3′-trihydroxyflavone (THF) is a novel pro-neuronal small molecule that acts as a TrkB agonist. In this study, we examined the effect of THF on promoting neuronal growth and protecting anesthetics-induced neurotoxicity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in vitro. Material/Methods Neonatal mouse DRG neurons were cultured in vitro and treated with various concentrations of THF. The effect of THF on neuronal growth was investigated by neurite outgrowth assay and Western blot. In addition, the protective effects of THF on bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity were investigated by apoptosis TUNEL assay, neurite outgrowth assay, and Western blot, respectively. Results THF promoted neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons in dose-dependent manner, with an EC50 concentration of 67.4 nM. Western blot analysis showed THF activated TrkB signaling pathway by inducing TrkB phosphorylation. THF also rescued bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity by reducing apoptosis and protecting neurite retraction in DRG neurons. Furthermore, the protection of THF in bupivacaine-injured neurotoxicity was directly associated with TrkB phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner in DRG neurons. Conclusions THF has pro-neuronal effect on DRG neurons by promoting neurite growth and protecting against bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity, likely through TrkB activation. PMID:27371503

  1. Fabrication of growth factor- and extracellular matrix-loaded, gelatin-based scaffolds and their biocompatibility with Schwann cells and dorsal root ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gámez Sazo, Rodolfo E.; Maenaka, Katsumi; Gu, Weiyong; Wood, Patrick M.; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2012-01-01

    One of the most exciting new avenues of research to repair the injured spinal cord is to combine cells for implantation with scaffolds that protect the cells and release growth factors to improve their survival and promote host axonal regeneration. To realize this goal, we fabricated biodegradable, photocurable gelatin tubes and membranes for exploratory in vitro studies. Detailed methods are described for their fabrication with a high gelatin concentration. Gelatin membranes fabricated in the same way as tubes and photo-co-immobilized with rhBDNF or rhNT-3, with or without Schwann cells (SCs), showed an initial burst of neurotrophin release within 24h, with release diminishing progressively for 21 days thereafter. SCs attained their typical bipolar conformation on membranes without neurotrophins but adhesion, alignment and proliferation were improved with neurotrophins, particularly rhBDNF. When dorsal root ganglion explants were cultured on membranes containing laminin and fibronectin plus both neurotrophins, neurite outgrowth was lengthier compared to combining one neurotrophin with laminin and fibronectin. Thus, these gelatin membranes allow SC survival and effectively release growth factors and harbor extracellular matrix components to improve cell survival and neurite growth. These scaffolds, based on the combination of cross-linked gelatin technology and incorporation of neurotrophins and extracellular matrix components, are promising candidates for spinal cord repair. PMID:22906605

  2. Caspase-2 Is Upregulated after Sciatic Nerve Transection and Its Inhibition Protects Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons from Apoptosis after Serum Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Berry, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sciatic nerve (SN) transection-induced apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGN) is one factor determining the efficacy of peripheral axonal regeneration and the return of sensation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that caspase-2 (CASP2) orchestrates apoptosis of axotomised DRGN both in vivo and in vitro by disrupting the local neurotrophic supply to DRGN. We observed significantly elevated levels of cleaved CASP2 (C-CASP2), compared to cleaved caspase-3 (C-CASP3), within TUNEL+DRGN and DRG glia (satellite and Schwann cells) after SN transection. A serum withdrawal cell culture model, which induced 40% apoptotic death in DRGN and 60% in glia, was used to model DRGN loss after neurotrophic factor withdrawal. Elevated C-CASP2 and TUNEL were observed in both DRGN and DRG glia, with C-CASP2 localisation shifting from the cytosol to the nucleus, a required step for induction of direct CASP2-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated downregulation of CASP2 protected 50% of DRGN from apoptosis after serum withdrawal, while downregulation of CASP3 had no effect on DRGN or DRG glia survival. We conclude that CASP2 orchestrates the death of SN-axotomised DRGN directly and also indirectly through loss of DRG glia and their local neurotrophic factor support. Accordingly, inhibiting CASP2 expression is a potential therapy for improving both the SN regeneration response and peripheral sensory recovery. PMID:23451279

  3. Dorsal root ganglion-derived Schwann cells combined with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduits for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Qu, Wei; Wu, Yuxuan; Ma, Hao; Jiang, Huajun

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cells, nerve regeneration promoters in peripheral nerve tissue engineering, can be used to repair both the peripheral and central nervous systems. However, isolation and purification of Schwann cells are complicated by contamination with fibroblasts. Current reported measures are mainly limited by either high cost or complicated procedures with low cell yields or purity. In this study, we collected dorsal root ganglia from neonatal rats from which we obtained highly purified Schwann cells using serum-free melanocyte culture medium. The purity of Schwann cells (> 95%) using our method was higher than that using standard medium containing fetal bovine serum. The obtained Schwann cells were implanted into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Results showed that axonal diameter and area were significantly increased and motor functions were obviously improved in the rat sciatic nerve tissue. Experimental findings suggest that serum-free melanocyte culture medium is conducive to purify Schwann cells and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan nerve conduits combined with Schwann cells contribute to restore sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25598778

  4. MicroRNA 146a locally mediates distal axonal growth of dorsal root ganglia neurons under high glucose and sildenafil conditions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Longfei; Wang, Lei; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Szalad, Alexandra; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-08-01

    Axonal loss contributes to induction of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, ameliorates neurological dysfunction in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. However, the direct effect of high glucose and sildenafil on axonal growth has not been extensively investigated. Using rat primary dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons cultured in a microfluidic chamber, we investigated the effect of axonal application of high glucose and sildenafil on distal axonal growth. We found that axonal, but not cell body, application of high glucose locally inhibited distal axonal growth. However, axonal application of sildenafil overcame high glucose-reduced axonal growth. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis of distal axonal samples revealed that high glucose reduced axonal miR-146a levels and substantially increased miR-146a target genes, IRAK1 and TRAF6 in the axon. In contrast, sildenafil significantly reversed high glucose-reduced miR-146a levels and high glucose-increased IRAK1 and TRAF6. Gain- and loss-of function of miR-146a in DRG neurons revealed that miR-146a mediated the local effect of high glucose on the distal axonal growth. These in vitro data provide new insights into molecular mechanisms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27167084

  5. Effects of serum immunoglobulins from patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) on depolarisation-induced calcium transients in isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Joanne M; Dharmalingam, Backialakshmi; Marsh, Stephen J; Thompson, Victoria; Goebel, Andreas; Brown, David A

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is thought to have an auto-immune component. One such target recently proposed from the effects of auto-immune IgGs on Ca(2+) transients in cardiac myocytes and cell lines is the α1-adrenoceptor. We have tested whether such IgGs exerted comparable effects on nociceptive sensory neurons isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia. Depolarisation-induced [Ca(2+)]i transients were generated by applying 30 mM KCl for 2 min and monitored by Fura-2 fluorescence imaging. No IgGs tested (including 3 from CRPS patients) had any significant effect on these [Ca(2+)]i transients. However, IgG from one CRPS patient consistently and significantly reduced the K(+)-induced response of cells that had been pre-incubated for 24h with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (1 μM histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and PGE2). Since this pre-incubation also appeared to induce a comparable inhibitory response to the α1-agonist phenylephrine, this is compatible with the α1-adrenoceptor as a target for CRPS auto-immunity. A mechanism whereby this might enhance pain is suggested. PMID:26708558

  6. An investigation of herpes simplex virus type 1 latency in a novel mouse dorsal root ganglion model suggests a role for ICP34.5 in reactivation.

    PubMed

    Mattila, R K; Harila, K; Kangas, S M; Paavilainen, H; Heape, A M; Mohr, I J; Hukkanen, V

    2015-08-01

    After a primary lytic infection at the epithelia, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) enters the innervating sensory neurons and translocates to the nucleus, where it establishes a quiescent latent infection. Periodically, the virus can reactivate and the progeny viruses spread back to the epithelium. Here, we introduce an embryonic mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) culture system, which can be used to study the mechanisms that control the establishment, maintenance and reactivation from latency. Use of acyclovir is not necessary in our model. We examined different phases of the HSV-1 life cycle in DRG neurons, and showed that WT HSV-1 could establish both lytic and latent form of infection in the cells. After reactivating stimulus, the WT viruses showed all markers of true reactivation. In addition, we showed that deletion of the γ(1)34.5 gene rendered the virus incapable of reactivation, even though the virus was clearly able to replicate and persist in a quiescent form in the DRG neurons. PMID:25854552

  7. The Venom of the Spider Selenocosmia Jiafu Contains Various Neurotoxins Acting on Voltage-Gated Ion Channels in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaotun; Zhou, Xi; Chen, Jia; Tang, Cheng; Xiao, Zhen; Ying, Dazhong; Liu, Zhonghua; Liang, Songping

    2014-01-01

    Selenocosmia jiafu is a medium-sized theraphosid spider and an attractive source of venom, because it can be bred in captivity and it produces large amounts of venom. We performed reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analyses and showed that S. jiafu venom contains hundreds of peptides with a predominant mass of 3000–4500 Da. Patch clamp analyses indicated that the venom could inhibit voltage-gated Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The venom exhibited inhibitory effects on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na+ currents and T-type Ca2+ currents, suggesting the presence of antagonists to both channel types and providing a valuable tool for the investigation of these channels and for drug development. Intra-abdominal injection of the venom had severe toxic effects on cockroaches and caused death at higher concentrations. The LD50 was 84.24 μg/g of body weight in the cockroach. However, no visible symptoms or behavioral changes were detected after intraperitoneal injection of the venom into mice even at doses up to 10 mg/kg body weight. Our results provide a basis for further case-by-case investigations of peptide toxins from this venom. PMID:24603666

  8. Alterations of (/sup 3/H)actinomycin D binding to axotomized dorsal root ganglion cell nuclei: an autoradiographic method to detect changes in chromatin structure and RNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.R.

    1984-11-01

    An autoradiographic method was developed to quantify on a comparative basis the binding of (/sup 3/H)actinomycin D (Act D) to the cell nuclei of frozen, unfixed sections of spinal sensory ganglia in rats. After a crush lesion of the sciatic nerve, alterations of (/sup 3/H)Act D binding were found in L5 and L6 dorsal root ganglia which corresponded to changes in RNA synthesis observed in other studies. An increase in Act D binding was seen at 1 to 3 days postoperation, followed by a decrease at 5 to 7 days. By 9 to 11 days a second increase in binding occurred, followed by a decrease at 14 days. Contralateral ganglia exhibited an increase in Act D binding only at 5 days compared with unoperated controls. The timing of the response in axotomized ganglia differed with the distance of the lesion from the cell body. The observed patterns of Act D binding confirm that changes of chromatin structure are closely associated with the alterations of RNA and protein synthesis occurring after axon injury. The method may be useful as an indicator for alterations in RNA synthesis related to changes in chromatin structure in complex tissues.

  9. Amitriptyline Activates TrkA to Aid Neuronal Growth and Attenuate Anesthesia-Induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaochun; Chen, Feng; Zheng, Ting; Huang, Fengyi; Chen, Jianghu; Tu, Wenshao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (AM) has been shown to exert neurotrophic activity on neurons. We thus explored whether AM may aid the neuronal development and protect anesthesia-induced neuro-injury in young spinal cord dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The DRG explants were prepared from 1-day-old rats. The effect of AM on aiding DRG neural development was examined by immunohistochemistry at dose-dependent manner. AM-induced changes in gene and protein expressions, and also phosphorylation states of tyrosine kinases receptor A (TrkA) and B (TrkB) in DRG, were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The effect of AM on attenuating lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration was examined by immunohistochemistry, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TrkA/B down-regulation. Amitriptyline stimulated DRG neuronal development in dose-dependent manner, but exerted toxic effect at concentrations higher than 10 M. AM activated TrkA in DRG through phosphorylation, whereas it had little effect on TrkB-signaling pathway. AM reduced lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration by regenerating neurites and growth cones. Moreover, the neuroprotection of AM on lidocaine-injured neurodegeneration was blocked by siRNA-mediated TrkA down-regulation, but not by TrkB down-regulation. Amitriptyline facilitated neuronal development and had protective effect on lidocaine-induced neurodegeneration, very likely through the activation of TrkA-signaling pathway in DRG. PMID:27149473

  10. Reconstructing Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorgorio, Nuria; Planas, Nuria

    2005-01-01

    Starting from the constructs "cultural scripts" and "social representations", and on the basis of the empirical research we have been developing until now, we revisit the construct norms from a sociocultural perspective. Norms, both sociomathematical norms and norms of the mathematical practice, as cultural scripts influenced by social…

  11. Enhanced Excitability of Primary Sensory Neurons and Altered Gene Expression of Neuronal Ion Channels in Dorsal Root Ganglion in Paclitaxel-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy after paclitaxel treatment is not well understood. Given the poor penetration of paclitaxel into central nervous system, peripheral nervous system is most at risk. Methods Intrinsic membrane properties of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were studied by intracellular recordings. Multiple-gene real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction array was used to investigate gene expression of DRG neuronal ion channels. Results Paclitaxel increased the incidence of spontaneous activity from 4.8% to 27.1% in large and from 0% to 33.3% in medium-sized neurons. Paclitaxel decreased the rheobase (nA) from 1.6 ± 0.1 to 0.8 ± 0.1 in large, from 1.5 ± 0.2 to 0.6 ± 0.1 in medium-sized, and from 1.6 ± 0.2 to 1.0 ± 0.1 in small neurons. After paclitaxel, other characteristics of membrane properties in each group remained the same except that Aδ neurons showed shorter action potential fall time (ms) (1.0 ± 0.2, n = 10 vs. 1.8 ± 0.3, n = 9, paclitaxel vs. vehicle). Meanwhile, real-time polymerase chain reaction array revealed an alteration in expression of some neuronal ion channel genes including upregulation of HCN1 (fold change 1.76 ± 0.06) and Nav1.7 (1.26 ± 0.02) and downregulation of Kir channels (Kir1.1, 0.73 ± 0.05, Kir3.4, 0.66 ± 0.06) in paclitaxel-treated animals. Conclusions The increased neuronal excitability and the changes in gene expression of some neuronal ion channels in DRG may provide insight into the molecular and cellular basis of paclitaxel neuropathy, which may lead to novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24534904

  12. Oxytocin-induced membrane hyperpolarization in pain-sensitive dorsal root ganglia neurons mediated by Ca(2+)/nNOS/NO/KATP pathway.

    PubMed

    Gong, L; Gao, F; Li, J; Li, J; Yu, X; Ma, X; Zheng, W; Cui, S; Liu, K; Zhang, M; Kunze, W; Liu, C Y

    2015-03-19

    Oxytocin (OT) plays an important role in pain modulation and antinociception in the central nervous system. However, little is known about its peripheral effects. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of OT on the electrical properties of neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the underlying mechanisms. DRG neurons from adult rats were acutely dissociated and cultured. Intracellular Ca(2+) was determined by fluorescent microscopy using an indicator dye. The electrical properties of DRG neurons were tested by patch-clamp recording. The oxytocin receptor (OTR) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) on DRG neurons were assessed with immunofluorescence assays. OTR co-localized with nNOS in most of Isolectin B4 (IB4)-binding cultured DRG neurons in rats. OT decreased the excitability, increased the outward current, and evoked the membrane hyperpolarization in cultured DRG neurons. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), the donor of nitric oxide (NO), exerted similar effects as OT on the membrane potential of cultured DRG neurons. OT increased the production of NO in DRGs and cultured DRG neurons. Pre-treatment of the OTR antagonist atosiban or the selective nNOS inhibitor N-Propyl-l-arginine (NPLA) significantly attenuated the hyperpolarization effect evoked by OT. OT produced a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) in DRG neurons that responds to capsaicin, which can be attenuated by atosiban, but not by NPLA. OT-evoked membrane hyperpolarization and increase of outward current were distinctly attenuated by glibenclamide, a blocker of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel. OT might be an endogenous antinociceptive agent and the peripheral antinociceptive effects of OT are mediated by activation of the Ca(2+)/nNOS/NO/KATP pathway in DRG neurons. PMID:25617653

  13. Changes in the expression of IL-6-Mediated MicroRNAs in the dorsal root ganglion under neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Hori, Naosuke; Narita, Michiko; Yamashita, Akira; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Hamada, Yusuke; Kondo, Takashige; Watanabe, Moe; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kawata, Miho; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Inada, Eiichi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Iseki, Masako; Mori, Tomohisa; Narita, Minoru

    2016-08-01

    A multiplex analysis for profiling the expression of candidate microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small noncoding RNAs that function as key post-transcriptional regulators, may lead to a better understanding of the complex machinery of neuropathic pain. In the present study, we performed a miRNA array analysis using tissues of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), a primary site for pain processing, obtained from mice with partial sciatic nerve ligation. Among 1135 total miRNAs, 26 miRNAs showed up-regulation (more than 2-fold change) and only 4 miRNAs showed down-regulation (less than 0.5-fold change) in the DRG of nerve-ligated mice. In a RT-qPCR assay, the levels of miR-21, miR-431, and miR-511-3p were significantly increased on the ipsilateral side of the DRG from 3 to 7 days after sciatic nerve ligation. These elevations were almost absent in IL-6 knockout mice. Furthermore, the expression level of miR-21, but not those of miR-431 or miR511-3p, was significantly increased in exosomes extracted from blood of nerve-ligated mice. These findings suggest that the increased expression of IL-6-regulated miR-21, miR-431, and miR-511-3p in the DRG and increased exosomal miR-21 extracted from blood after sciatic nerve ligation may play at least a partial role in neuropathic pain. Synapse 70:317-324, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990296

  14. Evaluation of the synuclein-γ (SNCG) gene as a PPARγ target in murine adipocytes, dorsal root ganglia somatosensory neurons, and human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Tamara N; Akiyama, Tasuku; Lee, Hyun Woo; Kim, Jae Bum; Knotts, Trina A; Smith, Steven R; Sears, Dorothy D; Carstens, Earl; Adams, Sean H

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence in adipocytes points to a role for synuclein-γ in metabolism and lipid droplet dynamics, but interestingly this factor is also robustly expressed in peripheral neurons. Specific regulation of the synuclein-γ gene (Sncg) by PPARγ requires further evaluation, especially in peripheral neurons, prompting us to test if Sncg is a bona fide PPARγ target in murine adipocytes and peripheral somatosensory neurons derived from the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Sncg mRNA was decreased in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (~68%) by rosiglitazone, and this effect was diminished by the PPARγ antagonist T0070907. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed PPARγ protein binding at two promoter sequences of Sncg during 3T3-L1 adipogenesis. Rosiglitazone did not affect Sncg mRNA expression in murine cultured DRG neurons. In subcutaneous human WAT samples from two cohorts treated with pioglitazone (>11 wks), SNCG mRNA expression was reduced, albeit highly variable and most evident in type 2 diabetes. Leptin (Lep) expression, thought to be coordinately-regulated with Sncg based on correlations in human adipose tissue, was also reduced in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by rosiglitazone. However, Lep was unaffected by PPARγ antagonist, and the LXR agonist T0901317 significantly reduced Lep expression (~64%) while not impacting Sncg. The results support the concept that synuclein-γ shares some, but not all, gene regulators with leptin and is a PPARγ target in adipocytes but not DRG neurons. Regulation of synuclein-γ by cues such as PPARγ agonism in adipocytes is logical based on recent evidence for an important role for synuclein-γ in the maintenance and dynamics of adipocyte lipid droplets. PMID:25756178

  15. Demethylation regulation of BDNF gene expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons is implicated in opioid-induced pain hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yu-Chieh; Xie, Fang; Li, Xueyang; Guo, Ruijuan; Yang, Ning; Zhang, Chen; Shi, Rong; Guan, Yun; Yue, Yun; Wang, Yun

    2016-07-01

    Repeated administration of morphine may result in opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), which involves altered expression of numerous genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Yet, it remains unclear how BDNF expression is increased in DRG neurons after repeated morphine treatment. DNA methylation is an important mechanism of epigenetic control of gene expression. In the current study, we hypothesized that the demethylation regulation of certain BDNF gene promoters in DRG neurons may contribute to the development of OIH. Real-time RT-PCR was used to assess changes in the mRNA transcription levels of major BDNF exons including exon I, II, IV, VI, as well as total BDNF mRNA in DRGs from rats after repeated morphine administration. The levels of exon IV and total BDNF mRNA were significantly upregulated by repeated morphine administration, as compared to that in saline control group. Further, ELISA array and immunocytochemistry study revealed a robust upregulation of BDNF protein expression in DRG neurons after repeated morphine exposure. Correspondingly, the methylation levels of BDNF exon IV promoter showed a significant downregulation by morphine treatment. Importantly, intrathecal administration of a BDNF antibody, but not control IgG, significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity that developed in rats after repeated morphine treatment. Conversely, intrathecal administration of an inhibitor of DNA methylation, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) markedly upregulated the BDNF protein expression in DRG neurons and enhanced the mechanical allodynia after repeated morphine exposure. Together, our findings suggest that demethylation regulation of BDNF gene promoter may be implicated in the development of OIH through epigenetic control of BDNF expression in DRG neurons. PMID:26970395

  16. Role of nuclear factor-κB in oxidative stress associated with rabies virus infection of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kammouni, Wafa; Hasan, Leena; Saleh, Ali; Wood, Heidi; Fernyhough, Paul; Jackson, Alan C

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies in an experimental model of rabies showed major structural changes in the brain involving neuronal processes that are associated with severe clinical disease. Cultured adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons infected with the challenge virus standard-11 strain of rabies virus (CVS) showed axonal swellings and immunostaining for 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), indicating evidence of lipid peroxidation associated with oxidative stress and reduced axonal growth compared to that of mock-infected DRG neurons. We have evaluated whether nuclear factor (NF)-κB might act as a critical bridge linking CVS infection and oxidative stress. On Western immunoblotting, CVS infection induced expression of the NF-κB p50 subunit compared to that of mock infection. Ciliary neurotrophic factor, a potent activator of NF-κB, had no effect on mock-infected rat DRG neurons and reduced the number of 4-HNE-labeled puncta. SN50, a peptide inhibitor of NF-κB, and CVS infection had an additive effect in producing axonal swellings, indicating that NF-κB is neuroprotective. The fluorescent signal for subunit p50 was quantitatively evaluated in the nucleus and cytoplasm of mock- and CVS-infected rat DRG neurons. At 24 h postinfection (p.i.), there was a significant increase in the nucleus/cytoplasm ratio, indicating increased transcriptional activity of NF-κB, perhaps as a response to stress. At both 48 and 72 h p.i., there was significantly reduced nuclear localization of NF-κB. CVS infection may induce oxidative stress by inhibiting nuclear activation of NF-κB. A rabies virus protein may directly inhibit NF-κB activity. Further investigations are needed to gain a better understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in the oxidative damage associated with rabies virus infection. PMID:22623795

  17. Localization of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase in rat dorsal root ganglion cells and its regulation after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lever, Isobel J; Robinson, Michelle; Cibelli, Mario; Paule, Cleoper; Santha, Peter; Yee, Louis; Hunt, Stephen P; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Elphick, Maurice R; Nagy, Istvan; Rice, Andrew S C

    2009-03-25

    Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a degradative enzyme for a group of endogenous signaling lipids that includes anandamide (AEA). AEA acts as an endocannabinoid and an endovanilloid by activating cannabinoid and vanilloid type 1 transient receptor potential (TRPV1) receptors, respectively, on dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. Inhibition of FAAH activity increases AEA concentrations in nervous tissue and reduces sensory hypersensitivity in animal pain models. Using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate the location of the FAAH in adult rat DRG, sciatic nerve, and spinal cord. In naive rats, FAAH immunoreactivity localized to the soma of 32.7 +/- 0.8% of neurons in L4 and L5 DRG. These were small-sized (mean soma area, 395.96 +/- 5.6 mum(2)) and predominantly colabeled with peripherin and isolectin B4 markers of unmyelinated C-fiber neurons; 68% colabeled with antibodies to TRPV1 (marker of nociceptive DRG neurons), and <2% colabeled with NF200 (marker of large myelinated neurons). FAAH-IR was also present in small, NF200-negative cultured rat DRG neurons. Incubation of these cultures with the FAAH inhibitor URB597 increased AEA-evoked cobalt uptake in a capsazepine-sensitive manner. After sciatic nerve axotomy, there was a rightward shift in the cell-size distribution of FAAH-immunoreactive (IR) DRG neurons ipsilateral to injury: FAAH immunoreactivity was detected in larger-sized cells that colabeled with NF200. An ipsilateral versus contralateral increase in both the size and proportion of FAAH-IR DRG occurred after spinal nerve transection injury but not after chronic inflammation of the rat hindpaw 2 d after injection of complete Freund's adjuvant. This study reveals the location of FAAH in neural tissue involved in peripheral nociceptive transmission. PMID:19321773

  18. Activation of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in rat dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord contributes toward induction and maintenance of bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gui-Qin; Liu, Su; He, Duan-Duan; Liu, Yue-Peng; Song, Xue-Jun

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) signaling in the development of bone cancer pain in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (N=48) were divided randomly into four groups: sham (n=8), tumor cell implantation (TCI) (n=16), TCI+saline (n=8), and TCI+PKA inhibitor (n=16). Bone cancer-induced pain behaviors - thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia - were tested at postoperative days -3, -1, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14. A PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMPS (1 mmol/l/20 μl), was injected intrathecally on postoperative days 3, 4, and 5 (early phase) or 7, 8, and 9 postoperative days (late phase). The expression of PKA mRNA in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was detected by reverse transcription-PCR. The concentration of cAMP and activity of PKA in DRG and spinal cord were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TCI treatment induced significant pain behaviors, manifested as thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Spinal administration of the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMPS during the early phase and late phase significantly delayed or reversed, respectively, TCI-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. TCI treatment also led to obvious tumor growth and bone destruction. The level of PKA mRNA in the DRG, as well as the concentration of cAMP and the activity of PKA, in both the DRG and spinal cord were significantly increased after TCI treatment (P<0.01). We conclude that the inhibition of the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway may reduce bone cancer pain. PMID:24978483

  19. Microstimulation of primary afferent neurons in the L7 dorsal root ganglia using multielectrode arrays in anesthetized cats: thresholds and recruitment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, R. A.; Hokanson, J. A.; Weber, D. J.

    2009-10-01

    Current research in motor neural prosthetics has focused primarily on issues related to the extraction of motor command signals from the brain (e.g. brain-machine interfaces) to direct the motion of prosthetic limbs. Patients using these types of systems could benefit from a somatosensory neural interface that conveys natural tactile and kinesthetic sensations for the prosthesis. Electrical microstimulation within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has been proposed as one method to accomplish this, yet little is known about the recruitment properties of electrical microstimulation in activating nerve fibers in this structure. Current-controlled microstimulation pulses in the range of 1-15 µA (200 µs, leading cathodic pulse) were delivered to the L7 DRG in four anesthetized cats using penetrating microelectrode arrays. Evoked responses and their corresponding conduction velocities (CVs) were measured in the sciatic nerve with a 5-pole nerve cuff electrode arranged as two adjacent tripoles. It was found that in 76% of the 69 electrodes tested, the stimulus threshold was less than or equal to 3 µA, with the lowest recorded threshold being 1.1 µA. The CVs of afferents recruited at threshold had a bimodal distribution with peaks at 70 m s-1 and 85 m s-1. In 53% of cases, the CV of the response at threshold was slower (i.e. smaller diameter fiber) than the CVs of responses observed at increasing stimulation amplitudes. In summary, we found that microstimulation applied through penetrating microelectrodes in the DRG provides selective recruitment of afferent fibers from a range of sensory modalities (as identified by CVs) at very low stimulation intensities. We conclude that the DRG may serve as an attractive location from which to introduce surrogate somatosensory feedback into the nervous system.

  20. Long-Term Activation of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Increases Functional TRPV1-Expressing Neurons in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Masuoka, Takayoshi; Kudo, Makiko; Yoshida, Junko; Ishibashi, Takaharu; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Kato, Nobuo; Imaizumi, Noriko; Nishio, Matomo

    2016-01-01

    Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h) treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG) increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC), a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia. PMID:27064319

  1. Transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3) is required for IgG immune complex-induced excitation of the rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Lintao; Li, Yumei; Pan, Xinghua; Zhang, Pu; LaMotte, Robert H.; Ma, Chao

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain may accompany immune-related disorders with an elevated level of serum IgG immune complex (IgG-IC) but the underlying mechanisms are obscure. We previously demonstrated that IgG-IC directly excited a subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons through the neuronal Fc-gamma receptor I (FcγRI). This might be a mechanism linking IgG-IC to pain and hyperalgesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways and transduction channels activated downstream of IgG-IC and FcγRI. In whole-cell recordings, IgG-IC induced a non-selective cation current (IIC) in the rat DRG neurons, carried by Ca2+ and Na+. The IIC was potentiated or attenuated by respectively lowering or increasing the intracellular Ca2+ buffering capacity, suggesting that this current was regulated by intracellular calcium. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed that transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3) mRNA was always coexpressed with FcγRI mRNA in the same DRG neuron. Moreover, ruthenium red (a general TRP channel blocker), BTP2 (a general TRPC channel inhibitor) or pyrazole-3 (a selective TRPC3 blocker), each potently inhibited the IIC. Specific knockdown of TRPC3 using small interfering RNA attenuated the IgG-IC-induced Ca2+ response and the IIC. Additionally, the IIC was blocked by the tyrosine kinase Syk inhibitor OXSI-2, the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor neomycin, or either the IP3 receptor antagonist 2-aminoethyldiphenylborinate or heparin. These results indicated that the activation of neuronal FcγRI triggers TRPC channels through the Syk-PLC-IP3 pathway, and that TRPC3 is a key molecular target for the excitatory effect of IgG-IC on DRG neurons. PMID:22787041

  2. Preferred recycling pathway by internalized PGE2 EP4 receptor following agonist stimulation in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to enhanced EP4 receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2016-06-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator abundantly produced in injured tissues, sensitizes nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) through its four EP receptors (EP1-4). Our prior study showed that PGE2 or EP4 agonist stimulates EP4 externalization and this event was not only suppressed by the inhibitor of anterograde export, but also by the recycling inhibitor (St-Jacques and Ma, 2013). These data suggest that EP4 recycling also contributes to agonist-enhanced EP4 surface abundance. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using antibody-feeding-based internalization assay, recycling assay and FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We observed that selective EP4 agonist 1-hydroxy-PGE1 (1-OH-PGE1) or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 internalization in cultured DRG neuron. Internalized EP4 was predominantly localized in the early endosomes and recycling endosomes, but rarely in the late endosomes and lysosomes. These observations were confirmed by FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We further revealed that 1-OH-PGE1 or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 recycling. Double exposures to 1-OH-PGE1 induced a greater increase in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release than a single exposure or vehicle exposure, an event blocked by pre-treatment with the recycling inhibitor monensin. Our data suggest that EP4 recycling contributes to agonist-induced cell surface abundance and consequently enhanced receptor sensitivity. Facilitating EP4 externalization and recycling is a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-induced nociceptor sensitization. PMID:27060485

  3. Efficient retrograde transport of adeno-associated virus type 8 to spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion after vector delivery in muscle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Li, Juan; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Zhang, Cheng; Xiao, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS), including peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglion (DRG), is involved in numerous neurological disorders, such as peripheral neuropathies (diabetic neuropathy, chronic pain, etc.) and demyelination diseases (multiple sclerosis, congenital muscular dystrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, etc.). Effective clinical interventions for those diseases are very limited. Gene therapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy for the PNS diseases, especially with simply and minimally invasive delivery methods. Previously, we have shown that adeno-associated virus type 8 (AAV8) can efficiently transduce muscles body wide by a simple intraperitoneal injection in neonatal mice. In this study, we investigated the capacity of AAV8 in transducing PNS in neonatal mice by intraperitoneal injection and also in adult mice by intramuscular injection. Efficient and long-term gene transfer was found in the white matter of the spinal cord, DRG neurons, and peripheral nerves in both groups, treated either as neonates or as adults, particularly neonates. In the adult mice injected with AAV8 in tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles in one of the hind legs, more neurons were transduced in the lower part of the spinal cord than in the upper part; the DRG neurons were transduced more on the vector-injected side than in the contralateral uninjected side. Few cells in the gray matter of the spinal cord were transduced regardless of the delivery methods and age of the mice. These results support the mechanism of vector retrograde transport and suggest that AAV8 crosses blood-nerve barrier poorly. Our finding should have important implications in gene therapy for peripheral neurological disorders. PMID:19719401

  4. Functional up-regulation of Nav1.8 sodium channel on dorsal root ganglia neurons contributes to the induction of scorpion sting pain.

    PubMed

    Ye, Pin; Hua, Liming; Jiao, Yunlu; Li, Zhenwei; Qin, Shichao; Fu, Jin; Jiang, Feng; Liu, Tong; Ji, Yonghua

    2016-02-01

    BmK I, purified from the venom of scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch (BmK), is a receptor site-3-specific modulator of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and can induce pain-related behaviors in rats. The tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channel Nav1.8 contributes to most of the sodium current underlying the action potential upstroke in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and may serve as a critical ion channel targeted by BmK I. Herein, using electrophysiological, molecular, and behavioral approaches, we investigated whether the aberrant expression of Nav1.8 in DRG contributes to generation of pain induced by BmK I. The expression of Nav1.8 was found to be significantly increased at both mRNA and protein levels following intraplantar injection of BmK I in rats. In addition, the current density of TTX-R Nav1.8 sodium channel is significantly increased and the gating kinetics of Nav1.8 is also altered in DRG neurons from BmK I-treated rats. Furthermore, spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia induced by BmK I, are significantly alleviated through either blockade of the Nav1.8 sodium channel by its selective blocker A-803467 or knockdown of the Nav1.8 expression in DRG by antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-ODN) targeting Nav1.8 in rats. Finally, BmK I was shown to induce enhanced pain behaviors in complete freund's adjuvant (CFA)-inflamed rats, which was partly due to the over-expression of Nav1.8 in DRG. Our results suggest that functional up-regulation of Nav1.8 channel on DRG neurons contributes to the development of BmK I-induced pain in rats. PMID:26764239

  5. Increased expression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 within dorsal root ganglia in a rat model of bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fang; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Yuan, Weixiu; Mi, Weidong

    2014-08-20

    In an attempt to investigate the underlying mechanisms of cancer-induced bone pain, we investigated the presence of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in an animal model of bone cancer pain. Forty-five female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups: sham-operation group (sham), cancer-bearing animals killed after 7 days (C7), and cancer-bearing animals killed after 14 days (C14). After establishment of the bone cancer pain model, pain-related behavioral tests were performed to determine the paw withdrawal threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Reverse transcription-PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence were used to determine mRNA and protein expression of ASIC3 in ipsilateral and contralateral lumbar 4-5 DRG neurons. Compared with the sham group, paw withdrawal threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in the C14 group showed a significant decrease (P<0.01) from postoperation day 7 to the termination of the experiment. Compared with the sham group, the ipsilateral but not contralateral mRNA of ASIC3 was upregulated in the C14 group. Meanwhile, the ipsilateral protein expression of ASIC3 was increased in the C7 and C14 group compared with the sham group. Double-labeled immunofluorescence showed that ASIC3 and isolectin-B4 (IB4)-colocalized small DRG neurons in the C14 group were more than that in the sham group. Furthermore, we also found that there were more ASIC3 and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-colocalized DRG neurons in the C14 group than in the sham group. The upregulation of mRNA and protein levels of ASIC3 suggested its potential involvement in the development and maintenance of cancer-induced bone pain. PMID:25006846

  6. Evaluation of the Synuclein-γ (SNCG) Gene as a PPARγ Target in Murine Adipocytes, Dorsal Root Ganglia Somatosensory Neurons, and Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Tamara N.; Akiyama, Tasuku; Lee, Hyun Woo; Kim, Jae Bum; Knotts, Trina A.; Smith, Steven R.; Sears, Dorothy D.; Carstens, Earl; Adams, Sean H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence in adipocytes points to a role for synuclein-γ in metabolism and lipid droplet dynamics, but interestingly this factor is also robustly expressed in peripheral neurons. Specific regulation of the synuclein-γ gene (Sncg) by PPARγ requires further evaluation, especially in peripheral neurons, prompting us to test if Sncg is a bona fide PPARγ target in murine adipocytes and peripheral somatosensory neurons derived from the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Sncg mRNA was decreased in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (~68%) by rosiglitazone, and this effect was diminished by the PPARγ antagonist T0070907. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed PPARγ protein binding at two promoter sequences of Sncg during 3T3-L1 adipogenesis. Rosiglitazone did not affect Sncg mRNA expression in murine cultured DRG neurons. In subcutaneous human WAT samples from two cohorts treated with pioglitazone (>11 wks), SNCG mRNA expression was reduced, albeit highly variable and most evident in type 2 diabetes. Leptin (Lep) expression, thought to be coordinately-regulated with Sncg based on correlations in human adipose tissue, was also reduced in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by rosiglitazone. However, Lep was unaffected by PPARγ antagonist, and the LXR agonist T0901317 significantly reduced Lep expression (~64%) while not impacting Sncg. The results support the concept that synuclein-γ shares some, but not all, gene regulators with leptin and is a PPARγ target in adipocytes but not DRG neurons. Regulation of synuclein-γ by cues such as PPARγ agonism in adipocytes is logical based on recent evidence for an important role for synuclein-γ in the maintenance and dynamics of adipocyte lipid droplets. PMID:25756178

  7. Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia neurons in vitro independently of nerve growth factor supplementation or its nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, K.T.; Seabright, R.; Logan, A.; Lilly, A.J.; Khanim, F.; Bunce, C.M.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Extracellular Nm23H1 stimulates nerve growth. {yields} Extracellular Nm23H1 provides pathfinding cues to growth cones. {yields} The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NDP kinase activity. {yields} The neurotrophic activity of Nm23H1 is independent of NGF. -- Abstract: The nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase, Nm23H1, is a highly expressed during neuronal development, whilst induced over-expression in neuronal cells results in increased neurite outgrowth. Extracellular Nm23H1 affects the survival, proliferation and differentiation of non-neuronal cells. Therefore, this study has examined whether extracellular Nm23H1 regulates nerve growth. We have immobilised recombinant Nm23H1 proteins to defined locations of culture plates, which were then seeded with explants of embryonic chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or dissociated adult rat DRG neurons. The substratum-bound extracellular Nm23H1 was stimulatory for neurite outgrowth from chick DRG explants in a concentration-dependent manner. On high concentrations of Nm23H1, chick DRG neurite outgrowth was extensive and effectively limited to the location of the Nm23H1, i.e. neuronal growth cones turned away from adjacent collagen-coated substrata. Nm23H1-coated substrata also significantly enhanced rat DRG neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in comparison to collagen-coated substrata. These effects were independent of NGF supplementation. Recombinant Nm23H1 (H118F), which does not possess NDP kinase activity, exhibited the same activity as the wild-type protein. Hence, a novel neuro-stimulatory activity for extracellular Nm23H1 has been identified in vitro, which may function in developing neuronal systems.

  8. Redox Imbalance in the Peripheral Mechanism Underlying the Mirror-Image Neuropathic Pain Due to Chronic Compression of Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Lv, H; Chen, H; Xu, J J; Jiang, Y S; Shen, Y J; Zhou, S Z; Xu, H; Xiong, Y C

    2016-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, but few studies have examined the role of oxidative stress in the mirror-image neuropathic pain (MINP). The present study was to investigate the role of ROS in MINP caused by chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) (CCD) in a rat model. SD rats were randomly divided into sham group and CCD group. CCD was conducted to induce MINP. CCD rats were intraperitoneally injected with α-Phenyl-N-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) at 7 days after surgery. Paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT) was measured at -1, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after surgery in sham group and CCD group, and at 8 time points after PBN injection. Rats were sacrificed at 3 and 7 days after surgery in sham group and CCD group and at 0.5 and 2 h after PBN injection, and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, as well as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malonaldehyde (MDA) contents were determined in the contralateral DRGs. Results showed bilateral PWMT reduced significantly in sham group and CCD group, but it returned to nearly normal level in sham group. MDA content, H2O2 content and SOD activity increased significantly, while catalase activity remained unchanged in CCD rats. PBN at 100 mg/kg significantly attenuated bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia accompanied by the improvement of oxidative stress in the contralateral DRGs. Our results demonstrate that ROS produced in the contralateral DRG are involved in the pathogenesis of CCD induced MINP, and ROS scavenger may be a promising drug for the therapy of MINP. PMID:26471165

  9. Ultrastructural Visualization of Individual Tegument Protein Dissociation during Entry of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 into Human and Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Anupriya; Boadle, Ross A.; Kelly, Barbara J.; Diefenbach, Russell J.; Alam, Waafiqa; Cunningham, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) enters neurons primarily by fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell plasma membrane, leading to the release of the capsid into the cytosol. The capsid travels via microtubule-mediated retrograde transport to the nuclear membrane, where the viral DNA is released for replication in the nucleus. In the present study, the composition and kinetics of incoming HSV-1 capsids during entry and retrograde transport in axons of human fetal and dissociated rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons were examined by wide-field deconvolution microscopy and transmission immunoelectron microscopy (TIEM). We show that HSV-1 tegument proteins, including VP16, VP22, most pUL37, and some pUL36, dissociated from the incoming virions. The inner tegument proteins, including pUL36 and some pUL37, remained associated with the capsid during virus entry and transit to the nucleus in the neuronal cell body. By TIEM, a progressive loss of tegument proteins, including VP16, VP22, most pUL37, and some pUL36, was observed, with most of the tegument dissociating at the plasma membrane of the axons and the neuronal cell body. Further dissociation occurred within the axons and the cytosol as the capsids moved to the nucleus, resulting in the release of free tegument proteins, especially VP16, VP22, pUL37, and some pUL36, into the cytosol. This study elucidates ultrastructurally the composition of HSV-1 capsids that encounter the microtubules in the core of human axons and the complement of free tegument proteins released into the cytosol during virus entry. PMID:22457528

  10. Frataxin Deficiency Leads to Defects in Expression of Antioxidants and Nrf2 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia of the Friedreich's Ataxia YG8R Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yuxi; Schoenfeld, Robert A.; Hayashi, Genki; Napoli, Eleonora; Akiyama, Tasuku; Iodi Carstens, Mirela; Carstens, Earl E.; Pook, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Oxidative stress is thought to be involved in Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA), yet it has not been demonstrated in the target neurons that are first to degenerate. Using the YG8R mouse model of FRDA, microarray and neuritic growth experiments were carried out in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), the primary site of neurodegeneration in this disease. Results: YG8R hemizygous mice exhibited defects in movement, and DRG neurites had growth defects. Microarray of DRG tissue identified decreased transcripts encoding the antioxidants, including peroxiredoxins, glutaredoxins, and glutathione S-transferase, and these were confirmed by immunoblots and quantitative real-time PCR. Because the decreased gene transcripts are the known targets of the antioxidant transcription factor nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), Nrf2 expression was measured; it was significantly decreased at the transcript and protein level in both the DRG and the cerebella of the YG8R hemizygous mouse; further, frataxin expression was significantly correlated with Nrf2 expression. Functionally, in YG8R hemizygous DRG, the total glutathione levels were reduced and explanted cells were more sensitive to the thioredoxin reductase (TxnRD) inhibitor auranofin, a thiol oxidant. In cell models of FRDA, including Schwann and the DRG, frataxin deficiency caused a decreased expression of the Nrf2 protein level in the nucleus, but not a defect in its translocation from the cytosol. Further, frataxin-deficient cells had decreased enzyme activity and expression of TxnRD, which is regulated by Nrf2, and were sensitive the TxnRD inhibitor auranofin. Innovation and Conclusion: These results support a mechanistic hypothesis in which frataxin deficiency decreases Nrf2 expression in vivo, causing the sensitivity to oxidative stress in target tissues the DRG and the cerebella, which contributes to the process of neurodegeneration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1481–1493. PMID:23350650

  11. Long-Term Activation of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Increases Functional TRPV1-Expressing Neurons in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Takayoshi; Kudo, Makiko; Yoshida, Junko; Ishibashi, Takaharu; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Kato, Nobuo; Imaizumi, Noriko; Nishio, Matomo

    2016-01-01

    Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h) treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG) increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC), a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia. PMID:27064319

  12. Effects of sciatic nerve transection on glucose uptake in the presence and absence of lactate in the frog dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rigon, F; Horst, A; Kucharski, L C; Silva, R S M; Faccioni-Heuser, M C; Partata, W A

    2014-08-01

    Frogs have been used as an alternative model to study pain mechanisms because the simplicity of their nervous tissue and the phylogenetic aspect of this question. One of these models is the sciatic nerve transection (SNT), which mimics the clinical symptoms of "phantom limb", a condition that arises in humans after amputation or transverse spinal lesions. In mammals, the SNT increases glucose metabolism in the central nervous system, and the lactate generated appears to serve as an energy source for nerve cells. An answerable question is whether there is elevated glucose uptake in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after peripheral axotomy. As glucose is the major energy substrate for frog nervous tissue, and these animals accumulate lactic acid under some conditions, bullfrogs Lithobates catesbeianus were used to demonstrate the effect of SNT on DRG and spinal cord 1-[14C] 2-deoxy-D-glucose (14C-2-DG) uptake in the presence and absence of lactate. We also investigated the effect of this condition on the formation of 14CO2 from 14C-glucose and 14C-L-lactate, and plasmatic glucose and lactate levels. The 3-O-[14C] methyl-D-glucose (14C-3-OMG) uptake was used to demonstrate the steady-state tissue/medium glucose distribution ratio under these conditions. Three days after SNT, 14C-2-DG uptake increased, but 14C-3-OMG uptake remained steady. The increase in 14C-2-DG uptake was lower when lactate was added to the incubation medium. No change was found in glucose and lactate oxidation after SNT, but lactate and glucose levels in the blood were reduced. Thus, our results showed that SNT increased the glucose metabolism in the frog DRG and spinal cord. The effect of lactate on this uptake suggests that glucose is used in glycolytic pathways after SNT. PMID:25627385

  13. Long-term non-invasive interrogation of human dorsal root ganglion neuronal cultures on an integrated microfluidic multielectrode array platform.

    PubMed

    Enright, H A; Felix, S H; Fischer, N O; Mukerjee, E V; Soscia, D; Mcnerney, M; Kulp, K; Zhang, J; Page, G; Miller, P; Ghetti, A; Wheeler, E K; Pannu, S

    2016-09-21

    Scientific studies in drug development and toxicology rely heavily on animal models, which often inaccurately predict the true response for human exposure. This may lead to unanticipated adverse effects or misidentified risks that result in, for example, drug candidate elimination. The utilization of human cells and tissues for in vitro physiological platforms has become a growing area of interest to bridge this gap and to more accurately predict human responses to drugs and toxins. The effects of new drugs and toxins on the peripheral nervous system are often investigated with neurons isolated from dorsal root ganglia (DRG), typically with one-time measurement techniques such as patch clamping. Here, we report the use of our multi-electrode array (MEA) platform for long-term noninvasive assessment of human DRG cell health and function. In this study, we acquired simultaneous optical and electrophysiological measurements from primary human DRG neurons upon chemical stimulation repeatedly through day in vitro (DIV) 23. Distinct chemical signatures were noted for the cellular responses evoked by each chemical stimulus. Additionally, the cell viability and function of the human DRG neurons were consistent through DIV 23. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on long-term measurements of the cell health and function of human DRG neurons on a MEA platform. Future generations will include higher electrode numbers in customized arrangements as well as integration with different tissue types on a single device. This platform will provide a valuable testing tool for both rodent and human cells, enabling a more comprehensive risk assessment for drug candidates and toxicants. PMID:27351032

  14. Guidance of dorsal root ganglion neurites and Schwann cells by isolated Schwann cell topography on poly(dimethyl siloxane) conduits and films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Rementer, C. W.; Bruder, Jan M.; Hoffman-Kim, D.

    2011-08-01

    Biomimetic replicas of cellular topography have been utilized to direct neurite outgrowth. Here, we cultured postnatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants in the presence of Schwann cell (SC) topography to determine the influence of SC topography on neurite outgrowth. Four distinct poly(dimethyl siloxane) conduits were fabricated within which DRG explants were cultured. To determine the contribution of SC topographical features to neurite guidance, the extent of neurite outgrowth into unpatterned conduits, conduits with randomly oriented SC replicas, and conduits with SC replicas parallel or perpendicular to the conduit long axis was measured. Neurite directionality and outgrowth from DRG were also quantified on two-dimensional SC replicas with orientations corresponding to the four conduit conditions. Additionally, live SC migration and neurite extension from DRG on SC replicas were examined as a first step toward quantification of the interactions between live SC and navigating neurites on SC replicas. DRG neurite outgrowth and morphology within conduits and on two-dimensional SC replicas were directed by the underlying SC topographical features. Maximal neurite outgrowth and alignment to the underlying features were observed into parallel conduits and on parallel two-dimensional substrates, whereas the least extent of outgrowth was observed into perpendicular conduits and on perpendicular two-dimensional replica conditions. Additionally, neurites on perpendicular conditions turned to extend along the direction of underlying SC topography. Neurite outgrowth exceeded SC migration in the direction of the underlying anisotropic SC replica after two days in culture. This finding confirms the critical role that SC have in guiding neurite outgrowth and suggests that the mechanism of neurite alignment to SC replicas depends on direct contact with cellular topography. These results suggest that SC topographical replicas may be used to direct and optimize neurite

  15. Modulation of oxidative stress and Ca(2+) mobilization through TRPM2 channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neuron by Hypericum perforatum.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, M; Çiğ, B; Özgül, C

    2014-03-28

    A main component of St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum, HP) is hyperforin which has antioxidant properties in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, due to its ability to modulate NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C. Recent reports indicate that oxidative stress through NADPH oxidase activates TRPM2 channels. HP may be a useful treatment for Ca(2+) entry and oxidative stress through modulation of TRPM2 channels in the DRG. We aimed to investigate the protective role of HP on Ca(2+) entry and oxidative stress through TRPM2 channels in DRG neurons of rats. The native rat DRG neurons were used in whole-cell patch-clamp, Fura-2 and antioxidant experiments. Appropriate, nontoxic concentrations and incubation times for HP were determined in the DRG neurons by assessing cell viability. The H2O2-induced TRPM2 currents were inhibited by 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB) and N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid (ACA). TRPM2 current densities and cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration in the neurons were also reduced by HP (2 and 24h). In Fura-2 experiments, cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization was reduced by voltage-gated calcium channel blockers (verapamil+diltiazem, V+D) and HP. Glutathione peroxidase activity and GSH values in the DRG were high in HP, 2-APB and V+D groups although lipid peroxidation level was low in the groups. In conclusion, we observed a protective role for HP on Ca(2+) entry through a TRPM2 channel in the DRG neurons. Since over-production of oxidative stress and Ca(2+) entry are implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain and neuronal inflammation, our findings may be relevant to the etiology and treatment of neuropathology in DRG neurons. PMID:24434769

  16. Decreased calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in the dorsal root ganglia of TNF-deficient mice in a monoiodoacetate-induced knee osteoarthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Aya; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Go; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Nakamura, Junichi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Toyone, Tomoaki; Inoue, Gen; Suzuki, Miyako; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The detailed mechanisms of knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain have not been clarified, but involvement of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) has been suggested. The present study aimed to investigate the more detailed neurological involvement of TNF in joint pain using a TNF-knockout mouse OA model. Methods: The right knees of twelve-week-old C57BL/6J wild and TNF-deficient knockout (TNF-ko) mice (n=15, each group) were given a single intra-articular injection of 10 µg monoiodoacetate in 10 mL sterile saline. The left knees were only punctured as the control. Evaluations were performed immediately after the injection (baseline) and at 7, 14, and 28 days after the injection with a subsequent intra-articular injection of neurotracer into both knees. The animals were evaluated for immunofluorescence of the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) innervating the knee joints. The injected knees were observed macroscopically and mouse pain-related behaviors were scored. Results: Macroscopic observation showed similar knee OA development in both wild and TNF-ko mice. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, a neuropeptide identified as a inflammatory pain-related biomarker) was significantly increased in DRG neurons innervating OA-induced knee joints with significantly less CGRP expression in TNF-ko animals. Pain-related behavior scoring showed a significant increase in pain in OA-induced joints, but there was no significant difference in pain observed between the wild and TNF-ko mice. Conclusions: The result of the present study indicates the possible association of TNF-alpha in OA pain but not OA development. PMID:26722492

  17. Expression and Regulation of Cav3.2 T-Type Calcium Channels during Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaya; Ueda, Takashi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Kumamoto, Natsuko; Shimada, Shoichi; Ugawa, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The Cav3.2 isoform of the T-type calcium channel is expressed in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and these channels contribute to nociceptive and neuropathic pain in rats. However, there are conflicting reports on the roles of these channels in pain processing in rats and mice. In addition, the function of T-type channels in persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia is poorly understood. We performed behavioral and comprehensive histochemical analyses to characterize Cav3.2-expressing DRG neurons and examined the regulation of T-type channels in DRGs from C57BL/6 mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. We show that approximately 20% of mouse DRG neurons express Cav3.2 mRNA and protein. The size of the majority of Cav3.2-positive DRG neurons (69 ± 8%) ranged from 300 to 700 μm2 in cross-sectional area and 20 to 30 μm in estimated diameter. These channels co-localized with either neurofilament-H (NF-H) or peripherin. The peripherin-positive cells also overlapped with neurons that were positive for isolectin B4 (IB4) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) but were distinct from transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-positive neurons during normal mouse states. In mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia, Cav3.2 channels, but not Cav3.1 or Cav3.3 channels, were upregulated in ipsilateral DRG neurons during the sub-acute phase. The increased Cav3.2 expression partially resulted from an increased number of Cav3.2-immunoreactive neurons; this increase in number was particularly significant for TRPV1-positive neurons. Finally, preceding and periodic intraplantar treatment with the T-type calcium channel blockers mibefradil and NNC 55-0396 markedly reduced and reversed mechanical hyperalgesia during the acute and sub-acute phases, respectively, in mice. These data suggest that Cav3.2 T-type channels participate in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia, and this channel might play an even greater

  18. Infection of human fetal dorsal root ganglion glial cells with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves an entry mechanism independent of the CD4 T4A epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Kunsch, C; Hartle, H T; Wigdahl, B

    1989-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been implicated in the generation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated neurological dysfunction, and it is believed that the presence of CD4 in the nervous system may be involved in the susceptibility of selected neural cell populations to HIV-1 infection. We previously demonstrated (B. Wigdahl, R. A. Guyton, and P. S. Sarin, Virology 159:440-445, 1987) that glial cells derived from human fetal dorsal root ganglion (DRG) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection and subsequently express at least a fraction of the virus genome. In contrast to HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes, which can be blocked by treatment with monoclonal antibodies directed against the HIV-1-binding region of CD4 (T4A epitope), treatment of human fetal DRG glial cells with similar antibodies resulted in only a slight reduction in HIV-1-specific gag antigen expression. In addition, preincubation of the HIV-1 inoculum prior to infection with HIV-1-neutralizing antiserum did not reduce HIV-1 gag antigen expression in these cells. Furthermore, we were unable to detect the synthesis or accumulation of the CD4 molecule in neural cell populations derived from DRG. However, a protected CD4-specific RNA fragment was detected in RNA isolated from human fetal DRG and spinal cord tissue by an RNase protection assay with a CD4-specific antisense RNA probe. RNA blot hybridization analysis of total cellular RNA isolated from human fetal DRG and spinal cord demonstrated specific hybridization to an RNA species that comigrated with the mature 3.0-kilobase CD4 mRNA as well as two unique CD4 RNA species with relative molecular sizes of approximately 5.3 and 6.7 kilobases. Furthermore, all three CD4-related RNA species were polyadenylated when isolated from human fetal spinal cord tissue. These data suggest that HIV-1 infection of human fetal DRG glial cells may proceed via a mechanism of viral entry independent of the T4A epitope of CD4. Images PMID:2479771

  19. TRPV1-Mediated Neuropeptide Secretion and Depressor Effects: Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Ca2+ Release Receptors in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Hui; Galligan, James J.; Wang, Donna H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study tests the hypothesis that the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-induced neuropeptide secretion and depressor response are mediated by, at least in part, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated Ca2+ release receptors, leading to increased cytosolic Ca2+ in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Methods/Results Bolus injection of capsaicin (CAP, 10 or 50 μg/kg), a selective TRPV1 agonist, into anesthetized male Wistar rats caused dose-dependent decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP, P<0.05). CAP (50 μg/kg)-induced depressor effects and increases in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels (-29±2 mmHg, 82.2±5.0 pg/ml, respectively) were abolished by a selective TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (3 mg/kg CAPZ, -4±1 mmHg, 41.8±4.4 pg/ml, P<0.01), and attenuated by a selective ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist, dantrolene (5 mg/kg, -12±1 mmHg, 57.2±2.6 pg/ml, P<0.01), but unaffected by an inhibitor of ER Ca2+-ATPase, thapsigargin (50 μg/kg TG, -30±1 mmHg, 73.8±2.3 pg/ml, P>0.05), or an antagonist of the inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (3 mg/kg 2-APB, -34±5 mmHg, 69.0±3.7 pg/ml, P>0.05). CGRP8-37 (1 mg/kg), a selective CGRP receptor antagonist, also blocked CAP-induced depressor effects. In contrast, dantrolene had no effect on CGRP (1 μg/kg)-induced depressor effects. In vitro, CAP (0.3 μM) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and CGRP release from freshly isolated sensory neurons in DRG (P<0.01), which were blocked by CAPZ (10 μM) and attenuated by dantrolene but not TG or 2-APB. Conclusion Our results indicate that TRPV1 activation triggers RyR- but not IP3R-dependent Ca2+ release from ER in DRG neurons leading to increased CGRP release and consequent depressor effects. PMID:18806620

  20. steve bAccumulation of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the uterus and dorsal root ganglia in a mouse model of adenomyosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adenomyosis is a common gynecological disease, which is accompanied by a series of immunological and neuroendocrinological changes. Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a critical role in producing pain, neural plasticity, immunocyte aggregation and release of inflammatory factors. This study aimed to investigate the expression of NGF and its two receptors in uteri and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in an adenomyosis mouse model, as well as their relationship with the severity of adenomyosis. Methods Forty newborn ICR mice were randomly divided into the adenomyosis model group and control group (n = 20 in each group). Mice in the adenomyosis model group were orally dosed with 2.7 μmol/kg tamoxifen on days 2-5 after birth. Experiments were conducted to identify the expression of NGF- beta and its receptors, tyrosine kinase receptor (trkA) and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), in the uterus and DRG in four age groups (90+/-5 d, 140+/-5 d, 190+/-5 d and 240+/-5 d; n = 5 mice in each group) by western bolt, immunochemistry and real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results Adenomyosis, which became more serious as age increased, was successfully induced in dosed ICR mice. NGF-beta, trkA and p75NTR protein levels in the uterus and trkA mRNA levels in DRG were higher in the older aged adenomyosis model group than those in controls (190+/-5 d and 240+/-5 d groups, P < 0.05). The expression of NGF-beta and its receptors in the uterus increased gradually as age increased for adenomyosis mice (190+/-5 d and 240+/-5 d, P < 0.05, compared with 90+/-5 d) but it showed little change in control mice. The mRNA level of trkA in DRG also increased as age increased in the adenomyosis model group (190+/-5 d and 240+/-5 d, P < 0.05, compared with 90+/-5 d) but was unchanged in controls. The mRNA level of p75NTR in DRG was not different between the adenomyosis and control groups and was stable from young to old mice. Conclusions NGF- beta can be used as an

  1. Diabetes enhances oxidative stress-induced TRPM2 channel activity and its control by N-acetylcysteine in rat dorsal root ganglion and brain.

    PubMed

    Sözbir, Ercan; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a sulfhydryl donor antioxidant that contributes to the regeneration of glutathione (GSH) and also scavengers via a direct reaction with free oxygen radicals. Recently, we observed a modulatory role of NAC on GSH-depleted dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells in rats. NAC may have a protective role on oxidative stress and calcium influx through regulation of the TRPM2 channel in diabetic neurons. Therefore, we investigated the effects of NAC on DRG TRPM2 channel currents and brain oxidative stress in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Thirty-six rats divided into four groups: control, STZ, NAC and STZ + NAC. Diabetes was induced in the STZ and STZ + NAC groups by intraperitoneal STZ (65 mg/kg) administration. After the induction of diabetes, rats in the NAC and STZ + NAC groups received NAC (150 mg/kg) via gastric gavage. After 2 weeks, DRG neurons and the brain cortex were freshly isolated from rats. In whole-cell patch clamp experiments, TRPM2 currents in the DRG following diabetes induction with STZ were gated by H2O2. TRPM2 channel current densities in the DRG and lipid peroxidation levels in the DRG and brain were higher in the STZ groups than in controls; however, brain GSH, GSH peroxidase (GSH-Px), vitamin C and vitamin E concentrations and DRG GSH-Px activity were decreased by diabetes. STZ + H2O2-induced TRPM2 gating was totally inhibited by NAC and partially inhibited by N-(p-amylcinnamoyl) anthranilic acid (ACA) and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB). GSH-Px activity and lipid peroxidation levels were also attenuated by NAC treatment. In conclusion, we observed a modulatory role of NAC on oxidative stress and Ca(2+) entry through the TRPM2 channel in the diabetic DRG and brain. Since excessive oxidative stress and overload Ca(2+) entry are common features of neuropathic pain, our findings are relevant to the etiology and treatment of pain neuropathology in DRG neurons. PMID:26612073

  2. Neuroprotection induced by N-acetylcysteine against cytosolic glutathione depletion-induced Ca2+ influx in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mice: role of TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, M; Ciğ, B; Ozgül, C

    2013-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) are thiol-containing antioxidants, and also act through a direct reaction with free radicals. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is the principal transduction channel serving as a polymodal detector. Despite the importance of oxidative stress in pain sensitivity, its role in TRPV1 modulation is poorly understood. NAC may also have a regulator role on TRPV1 channel activity in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron. Therefore, we tested the effects of GSH and NAC on TRPV1 channel current, Ca(2+) influx, oxidative stress and caspase activity in the DRG of mice. DRG neurons were freshly isolated from mice and the neurons were incubated for 6 and 24h with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Pretreatment of cultured DRG neurons with NAC, results in a protection against oxidative damages. This neuroprotection is associated with the attenuation of a Ca(2+) influx triggered by oxidative agents such as H2O2, 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and GSH depletion via BSO. Here, we demonstrate the contribution of cytosolic factors (related to thiol group depletion) on the activation of TRPV1 channels in this mechanism. TRPV1 channels are activated by various agents including capsaicin (CAP), the pungent component of hot chili peppers, and are blocked by capsazepine. An oxidative environment also increased CAP-evoked TRPV1 currents in the neurons. When NAC and GSH were included in the patch pipette as well as extracellularly in the chamber, TRPV1 channels were not activated by CAP and H2O2. TRPV1 inhibitors, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid strongly reduced BSO-induced oxidative toxicity and Ca(2+) influx, in a manner similar to pretreatment with NAC and GSH. Caspase-3 and -9 activities of all groups were not changed by the agonists or antagonists. In conclusion, in our experimental model, TRPV1 channels are involved in the oxidative stress-induced neuronal death, and negative modulation

  3. Hypericum perforatum Attenuates Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in the Dorsal Root Ganglion of Rats: Involvement of TRPM2 and TRPV1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Ümit Sinan; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Şenol, Nilgün; Ghazizadeh, Vahid

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress and cytosolic Ca(2+) overload have important roles on apoptosis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after spinal cord injury (SCI). Hypericum perforatum (HP) has an antioxidant property in the DRGs due to its ability to modulate NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C pathways. We aimed to investigate the protective property of HP on oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry through transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels in SCI-induced DRG neurons of rats. Rats were divided into four groups as control, HP, SCI, and SCI + HP. The HP groups received 30 mg/kg HP for three concessive days after SCI induction. The SCI-induced TRPM2 and TRPV1 currents and cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration were reduced by HP. The SCI-induced decrease in glutathione peroxidase and cell viability values were ameliorated by HP treatment, and the SCI-induced increase in apoptosis, caspase 3, caspase 9, cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization values in DRG of SCI group were overcome by HP treatment. In conclusion, we observed a protective role of HP on SCI-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 and TRPV1 in the DRG neurons. Our findings may be relevant to the etiology and treatment of SCI by HP. Graphical Abstract Possible molecular pathways of involvement of Hypericum perforatum (HP) on apoptosis, oxidative stress, and calcium accumulation through TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels in DRG neurons of SCI-induced rats. The TRPM2 channel is activated by ADP-ribose and oxidative stress through activation of ADP-ribose pyrophosphate although it was inhibited by N-(p-amylcinnamoyl) anthranilic acid (ACA) and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2APB). The TRPV1 channel is activated by oxidative stress and capsaicin and it is blocked by capsazepine. Injury in the DRG can result in augmented ROS release, leading to Ca(2+) uptake through

  4. Bilateral elevation of interleukin-6 protein and mRNA in both lumbar and cervical dorsal root ganglia following unilateral chronic compression injury of the sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current research implicates interleukin (IL)-6 as a key component of the nervous-system response to injury with various effects. Methods We used unilateral chronic constriction injury (CCI) of rat sciatic nerve as a model for neuropathic pain. Immunofluorescence, ELISA, western blotting and in situ hybridization were used to investigate bilateral changes in IL-6 protein and mRNA in both lumbar (L4-L5) and cervical (C7-C8) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) following CCI. The operated (CCI) and sham-operated (sham) rats were assessed after 1, 3, 7, and 14 days. Withdrawal thresholds for mechanical hyperalgesia and latencies for thermal hyperalgesia were measured in both ipsilateral and contralateral hind and fore paws. Results The ipsilateral hind paws of all CCI rats displayed a decreased threshold of mechanical hyperalgesia and withdrawal latency of thermal hyperalgesia, while the contralateral hind and fore paws of both sides exhibited no significant changes in mechanical or thermal sensitivity. No significant behavioral changes were found in the hind and fore paws on either side of the sham rats, except for thermal hypersensitivity, which was present bilaterally at 3 days. Unilateral CCI of the sciatic nerve induced a bilateral increase in IL-6 immunostaining in the neuronal bodies and satellite glial cells (SGC) surrounding neurons of both lumbar and cervical DRG, compared with those of naive control rats. This bilateral increase in IL-6 protein levels was confirmed by ELISA and western blotting. More intense staining for IL-6 mRNA was detected in lumbar and cervical DRG from both sides of rats following CCI. The DRG removed from sham rats displayed a similar pattern of staining for IL-6 protein and mRNA as found in naive DRG, but there was a higher staining intensity in SGC. Conclusions Bilateral elevation of IL-6 protein and mRNA is not limited to DRG homonymous to the injured nerve, but also extended to DRG that are heteronymous to the injured nerve. The

  5. Colocalization of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and T type Cav3.2 channel in dorsal root ganglia in chronic inflammatory pain mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Si-Fang; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Sun, Yan-Gang; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a neurotrophic factor and plays important roles in the nervous system. Increasing evidence supports that IGF-1 contributes to pain hypersensitivity through its insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) by activating IGF-1R/Akt or MAPK signaling pathways, whereas T-type Cav3.2 channel can facilitate and amplify pain signals originating from the sensory periphery. A recent study showed that activated IGF-1R can increase T-type Cav3.2 channel currents and further activate the G protein-dependent PKCα pathway to contribute to inflammatory pain sensitivity. However, the colocalization of IGF-1R and Cav3.2 in mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) under chronic inflammatory pain conditions remains elusive. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression of IGF-1R and the Cav3.2 channel, and their colocalization in mouse DRGs in chronic inflammatory pain condition (induced by complete Freund's adjuvant intraplanter injection) using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry approaches to confirm that Cav3.2 channel can mediate pain facilitation following IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling. We found that IGF-1R was expressed extensively in DRG neurons including small-, medium-, and large-sized neurons, whereas Cav3.2 channel was expressed exclusively in small-sized DRG neurons of naive mice. Expression of Cav3.2, but not IGF-1R, and colocalization of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R were increased in lumbar (L)4-L6 primary sensory neurons in DRGs of mice in chronic inflammatory pain. Moreover, the increased colocalization of IGF-1R and Cav3.2 is exclusively localized in small- and medium-sized primary sensory neurons. Our findings provided morphological evidence that T-type Cav3.2 channel, at least partially, mediates the pain facilitation of IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in chronic inflammatory pain condition. PMID:27213932

  6. Neuron-enriched cultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglia: establishment, characterization, survival, and neuropeptide expression in response to trophic factors.

    PubMed

    Grothe, C; Unsicker, K

    1987-01-01

    It is unknown whether adult dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons require trophic factors for their survival and maintenance of neuropeptide phenotypes. We have established and characterized neuron-enriched cultures of adult rat DRGs and investigated their responses to nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neuronotrophic factor (CNTF), pig brain extract (PBE, crude fraction of brain-derived neuronotrophic factor, BDNF), and laminin (LN). DRGs were dissected from levels C1 through L6 and dissociated and freed from myelin fragments and most satellite (S-100-immunoreactive) cells by centrifugation on Percoll and preplating. The enriched neurons, characterized by their morphology and immunoreactivity for neuron-specific enolase, constituted a population representative of the in vivo situation with regard to expression of substance P (SP), somatostatin (SOM), and cholecystokinin-8 (CCK) immunoreactivities. In the absence of trophic factors and using polyornithine (PORN) as a substratum, 60-70% of the neurons present initially (0.5 days) had died after 7 days. LN as a substratum did not prevent a 30% loss of neurons up to day 4.5, but it subsequently maintained DRG neurons at a plateau. This behavior might reflect a cotrophic effect of LN and factors provided by non-neuronal cells, whose proliferation between 4.5 and 7 days could not be prevented by addition of mitotic inhibitors of gamma-irradiation. CNTF, but not NGF, slightly enhanced survival at 7 days on either PORN or LN. No neuronal losses were found in non-enriched cultures or when enriched neurons were supplemented with PBE, indicating that non-neuronal cells and PBE provide factor(s) essential for adult DRG neuron survival. Proportions of SP-, SOM-, and CCK-immunoreactive cells were unaltered under any experimental condition, with the exception of a numerical decline in SP cells in 7-day cultures with LN, but not PORN, as the substratum. Our data, considered in the context of recent in vivo and vitro studies, suggest

  7. Peripheral prostaglandin E2 prolongs the sensitization of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons possibly by facilitating the synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking of EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2014-11-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator enriched in inflamed tissues, plays a pivotal role in the genesis of chronic pain conditions such as inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PGE2-prolonged sensitization of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) may contribute to the transition from acute to chronic pain. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that facilitating synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking of EP receptors contribute to PGE2-prolonged nociceptor sensitization. Intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of a stabilized PGE2 analog, 16,16 dimethyl PGE2 (dmPGE2), in a dose- and time-dependent manner, not only elicited primary tactile allodynia which lasted for 1d, but also prolonged tactile allodynia evoked by a subsequent i.pl. injection of dmPGE2 from 1d to 4d. Moreover, the duration of tactile allodynia was progressively prolonged following multiple sequential i.pl. injections of dmPGE2. Co-injection of the selective EP1 or EP4 receptor antagonist, the inhibitors of cAMP, PKA, PKC, PKCε or PLC as well as an interleukin-6 (IL-6) neutralizing antiserum differentially blocked primary tactile allodynia elicited by the 1st dmPGE2 and the prolonged tactile allodynia evoked by the 2nd dmPGE2, suggesting the involvement of these signaling events in dmPGE2-induced nociceptor activation and sensitization. Co-injection of a selective COX2 inhibitor or two EP4 antagonists prevented or shortened inflammagen-prolonged nociceptor sensitization. I.pl. injection of dmPGE2 or carrageenan time-dependently increased EP4 levels in L4-6 DRG neurons and peripheral nerves. EP4 was expressed in almost half of IB4-binding nociceptors of L4-6 DRG. Taken together, our data suggest that stimulating the synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking to increase EP4 availability at the axonal terminals of nociceptors is likely a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-prolonged nociceptor

  8. Pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the lumbar dorsal root ganglion in patients with chronic lumbar radicular pain: a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Shanthanna, Harsha; Chan, Philip; McChesney, James; Thabane, Lehana; Paul, James

    2014-01-01

    Background No proof of efficacy, in the form of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), exists to support pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) for chronic lumbar radicular (CLR) pain. We determined the feasibility of a larger trial (primary objective), and also explored the efficacy of PRF in decreasing pain on a visual analog scale (VAS) and improving the Oswestry Disability Index. Methods This was a single-center, placebo-controlled, triple-blinded RCT. Patients were randomized to a placebo group (needle placement) or a treatment group (PRF at 42°C for 120 seconds to the DRG). Patients were followed up for 3 months post procedure. Outcomes with regard to pain, Oswestry Disability Index score, and side effects were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. Results Over 15 months, 350 potential patients were identified and 56 were assessed for eligibility. Fifteen of them did not meet the selection criteria. Of the 41 eligible patients, 32 (78%) were recruited. One patient opted out before intervention. Three patients were lost to follow-up at 3 months. Mean VAS differences were not significantly different at 4 weeks (−0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI], −2.29, 1.57) or at 3 months (−0.76, 95% CI, −3.14, 1.61). The difference in mean Oswestry Disability Index score was also not significantly different at 4 weeks (−2%, 95% CI, −14%, 10%) or 3 months (−7%, 95% CI, −21%, 6%). There were no major side effects. Six of 16 patients in the PRF group and three of 15 in the placebo group showed a >50% decrease in VAS score. Conclusion The recruitment rate was partially successful. At 3 months, the relative success of PRF-DRG was small. A large-scale trial to establish efficacy is not practically feasible considering the small effect size, which would necessitate recruitment of a challengingly large number of participants over a number of years. Until clear parameters for application of PRF are established, clinicians will need

  9. Increased expression of HCN2 channel protein in L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons following axotomy of L5- and inflammation of L4-spinal nerves in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, T; Al Otaibi, M; Sathish, J; Djouhri, L

    2015-06-01

    A hallmark of peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) is chronic spontaneous pain and/or hypersensitivity to normally painful stimuli (hyperalgesia) or normally nonpainful stimuli (allodynia).This pain results partly from abnormal hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We have previously shown, using a modified version of the lumbar 5 (L5)-spinal nerve ligation model of PNP (mSNA model involving L5-spinal nerve axotomy plus loose ligation of the lumbar 4 (L4)-spinal nerve with neuroinflammation-inducing chromic-gut), that L4 DRG neurons exhibit increased spontaneous activity, the key characteristic of neuronal hyperexcitability. The underlying ionic and molecular mechanisms of the hyperexcitability of L4 DRG neurons are incompletely understood, but could result from changes in expression and/or function of ion channels including hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which are active near the neuron's resting membrane potential, and which produce an excitatory inward current that depolarizes the membrane potential toward the threshold of action potential generation. Therefore, in the present study we used the mSNA model to investigate whether: (a) expression of HCN1-HCN3 channels is altered in L4 DRG neurons which, in the mSNA model, are essential for transmission of the evoked pain, and which contribute to chronic spontaneous pain, and (b) local (intraplantar) blockade of these HCN channels, with a specific blocker, ZD7288, attenuates chronic spontaneous pain and/or evoked pain in mSNA rats. We found 7days after mSNA: (1) a significant increase in HCN2-immunoreactivity in small (<30μm) DRG neurons (predominantly IB4-negative neurons), and in the proportion of small neurons expressing HCN2 (putative nociceptors); (2) no significant change in HCN1- or HCN3-immunoreactivity in all cell types; and (3) attenuation, with ZD7288 (100μM intraplantar), of chronic spontaneous pain behavior (spontaneous foot lifting) and mechanical

  10. Osthole, a herbal compound, alleviates nucleus pulposus-evoked nociceptive responses through the suppression of overexpression of acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in rat dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiu-Lan; Chen, Yuling; Qin, Jian; Mo, Sui-Lin; Wei, Ming; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Li, Mei-Na; Zou, Xue-Nong; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Sun, Lai-Bao

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Osthole (Ost), a natural coumarin derivative, has been shown to inhibit many pro-inflammatory mediators and block voltage-gated Na+ channels. During inflammation, acidosis is an important pain inducer which activates nociceptors by gating depolarizing cationic channels, such as acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Ost on nucleus pulposus-evoked nociceptive responses and ASIC3 over-expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion, and to investigate the possible mechanism. Material/Methods Radicular pain was generated with application of nucleus pulposus (NP) to nerve root. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated using von Frey filaments with logarithmically incremental rigidity to calculate the 50% probability thresholds for mechanical paw withdrawal. ASIC3 protein expression in dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) was assessed with Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Membrane potential (MP) shift of DRG neurons induced by ASIC3-sensitive acid (pH6.5) was determined by DiBAC4 (3) fluorescence intensity (F.I.). Results The NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia model showed allodynia for 3 weeks, and ASIC3 expression was up-regulated in DRG neurons, reaching peak on Day 7. Epidural administration of Ost induced a remarkable and prolonged antinociceptive effect, accompanied by an inhibition of over-expressed ASIC3 protein and of abnormal shift of MP. Amiloride (Ami), an antagonist of ASIC3, strengthened the antinociceptive effect of Ost. Conclusions Up-regulation of ASIC3 expression may be associated with NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia. A single epidural injection of Ost decreased ASIC3 expression in DGR neurons and the pain in the NP-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia model. Osthole may be of great benefit for preventing chronic pain status often seen in lumbar disc herniation (LDH). PMID:22648244

  11. NORM regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  12. TRANSCRIPT EXPRESSION OF VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS IN LUMBAR DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA AND THE SPINAL CORD OF MICE – EFFECTS OF PERIPHERAL AXOTOMY OR HINDPAW INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    MALET, M.; VIEYTES, C. A.; LUNDGREN, K. H.; SEAL, R. P.; TOMASELLA, E.; SEROOGY, K. B.; HÖKFELT, T.; GEBHART, G.F.; BRUMOVSKY, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    Using specific riboprobes, we characterized the expression of VGLUT1-VGLUT3 transcripts in lumbar 4-5 (L4-5) DRGs and the thoracolumbar to lumbosacral spinal cord in male BALB/C mice after a 1- or 3-day hindpaw inflammation, or a 7-day sciatic nerve axotomy. Sham animals were also included. In sham and contralateral L4-5 DRGs of injured mice, VGLUT1-, VGLUT2- and VGLUT3 mRNAs were expressed in ~45%, ~69% or ~17% of neuron profiles (NPs), respectively. VGLUT1 was expressed in large and medium-sized NPs, VGLUT2 in NPs of all sizes, and VGLUT3 in small and medium-sized NPs. In the spinal cord, VGLUT1 was restricted to a number of NPs at thoracolumbar and lumbar segments, in what appears to be the dorsal nucleus of Clarke, and in mid laminae III-IV. In contrast, VGLUT2 was present in numerous NPs at all analyzed spinal segments, except the lateral aspects of the ventral horns, especially at the lumbar enlargement, where it was virtually absent. VGLUT3 was detected in a discrete number of NPs in laminae III-IV of the dorsal horn. Axotomy resulted in a moderate decrease in the number of DRG NPs expressing VGLUT3, whereas VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 were unaffected. Likewise, the percentage of NPs expressing VGLUT transcripts remained unaltered after hindpaw inflammation, both in DRGs and the spinal cord. Altogether, these results confirm previous descriptions on VGLUTs expression in adult mice DRGs, with the exception of VGLUT1, whose protein expression was detected in a lower percentage of mouse DRG NPs. A detailed account on the location of neurons expressing VGLUTs transcripts in the adult mouse spinal cord is also presented. Finally, the lack of change in the number of neurons expressing VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 transcripts after axotomy, as compared to data on protein expression, suggests translational rather than transcriptional regulation of VGLUTs after injury. PMID:23727452

  13. Electroacupuncture Reduces Carrageenan- and CFA-Induced Inflammatory Pain Accompanied by Changing the Expression of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8, rather than Nav1.9, in Mice Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ping; Chen, Hsiang-Ni; Su, Hong-Lin; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Lai, Zhen-Rung; Lin, Yi-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Several voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) from nociceptive nerve fibers have been identified as important effectors in pain signaling. The objective of this study is to investigate the electroacupuncture (EA) analgesia mechanism by changing the expression of Navs in mice dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We injected carrageenan and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the mice plantar surface of the hind paw to induce inflammation and examined the antinociception effect of EA at the Zusanli (ST36) acupoint at 2 Hz low frequency. Mechanical hyperalgesia was evaluated by using electronic von Frey filaments, and thermal hyperalgesia was assessed using Hargreaves' test. Furthermore, we observed the expression and quality of Navs in DRG neurons. Our results showed that EA reduced mechanical and thermal pain in inflammatory animal model. The expression of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 was increased after 4 days of carrageenan- and CFA-elicited inflammatory pain and further attenuated by 2 Hz EA stimulation. The attenuation cannot be observed in Nav1.9 sodium channels. We demonstrated that EA at Zusanli (ST36) acupoint at 2 Hz low-frequency stimulation attenuated inflammatory pain accompanied by decreasing the expression of Nav1.7 and 1.8, rather than Nav1.9, sodium channels in peripheral DRG neurons. PMID:23573123

  14. Alterations of gene expression of sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons of estrogen receptor knockout (ERKO) mice induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP).

    PubMed

    Ding, Haixia; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Jingli; Qian, Wenyi; Wang, Wenjuan; Wang, Jun; Gao, Rong; Xiao, Hang

    2012-08-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) mediate the neuroprotection of estrogens against MPTP-induced striatal dopamine (DA) depletion. Pain is an important and distressing symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). Voltage-gated sodium channels in sensory neurons are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. In this study, MPTP caused changes in nociception and alterations of gene expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in ER knockout (ERKO) mice were investigated. We found that administration of MPTP (11 mg/kg) to WT mice led to an extensive depletion of DA and its two metabolites, αERKO mice were observed to be more susceptible to MPTP toxicity than βERKO or WT mice. In addition, we found that the mRNA levels of TTX-S and TTX-R sodium channel subtypes were differentially affected in MPTP-treated WT animals. The MPTP-induced up-regulation of Nav1.1 and Nav1.9, down-regulation of Nav1.6 in DRG neurons may be through ERβ, up-regulation of Nav1.7 and down-regulation of Nav1.8 are dependent on both ERα and ERβ. Therefore, the MPTP-induced alterations of gene expression of sodium channels in DRG neurons could be an important mechanism to affect excitability and nociceptive thresholds, and the ERs appear to play a role in nociception in PD. PMID:22371119

  15. Elevated Expression of Fractalkine (CX3CL1) and Fractalkine Receptor (CX3CR1) in the Dorsal Root Ganglia and Spinal Cord in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: Implications in Multiple Sclerosis-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Intrater, Howard; Gong, Yuewen; Namaka, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous system (CNS) disease resulting from a targeted autoimmune-mediated attack on myelin proteins in the CNS. The release of Th1 inflammatory mediators in the CNS activates macrophages, antibodies, and microglia resulting in myelin damage and the induction of neuropathic pain (NPP). Molecular signaling through fractalkine (CX3CL1), a nociceptive chemokine, via its receptor (CX3CR1) is thought to be associated with MS-induced NPP. An experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS was utilized to assess time dependent gene and protein expression changes of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1. Results revealed significant increases in mRNA and the protein expression of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord (SC) 12 days after EAE induction compared to controls. This increased expression correlated with behavioural thermal sensory abnormalities consistent with NPP. Furthermore, this increased expression correlated with the peak neurological disability caused by EAE induction. This is the first study to identify CX3CL1 signaling through CX3CR1 via the DRG /SC anatomical connection that represents a critical pathway involved in NPP induction in an EAE model of MS. PMID:24175290

  16. α4-Integrin Antibody Treatment Blocks Monocyte/Macrophage Traffic to, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression in, and Pathology of the Dorsal Root Ganglia in an SIV Macaque Model of HIV-Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lakritz, Jessica R; Thibault, Derek M; Robinson, Jake A; Campbell, Jennifer H; Miller, Andrew D; Williams, Kenneth C; Burdo, Tricia H

    2016-07-01

    Traffic of activated monocytes into the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is critical for pathology in HIV peripheral neuropathy. We have shown that accumulation of recently recruited (bromodeoxyuridine(+) MAC387(+)) monocytes is associated with severe DRG pathology and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in SIV-infected macaques. Herein, we blocked leukocyte traffic by treating animals with natalizumab, which binds to α4-integrins. SIV-infected CD8-depleted macaques treated with natalizumab either early (the day of infection) or late (28 days after infection) were compared with untreated SIV-infected animals sacrificed at similar times. Histopathology showed diminished DRG pathology with natalizumab treatment, including decreased inflammation, neuronophagia, and Nageotte nodules. Natalizumab treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of bromodeoxyuridine(+) (early), MAC387(+) (late), CD68(+) (early and late), and SIVp28(+) (late) macrophages in DRG tissues. The number of CD3(+) T lymphocytes in DRGs was not affected by natalizumab treatment. Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, an adhesion molecule that mediates leukocyte traffic, was diminished in DRGs of all natalizumab-treated animals. These data show that blocking monocyte, but not T lymphocyte, traffic to the DRG results in decreased inflammation and pathology, supporting a role for monocyte traffic and activation in HIV peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27157989

  17. Expression patterns of T-type Cav3.2 channel and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mice after sciatic nerve axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Si-Fang; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Xiao-Ya; Wang, Bing; Li, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yan-Gang; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2016-10-19

    Substantial evidence indicates that T-type Cav3.2 channel and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) contribute to pain hypersensitivity within primary sensory nerves. A recent study suggested that activation of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) could increase Cav3.2 channel currents and further contribute to inflammatory pain sensitivity. However, the expression patterns of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R and their colocalization in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in chronic neuropathic pain condition remain unknown. In this study, we explored expression patterns of Cav3.2, IGF-1R and their colocalization, and whether phenotypic switch occurs in a subpopulation of Cav3.2 or IGF-1R neurons in mouse DRGs after sciatic nerve axotomy with immunofluorescence, real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and western blot assays. We found that expressions of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R, and their colocalization were not increased in DRGs of mice following axotomy. In addition, Cav3.2 or IGF-1R subpopulation neurons did not acquire significant switch in expression phenotype after sciatic nerve axotomy. Our findings argue for an upregulation of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R expression in lumbar DRGs post-sciatic nerve axotomy and provided an insight for understanding the functions of peripheral afferent Cav3.2 channel and IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:27571431

  18. Pulsed electromagnetic field enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression through L-type voltage-gated calcium channel- and Erk-dependent signaling pathways in neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Yan, Xiaodong; Liu, Juanfang; Li, Ling; Hu, Xinghua; Sun, Honghui; Tian, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Although pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) exposure has been reported to promote neuronal differentiation, the mechanism is still unclear. Here, we aimed to examine the effects of PEMF exposure on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) mRNA expression and the correlation between the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and Bdnf mRNA expression in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Exposure to 50Hz and 1mT PEMF for 2h increased the level of [Ca(2+)]i and Bdnf mRNA expression, which was found to be mediated by increased [Ca(2+)]i from Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). However, calcium mobilization was not involved in the increased [Ca(2+)]i and BDNF expression, indicating that calcium influx was one of the key factors responding to PEMF exposure. Moreover, PD098059, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) inhibitor, strongly inhibited PEMF-dependant Erk1/2 activation and BDNF expression, indicating that Erk activation is required for PEMF-induced upregulation of BDNF expression. These findings indicated that PEMF exposure increased BDNF expression in DRGNs by activating Ca(2+)- and Erk-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:24937769

  19. Immunohistological demonstration of CaV3.2 T-type voltage-gated calcium channel expression in soma of dorsal root ganglion neurons and peripheral axons of rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Rose, K E; Lunardi, N; Boscolo, A; Dong, X; Erisir, A; Jevtovic-Todorovic, V; Todorovic, S M

    2013-10-10

    Previous behavioral studies have revealed that CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels support peripheral nociceptive transmission and electrophysiological studies have established the presence of T-currents in putative nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG). To date, however, the localization pattern of this key nociceptive channel in the soma and peripheral axons of these cells has not been demonstrated due to lack of isoform-selective anti-CaV3.2 antibodies. In the present study a new polyclonal CaV3.2 antibody is used to localize CaV3.2 expression in rodent DRG neurons using different staining techniques including confocal and electron microscopy (EM). Confocal microscopy of both acutely dissociated cells and short-term cultures demonstrated strong immunofluorescence of anti-CaV3.2 antibody that was largely confined to smaller diameter DRG neurons where it co-localized with established immuno-markers of unmyelinated nociceptors, such as, CGRP, IB4 and peripherin. In contrast, a smaller proportion of these CaV3.2-labeled DRG cells also co-expressed neurofilament 200 (NF200), a marker of myelinated sensory neurons. In the rat sciatic nerve preparation, confocal microscopy demonstrated anti-CaV3.2 immunofluorescence which was co-localized with both peripherin and NF200. Further, EM revealed immuno-gold labeling of CaV3.2 preferentially in association with unmyelinated sensory fibers from mouse sciatic nerve. Finally, we demonstrated the expression of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nerve endings of mouse hindpaw skin as shown by co-localization with Mrgpd-GFP-positive fibers. The CaV3.2 expression within the soma and peripheral axons of nociceptive sensory neurons further demonstrates the importance of this channel in peripheral pain transmission. PMID:23867767

  20. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1 Increases Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Currents Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons via Different Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fang; Li, Yang; Fu, Qiang; Fan, Yong-Yan; Zhu, Chao; Liu, Yan-Hong; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)/chemokine CXC motif ligand 12 (CXCL12), a chemokine that is upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) during chronic pain models, has recently been found to play a central role in pain hypersensitivity. The purpose of present study is to investigate the functional impact of SDF-1 and its receptor, chemokine CXC motif receptor 4 (CXCR4), on two TTXR sodium channels in rat DRG using electrophysiological techniques. Preincubation with SDF-1 caused a concentration-dependent increase of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 currents amplitudes in acutely isolated small diameter DRG neurons in short-term culture. As to Nav1.9, changes in current density and kinetic properties of Nav1.9 current evoked by SDF-1(50 ng/ml) was eliminated by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002. The increase in Nav1.9 current was also blocked by pertussis toxin (PTX) but not cholera toxin (CTX), showing involvement of Gi/o but not Gs subunits. As to Nav1.8, inhibitors (AMD3100, PTX, CTX, LY294002) used in present study didn't inhibit the increased amplitude of Nav1.8 current and shifted activation curve of Nav1.8 in a hyperpolarizing direction in the presence of SDF-1 (50 ng/ml). In conclusion, our data demonstrated that SDF-1 may excite primary nociceptive sensory neurons by acting on the biophysical properties of Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 currents but via different mechanisms. PMID:27038931

  1. Accumulation of [3H]fucose-labelled glycoproteins in the Golgi apparatus of dorsal root ganglion neurons during inhibition of fast axonal transport caused by exposure of the ganglion to Co2+-containing or Ca2+-free medium.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, P A; Bennett, G

    1983-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies have established that Co2+-containing or Ca2+-free media interfere with the initiation of the fast axonal transport of proteins. The present study has used light- and electron-microscope radioautography to compare the distribution of [3H]fucose-labelled glycoproteins in neuronal cell bodies of control dorsal root ganglia and ganglia incubated for 16-17 h in Ca2+-free medium or in medium containing 0.18 mM Co2+. The radioautographic reaction in control cell bodies was diffusely scattered throughout the cytoplasm; grain counts revealed that 22% of the reaction was associated with elements of the Golgi apparatus and 78% was over other organelles and the remainder of the cytoplasm. In most experimental cell bodies, 78% of the silver grains were clustered over elements of the Golgi complex whereas other organelles and the remainder of the cytoplasm were comparatively much less labelled; structural alterations of the Golgi apparatus were also produced by the modified media. In parallel studies where the radioactivity in nerve trunks and ganglia was measured by liquid scintillation counting, it was found that the Ca2+-free medium and the Co2+-containing medium both reduced by approximately 80% the quantity of [3H]fucose-labelled glycoproteins which were carried by the fast axonal transport system; they did so without interfering with the incorporation of [3H]fucose into glycoproteins. The results indicate that in the presence of Co2+ or in the absence of Ca2+ the proteins which are destined for fast axonal transport accumulate at the Golgi apparatus of neuronal cell bodies. These results thus suggest that Ca2+ is required for proteins to leave the Golgi region in transit to the fast axonal transport system. PMID:6188994

  2. The PDZ domain protein PICK1 and the sodium channel BNaC1 interact and localize at mechanosensory terminals of dorsal root ganglion neurons and dendrites of central neurons.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Anne; Garcia-Anoveros, Jaime; Corey, David P

    2002-02-15

    Members of the BNaC/ASIC family of ion channels have been implicated in mechanotransduction and nociception mediated by dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. These ion channels are also expressed in the CNS. We identified the PDZ domain protein PICK1 as an interactor of BNaC1(ASIC2) in a yeast two-hybrid screen. We show by two-hybrid assays, glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays, and coimmunoprecipitations that the BNaC1-PICK1 interaction is specific, and that coexpression of both proteins leads to their clustering in intracellular compartments. The interaction between BNaC1 and PICK1 requires the PDZ domain of PICK1 and the last four amino acids of BNaC1. BNaC1 is similar to two other BNaC/ASIC family members, BNaC2 (ASIC1) and ASIC4, at its extreme C terminus, and we show that PICK1 also interacts with BNaC2. We found that PICK1, like BNaC1 and BNaC2, is expressed by DRG neurons and, like the BNaC1alpha isoform, is present at their peripheral mechanosensory endings. Both PICK1 and BNaC1alpha are also coexpressed by some pyramidal neurons of the cortex, by pyramidal neurons of the CA3 region of hippocampus, and by cerebellar Purkinje neurons, localizing to their dendrites and cell bodies. Therefore, PICK1 interacts with BNaC/ASIC channels and may regulate their subcellular distribution or function in both peripheral and central neurons. PMID:11739374

  3. Human Mas-Related G Protein-Coupled Receptors-X1 Induce Chemokine Receptor 2 Expression in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons and Release of Chemokine Ligand 2 from the Human LAD-2 Mast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Solinski, Hans Jürgen; Petermann, Franziska; Rothe, Kathrin; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Primate-specific Mas-related G protein-coupled receptors-X1 (MRGPR-X1) are highly enriched in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and induce acute pain. Herein, we analyzed effects of MRGPR-X1 on serum response factors (SRF) or nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT), which control expression of various markers of chronic pain. Using HEK293, DRG neuron-derived F11 cells and cultured rat DRG neurons recombinantly expressing human MRGPR-X1, we found activation of a SRF reporter gene construct and induction of the early growth response protein-1 via extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2 known to play a significant role in the development of inflammatory pain. Furthermore, we observed MRGPR-X1-induced up-regulation of the chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) via NFAT, which is considered as a key event in the onset of neuropathic pain and, so far, has not yet been described for any endogenous neuropeptide. Up-regulation of CCR2 is often associated with increased release of its endogenous agonist chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2). We also found MRGPR-X1-promoted release of CCL2 in a human connective tissue mast cell line endogenously expressing MRGPR-X1. Thus, we provide first evidence to suggest that MRGPR-X1 induce expression of chronic pain markers in DRG neurons and propose a so far unidentified signaling circuit that enhances chemokine signaling by acting on two distinct yet functionally co-operating cell types. Given the important role of chemokine signaling in pain chronification, we propose that interruption of this signaling circuit might be a promising new strategy to alleviate chemokine-promoted pain. PMID:23505557

  4. Dorsal wrist syndrome repair.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masataka; Masada, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Eiji

    2004-07-01

    Dorsal wrist pain with or without a palpable dorsal wrist ganglion is a common complaint. Watson developed the concept of the dorsal wrist syndrome (DWS) which is an entity encompassing pre-dynamic rotary subluxation of the scaphoid and the overloaded wrist. We reviewed 20 cases of DWS treated surgically. There were nine males (11 wrists) and nine females (nine wrists). Post-operative follow-up ranged from five to 67 months (mean, 37 months). At operation, we observed SLL tears in eight wrists and dorsal ganglia in 12 cases. Following surgery, 12 cases reported being pain free, five had mild pain, two moderate pain and one case reported severe pain. Post-operative extension/flexion was 73/70 average. Post-operative grip strength was 28 kg average. We believe that excision of the posterior interosseous nerve and the dorsal capsule including the ganglion, if present, provides pain relief in DWS. PMID:15368625

  5. Selective regulation of 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons: a possible mechanism to cope with peripheral nerve injury-induced chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Patte-Mensah, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Schaeffer, Véronique; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2010-09-01

    The enzyme 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase (3alpha-HSOR) catalyzes the synthesis and bioavailability of 3alpha,5alpha-neurosteroids as allopregnanolone (3alpha,5alpha-THP) which activates GABA(A) receptors and blocks T-type calcium channels involved in pain mechanisms. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to demonstrate that 3alpha-HSOR is a cellular target the modulation of which in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) may contribute to suppress pain resulting from peripheral nerve injury. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscope analyses showed 3alpha-HSOR-immunostaining in naive rat DRG sensory neurons and glial cells. Pulse-chase, high performance liquid chromatography and Flo/One characterization of neurosteroids demonstrated 3alpha,5alpha-THP production in DRG. Behavioral methods allowed identification of pain symptoms (thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and/or allodynia) in rats subjected to sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI). Reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that 3alpha-HSOR mRNA concentration in CCI-rat ipsilateral DRG, 5-fold higher than in contralateral DRG, was also 4- to 6-fold elevated than that in sham-operated or naive rat DRG. Consistently, Western blotting confirmed increased 3alpha-HSOR protein levels in CCI-rat ipsilateral DRG and double immunolabeling showed that 3alpha-HSOR overexpression occurred in DRG neurons but not in glia. Functional plasticity of 3alpha-HSOR leading to increased 3alpha,5alpha-THP production was evidenced in CCI-rat DRG. Interestingly, behavioral and molecular time-course investigations revealed that 3alpha-HSOR gene upregulation was correlated to pain symptom development. Most importantly, in vivo knockdown of 3alpha-HSOR expression in healthy rat DRG using 6-carboxyfluorescein-3alpha-HSOR-siRNA exacerbated thermal and mechanical pain perceptions. This paper is the first to show that siRNA-induced knockdown of a key neurosteroid-synthesizing enzyme directly

  6. From Norm Adoption to Norm Internalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Rosaria; Andrighetto, Giulia; Villatoro, Daniel

    In this presentation, advances in modeling the mental dynamics of norms will be presented. In particular, the process from norm-adoption, possibly yielding new normative goals, to different forms of norm compliance will be focused upon, including norm internalization, which is at study in social-behavioral sciences and moral philosophy since long. Of late, the debate was revamped within the rationality approach pointing to the role of norm internalization as a less costly and more reliable enforcement system than social control. So far, poor attention was paid to the mental underpinnings of internalization. In this presentation, a rich cognitive model of different types, degrees and factors of internalization is shown. The initial implementation of this model on EMIL-A, a normative agent architecture developed and applied to the.

  7. Use of a novel high-resolution magnetic resonance neurography protocol to detect abnormal dorsal root Ganglia in Sjögren patients with neuropathic pain: case series of 10 patients and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Julius; Duncan, Trisha; Owoyemi, Kristie; Wang, Kenneth C; Carrino, John; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-05-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of patients with Sjögren syndrome (SS) with neuropathic pain pose several challenges. Patients with SS may experience unorthodox patterns of burning pain not conforming to a traditional "stocking-and-glove" distribution, which can affect the face, torso, and proximal extremities. This distribution of neuropathic pain may reflect mechanisms targeting the proximal-most element of the peripheral nervous system-the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Skin biopsy can diagnose such a small-fiber neuropathy and is a surrogate marker of DRG neuronal cell loss. However, SS patients have been reported who have similar patterns of proximal neuropathic pain, despite having normal skin biopsy studies. In such cases, DRGs may be targeted by mechanisms not associated with neuronal cell loss. Therefore, alternative approaches are warranted to help characterize abnormal DRGs in SS patients with proximal neuropathic pain.We performed a systematic review of the literature to define the frequency and spectrum of SS peripheral neuropathies, and to better understand the attribution of SS neuropathic pain to peripheral neuropathies. We found that the frequency of SS neuropathic pain exceeded the prevalence of peripheral neuropathies, and that painful peripheral neuropathies occurred less frequently than neuropathies not always associated with pain. We developed a novel magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) protocol to evaluate DRG abnormalities. Ten SS patients with proximal neuropathic pain were evaluated by this MRN protocol, as well as by punch skin biopsies evaluating for intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) of unmyelinated nerves. Five patients had radiographic evidence of DRG abnormalities. Patients with MRN DRG abnormalities had increased IENFD of unmyelinated nerves compared to patients without MRN DRG abnormalities (30.2 [interquartile range, 4.4] fibers/mm vs. 11.0 [4.1] fibers/mm, respectively; p = 0.03). Two of these 5 SS patients whose neuropathic

  8. Adaptation and perceptual norms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Michael A.; Yasuda, Maiko; Haber, Sara; Leonard, Deanne; Ballardini, Nicole

    2007-02-01

    We used adaptation to examine the relationship between perceptual norms--the stimuli observers describe as psychologically neutral, and response norms--the stimulus levels that leave visual sensitivity in a neutral or balanced state. Adapting to stimuli on opposite sides of a neutral point (e.g. redder or greener than white) biases appearance in opposite ways. Thus the adapting stimulus can be titrated to find the unique adapting level that does not bias appearance. We compared these response norms to subjectively defined neutral points both within the same observer (at different retinal eccentricities) and between observers. These comparisons were made for visual judgments of color, image focus, and human faces, stimuli that are very different and may depend on very different levels of processing, yet which share the property that for each there is a well defined and perceptually salient norm. In each case the adaptation aftereffects were consistent with an underlying sensitivity basis for the perceptual norm. Specifically, response norms were similar to and thus covaried with the perceptual norm, and under common adaptation differences between subjectively defined norms were reduced. These results are consistent with models of norm-based codes and suggest that these codes underlie an important link between visual coding and visual experience.

  9. Geology and genesis of NORM industrial links and depositional processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.F.

    1995-12-31

    NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) has now been found to be associated with many industrial activities that extends far beyond oil and gas production. There are approximately 59 naturally occurring radionuclides that might end up in a train of NORM contamination, which could impact at least 13 industries. It is appropriate and indeed necessary to examine the geological roots of NORM and its concentration in various industries. Impacted NORM industries and their associated problems are presented. Some plant and environmental managers may not even suspect they have NORM problems, because one cannot ``sense`` NORM without instrumentation, until it might be too late for the health and safety of the effected employees and surrounding community. Others want to ``see no evil, hear no evil or speak any evil`` until they are forced into ``reactive`` environmental management, rather than ``proactive`` management. It has been the experience of many that reactive management is far more costly than proactive management.

  10. Below Level Central Pain Induced by Discrete Dorsal Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Amanda L.; McFadden, Andrew; Brown, Kimberley; Starnes, Charlotte; Maier, Steven F.; Watkins, Linda R.; Falci, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Central neuropathic pain occurs with multiple sclerosis, stroke, and spinal cord injury (SCI). Models of SCI are commonly used to study central neuropathic pain and are excellent at modeling gross physiological changes. Our goal was to develop a rat model of central neuropathic pain by traumatizing a discrete region of the dorsal spinal cord, thereby avoiding issues including paralysis, urinary tract infection, and autotomy. To this end, dorsal root avulsion was pursued. The model was developed by first determining the number of avulsed dorsal roots sufficient to induce below-level hindpaw mechanical allodynia. This was optimally achieved by unilateral T13 and L1 avulsion, which resulted in tissue damage confined to Lissauer's tract, dorsal horn, and dorsal columns, at the site of avulsion, with no gross physical changes at other spinal levels. Behavior following avulsion was compared to that following rhizotomy of the T13 and L1 dorsal roots, a commonly used model of neuropathic pain. Avulsion induced below-level allodynia that was more robust and enduring than that seen after rhizotomy. This, plus the lack of direct spinal cord damage associated with rhizotomy, suggests that avulsion is not synonymous with rhizotomy, and that avulsion (but not rhizotomy) is a model of central neuropathic pain. The new model described here is the first to use discrete dorsal horn damage by dorsal root avulsion to create below-level bilateral central neuropathic pain. PMID:20649467

  11. Dorsal spine osteoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Singh, Rahul; Garg, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign osteoblastoma is a rare primary neoplasm comprising less than 1% of primary bone tumors.[1] We report a case of a 20-year-old female patient presenting with progressive paraparesis over one year and back pain over the dorsal spine gradually increasing in severity over a year. Computerised tomomography (CT) of the spine revealed a well-defined 3.5 × 3.0 cm mass heterodense expansile bony lesion arising from the lamina of the D12 vertebra, having lytic and sclerotic component and causing compromise of the bony spinal canal. D12 laminectomy and total excision of the tumor was done. PMID:27057242

  12. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  13. Dual dorsal columns: a review.

    PubMed

    Beck, C H

    1976-02-01

    Recent evidence indicates that Wall (1970) may have been premature in concluding that dorsal column lesions produce no discernable sensory defects. Much of the negative evidence Wall presented to support this view is inconclusive. In addition several studies have reported significant sensory deficits in animals with severed dorsal columns. On the other hand, the literature strongly supports Wall's view that dorsal column lesions cause motor disturbances. A review of the anatomical and electrophysiological literature reveals growing evidence for the dissociation of two major subsystems relaying in the dorsal column nuclei. The possible functions of these two systems are discussed. PMID:814988

  14. Extending the Mertonian Norms: Scientists’ Subscription to Norms of Research

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Melissa S.; Ronning, Emily A.; DeVries, Raymond; Martinson, Brian C.

    2010-01-01

    This analysis, based on focus groups and a national survey, assesses scientists’ subscription to the Mertonian norms of science and associated counternorms. It also supports extension of these norms to governance (as opposed to administration), as a norm of decision-making, and quality (as opposed to quantity), as a evaluative norm. PMID:21132074

  15. The human lumbar dorsal rami.

    PubMed Central

    Bogduk, N; Wilson, A S; Tynan, W

    1982-01-01

    The L 1-4 dorsal rami tend to form three branches, medial, lateral, and intermediate, which are distributed, respectively, to multifidus, iliocostalis, and longissimus. The intertransversarii mediales are innervated by a branch of the dorsal ramus near the origin of the medial branch. The L 4 dorsal ramus regularly forms three branches while the L 1-3 levels the lateral and intermediate branches may, alternatively, arise from a short common stem. The L 5 dorsal ramus is much longer than the others and forms only a medial and an intermediate branch. Each lumbar medial branch innervates two adjacent zygapophysial joints and ramifies in multifidus, supplying only those fascicles which arise from the spinous process with the same segmental number as the nerve. The comparative anatomy of the lumbar dorsal rami is discussed and the applied anatomy with respect to 'rhizolysis', 'facet denervation' and diagnostic paraspinal electromyography is described. PMID:7076562

  16. Serotonin and Social Norms

    PubMed Central

    Bilderbeck, Amy C.; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Read, Judi; Woolrich, Mark; Cowen, Phillip J.; Behrens, Tim E. J.

    2014-01-01

    How do people sustain resources for the benefit of individuals and communities and avoid the tragedy of the commons, in which shared resources become exhausted? In the present study, we examined the role of serotonin activity and social norms in the management of depletable resources. Healthy adults, alongside social partners, completed a multiplayer resource-dilemma game in which they repeatedly harvested from a partially replenishable monetary resource. Dietary tryptophan depletion, leading to reduced serotonin activity, was associated with aggressive harvesting strategies and disrupted use of the social norms given by distributions of other players’ harvests. Tryptophan-depleted participants more frequently exhausted the resource completely and also accumulated fewer rewards than participants who were not tryptophan depleted. Our findings show that rank-based social comparisons are crucial to the management of depletable resources, and that serotonin mediates responses to social norms. PMID:24815611

  17. Regional Norms for English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachru, Braj B.

    The debate continues about regional norms for English usage around the world, although the discussion has become more realistic and less didactic. Educated non-native varieties are increasingly accepted, distinctions are being made between national and international language uses, and localized varieties are no longer considered as necessarily…

  18. New Treatments for Spinal Nerve Root Avulsion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Further progress in the treatment of the longitudinal spinal cord injury has been made. In an inverted translational study, it has been demonstrated that return of sensory function can be achieved by bypassing the avulsed dorsal root ganglion neurons. Dendritic growth from spinal cord sensory neurons could replace dorsal root ganglion axons and re-establish a reflex arch. Another research avenue has led to the development of adjuvant therapy for regeneration following dorsal root to spinal cord implantation in root avulsion injury. A small, lipophilic molecule that can be given orally acts on the retinoic acid receptor system as an agonist. Upregulation of dorsal root ganglion regenerative ability and organization of glia reaction to injury were demonstrated in treated animals. The dual effect of this substance may open new avenues for the treatment of root avulsion and spinal cord injuries. PMID:27602018

  19. New Treatments for Spinal Nerve Root Avulsion Injury.

    PubMed

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Further progress in the treatment of the longitudinal spinal cord injury has been made. In an inverted translational study, it has been demonstrated that return of sensory function can be achieved by bypassing the avulsed dorsal root ganglion neurons. Dendritic growth from spinal cord sensory neurons could replace dorsal root ganglion axons and re-establish a reflex arch. Another research avenue has led to the development of adjuvant therapy for regeneration following dorsal root to spinal cord implantation in root avulsion injury. A small, lipophilic molecule that can be given orally acts on the retinoic acid receptor system as an agonist. Upregulation of dorsal root ganglion regenerative ability and organization of glia reaction to injury were demonstrated in treated animals. The dual effect of this substance may open new avenues for the treatment of root avulsion and spinal cord injuries. PMID:27602018

  20. Morphometric data of canine sacral nerve roots with reference to electrical sacral root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rijkhoff, N J; Koldewijn, E L; d'Hollosy, W; Debruyne, F M; Wijkstra, H

    1996-01-01

    Experiments to investigate restoration of lower urinary tract control by electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve roots are mostly performed on dogs, yet little morphometric data (such as canine root and fiber diameter distributions) are available. The aim of this study was to acquire morphometric data of the intradural canine sacral dorsal and ventral roots (S1-S3). Cross-sections of sacral roots of two beagle dogs were analyzed using a light microscope and image processing software. The cross-sectional area of each root was measured. The diameters of the fibers and the axons in the cross-sections of the S2 and S3 roots were measured and used to construct nerve fiber diameter frequency distribution histograms. The results show a unimodal diameter distribution for the dorsal roots and a bimodal distribution for the ventral roots. In addition the average ratio g of the axon diameter to fiber diameter was calculated for each root. PMID:8732990

  1. Social Norms: Do We Love Norms Too Much?

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Cox, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Social norms are often cited as the cause of many social phenomena, especially as an explanation for prosocial family and relationship behaviors. And yet maybe we love the idea of social norms too much, as suggested by our failure to subject them to rigorous test. Compared to the detail in social norms theoretical orientations, there is very little detail in tests of normative theories. To provide guidance to researchers who invoke social norms as explanations, we catalog normative orientations that have been proposed to account for consistent patterns of action. We call on researchers to conduct tests of normative theories and the processes such theories assert. PMID:25937833

  2. Dorsal Hump Reduction and Osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Azizzadeh, Babak; Reilly, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the technique for planning, executing, and troubleshooting dorsal hump reduction for the cosmetic rhinoplasty patient. Details of the discussion include the necessary elements of the preoperative consultation with the patient, the specific instruments used to effectively and reproducibly create osteotomies, the anatomic and patient variables that require special attention, and the necessary measures to guard against potential complications. PMID:26616694

  3. The Haskell norm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Advocate, Dev L.

    The matter of the viscosity of the mantle has started to become serious. In 1935, Norm Haskell estimated the viscosity to be about 1020 poise and there the matter stood for about half a century. For a little while, people worried about excess ellipticity of the Earth and attributed this to a “fossil bulge” that lagged the rotation rate. For this same little while, 1025 poise was thought to be the viscosity of the lower mantle, but then it was discovered that the equator was also out of shape by about the same amount, ruling out the “fossil bulge” idea. To cover their embarrassment, geodynamicists upped the viscosity of the mantle to 1021 by adopting S.I. (Satan's Invention) units. No one noticed for some time since it didn't really matter whether viscosity was given in stokes, poise, or pascal seconds. It was just a large number with a large uncertainty and no one had a feel for it anyway.

  4. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  5. Universal Dorsal Approach of the Wrist.

    PubMed

    Ciais, Grégoire; Waitzenegger, Thomas; Parot, Catalina; Leclercq, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    The ideal dorsal wrist approach has to provide the best exposure while preserving sensitive dorsal nerve branches, dorsal veins, and skin integrity. Longitudinal incision is mostly used in the wrist surgery. Few anatomic or clinical studies have described transverse dorsal approach following Langer's lines. We present a universal transversal skin incision, the design of which meets the requirements of a dorsal wrist approach. It is adjustable with the radial and ulnar extension and respects Langer's lines, nerves, and veins. We conducted both an anatomic, clinical, and a retrospective study. For the anatomic part, we performed a cadaveric study on the wrist. For the clinical part of the study, we analyzed clinical results for 10 consecutive patients who underwent a universal dorsal wrist approach for various surgical procedures by the same surgeon. For the last part, we reviewed the patients operated during the past 5 years with this approach for different procedures in the wrist. PMID:26197157

  6. Slow dorsal-ventral rhythm generator in the lamprey spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Aoki, F; Wannier, T; Grillner, S

    2001-01-01

    In the isolated lamprey spinal cord, a very slow rhythm (0.03-0.11 Hz), superimposed on fast N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced locomotor activity (0.26-2.98 Hz), could be induced by a blockade of GABA(A) or glycine receptors or by administration of (1 s, 3 s)-l-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid a metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist. Ventral root branches supplying dorsal and ventral myotomes were exposed bilaterally to study the motor pattern in detail. The slow rhythm was expressed in two main forms: 1) a dorsal-ventral reciprocal pattern was the most common (18 of 24 preparations), in which bilateral dorsal branches were synchronous and alternated with the ventral branches, in two additional cases a diagonal dorsal-ventral reciprocal pattern with alternation between the left (or right) dorsal and the right (or left) ventral branches was observed; 2) synchronous bursting in all branches was encountered in four cases. In contrast, the fast locomotor rhythm occurred always in a left-right reciprocal pattern. Thus when the slow rhythm appeared in a dorsal-ventral reciprocal pattern, fast rhythms would simultaneously display left-right alternation. A longitudinal midline section of the spinal cord during ongoing slow bursting abolished the reciprocal pattern between ipsilateral dorsal and ventral branches but a synchronous burst activity could still remain. The fast swimming rhythm did not recover after the midline section. These results suggest that in addition to the network generating the swimming rhythm in the lamprey spinal cord, there is also a network providing slow reciprocal alternation between dorsal and ventral parts of the myotome. During steering, a selective activation of dorsal and ventral myotomes is required and the neural network generating the slow rhythm may represent activity in the spinal machinery used for steering. PMID:11152721

  7. Professional Norms Guiding School Principals' Pedagogical Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leo, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze the professional norms surrounding school development, with a special emphasis on school principals' pedagogical leadership. Design/methodology/approach: A norm perspective is used to identify possible links between legal norms, professional norms, and actions. The findings are based on…

  8. Changes in Synaptic Populations in the Spinal Dorsal Horn Following a Dorsal Rhizotomy in the Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Darian-Smith, Corinna; Hopkins, Stephanie; Ralston, Henry J.

    2010-01-01

    Studies in monkeys have shown substantial neuronal reorganization and behavioral recovery during the months following a cervical dorsal root lesion (DRL; Darian-Smith [2004] J. Comp. Neurol. 470:134–150; Darian-Smith and Ciferri [2005] J. Comp. Neurol. 491:27–45, [2006] J. Comp. Neurol. 498:552–565). The goal of the present study was to identify ultrastructural synaptic changes post-DRL within the dorsal horn (DH). Two monkeys received a unilateral DRL, as described previously (Darian-Smith and Brown [2000] Nat. Neurosci. 3:476–481), which removed cutaneous and proprioceptive input from the thumb, index finger, and middle finger. Six weeks before terminating the experiment at 4 post-DRL months, hand representation was mapped electrophysiologically within the somatosensory cortex, and anterograde tracers were injected into reactivated cortex to label corticospinal terminals. Sections were collected through the spinal lesion zone. Corticospinal terminals and inhibitory profiles were visualized by using preembedding immunohistochemistry and postembedding γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunostaining, respectively. Synaptic elements were systematically counted through the superficial DH and included synaptic profiles with round vesicles (R), pleomorphic flattened vesicles (F; presumed inhibitory synapses), similar synapses immunolabeled for GABA (F-GABA), primary afferent synapses (C-type), synapses with dense-cored vesicles (D, mostly primary afferents), and presynaptic dendrites of interneurons (PSD). Synapse types were compared bilaterally via ANOVAs. As expected, we found a significant drop in C-type profiles on the lesioned side (~16% of contralateral), and R profiles did not differ bilaterally. More surprising was a significant increase in the number of F profiles (~170% of contralateral) and F-GABA profiles (~315% of contralateral) on the side of the lesion. Our results demonstrate a striking increase in the inhibitory circuitry within the deafferented DH

  9. Neurogenic bladder: Highly selective rhizotomy of specific dorsal rootlets maybe a better choice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Genying; Zhou, Mouwang; Wang, Wenting; Zeng, Fanshuo

    2016-02-01

    Spinal cord injury results not only in motor and sensory dysfunctions, but also in loss of normal urinary bladder functions. A number of clinical studies were focused on the strategies for improvement of functions of the bladder. Completely dorsal root rhizotomy or selective specific S2-4 dorsal root rhizotomy suppress autonomic hyper-reflexia but have the same defects: it could cause detrusor and sphincter over-relaxation and loss of reflexive erection in males. So precise operation needs to be considered. We designed an experimental trail to test the possibility on the basis of previous study. We found that different dorsal rootlets which conduct impulses from the detrusor or sphincter can be distinguished by electro-stimulation in SD rats. Highly selective rhizotomy of specific dorsal rootlets could change the intravesical pressure and urethral perfusion pressure respectively. We hypothese that for neurogenic bladder following spinal cord injury, highly selective rhizotomy of specific dorsal rootlets maybe improve the bladder capacity and the detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, and at the same time, the function of other pelvic organ could be maximize retainment. PMID:26643667

  10. Is Co-norming Required?

    PubMed

    Rohling, Martin L; Miller, Ronald M; Axelrod, Bradley N; Wall, Jacqueline R; Lee, Amy J H; Kinikini, Daniel T

    2015-11-01

    Researchers who have been responsible for developing test batteries have argued that competent practice requires the use of a "fixed battery" that is co-normed. We tested this assumption with three normative systems: co-normed, meta-regressed norms and a system of these two methods. We analyzed two samples: 330 referred patients and 99 undergraduate volunteers. The T scores generated for referred patients using the three systems were highly associated with one another and quite similar in magnitude, with an Overall Test Battery Means (OTBMs) using the co-normed, hybrid, and meta-regressed scores equaled 43.8, 45.0, and 43.9, respectively. For volunteers, the OTBMs equaled 47.4, 47.5, and 47.1, respectively. The correlations amongst these OTBMs across systems were all above .90. Differences among OTBMs across normative systems were small and not clinically meaningful. We conclude that co-norming for competent clinical practice is not necessary. PMID:26152291

  11. Liberal Norms and Their Discontents.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Deborah A

    2012-09-01

    Recent analyses of the predominance of liberals in personality and social psychology have raised the possibility that this ideological imbalance is driven in part by active discrimination against conservatives. In this article, I review empirical evidence relevant to this possibility and find little support for it. The evidence points instead to a predominance of liberal views in academia more generally, driven by multiple factors including the consonance of academic work with the goals and values of liberals. Within the field of personality and social psychology, this concentration of liberal views has fostered strong liberal norms, which both intensify and exaggerate the field's ideological homogeneity. These liberal norms have unfortunate narrowing effects on research in personality and social psychology; remedies for these effects should focus on weakening the norms. PMID:26168510

  12. Changing Norms to Change Behavior.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dale T; Prentice, Deborah A

    2016-01-01

    Providing people with information about the behavior and attitudes of their peers is a strategy commonly employed by those seeking to reduce behavior deemed harmful either to individuals (e.g., high alcohol consumption) or the collective (e.g., high energy consumption). We review norm-based interventions, detailing the logic behind them and the various forms they can take. We give special attention to interventions designed to decrease college students' drinking and increase environment-friendly behaviors. We identify the conditions under which norm information has the highest likelihood of changing the targeted behavior and discuss why this is the case. PMID:26253542

  13. Norm-establishing and norm-following in autonomous agency.

    PubMed

    Barandiaran, Xabier E; Egbert, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Living agency is subject to a normative dimension (good-bad, adaptive-maladaptive) that is absent from other types of interaction. We review current and historical attempts to naturalize normativity from an organism-centered perspective, identifying two central problems and their solution: (1) How to define the topology of the viability space so as to include a sense of gradation that permits reversible failure, and (2) how to relate both the processes that establish norms and those that result in norm-following behavior. We present a minimal metabolic system that is coupled to a gradient-climbing chemotactic mechanism. Studying the relationship between metabolic dynamics and environmental resource conditions, we identify an emergent viable region and a precarious region where the system tends to die unless environmental conditions change. We introduce the concept of normative field as the change of environmental conditions required to bring the system back to its viable region. Norm-following, or normative action, is defined as the course of behavior whose effect is positively correlated with the normative field. We close with a discussion of the limitations and extensions of our model and some final reflections on the nature of norms and teleology in agency. PMID:23373978

  14. The influence of protein-calorie malnutrition on the development of paranodal regions in spinal roots. A study with the OTAN method on rat.

    PubMed

    Nordborg, C

    1977-11-28

    During the early postnatal development of spinal roots in rats paranodal regions were often found, containing OTAN-positive inclusions in the Schwann cell cytoplasm. The presence of OTAN-positive paranodal regions showed variations in time, which were synchronous for ventral and dorsal roots. Dorsal roots, however, showed a more marked presence during development than ventral roots. Spinal roots of animals submitted to a 50% food restriction, were shown to contain more OTAN-positive paranodal regions than controls. This was true for ventral as well as dorsal roots. It is suggested that crowding of internodal segments could be one factor, determining the presence of paranodal, OTAN-positive material. PMID:414508

  15. The direct connections of the C2 dorsal ganglion in the brain stem of the squirrel monkey: a preliminary investigation *

    PubMed Central

    Fitz-Ritson, Don E.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to observe the possible anatomical connections of C2 dorsal root with brain stem nuclei. Labelled amino acids (leucine, glycine, proline), were injected into the dorsal root of C2 of a squirrel monkey. The animal was allowed to survive for 20 hrs. and after, sections of the spinal cord and brain stem were subjected to autoradiographic methods. Direct connections were observed in Lamina II, VII, VIII of the spinal cord; the hypoglossal nucleus, medial vestibular nucleus, lateral cuneatus nucleus and lateral parvocellular reticular formation. Possible anatomical and physiological correlates are explored in relation to the importance of the upper cervical area and its control mechanisms.

  16. 03-NIF Dedication: Norm Pattiz

    ScienceCinema

    Norm Pattiz

    2010-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by Norm Pattiz, the chairman of Lawrence Livermore National Security, which manages Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  17. Nasalance Norms in Greek Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okalidou, Areti; Karathanasi, Asimina; Grigoraki, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to derive nasalance norms for monolingual Greek speakers, to examine nasalance scores as a function of gender and to draw cross-linguistic comparisons based on normative data. Participants read aloud a corpus of linguistic material, consisting of (1) a nasal text, an oral text and a balanced text; (2) a set of nasal…

  18. 03-NIF Dedication: Norm Pattiz

    SciTech Connect

    Norm Pattiz

    2009-07-02

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's largest laser system, was dedicated at a ceremony on May 29, 2009 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These are the remarks by Norm Pattiz, the chairman of Lawrence Livermore National Security, which manages Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. [Arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglia].

    PubMed

    Dumontier, C; Chaumeil, G; Chassat, R; Nourissat, G

    2006-11-01

    Incidentally discovered in 1987, arthroscopic treatment of dorsal wrist ganglia is based on our knowledge of their physiopathology which in turn benefits from the arthroscopic wrist evaluation. Dorsal wrist ganglia arise in the radiocarpal space from the dorsal part of the scapholunate ligament and migrate along the dorsal wrist capsule. According to their position above or under the dorsal intercarpal ligament, their cutaneous projection may vary. The basis of the arthroscopic treatment of wrist ganglia is, as with open surgery, the capsular resection in front of their origin. Arthroscopic resection is made either from dorsal radio-carpal or midcarpal approaches with little morbidity. Scars are unnoticeable, wrist mobility and strength close to normal by three months, which is the delay for dorsal wrist pain, always very limited, to disappear. The recurrence rate is however still debatable. Close to zero in some series, we had almost 20% recurrence rate in our series, with half of patients who reccur after two years follow-up. This variability in the recurrence rate also exists with open techniques. The only prospective and randomized study available to date found no differences between the two techniques, according to the recurrence rate. PMID:17361892

  20. Roots Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Barnabas

    1998-01-01

    Offers historical information about square roots. Presents three different methods--Hero's method, visual method, and remainder method--which can be used to teach the finding of square roots and one method for determining cube roots. (ASK)

  1. Disposal of NORM waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approving cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  2. Quality of decision making and group norms.

    PubMed

    Postmes, T; Spears, R; Cihangir, S

    2001-06-01

    Two studies investigated the impact of group norms for maintaining consensus versus norms for critical thought on group decisions in a modification of the biased sampling paradigm (G. Stasser & W. Titus, 1985). Both studies showed that critical norms improved the quality of decisions, whereas consensus norms did not. This effect appeared to be mediated by the perceived value of shared and unshared information: Consensus norm groups valued shared information more highly than critical groups did, and valence was a good predictor of decision outcome. In addition, the 2nd study showed that the group norm manipulation has no impact on individual decisions, consistent with the assumption that this is a group effect. Results suggest that the content of group norms is an important factor influencing the quality of group decision-making processes and that the content of group norms may be related to the group's proneness for groupthink. PMID:11414374

  3. Cultural Norms and Nonverbal Communication: An Illustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yanrong

    2015-01-01

    Nonverbal communication takes place in specific cultural contexts and is influenced by cultural norms. Cultural norms are "social rules for what certain types of people should and should not do" (Hall, 2005). Different cultures might have different norms for nonverbal behaviors in specific social, relational, and geographical contexts.…

  4. Rhinoplasty: dorsal grafts and the designer dorsum.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Rollin K

    2010-04-01

    Over the last 2 decades, many of the difficulties in shaping primary tips and rebuilding destroyed secondary tips have been solved through the use of tip sutures and grafts. Dorsal grafts, which are a highly visible determinant of the nasal profile and contour, have become the greatest challenge in rhinoplasty surgery. This article reviews the author's different approaches to dorsal grafts using fascia and diced cartilage, either separately or in combination. PMID:20206746

  5. [Dorsal ligament reconstruction in scapholunate dissociation].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H

    1985-07-01

    After discussion of the importance of the palmar, dorsal and interosseous ligaments in cases of scapholunate subluxation, the radiologic signs of this carpal instability are described. Four cases with this instability were treated successfully by reconstruction of the dorsal ligaments. In three instances ligament reconstruction was performed with the split tendon of the extensor carpi radialis brevis passed through drill holes in the scaphoid and lunate similar to the method reported by Dobyns. PMID:4029764

  6. Personal authentication through dorsal hand vein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Bin; Hao, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Jen-Chun

    2011-08-01

    Biometric identification is an emerging technology that can solve security problems in our networked society. A reliable and robust personal verification approach using dorsal hand vein patterns is proposed in this paper. The characteristic of the approach needs less computational and memory requirements and has a higher recognition accuracy. In our work, the near-infrared charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is adopted as an input device for capturing dorsal hand vein images, it has the advantages of the low-cost and noncontact imaging. In the proposed approach, two finger-peaks are automatically selected as the datum points to define the region of interest (ROI) in the dorsal hand vein images. The modified two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis, which performs an alternate two-dimensional PCA (2DPCA) in the column direction of images in the 2DPCA subspace, is proposed to exploit the correlation of vein features inside the ROI between images. The major advantage of the proposed method is that it requires fewer coefficients for efficient dorsal hand vein image representation and recognition. The experimental results on our large dorsal hand vein database show that the presented schema achieves promising performance (false reject rate: 0.97% and false acceptance rate: 0.05%) and is feasible for dorsal hand vein recognition.

  7. Separating subjective norms, university descriptive and injunctive norms, and U.S. descriptive and injunctive norms for drinking behavior intentions.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Sun; Klein, Katherine A; Smith, Sandi; Martell, Dennis

    2009-12-01

    The theory of planned behavior and the social norms approach both stress the important influence that normative perceptions have on behavioral intentions and behavior. These 2 approaches were used to examine the behavioral intention to limit drinking to 0 to 4 drinks. Further, this study examined whether perception of subjective norms, university- and U.S.-level descriptive norms, and university- and U.S.-level injunctive norms represented separate dimensions for this behavioral intention. A representative sample of 1,100 undergraduate students completed a Web-based survey. The results confirmed that the 5 types of norms were all unique constructs and showed that individuals' intentions to limit their alcohol consumption to 0 to 4 drinks were predicted by positive attitudes, perceived behavioral control, subjective norms, U.S. descriptive norms, and U.S. injunctive norms. Subjective norms also moderated the relationship between perceived behavioral control and behavioral intention. University descriptive norms served as a moderator between attitudes and behavioral intentions and between perceived behavioral control and behavioral intentions. This study has important implications for norms-based theories and campaigns. PMID:20183383

  8. Citizenship Norms in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Coffé, Hilde; van der Lippe, Tanja

    2010-05-01

    Research on Eastern Europe stresses the weakness of its civil society and the lack of political and social involvement, neglecting the question: What do people themselves think it means to be a good citizen? This study looks at citizens' definitions of good citizenship in Poland, Slovenia, the Czech Republic and Hungary, using 2002 European Social Survey data. We investigate mean levels of civic mindedness in these countries and perform regression analyses to investigate whether factors traditionally associated with civic and political participation are also correlated with citizenship norms across Eastern Europe. We show that mean levels of civic mindedness differ significantly across the four Eastern European countries. We find some support for theories on civic and political participation when explaining norms of citizenship, but also demonstrate that individual-level characteristics are differently related to citizenship norms across the countries of our study. Hence, our findings show that Eastern Europe is not a monolithic and homogeneous bloc, underscoring the importance of taking the specificities of countries into account. PMID:20390027

  9. Electrophysiological properties of rat spinal dorsal horn neurones in vitro: calcium-dependent action potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Murase, K; Randić, M

    1983-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological properties of dorsal horn neurones have been investigated in the immature rat in vitro spinal cord slice preparation. 2. Intracellular recordings from dorsal horn neurones show that direct or orthodromic stimulation generates action potentials followed by a brief after-hyperpolarization. Synaptic potentials were elicited by the activation of primary afferent fibres in the dorsal root. 3. Input resistance for dorsal horn neurones ranged from 48 to 267 M omega, and the membrane time constant was in the range of 4-19 ms. 4. In response to strong depolarizing currents dorsal horn neurones perfused with TTX and TEA frequently exhibit a slow regenerative depolarizing potential followed by a slow after-hyperpolarization. The depolarizing potential probably results from an influx of Ca. It is blocked by low concentration Ca, Co or Mn, and enhanced by high levels of extracellular Ca. 5. There is, in addition, a low-threshold Ca-dependent response which is activated at membrane potentials more negative than -65 mV and has a maximum rate of rise at the polarization level of about -80 mV. 6. The addition of Ba or TEA to the perfusing medium provided support for the Ca-dependence of the low- and high-threshold responses, and the lack of fast inactivation of the high-threshold Ca potential. Images Plate 1 PMID:6306228

  10. Low threshold primary afferent drive onto GABAergic interneurons in the superficial dorsal horn of the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Claire A.; MacDermott, Amy B.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition in the spinal cord dorsal horn is crucial for maintaining separation of touch and pain modalities. Disruption of this inhibition results in allodynia, allowing low threshold drive onto pain and temperature sensitive projection neurons. This low threshold excitatory pathway is normally under strong inhibition. We hypothesized that superficial dorsal horn inhibitory neurons, which would be ideally located to suppress low threshold drive onto projection neurons in a feedforward manner, are driven by low threshold input. In addition, because disinhibition-induced allodynia shares some features with the immature dorsal horn such as elevated sensitivity to low threshold input, we also questioned whether low threshold drive onto inhibitory neurons changes during postnatal maturation. To investigate these questions, slices were made at different ages from transgenic mice with EGFP expression in GABAergic neurons and whole cell recordings were made from these fluorescent neurons. Evoked synaptic activity was measured in response to electrical stimulation of the dorsal root. We demonstrate that Aβ fibers activate a significant proportion of superficial dorsal horn GABAergic neurons. This occurs with similar excitatory synaptic drive throughout postnatal maturation, but with a greater prevalence at younger ages. These GABAergic neurons are well situated to contribute to suppressing low threshold activation of output projection neurons. In addition, the majority of these GABAergic neurons also had convergent input from high threshold fibers, suggesting that this novel subclass of GABAergic neurons is important for gating innocuous as well as noxious information. PMID:19158295

  11. Neural basis of increased costly norm enforcement under adversity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Yu, Hongbo; Shen, Bo; Yu, Rongjun; Zhou, Zhiheng; Zhang, Guoping; Jiang, Yushi

    2014-01-01

    Humans are willing to punish norm violations even at a substantial personal cost. Using fMRI and a variant of the ultimatum game and functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated how the brain differentially responds to fairness in loss and gain domains. Participants (responders) received offers from anonymous partners indicating a division of an amount of monetary gain or loss. If they accept, both get their shares according to the division; if they reject, both get nothing or lose the entire stake. We used a computational model to derive perceived fairness of offers and participant-specific inequity aversion. Behaviorally, participants were more likely to reject unfair offers in the loss (vs gain) domain. Neurally, the positive correlation between fairness and activation in ventral striatum was reduced, whereas the negative correlations between fairness and activations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were enhanced in the loss domain. Moreover, rejection-related dorsal striatum activation was higher in the loss domain. Furthermore, the gain–loss domain modulates costly punishment only when unfair behavior was directed toward the participants and not when it was directed toward others. These findings provide neural and computational accounts of increased costly norm enforcement under adversity and advanced our understanding of the context-dependent nature of fairness preference. PMID:24396005

  12. Neural basis of increased costly norm enforcement under adversity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Yu, Hongbo; Shen, Bo; Yu, Rongjun; Zhou, Zhiheng; Zhang, Guoping; Jiang, Yushi; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2014-12-01

    Humans are willing to punish norm violations even at a substantial personal cost. Using fMRI and a variant of the ultimatum game and functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated how the brain differentially responds to fairness in loss and gain domains. Participants (responders) received offers from anonymous partners indicating a division of an amount of monetary gain or loss. If they accept, both get their shares according to the division; if they reject, both get nothing or lose the entire stake. We used a computational model to derive perceived fairness of offers and participant-specific inequity aversion. Behaviorally, participants were more likely to reject unfair offers in the loss (vs gain) domain. Neurally, the positive correlation between fairness and activation in ventral striatum was reduced, whereas the negative correlations between fairness and activations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were enhanced in the loss domain. Moreover, rejection-related dorsal striatum activation was higher in the loss domain. Furthermore, the gain-loss domain modulates costly punishment only when unfair behavior was directed toward the participants and not when it was directed toward others. These findings provide neural and computational accounts of increased costly norm enforcement under adversity and advanced our understanding of the context-dependent nature of fairness preference. PMID:24396005

  13. Power to Punish Norm Violations Affects the Neural Processes of Fairness-Related Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuemei; Zheng, Li; Li, Lin; Guo, Xiuyan; Wang, Qianfeng; Lord, Anton; Hu, Zengxi; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Punishing norm violations is considered an important motive during rejection of unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG). The present study investigates the impact of the power to punish norm violations on people’s responses to unfairness and associated neural correlates. In the UG condition participants had the power to punish norm violations, while an alternate condition, the impunity game (IG), was presented where participants had no power to punish norm violations since rejection only reduced the responder’s income to zero. Results showed that unfair offers were rejected more often in UG compared to IG. At the neural level, anterior insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex were more active when participants received and rejected unfair offers in both UG and IG. Moreover, greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity was observed when participants rejected than accepted unfair offers in UG but not in IG. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex activation was higher in UG than IG when unfair offers were accepted as well as when rejecting unfair offers in IG as opposed to UG. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the power to punish norm violations affects not only people’s behavioral responses to unfairness but also the neural correlates of the fairness-related social decision-making process. PMID:26696858

  14. Power to Punish Norm Violations Affects the Neural Processes of Fairness-Related Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuemei; Zheng, Li; Li, Lin; Guo, Xiuyan; Wang, Qianfeng; Lord, Anton; Hu, Zengxi; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Punishing norm violations is considered an important motive during rejection of unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG). The present study investigates the impact of the power to punish norm violations on people's responses to unfairness and associated neural correlates. In the UG condition participants had the power to punish norm violations, while an alternate condition, the impunity game (IG), was presented where participants had no power to punish norm violations since rejection only reduced the responder's income to zero. Results showed that unfair offers were rejected more often in UG compared to IG. At the neural level, anterior insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex were more active when participants received and rejected unfair offers in both UG and IG. Moreover, greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity was observed when participants rejected than accepted unfair offers in UG but not in IG. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex activation was higher in UG than IG when unfair offers were accepted as well as when rejecting unfair offers in IG as opposed to UG. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the power to punish norm violations affects not only people's behavioral responses to unfairness but also the neural correlates of the fairness-related social decision-making process. PMID:26696858

  15. Ligamentous Hyperlaxity and Dorsal Wrist Ganglions

    PubMed Central

    McKeon, Kathleen E.; London, Daniel A.; Osei, Daniel A.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Goldfarb, Charles A.; Boyer, Martin I.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine if symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions are associated with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity. Methods Ninety-six patients (61 females) presenting to hand surgeons for a symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were prospectively enrolled in this case-control investigation. Beighton scores were calculated to quantify generalized ligamentous laxity in each patient, and a scaphoid shift test (scapholunate capsuloligamentous laxity evaluation) was performed. A positive scaphoid shift test was defined by both pain and a palpable clunk. Ninety-six individuals without ganglions were then enrolled to form an age and sex frequency-matched control cohort. The control group was similarly assessed for Beighton score and scaphoid shift test. Binary logistic regression was performed to assess the association of ganglions with generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity (Beighton score ≥4) while accounting for effects of age and sex. Results Patients with symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions demonstrated significantly increased rates of generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity. Among those with ganglions, 27 of 96 (28%) patients exhibited generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity, compared to 12 of the 96 (13%) age and sex-matched individuals in the control group. Patients with symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were also significantly more likely to demonstrate localized scapholunate hyperlaxity with a positive scaphoid shift test (25% positive scaphoid shift test with ganglions vs 1% in controls). In logistic modeling, patients with dorsal wrist ganglions had 2.9 (95% CI 1.3-6.2) times greater odds of generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity compared to patients without a dorsal wrist ganglion after accounting for patient age and sex. Discussion Symptomatic dorsal wrist ganglions were associated with both generalized ligamentous hyperlaxity and a positive scaphoid shift test. Although an association between wrist ganglions and ligamentous hyperlaxity does not prove causation, the

  16. Sensitization of dorsal horn neurons in a two-compartment cell culture model: wind-up and long-term potentiation-like responses.

    PubMed

    Vikman, K S; Kristensson, K; Hill, R H

    2001-10-01

    One of the main characteristics of central sensitization associated with postinjury pain and chronic pain is increased excitability of the dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord. Two electrophysiological features associated with the origin and modulation of central sensitization are wind-up of action potential frequency and long-term potentiation (LTP), which have been demonstrated previously in the intact dorsal horn. Here we present evidence for electrically evoked sensitization of dorsal horn neurons in a two-compartment cell culture system of rat dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and dorsal horn neurons. Whole-cell recordings of dorsal horn neurons showed that repetitive low-frequency stimulation of DRG axons induced a frequency-dependent cumulative depolarization of the membrane potential with a concomitant increase in action potential frequency in a subset of neurons (41%). The characteristics presented here for dissociated cells are in accordance with those ascribed to classical wind-up in the intact dorsal horn. In addition, tetanic stimulation of DRG axons resulted in a significant increase in the number of action potentials in response to test stimuli in 42% of the cells tested. This prolonged potentiation of neuronal excitability in the dorsal horn lasted throughout the recording period (>1 hr) and tended to be voltage dependent in an LTP-like manner. To our knowledge, this is the first time that wind-up and LTP-like responses are reported for dorsal horn neurons in cell culture. PMID:11567080

  17. Gelsolin is a dorsalizing factor in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Kozmik, Zbynek; Swamynathan, Shivalingappa K.; Piatigorsky, Joram

    2003-01-01

    The gene for gelsolin (an actin-binding, cytoskeletal regulatory protein) was shown earlier to be specialized for high corneal expression in adult zebrafish. We show here that zebrafish gelsolin is required for proper dorsalization during embryogenesis. Inhibition of gelsolin expression by injecting fertilized eggs with a specific morpholino oligonucleotide resulted in a range of concentration-dependent ventralized phenotypes, including those lacking a brain and eyes. These were rescued by coinjection of zebrafish gelsolin or chordin (a known dorsalizing agent) mRNAs, or human gelsolin protein. Moreover, injection of gelsolin mRNA or human gelsolin protein by itself dorsalized the developing embryos, often resulting in axis duplication. Injection of the gelsolin-specific morpholino oligonucleotide enhanced the expression of Vent mRNA, a ventral marker downstream of bone morphogenetic proteins, whereas injection of gelsolin mRNA enhanced the expression of chordin and goosecoid mRNAs, both dorsal markers. Our results indicate that gelsolin also modulates embryonic dorsal/ventral pattern formation in zebrafish. PMID:12629212

  18. Dorsal and Ventral Pathways for Prosody.

    PubMed

    Sammler, Daniela; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Anwander, Alfred; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G; Belin, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Our vocal tone--the prosody--contributes a lot to the meaning of speech beyond the actual words. Indeed, the hesitant tone of a "yes" may be more telling than its affirmative lexical meaning. The human brain contains dorsal and ventral processing streams in the left hemisphere that underlie core linguistic abilities such as phonology, syntax, and semantics. Whether or not prosody--a reportedly right-hemispheric faculty--involves analogous processing streams is a matter of debate. Functional connectivity studies on prosody leave no doubt about the existence of such streams, but opinions diverge on whether information travels along dorsal or ventral pathways. Here we show, with a novel paradigm using audio morphing combined with multimodal neuroimaging and brain stimulation, that prosody perception takes dual routes along dorsal and ventral pathways in the right hemisphere. In experiment 1, categorization of speech stimuli that gradually varied in their prosodic pitch contour (between statement and question) involved (1) an auditory ventral pathway along the superior temporal lobe and (2) auditory-motor dorsal pathways connecting posterior temporal and inferior frontal/premotor areas. In experiment 2, inhibitory stimulation of right premotor cortex as a key node of the dorsal stream decreased participants' performance in prosody categorization, arguing for a motor involvement in prosody perception. These data draw a dual-stream picture of prosodic processing that parallels the established left-hemispheric multi-stream architecture of language, but with relative rightward asymmetry. PMID:26549262

  19. [Cleanliness Norms 1964-1975].

    PubMed

    Noelle-Neumann, E

    1976-01-01

    In 1964 the Institut für Demoskopie Allensbach made a first survey taking stock of norms concerning cleanliness in the Federal Republic of Germany. At that time, 78% of respondents thought that the vogue among young people of cultivating an unkempt look was past or on the wane (Table 1.). Today we know that this fashion was an indicator of more serious desires for change in many different areas like politics, sexual morality, education and that its high point was still to come. In the fall of 1975 a second survey, modelled on the one of 1964, was conducted. Again, it concentrated on norms, not on behavior. As expected, norms have changed over this period but not in a one-directional or simple manner. In general, people are much more large-minded about children's looks: neat, clean school-dress, properly combed hair, clean shoes, all this and also holding their things in order has become less important in 1975 (Table 2). To carry a clean handkerchief is becoming oldfashioned (Table 3). On the other hand, principles of bringing-up children have not loosened concerning personal hygiene - brushing ones teeth, washing hands, feet, and neck, clean fingernails (Table 4). On one item related to protection of the environment, namely throwing around waste paper, standards have even become more strict (Table 5). With regard to school-leavers, norms of personal hygiene have generally become more strict (Table 6). As living standards have gone up and the number of full bathrooms has risen from 42% to 75% of households, norms of personal hygiene have also increased: one warm bath a week seemed enough to 56% of adults in 1964, but to only 32% in 1975 (Table 7). Also standards for changing underwear have changed a lot: in 1964 only 12% of respondents said "every day", in 1975 48% said so (Table 8). Even more stringent norms are applied to young women (Tables 9/10). For comparison: 1964 there were automatic washing machines in 16%, 1975 in 79% of households. Answers to questions

  20. The false enforcement of unpopular norms.

    PubMed

    Willer, Robb; Kuwabara, Ko; Macy, Michael W

    2009-09-01

    Prevailing theory assumes that people enforce norms in order to pressure others to act in ways that they approve. Yet there are numerous examples of "unpopular norms" in which people compel each other to do things that they privately disapprove. While peer sanctioning suggests a ready explanation for why people conform to unpopular norms, it is harder to understand why they would enforce a norm they privately oppose. The authors argue that people enforce unpopular norms to show that they have complied out of genuine conviction and not because of social pressure. They use laboratory experiments to demonstrate this "false enforcement" in the context of a wine tasting and an academic text evaluation. Both studies find that participants who conformed to a norm due to social pressure then falsely enforced the norm by publicly criticizing a lone deviant. A third study shows that enforcement of a norm effectively signals the enforcer's genuine support for the norm. These results demonstrate the potential for a vicious cycle in which perceived pressures to conform to and falsely enforce an unpopular norm reinforce one another. PMID:20614762

  1. Overview of NORM and activities by a NORM licensed permanent decontamination and waste processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mirro, G.A.

    1997-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of issues related to handling NORM materials, and provides a description of a facility designed for the processing of NORM contaminated equipment. With regard to handling NORM materials the author discusses sources of NORM, problems, regulations and disposal options, potential hazards, safety equipment, and issues related to personnel protection. For the facility, the author discusses: description of the permanent facility; the operations of the facility; the license it has for handling specific radioactive material; operating and safety procedures; decontamination facilities on site; NORM waste processing capabilities; and offsite NORM services which are available.

  2. Square Root +

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, John G.

    1969-01-01

    A rational presentation of the so-called long division method for extracting the square root of a number. Diagrams are used to show relationship of this technique to the binomial theorem. Presentation exposes student to many facets of mathematics in addition to the mechanics of funding square root and cube root. Geometry, algebraic statements,…

  3. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-06-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  4. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  5. The neural signature of social norm compliance.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Manfred; Fischbacher, Urs; Herrnberger, Bärbel; Grön, Georg; Fehr, Ernst

    2007-10-01

    All known human societies establish social order by punishing violators of social norms. However, little is known about how the brain processes the punishment threat associated with norm violations. We use fMRI to study the neural circuitry behind social norm compliance by comparing a treatment in which norm violations can be punished with a control treatment in which punishment is impossible. Individuals' increase in norm compliance when punishment is possible exhibits a strong positive correlation with activations in the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Moreover, lateral orbitofrontal cortex activity is strongly correlated with Machiavellian personality characteristics. These findings indicate a neural network involved in social norm compliance that might constitute an important basis for human sociality. Different activations of this network reveal individual differences in the behavioral response to the punishment threat and might thus provide a deeper understanding of the neurobiological sources of pathologies such as antisocial personality disorder. PMID:17920024

  6. Complete dorsal dislocation of the carpal scaphoid with perilunate dorsal dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jong Woo; Park, Jong Hoon; Suh, Dong Hun; Park, Jong Woong

    2016-01-01

    Complete dorsal dislocation of the carpal scaphoid combined with dorsal perilunate dislocation is an extremely rare carpal injury. We describe the case of a 23-year-old man who presented with a complete dorsal dislocation of the carpal scaphoid, combined with a perilunate dislocation. Surgical treatment was performed with open reduction and interosseus ligament repair. At 4 years follow up, the patient's wrist pain had completely resolved without limitations of wrist joint motion and without evidence of avascular necrosis of the carpal scaphoid. PMID:27512229

  7. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  8. Assembly of the dorsal horn somatotopic map.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Koerber, H R; Millecchia, R

    1997-01-01

    We hypothesize: (a) peripheral innervation densities determine map scales in dorsal horn, (b) dorsal horn cell (DHC) receptive field (RF) geometries are determined by map scales, and (c) morphologies of primary afferents (PAs) and DHCs reflect their developmental history. We suggest the following sequence: (A) PAs project in a somatotopic mediolateral sequence. (B) DHCs assemble prototype RFs by sampling presynaptic neuropil with their dendrites. (C) PAs then project to all levels where their RFs are contained within prototype RFs of DHCs. (D) A competitive mechanism produces the adult form of DHC RFs. (E) Adult distributions of PA terminals and DHC dendrites reflect this developmental history. (F) Mediolateral somatotopic gradients are determined by RF densities of axons entering at the same levels. (G) Map scales at different rostrocaudal levels are determined by somatotopic gradients. (H) Geometries of DHC RFs are determined by constant convergence and divergence of monosynaptic connections. (I) Secondary processes further modify geometries of DHC RFs. (J) Residual self-organizing capacity supports maintenance and plastic mechanisms. We adduce the following evidence: (1) agreement between monosynaptically coupled inputs and cells' excitatory low threshold mechanoreceptive fields; (2) the temporal sequence of events during penetration of the gray matter by PAs; (3)variation of PA terminal and DHC dendritic domains as a function of map scale; (4) somatotopic gradients and geometries of DHC RFs in adult dorsal horn; (5) calculations of peripheral innervation densities and dorsal horn map scales; and (6) constant divergence and convergence between PAs and DHCs. PMID:9399410

  9. The Deanship and Its Faculty Interpreters: Do Mertonian Norms of Science Translate into Norms for Administration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Nathaniel J.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents research comparing faculty-held norms for academic deans' behavior to Mertonian norms of science. Findings indicate that while some elements of Mertonian norms hold true, it is not the best pattern of grouping faculty expectations for deans. Implications for research and practice are discussed. (Contains 5 tables.)

  10. Adults' Attitudes about Children's Gender Norm Transgressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakemore, Judith E. Owen

    This study examined college students' knowledge and attitudes regarding children's gender, and social and moral norms, and compared their evaluations of violation of each norm type. Participating were 140 female and 67 male college students ranging in age from 17 to 46 years, 33 of whom were parents. Subjects were asked questions related to toys,…

  11. Social norms theory and concussion education.

    PubMed

    Kroshus, Emily; Garnett, Bernice R; Baugh, Christine M; Calzo, Jerel P

    2015-12-01

    Secondary prevention of harm from sport-related concussion is contingent on immediate removal from play post-injury. To-date, educational efforts to reduce the prevalent risk behavior of continued play while symptomatic have been largely ineffective. Social norms theory may hold promise as a foundation for more effective concussion education aimed at increasing concussion reporting. The primary objective of this study was to assess whether perceived team concussion reporting norms would be less supportive of an individual's safe concussion symptom reporting behavior than objective team norms. Participants were 328 male and female US collegiate athletes. Written surveys were completed in person during the spring of 2014. Among both male and female athletes, team concussion reporting norms were significantly misperceived, with athletes tending to think that they themselves have safer attitudes about concussion reporting than their teammates. Perceived norms were associated with symptom reporting intention, independent of the team's objective reporting norm. A social norms approach to concussion education, in which misperceived group norms are corrected and shifted in the direction of safety, is an important avenue for program development and evaluation research aimed at the secondary prevention of harm from concussion. Implications for the design of this type of educational programming are discussed. PMID:26471918

  12. Superficial Dorsal Vein Injury/Thrombosis Presenting as False Penile Fracture Requiring Dorsal Venous Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Arash; Hakky, Tariq S; Martinez, Daniel; Parker, Justin; Carrion, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Conditions mimicking penile fracture are extremely rare and have been seldom described. Aim To describe a patient with false penile fracture who presented with superficial dorsal vein injury/thrombosis managed with ligation. Methods A 33-year-old male presented with penile swelling and ecchymosis after intercourse. A penile ultrasound demonstrated a thrombosed superficial dorsal vein but also questionable fracture of the tunica albuginea. As the thrombus was expanding, he was emergently taken to the operating room for exploration and required only dorsal venous ligation. Results Postoperatively, patient's Sexual Health Inventory for Men score was 23, and he had no issues with erections or sexual intercourse. Conclusion Early exploration of patients with suspected penile fracture provides excellent results with maintenance of erectile function. Also, in the setting of dorsal vein thrombosis, ligation preserves the integrity of the penile tissues and avoids unnecessary complications from conservative management. Rafiei A, Hakky TS, Martinez D, Parker J, and Carrion R. Superficial dorsal vein injury/thrombosis presenting as false penile fracture requiring dorsal venous ligation. PMID:25548650

  13. Disturbance energy norms: A critical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, K. Joseph; Sujith, R. I.

    2012-03-01

    The question of which norm should be used to characterize the fluctuating disturbance energy in studies on thermoacoustic instabilities remains a topic of continued debate. In this paper we formulate a strategy for developing mathematically consistent norms that do not support spurious growth of disturbance energy in the absence of 'physical' sources of energy. A critical analysis of various disturbance energy norms existing in literature is conducted and important conclusions regarding positive definitiveness and susceptibility to exhibiting unphysical growth are drawn. It is shown that the energy norm proposed by Cantrell and Hart [Interaction between sound and flow in acoustic cavities: mass, momentum and energy considerations, Journal of Acoustical Society of America 36 (1964) 697-706] and Myers' first order disturbance energy norm [Transport of energy by disturbances in arbitrary steady flow, Journal of Fluid Mechanics 226 (1991) 383-400] are positive definite if M0<1 and M0<1/√{γ}, respectively, where M0 is the magnitude of the local mean flow Mach number, γ is the ratio of specific heats at constant pressure and volume and the stipulated conditions should be met at every point in the flow domain. Our analysis shows that the disturbance energy norm proposed by Chu [On the energy transfer to small disturbances in fluid flow (part I), Acta Mechanica 1 (1965) 215-234] does not exhibit unphysical growth. It is also shown that this property is not unique to Chu's disturbance energy norm and there exists a family of norms which satisfy this requirement. The analysis also leads to an interesting interpretation of the acoustic energy conservation principle of Cantrell and Hart. The potential held by various disturbance energy norms for exhibiting fictitious growth is quantified using tools from nonmodal stability theory. It is concluded that if the mean flow Mach number is small, Myers' norm is a suitable measure of the disturbance energy.

  14. [Arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia].

    PubMed

    Borisch, N

    2014-10-01

    In arthroscopic wrist surgery, the resection of dorsal wrist ganglia has become a well accepted practice. As advantages for the minimally invasive procedure the low complication rate and low postoperative morbidity, less postoperative pain and faster recovery over open techniques are discussed. The possibility to assess accompanying joint pathology is considered as another advantage. The importance of identifying a so-called ganglion cyst stalk seems to have been overstated. Regarding the technique, the main discussion points are the size and localisation of the capsular window and the necessity of additional midcarpal arthroscopy. The possibility and results of treatment of recurrent ganglion cysts are still controversial. Our own experience and that of some authors are positive. Hardly mentioned in the literature is the treatment of occult dorsal wrist ganglia and its results, which is considered as very successful by the authors. PMID:25290273

  15. Ventral vs. dorsal chick dermal progenitor specification.

    PubMed

    Fliniaux, Ingrid; Viallet, Jean P; Dhouailly, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The dorsal and the ventral trunk integuments of the chick differ in their dermal cell lineage (originating from the somatic and somatopleural mesoderm respectively) and in the distribution of their feather fields. The dorsal macropattern has a large spinal pteryla surrounded by semi-apteria, whereas the ventral skin has a true medial apterium surrounded by the ventral pterylae. Comparison of the results of heterotopic transplantations of distal somatopleure in place of somatic mesoderm (Mauger 1972) or in place of proximal somatopleure (our data), leads to two conclusions. These are that the fate of the midventral apterium is not committed at day 2 of incubation and that the signals from the environment which specify the ventral and dorsal featherforming dermal progenitors are different. Effectively, Shh, but not Wnt -1 signalling can induce the formation of feather forming dermis from the embryonic somatopleure. Shh is not able, however, to trigger the formation of a feather forming dermis from the extra embryonic somatopleure. This brief report constitutes the first attempt, by comparing old and new preliminary results, to understand whether dermal progenitors at different sites are specified by different signalling pathways. PMID:15272375

  16. M-theory and E10: Billiards, Branes, and Imaginary Roots

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jeffrey; Ganor, Ori J.; Helfgott, Craig

    2004-01-09

    Eleven dimensional supergravity compactified on $T^10$ admits classical solutions describing what is known as billiard cosmology - a dynamics expressible as an abstract (billiard) ball moving in the 10-dimensional root space of the infinite dimensional Lie algebra E10, occasionally bouncing off walls in that space. Unlike finite dimensional Lie algebras, E10 has negative and zero norm roots, in addition to the positive norm roots. The walls above are related to physical fluxes that, in turn, are related to positive norm roots (called real roots) of E10. We propose that zero and negative norm roots, called imaginary roots, are related to physical branes. Adding 'matter' to the billiard cosmology corresponds to adding potential terms associated to imaginary roots. The, as yet, mysterious relation between E10 and M-theory on $T^10$ can now be expanded as follows: real roots correspond to fluxes or instantons, and imaginary roots correspond to particles and branes (in the cases we checked). Interactions between fluxes and branes and between branes and branes are classified according to the inner product of the corresponding roots (again in the cases we checked). We conclude with a discussion of an effective Hamiltonian description that captures some features of M-theory on $T^10.$

  17. "Be Nice": Wikipedia norms for supportive communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagle, Joseph M.

    2010-04-01

    Wikipedia is acknowledged to have been home to "some bitter disputes." Indeed, conflict at Wikipedia is said to be "as addictive as cocaine." Yet, such observations are not cynical commentary but motivation for a collection of social norms. These norms speak to the intentional stance and communicative behaviors Wikipedians should adopt when interacting with one another. In the following pages, I provide a survey of these norms on the English Wikipedia and argue that they can be characterized as supportive based on Jack Gibb's classic communication article "Defensive Communication."

  18. Roots and Root Function: Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of current issues related to water management, ecohydrology, and climate change are giving impetus to new research aimed at understanding roots and their functioning. Current areas of research include: use of advanced imaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging to observe roots...

  19. Legal forms and reproductive norms.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Ruth

    2003-06-01

    This article draws on Pashukanis's concept of legal form and on O'Brien's concept of synthetic value to argue that legal form plays a role in reproductive relations by constructing legal subjects as the bearers of reproductive responsibilities. Pashukanis conceived of legal form as playing a particular role in capitalist exchange relations by interpellating subjects as the bearers of property rights. O'Brien argued that reproduction's specific value is synthetic value, which represents the value of integrating nature and reason in species continuity. Synthetic value is distinct from exchange value or emotional value which may also attach to reproductive process. By working through Pashukanis's method of extracting legal form from specific social relations and by adapting it to reproductive relations, an example is provided of how legal form analysis can be extended beyond the particular context of capitalist exchange relations. Just as legal form constitutes owners and non-owners as legal subjects, so it constitutes reproducers and non-reproducers. By tracing the way in which law attributes reproductive responsibility, legal form analysis shows us how law draws a line between wanting to attribute responsibility and not to attribute it, and this contradiction is a hook which social forces such as sexuality, gender, race, class and disability can latch on to in pushing legal form to shape reproductive responsibilities in a particular way. Each legal form is also externally contradicted by other legal forms. When law negotiates a balance between the reproductive norms of responsibilities and rights, it demonstrates how particular legal forms manage the interaction of different sets of social relations, such as reproduction and exchange. PMID:15871155

  20. NORM -- The new kid on the block

    SciTech Connect

    Estey, H.P.

    1991-12-31

    The existence of radioactive materials in accumulations of scale and sludge in oil and gas production equipment is a relatively new issue. This developing issue first gained international attention in 1981 when significant radiation levels were detected on oil and gas production platforms in the North Sea; it didn`t become a domestic issue until 1986 when a similar situation was detected in a Mississippi pipe yard. Most published papers on the occurrence of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) in oil and gas production equipment have been based on studies of NORM-related activities in the United Kingdom (North Sea NORM). This paper addresses the occurrences and regulation of NORM in the US oil and gas production industry as experienced, witnessed and/or observed by the author over the past four years.

  1. Developmental Norms for the Sentence Repetition Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, John A.; MacDonald, John W.

    1984-01-01

    Obtained developmental norms for the Sentence Repetition Test from children (N=1,081) ranging in age from three to 13 years. Utilized a substanially larger number of children in each age group than previous reports. (Author/LLL)

  2. From innervation density to tactile acuity 2: embryonic and adult pre- and postsynaptic somatotopy in the dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paul B; Millecchia, Ronald; Lawson, Jeffrey J; Brown, Alan G; Koerber, H Richard; Culberson, James; Stephens, Stephanie

    2005-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dorsal horn laminae III-IV cell receptive fields (RFs) are initially established in three steps: cutaneous axons penetrate the dorsal horn near their rostrocaudal (RC) levels of entry into the spinal cord. Their terminal branches distribute mediolaterally (ML) according to their relative distoproximal RF locations on the leg, and form nonselective synapses with nearby dorsal horn cell dendrites, establishing the initial dorsal horn cell RFs. Rootlet axon RFs in adult cats were used to approximate the RC entry levels of hindlimb skin input. Cord dorsum recordings of monosynaptic field potentials evoked by electrical skin stimulation provided the RC distributions of synaptic input. These were in close agreement. Simulated projections of all 22,000 hindlimb axons were similar to projections predicted from EPSP distributions, and with the observed projections of dorsal roots, cutaneous nerves, and individual axons. The simulated terminals were connected nonselectively to nearby dendrites of 135,000 simulated lamina III-IV cells whose dendritic surface area distributions were based on intracellularly stained cells. There was an overall similarity among pre- and postsynaptic embryonic and adult somatotopies, with a progressive transformation of RF angular location as a function of RC, ML dorsal horn location from an initial embryonic presynaptic concentric pattern to an adult postsynaptic radial one. The initial embryonic dorsal horn cell RF assembly hypothesis was supported by the simulations, as was the additional hypothesis that further refinement of connections would be necessary to establish sufficient selectivity to account for observed adult RFs and somatotopy. PMID:16125155

  3. Direct catecholaminergic innervation of spinal dorsal horn neurons with axons ascending the dorsal columns in cat.

    PubMed

    Doyle, C A; Maxwell, D J

    1993-05-15

    Previous ultrastructural studies have shown that catecholamine-containing nerve terminals in the spinal dorsal horn form synaptic junctions with dendrites and somata, but the identity of the neurons giving rise to these structures is largely unknown. In this study we have investigated the possibility that spinomedullary neurons, which project through the dorsal columns to the dorsal column nuclei, are synaptic targets for descending catecholaminergic axons. Neurons with axons ascending the dorsal columns were retrogradely labelled after uptake of horseradish peroxidase by their severed axons in the thoracic (T10-T12) or cervical (C2-C3) dorsal columns. After the retrogradely labelled neurons were visualized, the tissue was immunocytochemically stained with antisera raised against tyrosine hydroxylase or dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. Three hundred forty-three retrogradely labelled neurons within laminae III-V of the lumbosacral dorsal horn were examined under high power with the light microscope. In Triton X-100 treated material, over 60% of cells were found to have dopamine-beta-hydroxylase-immunoreactive varicosities closely apposed to their somata and proximal dendrites. The number of contacts per cell varied from 1 to 22, with a mean number of 4.5. Fewer cells (34%) received contacts from axons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase as a consequence of the weaker immunoreaction produced by this antiserum. Correlated light and electron microscopic analysis confirmed that many of these contacts were regions of synaptic specialization and that immunostained boutons contained pleomorphic (round to oval) agranular vesicles together with several dense core vesicles. These observations suggest that catecholamines regulate sensory transmission through this spinomedullary pathway by a direct postsynaptic action upon its cells of origin. Such an action would be predicted to suppress transmission generally through this pathway. PMID:8099918

  4. Social norms for intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Witte, Tricia H; Mulla, Mazheruddin M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated perceived descriptive norms (i.e., perceived prevalence) for intimate partner violence (IPV) among college students. Male and female college students were asked to estimate the prevalence of IPV for same-sex "typical students" on their campus. Perpetrators of IPV made higher estimates than nonperpetrators. Both perpetrators and nonperpetrators overestimated the prevalence of IPV when compared to actual prevalence rates. Findings lend support for using social-norms-based prevention programs on college campuses. PMID:24547674

  5. NEIGHBORHOOD NORMS AND SUBSTANCE USE AMONG TEENS

    PubMed Central

    Musick, Kelly; Seltzer, Judith A.; Schwartz, Christine R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses new data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A. FANS) to examine how neighborhood norms shape teenagers’ substance use. Specifically, it takes advantage of clustered data at the neighborhood level to relate adult neighbors’ attitudes and behavior with respect to smoking, drinking, and drugs, which we treat as norms, to teenagers’ own smoking, drinking, and drug use. We use hierarchical linear models to account for parents’ attitudes and behavior and other characteristics of individuals and families. We also investigate how the association between neighborhood norms and teen behavior depends on: (1) the strength of norms, as measured by consensus in neighbors’ attitudes and conformity in their behavior; (2) the willingness and ability of neighbors to enforce norms, for instance, by monitoring teens’ activities; and (3) the degree to which teens are exposed to their neighbors. We find little association between neighborhood norms and teen substance use, regardless of how we condition the relationship. We discuss possible theoretical and methodological explanations for this finding. PMID:18496598

  6. A Cadaveric Investigation of the Dorsal Scapular Nerve.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vuvi H; Liu, Hao Howe; Rosales, Armando; Reeves, Rustin

    2016-01-01

    Compression of the dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) is associated with pain in the upper extremity and back. Even though entrapment of the DSN within the middle scalene muscle is typically the primary cause of pain, it is still easily missed during diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to document the DSN's anatomy and measure the oblique course it takes with regard to the middle scalene muscle. From 20 embalmed adult cadavers, 23 DSNs were documented regarding the nerve's spinal root origin, anatomical route, and muscular innervations. A transverse plane through the laryngeal prominence was established to measure the distance of the DSN from this plane as it enters, crosses, and exits the middle scalene muscle. Approximately 70% of the DSNs originated from C5, with 74% piercing the middle scalene muscle. About 48% of the DSNs supplied the levator scapulae muscle only and 52% innervated both the levator scapulae and rhomboid muscles. The average distances from a transverse plane at the laryngeal prominence where the DSN entered, crossed, and exited the middle scalene muscle were 1.50 cm, 1.79 cm, and 2.08 cm, respectively. Our goal is to help improve clinicians' ability to locate the site of DSN entrapment so that appropriate management can be implemented. PMID:27597900

  7. A Cadaveric Investigation of the Dorsal Scapular Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vuvi H.; Liu, Hao (Howe); Rosales, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Compression of the dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) is associated with pain in the upper extremity and back. Even though entrapment of the DSN within the middle scalene muscle is typically the primary cause of pain, it is still easily missed during diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to document the DSN's anatomy and measure the oblique course it takes with regard to the middle scalene muscle. From 20 embalmed adult cadavers, 23 DSNs were documented regarding the nerve's spinal root origin, anatomical route, and muscular innervations. A transverse plane through the laryngeal prominence was established to measure the distance of the DSN from this plane as it enters, crosses, and exits the middle scalene muscle. Approximately 70% of the DSNs originated from C5, with 74% piercing the middle scalene muscle. About 48% of the DSNs supplied the levator scapulae muscle only and 52% innervated both the levator scapulae and rhomboid muscles. The average distances from a transverse plane at the laryngeal prominence where the DSN entered, crossed, and exited the middle scalene muscle were 1.50 cm, 1.79 cm, and 2.08 cm, respectively. Our goal is to help improve clinicians' ability to locate the site of DSN entrapment so that appropriate management can be implemented. PMID:27597900

  8. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Malphrus, Jonathan D.; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B.; Konrad, Peter E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients (n=7) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and 1.23  J/cm2. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at 1.09  J/cm2 and a 2∶1 safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans. PMID:26157986

  9. Dorsal wrist mass: the carpal boss.

    PubMed

    Boggess, Blake; Berkoff, David

    2011-01-01

    The carpal boss is an osseous overgrowth that is occasionally mistaken for a ganglion cyst. This report highlights the case a 36-year-old patient who was originally diagnosed by his primary care physician with a ganglion cyst and was sent to an orthopaedist for aspiration. Upon further evaluation with a plain radiograph, the dorsal wrist mass was found to be a carpal boss. The patient was treated with rest and a wrist brace, and was informed that a corticosteroid injection or surgical excision would be necessary if conservative treatment failed. The patient was asymptomatic on follow-up and invasive procedures were not necessary. PMID:22707539

  10. Fair play: social norm compliance failures in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Claire; Bertoux, Maxime; Irish, Muireann; Shine, James M; Wong, Stephanie; Spiliopoulos, Leonidas; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    cortex, anterior cingulate and dorsal striatum. Acceptance rates in the Ultimatum Game were also significantly related to impairments in the everyday expression of empathic concern. In conclusion, we demonstrate that compliance to basic social norms (fairness) can be maintained in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia; however, more complex normative behaviours (prosociality, punishment) that require integration of social contextual information are disrupted in association with atrophy in key fronto-striatal regions. These results suggest that the integration of social contextual information to guide normative behaviour is uniquely impaired in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, and may explain other common features of the condition including gullibility and impaired empathy. Our findings also converge with previous functional neuroimaging investigations in healthy individuals and provide the first description of the structural anatomy of social norm compliance in a neurodegenerative lesion model. PMID:26503957

  11. Isolated dorsal dislocation of the tarsal naviculum

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Kaziz; Hazem, Ben Ghozlen; Yadh, Zitoun; Faouzi, Abid

    2015-01-01

    Isolated dislocation of the tarsal naviculum is an unusual injury, scarcely reported in the literature. The naviculum is surrounded by the rigid bony and ligamentous support hence fracture dislocation is more common than isolated dislocation. The mechanism and treatment options remain unclear. In this case report, we describe a 31 year old man who sustained an isolated dorsal dislocation of the left tarsal naviculum, without fracture, when he was involved in a motor vehicle collision. The reported mechanism of the dislocation is a hyper plantar flexion force applied to the midfoot, resulting in a transient disruption of the ligamentous support of the naviculum bone, with dorsal displacement of the bone. The patient was treated with open reduction and Krischner-wire fixation of the navicular after the failure of closed reduction. The wires were removed after 6 weeks postoperatively. Physiotherapy for stiffness and midfoot pain was recommended for 2 months. At 6 months postoperatively, limping, midfoot pain and weakness were reported, no X-ray abnormalities were found. The patient returned to his obvious activities with a normal range of motion. PMID:26806978

  12. Isolated dorsal dislocation of the lunate.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Na; Sarkar, Sp

    2012-01-01

    Lunate dislocations are well described in the volar direction as part of the perilunate dislocation, sometimes together with fractures of the other carpal bones or distal radius, as described by the anatomical studies of Mayfield [1]. It is a result of disruption of the complex inter-carpal and radiocarpal ligaments that hold the well conforming carpus in their normal position. Given the strength of these structures a significant trauma is required to cause them to fail.However, we present a case of a patient who not only presented with relatively trivial trauma that resulted in a lunate dislocation, but it was also in the dorsal direction and not associated with any fracture or neurological compromise. In addition, she presented several days after her injury.We treated her with closed manipulation and percutaneous K-wire fixation followed by a short period of immobilisation in a Plaster-of-Paris cast, with rapid return to full duties at work.As many volar lunate dislocations may be missed at presentation, we suggest that in patients with relatively trivial trauma there should also be a suspicion of the lunate dislocating dorsally, which may be treated successfully without the aggressive open surgery usually required in volar perilunate dislocations. PMID:23248723

  13. [Personal and social norms that determine children's waste reduction behavior].

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Kayo

    2011-08-01

    Research has demonstrated the environmentally conscious behavior of parents and caregivers acts as a social influence that produces environmentally conscious behavior in their children, and also has an effect on their children's cost-benefit evaluations and social norm evaluations. The present study examined the personal norms for producing continuous environmentally conscious behavior, and two social norms that form the personal norms, which are categorized as descriptive and subjective norms. The results of this study suggest that the subjective norm formed the personal norm. Furthermore, the parents' normative social influences affected the personal norm through the subjective norm, and the parents' behavior affected their children's environmentally conscious behavior through the descriptive norm. PMID:21919301

  14. Function of dorsal fins in bamboo shark during steady swimming.

    PubMed

    Maia, Anabela; Wilga, Cheryl A

    2013-08-01

    To gain insight into the function of the dorsal fins in white-spotted bamboo sharks (Orectolobiformes: Hemiscyillidae) during steady swimming, data on three-dimensional kinematics and electromyographic recordings were collected. Bamboo sharks were induced to swim at 0.5 and 0.75 body lengths per second in a laminar flow tank. Displacement, lag and angles were analyzed from high-speed video images. Onset, offset, duration, duty cycle and asynchrony index were calculated from three muscle implants on each side of each dorsal fin. The dorsal fins were displaced more laterally than the undulating body. In addition, the dorsal tips had larger lateral displacement than the trailing edges. Increased speed was accompanied by an increase in tail beat frequency with constant tail beat amplitude. However, lateral displacement of the fins and duration of muscle bursts remained relatively constant with increased speed. The range of lateral motion was greater for the second dorsal fin (mean 33.3°) than for the first dorsal fin (mean 28.4°). Bending within the fin was greater for the second dorsal fin (mean 43.8°) than for the first dorsal fin (mean 30.8°). Muscle onset and offset among implants on the same side of each dorsal fin was similar. Three-dimensional conformation of the dorsal fins was caused by interactions between muscle activity, material properties, and incident flow. Alternating bilateral activity occurred in both dorsal fins, further supporting the active role of these hydrofoils in thrust production during steady swimming. The dorsal fins in bamboo sharks are capable of thrust production during steady swimming and do not appear to function as stabilizing structures. PMID:23830781

  15. Learning the Norm of Internality: NetNorm, a Connectionist Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thierry, Bollon; Adeline, Paignon; Pascal, Pansu

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present article is to show that connectionist simulations can be used to model some of the socio-cognitive processes underlying the learning of the norm of internality. For our simulations, we developed a connectionist model which we called NetNorm (based on Dual-Network formalism). This model is capable of simulating the…

  16. The post-natal development of cutaneous afferent fibre input and receptive field organization in the rat dorsal horn.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, M

    1985-01-01

    The responses evoked in lumbar dorsal horn cells by both natural and electrical hind-limb skin stimulation were recorded in the spinal cord of rat pups aged 0-15 days under urethane anaesthesia. The input volley was recorded on the L4 dorsal root and consisted of two separate waves from birth. Latency and threshold measurements were consistent with these two waves being immature A (myelinated fibre) waves and C (non-myelinated fibre) waves. On the first 3 days of life background activity of cells in the dorsal horn was low and evoked discharges were sluggish. On electrical stimulation of the skin, neonatal dorsal horn cells frequently responded with only 1 or 2 impulses per input volley with long central delays of up to 20 ms. Synaptic linkage appeared weak and many cells failed to follow stimulation rates of 5 Hz. Natural skin stimulation showed that the majority of cells at days 0-3 responded to pinching the skin only. The development of responses evoked by C fibres in the dorsal horn was delayed compared to that of responses evoked by A fibres. Short and long latency responses corresponding to the early A and late C afferent input volleys could be recorded in the superficial laminae (I, II and III) of the dorsal horn from day 0, but in the deeper laminae only early short latency A responses were evoked until the age of day 7-8. After this time, a long latency C response also appeared and increased in strength with age. Convergence of low and high threshold inputs onto dorsal horn cells was rare at birth but increased gradually over the following two weeks. Receptive field areas, mapped by natural mechanical stimulation of skin, were large at birth and decreased in size with age. At birth the mean receptive field area was 14.2% of the total hind-limb area whereas at day 15 it was 3.6%. This fall in size was particularly marked in cells of the deep dorsal horn. Pinching or brushing the receptive field of many neonatal dorsal horn cells resulted in long

  17. Face recognition with L1-norm subspaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maritato, Federica; Liu, Ying; Colonnese, Stefania; Pados, Dimitris A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the problem of representing individual faces by maximum L1-norm projection subspaces calculated from available face-image ensembles. In contrast to conventional L2-norm subspaces, L1-norm subspaces are seen to offer significant robustness to image variations, disturbances, and rank selection. Face recognition becomes then the problem of associating a new unknown face image to the "closest," in some sense, L1 subspace in the database. In this work, we also introduce the concept of adaptively allocating the available number of principal components to different face image classes, subject to a given total number/budget of principal components. Experimental studies included in this paper illustrate and support the theoretical developments.

  18. True gender ratios and stereotype rating norms

    PubMed Central

    Garnham, Alan; Doehren, Sam; Gygax, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    We present a study comparing, in English, perceived distributions of men and women in 422 named occupations with actual real world distributions. The first set of data was obtained from previous a large-scale norming study, whereas the second set was mostly drawn from UK governmental sources. In total, real world ratios for 290 occupations were obtained for our perceive vs. real world comparison, of which 205 were deemed to be unproblematic. The means for the two sources were similar and the correlation between them was high, suggesting that people are generally accurate at judging real gender ratios, though there were some notable exceptions. Beside this correlation, some interesting patterns emerged from the two sources, suggesting some response strategies when people complete norming studies. We discuss these patterns in terms of the way real world data might complement norming studies in determining gender stereotypicality. PMID:26257681

  19. Mixed Norm Regularized Discrimination for Image Steganalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoming; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Dong

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of image steganalysis is to detect the presence of hidden messages in cover images. Steganalysis can be considered as a pattern recognition process to decide which class a test image belongs to: the innocent photographic image or the stego-image. This paper presents a definition of mixed L_{p,q} matrix norm as an extension of L_{2,1} matrix norm. We incorporate discriminative mixed L_{p,q} matrix norm analysis to select the features which best preserve the data distribution, e.g., manifold structure, of the whole feature sets. Experiments on different data sets verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach and the selected features are more discriminate.

  20. Development, social norms, and assignment to task

    PubMed Central

    Fafchamps, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Economic development involves a structural transformation in the way people are allocated to tasks. There is a shift from self-provision to market exchange, facilitating specialization. There is also a shift from self-employment to wage employment in large firms and organizations, driven by innovation and increasing returns to scale. Changes in allocation mechanisms require changes in norms and attitudes. Because different labor assignment domains coexist, conflicts arise among norms that apply to different domains, possibly resulting in dysfunctional outcomes. I argue that religion, humanism, and schools have all played an important historical role in fostering the changes in social norms and attitudes that are needed to accompany structural changes in the way economies allocate workers to tasks. PMID:22198757

  1. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent

  2. Dorsal Wrist Capsular Tears in Association with Scapholunate Instability: Results of an Arthroscopic Dorsal Capsuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Adeline Cambon; Kerfant, Nathalie; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Tandara, Andrea A.; Mathoulin, Christophe L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to report the association of dorsal wrist capsular avulsion with scapholunate ligament instability and to evaluate the results of an arthroscopy-assisted repair. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients with a mean age of 39.1 years suffering from chronic dorsal wrist pain. They underwent a wrist arthroscopy with an evaluation of the scapholunate ligament complex from the radiocarpal and midcarpal compartments. An avulsion of the dorsal intercarpal ligament (DICL) from the scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) was visible from the radiocarpal compartment in all cases, while the SLIL was intact. The DICL tear was repaired with an arthroscopy-assisted dorsal capsuloplasty. Patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by the QuickDASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) questionnaire, by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, and by a clinical and radiological examination. Results Preoperatively, all patients had reduced flexion and radial deviation of the affected wrist. On the lateral radiograph, 5 of the 10 patients showed an increase of the scapholunate angle (60 to 85°). The scapholunate instability was graded as Messina–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) II in five cases and as grade IIIB in five cases. A tear of the ulnar part of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) was found in seven cases. At a mean followup of 16 months, the wrist range of motion (ROM), the grip strength, the QuickDASH, and the VAS of pain improved significatively. The scapholunate angle was normalized in all cases. Discussion Isolated tears of the DICL at its insertion from the dorsal part of the SLIL can be associated with scapholunate instability in the absence of an injury to the SLIL. The diagnosis is made arthroscopically. The arthroscopic dorsal capsuloplasty is a minimally invasive technique that provides short-term satisfactory results. Further studies are needed to determine whether

  3. Root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    When a plant root is reoriented within the gravity field, it responds by initiating a curvature which eventually results in vertical growth. Gravity sensing occurs primarily in the root tip. It may involve amyloplast sedimentation in the columella cells of the root cap, or the detection of forces exerted by the mass of the protoplast on opposite sides of its cell wall. Gravisensing activates a signal transduction cascade which results in the asymmetric redistribution of auxin and apoplastic Ca2+ across the root tip, with accumulation at the bottom side. The resulting lateral asymmetry in Ca2+ and auxin concentration is probably transmitted to the elongation zone where differential cellular elongation occurs until the tip resumes vertical growth. The Cholodny-Went theory proposes that gravity-induced auxin redistribution across a gravistimulated plant organ is responsible for the gravitropic response. However, recent data indicate that the gravity-induced reorientation is more complex, involving both auxin gradient-dependent and auxin gradient-independent events.

  4. Root canal

    MedlinePlus

    Endodontic therapy ... the root of a tooth. Generally, there is pain and swelling in the area. The infection can ... You may have some pain or soreness after the procedure. An over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, can help relieve ...

  5. Energizing and de-motivating effects of norm-conflict.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Rachel I; Fielding, Kelly S; Louis, Winnifred R

    2013-01-01

    Norms have a pervasive influence on behavior, yet previous research has not addressed that people often face conflicting norms from multiple ingroups. The current research addresses this gap in the context of proenvironmental behavior and demonstrates two effects predicted by the novel theoretical position we offer: People can be de-motivated by norm-conflict, or conversely, norm-conflict can encourage people to take action. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrated that norm-conflict is associated with increased perceived effectiveness for those with positive attitudes to the issue and reduced perceived effectiveness for those with moderate attitudes, and effectiveness perceptions mediated an indirect effect on behavioral intentions. Study 3 found that perceived effectiveness also moderates the effects of norm-conflict such that norm-conflict only influences intentions when perceived effectiveness is high. Norm-conflict is both positively and negatively related to behavioral decision making, suggesting additional considerations in the design of social norms-based interventions. PMID:23100542

  6. Norms as Group-Level Constructs: Investigating School-Level Teen Pregnancy Norms and Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Domingue, Benjamin W.; Boardman, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Social norms are a group-level phenomenon, but past quantitative research has rarely measured them in the aggregate or considered their group-level properties. We used the school-based design of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to measure normative climates regarding teen pregnancy across 75 U.S. high schools. We distinguished between the strength of a school's norm against teen pregnancy and the consensus around that norm. School-level norm strength and dissensus were strongly (r = -0.65) and moderately (r = 0.34) associated with pregnancy prevalence within schools, respectively. Normative climate partially accounted for observed racial differences in school pregnancy prevalence, but norms were a stronger predictor than racial composition. As hypothesized, schools with both a stronger average norm against teen pregnancy and greater consensus around the norm had the lowest pregnancy prevalence. Results highlight the importance of group-level normative processes and of considering the local school environment when designing policies to reduce teen pregnancy. PMID:26074628

  7. Arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia and treatment of recurrences.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, R; Badia, A; Alfarano, M; Orbay, J; Indriago, I; Mustapha, B

    2000-02-01

    From 1995 to 1998, 30 patients with dorsal wrist ganglia and four with recurrent dorsal ganglia underwent arthroscopic resection. At a mean follow-up of 16 months, no complications were seen, but minimal pain persisted in three patients. Two recurrences were seen after arthroscopic resection of primary ganglia. PMID:10763721

  8. Arthroscopic diagnosis and treatment of dorsal wrist ganglion.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, S; Toh, S; Miura, H; Arai, K; Irie, T

    2001-12-01

    Thirty-seven patients with dorsal wrist ganglia underwent arthroscopic resection. The mean follow-up was 20 months, and no complications were encountered. The ganglia were classified into three types according to their arthroscopic appearance. This classification helps to determine the amount of dorsal capsular resection required. PMID:11884110

  9. Deafferentation causes a loss of presynaptic bombesin receptors and supersensitivity of substance P receptors in the dorsal horn of the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Massari, V J; Shults, C W; Park, C H; Tizabi, Y; Moody, T W; Chronwall, B M; Culver, M; Chase, T N

    1985-09-23

    Bombesin (BN)- and substance P (SP)-containing neurons are found in the dorsal root ganglia, and project to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The present study was undertaken to determine if chronic deafferentation of the cat spinal cord would affect BN or SP receptors in the spinal cord. Ten and 30 days after a unilateral lumbosacral dorsal rhizotomy, BN and SP receptor binding was evaluated autoradiographically using iodinated ligands to bind to these receptors in vitro. The normal distribution of BN receptors detected by this method was restricted to the head of the dorsal horn. Deafferentation caused a 38% and 22% decline in BN receptor binding in laminae I-IV at 10 or 30 days postoperatively, respectively. These data suggest that 'presynaptic' BN receptors are found on the central nervous system terminals of primary sensory afferents. Normal SP receptor distribution was most dense in lamina X, not in the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn. Deafferentation caused an initial decline in SP receptor binding in laminae I-II, followed by a 14% increase at 30 days in comparison to the unoperated side of the spinal cord. This delayed supersensitivity of SP receptors was confirmed in a separate experiment using a homogenate binding assay. These data are discussed with respect to the potential roles of receptor supersensitivity or subsensitivity in the development of deafferentation-induced changes in reactivity of dorsal horn neurons to nociceptive and non-nociceptive stimuli. PMID:2413960

  10. Criterion vs. Norm-referenced Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pimsleur, Paul

    1975-01-01

    A norm-referenced evaluation system, which evaluates the student in comparison to his peers, is rejected in favor of a criterion-referenced system. The latter, which rates the performance of a student on an absolute standard, makes for an individualized approach. Two kinds of tests are distinguished, the formative, administered during the course…

  11. Toleration and the Design of Norms.

    PubMed

    Floridi, Luciano

    2015-10-01

    One of the pressing challenges we face today-in a post-Westphalian order (emergence of the state as the modern, political information agent) and post-Bretton Woods world (emergence of non-state multiagent systems or MASs as "hyperhistorical" players in the global economy and politics)-is how to design the right kind of MAS that can take full advantage of the socio-economic and political progress made so far, while dealing successfully with the new global challenges that are undermining the best legacy of that very progress. This is the topic of the article. In it, I argue that (i) in order to design the right kind of MAS, we need to design the right kind of norms that constitute them; (ii) in order to design the right kind of constitutive norms, we need to identify and adopt the right kind of principles of normative design; (iii) toleration is one of those principles; (iv) unfortunately, its role as a foundation for the design of norms has been undermined by the "paradox of toleration"; (v) however, the paradox can be solved; (vi) so toleration can be re-instated as the right kind of foundational principle for the design of the right kind of norms that can constitute the right kind of MAS that can operate across cultures, societies and states, to help us to tackle the new global challenges facing us. PMID:25287376

  12. Contrasting Norm Referenced and Criterion Referenced Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Robert S.

    Differences in design between norm referenced measures (NRM) and criterion referenced measures (CRM) are reviewed, and some of the procedures proposed on designing and evaluating CRM are examined. Differences in design of NRM and CRM are said to arise from the different purposes that underlie each measure. In addition, there are differences among…

  13. Academic Dishonesty, Ethical Norms and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colnerud, Gunnel; Rosander, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This study is aimed to deduce which ethical norms and considerations are implicitly present in the students' answers when they are asked to define to what degree the presented actions in a questionnaire are acts of cheating. Data are analysed by factor analysis as well as qualitative analysis. The questions asked are: What characterises the items…

  14. Norming plans for the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Havlik, Richard; Cook, Karon F.; Hays, Ron D.; Wallner-Allen, Kathleen; Korper, Samuel P.; Lai, Jin-Shei; Nord, Christine; Zill, Nicholas; Choi, Seung; Yost, Kathleen J.; Ustsinovich, Vitali; Brouwers, Pim; Hoffman, Howard J.; Gershon, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function (NIH Toolbox) is a comprehensive battery of brief assessment tools. The purpose of this article is to describe plans to establish normative reference values for the NIH Toolbox measures. Methods: A large sample will be obtained from the US population for the purpose of calculating normative values. The sample will be stratified by age (ages 3–85 years), sex, and language preference (English or Spanish) and have a total sample size of at least 4,205. The sample will include a minimum of 25–100 individuals in each targeted demographic and language subgroup. Results: Norming methods will include poststratification adjustment calculated using iterative proportional fitting, also known as raking, so that the weighted sample will have the same distribution on key demographic variables as the US population described in the 2010 Census. Conclusions: As with any set of norms, users should be mindful of the reference population and make conclusions consistent with the limitations of normative sampling, since it is not a probability-based sample. However, the NIH Toolbox norming study has been designed to minimize bias and maximize representativeness and precision of estimates. The availability of a "toolbox" of normed measures will be an important foundation for addressing critical research questions in neurologic and behavioral health. PMID:23479550

  15. Non-Euclidean-normed Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2016-03-01

    This analysis introduces a possible generalization of Statistical Mechanics within the framework of non-Euclidean metrics induced by the Lp norms. The internal energy is interpreted by the non-Euclidean Lp-normed expectation value of a given energy spectrum. The presented non-Euclidean adaptation of Statistical Mechanics involves finding the stationary probability distribution in the Canonical Ensemble by maximizing the Boltzmann-Gibbs and Tsallis entropy under the constraint of internal energy. The derived non-Euclidean Canonical probability distributions are respectively given by an exponential, and by a q-deformed exponential, of a power-law dependence on energy states. The case of the continuous energy spectrum is thoroughly examined. The Canonical probability distribution is analytically calculated for a power-law density of energy. The relevant non-Euclidean-normed kappa distribution is also derived. This analysis exposes the possible values of the q- or κ-indices, which are strictly limited to certain ranges, depending on the given Lp-norm. The equipartition of energy in each degree of freedom and the extensivity of the internal energy, are also shown. Surprisingly, the physical temperature coincides with the kinetically defined temperature, similar to the Euclidean case. Finally, the connection with thermodynamics arises through the well-known standard classical formalisms.

  16. Social Norms Theory and Concussion Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroshus, Emily; Garnett, Bernice R.; Baugh, Christine M.; Calzo, Jerel P.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary prevention of harm from sport-related concussion is contingent on immediate removal from play post-injury. To date, educational efforts to reduce the prevalent risk behavior of continued play while symptomatic have been largely ineffective. Social norms theory may hold promise as a foundation for more effective concussion education aimed…

  17. Towards a Norm in South African Englishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Walt, Johann L.; van Rooy, Bertus

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the perception and application of the norm in South African English with specific reference to Black South African English. Hypothesizes that South African English is in the hibernation and expansion phase. Three sets of data are presented and analyzed. (Author/VWL)

  18. Dorsal hump morphology in pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha).

    PubMed

    Susuki, Kenta; Ichimura, Masaki; Koshino, Yosuke; Kaeriyama, Masahide; Takagi, Yasuaki; Adachi, Shinji; Kudo, Hideaki

    2014-05-01

    Mature male Pacific salmon (Genus Oncorhynchus) develop a dorsal hump, as a secondary male sexual characteristic, during the spawning period. Previous gross anatomical studies have indicated that the dorsal humps of salmon are mainly composed of cartilaginous tissue (Davidson [1935] J Morphol 57:169-183.) However, the histological and biochemical characteristics of such humps are poorly understood. In this study, the detailed microstructures and components of the dorsal humps of pink salmon were analyzed using histochemical techniques and electrophoresis. In mature males, free interneural spines and neural spines were located in a line near to the median septum of the dorsal hump. No cartilaginous tissue was detected within the dorsal hump. Fibrous and mucous connective tissues were mainly found in three regions of the dorsal hump: i) the median septum, ii) the distal region, and iii) the crescent-shaped region. Both the median septum and distal region consisted of connective tissue with a high water content, which contained elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid. It was also demonstrated that the lipid content of the dorsal hump connective tissue was markedly decreased in the mature males compared with the immature and maturing males. Although, the crescent-shaped region of the hump consisted of connective tissue, it did not contain elastic fibers, hyaluronic acid, or lipids. In an ultrastructural examination, it was found that all of the connective tissues in the dorsal hump were composed of collagen fibers. Gel electrophoresis of collagen extracts from these tissues found that the collagen in the dorsal hump is composed of Type I collagen, as is the case in salmon skin. These results indicate that in male pink salmon the dorsal hump is formed as a result of an increase in the amount of connective tissue, rather than cartilage, and the growth of free interneural spines and neural spines. PMID:24323872

  19. β-Arrestins Negatively Regulate the Toll Pathway in Shrimp by Preventing Dorsal Translocation and Inhibiting Dorsal Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie-Jie; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Yang, Ming-Chong; Niu, Guo-Juan; Ding, Ding; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-04-01

    The Toll signaling pathway plays an important role in the innate immunity ofDrosophila melanogasterand mammals. The activation and termination of Toll signaling are finely regulated in these animals. Although the primary components of the Toll pathway were identified in shrimp, the functions and regulation of the pathway are seldom studied. We first demonstrated that the Toll signaling pathway plays a central role in host defense againstStaphylococcus aureusby regulating expression of antimicrobial peptides in shrimp. We then found that β-arrestins negatively regulate Toll signaling in two different ways. β-Arrestins interact with the C-terminal PEST domain of Cactus through the arrestin-N domain, and Cactus interacts with the RHD domain of Dorsal via the ankyrin repeats domain, forming a heterotrimeric complex of β-arrestin·Cactus·Dorsal, with Cactus as the bridge. This complex prevents Cactus phosphorylation and degradation, as well as Dorsal translocation into the nucleus, thus inhibiting activation of the Toll signaling pathway. β-Arrestins also interact with non-phosphorylated ERK (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) through the arrestin-C domain to inhibit ERK phosphorylation, which affects Dorsal translocation into the nucleus and phosphorylation of Dorsal at Ser(276)that impairs Dorsal transcriptional activity. Our study suggests that β-arrestins negatively regulate the Toll signaling pathway by preventing Dorsal translocation and inhibiting Dorsal phosphorylation and transcriptional activity. PMID:26846853

  20. Identification and molecular characterization of dorsal and dorsal-like genes in the cyclopoid copepod Paracyclopina nana.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Lee, Min Chul; Lee, Kyun-Woo; Seo, Jung Soo; Park, Heum Gi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-12-01

    To date, knowledge of the immune system in aquatic invertebrates has been reported in only a few model organisms, even though all metazoans have an innate immune system. In particular, information on the copepod's immunity and the potential role of key genes in the innate immune systems is still unclear. In this study, we identified dorsal and dorsal-like genes in the cyclopoid copepod Paracyclopina nana. In silico analyses for identifying conserved domains and phylogenetic relationships supported their gene annotations. The transcriptional levels of both genes were slightly increased from the nauplius to copepodid stages, suggesting that these genes are putatively involved in copepodid development of P. nana. To examine the involvement of both genes in the innate immune response and under stressful conditions, the copepods were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), different culture densities, salinities, and temperatures. LPS significantly upregulated mRNA expressions of dorsal and dorsal-like genes, suggesting that both genes are transcriptionally sensitive in response to immune modulators. Exposure to unfavorable culture conditions also increased mRNA levels of dorsal and dorsal-like genes. These findings suggest that transcriptional regulation of the dorsal and dorsal-like genes would be associated with environmental changes in P. nana. PMID:26297599

  1. Normes linguistiques: Determination, description, contenu, utilite (Linguistic Norms: Determination, Description, Content, Usefulness)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mareschal, Roger

    1977-01-01

    Discusses different approaches for determining second language proficiency norms to be set by employers for personnel, all involving varying degrees of emphasis on linguistic proficiency on the one hand, and communicative competence on the other. (Text is in French.) (AM)

  2. Injunctive social norms primacy over descriptive social norms in retirement savings decisions.

    PubMed

    Croy, Gerry; Gerrans, Paul; Speelman, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Consistent with the global trend to shift responsibility for retirement income provision from the public purse to individuals has been encouragement to save more and to manage investment strategy. Analyzing data from 2,300 respondents to a randomly distributed questionnaire, this article focuses on the motivational importance of social norms. The study finds injunctive social norms (what is commonly approved or disapproved of) exert greater influence than descriptive social norms (what is commonly done) in predicting retirement savings intentions. Modeling employs the theory of planned behavior, and also finds injunctive social norm has predictive primacy over attitude and perceived behavioral control. Discussion advocates a balanced approach to intervention design, and identifies opportunities for the further study of normative message framing. PMID:21261135

  3. Clinically relevant concentration of pregabalin has no acute inhibitory effect on excitation of dorsal horn neurons under normal or neuropathic pain conditions: An intracellular calcium-imaging study in spinal cord slices from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Baba, Hiroshi; Petrenko, Andrey B; Fujiwara, Naoshi

    2016-10-01

    Pregabalin is thought to exert its therapeutic effect in neuropathic pain via binding to α2δ-1 subunits of voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. However, the exact analgesic mechanism after its binding to α2δ-1 subunits remains largely unknown. Whether a clinical concentration of pregabalin (≈10μM) can cause acute inhibition of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is controversial. To address this issue, we undertook intracellular Ca(2+)-imaging studies using spinal cord slices with an intact attached L5 dorsal root, and examined if pregabalin acutely inhibits the primary afferent stimulation-evoked excitation of dorsal horn neurons in normal rats and in rats with streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, stimulation of a dorsal root evoked Ca(2+) signals predominantly in the superficial dorsal horn. Clinically relevant (10μM) and a very high concentration of pregabalin (100μM) did not affect the intensity or spread of dorsal root stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals, whereas an extremely high dose of pregabalin (300μM) slightly but significantly attenuated Ca(2+) signals in normal rats and in diabetic neuropathic (DN) rats. There was no difference between normal rats and DN rats with regard to the extent of signal attenuation at all concentrations tested. These results suggest that the activity of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is not inhibited acutely by clinical doses of pregabalin under normal or DN conditions. It is very unlikely that an acute inhibitory action in the dorsal horn is the main analgesic mechanism of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states. PMID:27543338

  4. Norms Regulating Self-Disclosure Among Polish University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derlega, Valerian J.; Stepien, Ewa Gurnik

    1977-01-01

    In the first study reported most American norms governing reactions to self-disclosure to friends and strangers were replicated. In the second study American norms governing self-disclosure to males and females were not replicated. (Author/AM)

  5. A Review of Norms and Normative Multiagent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Moamin A.; Ahmad, Mohd Sharifuddin; Mustapha, Aida

    2014-01-01

    Norms and normative multiagent systems have become the subjects of interest for many researchers. Such interest is caused by the need for agents to exploit the norms in enhancing their performance in a community. The term norm is used to characterize the behaviours of community members. The concept of normative multiagent systems is used to facilitate collaboration and coordination among social groups of agents. Many researches have been conducted on norms that investigate the fundamental concepts, definitions, classification, and types of norms and normative multiagent systems including normative architectures and normative processes. However, very few researches have been found to comprehensively study and analyze the literature in advancing the current state of norms and normative multiagent systems. Consequently, this paper attempts to present the current state of research on norms and normative multiagent systems and propose a norm's life cycle model based on the review of the literature. Subsequently, this paper highlights the significant areas for future work. PMID:25110739

  6. The Norm Implementation Problem in Normative Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, D.; Gabbay, D.; van der Torre, L.

    The norm implementation problem consists in how to see to it that the agents in a system comply with the norms specified for that system by the system designer. It is part of the more general problem of how to synthesize or create norms for multi-agent systems, by, for example, highlighting the choice between regimentation and enforcement, or the punishment associated with a norm violation. In this paper we discuss how various ways to implement norms in a multi-agent system can be distinguished in a formal game-theoretic framework. In particular, we show how different types of norm implementation can all be uniformly specified and verified as types of transformations of extensive games. We introduce the notion of retarded preconditions to implement norms, and we illustrate the framework and the various ways to implement norms in the blocks world environment.

  7. A Modified CIPW Norm Calculation for Lunar Mare Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milliken, R. E.; Basu, A.

    2000-01-01

    CIPW norms of lunar mare basalts are anomalously low in pyroxene. A modified norm calculation allowing higher Ca, Ti, Al, Cr, and Mn in di' and hy' obtains closer matches between normative and modal mineralogy.

  8. Occult scapholunate ganglion: a cause of dorsal radial wrist pain.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, B D; Kleinman, W B

    1999-03-01

    There are multiple causes for chronic dorsal wrist pain over the scapholunate ligament, including occult dorsal carpal ganglion cyst, scaphoid impaction syndrome, dorsal carpal capsulitis, distal posterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and dynamic scapholunate ligament instability. Patients with such pain often have normal x-rays. A retrospective study of 21 patients undergoing surgical exploration for chronic dorsal radial wrist pain who had no palpable cyst and normal x-rays revealed that 18 of the patients had occult scapholunate ganglion cysts or myxomatous degeneration within the scapholunate ligament. All had failed long-term conservative management. Surgery involved an approach through Langer's lines, resection of a large triangular portion of the capsule between the dorsal intercarpal and radiotriquetral ligaments, and tangential debridement of the area of myxoid degeneration proximal to the distal 2 to 3 mm of dorsal scapholunate interosseous ligament. None of the patients had scapholunate instability or scaphoid impacting syndrome. Of the 18 patients with histologically confirmed myxomatous changes in the scapholunate ligament, 16 had an excellent outcome as defined by rigorous criteria; 1 had a good outcome. There was 1 patient with a poor result. A compelling argument is made for surgical exploration of the scapholunate joint in patients with persistent dorsal radial wrist pain and scapholunate point tenderness. PMID:10194003

  9. Copper sensitivity in dorsal hippocampus slices.

    PubMed

    Leiva, J; Palestini, M; Tetas, M; López, J

    2000-04-01

    The action of copper on the pyramidal neurons in CA1 of the hippocampus is little understood. Our main aim was to study the possible interaction of copper on the synaptic network in CA1 pyramidal neurons. We used Wistar rats hippocampus slices in a recording chamber. The population response ("population of spikes") collected by an extracellular micropipette under baseline conditions served as control. Copper, GABA, bicuculline and picrotoxin were delivered in different experimental conditions to the slice. One, 10 and 100 microM of copper concentration decreased significantly the amplitude and duration of the population spikes in relation to the control response. This effect did not show concentration dependency. Copper in bicuculline medium decreased significantly the duration response in relation to the control response and in relation to copper effect in a free bicuculline medium. This phenomenon emphasizes the copper action on the GABA (B) and (C) receptors. Copper in a picrotoxin medium increased significantly the excitability of the response. This new effect suggests that copper acts on non-GABA receptors, an effect that could be detected when the GABA receptors were inactivated. As a result of these findings it appears that, under our experimental conditions, copper generated transient sensitivity changes in pyramidal neurons of CA1 dorsal hippocampus. PMID:10782257

  10. Are The Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus functionally distinct structures?

    PubMed Central

    Fanselow, Michael S.; Dong, Hong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    One literature treats the hippocampus as a purely cognitive structure involved in memory; another treats it as a regulator of emotion whose dysfunction leads to psychopathology. We review behavioral, anatomical, and gene expression studies that together support a functional segmentation into 3 hippocampal compartments dorsal, intermediate and ventral. The dorsal hippocampus, which corresponds to the posterior hippocampus in primates, performs primarily cognitive functions. The ventral (anterior in primates) relates to stress, emotion and affect. Strikingly, gene expression in the dorsal hippocampus correlates with cortical regions involved in information processing, while genes expressed in the ventral hippocampus correlate with regions involved in emotion and stress (amygdala and hypothalamus). PMID:20152109

  11. Effects of Group Norms on Children's Intentions to Bully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Drew; Durkin, Kevin; Maass, Anne; Kiesner, Jeff; Griffiths, Judith A.

    2008-01-01

    A minimal group study examined the effect of peer group norms on children's direct and indirect bullying intentions. Prior to an inter-group drawing competition, children (N = 85) aged seven and nine years were assigned to a group that had a norm of out-group dislike or out-group liking. Results indicated that, regardless of group norms, the…

  12. Tutorial: Calculating Percentile Rank and Percentile Norms Using SPSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Ted A.

    2009-01-01

    Practitioners can benefit from using norms, but they often have to develop their own percentile rank and percentile norms. This article is a tutorial on how to quickly and easily calculate percentile rank and percentile norms using SPSS, and this information is presented for a data set. Some issues in calculating percentile rank and percentile…

  13. Content and Construct Validity of Norm-Referenced Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Donald Ross; Yen, Wendy M.

    Basic skills tests in which measurement of growth is defined in the context of national norms are discussed. An integral part of the construction of norms is the production of a trait or ability score which is normed. Test publishers define a multidimensional trait by including items which measure it. The trait as a construct is a distinct…

  14. Pythium Root Rot (and Feeder Root Necrosis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pythium species cause a number of diseases on corn. Among the Pythium diseases, root rot presents the least conspicuous aboveground symptoms. Broadly defined, root rot also includes feeder root necrosis. At least 16 species of Pythium are known to cause root rot of corn. These include P. acanthicu...

  15. Safety of CT-Guided Lumbar Nerve Root Infiltrations

    PubMed Central

    Gossner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Summary Selective nerve root infiltrations are frequently performed in patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Computed tomography (CT) is now commonly used for image guidance. Despite the widespread use of CT-guided lumbar nerve root infiltrations few studies have systematically examined the safety of this approach. In a two-year period, 231 lumbar nerve root infiltrations were performed on in-patients and were retrospectively reviewed. No major complications like inflammation (especially spondylodiscitis), large haematomas requiring surgery, severe allergic reactions or spinal ischaemia occurred. In accordance with other published studies, CT-guided lumbar nerve root infiltrations seem to be safe. To minimize the risk of catastrophic neurological complications due to spinal ischaemia, careful needle placement dorsal to the nerve root and the use of a non-particulate corticosteroid, like dexamethasone, are advocated. PMID:25363255

  16. A Comparative Study of Dorsal Buccal Mucosa Graft Substitution Urethroplasty by Dorsal Urethrotomy Approach versus Ventral Sagittal Urethrotomy Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Mrinal; Gupta, Sanjeev; Pahwa, Mayank; Jain, Brig D. K.; Gupta, Manu

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the outcome of dorsal buccal mucosal graft (BMG) substitution urethroplasty by dorsal urethrotomy approach with ventral urethrotomy approach in management of stricture urethra. Methods and Materials. A total of 40 patients who underwent dorsal BMG substitution urethroplasty were randomized into two groups. 20 patients underwent dorsal onlay BMG urethroplasty as described by Barbagli, and the other 20 patients underwent dorsal BMG urethroplasty by ventral urethrotomy as described by Asopa. Operative time, success rate, satisfaction rate, and complications were compared between the two groups. Mean follow-up was 12 months (6–24 months). Results. Ventral urethrotomy group had considerably lesser operative time although the difference was not statistically significant. Patients in dorsal group had mean maximum flow rate of 19.6 mL/min and mean residual urine of 27 mL, whereas ventral group had a mean maximum flow rate of 18.8 and residual urine of 32 mL. Eighteen out of twenty patients voided well in each group, and postoperative imaging study in these patients showed a good lumen with no evidence of leak or extravasation. Conclusion. Though ventral sagittal urethrotomy preserves the blood supply of urethra and intraoperative time was less than dorsal urethrotomy technique, there was no statistically significant difference in final outcome using either technique. PMID:24194754

  17. Norm-based measurement of quantum correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yuchun; Guo Guangcan

    2011-06-15

    In this paper we derived a necessary and sufficient condition for classical correlated states and proposed a norm-based measurement Q of quantum correlation. Using the max norm of operators, we gave the expression of the quantum correlation measurement Q and investigated the dynamics of Q in Markovian and non-Markovian cases, respectively. Q decays exponentially and vanishes only asymptotically in the Markovian case and causes periodical death and rebirth in the non-Markovian case. In the pure state, the quantum correlation Q is always larger than the entanglement, which was different from other known measurements. In addition, we showed that locally broadcastable and broadcastable are equivalent and reproved the density of quantum correlated states.

  18. SCHWARZ'S LEMMA IN NORMED LINEAR SPACES*

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lawrence A.

    1969-01-01

    In this paper we show that any Fréchet holomorphic function mapping the open unit ball of one normed linear space into the closed unit ball of another must be a linear mapping if the Fréchet derivative of the function at zero is a surjective isometry. From this fact we deduce a Banach-Stone theorem for operator algebras which generalizes that of R. V. Kadison. PMID:16591741

  19. The Effects of Liking Norms and Descriptive Norms on Vegetable Consumption: A Randomized Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jason M.; Liu, Jinyu; Robinson, Eric L.; Aveyard, Paul; Herman, C. Peter; Higgs, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that social norm messages can be used to promote the selection of fruit and vegetables in low habitual consumers of these foods but it is unclear whether this effect is sustained over time. It is also unclear whether information about others' liking for a food (liking norm) could have the same effect. Using a 2 × 5 × 2 experimental design we investigated the effects of exposure to various messages on later intake from a food buffet and whether any effects were sustained 24 h after exposure in both low and high consumers of vegetables. There were three factors: delay (immediate food selection vs. food selection 24 h after exposure), message type (liking norm, descriptive norm, health message, vegetable variety condition, and neutral control message), and habitual consumption (low vs. high). The buffet consisted of three raw vegetables, three energy-dense foods, and two dips. For vegetables and non-vegetables there were no main effects of message type, nor any main effect of delay. There was a significant message × habitual vegetable consumption interaction for vegetable consumption; however, follow up tests did not yield any significant effects. Examining each food individually, there were no main effects of message type, nor any main effect of delay, for any of the foods; however, there was a message × habitual vegetable consumption interaction for broccoli. Consumption of broccoli in the health message and descriptive norm conditions did not differ from the control neutral condition. However, habitually low consumers of vegetables increased their consumption of broccoli in the vegetable variety and liking norm conditions relative to habitual low vegetable consumers in the neutral control condition (p < 0.05). Further, investigation of the effects of the liking norm and vegetable variety condition on vegetable intake is warranted. This trial is listed as NCT02618174 at clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:27065913

  20. Establishing a NORM based radiation calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J

    2016-05-01

    An environmental radiation calibration facility has been constructed by the Radiation and Nuclear Sciences unit of Queensland Health at the Forensic and Scientific Services Coopers Plains campus in Brisbane. This facility consists of five low density concrete pads, spiked with a NORM source, to simulate soil and effectively provide a number of semi-infinite uniformly distributed sources for improved energy response calibrations of radiation equipment used in NORM measurements. The pads have been sealed with an environmental epoxy compound to restrict radon loss and so enhance the quality of secular equilibrium achieved. Monte Carlo models (MCNP),used to establish suitable design parameters and identify appropriate geometric correction factors linking the air kerma measured above these calibration pads to that predicted for an infinite plane using adjusted ICRU53 data, are discussed. Use of these correction factors as well as adjustments for cosmic radiation and the impact of surrounding low levels of NORM in the soil, allows for good agreement between the radiation fields predicted and measured above the pads at both 0.15 m and 1 m. PMID:26921707

  1. A histopathological study of the role of periodontal ligament tissue in root resorption in the rat.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, C; Hara, Y; Abe, Y; Ukai, T; Kato, I

    2001-02-01

    Whether periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue is capable of inducing root resorption was examined. The distal root of the rat molar was sectioned at the furcation and the PDL tissue removed from the root (non-PDL group, n=40). The distal root with the PDL intact was also prepared (PDL-intact group, n=40). The roots were transplanted into the dorsal skin of the rat. On the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 10th, 14th, 21st or 28th day after transplantation, the roots were removed together with surrounding dorsal subcutaneous tissue and were fixed, demineralized and embedded in paraffin. Serial sections from each block were stained with haematoxylin and eosin or by the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) method to observe root-resorbing cell formation. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX2) was also detected immunohistologically to examine prostaglandin E(2) production. On the 7th day after transplantation, multinucleated root-resorbing cells with TRAP were observed in the PDL-intact group. The number of TRAP-positive cells peaked on the 10th day after transplantation. COX2-positive cells were observed in PDL during the early experimental stages. No root resorption was seen in the non-PDL group. These results suggest that PDL tissue is involved in the formation of root-resorbing cells and root resorption. PMID:11163317

  2. An Abbreviated Tool for Assessing Feminine Norm Conformity: Psychometric Properties of the Conformity to Feminine Norms Inventory-45

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Mike C.; Moradi, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    The Conformity to Feminine Norms Inventory-45 (CFNI-45; Parent & Moradi, 2010) is an important tool for assessing level of conformity to feminine gender norms and for investigating the implications of such norms for women's functioning. The authors of the present study assessed the factor structure, measurement invariance, reliability, and…

  3. Silent NMDA receptor-mediated synapses are developmentally regulated in the dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Baba, H; Doubell, T P; Moore, K A; Woolf, C J

    2000-02-01

    In vitro whole cell patch-clamp recording techniques were utilized to study silent pure-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic responses in lamina II (substantia gelatinosa, SG) and lamina III of the spinal dorsal horn. To clarify whether these synapses are present in the adult and contribute to neuropathic pain, transverse lumbar spinal cord slices were prepared from neonatal, naive adult and adult sciatic nerve transected rats. In neonatal rats, pure-NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were elicited in SG neurons either by focal intraspinal stimulation (n = 15 of 20 neurons) or focal stimulation of the dorsal root (n = 2 of 7 neurons). In contrast, in slices from naive adult rats, no silent pure-NMDA EPSCs were recorded in SG neurons following focal intraspinal stimulation (n = 27), and only one pure-NMDA EPSC was observed in lamina III (n = 23). Furthermore, in rats with chronic sciatic nerve transection, pure-NMDA EPSCs were elicited by focal intraspinal stimulation in only 2 of 45 SG neurons. Although a large increase in Abeta fiber evoked mixed alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and NMDA receptor-mediated synapses was detected after sciatic nerve injury, Abeta fiber-mediated pure-NMDA EPSCs were not evoked in SG neurons by dorsal root stimulation. Pure-NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs are therefore a transient, developmentally regulated phenomenon, and, although they may have a role in synaptic refinement in the immature dorsal horn, they are unlikely to be involved in receptive field plasticity in the adult. PMID:10669507

  4. Evaluation of Five Tests for Sensitivity to Functional Deficits following Cervical or Thoracic Dorsal Column Transection in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Ruben; Tuinenbreijer, Lizz; Kouwenhoven, Dorette; Verhaagen, Joost; Mason, Matthew R. J.

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal column lesion model of spinal cord injury targets sensory fibres which originate from the dorsal root ganglia and ascend in the dorsal funiculus. It has the advantages that fibres can be specifically traced from the sciatic nerve, verifiably complete lesions can be performed of the labelled fibres, and it can be used to study sprouting in the central nervous system from the conditioning lesion effect. However, functional deficits from this type of lesion are mild, making assessment of experimental treatment-induced functional recovery difficult. Here, five functional tests were compared for their sensitivity to functional deficits, and hence their suitability to reliably measure recovery of function after dorsal column injury. We assessed the tape removal test, the rope crossing test, CatWalk gait analysis, and the horizontal ladder, and introduce a new test, the inclined rolling ladder. Animals with dorsal column injuries at C4 or T7 level were compared to sham-operated animals for a duration of eight weeks. As well as comparing groups at individual timepoints we also compared the longitudinal data over the whole time course with linear mixed models (LMMs), and for tests where steps are scored as success/error, using generalized LMMs for binomial data. Although, generally, function recovered to sham levels within 2–6 weeks, in most tests we were able to detect significant deficits with whole time-course comparisons. On the horizontal ladder deficits were detected until 5–6 weeks. With the new inclined rolling ladder functional deficits were somewhat more consistent over the testing period and appeared to last for 6–7 weeks. Of the CatWalk parameters base of support was sensitive to cervical and thoracic lesions while hind-paw print-width was affected by cervical lesion only. The inclined rolling ladder test in combination with the horizontal ladder and the CatWalk may prove useful to monitor functional recovery after experimental treatment in this

  5. Evaluation of Five Tests for Sensitivity to Functional Deficits following Cervical or Thoracic Dorsal Column Transection in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Fagoe, Nitish D; Attwell, Callan L; Eggers, Ruben; Tuinenbreijer, Lizz; Kouwenhoven, Dorette; Verhaagen, Joost; Mason, Matthew R J

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal column lesion model of spinal cord injury targets sensory fibres which originate from the dorsal root ganglia and ascend in the dorsal funiculus. It has the advantages that fibres can be specifically traced from the sciatic nerve, verifiably complete lesions can be performed of the labelled fibres, and it can be used to study sprouting in the central nervous system from the conditioning lesion effect. However, functional deficits from this type of lesion are mild, making assessment of experimental treatment-induced functional recovery difficult. Here, five functional tests were compared for their sensitivity to functional deficits, and hence their suitability to reliably measure recovery of function after dorsal column injury. We assessed the tape removal test, the rope crossing test, CatWalk gait analysis, and the horizontal ladder, and introduce a new test, the inclined rolling ladder. Animals with dorsal column injuries at C4 or T7 level were compared to sham-operated animals for a duration of eight weeks. As well as comparing groups at individual timepoints we also compared the longitudinal data over the whole time course with linear mixed models (LMMs), and for tests where steps are scored as success/error, using generalized LMMs for binomial data. Although, generally, function recovered to sham levels within 2-6 weeks, in most tests we were able to detect significant deficits with whole time-course comparisons. On the horizontal ladder deficits were detected until 5-6 weeks. With the new inclined rolling ladder functional deficits were somewhat more consistent over the testing period and appeared to last for 6-7 weeks. Of the CatWalk parameters base of support was sensitive to cervical and thoracic lesions while hind-paw print-width was affected by cervical lesion only. The inclined rolling ladder test in combination with the horizontal ladder and the CatWalk may prove useful to monitor functional recovery after experimental treatment in this

  6. Dictator Game Giving: The Importance of Descriptive versus Injunctive Norms

    PubMed Central

    Raihani, Nichola J.; McAuliffe, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Human behaviour is influenced by social norms but norms can entail two types of information. Descriptive norms refer to what others do in this context, while injunctive norms refer to what ought to be done to ensure social approval. In many real-world situations these norms are often presented concurrently meaning that their independent effects on behaviour are difficult to establish. Here we used an online Dictator Game to test how descriptive and injunctive norms would influence dictator donations when presented independently of one another. In addition, we varied the cost of complying with the norm: By stating that $0.20 or $0.50 cent donations from a $1 stake were normal or suggested, respectively. Specifying a higher target amount was associated with increased mean donation size. In contrast to previous studies, descriptive norms did not seem to influence giving behaviour in this context, whereas injunctive norms were associated with increased likelihood to give at least the target amount to the partner. This raises the question of whether injunctive norms might be more effective than descriptive norms at promoting prosocial behaviour in other settings. PMID:25493945

  7. Functional Connectivity of the Dorsal Striatum in Female Musicians.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shoji; Kirino, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal striatum (caudate/putamen) is a node of the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical (CSPTC) motor circuit, which plays a central role in skilled motor learning, a critical feature of musical performance. The dorsal striatum receives input from a large part of the cerebral cortex, forming a hub in the cortical-subcortical network. This study sought to examine how the functional network of the dorsal striatum differs between musicians and nonmusicians. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired from female university students majoring in music and nonmusic disciplines. The data were subjected to functional connectivity analysis and graph theoretical analysis. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that compared with nonmusicians, musicians had significantly decreased connectivity between the left putamen and bilateral frontal operculum (FO) and between the left caudate nucleus and cerebellum. The graph theoretical analysis of the entire brain revealed that the degrees, which represent the numbers of connections, of the bilateral putamen were significantly lower in musicians than in nonmusicians. In conclusion, compared with nonmusicians, female musicians have a smaller functional network of the dorsal striatum with decreased connectivity. These data are consistent with previous anatomical studies reporting a reduced volume of the dorsal striatum in musicians and ballet dancers, suggesting that long-term musical training reshapes the functional network of the dorsal striatum to be less extensive or selective. PMID:27148025

  8. Variation of dorsal horn cell dendritic spread with map scale.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Millecchia, R; Culberson, J L; Gladfelter, W; Covalt-Dunning, D

    1996-10-21

    Cells in laminae III, IV, and V of cat dorsal horn were injected with horseradish peroxidase or neurobiotin. Dorsal views of the dendritic domains were constructed in order to measure their lengths, widths, areas, and length/width ratios in the horizontal plane (the plane of the somatotopic map). Dendritic domain width and area in the horizontal plane were negatively correlated with fractional distance between the medial and lateral edges of the dorsal horn. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that dendritic domain width varies with map scale, which is maximal in the medial dorsal horn. This is similar to the variation in widths of primary afferent bouton distributions. The parallel variation of dorsal horn cell dendritic domain width and primary afferent bouton distribution width with map scale suggests that there is a causal relation between morphology and map scale in the dorsal horn representation of the hindlimb. This variation of adult morphology with map scale must reflect mechanisms responsible for the assembly of receptive fields. PMID:8906504

  9. Interactions between dorsal and ventral streams for controlling skilled grasp.

    PubMed

    van Polanen, Vonne; Davare, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The two visual systems hypothesis suggests processing of visual information into two distinct routes in the brain: a dorsal stream for the control of actions and a ventral stream for the identification of objects. Recently, increasing evidence has shown that the dorsal and ventral streams are not strictly independent, but do interact with each other. In this paper, we argue that the interactions between dorsal and ventral streams are important for controlling complex object-oriented hand movements, especially skilled grasp. Anatomical studies have reported the existence of direct connections between dorsal and ventral stream areas. These physiological interconnections appear to be gradually more active as the precision demands of the grasp become higher. It is hypothesised that the dorsal stream needs to retrieve detailed information about object identity, stored in ventral stream areas, when the object properties require complex fine-tuning of the grasp. In turn, the ventral stream might receive up to date grasp-related information from dorsal stream areas to refine the object internal representation. Future research will provide direct evidence for which specific areas of the two streams interact, the timing of their interactions and in which behavioural context they occur. PMID:26169317

  10. Interactions between dorsal and ventral streams for controlling skilled grasp

    PubMed Central

    van Polanen, Vonne; Davare, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The two visual systems hypothesis suggests processing of visual information into two distinct routes in the brain: a dorsal stream for the control of actions and a ventral stream for the identification of objects. Recently, increasing evidence has shown that the dorsal and ventral streams are not strictly independent, but do interact with each other. In this paper, we argue that the interactions between dorsal and ventral streams are important for controlling complex object-oriented hand movements, especially skilled grasp. Anatomical studies have reported the existence of direct connections between dorsal and ventral stream areas. These physiological interconnections appear to be gradually more active as the precision demands of the grasp become higher. It is hypothesised that the dorsal stream needs to retrieve detailed information about object identity, stored in ventral stream areas, when the object properties require complex fine-tuning of the grasp. In turn, the ventral stream might receive up to date grasp-related information from dorsal stream areas to refine the object internal representation. Future research will provide direct evidence for which specific areas of the two streams interact, the timing of their interactions and in which behavioural context they occur. PMID:26169317

  11. Functional Connectivity of the Dorsal Striatum in Female Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shoji; Kirino, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal striatum (caudate/putamen) is a node of the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical (CSPTC) motor circuit, which plays a central role in skilled motor learning, a critical feature of musical performance. The dorsal striatum receives input from a large part of the cerebral cortex, forming a hub in the cortical-subcortical network. This study sought to examine how the functional network of the dorsal striatum differs between musicians and nonmusicians. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired from female university students majoring in music and nonmusic disciplines. The data were subjected to functional connectivity analysis and graph theoretical analysis. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that compared with nonmusicians, musicians had significantly decreased connectivity between the left putamen and bilateral frontal operculum (FO) and between the left caudate nucleus and cerebellum. The graph theoretical analysis of the entire brain revealed that the degrees, which represent the numbers of connections, of the bilateral putamen were significantly lower in musicians than in nonmusicians. In conclusion, compared with nonmusicians, female musicians have a smaller functional network of the dorsal striatum with decreased connectivity. These data are consistent with previous anatomical studies reporting a reduced volume of the dorsal striatum in musicians and ballet dancers, suggesting that long-term musical training reshapes the functional network of the dorsal striatum to be less extensive or selective. PMID:27148025

  12. Bundles of Norms About Teen Sex and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Sennott, Christie

    2015-09-01

    Teen pregnancy is a cultural battleground in struggles over morality, education, and family. At its heart are norms about teen sex, contraception, pregnancy, and abortion. Analyzing 57 interviews with college students, we found that "bundles" of related norms shaped the messages teens hear. Teens did not think their communities encouraged teen sex or pregnancy, but normative messages differed greatly, with either moral or practical rationalizations. Teens readily identified multiple norms intended to regulate teen sex, contraception, abortion, childbearing, and the sanctioning of teen parents. Beyond influencing teens' behavior, norms shaped teenagers' public portrayals and post hoc justifications of their behavior. Although norm bundles are complex to measure, participants could summarize them succinctly. These bundles and their conflicting behavioral prescriptions create space for human agency in negotiating normative pressures. The norm bundles concept has implications for teen pregnancy prevention policies and can help revitalize social norms for understanding health behaviors. PMID:25387911

  13. Entosiphon sulcatum (Euglenophyceae): flagellar roots of the basal body complex and reservoir region

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, J.A.; Walne, P.L.; Kivic, P.A.

    1987-03-01

    The flagellar root system of Entosiphon sulcatum (Dujardin) Stein (Euglenophyceae) is described and compared with kinetoplastid and other euglenoid systems. An asymmetric pattern of three microtubular roots, one between the two flagellar basal bodies and one on either side (here called the intermediate, dorsal, and ventral roots), is consistent within the euglenoid flagellates studied thus far. The dorsal root is associated with the basal body of the anterior flagellum (F1) and lies on the left dorsal side of the basal body complex. Originating between the two flagellar basal bodies, and associated with the basal body of the trailing flagellum (F2), the intermediate root is morphologically distinguished by fibrils interconnecting the individual microtubules to one another and to the overlying reservoir membrane. The intermediate root is often borne on a ridge projecting into the reservoir. The ventral root originates near the F2 basal body and lies on the right ventral side of the cell. Fibrillar connections link the membrane of F2 with the reservoir membrane at the reservoir-canal transition level. A large cross-banded fiber joins the two flagellar basal bodies, and a series of smaller striated fibers links the anterior accessory and flagellar basal bodies. Large nonstriated fibers extend from the basal body complex posteriorly into the cytoplasm.

  14. Evaluating the Differential Roles of the Dorsal Dentate Gyrus, Dorsal CA3, and Dorsal CA1 During a Temporal Ordering for Spatial Locations Task

    PubMed Central

    Hunsaker, Michael R.; Kesner, Raymond P.

    2008-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the dorsal CA1 subregion of the hippocampus mediates temporal processing of information, that dorsal CA3 participates in the spatiotemporal processing of memory, and the dorsal dentate gyrus mediates spatial pattern separation. A temporal ordering of spatial locations task was developed to test the role of the dorsal dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 for the temporal processing of spatial information with either high or low levels of spatial interference. The results indicate that animals with dentate gyrus lesions showed difficulty performing the task at high levels of spatial interference, but were able to perform the task well when there was low spatial interference. Animals with lesions to CA3 did not show a preference for either spatial location presented during the study phase during the preference test, suggesting impaired spatiotemporal processing. Animals with lesions to CA1 showed a preference for a later presented spatial location over the earlier, the opposite preference to that shown by control animals. PMID:18493930

  15. CORPEX{reg_sign} NORM decontamination process

    SciTech Connect

    Azrak, R.G.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes a commecial process which has been developed for application to the remediation of NORM deposits on metal parts or embedded in scales on such parts. The process employs a registered chemical process, involving non-RCRA regulated chemicals, which can remove fixed {sup 226,228}Radium, {sup 210}Lead, and {sup 210}Polonium. The author describes the capabilities of the chemical process which has been developed, the way it is offered to potential customers as a practical process, and numerous examples of its application in the field.

  16. α-Dendrotoxin inhibits the ASIC current in dorsal root ganglion neurons from rat.

    PubMed

    Báez, Adriana; Salceda, Emilio; Fló, Martín; Graña, Martín; Fernández, Cecilia; Vega, Rosario; Soto, Enrique

    2015-10-01

    Dendrotoxins are a group of peptide toxins purified from the venom of several mamba snakes. α-Dendrotoxin (α-DTx, from the Eastern green mamba Dendroaspis angusticeps) is a well-known blocker of voltage-gated K(+) channels and specifically of K(v)1.1, K(v)1.2 and K(v)1.6. In this work we show that α-DTx inhibited the ASIC currents in DRG neurons (IC50=0.8 μM) when continuously perfused during 25 s (including a 5 s pulse to pH 6.1), but not when co-applied with the pH drop. Additionally, we show that α-DTx abolished a transient component of the outward current that, in some experiments, appeared immediately after the end of the acid pulse. Our data indicate that α-DTx inhibits ASICs in the high nM range while some Kv are inhibited in the low nM range. The α-DTx selectivity and its potential interaction with ASICs should be taken in consideration when DTx is used in the high nM range. PMID:26314509

  17. Trans-activation of TRPV1 by D1R in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woo; Cho, Pyung Sun; Lee, Han Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jung, Sung Jun; Oh, Seog Bae

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1, a ligand-gated ion channel expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons is modulated by a variety of intracellular signaling pathways. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that plays important roles in motor control, cognition, and pain modulation in the CNS, and acts via a variety of dopamine receptors (D1R-D5R), a class of GPCRs. Although nociceptive sensory neurons express D1-like receptors, very little is known about the effect of dopamine on TRPV1 in the peripheral nervous system. Therefore, in this study, we examined the effects of D1R activation on TRPV1 in mouse DRG neurons using Ca(2+) imaging and immunohistochemical analysis. The D1R agonist SKF-38393 induced reproducible Ca(2+) responses via Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 rather than Ca(2+) mobilization from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed co-expression of D1R and TRPV1 in mouse DRG neurons. The PLC-specific inhibitor blocked the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response, whereas the PKC, DAG lipase, AC, and PKA inhibitors had no effect on the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response. Taken together, our results suggest that the SKF-38393-induced Ca(2+) response results from the direct activation of TRPV1 by a PLC/DAG-mediated membrane-delimited pathway. These results provide evidence that the trans-activation of TRPV1 following D1R activation may contribute to the modulation of pain signaling in nociceptive sensory neurons. PMID:26319554

  18. Chemical Structure and Morphology of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons from Naive and Inflamed Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Barabas, Marie E.; Mattson, Eric C.; Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Hirschmugl, Carol J.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy provides label-free imaging to detect the spatial distribution of the characteristic functional groups in proteins, lipids, phosphates, and carbohydrates simultaneously in individual DRG neurons. We have identified ring-shaped distributions of lipid and/or carbohydrate enrichment in subpopulations of neurons which has never before been reported. These distributions are ring-shaped within the cytoplasm and are likely representative of the endoplasmic reticulum. The prevalence of chemical ring subtypes differs between large- and small-diameter neurons. Peripheral inflammation increased the relative lipid content specifically in small-diameter neurons, many of which are nociceptive. Because many small-diameter neurons express an ion channel involved in inflammatory pain, transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), we asked whether this increase in lipid content occurs in TRPA1-deficient (knock-out) neurons. No statistically significant change in lipid content occurred in TRPA1-deficient neurons, indicating that the inflammation-mediated increase in lipid content is largely dependent on TRPA1. Because TRPA1 is known to mediate mechanical and cold sensitization that accompanies peripheral inflammation, our findings may have important implications for a potential role of lipids in inflammatory pain. PMID:25271163

  19. Chemical structure and morphology of dorsal root ganglion neurons from naive and inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Barabas, Marie E; Mattson, Eric C; Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Hirschmugl, Carol J; Stucky, Cheryl L

    2014-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectromicroscopy provides label-free imaging to detect the spatial distribution of the characteristic functional groups in proteins, lipids, phosphates, and carbohydrates simultaneously in individual DRG neurons. We have identified ring-shaped distributions of lipid and/or carbohydrate enrichment in subpopulations of neurons which has never before been reported. These distributions are ring-shaped within the cytoplasm and are likely representative of the endoplasmic reticulum. The prevalence of chemical ring subtypes differs between large- and small-diameter neurons. Peripheral inflammation increased the relative lipid content specifically in small-diameter neurons, many of which are nociceptive. Because many small-diameter neurons express an ion channel involved in inflammatory pain, transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), we asked whether this increase in lipid content occurs in TRPA1-deficient (knock-out) neurons. No statistically significant change in lipid content occurred in TRPA1-deficient neurons, indicating that the inflammation-mediated increase in lipid content is largely dependent on TRPA1. Because TRPA1 is known to mediate mechanical and cold sensitization that accompanies peripheral inflammation, our findings may have important implications for a potential role of lipids in inflammatory pain. PMID:25271163

  20. Dorsal-Ventral Patterning and Neural Induction in Xenopus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Edward M.; Kuroda, Hiroki

    2008-01-01

    We review the current status of research in dorsal-ventral (D-V) patterning in vertebrates. Emphasis is placed on recent work on Xenopus, which provides a paradigm for vertebrate development based on a rich heritage of experimental embryology. D-V patterning starts much earlier than previously thought, under the influence of a dorsal nuclear β-Catenin signal. At mid-blastula two signaling centers are present on the dorsal side: The prospective neuroectoderm expresses bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonists, and the future dorsal endoderm secretes Nodal-related mesoderm-inducing factors. When dorsal mesoderm is formed at gastrula, a cocktail of growth factor antagonists is secreted by the Spemann organizer and further patterns the embryo. A ventral gastrula signaling center opposes the actions of the dorsal organizer, and another set of secreted antagonists is produced ventrally under the control of BMP4. The early dorsal β-Catenin signal inhibits BMP expression at the transcriptional level and promotes expression of secreted BMP antagonists in the prospective central nervous system (CNS). In the absence of mesoderm, expression of Chordin and Noggin in ectoderm is required for anterior CNS formation. FGF (fibroblast growth factor) and IGF (insulin-like growth factor) signals are also potent neural inducers. Neural induction by anti-BMPs such as Chordin requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation mediated by FGF and IGF. These multiple signals can be integrated at the level of Smad1. Phosphorylation by BMP receptor stimulates Smad1 transcriptional activity, whereas phosphorylation by MAPK has the opposite effect. Neural tissue is formed only at very low levels of activity of BMP-transducing Smads, which require the combination of both low BMP levels and high MAPK signals. Many of the molecular players that regulate D-V patterning via regulation of BMP signaling have been conserved between Drosophila and the vertebrates. PMID:15473842

  1. Pointing in visual periphery: is DF's dorsal stream intact?

    PubMed

    Hesse, Constanze; Ball, Keira; Schenk, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the visual form agnosic patient DF have been highly influential in establishing the hypothesis that separate processing streams deal with vision for perception (ventral stream) and vision for action (dorsal stream). In this context, DF's preserved ability to perform visually-guided actions has been contrasted with the selective impairment of visuomotor performance in optic ataxia patients suffering from damage to dorsal stream areas. However, the recent finding that DF shows a thinning of the grey matter in the dorsal stream regions of both hemispheres in combination with the observation that her right-handed movements are impaired when they are performed in visual periphery has opened up the possibility that patient DF may potentially also be suffering from optic ataxia. If lesions to the posterior parietal cortex (dorsal stream) are bilateral, pointing and reaching deficits should be observed in both visual hemifields and for both hands when targets are viewed in visual periphery. Here, we tested DF's visuomotor performance when pointing with her left and her right hand toward targets presented in the left and the right visual field at three different visual eccentricities. Our results indicate that DF shows large and consistent impairments in all conditions. These findings imply that DF's dorsal stream atrophies are functionally relevant and hence challenge the idea that patient DF's seemingly normal visuomotor behaviour can be attributed to her intact dorsal stream. Instead, DF seems to be a patient who suffers from combined ventral and dorsal stream damage meaning that a new account is needed to explain why she shows such remarkably normal visuomotor behaviour in a number of tasks and conditions. PMID:24626162

  2. Category Norms: An Updated and Expanded Version of the Battig and Montague (1969) Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Overschelde, James P.; Rawson, Katherine A.; Dunlosky, John

    2004-01-01

    The Battig and Montague (1969) category norms have been an invaluable tool for researchers in many fields, with a recent literature search revealing their use in over 1600 projects published in more than 200 different journals. Since 1969, numerous changes have occurred culturally that warrant the collection of new normative data. For instance, in…

  3. Injunctive Social Norms Primacy over Descriptive Social Norms in Retirement Savings Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croy, Gerry; Gerrans, Paul; Speelman, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Consistent with the global trend to shift responsibility for retirement income provision from the public purse to individuals has been encouragement to save more and to manage investment strategy. Analyzing data from 2,300 respondents to a randomly distributed questionnaire, this article focuses on the motivational importance of social norms. The…

  4. Ecophysiology of dorsal versus ventral cuticle in flattened sawfly larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boevé, Jean-Luc; Angeli, Sergio

    2010-06-01

    Platycampus larvae are highly cryptic leaf feeders characterised by a dorso-ventrally flattened body, the dorsal integument resembling a shield. Dorsal and ventral cuticles from Platycampus luridiventris were compared by histology and gel electrophoresis. By Azan-staining, a red and a blue layer were distinguished in the dorsal cuticle, while the ventral cuticle showed one, almost uniform blue layer, as in both cuticles of control species. The two cuticles from P. luridiventris had similar amounts and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles of soluble proteins, but not insoluble proteins. One insoluble protein (MW ≈ 41 kDa) was visible as a large band in the ventral cuticle only. It is likely that this protein renders the cuticle elastic, and that the dorsal, red layer is the exocuticle, mainly composed of insoluble proteins. We discuss eco-physiological implications of the exocuticle in insects. Further, data from the literature indicate that the defence strategy in P. luridiventris larvae relies on being visually cryptic towards avian predators and tactically cryptic towards arthropod predators and parasitoids. Crypsis in both senses is favoured by the shield effect, itself based on an abnormally thick dorsal exocuticle. Although the larvae are external feeders, they may be considered as hidden from an ecological perspective.

  5. The dorsal raphe modulates sensory responsiveness during arousal in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Tohei; Hannan, Markus C.; Burgess, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    During waking behavior animals adapt their state of arousal in response to environmental pressures. Sensory processing is regulated in aroused states and several lines of evidence imply that this is mediated at least partly by the serotonergic system. However there is little information directly showing that serotonergic function is required for state-dependent modulation of sensory processing. Here we find that zebrafish larvae can maintain a short-term state of arousal during which neurons in the dorsal raphe modulate sensory responsiveness to behaviorally relevant visual cues. Following a brief exposure to water flow, larvae show elevated activity and heightened sensitivity to perceived motion. Calcium imaging of neuronal activity after flow revealed increased activity in serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe. Genetic ablation of these neurons abolished the increase in visual sensitivity during arousal without affecting baseline visual function or locomotor activity. We traced projections from the dorsal raphe to a major visual area, the optic tectum. Laser ablation of the tectum demonstrated that this structure, like the dorsal raphe, is required for improved visual sensitivity during arousal. These findings reveal that serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe have a state-dependent role in matching sensory responsiveness to behavioral context. PMID:23100441

  6. Acquisition of the dorsal structures in chordate amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Morov, Arseniy R.; Ukizintambara, Tharcisse; Sabirov, Rushan M.

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of dorsal structures, such as notochord and hollow nerve cord, is likely to have had a profound influence upon vertebrate evolution. Dorsal formation in chordate development thus has been intensively studied in vertebrates and ascidians. However, the present understanding does not explain how chordates acquired dorsal structures. Here we show that amphioxus retains a key clue to answer this question. In amphioxus embryos, maternal nodal mRNA distributes asymmetrically in accordance with the remodelling of the cortical cytoskeleton in the fertilized egg, and subsequently lefty is first expressed in a patch of blastomeres across the equator where wnt8 is expressed circularly and which will become the margin of the blastopore. The lefty domain co-expresses zygotic nodal by the initial gastrula stage on the one side of the blastopore margin and induces the expression of goosecoid, not-like, chordin and brachyury1 genes in this region, as in the oral ectoderm of sea urchin embryos, which provides a basis for the formation of the dorsal structures. The striking similarity in the gene regulations and their respective expression domains when comparing dorsal formation in amphioxus and the determination of the oral ectoderm in sea urchin embryos suggests that chordates derived from an ambulacrarian-type blastula with dorsoventral inversion. PMID:27307516

  7. Dorsal and ventral language pathways in persistent developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Kronfeld-Duenias, Vered; Amir, Ofer; Ezrati-Vinacour, Ruth; Civier, Oren; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering is a speech disorder that affects an individual's ability to fluently produce speech. While the disorder mainly manifests in situations that require language production, it is still unclear whether persistent developmental stuttering is indeed a language impairment, and if so, which language stream is implicated in people who stutter. In this study, we take a neuroanatomical approach to this question by examining the structural properties of the dorsal and ventral language pathways in adults who stutter (AWS) and fluent controls. We use diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and individualized tract identification to extract white matter volumes and diffusion properties of these tracts in samples of adults who do and do not stutter. We further quantify diffusion properties at multiple points along the tract and examine group differences within these diffusivity profiles. Our results show differences in the dorsal, but not in the ventral, language-related tracts. Specifically, AWS show reduced volume of the left dorsal stream, as well as lower anisotropy in the right dorsal stream. These data provide neuroanatomical support for the view that stuttering involves an impairment in the bidirectional mapping between auditory and articulatory cortices supported by the dorsal pathways, not in lexical access and semantic aspects of language processing which are thought to rely more heavily on the left ventral pathways. PMID:27179916

  8. Dorsal Buttress Plate Fixation of Ulnar Carpometacarpal Joint Fracture Dislocations.

    PubMed

    Tan, En Si; Chao, Tay Shian

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for open reduction and internal fixation of early and unstable ulnar (fourth and/or fifth) carpometacarpal joint (CMCJ) fracture subluxations or dislocations using a dorsal buttress plate. In ulnar CMCJ fracture dislocations, the metacarpal has a tendency to displace dorsally and proximally when there is an axial load. Using the dorsal buttress plate method of fixation, a plate is fixed proximally to the hamate, aligned parallel and dorsal to the metacarpal to act as a buttress, to resist this movement. To preserve the fourth and the fifth CMCJ mobility, the distal end of the plate is not fixed to the metacarpal base. We illustrate the use of this technique on 4 patients who had different patterns of injury at the ulnar CMCJ. All patients regained excellent range of motion and function. None of the patients had redisplacement or nonunion of fracture. The dorsal buttress plate is a viable option for fixation of early and unstable ulnar CMCJ fracture subluxations or dislocations. PMID:27077465

  9. Acquisition of the dorsal structures in chordate amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Morov, Arseniy R; Ukizintambara, Tharcisse; Sabirov, Rushan M; Yasui, Kinya

    2016-06-01

    Acquisition of dorsal structures, such as notochord and hollow nerve cord, is likely to have had a profound influence upon vertebrate evolution. Dorsal formation in chordate development thus has been intensively studied in vertebrates and ascidians. However, the present understanding does not explain how chordates acquired dorsal structures. Here we show that amphioxus retains a key clue to answer this question. In amphioxus embryos, maternal nodal mRNA distributes asymmetrically in accordance with the remodelling of the cortical cytoskeleton in the fertilized egg, and subsequently lefty is first expressed in a patch of blastomeres across the equator where wnt8 is expressed circularly and which will become the margin of the blastopore. The lefty domain co-expresses zygotic nodal by the initial gastrula stage on the one side of the blastopore margin and induces the expression of goosecoid, not-like, chordin and brachyury1 genes in this region, as in the oral ectoderm of sea urchin embryos, which provides a basis for the formation of the dorsal structures. The striking similarity in the gene regulations and their respective expression domains when comparing dorsal formation in amphioxus and the determination of the oral ectoderm in sea urchin embryos suggests that chordates derived from an ambulacrarian-type blastula with dorsoventral inversion. PMID:27307516

  10. Computational substrates of social norm enforcement by unaffected third parties.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Songfa; Chark, Robin; Hsu, Ming; Chew, Soo Hong

    2016-04-01

    Enforcement of social norms by impartial bystanders in the human species reveals a possibly unique capacity to sense and to enforce norms from a third party perspective. Such behavior, however, cannot be accounted by current computational models based on an egocentric notion of norms. Here, using a combination of model-based fMRI and third party punishment games, we show that brain regions previously implicated in egocentric norm enforcement critically extend to the important case of norm enforcement by unaffected third parties. Specifically, we found that responses in the ACC and insula cortex were positively associated with detection of distributional inequity, while those in the anterior DLPFC were associated with assessment of intentionality to the violator. Moreover, during sanction decisions, the subjective value of sanctions modulated activity in both vmPFC and rTPJ. These results shed light on the neurocomputational underpinnings of third party punishment and evolutionary origin of human norm enforcement. PMID:26825438

  11. Social-norms interventions for light and nondrinking students

    PubMed Central

    Neighbors, Clayton; Jensen, Megan; Tidwell, Judy; Walter, Theresa; Fossos, Nicole; Lewis, Melissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Social-norms approaches to alcohol prevention are based on consistent findings that most students overestimate the prevalence of drinking among their peers. Most interventions have been developed for heavy-drinking students, and the applicability of social-norms approaches among abstaining or light-drinking students has yet to be evaluated. The present research aimed to evaluate the impact of two types of online social-norms interventions developed for abstaining or light-drinking students. Identification with other students was evaluated as a moderator. Participants included 423 freshmen and sophomore college students who reported never or rarely drinking at screening. Students were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (a) personalized-norms feedback, (b) social-norms marketing ads, or (c) attention control. Data were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models. Results provided some support for both interventions but were stronger for social-norms marketing ads, particularly among participants who identified more closely with other students.

  12. Structural and molecular alterations of primary afferent fibres in the spinal dorsal horn in vincristine-induced neuropathy in rat.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Rivals, Isabelle; M'Dahoma, Saïd; Dubacq, Sophie; Pezet, Sophie; Calvino, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    Vincristine is one of the most common anti-cancer drug therapies administered for the treatment of many types of cancer. Its dose-limiting side effect is the emergence of peripheral neuropathy, resulting in chronic neuropathic pain in many patients. This study sought to understand the mechanisms underlying the development of neuropathic pain by vincristine-induced neurotoxicity. We focused on signs of functional changes and revealed that deep layers of the spinal cord (III-IV) experience increased neuronal activity both in the absence of peripheral stimulation and, as a result of tactile mechanical stimulations. These laminae and superficial laminae I-II were also subject to structural changes as evidenced by an increase in immunoreactivity of Piccolo, a marker of active presynaptic elements. Further investigations performed, using DNA microarray technology, describe a large number of genes differentially expressed in dorsal root ganglions and in the spinal dorsal horn after vincristine treatment. Our study describes an important list of genes differentially regulated by vincristine treatment that will be useful for future studies and brings forward evidence for molecular and anatomical modifications of large diameter sensory neurons terminating in deep dorsal horn laminae, which could participate in the development of tactile allodynia. PMID:23975629

  13. Predictors of photo naming: Dutch norms for 327 photos.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zeshu; Stiegert, Julia

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we report naming latencies and norms for 327 photos of objects in Dutch. We provide norms for eight psycholinguistic variables: age of acquisition, familiarity, imageability, image agreement, objective and subjective visual complexity, word frequency, word length in syllables and letters, and name agreement. Furthermore, multiple regression analyses revealed that the significant predictors of photo-naming latencies were name agreement, word frequency, imageability, and image agreement. The naming latencies, norms, and stimuli are provided as supplemental materials. PMID:26122979

  14. Revised Push-Up Test Norms for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Ted A.; Hales, Derek; Chung, Hyuk; Oh, Suhak; Wood, Heather M.

    2004-01-01

    A revised push-up test for college students was presented in 2002. The purpose of this study was to develop percentile norms for the revised push-up test when it is used with college students. Revised push-up scores collected on 177 male and 274 female college students were used to develop percentile norms. The norms for the men have a different…

  15. Base norms and discrimination of generalized quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Jenčová, A.

    2014-02-15

    We introduce and study norms in the space of hermitian matrices, obtained from base norms in positively generated subspaces. These norms are closely related to discrimination of so-called generalized quantum channels, including quantum states, channels, and networks. We further introduce generalized quantum decision problems and show that the maximal average payoffs of decision procedures are again given by these norms. We also study optimality of decision procedures, in particular, we obtain a necessary and sufficient condition under which an optimal 1-tester for discrimination of quantum channels exists, such that the input state is maximally entangled.

  16. Using multiscale norms to quantify mixing and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

    2012-02-01

    Mixing is relevant to many areas of science and engineering, including the pharmaceutical and food industries, oceanography, atmospheric sciences and civil engineering. In all these situations one goal is to quantify and often then to improve the degree of homogenization of a substance being stirred, referred to as a passive scalar or tracer. A classical measure of mixing is the variance of the concentration of the scalar, which is the L2 norm of a mean-zero concentration field. Recently, other norms have been used to quantify mixing, in particular the mix-norm as well as negative Sobolev norms. These norms have the advantage that unlike variance they decay even in the absence of diffusion, and their decay corresponds to the flow being mixing in the sense of ergodic theory. General Sobolev norms weigh scalar gradients differently, and are known as multiscale norms for mixing. We review the applications of such norms to mixing and transport, and show how they can be used to optimize the stirring and mixing of a decaying passive scalar. We then review recent work on the less-studied case of a continuously replenished scalar field—the source-sink problem. In that case the flows that optimally reduce the norms are associated with transport rather than mixing: they push sources onto sinks, and vice versa.

  17. Dorsal Plating of Unstable Scaphoid Fractures and Nonunions.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; Turow, Arthur; Phadnis, Joideep

    2015-09-01

    Achieving stable fixation of displaced acute and chronic nonunited scaphoid fractures continues to be a challenge for the treating surgeon. The threaded compression screw has been the mainstay of treatment of these fractures for the last 3 decades; however, persistent nonunion after screw fixation has prompted development of new techniques. Recent results of volar buttress plating have been promising. We describe a novel technique of dorsal scaphoid plating. In contrast to volar plating, the dorsal plate is biomechanically more favorable as it utilizes the tension side of the scaphoid bone for dynamic compression. Dorsal scaphoid plating provides a more stable construct than the traditional Herbert screw and mitigates the need for vascular or corticocancellous bone grafting in most cases. PMID:26053203

  18. Dorsal and ventral stream sensitivity in normal development and hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Alison; Cory, Elizabeth; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver; Wattam-Bell, John; Guzzetta, Andrea; Cioni, Giovanni

    2002-05-01

    Form and motion coherence thresholds can provide comparable measures of global visual processing in the ventral and dorsal streams respectively. Normal development of thresholds was tested in 360 normally developing children aged 4-11 and in normal adults. The two tasks showed similar developmental trends, with some greater variability and a slight delay in motion coherence compared to form coherence performance, in reaching adult levels. To examine the proposal of dorsal stream vulnerability related to specific developmental disorders, we compared 24 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy with the normally developing group. Hemiplegic children performed significantly worse than controls on the motion coherence task for their age, but not on the form coherence task; however, within this group no specific brain area was significantly associated with poor motion compared to form coherence performance. These results suggest that extrastriate mechanisms mediating these thresholds normally develop in parallel, but that the dorsal stream has a greater, general vulnerability to early neurological impairment. PMID:11997698

  19. Root Growth Response to Application and Overexpression of Heterodera glycines CLE peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant CLAVATA3/ESR(CLE)-like peptides have been shown to be involved with several aspects of plant development including maintenance of stem cell pools in the root meristem. Interestingly, parasitism genes, HgCLE-1 and HgCLE-2, encoding secreted CLE-like peptides are expressed in the dorsal esophage...

  20. Dorsal eye selector pannier (pnr) suppresses the eye fate to define dorsal margin of the Drosophila eye

    PubMed Central

    Oros, Sarah M.; Tare, Meghana; Kango-Singh, Madhuri; Singh, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Axial patterning is crucial for organogenesis. During Drosophila eye development, dorso-ventral (DV) axis determination is the first lineage restriction event. The eye primordium begins with a default ventral fate, on which the dorsal eye fate is established by expression of the GATA-1 transcription factor pannier (pnr). Earlier, it was suggested that loss of pnr function induces enlargement in the dorsal eye due to ectopic equator formation. Interestingly, we found that in addition to regulating DV patterning, pnr suppresses the eye fate by downregulating the core retinal determination genes eyes absent (eya), sine oculis (so) and dacshund (dac) to define the dorsal eye margin. We found that pnr acts downstream of Ey and affect the retinal determination pathway by suppressing eya. Further analysis of the “eye suppression” function of pnr revealed that this function is likely mediated through suppression of the homeotic gene teashirt (tsh) and is independent of homothorax (hth), a negative regulator of eye. Pnr expression is restricted to the peripodial membrane on the dorsal eye margin, which gives rise to head structures around the eye, and pnr is not expressed in the eye disc proper that forms the retina. Thus, pnr has dual function, during early developmental stages pnr is involved in axial patterning whereas later it promotes the head specific fate. These studies will help in understanding the developmental regulation of boundary formation of the eye field on the dorsal eye margin. PMID:20691679

  1. The NORM technology connection web site : streamlined access to NORM-related service company and regulatory information.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. P.; Richmond, P.; LePoire, D. J.; Arnish, J. J.; Johnson, R.

    2000-11-08

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an Internet web site providing access to critical information needed to support decisions on the management and disposal of wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The NORM Technology Connection web site provides current information on (1) service companies that provide support on NORM issues (e.g., site characterization and remediation, sample analysis, radiation safety training, disposal) and (2) existing applicable NORM regulations and guidelines. A third element of the site is an electronic mail list that allows users to post or respond to questions about the management of NORM. Development of the NORM Technology Connection web site was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. It is hosted and maintained by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The web site is publicly available; access is free, as is participation by any of the service companies.

  2. Dorsal Tear of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex: Clinical Features and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yukio; Moriya, Atsushi; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Background Several different triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tear patterns have been classified through the use of wrist arthroscopy. A tear of the dorsal aspect of the TFCC has been previously reported, but it is not included in Palmer original classification. Our purpose was to describe this type of tear pattern along with the clinical presentation. Methods An isolated dorsal TFCC tear was encountered in seven wrists of six patients (three men and three women; average age was 31 years). All patients were evaluated by physical exam, X-ray, plain axial computed tomography with pronation, neutral and supination position, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with coronal, sagittal, and axial section and arthroscopy. Results The clinical findings varied and included the following: tenderness at the dorsoulnar aspect of the wrist was positive in all wrists, fovea sign was positive in five wrists, and tenderness at the dorsal aspect of the distal radioulnar joint was present in one wrist. Pain with forearm rotation was positive in all wrists. The ulnar head ballottement test induced pain in all wrists, whereas dorsal instability of the ulnar head was present in one wrist with this test. The ulnocarpal stress test was positive in five wrists. Axial and sagittal images on MRI revealed the dorsal tear in five wrists. All wrists were treated with an arthroscopic capsular repair. The final functional outcome at an average follow-up of 16.1 months was four excellent and one good wrist according to the modified Mayo wrist score. Conclusions The aim of this article is to describe our experiences with tears involving the dorsal aspect of the TFCC, which may be misdiagnosed if the surgeon is not cognizant of this injury. Type of study/level of evidence Diagnostic/level IV. PMID:26855835

  3. Expression of Nav1.7 in DRG neurons extends from peripheral terminals in the skin to central preterminal branches and terminals in the dorsal horn

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sodium channel Nav1.7 has emerged as a target of considerable interest in pain research, since loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A, the gene that encodes Nav1.7, are associated with a syndrome of congenital insensitivity to pain, gain-of-function mutations are linked to the debiliting chronic pain conditions erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, and upregulated expression of Nav1.7 accompanies pain in diabetes and inflammation. Since Nav1.7 has been implicated as playing a critical role in pain pathways, we examined by immunocytochemical methods the expression and distribution of Nav1.7 in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons, from peripheral terminals in the skin to central terminals in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Results Nav1.7 is robustly expressed within the somata of peptidergic and non-peptidergic DRG neurons, and along the peripherally- and centrally-directed C-fibers of these cells. Nav1.7 is also expressed at nodes of Ranvier in a subpopulation of Aδ-fibers within sciatic nerve and dorsal root. The peripheral terminals of DRG neurons within skin, intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENF), exhibit robust Nav1.7 immunolabeling. The central projections of DRG neurons in the superficial lamina of spinal cord dorsal horn also display Nav1.7 immunoreactivity which extends to presynaptic terminals. Conclusions The expression of Nav1.7 in DRG neurons extends from peripheral terminals in the skin to preterminal central branches and terminals in the dorsal horn. These data support a major contribution for Nav1.7 in pain pathways, including action potential electrogenesis, conduction along axonal trunks and depolarization/invasion of presynaptic axons. The findings presented here may be important for pharmaceutical development, where target engagement in the right compartment is essential. PMID:23134641

  4. The majority of dorsal spinal cord gastrin releasing peptide is synthesized locally whereas neuromedin B is highly expressed in pain- and itch-sensing somatosensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Itch is one of the major somatosensory modalities. Some recent findings have proposed that gastrin releasing peptide (Grp) is expressed in a subset of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and functions as a selective neurotransmitter for transferring itch information to spinal cord interneurons. However, expression data from public databases and earlier literatures indicate that Grp mRNA is only detected in dorsal spinal cord (dSC) whereas its family member neuromedin B (Nmb) is highly expressed in DRG neurons. These contradictory results argue that a thorough characterization of the expression of Grp and Nmb is warranted. Findings Grp mRNA is highly expressed in dSC but is barely detectable in DRGs of juvenile and adult mice. Anti-bombesin serum specifically recognizes Grp but not Nmb. Grp is present in a small number of small-diameter DRG neurons and in abundance in layers I and II of the spinal cord. The reduction of dSC Grp after dorsal root rhizotomy is significantly different from those of DRG derived markers but similar to that of a spinal cord neuronal marker. Double fluorescent in situ of Nmb and other molecular markers indicate that Nmb is highly and selectively expressed in nociceptive and itch-sensitive DRG neurons. Conclusion The majority of dSC Grp is synthesized locally in dorsal spinal cord neurons. On the other hand, Nmb is highly expressed in pain- and itch-sensing DRG neurons. Our findings provide direct anatomic evidence that Grp could function locally in the dorsal spinal cord in addition to its roles in DRG neurons and that Nmb has potential roles in nociceptive and itch-sensitive neurons. These results will improve our understanding about roles of Grp and Nmb in mediating itch sensation. PMID:22776446

  5. The cultural transmission of cooperative norms

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinyue; Liu, Yan; Ho, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative behavior depends on cultural environment, so what happens when people move from to a new culture governed by a new norm? The dynamics of culture-induced cooperation has not been well understood. We expose lab participants to a sequence of different subject pools while playing a constrained Trust Game. We find prior exposure to different subject pools does in fact influence cooperative behavior; first impressions matter—the primacy effect plays a stronger role than the recency effect; and selfish first impressions matter more than cooperative first impressions—observing selfish behavior by others had a longer-lasting and greater influence on behaviors than observing cooperative behavior by others. Moreover, three consecutive exposures to cooperative environments were needed to neutralize one exposure to a selfish environment. PMID:26578993

  6. Understanding Community Norms Surrounding Tobacco Sales

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Patricia A.; Malone, Ruth E.

    2014-01-01

    Background In the US, denormalizing tobacco use is key to tobacco control; less attention has been paid to denormalizing tobacco sales. However, some localities have placed limits on the number and type of retailers who may sell tobacco, and some retailers have abandoned tobacco sales voluntarily. Understanding community norms surrounding tobacco sales may help accelerate tobacco denormalization. Methods We conducted 15 focus groups with customers of California, New York, and Ohio retailers who had voluntarily discontinued tobacco sales to examine normative assumptions about where cigarettes should or should not be sold, voluntary decisions to discontinue tobacco sales, and government limits on such sales. Results Groups in all three states generally agreed that grocery stores that sold healthy products should not sell tobacco; California groups saw pharmacies similarly, while this was a minority opinion in the other two states. Convenience stores were regarded as a natural place to sell tobacco. In each state, it was regarded as normal and commendable for some stores to want to stop selling tobacco, although few participants could imagine convenience stores doing so. Views on government's role in setting limits on tobacco sales varied, with California and New York participants generally expressing support for restrictions, and Ohio participants expressing opposition. However, even those who expressed opposition did not approve of tobacco sales in all possible venues. Banning tobacco sales entirely was not yet normative. Conclusion Limiting the ubiquitous availability of tobacco sales is key to ending the tobacco epidemic. Some limits on tobacco sales appear to be normative from the perspective of community members; it may be possible to shift norms further by problematizing the ubiquitous presence of cigarettes and drawing connections to other products already subject to restrictions. PMID:25180772

  7. Wavefield imaging using the energy norm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Daniel Carvalho, Junior

    For various wavefield types, one can formulate a measurement of the mechanical energy that satisfies conservation laws. Based on this formulation, one can derive an energy norm that is applicable to wavefield imaging. Extending the concept of the norm to an inner product, one can compare two related wavefields. Therefore, an imaging condition can be defined as the inner product between the source and receiver wavefields at every spatial location. In this regard, the imaging condition based on the energy inner product accounts for wavefield directionality in space and time, overcoming some problems present in the conventional imaging condition. I exploit the wavefield directionality information from the energy imaging condition to attenuate unwanted events in reverse time migrated (RTM) images. For acoustic wavefields, these unwanted events are characterized by the collinearity of the source and receiver raypaths, and they are described as RTM backscattering artifacts. For elastic wavefields, these events are characterized by the fact that source and receiver displacement fields have the same polarization and wave propagation directions. In both acoustic and elastic cases, one can to attenuate these artifacts and produce high quality images. Another application that uses the wavefield directionality is to enhance the full waveform inversion (FWI) gradient for acoustic wavefields. By enhancing wave events that are collinear and suppressing all other wave events, I am able to compute gradients that are more suitable for the inversion process. Numerical experiments show the efficacy of these applications for synthetic models that emulate the complexity of subsurface structures found in exploration seismology, such as salt bodies, diffractors, dipping layers and faults.

  8. Glial nitric oxide-mediated long-term presynaptic facilitation revealed by optical imaging in rat spinal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Murase, Kazuyuki

    2004-11-01

    We investigated a presynaptic form of long-term potentiation (LTP) in horizontal slices of the rat spinal cord by visualizing presynaptic and postsynaptic excitation with a voltage-sensitive dye. To record presynaptic excitation, we stained primary afferent fibers anterogradely from the dorsal root. A single-pulse test stimulation of C fiber-activating strength to the dorsal root elicited action potential (AP)-like or compound AP-like optical signals throughout the superficial dorsal horn. After conditioning (240 pulses at 2 Hz for 2 min), the presynaptic excitation was augmented. Furthermore, new excitation was elicited in the areas that were silent before conditioning. For postsynaptic recording, projection neurons in spinal lamina I were stained retrogradely from the periaqueductal gray in the brain stem. The test stimulation elicited AP-like or EPSP-like optical signals in the stained neurons. After conditioning, the EPSP-like responses were augmented, and previously silent neurons were converted to active ones. Results obtained with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, NO synthase inhibitors, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist and mGluR1 antagonist, and a glial metabolism inhibitor suggest that after conditioning, presynaptic excitation is facilitated by NO released from glial cells via the activation of mGluR1. The results also indicate the possible presence of additional presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanism(s) for the LTP induction. Activity-dependent LTP of nociceptive afferent synaptic transmission in the spinal cord is believed to underlie central sensitization after inflammation or nerve injury. This glial NO-mediated control of presynaptic excitation may contribute to the induction at least in part. PMID:15525773

  9. easyCBM Norms. 2014 Edition. Technical Report #1409

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saven, Jessica L.; Tindal, Gerald; Irvin, P. Shawn; Farley, Dan; Alonzo, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Previous norms for the easyCBM assessment system were computed using scores from all students who took each measure for every grade and benchmark season (fall, winter, and spring). During the 2013-­14 school year, new national norms were developed to more accurately (proportionately) represent reading and mathematics performance by two variables:…

  10. Norms and Varieties of English and TESOL Teacher Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamid, M. Obaidul; Zhu, Lingyan; Baldauf, Richard B., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The growing recognition of the plurality of English underlying the World Englishes (WE) paradigm has problematised the conventional second language acquisition (SLA) views of errors. If English use in emerging English-speaking contexts is to be judged by local norms, as argued by WE scholars, applying exocentric norms in these contexts can be…

  11. The Maturation of Norms for Computer-Mediated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Gregory B.

    1993-01-01

    Analyzes the communication norms of the major forms of computer-mediated communication, including electronic mail, mailing lists, Usenet and other bulletin board systems, interactive messaging, multiuser domains (MUDs), and mass-broadcast media. New uses and the development of standards, or norms, are discussed. (Contains 11 references.) (LRW)

  12. Creation of Norms for the Purpose of Global Talent Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedricks, Cynthia A.; Robie, Chet; Harnisher, John V.

    2008-01-01

    Personality scores were used to construct three databases of global norms. The composition of the three databases varied according to percentage of cases by global region, occupational group, applicant status, and gender of the job candidate. Comparison of personality scores across the three norms databases revealed that the magnitude of the…

  13. Gender Norms and Retaliatory Violence against Spouses and Acquaintances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feld, Scott L.; Felson, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines an experiment embedded within a nationally representative survey of adult Americans to investigate gender norms regarding retaliatory violence between spouses and acquaintances. Contrary to claims that societal norms permit violence within marriage, respondents disapproved of retaliatory violence against spouses more than…

  14. The Subjectivity of the Translator and Socio-Cultural Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pei, Denghua

    2010-01-01

    This thesis attempts to probe into the dialectical relationship between the subjectivity of the translator and socio-cultural norms. The socio-cultural norms inevitably regulate the translator's translating activity, as acceptability of the translated text is the primary concern of most translators. However, this does not mean that the…

  15. Professional Development of PMRI Teachers for Introducing Social Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Dolk, Maarten; Zulkardi

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports implementation results of designing a workshop for mathematics teachers in introducing classroom social norms. The participants are eight mathematics teachers in primary and junior secondary level. Teachers learned and did some activities about social norms during the workshop. First, they watched an example of learning videos…

  16. Utility of Inferential Norming with Smaller Sample Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Jianjun; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2011-01-01

    We examined the utility of inferential norming using small samples drawn from the larger "Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children-Fourth Edition" (WISC-IV) standardization data set. The quality of the norms was estimated with multiple indexes such as polynomial curve fit, percentage of cases receiving the same score, average absolute score…

  17. Teaching the Sociocultural Norms of an Undergraduate Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couper, Graeme; Denny, Heather; Watkins, Annette

    2016-01-01

    The importance of teaching second language learners the pragmatic norms of relevant communities of practice is widely recognised. Familiarisation with these norms is also an important aspect of socialisation for native speakers entering a new community of practice. This study focuses on pragmatic instruction of English as an additional language…

  18. The Quest for Quality--Towards Joint European Quality Norms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomeus, Yvonne, Ed.; And Others

    This book contains the following papers about considerations in developing joint European quality norms for vocational guidance: "Joint Quality Norms in Guidance"; "Careers Guidance in the Information Society" (Frans Meijers); "The Changing Nature of Guidance" (J. Chamberlain); "Quality with Policy: Beyond Calimero?" (Saskia den Broeder); "Ethical…

  19. Parametric R-norm directed-divergence convex function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Dhanesh; Kumar, Satish

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we define parametric R-norm directed-divergence convex function and discuss their special cases and prove some properties similar to Kullback-Leibler information measure. From R-norm divergence measure new information measures have also been derived and their relations with different measures of entropy have been obtained and give its application in industrial engineering.

  20. The American Freshman: National Norms for Fall 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astin, Alexander W.; And Others

    This publication presents national norms for 237,777 college freshmen in fall 1994 based on the 29th annual survey of incoming students at 461 two-year and four-year colleges and universities. Three major tables present the norms for type of institutional control for all freshmen and by sex; for universities by selectivity level and by sex; and…

  1. Time Lag and Communication in Changing Unpopular Norms

    PubMed Central

    Gërxhani, Klarita; Bruggeman, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Humans often coordinate their social lives through norms. When a large majority of people are dissatisfied with an existing norm, it seems obvious that they will change it. Often, however, this does not occur. We investigate how a time lag between individual support of a norm change and the change itself hinders such change, related to the critical mass of supporters needed to effectuate the change, and the (im)possibility of communicating about it. To isolate these factors, we utilize a laboratory experiment. As predicted, we find unambiguous effects of time lag on precluding norm change; a higher threshold for a critical mass does so as well. Communication facilitates choosing superior norms but it does not necessarily lead to norm change when the uncertainty on whether there will be a norm change in the future is high. Communication seems to help coordination on actions at the present but not the future. Hence, the uncertainty driven by time lag makes individuals choose the status quo, here the unpopular norm. PMID:25880200

  2. CLEX: A Cross-Linguistic Lexical Norms Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Rune Norgaard; Dale, Philip S.; Bleses, Dorthe; Fenson, Larry

    2010-01-01

    Parent report has proven a valid and cost-effective means of evaluating early child language. Norming datasets for these instruments, which provide the basis for standardized comparisons of individual children to a population, can also be used to derive norms for the acquisition of individual words in production and comprehension and also early…

  3. Epistemological Norms and Companion Meanings in Science Classroom Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundqvist, Eva; Almqvist, Jonas; Ostman, Leif

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe two central epistemological norms related to the importance of making investigations and to scientific language and its logic. These norms have been identified in empirical material consisting of 200 video-recorded lessons in three different science classes. With regard to the learning of science and socialization, we…

  4. Family Norms in a Rapidly Industrializing Society: Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podmore, David; Chaney, David

    1974-01-01

    A sample of 1123 young people in Hong Kong responded to a number of statements concerning family norms. Data suggest that with regard to relationships between husband and wife, and parents and children, views are more consonant with the norms of the Western conjugal family than the traditional Chinese family. (Author)

  5. Minnesota Test-Norms and Expectancy Tables. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joselyn, Edwin Gary, Comp.; Perry, Dallis K.

    The volume of test-norms and expectancy tables is intended as a tool for counselors in counseling individuals. The work contains a chapter on test interpretation to assist the counselor in relating individual test scores to other information about the individual. In the Minnesota Norms section of the tables, there are no data at the elementary…

  6. Linguistic Norms and Adult Roles in Play and Serious Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moller, Janus Spindler; Jorgensen, Jens Normann

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the ways in which minority students in the Danish public school system bring mono-lingually based norms into their poly-lingual peer group interaction. In sequential micro-analyses of interaction we show how the students use the voice of an authority in their reproduction and negotiation of linguistic norms. We base our…

  7. Neuromuscular diversity in archosaur deep dorsal thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Gatesy, S M

    1994-01-01

    The living members of the clade Archosauria, crocodilians and birds, differ markedly in the morphology of their deep dorsal thigh muscles. To investigate whether this diversity is accompanied by differences in motor pattern and muscle function, the hindlimbs of representative archosaurs were studied by electromyography and cineradiography during terrestrial locomotion. In a crocodilian, Alligator, the iliofemoralis and pubo-ischio-femoralis internus part 2 are both active during the swing phase of the stride cycle. This appears to be the primitive motor pattern for archosaurs. There are four avian homologues of these muscles in the helmeted guineafowl, Numida. These are primarily active in the propulsive phase (iliotrochantericus caudalis and iliotrochantericus medius), the swing phase (iliotrochantericus cranialis) and a speed-dependent combination of the propulsive and/or swing phases (iliofemoralis externus). Differences between Alligator and Numida in the number and attachment of deep dorsal muscles are associated with dissimilar motor patterns and functions. Evolutionary modifications of neuromuscular control must be recognized when evaluating avian locomotor history, but are rarely considered by paleontologists. Even within the deep dorsal thigh muscles of Numida, developmentally and anatomically similar muscles are active out-of-phase. Therefore, although the actions of two adjacent muscles appear equivalent, their functions may differ dramatically. The diversity of deep dorsal thigh muscles in modern birds may be a good model for studying the relationship between activity pattern and peripheral morphology. PMID:8306187

  8. Retinoids control anterior and dorsal properties in the developing forebrain.

    PubMed

    Halilagic, Aida; Ribes, Vanessa; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Zile, Maija H; Dollé, Pascal; Studer, Michèle

    2007-03-01

    We have previously shown that retinoic acid (RA) synthesized by the retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (RALDH2) is required in forebrain development. Deficiency in RA due to inactivation of the mouse Raldh2 gene or to complete absence of retinoids in vitamin-A-deficient (VAD) quails, leads to abnormal morphogenesis of various forebrain derivatives. In this study we show that double Raldh2/Raldh3 mouse mutants have a more severe phenotype in the craniofacial region than single null mutants. In particular, the nasal processes are truncated and the eye abnormalities are exacerbated. It has been previously shown that retinoids act mainly on cell proliferation and survival in the ventral forebrain by regulating SHH and FGF8 signaling. Using the VAD quail model, which survives longer than the Raldh-deficient mouse embryos, we found that retinoids act in maintaining the correct position of anterior and dorsal boundaries in the forebrain by modulating FGF8 anteriorly and WNT signaling dorsally. Furthermore, BMP4 and FGF8 signaling are affected in the nasal region and BMP4 is ventrally expanded in the optic vesicle. At the optic cup stage, Pax6, Tbx5 and Bmp4 are ectopically expressed in the presumptive retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), while Otx2 and Mitf are not induced, leading to a dorsal transdifferentiation of RPE to neural retina. Therefore, besides being required for survival of ventral structures, retinoids are involved in restricting anterior identity in the telencephalon and dorsal identity in the diencephalon and the retina. PMID:17184764

  9. Attention modulates the dorsal striatum response to love stimuli.

    PubMed

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; van der Veen, Frederik M; Röder, Christian H

    2014-02-01

    In previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies concerning romantic love, several brain regions including the caudate and putamen have consistently been found to be more responsive to beloved-related than control stimuli. In those studies, infatuated individuals were typically instructed to passively view the stimuli or to think of the viewed person. In the current study, we examined how the instruction to attend to, or ignore the beloved modulates the response of these brain areas. Infatuated individuals performed an oddball task in which pictures of their beloved and friend served as targets and distractors. The dorsal striatum showed greater activation for the beloved than friend, but only when they were targets. The dorsal striatum actually tended to show less activation for the beloved than the friend when they were distractors. The longer the love and relationship duration, the smaller the response of the dorsal striatum to beloved-distractor stimuli was. We interpret our findings in terms of reinforcement learning. By virtue of using a cognitive task with a full factorial design, we show that the dorsal striatum is not activated by beloved-related information per se, but only by beloved-related information that is attended. PMID:23097247

  10. Role of the Dorsal Hippocampus in Object Memory Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sannino, Sara; Russo, Fabio; Torromino, Giulia; Pendolino, Valentina; Calabresi, Paolo; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal hippocampus is crucial for mammalian spatial memory, but its exact role in item memory is still hotly debated. Recent evidence in humans suggested that the hippocampus might be selectively involved in item short-term memory to deal with an increasing memory load. In this study, we sought to test this hypothesis. To this aim we developed…

  11. Enkephalin surges in dorsal neostriatum as a signal to eat.

    PubMed

    DiFeliceantonio, Alexandra G; Mabrouk, Omar S; Kennedy, Robert T; Berridge, Kent C

    2012-10-23

    Compulsive overconsumption of reward characterizes disorders ranging from binge eating to drug addiction. Here, we provide evidence that enkephalin surges in an anteromedial quadrant of dorsal neostriatum contribute to generating intense consumption of palatable food. In ventral striatum, mu opioid circuitry contributes an important component of motivation to consume reward. In dorsal neostriatum, mu opioid receptors are concentrated within striosomes that receive inputs from limbic regions of prefrontal cortex. We employed advanced opioid microdialysis techniques that allow detection of extracellular enkephalin levels. Endogenous >150% enkephalin surges in anterior dorsomedial neostriatum were triggered as rats began to consume palatable chocolates. In contrast, dynorphin levels remained unchanged. Furthermore, a causal role for mu opioid stimulation in overconsumption was demonstrated by observations that microinjection in the same anterior dorsomedial quadrant of a mu receptor agonist ([D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin; DAMGO) generated intense >250% increases in intake of palatable sweet food (without altering hedonic impact of sweet tastes). Mapping by "Fos plume" methods confirmed the hyperphagic effect to be anatomically localized to the anteromedial quadrant of the dorsal neostriatum, whereas other quadrants were relatively ineffective. These findings reveal that opioid signals in anteromedial dorsal neostriatum are able to code and cause motivation to consume sensory reward. PMID:23000149

  12. Dorsal finger joint soft tissue loss: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Bervar, M

    2003-01-01

    This article brings our experience, standpoints and management guidelines for early reconstruction of traumatic soft tissue loss on the dorsal aspect of the finger joints, with the aim of preserving acceptable late functional ability of the hand. Two interesting and unusual cases of reconstruction are presented. PMID:14989334

  13. Social Norms about a Health Issue in Work Group Networks

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Lauren B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to advance theorizing about how small groups understand health issues through the use of social network analysis. To achieve this goal, an adapted cognitive social structure examines group social norms around a specific health issue, H1N1 flu prevention. As predicted, individual’s attitudes, self-efficacy, and perceived social norms were each positively associated with behavioral intentions for at least one of the H1N1 health behaviors studied. Moreover, collective norms of the whole group were also associated with behavioral intentions, even after controlling for how individual group members perceive those norms. For members of work groups in which pairs were perceived to agree in their support for H1N1 vaccination, the effect of individually perceived group norms on behavioral intentions was stronger than for groups with less agreement. PMID:26389934

  14. Ethnic diversity, traditional norms, and marriage behaviour in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Buttenheim, Alison M; Nobles, Jenna

    2009-11-01

    What role do cultural norms play in shaping individual behaviour and how does this relationship change with rapid socio-economic development? While modernization and convergence theories predict a weakened relationship between culture and behaviour as individuals rely less on family and community members for economic opportunities, recent research suggests that such norms can persist and continue to influence behaviour. We explored this question for Indonesia, asking whether cultural norms for age at marriage and post-marriage residence-as embodied in local ethnicity-based laws and customs known as 'adat'-relate to actual marriage behaviour. We demonstrate that adat norms are strong predictors of marriage behaviour, both over time and net of large increases in educational attainment. Our results suggest more generally that traditional marriage norms can persist even when a society is in the process of rapid socio-economic development. PMID:19851937

  15. Privacy, technology, and norms: the case of Smart Meters.

    PubMed

    Horne, Christine; Darras, Brice; Bean, Elyse; Srivastava, Anurag; Frickel, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Norms shift and emerge in response to technological innovation. One such innovation is Smart Meters - components of Smart Grid energy systems capable of minute-to-minute transmission of consumer electricity use information. We integrate theory from sociological research on social norms and privacy to examine how privacy threats affect the demand for and expectations of norms that emerge in response to new technologies, using Smart Meters as a test case. Results from three vignette experiments suggest that increased threats to privacy created by Smart Meters are likely to provoke strong demand for and expectations of norms opposing the technology and that the strength of these normative rules is at least partly conditional on the context. Privacy concerns vary little with actors' demographic characteristics. These findings contribute to theoretical understanding of norm emergence and have practical implications for implementing privacy protections that effectively address concerns of electricity users. PMID:25769852

  16. Dorsal dislocation of the trapezoid at the scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal joint.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Malliaris, Stephanie; Weiland, Andrew J

    2015-05-01

    Background Axial dislocations of the trapezoid are rare, high-energy injuries. We present an unusual case of isolated dorsal dislocation of the trapezoid and index metacarpal at the scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal (STT) joint due to steering wheel injury. Case Description A 56-year-old man presented to our office with right hand pain for 10 days after a head-on motor vehicle accident (MVA) in which he suffered an axial load injury to his hand on the steering wheel. X-ray images were reported as unremarkable. Further workup with computed tomography (CT) scan revealed an isolated dorsal dislocation of the trapezoid with its associated index metacarpal at the STT joint. The patient was treated with open reduction, pinning, and dorsal capsulodesis. Literature Review Dorsal dislocation of the trapezoid has been associated with high-energy trauma such as industrial accidents or motorcycle accidents; however, recent case reports have also revealed an axial loading mechanism from a steering wheel injury as an increasingly common mechanism. These cases typically occur concomitantly with other fractures or dislocations of the carpal bones or carpometacarpal (CMC) joints. Multiple reports of delayed diagnoses due to distracting injuries and difficulty of recognition on plain radiographs have been reported. Clinical Relevance Dorsal dislocation of the trapezoid with its associated second metacarpal is a rare, high-energy injury that can often be missed on plain radiography. We report a rare variant with no concomitant injury to the metacarpals or carpal bones. A low index of suspicion for further imaging should exist in the setting of an axial loading injury to the hand. PMID:25945300

  17. Disciplinary Differences in Faculty Conformity to the Norms of Science: Are Norms Compensatory Integrating Mechanisms for Professional Fragmentation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coopersmith, Georgia A.; Braxton, John M.

    The norms of science define appropriate and inappropriate scholarly or research role performance. The four norms described in this study are (1) universalism: research is assessed on its merit, not particularistic criteria; (2) commonality: research must be made public and shared with the research community; (3) disinterestedness: research is…

  18. 17β-Estradiol infusions into the dorsal striatum rapidly increase dorsal striatal dopamine release in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shams, Waqqas M; Sanio, Christian; Quinlan, Matthew G; Brake, Wayne G

    2016-08-25

    Systemic injections of 17β-estradiol (E2) in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats rapidly enhance dorsal striatal dopamine (DA) release in response to amphetamine (AMPH). Additionally, a single injection of E2 rapidly (within 30min) enhances amphetamine-induced DA release. In situ studies show that this rapid effect of E2 occurs specifically within the dorsal striatum (DS). The present study investigated the in vivo effects of E2 infused into the DS, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) or the substantia nigra (SN) on dorsal striatal DA release. Rats were OVX and implanted with a silastic tube containing 5% E2 in cholesterol, previously shown to mimic low physiological serum concentrations of 18-32pg/ml. Single-probe microdialysis was used to measure extracellular DA levels in the DS. In addition, DA release was measured subsequent to systemic injections of the indirect DA agonist, AMPH (0.5mg/kg SC), administered simultaneously with E2 (0.544μg/100μl) or its vehicle, cyclodextrin (VEH) (0.520μg/100μl). Local infusions of E2 into the DS resulted in a greater amphetamine-induced dorsal striatal DA release in comparison to vehicle. Local infusions of E2 into the mPFC or the SN did not result in an enhancement of amphetamine-induced DA levels in the DS. These studies suggest that increases in dorsal striatal DA release in response to systemic E2 are a consequence of E2 actions within the DS itself. PMID:27256507

  19. Presynaptic inhibitory effects of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on nociceptive excitatory synaptic transmission in spinal superficial dorsal horn neurons of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Tomoyose, Orie; Kodama, Daisuke; Ono, Hideki; Tanabe, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, has been shown to exert analgesic effects in humans and laboratory animals. However, its effects on spinal nociceptive synaptic transmission have not been fully characterized. Here, whole-cell recordings were made from dorsal horn neurons in spinal slices with attached dorsal roots from adult mice, and the effects of fluvoxamine on monosynaptic A-fiber- and C-fiber-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked in response to electrical stimulation of a dorsal root were studied. Fluvoxamine (10 - 100 μM) concentration-dependently suppressed both monosynaptic A-fiber- and C-fiber-mediated EPSCs, which were attenuated by the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635. In the presence of the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron, fluvoxamine hardly suppressed A-fiber-mediated EPSCs, whereas its inhibitory effect on C-fiber-mediated EPSCs was not affected. Although fluvoxamine increased the paired-pulse ratio of A-fiber-mediated EPSCs, it increased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs (sEPSCs and mEPSCs). Since sEPSCs and mEPSCs appeared to arise largely from spinal interneurons, we then recorded strontium-evoked asynchronous events occurring after A-fiber stimulation, whose frequency was reduced by fluvoxamine. These results suggest that fluvoxamine reduces excitatory synaptic transmission from primary afferent fibers via presynaptic mechanisms involving 5-HT1A and/or 5-HT3 receptors, which may contribute to its analgesic effects. PMID:25252797

  20. Hazard of NORM from phosphorite of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sabiha-Javied; Tufail, M; Asghar, M

    2010-04-15

    In order to investigate the radiological hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in phosphorite deposits of Pakistan, 26 samples of phosphorite were collected from the phosphorite mines near Abbottabad, and 20 samples of single superphosphate (SSP) fertilizer were obtained from the warehouses in Pakistan. Activity concentration in all the samples was assayed using HPGe detection system. Specific activity values of (238)U, (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th in the samples of phosphorite were 550+/-156 (329-845), 206+/-72 (93-362), 511+/-189 (316-830) and 52+/-17 (23-81) Bq kg(-1), respectively; and those in SSP fertilizer due to these radionuclides were 637+/-44 (596-687), 164+/-24 (113-215), 589+/-44 (521-671) and 29+/-6 (16-45) Bq kg(-1), respectively. The results were compared with that of worldwide soil. Outdoor external dose rate due to gamma rays from phosphorite was calculated to be 276+/-94 (177-441) nGy h(-1) and external dose rate in a room made of phosphorite containing material was estimated to be 706+/-243 (455-1129) nGy h(-1). The concentration of radon was measured in phosphorite mines and in the warehouses for SSP fertilizer by an active method. Protective measures have been proposed to control the pollution in the phosphorite mining and processing, and fertilizer storage areas. PMID:19963319

  1. Suicidality, Economic Shocks, and Egalitarian Gender Norms

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Aaron; Stuckler, David

    2015-01-01

    Durkheim conceived of suicide as a product of social integration and regulation. Although the sociology of suicide has focused on the role of disintegration, to our knowledge, the interaction between integration and regulation has yet to be empirically evaluated. In this article we test whether more egalitarian gender norms, an important form of macro-regulation, protects men and women against suicidality during economic shocks. Using cross-national data covering 20 European Union countries from the years 1991 to 2011, including the recent economic crises in Europe, we first assessed the relation between unemployment and suicide. Then we evaluated potential effect modification using three measures of gender equality, the gender ratio in labour force participation, the gender pay gap, and women’s representation in parliament using multiple measures. We found no evidence of a significant, direct link between greater gender equality and suicide rates in either men or women. However, a greater degree of gender equality helped protect against suicidality associated with economic shocks. At relatively high levels of gender equality in Europe, such as those seen in Sweden and Austria, the relationship between rising unemployment rates and suicide in men disappeared altogether. Our findings suggest that more egalitarian forms of gender regulation may help buffer the suicidal consequences of economic shocks, especially in men. PMID:26877572

  2. Feasibility of re-melting NORM-contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, S. J.; Smith, K. P.

    1999-10-26

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) sometimes accumulate inside pieces of equipment associated with oil and gas production and processing activities. Typically, the NORM accumulates when radium that is present in solution in produced water precipitates out in scale and sludge deposits. Scrap equipment containing residual quantities of these NORM-bearing scales and sludges can present a waste management problem if the radium concentrations exceed regulatory limits or activate the alarms on radiation screening devices installed at most scrap metal recycling facilities. Although NORM-contaminated scrap metal currently is not disposed of by re-melting, this form of recycling could present a viable disposition option for this waste stream. Studies indicate that re-melting NORM-contaminated scrap metal is a viable recycling option from a risk-based perspective. However, a myriad of economic, regulatory, and policy issues have caused the recyclers to turn away virtually all radioactive scrap metal. Until these issues can be resolved, re-melting of the petroleum industry's NORM-impacted scrap metal is unlikely to be a widespread practice. This paper summarizes the issues associated with re-melting radioactive scrap so that the petroleum industry and its regulators will understand the obstacles. This paper was prepared as part of a report being prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission's NORM Subcommittee.

  3. Options and cost for disposal of NORM waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.

    1998-10-22

    Oil field waste containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is presently disposed of both on the lease site and at off-site commercial disposal facilities. The majority of NORM waste is disposed of through underground injection, most of which presently takes place at a commercial injection facility located in eastern Texas. Several companies offer the service of coming to an operator's site, grinding the NORM waste into a fine particle size, slurrying the waste, and injecting it into the operator's own disposal well. One company is developing a process whereby the radionuclides are dissolved out of the NORM wastes, leaving a nonhazardous oil field waste and a contaminated liquid stream that is injected into the operator's own injection well. Smaller quantities of NORM are disposed of through burial in landfills, encapsulation inside the casing of wells that are being plugged and abandoned, or land spreading. It is difficult to quantify the total cost for disposing of NORM waste. The cost components that must be considered, in addition to the cost of the operation, include analytical costs, transportation costs, container decontamination costs, permitting costs, and long-term liability costs. Current NORM waste disposal costs range from $15/bbl to $420/bbl.

  4. Predicting Early Reading Skills from Pre-Reading Measures of Dorsal Stream Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Alison; Pammer, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    It is well documented that good reading skills may be dependent upon adequate dorsal stream processing. However, the degree to which dorsal stream deficits play a causal role in reading failure has not been established. This study used coherent motion and visual frequency doubling to examine whether dorsal stream sensitivity measured before the…

  5. Using Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, William Wynne

    1976-01-01

    This article describes techniques which enable the user of a comparatively simple calculator to perform calculations of cube roots, nth roots, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions, logarithms, and exponentials. (DT)

  6. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  7. Deafferentation is insufficient to induce sprouting of A-fibre central terminals in the rat dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Mannion, R J; Doubell, T P; Gill, H; Woolf, C J

    1998-04-01

    The mechanism by which A-fibres sprout into lamina II of the dorsal horn of the adult rat after peripheral nerve injury, a region which normally receives input from noci- and thermoreceptive C-fibres alone, is not known. Recent findings indicating that selective C-fibre injury and subsequent degenerative changes in this region are sufficient to induce sprouting of uninjured A-fibres have raised the possibility that the structural reorganisation of A-fibre terminals is an example of collateral sprouting, in that deafferentation of C-fibre terminals alone in lamina II may be sufficient to cause A-fibre sprouting. Primary afferents of the sciatic nerve have their cell bodies located predominantly in the L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), and the A-fibres of each DRG have central termination fields that show an extensive rostrocaudal overlap in lamina III in the L4 and L5 spinal segments. In this study, we have found that C-fibres from either DRG have central terminal fields that overlap much less in lamina II than A-fibres in lamina III. We have exploited this differential terminal organisation to produce deafferentation in lamina II of the L5 spinal segment, by an L5 rhizotomy, and then test whether A-fibres of the intact L4 dorsal root ganglion, which terminate within the L5 segment, sprout into the denervated lamina II in the L5 spinal segment. Neither intact nor peripherally injured A-fibres were seen to sprout into denervated lamina II after L5 rhizotomy. Sprouting was only ever seen into regions of lamina II containing the terminals of peripherally injured C-fibres. Therefore, it seems that the creation of synaptic space within lamina II is not the explanation for A-fibre sprouting after peripheral nerve section or crush, emphasising that injury-induced changes in C-fibres and subsequent chemotrophic effects in the superficial dorsal horn are the likely explanation. PMID:9548693

  8. [The new International Standardization Organization 9000 norms: 2000].

    PubMed

    Arnold, J

    1999-07-01

    The reviewing of ISO 9000 norms has been planned to be published within the last quarter of the year 2000. It aims at overcoming the limits and difficulties of use evidenced by the implementation of the 1994 ISO norms, and at providing an analysis aid for improving quality, which would be adapted to the needs of each company or user. What is at stake with these new norms is the implementation of a quality management system, and its evolution towards a total-quality management. PMID:10472689

  9. Corky root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corky root rot (corchosis) was first reported in Argentina in 1985, but the disease was presumably present long before that. The disease occurs in most alfalfa-growing areas of Argentina but is more common in older stands. In space-planted alfalfa trials scored for root problems, corky root rot was ...

  10. WHY ROOTING FAILS.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-07-30

    I explore the origins of the unphysical predictions from rooted staggered fermion algorithms. Before rooting, the exact chiral symmetry of staggered fermions is a flavored symmetry among the four 'tastes.' The rooting procedure averages over tastes of different chiralities. This averaging forbids the appearance of the correct 't Hooft vertex for the target theory.