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Sample records for dorsi tendon transfer

  1. Latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for massive, irreparable posterosuperior rotator cuff tears: surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Rabah; Romine, Lucas; Yao, David C; Duncan, Scott F M

    2014-09-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears remain a complex and challenging problem for both the patient and the surgeon. Although significant advancements in surgical techniques as well as technology for arthroscopic and mini-open rotator cuff repairs have been made, many massive tears result in failed repair with continued progressive tendon retraction and degeneration. In cases when primary tendon to bone healing is impractical, latissimus dorsi tendon transfer provides promising and reproducible clinical results. Herein, we present a latissimus tendon transfer surgical technique, a procedure we have used as a salvage operation for failed arthroscopic/mini-open primary rotator cuff repair. PMID:24854152

  2. Biomechanics of Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Andrew; Tueting, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    The transfer of tendons in the upper extremity is a powerful technique to restore function to a partially paralyzed hand. The biomechanical principles of muscle tension and tendon excursion dictate motor function both in the native as well as transferred states. Appropriately tensioning transferred tendons to maximize the function of the associated muscle remains an area of focused research. Newer methods of tendon coaptation have proven similar in strength to the standard Pulvertaft weave, affording more options to the surgeon. PMID:27387073

  3. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  4. Principles of Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Danielle; Hammert, Warren C

    2016-08-01

    Tendon transfers provide a substitute, either temporary or permanent, when function is lost due to neurologic injury in stroke, cerebral palsy or central nervous system lesions, peripheral nerve injuries, or injuries to the musculotendinous unit itself. This article reviews the basic principles of tendon transfer, which are important when planning surgery and essential for an optimal outcome. In addition, concepts for coapting the tendons during surgery and general principles to be followed during the rehabilitation process are discussed. PMID:27387072

  5. Tendon Transfers for Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that 65% to 75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery. The goals of surgery are to restore elbow extension, as well as hand pinch, grasp, and release. Patients who have defined goals, actively participate in therapy, and understand expected outcomes, appear to have the highest satisfaction following tendon transfer procedures. PMID:27387082

  6. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are used commonly for the correction of soft tissue imbalances and instabilities. The complete transfer and the split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon are well-accepted methods for the treatment of idiopathic equinovarus deformity in children and adults. Throughout the literature, complete and split transfer have been shown to yield significant improvements in ankle and foot range of motion and muscle function. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend one procedure over the other, although the split procedure has been advocated for consistently achieving inversion to eversion muscle balance without overcorrection. PMID:26590723

  7. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  8. Principles of tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Coulet, B

    2016-04-01

    Tendon transfers are carried out to restore functional deficits by rerouting the remaining intact muscles. Transfers are highly attractive in the context of hand surgery because of the possibility of restoring the patient's ability to grip. In palsy cases, tendon transfers are only used when a neurological procedure is contraindicated or has failed. The strategy used to restore function follows a common set of principles, no matter the nature of the deficit. The first step is to clearly distinguish between deficient muscles and muscles that could be transferred. Next, the type of palsy will dictate the scope of the program and the complexity of the gripping movements that can be restored. Based on this reasoning, a surgical strategy that matches the means (transferable muscles) with the objectives (functions to restore) will be established and clearly explained to the patient. Every paralyzed hand can be described using three parameters. 1) Deficient segments: wrist, thumb and long fingers; 2) mechanical performance of muscles groups being revived: high energy-wrist extension and finger flexion that require strong transfers with long excursion; low energy-wrist flexion and finger extension movements that are less demanding mechanically, because they can be accomplished through gravity alone in some cases; 3) condition of the two primary motors in the hand: extrinsics (flexors and extensors) and intrinsics (facilitator). No matter the type of palsy, the transfer surgery follows the same technical principles: exposure, release, fixation, tensioning and rehabilitation. By performing an in-depth analysis of each case and by following strict technical principles, tendon transfer surgery leads to reproducible results; this allows the surgeon to establish clear objectives for the patient preoperatively. PMID:27117119

  9. Tendon Transfers for Combined Peripheral Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Makarewich, Christopher A; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2016-08-01

    Combined peripheral nerve injuries present a unique set of challenges to the hand surgeon when considering tendon transfers. They are often associated with severe soft tissue trauma, including lacerations to remaining innervated muscles and tendons, significant scar formation, and substantial sensory loss. In the case of combined nerve injuries, there are typically fewer options for tendon transfers due to fewer tendons of shared function that are expendable as well as associated injuries to tendon or muscle bellies. As such, careful preoperative planning must be performed to make the most of remaining muscle tendon units. PMID:27387081

  10. Rerouting extensor pollicis longus tendon transfer.

    PubMed

    Colantoni Woodside, Julie; Bindra, Randip R

    2015-04-01

    Following radial nerve palsy, loss of the extensor pollicis longus (EPL), abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons results in loss of thumb extension and radial abduction. Multiple tendon transfers are described to address the loss of thumb extension following radial palsy utilizing the palmaris longus or flexor digitorum sublimis transferred to the EPL tendon. Owing to its ulnar vector of pull, the EPL tendon is a secondary adductor of the thumb, and in order to mitigate the tendency for thumb adduction, the EPL tendon is divided at the wrist and brought subcutaneously to the radial side of the wrist for repair to the donor tendon to improve the line of pull for the donor tendon. We describe the use of a technique to reroute the EPL tendon through the first compartment in a retrograde fashion prior to repair with the donor tendon on the radial side of the wrist. The use of the first dorsal compartment provides a pulley to maintain the position of the transfer and to prevent potential bowstringing of the tendon as wrist flexion and thumb extension are attempted. because the repair is performed proximal to the extensor retinaculum, the donor tendon length is not compromised. Because the tendon is redirected through the first dorsal compartment and inserts into the distal phalanx, a single transfer attempts to restores both thumb extension and radial abduction. PMID:25746145

  11. Arthroscopic fixation with a minimally invasive axillary approach for latissimus dorsi transfer using an endobutton in massive and irreparable postero-superior cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Yariv; Grimberg, Jean; Valenti, Philippe; Chechik, Ofir; Drexler, Michael; Kany, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer is a viable option for treatment of patients in their 50s to 70s, without arthritis of the glenohumeral joint, who suffer from massive rotator cuff tears that are not amendable to primary repair due to fatty changes in the muscle tissue, or that have failed previous repair attempts. This procedure offers immediate and dramatic pain relief and is not as technically demanding as one might think. Understanding and respecting the principles of tendon transfer is a key to the success of this procedure. PMID:23960367

  12. Bipolar Latissimus Dorsi Transfer through a Single Incision: First Key-Step in Poland Syndrome Chest Deformity.

    PubMed

    Watfa, William; di Summa, Pietro G; Raffoul, Wassim

    2016-08-01

    Poland syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by a unilateral congenital absence of the sternocostal head of the pectoralis major muscle. The absence of the pectoralis major does not only result in chest asymmetry but also in a missing anterior axillary fold, which is essential for natural anatomical appearance in both male and female patients. In Poland syndrome patients, we perform bipolar latissimus dorsi flap transfer, which can be associated with a sublatissimus implant in women. All procedures are performed through a single short midaxillary incision, and tendon translocation in this technique allows the creation of the anterior axillary fold and thus a natural chest appearance. Moreover, this technique can be performed by any plastic surgeon operating under a basic operating room setting. PMID:27622115

  13. Bipolar Latissimus Dorsi Transfer through a Single Incision: First Key–Step in Poland Syndrome Chest Deformity

    PubMed Central

    di Summa, Pietro G.; Raffoul, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Poland syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by a unilateral congenital absence of the sternocostal head of the pectoralis major muscle. The absence of the pectoralis major does not only result in chest asymmetry but also in a missing anterior axillary fold, which is essential for natural anatomical appearance in both male and female patients. In Poland syndrome patients, we perform bipolar latissimus dorsi flap transfer, which can be associated with a sublatissimus implant in women. All procedures are performed through a single short midaxillary incision, and tendon translocation in this technique allows the creation of the anterior axillary fold and thus a natural chest appearance. Moreover, this technique can be performed by any plastic surgeon operating under a basic operating room setting. PMID:27622115

  14. Tendon Transfers in the Rheumatoid Hand for Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Michael Brody; Singh, Hardeep; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2016-08-01

    Long-standing rheumatoid arthritis can result in spontaneous tendon rupture caused by attrition of the tendons. Ruptures of the ulnar-sided extensor tendons, flexor pollicis longus, and the flexor digitorum profundus can be seen. Primary repair of these tendon ruptures is frequently not possible because of delayed presentation and tendon damage by the disease process. Tendon transfers are the preferred method of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. At surgery, it is critical to address the underlying cause of rupture to prevent future tendon ruptures. Rates of tendon rupture may decrease due to improved medications for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27387084

  15. Extensive Loss of Tibialis Anterior Tendon: Surgical Repair With Split Tendon Transfer of Tibialis Posterior Tendon: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Inukai, Tomoo; Sakamoto, Takumi; Yamagishi, Atsushi; Kitade, Makoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Extensive damage of the tibialis anterior tendon is rare and mainly caused by trauma. Surgical treatment of these injuries can become challenging owing to the limited availability of autogenous graft resources for reconstruction of the defect. In the present case report, we describe a large defect in the midfoot soft tissue after a traffic injury, which included complete loss of the tibialis anterior tendon. The tendon was reconstructed by split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon without sacrificing function, which was confirmed by the follow-up examination at 6 years after injury. We believe split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon can be one of the treatment options for patients with extensive disruption of the tibialis anterior tendon. PMID:26213163

  16. Tendon Transfers for the Hypoplastic Thumb.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2016-08-01

    Thumb hypoplasia is a component of radial longitudinal deficiency. The severity of hypoplasia can range from a slightly smaller thumb to a complete absence. Types II and IIIA hypoplastic thumbs are candidates for reconstruction to improve function, stability, and strength. There are 2 commonly used tendon transfers that can augment thumb opposition strength: the Huber abductor digiti minimi muscle transfer and the flexor digitorum superficialis opposition transfer. Both transfers use ulnar-sided structures to augment the thenar musculature. The Huber opposition transfer increases thenar bulk, but does not provide additional tissue for metacarpophalangeal stability. PMID:27387085

  17. Shear Load Transfer in High and Low Stress Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Background Tendon is an integral part of joint movement and stability, as it functions to transmit load from muscle to bone. It has an anisotropic, fibrous hierarchical structure that is generally loaded in the direction of its fibers/fascicles. Internal load distributions are altered when joint motion rotates an insertion site or when local damage disrupts fibers/fascicles, potentially causing inter-fiber (or inter-fascicular) shear. Tendons with different microstructure (helical versus linear) may redistribute loads differently. Method of Approach This study explored how shear redistributes axial loads in rat tail tendon (low stress tendons with linear microstructure) and porcine flexor tendon (high stress with helical microstructure) by creating lacerations on opposite sides of the tendon, ranging from about 20-60% of the tendon width, to create various magnitudes of shear. Differences in fascicular orientation were quantified using polarized light microscopy. Results and Conclusions Unexpectedly, both tendon types maintained about 20% of pre-laceration stress values after overlapping cuts of 60% of tendon width (no intact fibers end to end) suggesting that shear stress transfer can contribute more to overall tendon strength and stiffness than previously reported. All structural parameters for both tendon types decreased linearly with increasing laceration depth. The tail tendon had a more rapid decline in post-laceration elastic stress and modulus parameters as well as a more linear and less tightly packed fascicular structure, suggesting that positional tendons may be less well suited to redistribute loads via a shear mechanism. PMID:25700261

  18. Patch-Augmented Latissimus Dorsi Transfer and Open Reduction–Internal Fixation of Unstable Os Acromiale for Irreparable Massive Posterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Maximilian; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Millett, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Latissimus dorsi transfer is a reasonable treatment option for massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tears that can substantially improve chronically painful and dysfunctional shoulders. This report and accompanying video describe the treatment of an active 43-year-old man with severe pain and weakness in the right shoulder after 3 failed rotator cuff repairs. Preoperative imaging showed a massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tear retracted to the glenoid as well as a hypermobile os acromiale likely causing dynamic impingement and recurrent rotator cuff tears. After diagnostic arthroscopy, the latissimus tendon is harvested and augmented with a 3-mm human acellular dermal patch (ArthroFlex; Arthrex, Naples, FL). The native rotator cuff tissue is repaired as much as possible, and the latissimus tendon is passed underneath the deltoid and posterior to the teres minor. The patch-augmented tendon is then integrated into a double-row SpeedBridge repair of eight 4.75-mm BioComposite SwiveLock anchors (Arthrex). The bony surface of the os acromiale is prepared and then fixed to the acromion with 2 cannulated partially threaded screws and additional tension-band wiring. Postoperative rehabilitation initially focuses on early passive range of motion, followed by active and active-assisted motion and a biofeedback program starting at 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26697309

  19. [Irreparable rotator cuff tears. Debridement, partial reconstruction, tendon transfer or reversed shoulder arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Patzer, Th; Hufeland, M; Krauspe, R

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears are fluent, are dependent on the patients' claims and demands and on the grade of the ongoing cuff tear arthropathy.A partial rotator cuff reconstruction with sufficient tenolysis combined with interval slide techniques to restore the anterior and posterior force couple may be indicated if there is no fatty degeneration > grade 3 of the rotator cuff muscles in a well-centered joint. The margin convergence technique with side-by-side adaptation of the tendon limbs may reduce the load on the reconstructed tendons.The role of the suprascapular nerve, which can probably be constricted by the retracted rotator cuff, and its therapy has not been completely clarified. When distinct symptoms are present neurolysis may be reasonable.Tendon transfers can be indicated in a cooperative patient < 65 years with a higher grade of muscular atrophy but without degenerative changes > grade II according to Hamada with the loss of active external rotation but performable active flexion. For posterosuperior tears the latissimus dorsi or recently the teres major tendon transfer to the rotator cuff footprint may be appropriate. For nonreconstructable anterosuperior tears a partial transfer of the pectoralis major tendon is possible.Careful subacromial debridement combined with biceps tenotomy and a cautious or reversed decompression may reduce the pain temporarily without having an influence on active motion until with the loss of active elevation the indication for a reversed shoulder arthroplasty is reached.In the mean time, absorbable subacromial spacers may re-center the humeral head, but the effectiveness of this therapy on clinical outcome should be analyzed in further studies. PMID:26768144

  20. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer for Posterior Tibial Tendon Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Cobb procedure is useful for addressing stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and is often accompanied by a medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy and/or lateral column lengthening. The Cobb procedure can also be combined with selected medial column arthrodesis and realignment osteotomies along with equinus correction when indicated. PMID:26590721

  1. Outcome following addition of peroneus brevis tendon transfer to treatment of acquired posterior tibial tendon insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Song, S J; Deland, J T

    2001-04-01

    The flexor digitorum longus, the tendon most often used for transfer in posterior tibial tendon insufficiency, is one-half to one-third the size of the posterior tibial tendon. Occasionally it may be particularly small or may have been previously used for transfer. In these cases, the senior author has felt that the addition of a transfer of the Peroneus Brevis (PBr) tendon may be helpful in maintaining sufficient tendon and muscle mass to rebalance the foot. Thirteen patients who underwent this procedure were retrospectively identified and matched by age and length of follow-up to patients who underwent a more standard tendon transfer operation minus the addition of the PBr transfer. Pain and functional status were then assessed by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society's ankle/hindfoot rating scale. Each patient was tested by an independent physical therapist to evaluate inversion and eversion strength. The mean duration of follow-up was 20.6 months (12 to 34 months). The average AOFAS score of the PBr group was 75.8 compared to 71.5 for the standard control group. There was no significant difference between the groups when inversion or eversion strengths were compared. Inversion strength and eversion strength was rated good or excellent (4 or 5) in 12 out of 13 of the PBr transfer group patients. No major complications were encountered in either group. Although it does not increase inversion strength, a PBr transfer can be used to augment a small FDL without causing significant eversion weakness. This can be useful when the FDL is particularly small or in revision surgery. PMID:11354442

  2. A coincidental variation of the axillary artery: the brachioradial artery and the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle

    PubMed Central

    Konarik, Marek; Kachlik, David; Baca, Vaclav

    2014-01-01

    A case of anomalous terminal branching of the axillary artery was encountered and described in a left upper limb of a male cadaver. A series of 214 upper limbs of Caucasian race was dissected. A variant artery, stemming from the very end of the axillary artery followed a superficial course distally. It passed the cubital fossa, ran on the lateral side of the forearm as usual radial artery, crossed ventrally to the palm and terminated in the deep palmar arch. This vessel is a case of the brachioradial artery (incorrectly termed as the “radial artery with high origin”). Moreover, it was associated with another variation, concerning the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is essential for radiodiagnostic, surgical and traumatologic procedures. The superficially located artery brings an elevated danger of heavy bleeding in all unexpected situations, its variant branching can cause problems in radial catheterization procedures and the anomalously coursing other arterial variant poses an elevated danger in surgical procedures concerning the surgical neck of humerus. PMID:25428677

  3. Tendon Transfer Surgery for People With Tetraplegia: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jennifer A; Sinnott, K Anne; Rothwell, Alastair G; Mohammed, Khalid D; Simcock, Jeremy W

    2016-06-01

    After cervical spinal cord injury, the loss of upper limb function is common. This affects an individual's ability to perform activities of daily living and participate in previous life roles. There are surgical procedures that can restore some of the upper limb function lost after cervical spinal cord injury. Tendon transfer surgery has been performed in the tetraplegic population since the early 1970s. The goals of surgery are to provide a person with tetraplegia with active elbow extension, wrist extension (if absent), and sufficient pinch and/or grip strength to perform activities of daily living without the need for adaptive equipment or orthoses. These procedures are suitable for a specific group, usually with spinal cord impairment of C4-8, with explicit components of motor and sensory loss. Comprehensive team assessments of current functioning, environment, and personal circumstances are important to ensure success of any procedure. Rehabilitation after tendon transfer surgery involves immobilization for tendon healing followed by specific, targeted therapy based on motor learning and goal-orientated training. Outcomes of tendon transfer surgery are not limited to the improvements in an individual's strength, function, and performance of activities but have much greater life affects, especially with regard to well-being, employment, and participation. This article will provide an overview of the aims of surgery, preoperative assessment, common procedures, postoperative rehabilitation strategies, and outcomes based on clinical experience and international published literature. PMID:27233594

  4. Treatment of peroneal nerve injuries with simultaneous tendon transfer and nerve exploration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Common peroneal nerve palsy leading to foot drop is difficult to manage and has historically been treated with extended bracing with expectant waiting for return of nerve function. Peroneal nerve exploration has traditionally been avoided except in cases of known traumatic or iatrogenic injury, with tendon transfers being performed in a delayed fashion after exhausting conservative treatment. We present a new strategy for management of foot drop with nerve exploration and concomitant tendon transfer. Method We retrospectively reviewed a series of 12 patients with peroneal nerve palsies that were treated with tendon transfer from 2005 to 2011. Of these patients, seven were treated with simultaneous peroneal nerve exploration and repair at the time of tendon transfer. Results Patients with both nerve repair and tendon transfer had superior functional results with active dorsiflexion in all patients, compared to dorsiflexion in 40% of patients treated with tendon transfers alone. Additionally, 57% of patients treated with nerve repair and tendon transfer were able to achieve enough function to return to running, compared to 20% in patients with tendon transfer alone. No patient had full return of native motor function resulting in excessive dorsiflexion strength. Conclusion The results of our limited case series for this rare condition indicate that simultaneous nerve repair and tendon transfer showed no detrimental results and may provide improved function over tendon transfer alone. PMID:25099247

  5. Tendon Transfers Part II: Transfers for Ulnar Nerve Palsy and Median Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sammer, Douglas M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives After reading this article (part II of II), the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the anatomy and function of the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm and hand. 2. Describe the clinical deficits associated with injury to each nerve. 3. Describe the indications, benefits, and drawbacks for various tendon transfer procedures used to treat median and ulnar nerve palsy.4. Describe the treatment of combined nerve injuries. 5. Describe postoperative care and possible complications associated with these tendon transfer procedures. Summary This article discusses the use of tendon transfer procedures for treatment of median and ulnar nerve palsy as well as combined nerve palsies. Postoperative management and potential complications are also discussed. PMID:19730287

  6. Evaluation of elbow flexion following free muscle transfer from the medial gastrocnemius or transfer from the latissimus dorsi, in cases of traumatic injury of the brachial plexus☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Kwae, Mário Yoshihide; da Silva, Ricardo Pereira; Porto, Celmo Celeno; de Paiva Magalhães, Daniel; Paulino, Matheus Veloso

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the gain in elbow flexion in patients with traumatic injury of the brachial plexus following muscle transfer from latissimus dorsi with the gain following free muscle transfer from the medial belly of the gastrocnemius. Methods This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of a convenience sample of 13 patients operated between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. Group 1 comprised seven patients who underwent transfers from the gastrocnemius and group 2 (controls) comprised six patients who underwent transfers from the latissimus dorsi. The following functions were evaluated: (1) range of motion (ROM) of elbow flexion, in degrees, using manual goniometry and (2) grade of elbow flexion strength, using a muscle strength scale. Satisfactory results were defined as: (1) elbow flexion ROM ≥ 80° and (2) elbow flexion strength ≥ M3. The Fisher exact and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used (p < 0.05). Results The patients’ mean age was 32 years (range: 17–56) and 72% had been involved in motorcycle accidents. Elbow flexion strength ≥ M3 was observed in seven patients (100%) in group 1 and in five patients (83.3%) in group 2 (p = 0.462). None of the patients presented M5, and one patient (16.7%) in group 2 had a poor result (M2). Elbow flexion ROM with a gain ≥ 80° (daily functions) was found in six patients (86%) in group 1 and in three patients (50%) in group 2 (p = 0.1). Conclusion The patients in group 1 had greater gains in strength and ROM than did those in group 2, but without statistical significance. Thus, transfers from the gastrocnemius become a new surgical option, if other techniques cannot be used. PMID:27218077

  7. Scapholunate stabilization with dynamic extensor carpi radialis longus tendon transfer.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Steven L; Freeland, Alan E

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic extensor carpi radialis longus tendon transfer to the distal pole of the scaphoid acts synchronously and synergistically with wrist motion to restore the slider crank mechanism of the scaphoid after scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) injury. The procedure is designed to simulate a hypothetical dorsal radioscaphoid ligament that more closely approximates the normal viscoelastic forces acting on the scaphoid throughout all phases of wrist motion than does the static checkrein effect and motion limitations of capsulodesis or tenodesis. Extensor carpi radialis longus transfer may be independently sufficient to support normal or near-normal scapholunate and midcarpal kinematics and prevent further injury propagation in patients with partial SLIL tears and dynamic scapholunate instability. Extensor carpi radialis longus transfer alone may improve carpal congruity in patients with static scapholunate instability, but SLIL and dorsal lunate ligament repair or reconstruction is essential for favorable durable outcomes. Extensor carpi radialis longus transfer offers a simple and reasonable alternative to capsulodesis or tenodesis to support these ligament repairs or reconstructions, does not require intercarpal fixation, and allows rehabilitation to proceed expeditiously at approximately 1 month after surgery. PMID:21134618

  8. Rupture of the posterior tibial tendon. Evaluation of injury of the spring ligament and clinical assessment of tendon transfer and ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Gazdag, A R; Cracchiolo, A

    1997-05-01

    Eighteen of twenty-two patients who were having a tendon transfer to treat rupture of the posterior tibial tendon had evidence of injury to the spring ligament. The injury consisted of a longitudinal tear in the ligament in seven patients, a lax ligament without a gross tear in seven, and a complete rupture of the ligament in four. The ruptured posterior tibial tendon was treated with transfer of the flexor digitorum longus in twenty of the twenty-two patients. A variety of methods were used to repair the ligament. It is essential to determine the status of the spring ligament when patients are managed for rupture of the posterior tibial tendon. Patients who have a torn or lax spring ligament in addition to the ruptured posterior tibial tendon may have more severe abnormalities of the hindfoot than those who have only a ruptured tendon. PMID:9160939

  9. Rupture Following Biceps-to-Triceps Tendon Transfer in Adolescents and Young Adults With Spinal Cord Injury:

    PubMed Central

    Merenda, Lisa A.; Rutter, Laure; Curran, Kimberly; Kozin, Scott H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tendon transfer surgery can restore elbow extension in approximately 70% of persons with tetraplegia and often results in antigravity elbow extension strength. However, we have noted an almost 15% rupture/attenuation rate. Objective: This investigation was conducted to analyze potential causes in adolescents/young adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) who experienced tendon rupture or attenuation after biceps-to-triceps transfer. Methods: Medical charts of young adults with SCI who underwent biceps-to-triceps transfer and experienced tendon rupture or attenuation were reviewed. Data collected by retrospective chart review included general demographics, surgical procedure(s), use and duration of antibiotic treatment, time from tendon transfer surgery to rupture/attenuation, and method of diagnosis. Results: Twelve subjects with tetraplegia (mean age, 19 years) who underwent biceps-to-triceps reconstruction with subsequent tendon rupture or attenuation were evaluated. Mean age at time of tendon transfer was 18 years (range, 14-21 years). A fluoroquinolone was prescribed for 42% (n=5) of subjects. Tendon rupture was noted in 67% (n=8), and attenuation was noted in 33% (n=4). Average length of time from surgery to tendon rupture/attenuation was 5.7 months (range, 3-10 months). Conclusion: Potential contributing causes of tendon rupture/attenuation after transfer include surgical technique, rehabilitation, co-contraction of the transfer, poor patient compliance, and medications. In this cohort, 5 subjects were prescribed fluoroquinolones that have a US Food and Drug Administration black box concerning tendon ruptures. Currently, all candidates for upper extremity tendon transfer reconstruction are counseled on the effects of fluoroquinolones and the potential risk for tendon rupture. PMID:23459326

  10. Tendon Transfers for Management of Digital and Lesser Metatarsophalangeal Joint Deformities.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Managing digital and metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) deformities can range from simple to complex and uniplanar to triplanar. Because of the complexity and variability of digital and MTPJ deformities, there are many procedures, and no 1 procedure has become the gold standard. Tendon transfers for digital and MTPJ deformities are just 1 treatment option, and usually they are not stand-alone procedures. Typically, a combination of procedures needs to be performed. This article describes the surgical technique and provides a review of the literature, including clinical results for tendon transfers of the central rays. PMID:26590726

  11. Use of adjunctive palmaris longus abductorplasty (Camitz) tendon transfer in pediatric median nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Baluch, Narges; Borschel, Gregory H

    2013-05-01

    A number of tendon transfers have been described for opponensplasty. Transfer of the palmaris longus (PL) tendon with a palmar fascial extension was initially described by Camitz. This technique has mostly been combined with carpal tunnel release in patients with long standing median neuropathy with atrophy of the thenar muscles. However, the Camitz transfer has not been previously described in the setting of pediatric median nerve injury. We report 4 cases of Camitz transfer in pediatric patients with median nerve injuries. Four children (all female; age range 3-15 yrs) underwent PL tendon transfer following median nerve injury. The causes of injury included trauma, iatrogenic injury, and neuritis of the brachial plexus. The Camitz procedure was performed at the time of median nerve decompression and/or reconstruction. All patients had excellent early return of function. Transfer of the palmaris longus tendon reliably restores palmar abduction, with minimal to no additional morbidity, in carefully selected pediatric patients with median nerve injury undergoing release of the carpal tunnel. PMID:22981385

  12. Pseudoaneurysm of the Posterior Tibial Artery After Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Elabdi, Monsef; Roukhsi, Redouane; Tijani, Youssef; Chtata, Hassan; Jaafar, Abdeloihab

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery is an uncommon condition that, left untreated, can lead to hemorrhage, thrombosis, or emboli. We present the case of a 54-year-old male who developed pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery 4 months after undergoing tibialis posterior tendon transfer for management of peroneal nerve palsy, which had developed as a complication of hip arthroplasty. PMID:26972754

  13. Combined Total Ankle Arthroplasty With Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer for End-Stage Cavovarus Deformity.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, John M; Bowlby, Melinda A; Christensen, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon transfer has been described to reduce and balance the cavovarus deformity in those patients who receive a total ankle replacement for end-stage arthritis. In this article, we discuss the indications and provide a detailed description of the technique for this powerful procedure. Case examples that demonstrate the utility of the procedure are provided. PMID:27095088

  14. Tailoring Tendon Transfer Surgery and Rehabilitation for a Musician: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Cynthia; Rivlin, Michael; Beredjiklian, Pedro K.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfers in hand patients are a commonly performed procedure after extensor tendon rupture. However, the standard side to side technique is not applicable in every patient. We present a case of a musician with unique demands to demonstrate the option to customize surgical technique and therapy regimen to the unique needs of each patient. An extensor indicis proprius to extensor digitorum communis transfer was performed in a 73 year old musician. A controlled active motion therapy protocol was followed. The patients musical practice regimen was incorporated into the therapy. The patient was able to independently extend her ring and small fingers in order to play her instrument and resumed play within one month postoperatively. A patient’s functional goals including avocations need to be considered when selecting the appropriate surgical and therapeutic approach. PMID:27200400

  15. Scapular and Shoulder Girdle Muscular Anatomy: Its Role in Periscapular Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Matthew M; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-02-01

    The importance of coordinated, normal scapulothoracic motion in facilitating full, pain-free motion of the shoulder complex has been increasingly studied over the past decade, leading to renewed interest in scapular-based reconstructions to improve shoulder girdle motion through the use of muscle advancements and tendon transfers. This article will review recent advances regarding scapulothoracic motion and the muscular stabilizers of the scapula, focusing on clinical diagnosis and anatomy as it pertains to scapular dyskinesis and common periscapular tendon transfers. Although many of these treatment techniques remain in their infancy and further follow-up is necessary before universal adoption, they provide a novel means of addressing difficult-to-treat and complex shoulder girdle pathologies. PMID:26754193

  16. Adaptation of physiological cross-sectional area and serial number of sarcomeres after tendon transfer of rat muscle.

    PubMed

    Huijing, P A; Maas, H

    2016-03-01

    Tendon transfer surgery to a new extensor insertion was performed for musculus flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) of young adult rats, after which animals were allowed to recover. Mechanical properties and adaptive effects on body mass, bone growth, serial number of sarcomeres, and muscle physiological cross-sectional area were studied. Between the transfer and control groups, no differences were found for body mass and forearm length growth. In contrast, transferred muscles had a 19% smaller physiological cross-sectional area and 25% fewer sarcomeres in series within its muscle fibers than control muscles, i.e., a deficit in muscle belly growth is present. Our present results confirm our the length of previous work showing a limited capability of changing the adapted transferred FCU muscle belly, as the muscle-tendon complex is stretched, so that most of the acute FCU length change must originate from the tendon. This should most likely be attributed to surgery-related additional and/or altered connective tissue linkages at the muscle-tendon boundary. The substantially increased FCU tendon length found, after recovery from surgery and adaptation to the conditions of the transferred position, is likely to be related to such enhanced stretching of the FCU tendon. PMID:25693427

  17. A Comprehensive Guide on Restoring Grasp Using Tendon Transfer Procedures for Ulnar Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Garcia, Rafael J; Chung, Kevin C

    2016-08-01

    Ulnar nerve paralysis results in classic stigmata, including weakness of grasp and pinch, poorly coordinated flexion, and clawing of digits. Restoration of grasp is a key portion of the reconstructive efforts after loss of ulnar nerve function. Improving flexion at the metacarpophalangeal joint can be done by static and dynamic means, although only the latter can improve interphalangeal extension. Deformity and digital posture are more predictably corrected with surgical intervention. Loss of strength from intrinsic muscle paralysis cannot be fully restored with tendon transfer procedures. Preoperative patient education is paramount to success if realistic expectations are to be met. PMID:27387079

  18. Subtotal Scapulectomy With Scapulothoracic Fusion and Local Tendon Transfer for Management of Chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Bradley; Shives, Thomas; Elhassan, Bassem

    2016-06-01

    Scapulectomy can dramatically alter glenohumeral function and the ability of patients to conduct activities of daily living. In oncologic cases, treatment of the tumor can compromise local musculature, making successful reconstruction difficult to achieve. Depending on the resection level, local musculature may be inadequate to restore shoulder range of motion and/or glenohumeral stability. Surgeons have attempted to address these issues via soft-tissue repairs, allograft replacement, and prosthetic replacement, with variable success. Outcomes are better when a greater portion of the scapula is preserved, thus saving functional rotator cuff muscle bellies. However, preservation of significant rotator cuff musculature is not routinely possible. To our knowledge, no authors in the English-language orthopaedic literature have reported on local tendon transfers as a technique to augment and reconstruct the rotator cuff in a patient with previous scapulectomy. PMID:27115794

  19. Tendon transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears: indications and surgical rationale

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Chillemi, Claudio; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Cerciello, Simone; Ippolito, Giorgio; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: treatment of symptomatic irreparable rotator cuff tears is extremely challenging because, at present, there are no ideal solutions to this problem. Many patients respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment. However, when conservative measures fail to improve the patient’s pain and disability, surgery should be considered. Methods: different surgical techniques are available and the choice of the most appropriate procedure depends on the presenting symptoms, age of the patient, functional demand, medical comorbidities, joint stability and presence of arthritic changes. The transposition of the surrounding muscles to replace the rotator cuff function represents a viable option in the treatment of younger patients without glenohumeral osteoarthritis and with severe functional limitation. Purpose: aim of this study is to give an overview of the currently available evidence regarding tendon transfer procedures for irreparable rotator cuff tears. PMID:25767779

  20. Flexor Carpi Radialis to Palmaris Longus Tendon Transfer for Spontaneous Rupture of the Flexor Carpi Radialis Tendon-A Review of an Uncommon Finding and Surgical Technique for Operative Correction.

    PubMed

    Shearin, Jonathan Winkworth; Walters, Brian; Yang, S Steven

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous ruptures of the flexor carpi radialis tendon (FCR) are rare and associated with systemic inflammatory diseases, localized tendinopathy related to scaphotrapezial-trapezoidal arthritis, or chronic immunosuppression from corticosteroids. While most cases do not require operative intervention, some patients develop weakness, impaired range of motion, and persistent pain. Previously reported surgical options include synovectomy, tendon stump resection, and osteophyte removal. We describe a surgical technique for patients with persistent symptomatology following FCR rupture in which the FCR is transposed end-to-side to the palmaris longus tendon. Three cases using this technique are presented with follow-up of 4-9 months that were collected at Lenox Hill Hospital. All three patients did well regarding specific outcome measures: grip strength, range of motion, and functional activity. FCR transfer to palmaris is an alternative to other surgical options for the spontaneous rupture of the FCR tendon in patients who remain symptomatic despite a course of non-operative therapy. PMID:27595965

  1. Posterior Deltoid-to-Triceps Tendon Transfer for Elbow Extension in a Tetraplegia Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Hun; Ahn, Dong Heun; Kim, Yong Rok; Hong, Mi Jin; Lee, Yung Jin; Park, Chang-il; Heo, Youn Moo

    2016-01-01

    In tetraplegia patients, activities of daily living are highly dependent on the remaining upper limb functions. In other countries, upper limb reconstruction surgery to improve function has been applied to diverse cases, but few cases have been reported in Korea. The current authors experienced a case of posterior deltoid-to-triceps tendon transfer and rehabilitation in a complete spinal cord injury with a C6 neurologic level, and we introduce the case—a 36-year-old man—with a literature review. The patient's muscle strength in C5 C6 muscles were normal, but C7 muscles were trace, and the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM III) score was 24. The tendon of the posterior deltoid was transferred to the triceps brachii muscle, and then the patient received comprehensive rehabilitative treatment. His C7 muscle strength in the right upper extremity was enhanced from trace to fair, and his SCIM III score improved to 29. PMID:27152287

  2. Tendon Structure and Composition.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are soft, fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone. Their main function is to transfer muscle generated force to the bony skeleton, facilitating movement around a joint, and as such they are relatively passive, inelastic structures, able to resist high forces. Tendons are predominantly composed of collagen, which is arranged in a hierarchical manner parallel to the long axis of the tendon, resulting in high tensile strength. Tendon also contains a range of non-collagenous proteins, present in low amounts, which nevertheless have important functional roles. In this chapter, we describe general tendon composition and structure, and discuss how variations in composition and structure at different levels of the tendon hierarchy confer specific mechanical properties, which are related to tendon function. PMID:27535244

  3. Latissimus dorsi free flap for coverage of sacral radiodermatitis in the ambulatory patient

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.; Tofield, J.J.; Terranova, W.; Hurley, D.; Kenney, J.

    1987-07-01

    Ambulatory patients with large sacral ulcers can represent extremely challenging coverage problems. Technical options become fewer when sacral ulcers are coupled with radiation dermatitis. Latissimus dorsi free flap transfer, with direct anastomoses to sacral vessels, is described in 2 patients.

  4. Tendonitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendon. It can occur as a result of injury, overuse, or with aging as the tendon loses elasticity. Any action that places prolonged repetitive strain on the forearm muscles can cause tendonitis. The ...

  5. Subtalar arthrodesis with flexor digitorum longus transfer and spring ligament repair for treatment of posterior tibial tendon insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J E; Cohen, B E; DiGiovanni, B F; Lamdan, R

    2000-09-01

    The surgical treatment of flexible pes planovalgus deformities resulting from Stage 2 posterior tibial tendon insufficiency is controversial and many techniques have been proposed. We retrospectively reviewed the results of subtalar arthrodesis combined with spring ligament repair/reefing and flexor digitorum longus (FDL) transfer to the navicular. There were sixteen patients (seventeen feet) with an average follow-up of 27 months (9-52). All deformities were passively correctable. The average age was 56 yrs (39-78). All patients had failed conservative management, 88% had previously been treated with orthotics, and 53% had lateral pain from subfibular impingement. Two patients were noted to have degenerative changes of the subtalar joint. Successful subtalar joint fusion occurred in all patients with an average time to radiographic union of 10.1 weeks (5-24). The average AOFAS hindfoot score and Maryland foot score postoperatively was 82 and 86 respectively. Standing radiographic analysis demonstrated an average improvement in the AP talo-1st metatarsal angle of 6 degrees (24 degrees preoperative, 18 degrees postoperative). The talonavicular coverage angle improved an average of 17 degrees (34 degrees preoperative, 17 degrees postoperative). The lateral talo-1st metatarsal angle improved an average of 10 degrees (18 degrees preoperative, 8 degrees postoperative). The lateral talocalcaneal angle decreased an average of 21o (55 degrees preoperative, 34 degrees postoperative). The distance of the medial cuneiform to the floor on the lateral radiograph averaged 12mm preoperatively and 18mm postoperatively (avg. improvement 6mm). The combination of the flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer and spring ligament repair with subtalar arthrodesis is an effective and reliable procedure which provides excellent correction of hindfoot valgus as well as forefoot abduction and restoration of the height of the longitudinal arch. These results compare favorably with flexor

  6. Tendon Innervation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W; Salo, Paul; Hart, David A

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of tendon metabolism including the responses to loading is far from being well understood. During the last decade, however, accumulating data show that tendon innervation in addition to afferent functions, via efferent pathways has a regulatory role in tendon homeostasis via a wide range of neuromediators, which coordinate metabolic and neuro-inflammatory pathways.Innervation of intact healthy tendons is localized in the surrounding structures, i.e paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the tendon proper is practically devoid of neuronal supply. This anatomical finding reflects that the tendon metabolism is regulated from the tendon envelope, i.e. interfascicular matrix (see Chap. 1 ).Tendon innervation after injury and during repair, however, is found as extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of different neuronal mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammatory and metabolic pathways in tendon regeneration. After healing nerve fibers retract to the tendon envelope.In tendinopathy innervation has been identified to consist of excessive and protracted nerve ingrowth in the tendon proper, suggesting pro-inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses.In metabolic disorders such as eg. diabetes impaired tendon healing has been established to be related to dysregulation of neuronal growth factors.Targeted approaches to the peripheral nervous system including neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:27535247

  7. Tribological characteristics of healthy tendon.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Peter S; Dowson, Duncan; Khan, Ilyas M; Jones, Michael D

    2012-07-26

    Tendons transfer muscular forces efficiently and painlessly, facilitating joint motion. Whilst the tribology of articular cartilage is constantly explored, a poorer understanding remains of tendon lubrication and friction. This study reports experimental data describing the tribological characteristics of tendon and its surrounding tissue, before presenting an arithmetic solution to facilitate numerical modelling. The experimental characteristics of the tensile (i.e. mid-substance) and compressive (i.e. fibrocartilaginous) regions of bovine flexor tendon were investigated using a pin-on-plate tribometer, with immunofluroscence analysis describing the relative intensity and distribution of surface-bound lubricin. Arithmetic analysis considering the digital extensor tendon determined that, in physiological conditions, the tensile tendon region was able to generate elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL). The equivalent region of compressive tendon exhibited a higher intensity of surface-bound lubricin which, it is hypothesised, serves to minimise the increased frictional resistance due to generating only mixed or boundary lubrication regimes. Arithmetic analysis indicates that, given a more favourable biomechanical environment, this region can also generate EHL. Whilst acknowledging the limitations of transferring data from an animal model to a clinical environment, by providing the first data and equations detailing the film thicknesses and lubrication regime for these two tendon regions it is hoped that clinicians, engineers and scientists can consider improved clinical strategies to tackle both tendinopathy and tendon rupture. PMID:22704825

  8. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cannon DL. Flexor and extensor tendon injuries. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . ... Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  9. Tendon Transfer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ... Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis ...

  10. Flexor digitorum brevis tendon transfer to the flexor digitorum longus tendon according to Valtin in posttraumatic flexible claw toe deformity due to extrinsic toe flexor shortening.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, H; Kajetanek, C; Graff, W; Thiongo, M; Laporte, C

    2015-04-01

    Claw toe deformity after posterior leg compartment syndrome is rare but incapacitating. When the mechanism is flexor digitorum longus (FDL) shortening due to ischemic contracture of the muscle after posterior leg syndrome, a good treatment option is the Valtin procedure in which the flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) is transferred to the FDL after FDL tenotomy. The Valtin procedure reduces the deformity by lengthening and reactivating the FDL. Here, we report the outcomes of FDB to FDL transfer according to Valtin in 10 patients with posttraumatic claw toe deformity treated a mean of 34 months after the injury. Toe flexion was restored in all 10 patients, with no claw toe deformity even during dorsiflexion of the ankle. PMID:25703152

  11. Tendon latch

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A latch connects tendons run from a floating platform to a socket in a foundation on the sea floor. The latch includes a latch body having a plurality of dogs disposed within and urgible outward from the latch body. A piston is releasably disposed within the latch body above the dogs and moves downwardly when released to urge the dogs outwardly from the body into latching engagement with the socket. A trigger mechanism in the latch releases the piston when the latch body lands in the socket and contacts a trigger pin projecting upwardly from the bottom of the socket. A series of wedges are disposed exteriorally on the body and inhibit lateral movement of the body relative to the socket when the tendon is subjected to a cycle bending loads.

  12. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  13. Tendon, tendon healing, hyperlipidemia and statins

    PubMed Central

    Esenkaya, Irfan; Unay, Koray

    2011-01-01

    Summary Both hyperlipidemia and metabolic syndrome have adverse effect on tendon structure. Atorvastatin is most widely used antihyperlipidemic drug. Statins have adverse effects on the tendon. Many studies have analyzed the relationship between atorvastatin and skeletal muscles. Atorvastatin administered after the surgical repair of a ruptured tendon appears to affect revascularization, collagenization, inflammatory cell infiltration, and collagen construction. Therefore, further investigations on the effects of atorvastatin on tendon healing are needed. PMID:23738266

  14. Distribution of proteins within different compartments of tendon varies according to tendon type.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Karunaseelan, Kabelan J; Ng Chieng Hin, Jade; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-09-01

    Although the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the energetic cost of locomotion. To maximise energy storage and return, energy-storing tendons need to be more extensible and elastic than tendons with a purely positional function. These properties are conferred in part by a specialisation of a specific compartment of the tendon, the interfascicular matrix, which enables sliding and recoil between adjacent fascicles. However, the composition of the interfascicular matrix is poorly characterised and we therefore tested the hypothesis that the distribution of elastin and proteoglycans differs between energy-storing and positional tendons, and that protein distribution varies between the fascicular matrix and the interfascicular matrix, with localisation of elastin and lubricin to the interfascicular matrix. Protein distribution in the energy-storing equine superficial digital flexor tendon and positional common digital extensor tendon was assessed using histology and immunohistochemistry. The results support the hypothesis, demonstrating enrichment of lubricin in the interfascicular matrix in both tendon types, where it is likely to facilitate interfascicular sliding. Elastin was also localised to the interfascicular matrix, specifically in the energy-storing superficial digital flexor tendon, which may account for the greater elasticity of the interfascicular matrix in this tendon. A differential distribution of proteoglycans was identified between tendon types and regions, which may indicate a distinct role for each of these proteins in tendon. These data provide important advances into fully characterising structure-function relationships within tendon. PMID:27113131

  15. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion. PMID:24045762

  16. Development of a free latissimus dorsi muscle flap in cats.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, S A; Fowler, J D; Remedios, A M; Clapson, J B; George, D

    1996-01-01

    Anatomic and experimental evaluation of the feline latissimus dorsi muscle was performed to assess its potential use as a free muscle flap. In the anatomic study, nonselective angiography of the subscapular artery was performed in nine heparinized feline cadavers. The muscle dimensions and vascular anatomy of the dissected latissimus dorsi muscle were recorded. In the experimental study four cats underwent heterotopic transplantation of a partial latissimus dorsi flap, and three cats underwent orthotopic transplantation of a complete latissimus dorsi flap. The mean length and width of the latissimus dorsi muscle was 19.0 and 5.4 cm, respectively. The dominant vascular pedicle was the thoracodorsal artery and vein. The average length and diameter of the thoracodorsal artery was 2.7 cm and 0.6 mm, respectively. Minor vascular pedicles were provided by branches of the intercostal arteries. Numerous choke anastomoses existed between the two pedicle systems. Viability of muscle flaps based on subjective evaluation, angiography, and histopathology, was 66% and 100% in the heterotopic and orthotopic studies, respectively. Flap failure seemed to be caused by both arterial and venous thrombosis. The latissimus dorsi muscle flap met criteria required for application in microvascular reconstruction. The vascular pattern was appropriate and consistent. Donor site morbidity was low, whereas surgical accessibility was high. The muscle satisfied the physical criteria of a free flap. Long-term anastomotic patency and flap viability was shown. PMID:8719085

  17. A New Method to Control Tendon Tension in the Transfer of Extensor Indicis Proprius to Extensor Pollicis Longus Rupture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Cho, Young Joo; Chung, Duke Whan

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the outcomes of extensor indicis proprius (EIP) transfer based on varying degrees of thumb extension after EIP transfer and elongation of the EIP. A total of 24 cases with extensor pollicis longus (EPL) ruptures who underwent EIP to EPL transfer were analyzed prospectively. The EIP transfer was performed with neutral wrist positioning. In group I (12 cases), EIP and EPL were sutured on the thumb in neutral state at interphalangeal joint, and the mean EIP elongation of this group measured 0.2 cm (range, -0.5 to 0.5 cm). In group II (12 cases), EIP and EPL were sutured on the thumb in full extension state at interphalangeal joint, and the mean EIP elongation measured 0.7 cm (range, 0.5-1.5 cm). The mean follow-up period was 13.5 months. The 2 groups were compared based on thumb motion, grip strength, pinch power, and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire score. Extension of the thumb at the interphalangeal joint was -5.2° in group I and 7.2° in group II, demonstrating statistically significant differences. No significant differences were found between the 2 groups in other parameters. In EIP transfer, thumb in extension after transfer and EIP elongation is recommended for restoring thumb extension at the interphalangeal joint. PMID:26418770

  18. Pressurized liquid filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, G.E.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes an apparatus for detecting a leak in a tension leg platform tendon, comprising: a fluid-tight tensioned tubular tendon, the tendon connected on its upper end to a buoyant offshore structure and on its lower end to an anchor means. The anchor means is connected to the sea floor; means for supplying liquid to the tendon; means for pressurizing the liquid in excess of the maximum hydrostatic pressure exerted by the sea water on the tendon; and means for monitoring pressure, the means monitoring variations in liquid pressure to the tendon.

  19. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Samuel Salisbury, S T; Paul Buckley, C; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  20. Tendon action of two-joint muscles: transfer of mechanical energy between joints during jumping, landing, and running.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Zatsiorsky, V M

    1994-01-01

    The amount of mechanical energy transferred by two-joint muscles between leg joints during squat vertical jumps, during landings after jumping down from a height of 0.5 m, and during jogging were evaluated experimentally. The experiments were conducted on five healthy subjects (body height, 1.68-1.86 m; and mass, 64-82 kg). The coordinates of the markers on the body and the ground reactions were recorded by optical methods and a force platform, respectively. By solving the inverse problem of dynamics for the two-dimensional, four-link model of a leg with eight muscles, the power developed by the joint (net muscular) moments and the power developed by each muscle were determined. The energy transferred by two-joint muscles from and to each joint was determined as a result of the time integration of the difference between the power developed at the joint by the joint moment, and the total power of the muscles serving a given joint. It was shown that during a squat vertical jump and in the push-off phase during running, the two-joint muscles (rectus femoris and gastrocnemius) transfer mechanical energy from the proximal joints of the leg to the distal ones. At landing and in the shock-absorbing phase during running, the two-joint muscles transfer energy from the distal to proximal joints. The maximum amount of energy transferred from the proximal joints to distal ones was equal to 178.6 +/- 45.7 J (97.1 +/- 27.2% of the work done by the joint moment at the hip joint) at the squat vertical jump. The maximum amount of energy transferred from the distal to proximal joints was equal to 18.6 +/- 4.2 J (38.5 +/- 36.4% of work done by the joint moment at the ankle joint) at landing. The conclusion was made that the one-joint muscles of the proximal links compensate for the deficiency in work production of the distal one-joint muscles by the distribution of mechanical energy between joints through the two-joint muscles. During the push-off phase, the muscles of the proximal

  1. Achilles tendon: US examination

    SciTech Connect

    Fornage, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon. The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.

  2. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  3. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/007643.htm Achilles tendon repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your Achilles tendon joins your calf muscle to your heel. You can tear your Achilles tendon if you land hard on your heel during sports, from a ...

  4. Pressurized gas filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Silcox, W. H.

    1985-06-04

    Pressurized gas filled tubular tendons provide a means for detecting leaks therein. Filling the tendon with a gaseous fluid provides increased buoyancy and reduces the weight supported by the buoyant structure. The use of a corrosion inhibiting gaseous fluid reduces the corrosion of the interior tendon wall.

  5. Cerebral Palsy Tendon Transfers: Flexor Carpi Ulnaris to Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis and Extensor Pollicis Longus Reroutement.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Anchal; Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2016-08-01

    The flexor carpi ulnaris to extensor carpi radialis brevis transfer and extensor pollicis longus rerouting combined with thenar release are 2 successful surgical interventions for children with spastic cerebral palsy. The goal of both procedures is to improve quality of life for patients who have previously failed conservative management, and the degree of expected improvement is predicated on several patient variables, making careful patient selection crucial for ensuring successful outcomes. Here, surgical technique is described; risk factors are discussed, and outcomes related to both procedures are presented. PMID:27387086

  6. Tendon Functional Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Screen, H.R.C.; Birk, D.E.; Kadler, K.E.; Ramirez, F; Young, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    This article is one of a series, summarising views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the “Functional Extracellular Matrix” stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely-varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, ageing and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. PMID:25640030

  7. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  8. Riser and tendon management system

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, P.V.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes a riser and tendon management system. It comprises means to set nominal conditions for the risers and tendons; means to measure actual riser and tendon conditions; means to compare the actual and nominal conditions of the risers and tendons; and means responsive to a differential between the actual and nominal riser and tendon conditions, which difference exceeds specified limits, and recommending corrective action to bring the risers and tendons back to within nominal conditions.

  9. Treatment of the severely infected frontal sinus with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flaps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn Hwan; Youn, Seung Ki; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Sang Wha; Yi, Hyeong Joong; Kim, Chang Yeon

    2011-05-01

    In trauma patients with severe intracranial hemorrhaging, diagnosing facial bone fractures can be delayed. In frontal sinus fractures with nasofrontal duct obstruction, obliteration of the nasofrontal duct and the sinus is the current treatment of choice. But with inadequate management, ascending infections happen, and widely spread infections can involve the entire frontal soft tissues, which result in meningitis, encephalitis, and subcutaneous abscess pockets creating skin defects. In the treatment of these infections, radical debridement of all infected tissues including galea, pericranium, and surrounding soft tissues is obligatory; hence, available local vascularized flap options for obliteration of the postdebridement defect are scarce. In these situations, free-tissue transfer can be a treatment option. Although there have been numerous reports of using nonvascularized materials for obliteration of the frontal sinus, the material itself can serve as a nidus for infection, and it is generally accepted that well-vascularized tissues have greater ability to withstand local soft-tissue infection and osteomyelitis. Hence, we report 3 cases where we performed latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps for severe frontal sinus infections after frontal cranioplasty for severe hemorrhaging. Large bulks of muscle obliterated the nasofrontal duct and the dead space surrounding the entire frontal sinus. The latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap is not a permanent solution for frontal sinus reconstruction, which requires a secondary bony reconstruction. However, when we face acute stages of intractable infections of the frontal sinus, it can control the infection and result in saving the patient's life. PMID:21558912

  10. Coverage of Amputation Stumps Using a Latissimus Dorsi Flap With a Serratus Anterior Muscle Flap: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Jeon, Seung Bae; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Amputation of the extremities is a definitive reconstructive option, and surgeons should aim to preserve maximum overall function. If the exposed bone cannot be adequately covered using local tissues, the stump can be reconstructed using a number of well-described free flap transfer techniques. Between January 2002 and December 2011, 31 patients with severe injuries to the lower extremities underwent above-the-knee, below-the-knee, and Chopart and Ray amputations. Bony stumps were covered using latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps alone (group 1), or together with serratus anterior muscle flaps (group 2). The groups were compared with respect to age, flap survival, skin flap size, immediate complications, wound sloughing, deep ulceration, need for bone amputation, limb visual analog scale score, time to prosthesis, and follow-up duration. The mean area of the latissimus dorsi skin flap was 255.9 cm, and immediate complications occurred in 8 (25.8%) patients. In the double-padding group, there were fewer cases of deep ulceration than in the single-flap group, and prostheses could be worn sooner. There were no statistically significant differences in other parameters. Successful reconstruction of amputation stumps requires an adequate, durable, weight-bearing, and well-contoured soft tissue cover. A latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap together with a serratus anterior muscle flap provides well-vascularized muscle tissue and a durable skin paddle, leading to less ulceration than conventional flap techniques. PMID:25003415

  11. Fatigue loading of tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries, often called tendinopathies, are debilitating and painful conditions, generally considered to develop as a result of tendon overuse. The aetiology of tendinopathy remains poorly understood, and whilst tendon biopsies have provided some information concerning tendon appearance in late-stage disease, there is still little information concerning the mechanical and cellular events associated with disease initiation and progression. Investigating this in situ is challenging, and numerous models have been developed to investigate how overuse may generate tendon fatigue damage and how this may relate to tendinopathy conditions. This article aims to review these models and our current understanding of tendon fatigue damage. We review the strengths and limitations of different methodologies for characterizing tendon fatigue, considering in vitro methods that adopt both viable and non-viable samples, as well as the range of different in vivo approaches. By comparing data across model systems, we review the current understanding of fatigue damage development. Additionally, we compare these findings with data from tendinopathic tissue biopsies to provide some insights into how these models may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. Fatigue-induced damage consistently highlights the same microstructural, biological and mechanical changes to the tendon across all model systems and also correlates well with the findings from tendinopathic biopsy tissue. The multiple testing routes support matrix damage as an important contributor to tendinopathic conditions, but cellular responses to fatigue appear complex and often contradictory. PMID:23837793

  12. Peroneal Tendon Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Peroneal Tendon Injuries Text Size Print Bookmark ... foot run side-by-side behind the outer ankle bone. One peroneal tendon attaches to the outer ...

  13. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Godinho, Marta S.C.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R.C.

    2015-01-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. PMID:25958330

  14. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Godinho, Marta S C; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2015-12-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. PMID:25958330

  15. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology. PMID:27535258

  16. Bilateral elastofibroma dorsi: a case report of an uncommon and under-diagnosed tumor

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Stefanie; Richter, Matthias; Ernst, Tom; Flade, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Elastofibroma dorsi is a rare benign tumor of the back, located between the latissimus dorsi and the rhomboid muscle. In most cases it is unilateral, but in up to 10% it occurs on both sides. The etiology is still in discussion. Here we report a case of a 51-year-old man with bilateral elastofibroma dorsi. The therapy of choice was surgical resection. No long-term complications were reported in a 6-month follow-up. PMID:26855655

  17. Reconstruction of the pelvis and perineum with a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kieran, I; Nugent, N; Riordain, M Ó; Kelly, J

    2012-11-01

    Reconstruction of the perineum and pelvic cavity in continuity is an uncommon and difficult challenge. This case describes a 66-year-old man who presented following recurrence of a Dukes' B rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma that had been treated nine years previously by anterior resection, 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy. His recurrent disease was treated with radical pelvic exenteration with formation of an end colostomy and urinary ileal conduit. A post-operative pelvic collection necessitated incisional drainage via the perineum. This resulted in a perineal defect in continuity with the pelvic cavity, neither of which healed in spite of alternate day packing with antiseptic dressings. The perineum and cavity were reconstructed successfully with a microvascular transfer of the latissimus dorsi using the primary gracilis pedicle as recipient donor vessels. PMID:23131218

  18. Modelling approaches for evaluating multiscale tendon mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Lake, Spencer P

    2016-02-01

    Tendon exhibits anisotropic, inhomogeneous and viscoelastic mechanical properties that are determined by its complicated hierarchical structure and varying amounts/organization of different tissue constituents. Although extensive research has been conducted to use modelling approaches to interpret tendon structure-function relationships in combination with experimental data, many issues remain unclear (i.e. the role of minor components such as decorin, aggrecan and elastin), and the integration of mechanical analysis across different length scales has not been well applied to explore stress or strain transfer from macro- to microscale. This review outlines mathematical and computational models that have been used to understand tendon mechanics at different scales of the hierarchical organization. Model representations at the molecular, fibril and tissue levels are discussed, including formulations that follow phenomenological and microstructural approaches (which include evaluations of crimp, helical structure and the interaction between collagen fibrils and proteoglycans). Multiscale modelling approaches incorporating tendon features are suggested to be an advantageous methodology to understand further the physiological mechanical response of tendon and corresponding adaptation of properties owing to unique in vivo loading environments. PMID:26855747

  19. Achilles Tendon Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... after periods of rest, then improves somewhat with motion but later worsens with increased activity. Tenderness, or ... foot and ankle and evaluate the range of motion and condition of the tendon. The extent of ...

  20. Inflamed shoulder tendons (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tearing and inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder muscles can occur in sports which require the ... pitching, swimming, and lifting weights. Most often the shoulder will heal if a break is taken from ...

  1. The integrated function of muscles and tendons during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas J

    2002-12-01

    The mechanical roles of tendon and muscle contractile elements during locomotion are often considered independently, but functionally they are tightly integrated. Tendons can enhance muscle performance for a wide range of locomotor activities because muscle-tendon units shorten and lengthen at velocities that would be mechanically unfavorable for muscle fibers functioning alone. During activities that require little net mechanical power output, such as steady-speed running, tendons reduce muscular work by storing and recovering cyclic changes in the mechanical energy of the body. Tendon stretch and recoil not only reduces muscular work, but also allows muscle fibers to operate nearly isometrically, where, due to the force-velocity relation, skeletal muscle fibers develop high forces. Elastic energy storage and recovery in tendons may also provide a key mechanism to enable individual muscles to alter their mechanical function, from isometric force-producers during steady speed running to actively shortening power-producers during high-power activities like acceleration or uphill running. Evidence from studies of muscle contraction and limb dynamics in turkeys suggests that during running accelerations work is transferred directly from muscle to tendon as tendon stretch early in the step is powered by muscle shortening. The energy stored in the tendon is later released to help power the increase in energy of the body. These tendon length changes redistribute muscle power, enabling contractile elements to shorten at relatively constant velocities and power outputs, independent of the pattern of flexion/extension at a joint. Tendon elastic energy storage and recovery extends the functional range of muscles by uncoupling the pattern of muscle fiber shortening from the pattern of movement of the body. PMID:12485693

  2. Subrupture Tendon Fatigue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Laudier, Damien M.; Shine, Jean H.; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Jepsen, Karl J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Flatow, Evan L.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical and microstructural bases of tendon fatigue, by which damage accumulates and contributes to degradation, are poorly understood. To investigate the tendon fatigue process, rat flexor digitorum longus tendons were cyclically loaded (1–16 N) until reaching one of three levels of fatigue damage, defined as peak clamp-to-clamp strain magnitudes representing key intervals in the fatigue life: i) Low (6.0%–7.0%); ii) Moderate (8.5%–9.5%); and iii) High (11.0%–12.0%). Stiffness, hysteresis, and clamp-to-clamp strain were assessed diagnostically (by cyclic loading at 1–8 N) before and after fatigue loading and following an unloaded recovery period to identify mechanical parameters as measures of damage. Results showed that tendon clamp-to-clamp strain increased from pre- to post-fatigue loading significantly and progressively with the fatigue damage level (p≤0.010). In contrast, changes in both stiffness and hysteresis were significant only at the High fatigue level (p≤0.043). Correlative microstructural analyses showed that Low level of fatigue was characterized by isolated, transverse patterns of kinked fiber deformations. At higher fatigue levels, tendons exhibited fiber dissociation and localized ruptures of the fibers. Histomorphometric analysis showed that damage area fraction increased significantly with fatigue level (p≤0.048). The current findings characterized the sequential, microstructural events that underlie the tendon fatigue process and indicate that tendon deformation can be used to accurately assess the progression of damage accumulation in tendons. PMID:18683881

  3. Relationship between tendon stiffness and failure: a metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    LaCroix, Andrew S; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E; Lakes, Roderic S; Vanderby, Ray

    2013-07-01

    Tendon is a highly specialized, hierarchical tissue designed to transfer forces from muscle to bone; complex viscoelastic and anisotropic behaviors have been extensively characterized for specific subsets of tendons. Reported mechanical data consistently show a pseudoelastic, stress-vs.-strain behavior with a linear slope after an initial toe region. Many studies report a linear, elastic modulus, or Young's modulus (hereafter called elastic modulus) and ultimate stress for their tendon specimens. Individually, these studies are unable to provide a broader, interstudy understanding of tendon mechanical behavior. Herein we present a metaanalysis of pooled mechanical data from a representative sample of tendons from different species. These data include healthy tendons and those altered by injury and healing, genetic modification, allograft preparation, mechanical environment, and age. Fifty studies were selected and analyzed. Despite a wide range of mechanical properties between and within species, elastic modulus and ultimate stress are highly correlated (R(2) = 0.785), suggesting that tendon failure is highly strain-dependent. Furthermore, this relationship was observed to be predictable over controlled ranges of elastic moduli, as would be typical of any individual species. With the knowledge gained through this metaanalysis, noninvasive tools could measure elastic modulus in vivo and reasonably predict ultimate stress (or structural compromise) for diseased or injured tendon. PMID:23599401

  4. Hyperuricemia in Tendons.

    PubMed

    Andia, Isabel; Abate, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, particularly gout, and the immune inflammatory response are highly integrated. Both, long standing hyperuricemia and monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition can challenge tendon homeostasis because of their potential to cause inflammation to the host. Knowledge is emerging from clinical imaging research depicting where MSU crystals deposit, including patellar tendon, triceps and quadriceps tendons. Remarkably, subclinical tendon inflammation and damage are also present in asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Monosodium urate crystals act as danger activating molecular patterns (DAMPs), activating the inflammasome and inducing the secretion of IL-1beta, a key mediator of the inflammatory response. The crucial role of IL-1beta in driving the inflammatory events during gout attacks is supported by the clinical efficacy of IL-1beta blockade. Some data implicating IL-1beta as an initiator of tendinopathy exist, but the link between hyperuricemia and the development of tendinopathy remains to be validated. Further knowledge about the interactions of uric acid with both innate immune and tendon cells, and their consequences may help to determine if there is a subclass of hyperuricemic-tendinopathy. PMID:27535254

  5. Characterization of mechanical and biochemical properties of developing embryonic tendon

    PubMed Central

    Marturano, Joseph E.; Arena, Jeffrey D.; Schiller, Zachary A.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kuo, Catherine K.

    2013-01-01

    Tendons have uniquely high tensile strength, critical to their function to transfer force from muscle to bone. When injured, their innate healing response results in aberrant matrix organization and functional properties. Efforts to regenerate tendon are challenged by limited understanding of its normal development. Consequently, there are few known markers to assess tendon formation and parameters to design tissue engineering scaffolds. We profiled mechanical and biological properties of embryonic tendon and demonstrated functional properties of developing tendon are not wholly reflected by protein expression and tissue morphology. Using force volume-atomic force microscopy, we found that nano- and microscale tendon elastic moduli increase nonlinearly and become increasingly spatially heterogeneous during embryonic development. When we analyzed potential biochemical contributors to modulus, we found statistically significant but weak correlation between elastic modulus and collagen content, and no correlation with DNA or glycosaminoglycan content, indicating there are additional contributors to mechanical properties. To investigate collagen cross-linking as a potential contributor, we inhibited lysyl oxidase-mediated collagen cross-linking, which significantly reduced tendon elastic modulus without affecting collagen morphology or DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen content. This suggests that lysyl oxidase-mediated cross-linking plays a significant role in the development of embryonic tendon functional properties and demonstrates that changes in cross-links alter mechanical properties without affecting matrix content and organization. Taken together, these data demonstrate the importance of functional markers to assess tendon development and provide a profile of tenogenic mechanical properties that may be implemented in tissue engineering scaffold design to mechanoregulate new tendon regeneration. PMID:23576745

  6. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  7. The role of hind limb tendons in gibbon locomotion: springs or strings?

    PubMed

    Vereecke, Evie E; Channon, Anthony J

    2013-11-01

    Tendon properties have an important effect on the mechanical behaviour of muscles, with compliant tendons allowing near-isometric muscle contraction and facilitating elastic energy storage and recoil. Stiff tendons, in contrast, facilitate rapid force transfer and precise positional control. In humans, the long Achilles tendon contributes to the mechanical efficiency of running via elastic energy storage and recovery, and its presence has been linked to the evolution of habitual bipedalism. Gibbons also possess relatively long hind limb tendons; however, their role is as yet unknown. Based on their large dimensions, and inferring from the situation in humans, we hypothesize that the tendons in the gibbon hind limb will facilitate elastic energy storage and recoil during hind-limb-powered locomotion. To investigate this, we determined the material properties of the gibbon Achilles and patellar tendon in vitro and linked this with available kinematic and kinetic data to evaluate their role in leaping and bipedalism. Tensile tests were conducted on tendon samples using a material testing machine and the load-displacement data were used to calculate stiffness, Young's modulus and hysteresis. In addition, the average stress-in-life and energy absorption capacity of both tendons were estimated. We found a functional difference between the gibbon Achilles and patellar tendon, with the Achilles tendon being more suitable for elastic energy storage and release. The patellar tendon, in contrast, has a relatively high hysteresis, making it less suitable to act as elastic spring. This suggests that the gibbon Achilles tendon might fulfil a similar function as in humans, contributing to reducing the locomotor cost of bipedalism by acting as elastic spring, while the high stiffness of the patellar tendon might favour fast force transfer upon recoil and, possibly, enhance leaping performance. PMID:23868842

  8. Distal Triceps Tendon Injuries.

    PubMed

    Keener, Jay D; Sethi, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Acute triceps ruptures are an uncommon entity, occurring mainly in athletes, weight lifters (especially those taking anabolic steroids), and following elbow trauma. Accurate diagnosis is made clinically, although MRI may aid in confirmation and surgical planning. Acute ruptures are classified on an anatomic basis based on tear location and the degree of tendon involvement. Most complete tears are treated surgically in medically fit patients. Partial-thickness tears are managed according to the tear severity, functional demands, and response to conservative treatment. We favor an anatomic footprint repair of the triceps to provide optimal tendon to bone healing and, ultimately, functional outcome. PMID:26498552

  9. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Gomes Júnior, Nelson Pelozo; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Raduan, Fernando Cipolini; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome. PMID:26962495

  10. Shear loads induce cellular damage in tendon fascicles.

    PubMed

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2015-09-18

    Tendon is vital to musculoskeletal function, transferring loads from muscle to bone for joint motion and stability. It is an anisotropic, highly organized, fibrous structure containing primarily type I collagen in addition to tenocytes and other extracellular matrix components contributing to maintenance and function. Tendon is generally loaded via normal stress in a longitudinal direction. However, certain situations, including fiber breakage, enzymatic remodeling, or tendon pathology may introduce various degrees of other loading modalities, such as shear-lag at the fiber level, potentially affecting cellular response and subsequent function. Fascicles from rat tail tendon were dissected and placed in one of three paired groups: intact, single laceration, or double laceration. Each pair had a mechanically tested and control specimen. Single laceration fascicles contained one transverse laceration to mimic a partial tear. Double laceration fascicles had overlapping, longitudinally separated lacerations on opposite sides to cause intra-fascicular shear transfer to be the primary mechanism of loading. Elastic properties of the fascicle, e.g. peak load, steady state load, and stiffness, decreased from intact to single laceration to double laceration groups. Surprisingly, 45% of the intact strength was maintained when shear was the primary internal load transfer mechanism. Cellular viability decreased after mechanical testing in both laceration groups; cell death appeared primarily in a longitudinal plane where high shear load transfer occurred. This cell death extended far from the injury site and may further compromise an already damaged tendon via enzymatic factors and subsequent remodeling associated with cell necrosis. PMID:26162546

  11. [Diseases of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Schönbauer, H R

    1986-01-01

    In this report diseases of the Achilles tendon are discussed. First an anatomical survey of this region is presented including anatomical variations together with the results of the author's own investigations on corpses. Certain positions and insertions of the plantaris tendon with respect to the Achilles tendon may have pathological influence. Pathological aspects are discussed after a review of the physiology of the Achilles tendon, including functional and tensile tests. The clinical picture changes according to the location of the pathological disorder--tendon, paratenon, insertion and bursae--and whether the disease is acute or chronic. There are various reasons for degenerative changes in the tendon, which can even lead to rupture. Surgical and non-surgical treatment and their indications are presented. In conclusion treatment methods and their results for 36 cases are given. PMID:3087066

  12. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  13. Traumatic flexor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Lapegue, F; Andre, A; Brun, C; Bakouche, S; Chiavassa, H; Sans, N; Faruch, M

    2015-12-01

    The flexor system of the fingers consisting of flexor tendons and finger pulleys is a key anatomic structure for the grasping function. Athletes and manual workers are particularly at risk for closed injuries of the flexor system: ruptured pulleys, ruptures of the flexor digitorum profundus from its distal attachment ("jersey finger"), and less frequently, ruptures of the flexor digitorum superficialis and of the lumbrical muscles. Open injuries vary more and their imaging features are more complex since tendons may be torn in several locations, the locations may be unusual, the injuries may be associated with nerve and vascular injuries, fibrosis… Sonography is the best imaging modality to associate with the clinical exam for it allows an experienced physician to make an accurate and early diagnosis, crucial to appropriate early treatment planning. PMID:26564614

  14. Fetal reconstructive surgery: experimental use of the latissimus dorsi flap to correct myelomeningocele in utero.

    PubMed

    Meuli-Simmen, C; Meuli, M; Hutchins, G M; Harrison, M R; Buncke, H J; Sullivan, K M; Adzick, N S

    1995-10-01

    A recent study in human fetuses with myelomeningocele produced evidence that nonclosure of the spine leads to progressive damage of the exposed spinal cord during pregnancy. Thus in utero coverage might spare function. We tested the use of the latissimus dorsi flap for fetal myelomeningocele repair. In seven sheep fetuses, a lumbar myelomeningocele type of lesion was created at 75 days' gestation and was covered with a "reversed" latissimus dorsi flap at 100 days. At term, the three survivors had healed cutaneous wounds and normal hindlimb function. The vascular pedicle of the latissimus dorsi flap was patent, the viable flap covered the entire lesion, and the underlying spinal cord was grossly intact. We conclude that the latissimus dorsi flap repair is suitable for fetal surgery and provides efficient coverage of the lesion. These results have clinical implications, since fetal myelomeningocele repair may be a compelling way to reduce the severe neurologic deficit in humans. PMID:7568473

  15. Mechanisms of collagen fibril alignment in tendon injury: from tendon regeneration to artificial tendon.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Kojun; Tanaka, Hirohito F; Yonenaga, Kazumichi; Ohkochi, Hiroki; Miyasaka, Muneo; Sato, Ryota; Kuzumaki, Toru; Yoshida, Kazuharu; Yoshida, Toshiko

    2011-12-01

    The process by which collagen fibrils are aligned following tendon injury remains unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the process of tendon regeneration by transmission electron microscopy, using a film model method. In mice, the Achilles tendon of medial head was transected. On day 3, after only the proximal end of the transected tendon was placed on film and kept in vivo, a translucent substance containing granules, called tendon gel, was secreted. On day 5, the granules assembled in a loose (L) layer, and coalesced tightly in a dense (D) layer, forming an L-D-L layered pattern. On day 10, granules showed high electron density in H layers, which developed into D-H-D layers on day 13. The distal end was placed on film to face the proximal end. On day 10, the tendon gel showed a D-H-D layer pattern. On day 11, mechanical stress from muscular constriction changed the tendon gel to aligned collagen fibrils (6 ± 2 nm in diameter). Thereafter, the diameter of the fibrils increased. Tendon gel harvested on day 5 or day 10 was pulled manually or by hanging weights (about 0.6 MPa). Aligned collagen fibrils (32 ± 7 nm in diameter) were created by traction using tendon gel harvested on day 10. PMID:21618275

  16. An Artificial Tendon with Durable Muscle Interface

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan; Litsky, Alan; Mayerson, Joel; Witte, David; Melvin, David; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    A coupling mechanism that can permanently fix a forcefully contracting muscle to a bone anchor or any totally inert prosthesis would meet a serious need in orthopaedics. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to satisfy these demands. The objective of this study was to test OrthoCoupler’s performance in vitro and in vivo in the goat semitendinosus tendon model. For in vitro evaluation, 40 samples were fatigue-tested, cycling at 10 load levels, n=4 each. For in vivo evaluation, the semitendinosus tendon was removed bilaterally in 8 goats. Left sides were reattached with an OrthoCoupler, and right sides were reattached using the Krackow stitch with #5 braided polyester sutures. Specimens were harvested 60 days post-surgery and assigned for biomechanics and histology. Fatigue strength of the devices in vitro was several times the contractile force of the semitendinosus muscle. The in vivo devices were built equivalent to two of the in vitro devices, providing an additional safety factor. In strength testing at necropsy, suture controls pulled out at 120.5 ± 68.3 N, whereas each OrthoCoupler was still holding after the muscle tore, remotely, at 298±111.3N (mean ± SD)(p<0.0003). Muscle tear strength was reached with the fiber-muscle composite produced in healing still soundly intact. This technology may be of value for orthopaedic challenges in oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and sports-injury reconstruction. PMID:19639642

  17. Activity of latissimus dorsi muscle during inspiratory threshold loads.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Levi, M; Gea, J; Monells, J; Aran, X; Aguar, M C; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    The ability of the latissimus dorsi muscle (LD) to participate as an accessory inspiratory muscle has been the subject of controversy. Electromyographic (EGM) activity of LD was evaluated in 11 healthy subjects (aged 30 +/- 2 yrs; forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 106 +/- 5% predicted; maximal inspiratory pressure (Pmax), 120 +/- 6 cmH2O) under different breathing conditions. The ipsilateral biceps brachii was chosen as the control muscle. The EMG was recorded from surface electrodes, but needle electrodes were also used for LD evaluation in a subset of three subjects. The EMG signal from both muscles was recorded simultaneously, rectified and integrated, with subtraction of the electrocardiographic signal. Situations evaluated were: 1) maximal voluntary contraction (MVC); 2) apnoea; and 3) breathing under progressive inspiratory threshold loads (20-100% Pmax, at 20% intervals). A close relationship was evident between LD recordings from surface and needle electrodes (r = 0.975). Activity of LD at baseline was 1.8 +/- 0.4% MVC, and showed a phasic increase during inspiration under loads. This change had a linear tendency and was significant for loads corresponding to 40, 60, 80 and 100% of Pmax when compared to the control muscle. At this latter level, LD activity was equivalent to 32 +/- 5% MVC (range 11-61%), whereas mean activity of the control muscle was less than 7.5% MVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7789491

  18. Activity Patterns in Latissimus Dorsi and Sternocleidomastoid in Classical Singers

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Alan H.D.; Williams, Caitlin; James, Buddug V.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the roles of the accessory respiratory muscles, latissimus dorsi (LD), and sternocleidomastoid, in classical singing. Methods Electromyography was used to record the activity of these muscles in six classically trained female singers carrying out a number of singing and nonsinging tasks. Movements of the chest and abdominal walls were monitored simultaneously using inductive plethysmography, and the sound of the phonations was recorded. Results In normal breathing, LD is active transiently during very deep inhalations and in inhalation against resistance. During exhalation it becomes active again as residual capacity is approached or when air is expelled with great force. Sternocleidomastoid (SCM) supports inhalation when lung volume nears 100% vital capacity or when this is very rapid. All singers engaged LD in supported singing where it was associated with maintaining an expanded thorax. In coloratura singing, pulses of activity of increasing amplitude were often seen in LD toward the end of the breath. These were synchronized with each note. During a short phrase typical of the end of an aria, which was sung at full volume with the projected voice, both LD and SCM were active simultaneously. Spectral analysis of muscle activity demonstrated that in some singers, activity in LD and more rarely SCM, fluctuated in phase with vibrato. Conclusions LD appears to play a significant role in maintaining chest expansion and the dynamic processes underlying vibrato and coloratura singing in classically trained singers. PMID:21724365

  19. Diabetes alters mechanical properties and collagen fiber re-alignment in multiple mouse tendons.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Bhatt, Pankti R; Liechty, Kenneth W; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2014-09-01

    Tendons function to transfer load from muscle to bone through their complex composition and hierarchical structure, consisting mainly of type I collagen. Recent evidence suggests that type II diabetes may cause alterations in collagen structure, such as irregular fibril morphology and density, which could play a role in the mechanical function of tendons. Using the db/db mouse model of type II diabetes, the diabetic skin was found to have impaired biomechanical properties when compared to the non-diabetic group. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of diabetes on biomechanics, collagen fiber re-alignment, and biochemistry in three functionally different tendons (Achilles, supraspinatus, patellar) using the db/db mouse model. Results showed that cross-sectional area and stiffness, but not modulus, were significantly reduced in all three tendons. However, the tendon response to load (transition strain, collagen fiber re-alignment) occurred earlier in the mechanical test, contrary to expectations. In addition, the patellar tendon had an altered response to diabetes when compared to the other two tendons, with no changes in fiber re-alignment and decreased collagen content at the midsubstance of the tendon. Overall, type II diabetes alters tendon mechanical properties and the dynamic response to load. PMID:24833253

  20. Diabetes Alters Mechanical Properties and Collagen Fiber Re-Alignment in Multiple Mouse Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Connizzo, Brianne K.; Bhatt, Pankti R.; Liechty, Kenneth W.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Tendons function to transfer load from muscle to bone through their complex composition and hierarchical structure, consisting mainly of type I collagen. Recent evidence suggests that type II diabetes may cause alterations in collagen structure, such as irregular fibril morphology and density, which could play a role in the mechanical function of tendons. Using the db/db mouse model of type II diabetes, the diabetic skin was found to have impaired biomechanical properties when compared to the non-diabetic group. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of diabetes on biomechanics, collagen fiber re-alignment, and biochemistry in three functionally different tendons (Achilles, supraspinatus, patellar) using the db/db mouse model. Results showed that cross-sectional area and stiffness, but not modulus, were significantly reduced in all three tendons. However, the tendon response to load (transition strain, collagen fiber re-alignment) occurred earlier in the mechanical test, contrary to expectations. In addition, the patellar tendon had an altered response to diabetes when compared to the other two tendons, with no changes in fiber realignment and decreased collagen content at the midsubstance of the tendon. Overall, type II diabetes alters tendon mechanical properties and the dynamic response to load. PMID:24833253

  1. Chick myotendinous antigen. I. A monoclonal antibody as a marker for tendon and muscle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, M; Fambrough, D M

    1984-06-01

    Extracellular matrix components are likely to be involved in the interaction of muscle with nonmuscle cells during morphogenesis and in adult skeletal muscle. With the aim of identifying relevant molecules, we generated monoclonal antibodies that react with the endomysium, i.e., the extracellular matrix on the surface of single muscle fibers. Antibody M1, which is described here, specifically labeled the endomysium of chick anterior latissimus dorsi muscle (but neither the perimysium nor, with the exception of blood vessels and perineurium, the epimysium ). Endomysium labeling was restricted to proximal and distal portions of muscle fibers near their insertion points to tendon, but absent from medial regions of the muscle. Myotendinous junctions and tendon fascicles were intensely labeled by M1 antibody. In chick embryos, " myotendinous antigen" (as we tentatively call the epitope recognized by M1 antibody) appeared first in the perichondrium of vertebrae and limb cartilage elements, from where it gradually extended to the premuscle masses. Around day 6, tendon primordia were clearly labeled. The other structures labeled by M1 antibody in chick embryos were developing smooth muscle tissues, especially aorta, gizzard, and lung buds. In general, tissues labeled with M1 antibody appeared to be a subset of the ones accumulating fibronectin. In cell cultures, M1 antibody binds to fuzzy, fibrillar material on the substrate and cell surfaces of living fibroblast and myogenic cells, which confirms an extracellular location of the antigenic site. The appearance of myotendinous antigen during limb morphogenesis and its distribution in adult muscle and tendon are compatible with the idea that it might be involved in attaching muscle fibers to tendon fascicles. Its biochemical characterization is described in the accompanying paper ( Chiquet , M., and D. Fambrough , 1984, J. Cell Biol. 98:1937-1946). PMID:6725406

  2. TLP tendon bottom connector

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, H.S.

    1986-09-16

    This patent describes a bottom connector for connecting a tendon segment of a tension leg platform to a subsea template which includes a receptacle for the connector comprising: a first body member adapted to be received within an anchor receptacle, a second body member connected to the first body member through a flexible joint for universally pivotal movement and adapted to be connected to the tendon segment, a latch carrier movable with respect to the first body member and having latch segments pivotally connected to the latch carrier, the latch segments being such that in one position of the latch carrier, the latch segments engage both a recess in the receptacle and the first body member when the connector is inserted into the receptacle a sufficient distance so that the latch segments and carrier will react to the recess and such that when the latch carrier is in another position, the latch segments are clear of the recess to enable the connector to move further into the receptacle or to allow the bottom connector to be removed from the receptacle, and release means operative to maintain the carrier in the other position if a decision is made to remove the connector from the receptacle.

  3. Architectural analysis and predicted functional capability of the human latissimus dorsi muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Michael E; Brown, Stephen H M

    2013-01-01

    The latissimus dorsi is primarily considered a muscle with actions at the shoulder, despite its widespread attachments at the spine. There is some dispute regarding the potential contribution of this muscle to lumbar spine function. The architectural design of a muscle is one of the most accurate predictors of muscle function; however, detailed architectural data on the latissimus dorsi muscle are limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the architectural properties of the latissimus dorsi muscle and model mechanical function in light of these new data. One latissimus dorsi muscle was removed from each of 12 human cadavers, separated into regions, and micro-dissected for quantification of fascicle length, sarcomere length, and physiological cross-sectional area. From these data, sarcomere length operating ranges were modelled to determine the force–length characteristics of latissimus dorsi across the spine and shoulder ranges of motion. The physiological cross-sectional area of latissimus dorsi was 5.6 ± 0.5 cm2 and normalized fascicle length was 26.4 ± 1.0 cm, indicating that this muscle is designed to produce a moderate amount of force over a large range of lengths. Measured sarcomere length in the post-mortem neutral spine posture was nearly optimal at 2.69 ± 0.06 μm. Across spine range of motion, biomechanical modelling predicted latissimus dorsi acts across both the ascending and descending limbs of the force–length curve during lateral bend, and primarily at or near the plateau region (where maximum force generation is possible) during flexion/extension and axial twist. Across shoulder range of motion, latissimus dorsi acts primarily on the plateau region and descending limbs of the force length curve during both flexion/extension and abduction/adduction. These data provide novel insights into the ability of the latissimus dorsi muscle to generate force and change length throughout the spine and shoulder ranges of motion. In addition

  4. Architectural analysis and predicted functional capability of the human latissimus dorsi muscle.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Michael E; Brown, Stephen H M

    2013-08-01

    The latissimus dorsi is primarily considered a muscle with actions at the shoulder, despite its widespread attachments at the spine. There is some dispute regarding the potential contribution of this muscle to lumbar spine function. The architectural design of a muscle is one of the most accurate predictors of muscle function; however, detailed architectural data on the latissimus dorsi muscle are limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the architectural properties of the latissimus dorsi muscle and model mechanical function in light of these new data. One latissimus dorsi muscle was removed from each of 12 human cadavers, separated into regions, and micro-dissected for quantification of fascicle length, sarcomere length, and physiological cross-sectional area. From these data, sarcomere length operating ranges were modelled to determine the force-length characteristics of latissimus dorsi across the spine and shoulder ranges of motion. The physiological cross-sectional area of latissimus dorsi was 5.6±0.5 cm2 and normalized fascicle length was 26.4±1.0 cm, indicating that this muscle is designed to produce a moderate amount of force over a large range of lengths. Measured sarcomere length in the post-mortem neutral spine posture was nearly optimal at 2.69±0.06 μm. Across spine range of motion, biomechanical modelling predicted latissimus dorsi acts across both the ascending and descending limbs of the force-length curve during lateral bend, and primarily at or near the plateau region (where maximum force generation is possible) during flexion/extension and axial twist. Across shoulder range of motion, latissimus dorsi acts primarily on the plateau region and descending limbs of the force length curve during both flexion/extension and abduction/adduction. These data provide novel insights into the ability of the latissimus dorsi muscle to generate force and change length throughout the spine and shoulder ranges of motion. In addition, these

  5. The Scarless Latissimus Dorsi Flap Provides Effective Lower Pole Prosthetic Coverage in Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Miteff, Kirstin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The evolution of surgical breast cancer treatment has led to the oncologically safe preservation of greater amounts of native skin, yet we are still often using flaps with large skin paddles, thereby resulting in significant donor-site scars. This explains the increasing appeal of acellular dermal matrix reconstructions. Acellular dermal matrices can, however, have significant problems, particularly if there is any vascular compromise of the mastectomy skin flaps. We have developed a method of raising the latissimus dorsi flap through the anterior mastectomy incisions without requiring special instruments or repositioning. This can provide autologous vascularized cover of the prosthesis. Methods: A clear surgical description of the scarless latissimus dorsi flap harvest is provided, and our results of a retrospective cohort review of 20 consecutive patients with 27 traditional latissimus dorsi breast reconstructions were compared with those of 20 consecutive patients with 30 scarless latissimus dorsi breast reconstructions. Results: Operative time, length of stay, and complication rates were reduced in the scarless group. Patients Breast-Q scores were equivalent in each group. The aesthetic assessment was good/excellent in 77% of both groups; however, subscale assessment was better in the scarless group. This was statistically significant (P = 0.0). Conclusions: Breast reconstruction using the scarless latissimus dorsi flap is time effective, requires no patient repositioning, and uses standard breast instrumentation. It is safe and versatile while reducing the risk of exposed prosthesis if native skin necrosis occurs. It is a vascularized alternative to acellular dermal matrices. PMID:25289340

  6. Structure of the latissimus dorsi muscle and respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Levi, M; Gea, J; Sauleda, J; Corominas, J M; Minguella, J; Aran, X; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether respiratory function influences the structure of the latissimus dorsi muscle (LD). Twelve patients (58 +/- 10 yr) undergoing thoracotomy were studied. Lung and respiratory muscle function were evaluated before surgery. Patients showed a forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 67 +/- 16% of the reference value, an FEV1-forced vital capacity ratio of 69 +/- 9%, a maximal inspiratory pressure of 101 +/- 21% of the reference value, and a tension-time index of the diaphragm (TTdi) of 0.04 +/- 0.02. When patients were exposed to 8% CO2 breathing, TTdi increased to 0.06 +/- 0.03 (P < 0.05). The structural analysis of LD showed that 51 +/- 5% of the fibers were type I. The diameter was 56 +/- 9 microns for type I fibers and 61 +/- 9 microns for type II fibers, whereas the hypertrophy factor was 87 +/- 94 and 172 +/- 208 for type I and II fibers, respectively. Interestingly, the histogram distribution of the LD fibers was unimodal in two of the three individuals with normal lung function and bimodal (additional mode of hypertrophic fibers) in seven of the nine patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. An inverse relationship was found between the %FEV1-forced vital capacity ratio and both the diameter of the fibers (type I: r = -0.773, P < 0.005; type II: r = -0.590, P < 0.05) and the hypertrophy factors (type I: r = -0.647, P < 0.05; type II: r = -0.575, P = 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7775307

  7. Extensor pollicis brevis tendon can hyperextend thumb interphalangeal joint in absence of extensor pollicis longus: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Strauch, Robert J; Strauch, Carolyn B

    2016-07-18

    We are reporting a case of extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture which did not require tendon transfer owing to the ability of the intact extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) to fully hyperextend the thumb interphalangeal joint. The thumb metacarpophalangeal joint was also able to be fully actively extended by the EPB. Previous anatomical studies have demonstrated that the insertional anatomy of the EPB tendon is highly variable and sometimes inserts onto the extensor hood and distal phalanx, which is likely the mechanism by which our patient was able to fully extend the thumb interphalangeal joint. Despite the potential for the EPB to extend the IP joint of the thumb, virtually all previously reported cases of extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon rupture had deficits of thumb IP extension requiring tendon transfer. This case highlights the potential ability of the EPB tendon to completely substitute for the function of the EPL tendon in providing thumb IP joint extension. PMID:27458556

  8. Extensor pollicis brevis tendon can hyperextend thumb interphalangeal joint in absence of extensor pollicis longus: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Strauch, Robert J; Strauch, Carolyn B

    2016-01-01

    We are reporting a case of extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture which did not require tendon transfer owing to the ability of the intact extensor pollicis brevis (EPB) to fully hyperextend the thumb interphalangeal joint. The thumb metacarpophalangeal joint was also able to be fully actively extended by the EPB. Previous anatomical studies have demonstrated that the insertional anatomy of the EPB tendon is highly variable and sometimes inserts onto the extensor hood and distal phalanx, which is likely the mechanism by which our patient was able to fully extend the thumb interphalangeal joint. Despite the potential for the EPB to extend the IP joint of the thumb, virtually all previously reported cases of extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon rupture had deficits of thumb IP extension requiring tendon transfer. This case highlights the potential ability of the EPB tendon to completely substitute for the function of the EPL tendon in providing thumb IP joint extension. PMID:27458556

  9. Tendon grafts: their natural history, biology and future development.

    PubMed

    Wong, R; Alam, N; McGrouther, A D; Wong, J K F

    2015-09-01

    The use of tendon grafts has diminished as regimes of primary repairs and rehabilitation have improved, but they remain important in secondary reconstruction. Relatively little is known about the cellular biology of grafts, and the general perception is that they have little biological activity. The reality is that there is a wealth of cellular and molecular changes occurring with the process of engraftment that affect the quality of the repair. This review highlights the historical perspectives and modern concepts of graft take, reviews the different attachment techniques and revisits the biology of pseudosheath formation. In addition, we discuss some of the future directions in tendon reconstruction by grafting, which include surface modification, vascularized tendon transfer, allografts, biomaterials and cell-based therapies. PMID:26264585

  10. Partial Tendon Release for Treatment of a Symptomatic Snapping Biceps Femoris Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Scott A.; Quach, Tony; McAllister, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Snapping of the biceps femoris tendon over the fibular head is an uncommon condition. Reported causes include an anomalous insertion of the tendon, trauma at the insertion site of the tendon, and an abnormality of the fibular head. This article reports a case of a painful snapping biceps femoris tendon in a patient without an anomalous tendon insertion or an abnormality of the fibular head. Partial release of the superior aspect of the tendon resulted in resolution of symptoms. PMID:23015904

  11. Tendon-to-Bone Attachment: From Development to Maturity

    PubMed Central

    Zelzer, Elazar; Blitz, Einat; Killian, Megan L.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2014-01-01

    The attachment between tendon and bone occurs across a complex transitional tissue that minimizes stress concentrations and allows for load transfer between muscles and skeleton. This unique tissue cannot be reconstructed following injury, leading to high incidence of recurrent failure and stressing the need for new clinical approaches. This review describes the current understanding of the development and function of the attachment site between tendon and bone. The embryonic attachment unit, namely, the tip of the tendon and the bone eminence into which it is inserted, was recently shown to develop modularly from a unique population of Sox9- and Scx-positive cells, which are distinct from tendon fibroblasts and chondrocytes. The fate and differentiation of these cells is regulated by transforming growth factor beta and bone morphogenetic protein signaling, respectively. Muscle loads are then necessary for the tissue to mature and mineralize. Mineralization of the attachment unit, which occurs postnatally at most sites, is largely controlled by an Indian hedgehog/parathyroid hormone-related protein feedback loop. A number of fundamental questions regarding the development of this remarkable attachment system require further study. These relate to the signaling mechanism that facilitates the formation of an interface with a gradient of cellular and extracellular phenotypes, as well as to the interactions between tendon and bone at the point of attachment. PMID:24677726

  12. Latissimus dorsi pedicle flap for coverage of soft tissue defects about the elbow.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, M; Sharpe, F; Thommen, V D; Itamura, J M; Schnall, S B

    1999-01-01

    Sixteen consecutive patients who were treated with a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap for complex soft tissue defects about the elbow were reviewed. The average defect size was 100 cm2. Thirteen of the 16 patients achieved stable wound healing with a single procedure. Three patients had partial necrosis of the latissimus and required additional coverage procedures. We recommend that the latissimus dorsi flap should not be routinely used to cover defects more than 8 cm distal to the olecranon. The flap should be closely monitored in the first 48 hours, drains should be routinely used at the recipient and donor sites, and the elbow should be maintained in an extended position for the first 5 days after the procedure. The latissimus dorsi flap may also have a prophylactic role in selected patients with compromised soft tissue coverage about the elbow. The pedicled latissimus flap can be performed under loupe magnification and requires no microsurgical skills or equipment. PMID:10633903

  13. Management of Extensor Tendon Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, M; Hindocha, S; Jordan, D; Saleh, M; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Extensor tendon injuries are very common injuries, which inappropriately treated can cause severe lasting impairment for the patient. Assessment and management of flexor tendon injuries has been widely reviewed, unlike extensor injuries. It is clear from the literature that extensor tendon repair should be undertaken immediately but the exact approach depends on the extensor zone. Zone I injuries otherwise known as mallet injuries are often closed and treated with immobilisaton and conservative management where possible. Zone II injuries are again conservatively managed with splinting. Closed Zone III or ‘boutonniere’ injuries are managed conservatively unless there is evidence of displaced avulsion fractures at the base of the middle phalanx, axial and lateral instability of the PIPJ associated with loss of active or passive extension of the joint or failed non-operative treatment. Open zone III injuries are often treated surgically unless splinting enable the tendons to come together. Zone V injuries, are human bites until proven otherwise requires primary tendon repair after irrigation. Zone VI injuries are close to the thin paratendon and thin subcutaneous tissue which strong core type sutures and then splinting should be placed in extension for 4-6 weeks. Complete lacerations to zone IV and VII involve surgical primary repair followed by 6 weeks of splinting in extension. Zone VIII require multiple figure of eight sutures to repair the muscle bellies and static immobilisation of the wrist in 45 degrees of extension. To date there is little literature documenting the quality of repairing extensor tendon injuries however loss of flexion due to extensor tendon shortening, loss of flexion and extension resulting from adhesions and weakened grip can occur after surgery. This review aims to provide a systematic examination method for assessing extensor injuries, presentation and management of all type of extensor tendon injuries as well as guidance on

  14. Differential impact of visual feedback on plantar- and dorsi-flexion maximal torque output.

    PubMed

    Toumi, Anis; Jakobi, Jennifer M; Simoneau-Buessinger, Emilie

    2016-05-01

    The effect of visual feedback on enhancing isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) was evaluated. Twelve adults performed plantar-flexion and dorsi-flexion MVCs in 3 conditions (no visual feedback, visual feedback, and visual feedback with target). There was no significant effect of visual conditions on dorsi-flexion MVC but there was an effect on plantar-flexion. Irrespective of whether a target was evident, visual feedback increased plantar-flexion MVC by ∼15%. This study highlights the importance of optimal feedback to enhance MVC. PMID:27031663

  15. Split latissimus dorsi muscle flap repair of acquired, nonmalignant, intrathoracic tracheoesophageal and bronchoesophageal fistulas.

    PubMed

    Hammoudeh, Ziyad S; Gursel, Eti; Baciewicz, Frank A

    2015-06-01

    The development of a fistula between the tracheobronchial tree and oesophagus due to nonmalignant causes is uncommon. Division of the fistula with muscle flap interposition eliminates contact between the tracheobronchial segment and the oesophagus, theoretically decreasing the chance of recurrence as well as providing a robust blood supply to aid in healing. The split latissimus dorsi muscle flap is a well-suited flap for such repairs because of the ability to simultaneously cover two separate apertures (tracheobronchial and oesophageal). The authors describe the split latissimus dorsi muscle flap with step-by-step technique for repair of intrathoracic aerodigestive fistulas. PMID:25697381

  16. Acute Traumatic Tear of Latissimus Dorsi Muscle in an Elite Track Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Çelebi, Mehmet Mesut; Ergen, Emin; Üstüner, Evren

    2013-01-01

    Soft tissue injuries constitute 30-50% of all sports related injuries; however, injury to the latissimus dorsi muscle is quite rare with only a few cases reported in the literature. Herein, we describe an acute traumatic tear of the latissimus dorsi muscle in an elite track athlete, which has not been reported in the track and field sports before. The injury was caused by forceful resisted arm adduction that took place at hurdling and starting from the block. A pseudotumor appearance in the axillary region was misdiagnosed as a mass. The diagnosis was made by ultrasound alone and the patient was managed conservatively. PMID:24765503

  17. Intraoperative hemodynamic evaluation of the latissimus dorsi muscle flap: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Fulvio; Giordano, Salvatore; Tukiainen, Erkki

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess intraoperatively the hemodynamic changes in the donor vessel of free latissimus dorsi (LD) flap before and after denervation and to analyze flow changes after flap transfer. Twenty-seven patients underwent LD muscle microvascular reconstruction for lower-limb soft tissue defects. Measurements of blood flow were performed intraoperatively by using a 2- to 5-mm probe ultrasonic transit-time flowmeter around the dissected vessels. Registrations were made in the thoracodorsal artery before and after harvesting the flap, after compressing and cutting the motor nerve, and after anastomosis. Mean blood flow of in situ harvested thoracodorsal artery as measured intraoperatively by transit-time flowmeter was (mean ± standard deviation) 16.6 ± 11 mL/min and was significantly increased after raising the flap to 24.0 ± 22 mL/min (p <0.05); it was 25.6 ± 23 mL/min after compressing the motor nerve and was significantly increased after cutting the motor nerve to 32.5 ± 26 mL/min (p <0.05). A significant increase of blood flow to 28.1 ± 19 mL/min was also detected in the thoracodorsal artery after flap transplantation with end-to-side anastomosis (p <0.05). Vascular resistance in the thoracodorsal artery significantly decreased after flap raising and anastomosis (from 7.5 ± 3.4 to 4.0 ± 1.9 and to 4.5 ± 2.4, respectively, p <0.05). LD flap harvesting increases blood flow and decreases resistance in the thoracodorsal artery, especially after denervation. PMID:22492006

  18. Hyaluronic acid and tendon lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Samson, Antoine; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction recently, the viscoelastic properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) on liquid connective tissue have been proposed for the treatment of tendinopathies. Some fundamental studies show encouraging results on hyaluronic acid’s ability to promote tendon gliding and reduce adhesion as well as to improve tendon architectural organisation. Some observations also support its use in a clinical setting to improve pain and function. This literature review analyses studies relating to the use of hyaluronic acid in the treatment of tendinopathies. Methods this review was constructed using the Medline database via Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar. The key words hyaluronic acid, tendon and tendinopathy were used for the research. Results in total, 28 articles (in English and French) on the application of hyaluronic acid to tendons were selected for their relevance and scientific quality, including 13 for the in vitro part, 7 for the in vivo animal part and 8 for the human section. Conclusions preclinical studies demonstrate encouraging results: HA permits tendon gliding, reduces adhesions, creates better tendon architectural organisation and limits inflammation. These laboratory observations appear to be supported by limited but encouraging short-term clinical results on pain and function. However, controlled randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26958533

  19. Basic FGF or VEGF gene therapy corrects insufficiency in the intrinsic healing capacity of tendons

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jin Bo; Wu, Ya Fang; Cao, Yi; Chen, Chuan Hao; Zhou, You Lang; Avanessian, Bella; Shimada, Masaru; Wang, Xiao Tian; Liu, Paul Y.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon injury during limb motion is common. Damaged tendons heal poorly and frequently undergo unpredictable ruptures or impaired motion due to insufficient innate healing capacity. By basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene therapy via adeno-associated viral type-2 (AAV2) vector to produce supernormal amount of bFGF or VEGF intrinsically in the tendon, we effectively corrected the insufficiency of the tendon healing capacity. This therapeutic approach (1) resulted in substantial amelioration of the low growth factor activity with significant increases in bFGF or VEGF from weeks 4 to 6 in the treated tendons (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01), (2) significantly promoted production of type I collagen and other extracellular molecules (p < 0.01) and accelerated cellular proliferation, and (3) significantly increased tendon strength by 68–91% from week 2 after AAV2-bFGF treatment and by 82–210% from week 3 after AAV2-VEGF compared with that of the controls (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). Moreover, the transgene expression dissipated after healing was complete. These findings show that the gene transfers provide an optimistic solution to the insufficiencies of the intrinsic healing capacity of the tendon and offers an effective therapeutic possibility for patients with tendon disunion. PMID:26865366

  20. Basic FGF or VEGF gene therapy corrects insufficiency in the intrinsic healing capacity of tendons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin Bo; Wu, Ya Fang; Cao, Yi; Chen, Chuan Hao; Zhou, You Lang; Avanessian, Bella; Shimada, Masaru; Wang, Xiao Tian; Liu, Paul Y

    2016-01-01

    Tendon injury during limb motion is common. Damaged tendons heal poorly and frequently undergo unpredictable ruptures or impaired motion due to insufficient innate healing capacity. By basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene therapy via adeno-associated viral type-2 (AAV2) vector to produce supernormal amount of bFGF or VEGF intrinsically in the tendon, we effectively corrected the insufficiency of the tendon healing capacity. This therapeutic approach (1) resulted in substantial amelioration of the low growth factor activity with significant increases in bFGF or VEGF from weeks 4 to 6 in the treated tendons (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01), (2) significantly promoted production of type I collagen and other extracellular molecules (p < 0.01) and accelerated cellular proliferation, and (3) significantly increased tendon strength by 68-91% from week 2 after AAV2-bFGF treatment and by 82-210% from week 3 after AAV2-VEGF compared with that of the controls (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). Moreover, the transgene expression dissipated after healing was complete. These findings show that the gene transfers provide an optimistic solution to the insufficiencies of the intrinsic healing capacity of the tendon and offers an effective therapeutic possibility for patients with tendon disunion. PMID:26865366

  1. Stochastic Interdigitation as a Toughening Mechanism at the Interface between Tendon and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yizhong; Birman, Victor; Demyier-Black, Alix; Schwartz, Andrea G.; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Genin, Guy M.

    2015-01-01

    Reattachment and healing of tendon to bone poses a persistent clinical challenge and often results in poor outcomes, in part because the mechanisms that imbue the uninjured tendon-to-bone attachment with toughness are not known. One feature of typical tendon-to-bone surgical repairs is direct attachment of tendon to smooth bone. The native tendon-to-bone attachment, however, presents a rough mineralized interface that might serve an important role in stress transfer between tendon and bone. In this study, we examined the effects of interfacial roughness and interdigital stochasticity on the strength and toughness of a bimaterial interface. Closed form linear approximations of the amplification of stresses at the rough interface were derived and applied in a two-dimensional unit-cell model. Results demonstrated that roughness may serve to increase the toughness of the tendon-to-bone insertion site at the expense of its strength. Results further suggested that the natural tendon-to-bone attachment presents roughness for which the gain in toughness outweighs the loss in strength. More generally, our results suggest a pathway for stochasticity to improve surgical reattachment strategies and structural engineering attachments. PMID:25606690

  2. Peroneal Tendon Reconstruction and Coverage for Treatment of Septic Peroneal Tenosynovitis: A Devastating Complication of Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction With a Tendon Allograft.

    PubMed

    Schade, Valerie L; Harsha, Wayne; Rodman, Caitlin; Roukis, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Septic peroneal tenosynovitis is a rare and significant challenge. A search of peer-reviewed published studies revealed only 5 case reports to guide treatment, none of which resulted in significant loss of both peroneal tendons necessitating reconstruction. No clear guidance is available regarding how to provide reliable reconstruction of both peroneal tendons after a significant loss secondary to septic tenosynovitis. In the present report, we describe the case of a young, active-duty soldier who underwent lateral ankle ligament reconstruction with a tendon allograft whose postoperative course was complicated by septic peroneal tenosynovitis resulting in significant loss of both peroneal tendons. Reconstruction was achieved in a staged fashion with the use of silicone rods and external fixation to maintain physiologic tension and preserve peroneal tendon function, followed by reconstruction of both peroneal tendons and the superior peroneal retinaculum with a tensor fascia lata autograft. Soft tissue coverage was obtained with an anterolateral thigh free tissue transfer and a split-thickness skin graft. The patient returned to full activity as an active-duty soldier with minimal pain and no instability of the right lower extremity. The muscle strength of both peroneal tendons remained at 5 of 5, and no objective findings of ankle instability were seen at 3.5 years postoperatively. PMID:26002675

  3. The long head of the biceps tendon is a suitable cell source for tendon tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pietschmann, Matthias F.; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F.; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tendon tissue engineering (TTE) tries to produce tendinous tissue of high quality to replace dysfunctional tissue. One possible application of TTE might be the replacement of ruptured tissue of the rotator cuff. Autologous tenocytes seem to be most suitable as no differentiation in vitro is necessary. Today it is still uncertain if there is a difference between tendon-derived cells (TDC) of different native tissues. Moreover, the search for suitable scaffolds is another important issue in TTE. Material and methods This study compared TDC of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHB), the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the tendon of the musculus semitendinosus (TMS). The TDC were isolated using the cell migration method. Cell morphology was assessed using light microscopy and gene expression was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Afterwards, cell seeding efficiency and proliferation were tested on a collagen I scaffold using the WST-1 assay. Results were confirmed using H + E staining. Results The TDC of the LHB showed higher expression levels of collagen type I and decorin (p < 0.01) compared to TDC of other origin. Results showed efficient cell seeding and proliferation within the scaffold. Proliferation within the scaffold was not as high as when cells were cultivated without a scaffold. Conclusions The TDC of the LHB seems to be the most suitable cell source. Further research is necessary to find out if the results can be transferred to an in vivo model. The new collagen I scaffold seems to offer an opportunity to combine good biocompatibility and mechanical strength. PMID:25097592

  4. Ulnar Nerve Tendon Transfers for Pinch.

    PubMed

    Cook, Shane; Gaston, R Glenn; Lourie, Gary M

    2016-08-01

    Power and tip pinch are an integral part of intrinsic hand function that can be significantly compromised with dysfunction of the ulnar nerve. Loss of power pinch is one component that can significantly affect an individual's ability to perform simple daily tasks. Tip pinch is less affected, as this task has significant contributions from the median nerve. To restore power pinch, the primary focus must be on restoring the action of the adductor pollicis primarily, and if indicated the first dorsal interosseous muscle and flexor pollicis brevis. PMID:27387080

  5. Achilles tendon rupture rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, R. S.; Parsons, N.; Underwood, M.; Costa, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The evidence base to inform the management of Achilles tendon rupture is sparse. The objectives of this research were to establish what current practice is in the United Kingdom and explore clinicians’ views on proposed further research in this area. This study was registered with the ISRCTN (ISRCTN68273773) as part of a larger programme of research. Methods We report an online survey of current practice in the United Kingdom, approved by the British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and completed by 181 of its members. A total of ten of these respondents were invited for a subsequent one-to-one interview to explore clinician views on proposed further research in this area. Results The survey showed wide variations in practice, with patients being managed in plaster cast alone (13%), plaster cast followed by orthoses management (68%), and orthoses alone (19%). Within these categories, further variation existed regarding the individual rehabilitation facets, such as the length of time worn, the foot position within them and weight-bearing status. The subsequent interviews reflected this clinical uncertainty and the pressing need for definitive research. Conclusions The gap in evidence in this area has resulted in practice in the United Kingdom becoming varied and based on individual opinion. Future high-quality randomised trials on this subject are supported by the clinical community. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:65–9 PMID:25868938

  6. Effects of quantitative trait loci on mineral content 1 of bovine longissimus dorsi muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle require dietary minerals to maintain their health, production and reproduction. Concentrations of minerals in tissues are at least partially genetically determined. Mapping genomic regions related to the mineral content of the bovine longissimus dorsi muscle may help in the identificatio...

  7. Common Disorders of the Achilles Tendon

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress on the tendon too quickly, leading to micro-injury of the tendon fibers. Due to this ... with over-pronation or gait abnormalities, custom orthotic devices may be prescribed. Night splints. Night splints help ...

  8. The study of optical properties and proteoglycan content of tendons by PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Rupani, Asha; Weightman, Alan; Wimpenny, Ian; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Ahearne, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Tendons are load-bearing collagenous tissues consisting mainly of type I collagen and various proteoglycans (PGs) including decorin and versican. It is widely accepted that highly orientated collagen fibers in tendons a play critical role for transferring tensile stress and demonstrate birefringent optical properties. However, the influence that proteoglycans have on the optical properties of tendons is yet to be fully elucidated. Tendinopathy (defined as a syndrome of tendon pain, tenderness and swelling that affects the normal function of the tissue) is a common disease associated with sporting injuries or degeneration. PG's are the essential components of the tendon extracellular matrix; changes in their quantities and compositions have been associated with tendinopathy. In this study, polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been used to reveal the relationship between proteoglycan content/location and birefringent properties of tendons. Tendons dissected from freshly slaughtered chickens were imaged at regular intervals by PS-OCT and polarizing light microscope during the extraction of PGs or glycosaminoglycans using established protocols (guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) or proteinase K solution). The macroscopic and microscopic time lapsed images are complimentary; mutually demonstrating that there was a higher concentration of PG's in the outer sheath region than in the fascicles; and the integrity of the sheath affected extraction process and the OCT birefringence bands. Extraction of PGs using GuHCl disturbed the organization of local collagen bundles, which corresponded to a reduction in the frequency of birefringence bands and the band width by PS-OCT. The feature of OCT penetration depth helped us to define the heterogeneous distribution of PG's in tendon, which was complimented by polarizing light microscopy. The results provide new insight of tendon structure and also demonstrate a great potential for using PS-OCT as a

  9. Silastic tendon graft: its role in neglected tendon repair.

    PubMed

    LaBarbiera, A P; Solitto, R J

    1990-01-01

    A case history is presented of the repair of a neglected traumatic tendon laceration by the use of a permanent Silastic tendon implant, originally manufactured for hand surgery by a staged procedure. Stage I consists of implantation of the Silastic implant and allowance of a 2- to 3-month period for the production of a pseudosheath. Stage II consists of removal of the implant after using it to guide an auto- or allograft, through the newly formed pseudosheath for attachment to the anastomotic sites. PMID:2258563

  10. Madelung Deformity and Extensor Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, Gholam Hossain; Peyman, Maryam; Mozafarian, Kamran

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tendon rupture in chronic Madelung deformity, as a result of tendon attrition on the dislocated distal ulna, is a rare occurrence. It is, however, seen more often in rheumatoid arthritis. There are few case reports in the English-language literature on this issue. We report a case of multiple tendon ruptures in a previously undiagnosed Madelung deformity. PMID:26161772

  11. Staged tendon grafts and soft tissue coverage

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, David

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the two-staged flexor tendon method is to improve the predictability of final results in difficult problems dealing with tendon reconstruction. This article reviews the evolution and benefits of this procedure. It also considers the use of the technique to help deal with problems requiring pulley and skin reconstruction simultaneously with re-constituting the flexor tendon system. PMID:22022043

  12. Tenascin-C and human tendon degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, G. P.; Harrall, R. L.; Cawston, T. E.; Hazleman, B. L.; Mackie, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of tenascin in supraspinatus tendons to determine whether an alteration in tenascin expression was associated with human tendon degeneration. Tenascin was present in all of the tendons studied, although with two distinct patterns of expression. First, tenascin was associated with organized, fibrous regions of the tendon matrix that were typical of the normal tendon structure. This distribution is consistent with a role for tenascin in collagen fibril organization, perhaps maintaining the interface between fibrils and adjacent structures. Second, although tenascin was generally absent from poorly organized matrix in degenerate tendons, it was strongly associated with some rounded cells in disorganized fibrocartilaginous regions that were more abundant in pathological specimens. Tenascin was also found around infiltrating blood vessels, with more intense staining associated with a mononuclear cell infiltrate. Western blotting of tendon extracts showed differences in tenascin isoform expression, with only the small (200-kd) tenascin isoform found in normal tendons. Degenerate tendons also expressed the 300-kd isoform, consistent with a role for the larger tenascin isoform in tendon disease, potentially stimulating tenocyte proliferation, cell rounding, and fibrocartilaginous change. Proteolytic fragments of tenascin were detected but only in ruptured tendons, an indication of matrix remodeling in degenerate tendons, with fragment sizes consistent with the activity of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8780397

  13. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  14. Generation of tendon-to-bone interface "enthesis" with use of recombinant BMP-2 in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yusuke; Yoshida, Gen; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Takaoka, Kunio

    2007-11-01

    The anatomical structure at bone-tendon and bone-ligament interfaces is called the enthesis. Histologically, the enthesis is characterized by a transitional series of tissue layers from the end of the tendon to bone, including tendon, fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage, and bone. This arrangement yields stronger direct connection of the soft tissues to bone. In surgical repair, the enthesis has proven difficult to reproduce, and the success of ligament-bone bonding has depended on the fibrous attachment that forms after any ligament reconstructions. In this study, we attempted to generate a direct-insertion enthesis in two stages. First, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) was injected into the flexor digitorum communis tendon in the rabbit hind limb to induce ectopic ossicle formation. In a second step, the resultant tendon/ossicle complex was then surgically transferred onto the surface of the rabbit tibia to generate a stable tendon-bone junction. One month following surgery, histomorphological examination confirmed direct insertion of tendon-bone structures in the proximal tibia of the rabbit. Ultimate failure loads of the BMP-2-generated tendon-bone junction were significantly higher than in the control group (p < 0.01). These findings suggest that it is possible to successfully regenerate a direct tendon-to-bone enthesis. Use of this approach may enable successful reconstruction of joints rendered unstable after ligamentous rupture or laxity after anterior cruciate ligament injury. PMID:17557323

  15. Early Management, With a Minimal Initial Hospitalization Length, of Major Self-inflicted Rifle Wounds to the Face by a Single Latissimus Dorsi Free Musculocutaneous Flap: A 10-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Danino, A. M.; Hariss, P. G.; Servant, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Severe ballistic injuries to the face create complex, composite defects of 2 facial subunits. These injuries have an extremely high economic impact for the Medicare system. The surgical goal with these patients is to restore basic functions of the face with a rapid morphological improvement. Our hypothesis is as follows: Early restoration of facial segments with a single free multiple island latissimus dorsi flap without primary bone reconstruction can significantly reduce hospitalization time and allow earlier psychiatric therapy with good morphological results. Surgical method: (1) Large debridement, bony stabilization with external fixation, and tracheotomy. (2) Definitive early reconstruction of soft tissue with composite free latissimus dorsi-scapular musculocutaneous flap. (3) Several refinements will optimize the results. Study design: Retrospective case series of lower- and middle-face composite facial close-range high-energy gunshot wound patients were evaluated. Age, gender, mechanism of injury, anatomic subsites involved, surgical procedures, flaps utilized, complications, functional outcomes, time of tracheotomy closure, hospitalization duration, and beginning of psychiatric treatment were analyzed. Results: Twelve defects were gunshot wounds, 12 free latissimus dorsi flaps, and no flap losses. Patients received psychiatric treatment after 22 days (7–29); the tracheotomy was removed in 10 patients with normal alimentation in all cases. Mean hospitalization duration was 21 days. Conclusions: Free tissue transfer techniques allow early reconstruction of the soft tissue framework of the face with a single multiple-island flap. Rapid restitution of facial compartments at a soft tissue level can dramatically reduce duration of hospitalization. PMID:19587777

  16. Tendon Ruptures Associated With Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Alan A.; Horowitz, Bruce G.; Nagel, Donald A.

    1977-01-01

    In five patients, tendon ruptures occurred in association with corticosteroid therapy, either systemic or local infiltration. The chronic nature of the pain in all of these patients suggests that what we often call tendinitis may in fact be early or partial ruptures of tendons. Patients who receive local infiltration of corticosteroids should perhaps be advised of the risk of a ruptured tendon. In addition, particularly when the Achilles tendon is involved, immobilization should be utilized initially for a presumed tendinitis or early rupture, to protect the tendon from further injury. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:919538

  17. Spring ligament reconstruction using the autogenous flexor hallucis longus tendon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Chun; Yi, Young

    2014-07-01

    The calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament complex is the soft tissue most often seen to fail in flatfoot pathology and is associated with deformity of the talonavicular joint. The spring ligament complex supports the talar head, preventing it from displacing into excessive plantar flexion/adduction. An anatomical reconstruction of the spring ligament should replicate this function. A new method of spring ligament reconstruction using autogenous flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer is reported. PMID:24992052

  18. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  19. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E.; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen. Here, we investigated the function of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR1 in tendon formation, healing, and repair using rodent animal models and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adult tendons of Egr1–/– mice displayed a deficiency in the expression of tendon genes, including Scx, Col1a1, and Col1a2, and were mechanically weaker compared with their WT littermates. EGR1 was recruited to the Col1a1 and Col2a1 promoters in postnatal mouse tendons in vivo. Egr1 was required for the normal gene response following tendon injury in a mouse model of Achilles tendon healing. Forced Egr1 expression programmed MSCs toward the tendon lineage and promoted the formation of in vitro–engineered tendons from MSCs. The application of EGR1-producing MSCs increased the formation of tendon-like tissues in a rat model of Achilles tendon injury. We provide evidence that the ability of EGR1 to promote tendon differentiation is partially mediated by TGF-β2. This study demonstrates EGR1 involvement in adult tendon formation, healing, and repair and identifies Egr1 as a putative target in tendon repair strategies. PMID:23863709

  20. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) Text Size ... the arch, and an inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. ...

  1. Structural and Ultrastructural Characteristics of Bone-Tendon Junction of the Calcaneal Tendon of Adult and Elderly Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Diego Pulzatto; Dias, Fernando José; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Watanabe, Ii-sei

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are transition tissues that transfer the contractile forces generated by the muscles to the bones, allowing movement. The region where the tendon attaches to the bone is called bone-tendon junction or enthesis and may be classified as fibrous or fibrocartilaginous. This study aims to analyze the collagen fibers and the cells present in the bone-tendon junction using light microscopy and ultrastructural techniques as scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Forty male Wistar rats were used in the experiment, being 20 adult rats at 4 months-old and 20 elderly rats at 20 months-old. The hind limbs of the rats were removed, dissected and prepared to light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The aging process showed changes in the collagen fibrils, with a predominance of type III fibers in the elderly group, in addition to a decrease in the amount of the fibrocartilage cells, fewer and shorter cytoplasmic processes and a decreased synthetic capacity due to degradation of the organelles involved in synthesis. PMID:27078690

  2. Hyperuricemic PRP in tendon cells.

    PubMed

    Andia, I; Rubio-Azpeitia, E; Maffulli, N

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is injected within tendons to stimulate healing. Metabolic alterations such as the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, or hyperuricemia could hinder the therapeutic effect of PRP. We hypothesise that tendon cells sense high levels of uric acid and this could modify their response to PRP. Tendon cells were treated with allogeneic PRPs for 96 hours. Hyperuricemic PRP did not hinder the proliferative actions of PRP. The gene expression pattern of inflammatory molecules in response to PRP showed absence of IL-1b and COX1 and modest expression of IL6, IL8, COX2, and TGF-b1. IL8 and IL6 proteins were secreted by tendon cells treated with PRP. The synthesis of IL6 and IL8 proteins induced by PRP is decreased significantly in the presence of hyperuricemia (P = 0.017 and P = 0.012, resp.). Concerning extracellular matrix, PRP-treated tendon cells displayed high type-1 collagen, moderate type-3 collagen, decorin, and hyaluronan synthase-2 expression and modest expression of scleraxis. Hyperuricemia modified the expression pattern of extracellular matrix proteins, upregulating COL1 (P = 0.036) and COMP (P = 0.012) and downregulating HAS2 (P = 0.012). Positive correlations between TGF-b1 and type-1 collagen (R = 0.905, P = 0.002) and aggrecan (R = 0.833, P = 0.010) and negative correlations between TGF-b1 and IL6 synthesis (R = -0.857, P = 0.007) and COX2 (R = -0.810, P = 0.015) were found. PMID:25276832

  3. Inspiratory muscle fatigue affects latissimus dorsi but not pectoralis major activity during arms only front crawl sprinting.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch; Tasker, Louise; Bostanci, Ozgur

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) affects the muscle activity of the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major during maximal arms only front crawl swimming. Eight collegiate swimmers were recruited to perform 2 maximal 20-second arms only front crawl sprints in a swimming flume. Both sprints were performed on the same day, and IMF was induced 30 minutes after the first (control) sprint. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures (PImax and PEmax, respectively) were measured before and after each sprint. The median frequency (MDF) of the electromyographic signal burst was recorded from the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major during each 20-second sprint along with stroke rate and breathing frequency. Median frequency was assessed in absolute units (Hz) and then referenced to the start of the control sprint for normalization. After IMF inducement, stroke rate increased from 56 ± 4 to 59 ± 5 cycles per minute, and latissimus dorsi MDF fell from 67 ± 11 Hz at the start of the sprint to 61 ± 9 Hz at the end. No change was observed in the MDF of the latissimus dorsi during the control sprint. Conversely, the MDF of the pectoralis major shifted to lower frequencies during both sprints but was unaffected by IMF. As the latter induced fatigue in the latissimus dorsi, which was not otherwise apparent during maximal arms only control sprinting, the presence of IMF affects the activity of the latissimus dorsi during front crawl sprinting. PMID:24402450

  4. Nanostructured substrate fabricated by sectioning tendon using a microtome for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoshu; Xu, Qiaobing

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes an efficient and versatile method for the fabrication of nanostructured substrates from a piece of tendon which comprises aligned collagen nanofibers. We used a microtome to generate the tendon slices (10-50  µm thick), which were used as a scaffold for guiding directional cell growth. Highly aligned and uniform monolayer cells sheets were obtained. The tendon slices were used as a master, and the nanostructures outlined by the bundles of collagen nanofibers were successfully transferred onto a polystyrene film using standard soft lithography. The cell growing on the nanostructured polystyrene substrate showed good adhesion and alignment. The technique developed here enables one to fabricate nanostructured substrates without using any traditional micro/nanofabrication tools. The nanostructured substrate, e.g. a slice of tendon, has excellent biocompatibility and relatively good mechanical stability, which makes this technique useful in constructing complicated 3D tissues. PMID:22101489

  5. [Latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap combined with implant in breast reconstruction: The technique of the dorsal bra].

    PubMed

    Bruant-Rodier, C; Chiriac, S; Baratte, A; Dissaux, C; Bodin, F

    2016-06-01

    The latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap combined with an implant is an effective breast reconstruction solution especially in irradiated patients. The authors describe the specific technical aspects that allow them to optimize the results of this intervention. In the back, the skin paddle is drawn in the shape of a horizontal spindle so as to conceal the residual scar under the bra. In breast area, a J-shaped contraincision barring the mastectomy scar ensures a harmonious positioning of the skin paddle to the inferolateral part of the breast. After a 180° rotation, the latissimus dorsi muscle envelops the implant like a bra. Its upper edge is attached at the bottom to define the new submammary fold. Under the pectoralis major muscle, its distal end comes to fill the décolleté above the implant. PMID:26117706

  6. Pectoralis Major Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cordasco, Frank A.; Degen, Ryan; Mahony, Gregory Thomas; Tsouris, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Systematic reviews of the literature have identified 365 reported cases of Pectoralis Major Tendon (PMT) injuries. While surgical treatment has demonstrated improved outcomes compared to non-operative treatment, there is still relatively limited data on the functional outcome, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in athletes following PMT repair. This study comprises the largest series of athletes following PMT repair reported to date. The Objective is to report on the functional outcomes, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in a consecutive series of PMT tears. Methods: From 2009, 81 patients with PMT tears were enrolled in this prospective series. Baseline evaluation included patient demographics, mechanism of injury, physical examination and PMT specific MRI for confirmation of the diagnosis and analysis of the extent of injury. Each patient underwent surgical repair by the senior author utilizing a previously published surgical technique. Patients were then followed at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months and further follow-up was conducted annually thereafter with functional outcome scores and adduction strength testing. The return to sport and incidence of 2nd surgery data were recorded. This study includes the first 40 athletes to reach the 2-year post-operative period. Results: All athletes were male, with an average age of 34.4 years (range 23-59). The patient cohort consisted of 4 professional NFL players and 36 recreational athletes. Average follow-up duration was 2.5 years (range 2 - 6.0 years). The most common mechanisms of injury occurred during the bench press (n=26) and contact sport participation (n=14). Sixteen injuries were complete avulsions involving both the clavicular and sternocostal heads, while 24 were isolated sternocostal head avulsions. Average pre-injury bench press of 396 lbs (range 170-500 lbs) was restored to 241 lbs post-operatively (range 140-550 lbs). Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores

  7. The pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui Shan; Ji, Tong; Zhang, Chen Ping

    2014-08-01

    The pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap (PLDMF) is not the first-line reconstructive option for most clinicians; however, when treating salvage patients or those with depleted neck vessels, the PLDMF provides a valuable armamentarium. Unlike the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap or the lower island trapezius flap, the PLDMF has greater versatility in soft tissue design and a longer arc of rotation. These advantages are of great importance in managing advanced reconstructive cases. PMID:24958381

  8. Mechanisms of tendon injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Parks, William C.; Rifkin, Daniel B.; Derwin, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon disorders are common and lead to significant disability, pain, healthcare cost, and lost productivity. A wide range of injury mechanisms exist leading to tendinopathy or tendon rupture. Tears can occur in healthy tendons that are acutely overloaded (e.g., during a high speed or high impact event) or lacerated (e.g., a knife injury). Tendinitis or tendinosis can occur in tendons exposed to overuse conditions (e.g., an elite swimmer’s training regimen) or intrinsic tissue degeneration (e.g., age-related degeneration). The healing potential of a torn or pathologic tendon varies depending on anatomic location (e.g., Achilles vs. rotator cuff) and local environment (e.g., intrasynovial vs. extrasynovial). Although healing occurs to varying degrees, in general healing of repaired tendons follows the typical wound healing course, including an early inflammatory phase, followed by proliferative and remodeling phases. Numerous treatment approaches have been attempted to improve tendon healing, including growth factor- and cell-based therapies and rehabilitation protocols. This review will describe the current state of knowledge of injury and repair of the three most common tendinopathies-- flexor tendon lacerations, Achilles tendon rupture, and rotator cuff disorders-- with a particular focus on the use of animal models for understanding tendon healing. PMID:25641114

  9. The Effects of Glucocorticoid on Tendon and Tendon Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Dean, Benjamin John Floyd; Carr, Andrew Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are generally used to relieve pain and/or inflammation in a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders including osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, tendinopathy and degenerative spine disease. Glucocorticoids reduce tendon derived cell proliferation in vitro and reduce extracellular matrix synthesis both in vitro and in vivo, in particular type I collagen synthesis. Glucocorticoids also appear to result in acute deleterious changes in healthy in vivo tendon including collagen necrosis, collagen disorganisation and inflammatory cell infiltration; while the overall effect of glucocorticoid administration on the mechanical properties of healthy in vivo tendon are generally negative. Overall the existing in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that glucocorticoids should be used with caution in treating painful tendinopathy. Certainly a real need exists to follow up the long term clinical effects of glucocorticoid in treating tendinopathy, as there is currently a paucity of evidence in this area. However in this context while the short term benefits are clear, glucocorticoids remain a useful treatment option provided they are used in the right patients in sensible moderation. PMID:27535266

  10. Direct Lentiviral-Cyclooxygenase 2 Application to the Tendon-Bone Interface Promotes Osteointegration and Enhances Return of the Pull-Out Tensile Strength of the Tendon Graft in a Rat Model of Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Wergedal, Jon E.; Stiffel, Virginia; Lau, Kin-Hing William

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine if direct application of the lentiviral (LV)-cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) vector to the tendon-bone interface would promote osteointegration of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy was chosen for investigation because a similar COX2 gene transfer strategy promoted bony bridging of the fracture gap during bone repair, which involves similar histologic transitions that occur in osteointegration. Briefly, a 1.14-mm diameter tunnel was drilled in the mid-groove of the humerus of adult Fischer 344 rats. The LV-COX2 or βgal control vector was applied directly into the bone tunnel and onto the end of the tendon graft, which was then pulled into the bone tunnel. A poly-L-lactide pin was press-fitted into the tunnel as interference fixation. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 5, or 8 weeks for histology analysis of osteointegration. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy enhanced neo-chondrogenesis at the tendon-bone interface but with only marginal effect on de novo bone formation. The tendon-bone interface of the LV-COX2-treated tenodesis showed the well-defined tendon-to-fibrocartilage-to-bone histologic transitions that are indicative of osteointegration of the tendon graft. The LV-COX2 in vivo gene transfer strategy also significantly enhanced angiogenesis at the tendon-bone interface. To determine if the increased osteointegration was translated into an improved pull-out mechanical strength property, the pull-out tensile strength of the LV-COX2-treated tendon grafts was determined with a pull-out mechanical testing assay. The LV-COX2 strategy yielded a significant improvement in the return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft after 8 weeks. In conclusion, the COX2-based in vivo gene transfer strategy enhanced angiogenesis, osteointegration and improved return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft. Thus, this strategy has great potential to be developed into an effective therapy to

  11. Direct lentiviral-cyclooxygenase 2 application to the tendon-bone interface promotes osteointegration and enhances return of the pull-out tensile strength of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Rundle, Charles H; Chen, Shin-Tai; Coen, Michael J; Wergedal, Jon E; Stiffel, Virginia; Lau, Kin-Hing William

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine if direct application of the lentiviral (LV)-cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) vector to the tendon-bone interface would promote osteointegration of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy was chosen for investigation because a similar COX2 gene transfer strategy promoted bony bridging of the fracture gap during bone repair, which involves similar histologic transitions that occur in osteointegration. Briefly, a 1.14-mm diameter tunnel was drilled in the mid-groove of the humerus of adult Fischer 344 rats. The LV-COX2 or βgal control vector was applied directly into the bone tunnel and onto the end of the tendon graft, which was then pulled into the bone tunnel. A poly-L-lactide pin was press-fitted into the tunnel as interference fixation. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 5, or 8 weeks for histology analysis of osteointegration. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy enhanced neo-chondrogenesis at the tendon-bone interface but with only marginal effect on de novo bone formation. The tendon-bone interface of the LV-COX2-treated tenodesis showed the well-defined tendon-to-fibrocartilage-to-bone histologic transitions that are indicative of osteointegration of the tendon graft. The LV-COX2 in vivo gene transfer strategy also significantly enhanced angiogenesis at the tendon-bone interface. To determine if the increased osteointegration was translated into an improved pull-out mechanical strength property, the pull-out tensile strength of the LV-COX2-treated tendon grafts was determined with a pull-out mechanical testing assay. The LV-COX2 strategy yielded a significant improvement in the return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft after 8 weeks. In conclusion, the COX2-based in vivo gene transfer strategy enhanced angiogenesis, osteointegration and improved return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft. Thus, this strategy has great potential to be developed into an effective therapy to

  12. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    PubMed Central

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  13. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-12-15

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7-21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  14. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types. PMID:25940499

  15. On the mechanical function of tendon.

    PubMed

    Kafka, V; Jírová, J; Smetana, V

    1995-01-01

    A mesoscopic approach is followed for mathematical modelling of the specific deformation properties of tendon. The approach starts from our general concept of modelling mechanical behaviour of heterogeneous media and assumes that the structure of tendon is optimized in such a way that it enables its adjacent muscle to work with a constant performance in the course of increasing loading (acting like a gearbox in a car). The model based on this assumption gives results that are in a very good accordance with observed properties of tendons. Clinical experience reveals that if this function of tendon is violated pathological changes appear in the respective muscle. RELEVANCE: Clarification and mathematical modelling of the mechanical function of tendon is of intellectual interest in its own right, but it is important also for cautioning surgeons against unnecessary violation of this function, and for tissue engineering aspects if tendon must be replaced. PMID:11415531

  16. Dynamic behavior of tendons in random seas

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwecki, J.M.; Rijken, O.R.; Soemantri, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamic behavior of large scale (1:55) undistorted models of TLP tendons were investigated. The tendons modeled were for a TLP designed to be deployed in a water depth of 914 m. The tendon motions were studied without the presence of the hull, In the study reported, the tendon models were subjected to three quite different design seas and the single and paired tendon configurations were compared under identical wave conditions. The main objective of this study was to examine the dynamic response of TLP tendons under controlled environmental conditions in order to better quantify the observed dynamic behavior. Underwater video tracking techniques were utilized in the experiments to obtain direct measurement of the inline and transverse displacements. Envelopes characterizing the extreme displacement behavior, spatial variations in response and collision behavior are presented and discussed.

  17. Nutrient pathways of flexor tendons in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Manske, P.R.; Lesker, P.A.

    1982-09-01

    The perfusion and diffusion pathways to the flexor profundus tendons of 40 monkeys were investigated by measuring the uptake of tritiated proline by various tendon segments. In the absence of all vascular connections, the process of diffusion provides nutrients to all areas of flexor tendon and in this study the process of diffusion was greater. The distal segment of tendon was observed to be profused most rapidly. The proximal tendon segment is perfused from both the muscular-tendinous junction and the vinculum longus; vincular segment perfusion is via the vinculum longus vessels alone; central segment perfusion is shared by the vinculum longus and vinculum brevis vasculature. The distal segment uptake is by both the process of diffusion or vinculum brevis perfusion. The osseous attachment at the distal phalanx contributes little to tendon nutrition.

  18. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R. PMID:24414293

  19. Second-order wave effects on TLP tendon tension responses

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, H.; Mercier, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a general procedure for analyzing the second-order wave effects on the tendon tension responses of a TLP. The approach solves both first- and second-order equation of motions for a TLP system in frequency domain. Viscous effects are included in the form of statistically linearized damping coefficients. An efficient algorithm has been devised for reducing the burden of second-order wave diffraction analysis, which selects the interacting frequency pairs according to springing frequency of interest to minimize the cost of computing quadratic transfer functions (QTFs) and allow accurate interpolation of QTFs. Moment statistics of the tension process are computed through an eigenvalue analysis. The developed method is applied to analyze the tendon tension responses of a TLP design in water depth of 3,000 ft.

  20. Ulnar Nerve Injury after Flexor Tendon Grafting.

    PubMed

    McCleave, Michael John

    2016-10-01

    A 43-year-old female is presented who underwent a two-stage tendon reconstruction and developed a low ulnar nerve palsy postoperatively. Exploration found that the tendon graft was passing through Guyon's canal and that the ulnar nerve was divided. This is a previously unreported complication. The reconstruction is discussed, the literature reviewed and a guide is given on how to identify the correct tissue plane when passing a tendon rod. PMID:27595967

  1. Crucial transcription factors in tendon development and differentiation: their potential for tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanhuan; Zhu, Shouan; Zhang, Can; Lu, Ping; Hu, Jiajie; Yin, Zi; Ma, Yue; Chen, Xiao; OuYang, Hongwei

    2014-05-01

    Tendons that connect muscles to bone are often the targets of sports injuries. The currently unsatisfactory state of tendon repair is largely attributable to the limited understanding of basic tendon biology. A number of tendon lineage-related transcription factors have recently been uncovered and provide clues for the better understanding of tendon development. Scleraxis and Mohawk have been identified as critical transcription factors in tendon development and differentiation. Other transcription factors, such as Sox9 and Egr1/2, have also been recently reported to be involved in tendon development. However, the molecular mechanisms and application of these transcription factors remain largely unclear and this prohibits their use in tendon therapy. Here, we systematically review and analyze recent findings and our own data concerning tendon transcription factors and tendon regeneration. Based on these findings, we provide interaction and temporal programming maps of transcription factors, as a basis for future tendon therapy. Finally, we discuss future directions for tendon regeneration with differentiation and trans-differentiation approaches based on transcription factors. PMID:24705622

  2. High axial load termination for TLP tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a hollow high axial load termination for a composite tubular tendon. It comprises: a curved hollow termination body open at one end wit a circular opening and connected at the opposite curved end with an elongated hollow member of lesser diameter than the diameter of the circular opening of the termination body, a composite tubular tendon containing axial fibers and helical fibers laid on an inner hollow liner; fibers of the composite tubular tendon extending over and covering the termination body from the abutment with the composite tubular tendon to the elongated member of lesser diameter than the termination body.

  3. Neurovascular free-muscle transfer for the treatment of established facial paralysis following ablative surgery in the parotid region.

    PubMed

    Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori; Asato, Hirotaka; Ueda, Kazuki; Yamada, Atsushi

    2004-05-01

    Neurovascular free-muscle transfer for facial reanimation was performed as a secondary reconstructive procedure for 45 patients with facial paralysis resulting from ablative surgery in the parotid region. This intervention differs from neurovascular free-muscle transfer for treatment of established facial paralysis resulting from conditions such as congenital dysfunction, unresolved Bell palsy, Hunt syndrome, or intracranial morbidity, with difficulties including selection of recipient vessels and nerves, and requirements for soft-tissue augmentation. This article describes the authors' operative procedure for neurovascular free-muscle transfer after ablative surgery in the parotid region. Gracilis muscle (n = 24) or latissimus dorsi muscle (n = 21) was used for transfer. With gracilis transfer, recipient vessels comprised the superficial temporal vessels in 12 patients and the facial vessels in 12. For latissimus dorsi transfer, recipient vessels comprised the facial vessels in 16 patients and the superior thyroid artery and superior thyroid or internal jugular vein in four. Facial vessels on the contralateral side were used with interpositional graft of radial vessels in the remaining patient with latissimus dorsi transfer. Cross-face nerve grafting was performed before muscle transfer in 22 patients undergoing gracilis transfer. In the remaining two gracilis patients, the ipsilateral facial nerve stump was used as the primary recipient nerve. Dermal fat flap overlying the gracilis muscle was used for cheek augmentation in one patient. In the other 23 patients, only the gracilis muscle was used. With latissimus dorsi transfer, the ipsilateral facial nerve stump was used as the recipient nerve in three patients, and a cross-face nerve graft was selected as the recipient nerve in six. The contralateral facial nerve was selected as the recipient nerve in 12 patients, and a thoracodorsal nerve from the latissimus dorsi muscle segment was crossed through the upper lip

  4. Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendons rupture.

    PubMed

    Celik, Evrim Coşkun; Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Ofluoglu, Demet; Demircay, Emre

    2012-07-01

    Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and some medications. We report a case of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture that may be related to the long-term use of a statin. PMID:22561379

  5. Measuring Regional Changes in Damaged Tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Catherine Kayt Vincent

    Mechanical properties of tendon predict tendon health and function, but measuring these properties in vivo is difficult. An ultrasound-based (US) analysis technique called acoustoelastography (AE) uses load-dependent changes in the reflected US signal to estimate tissue stiffness non-invasively. This thesis explores whether AE can provide information about stiffness alteration resulting from tendon tears both ex vivo and in vivo. An ex vivo ovine infraspinatus tendon model suggests that the relative load transmitted by the different tendon layers transmit different fractions of the load and that ultrasound echo intensity change during cyclic loading decreases, becoming less consistent once the tendon is torn. An in vivo human tibialis anterior tendon model using electrically stimulated twitch contractions investigated the feasibility of measuring the effect in vivo. Four of the five subjects showed the expected change and that the muscle contraction times calculated using the average grayscale echo intensity change compared favorably with the times calculated based on the force data. Finally an AE pilot study with patients who had rotator cuff tendon tears found that controlling the applied load and the US view of the system will be crucial to a successful in vivo study.

  6. Ultrasonographic assessment of the equine palmar tendons

    PubMed Central

    Padaliya, N. R.; Ranpariya, J. J.; Kumar, Dharmendra; Javia, C. B.; Barvalia, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the equine palmar tendon by ultrasonography (USG) in standing the position. Materials and Methods: USG of palmar tendons was performed in 40 adult horses using linear transducer having frequency of 10-18 MHz (e-soate, My Lab FIVE) and L52 linear array transducer (Titan, SonoSite) with frequencies ranging from 8 to 10 MHz. Palmar tendon was divided into 7 levels from distal to accessory carpal bone up to ergot in transverse scanning and 3 levels in longitudinal scanning. Results: The USG evaluation was very useful for diagnosis of affections of the conditions such as chronic bowed tendon, suspensory ligament desmitis, carpal sheath tenosynovitis and digital sheath effusions. The mean cross-sectional area (cm2) of affected tendons was significantly increased in affected than normal tendons. The echogenicity was also found reduced in affected tendons and ligaments along with disorganization of fiber alignment depending on the severity of lesion and injury. Conclusion: USG proved ideal diagnostic tool for diagnosis and post-treatment healing assessment of tendon injuries in horses. PMID:27047074

  7. Augmentation of tendon-to-bone healing.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Fu, Freddie H; Wolf, Megan R; Ochi, Mitsuo; Jazrawi, Laith M; Doral, M Nedim; Lubowitz, James H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-03-19

    Tendon-to-bone healing is vital to the ultimate success of the various surgical procedures performed to repair injured tendons. Achieving tendon-to-bone healing that is functionally and biologically similar to native anatomy can be challenging because of the limited regeneration capacity of the tendon-bone interface. Orthopaedic basic-science research strategies aiming to augment tendon-to-bone healing include the use of osteoinductive growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, gene therapy, enveloping the grafts with periosteum, osteoconductive materials, cell-based therapies, biodegradable scaffolds, and biomimetic patches. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and extracorporeal shockwave treatment may affect tendon-to-bone healing by means of mechanical forces that stimulate biological cascades at the insertion site. Application of various loading methods and immobilization times influence the stress forces acting on the recently repaired tendon-to-bone attachment, which eventually may change the biological dynamics of the interface. Other approaches, such as the use of coated sutures and interference screws, aim to deliver biological factors while achieving mechanical stability by means of various fixators. Controlled Level-I human trials are required to confirm the promising results from in vitro or animal research studies elucidating the mechanisms underlying tendon-to-bone healing and to translate these results into clinical practice. PMID:24647509

  8. Traumatic Tear of the Latissimus Dorsi Myotendinous Junction: Case Report of a CrossFit-Related Injury.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Michael V; Stensby, J Derek; Hillen, Travis J; Demertzis, Jennifer L; Keener, Jay D

    2015-01-01

    A case of a latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction strain in an avid CrossFit athlete is presented. The patient developed acute onset right axillary burning and swelling and subsequent palpable pop with weakness while performing a "muscle up." Magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated a high-grade tear of the right latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction approximately 9 cm proximal to its intact humeral insertion. There were no other injuries to the adjacent shoulder girdle structures. Isolated strain of the latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction is a very rare injury with a scarcity of information available regarding its imaging appearance and preferred treatment. This patient was treated conservatively and was able to resume active CrossFit training within 3 months. At 6 months postinjury, he had only a mild residual functional deficit compared with his preinjury level. PMID:26502450

  9. Blood supply of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, I M; Lagopoulos, M; McConnell, P; Soames, R W; Sefton, G K

    1998-09-01

    The Achilles tendon is one of the most common sites of injury and rupture as a result of overuse. Evidence suggests that the pathogenesis of rupture could involve the pattern of its blood supply. With use of angiographic and histological techniques, the blood supply of the Achilles tendon was investigated in 12 human cadaveric specimens. Angiography confirmed Mayer's 1916 finding that the blood supply to the tendon is from three areas: the musculotendinous and osseotendinous junctions and the paratenon, with the posterior tibial artery providing the major contribution. However, qualitative and quantitative histological analyses in this study showed that the Achilles tendon has a poor blood supply throughout its length, as determined by the small number of blood vessels per cross-sectional area, which do not in general vary significantly along its length. In light of these findings, it is suggested that poor vascularity may prevent adequate tissue repair following trauma, leading to further weakening of the tendon. PMID:9820283

  10. Tendon Vasculature in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tendons represent a bradytrophic tissue which is poorly vascularized and, compared to bone or skin, heal poorly. Usually, a vascularized connective scar tissue with inferior functional properties forms at the injury site. Whether the increased vascularization is the root cause of tissue impairments such as loss of collagen fiber orientation, ectopic formation of bone, fat or cartilage, or is a consequence of these pathological changes remains unclear. This review provides an overview of the role of tendon vasculature in healthy and chronically diseased tendon tissue as well as its relevance for tendon repair. Further, the nature and the role of perivascular tendon stem/progenitor cells residing in the vascular niche will be discussed and compared to multipotent stromal cells in other tissues. PMID:26635616

  11. Secondary repair of flexor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Battiston, B; Triolo, P F; Bernardi, A; Artiaco, S; Tos, P

    2013-03-01

    Tendon adhesions or even secondary ruptures causing severe hand functional impairment still represent a frequent complication after repair of flexor tendon injuries. Secondary treatment of these problems includes tenolysis, one or two stages flexor tendons reconstruction by grafts or even the use of tendon prosthesis. The mechanism and severity of injury, the status of the surrounding tissues and injured finger, the presence of associated lesions, the age of the patient, post-operative management, patient motivation and the surgeon's skill, may all have implications in the final outcome of the tendon reconstruction. A correct evaluation of the problem by means of classifications such as the one described by Boyes, may help the surgeon in choosing the appropriate technique. PMID:23347767

  12. Mathematical modeling of ligaments and tendons.

    PubMed

    Woo, S L; Johnson, G A; Smith, B A

    1993-11-01

    Ligaments and tendons serve a variety of important functions in maintaining the structure of the human body. Although abundant literature exists describing experimental investigations of these tissues, mathematical modeling of ligaments and tendons also contributes significantly to understanding their behavior. This paper presents a survey of developments in mathematical modeling of ligaments and tendons over the past 20 years. Mathematical descriptions of ligaments and tendons are identified as either elastic or viscoelastic, and are discussed in chronological order. Elastic models assume that ligaments and tendons do not display time dependent behavior and thus, they focus on describing the nonlinear aspects of their mechanical response. On the other hand, viscoelastic models incorporate time dependent effects into their mathematical description. In particular, two viscoelastic models are discussed in detail; quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV), which has been widely used in the past 20 years, and the recently proposed single integral finite strain (SIFS) model. PMID:8302027

  13. Ultrasonic evaluation of flood gate tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.; Brown, A.

    1997-10-01

    Our water resources infrastructure is susceptible to aging degradation just like the rest of this country`s infrastructure. A critical component of the water supply system is the flood gate that controls the outflow from dams.Long steel rods called tendons attach these radial gates to the concrete in the dam. The tendons are typically forty feet long and over one inch in diameter. Moisture may seep into the grout around the tendons and cause corrosion. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is working with the California Department of Water Resources to develop advanced ultrasonic techniques for nondestructively inspecting their tendons. A unique transducer was designed and fabricated to interrogate the entire tendon. A robust,portable unit was assembled that included a computer controlled data acquisition system and specialized data processing software to analyze the ultrasonic signals. This system was tested on laboratory specimens and is presently being fielded at two dam sites.

  14. Subscapularis Tendon Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Bok; Park, Young Eun; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Shon, Min Soo; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    The subscapularis tendon plays an essential role in shoulder function. Although subscapularis tendon tears are less common than other rotator cuff tears, tears of the subscapularis tendon have increasingly been recognized with the advent of magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy. A suture bridge technique for the treatment of posterosuperior rotator cuff tears has provided the opportunity to improve the pressurized contact area and mean footprint pressure. However, suture bridge fixation of subscapularis tendon tears appears to be technically challenging. We describe an arthroscopic surgical technique for suture bridge repair of subscapularis tendon tears that obtains ideal cuff integrity and footprint restoration. Surgery using such a suture bridge technique is indicated for large tears, such as tears involving the entire first facet or more, tears with a disrupted lateral sling, and combined medium to large supraspinatus/infraspinatus tears. PMID:26052489

  15. The Role of Detraining in Tendon Mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Frizziero, Antonio; Salamanna, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Vittadini, Filippo; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Nicoli Aldini, Nicolò; Masiero, Stefano; Fini, Milena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several conditions such as training, aging, estrogen deficiency and drugs could affect the biological and anatomo-physiological characteristics of the tendon. Additionally, recent preclinical and clinical studies examined the effect of detraining on tendon, showing alterations in its structure and morphology and in tenocyte mechanobiology. However, few data evaluated the importance that cessation of training might have on tendon. Basically, we do not fully understand how tendons react to a phase of training followed by sudden detraining. Therefore, within this review, we summarize the studies where tendon detraining was examined. Materials and Methods: A descriptive systematic literature review was carried out by searching three databases (PubMed, Scopus and Web of Knowledge) on tendon detraining. Original articles in English from 2000 to 2015 were included. In addition, the search was extended to the reference lists of the selected articles. A public reference manager (www.mendeley.com) was adopted to remove duplicate articles. Results: An initial literature search yielded 134 references (www.pubmed.org: 53; www.scopus.com: 11; www.webofknowledge.com: 70). Fifteen publications were extracted based on the title for further analysis by two independent reviewers. Abstracts and complete articles were after that reviewed to evaluate if they met inclusion criteria. Conclusions: The revised literature comprised four clinical studies and an in vitro and three in vivo reports. Overall, the results showed that tendon structure and properties after detraining are compromised, with an alteration in the tissue structural organization and mechanical properties. Clinical studies usually showed a lesser extent of tendon alterations, probably because preclinical studies permit an in-depth evaluation of tendon modifications, which is hard to perform in human subjects. In conclusion, after a period of sudden detraining (e.g., after an injury), physical activity should

  16. Modified free latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap in the reconstruction of extensive postoncologic defects in the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiquan; Li, Chunhua; Chen, Jin; Cai, Yongcong; Li, Ling; Wang, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Oncological resection of advanced carcinoma in the head and neck region results in vast defects. The free latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap (FLDMF) is one of the most commonly used flaps for the repair of complex head and neck defects. We tried to modify FLDMF to multiple segments or combine it with acellular dermis to fit through-and-through defects in the oral-facial region during the last decade. A retrospective review of patients with FLDMF reconstruction between 2004 and 2012 was undertaken. Demographics, histology, surgical management, disease control and overall survival, complications, radiotherapy, aesthetic outcome, as well as economic results were analyzed. The majority of the patients (66.7%) had recurrent tumors, and the rest of the patients had primary tumor with stage IV. Fourteen patients (38.9%) had a history of prior radiation therapy, whereas 27.8% of the patients had postoperative radiation therapy. The areas of the defects vary from 52 cm to 180 cm (mean, 86.4 cm). The flap failed in 1 of the 37 patients. The complications at the recipient site include hematoma (n = 6, 16.7%), venous insufficiency (n = 4, 11.1%), infection (n = 3, 8.3), and partial flap necrosis (n = 2, 5.5%). The donor-site complications include delayed healing, necrosis of skin graft, and limited shoulder function. The 5-year overall survival rate was 39.1%, and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 22.1%. In conclusion, the FLDMF could be modified to fit vast defects where voluminous tissue is needed to be transferred in the head and neck region. PMID:25723665

  17. Gene Expression Patterns Associated with Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor (PPAR) Signaling in the Longissimus dorsi of Hanwoo (Korean Cattle)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Dajeong; Chai, Han-Ha; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Cho, Yong-Min; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Nam-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue deposited within muscle fibers, known as intramuscular fat (IMF or marbling), is a major determinant of meat quality and thereby affects its economic value. The biological mechanisms that determine IMF content are therefore of interest. In this study, 48 genes involved in the bovine peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway, which is involved in lipid metabolism, were investigated to identify candidate genes associated with IMF in the longissimus dorsi of Hanwoo (Korean cattle). Ten genes, retinoid X receptor alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), phospholipid transfer protein, stearoyl-CoA desaturase, nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group H member 3, fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3), carnitine palmitoyltransferase II, acyl-Coenzyme A dehydrogenase long chain (ACADL), acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase 2 branched chain, and fatty acid binding protein 4, showed significant effects with regard to IMF and were differentially expressed between the low- and high-marbled groups (p<0.05). Analysis of the gene co-expression network based on Pearson’s correlation coefficients identified 10 up-regulated genes in the high-marbled group that formed a major cluster. Among these genes, the PPARG-FABP4 gene pair exhibited the strongest correlation in the network. Glycerol kinase was found to play a role in mediating activation of the differentially expressed genes. We categorized the 10 significantly differentially expressed genes into the corresponding downstream pathways and investigated the direct interactive relationships among these genes. We suggest that fatty acid oxidation is the major downstream pathway affecting IMF content. The PPARG/RXRA complex triggers activation of target genes involved in fatty acid oxidation resulting in increased triglyceride formation by ATP production. Our findings highlight candidate genes associated with the IMF content of the loin muscle of Korean cattle and provide insight into the

  18. Functional Tissue Engineering of Tendon: Establishing Biological Success Criteria for Improving Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Breidenbach, Andrew P; Gilday, Steven D; Lalley, Andrea L; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Gooch, Cynthia; Shearn, Jason T; Butler, David L

    2013-01-01

    Improving tendon repair using Functional Tissue Engineering (FTE) principles has been the focus of our laboratory over the last decade. Although our primary goals were initially focused only on mechanical outcomes, we are now carefully assessing the biological properties of our tissue-engineered tendon repairs so as to link biological influences with mechanics. However, given the complexities of tendon development and healing, it remains challenging to determine which aspects of tendon biology are the most important to focus on in the context of tissue engineering. To address this problem, we have formalized a strategy to identify, prioritize, and evaluate potential biological success criteria for tendon repair. We have defined numerous biological properties of normal tendon relative to cellular phenotype, extracellular matrix and tissue ultra-structure that we would like to reproduce in our tissue-engineered repairs and prioritized these biological criteria by examining their relative importance during both normal development and natural tendon healing. Here, we propose three specific biological criteria which we believe are essential for normal tendon function: 1) scleraxis-expressing cells; 2) well-organized and axially-aligned collagen fibrils having bimodal diameter distribution; and 3) a specialized tendon-to-bone insertion site. Moving forward, these biological success criteria will be used in conjunction with our already established mechanical success criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered tendon repairs. PMID:24200342

  19. Is higher serum cholesterol associated with altered tendon structure or tendon pain? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Benjamin J; Cook, Jill L; Docking, Sean I; Gaida, James E

    2015-01-01

    Background Tendon pain occurs in individuals with extreme cholesterol levels (familial hypercholesterolaemia). It is unclear whether the association with tendon pain is strong with less extreme elevations of cholesterol. Objective To determine whether lipid levels are associated with abnormal tendon structure or the presence of tendon pain. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant articles were found through an electronic search of 6 medical databases—MEDLINE, Cochrane, AMED, EMBASE, Web of Science and Scopus. We included all case–control or cross-sectional studies with data describing (1) lipid levels or use of lipid-lowering drugs and (2) tendon structure or tendon pain. Results 17 studies (2612 participants) were eligible for inclusion in the review. People with altered tendon structure or tendon pain had significantly higher total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; with mean difference values of 0.66, 1.00, 0.33, and −0.19 mmol/L, respectively. Conclusions The results of this review indicate that a relationship exists between an individual’s lipid profile and tendon health. However, further longitudinal studies are required to determine whether a cause and effect relationship exists between tendon structure and lipid levels. This could lead to advancement in the understanding of the pathoaetiology and thus treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:26474596

  20. Functional tissue engineering of tendon: Establishing biological success criteria for improving tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Breidenbach, Andrew P; Gilday, Steven D; Lalley, Andrea L; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Gooch, Cynthia; Shearn, Jason T; Butler, David L

    2014-06-27

    Improving tendon repair using Functional Tissue Engineering (FTE) principles has been the focus of our laboratory over the last decade. Although our primary goals were initially focused only on mechanical outcomes, we are now carefully assessing the biological properties of our tissue-engineered tendon repairs so as to link biological influences with mechanics. However, given the complexities of tendon development and healing, it remains challenging to determine which aspects of tendon biology are the most important to focus on in the context of tissue engineering. To address this problem, we have formalized a strategy to identify, prioritize, and evaluate potential biological success criteria for tendon repair. We have defined numerous biological properties of normal tendon relative to cellular phenotype, extracellular matrix and tissue ultra-structure that we would like to reproduce in our tissue-engineered repairs and prioritized these biological criteria by examining their relative importance during both normal development and natural tendon healing. Here, we propose three specific biological criteria which we believe are essential for normal tendon function: (1) scleraxis-expressing cells; (2) well-organized and axially-aligned collagen fibrils having bimodal diameter distribution; and (3) a specialized tendon-to-bone insertion site. Moving forward, these biological success criteria will be used in conjunction with our already established mechanical success criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered tendon repairs. PMID:24200342

  1. Achilles tendon: US diagnosis of pathologic conditions. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Blei, C.L.; Nirschl, R.P.; Grant, E.G.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-three patients were prospectively examined with ultra-sound (US) for acute or recurrent Achilles tendon symptoms. Three types of pathologic conditions of the Achilles tendon were found: tendinitis/tenosynovitis, acute tendon trauma, and postoperative changes. US appears to enable differentiation of these conditions and to contribute to the diagnosis of a broad range of Achilles tendon disorders.

  2. Tendon rupture associated with simvastatin/ezetimibe therapy.

    PubMed

    Pullatt, Raja C; Gadarla, Mamatha Reddy; Karas, Richard H; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Thompson, Paul D

    2007-07-01

    A case of spontaneous biceps tendon rupture in a physician during therapy with the combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe (Vytorin) is reported. Rechallenge produced tendinopathy in the contralateral biceps tendon that abated with drug discontinuation. Tendon rupture generally occurs in injured tendons. Physiological repair of an injured tendon requires degradation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix through matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Statins are known to inhibit MMPs. It was hypothesized that statins may increase the risk of tendon rupture by altering MMP activity. In conclusion, statins may increase the risk of tendon rupture by altering MMP activity. PMID:17599460

  3. Tenderization of Bovine Longissimus Dorsi Muscle using Aqueous Extract from Sarcodon aspratus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Ryu, Youn-Chul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aqueous extract from Sarcodon aspratus on tenderization of the bovine longissimus dorsi muscles in comparison with commercial proteolytic enzymes. Furthermore, meat quality and muscle protein degradation were examined. We marinated meat with 2% Sarcodon aspratus extract, 2% kiwi extract, and 0.2% papain. Beef chunks (3×3×3 cm(3)) were marinated with distilled water (control), Sarcodon aspratus extract (T1), kiwi extract (T2) or papain (T3) for 48 h at 4℃. There were no significant differences in muscle pH and lightness between control and treated samples. T1 had the lowest redness (p<0.01), and higher cooking loss and water holding capacity than control and T2 (p<0.05). T1 and T3 exhibited lower shear force values than control (p<0.05). Total protein solubility did not differ significantly between T1 and control, but T1 had less myofibrillar protein solubility than control and T2 (p<0.001). The degradation of myosin heavy chain in T1 and T3 was observed. This degradation of myofibrillar protein suggests that Sarcodon aspratus extract could influence tenderization. These results show that aqueous extract of Sarcodon aspratus extract actively affect the tenderness of the bovine longissimus dorsi muscle. PMID:26761876

  4. Tenderization of Bovine Longissimus Dorsi Muscle using Aqueous Extract from Sarcodon aspratus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aqueous extract from Sarcodon aspratus on tenderization of the bovine longissimus dorsi muscles in comparison with commercial proteolytic enzymes. Furthermore, meat quality and muscle protein degradation were examined. We marinated meat with 2% Sarcodon aspratus extract, 2% kiwi extract, and 0.2% papain. Beef chunks (3×3×3 cm3) were marinated with distilled water (control), Sarcodon aspratus extract (T1), kiwi extract (T2) or papain (T3) for 48 h at 4℃. There were no significant differences in muscle pH and lightness between control and treated samples. T1 had the lowest redness (p<0.01), and higher cooking loss and water holding capacity than control and T2 (p<0.05). T1 and T3 exhibited lower shear force values than control (p<0.05). Total protein solubility did not differ significantly between T1 and control, but T1 had less myofibrillar protein solubility than control and T2 (p<0.001). The degradation of myosin heavy chain in T1 and T3 was observed. This degradation of myofibrillar protein suggests that Sarcodon aspratus extract could influence tenderization. These results show that aqueous extract of Sarcodon aspratus extract actively affect the tenderness of the bovine longissimus dorsi muscle. PMID:26761876

  5. Proteomic changes involved in tenderization of bovine Longissimus dorsi muscle during prolonged ageing.

    PubMed

    Polati, Rita; Menini, Michele; Robotti, Elisa; Millioni, Renato; Marengo, Emilio; Novelli, Enrico; Balzan, Stefania; Cecconi, Daniela

    2012-12-01

    To study proteomic changes involved in tenderization of bovine Longissimus dorsi four Charolaise heifers and four Charolaise bull's muscles were sampled at slaughter after early and long ageing (2-4°C for 12 and 26days respectively). Descriptive sensory evaluation of samples were performed and their tenderness evaluated by Warner-Bratzler shear force test. Protein composition of fresh muscle and of meat aged was analysed by cartesian and polar 2-D electrophoresis. Student's t-test and Ranking-PCA analyses were performed to detect proteomic modulation, and the selected protein spots were identified by nano-HPLC-Chip MS/MS. This research has demonstrated that there are no differences between proteomic patterns of male and females Longissimus dorsi muscle, and that the extension of ageing beyond 12days, did not brings any concrete advantage in terms of sensory quality. Furthermore, the data presented here demonstrated that meat maturation caused changes of the abundance of proteins involved in metabolic, structural, and stress related processes. PMID:22953957

  6. The role of mechanobiology in tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Killian, Megan L; Cavinatto, Leonardo; Galatz, Leesa M; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical cues affect tendon healing, homeostasis, and development in a variety of settings. Alterations in the mechanical environment are known to result in changes in the expression of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, transcription factors, and cytokines that can alter tendon structure and cell viability. Loss of muscle force in utero or in the immediate postnatal period delays tendon and enthesis development. The response of healing tendons to mechanical load varies depending on anatomic location. Flexor tendons require motion to prevent adhesion formation, yet excessive force results in gap formation and subsequent weakening of the repair. Excessive motion in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction causes accumulation of macrophages, which are detrimental to tendon graft healing. Complete removal of load is detrimental to rotator cuff healing; yet, large forces are also harmful. Controlled loading can enhance healing in most settings; however, a fine balance must be reached between loads that are too low (leading to a catabolic state) and too high (leading to microdamage). This review will summarize existing knowledge of the mechanobiology of tendon development, homeostasis, and healing. PMID:22244066

  7. Viscoelasticity of Tendons Under Transverse Compression.

    PubMed

    Paul Buckley, C; Samuel Salisbury, S T; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-10-01

    Tendons are highly anisotropic and also viscoelastic. For understanding and modeling their 3D deformation, information is needed on their viscoelastic response under off-axis loading. A study was made, therefore, of creep and recovery of bovine digital extensor tendons when subjected to transverse compressive stress of up to ca. 100 kPa. Preconditioned tendons were compression tested between glass plates at increasing creep loads. The creep response was anomalous: the relative rate of creep reduced with the increasing stress. Over each ca. 100 s creep period, the transverse creep deformation of each tendon obeyed a power law dependence on time, with the power law exponent falling from ca. 0.18 to an asymptote of ca. 0.058 with the increasing stress. A possible explanation is stress-driven dehydration, as suggested previously for the similar anomalous behavior of ligaments. Recovery after removal of each creep load was also anomalous. Relative residual strain reduced with the increasing creep stress, but this is explicable in terms of the reducing relative rate of creep. When allowance was made for some adhesion occurring naturally between tendon and the glass plates, the results for a given load were consistent with creep and recovery being related through the Boltzmann superposition principle (BSP). The tendon tissue acted as a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) in contact with the glass plates: explicable in terms of the low transverse shear modulus of the tendons. PMID:27496279

  8. Les plaies du tendon patellaire

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mardy, Abdelhak; Elayoubi, Abdelghni; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Les plaies du tendon patellaire sont peu fréquentes et sont peu rapportés dans la littérature, contrairement aux ruptures sous cutanées. Les sections du tendon patellaire nécessitent une réparation immédiate afin de rétablir l'appareil extenseur et de permettre une récupération fonctionnelle précoce. A travers ce travail rétrospectif sur 13 cas, nous analysons les aspects épidémiologiques, thérapeutiques et pronostiques de ce type de pathologie en comparant différents scores. L’âge moyen est de 25 ans avec une prédominance masculine. Les étiologies sont dominées par les accidents de la voie publique (68%) et les agressions par agent tranchant (26%) et contendant (6 %). Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un parage chirurgical avec suture tendineuse direct protégée par un laçage au fils d'aciers en légère flexion. La rééducation est débutée après sédation des phénomènes inflammatoires. Au dernier recul les résultats sont excellents et bon à 92%. Nous n'avons pas noté de différence de force musculaire et d'amplitude articulaire entre le genou sain et le genou lésé. Les lésions ouvertes du tendon patellaire est relativement rare. La prise en charge chirurgicale rapide donne des résultats assez satisfaisants. La réparation est généralement renforcée par un semi-tendineux, synthétique ou métallique en forme de cadre de renfort pour faciliter la réadaptation et réduire le risque de récidive après la fin de l'immobilisation. PMID:25170379

  9. Tendon-Holding Capacities of Two Newly Designed Implants for Tendon Repair: An Experimental Study on the Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon of Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Ağır, İsmail; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim; Başçı, Onur; Çaypınar, Barış; Erol, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Two main factors determine the strength of tendon repair; the tensile strength of material and the gripping capacity of a suture configuration. Different repair techniques and suture materials were developed to increase the strength of repairs but none of techniques and suture materials seem to provide enough tensile strength with safety margins for early active mobilization. In order to overcome this problem tendon suturing implants are being developed. We designed two different suturing implants. The aim of this study was to measure tendon-holding capacities of these implants biomechanically and to compare them with frequently used suture techniques Materials and Methods: In this study we used 64 sheep flexor digitorum profundus tendons. Four study groups were formed and each group had 16 tendons. We applied model 1 and model 2 implant to the first 2 groups and Bunnell and locking-loop techniques to the 3rd and 4th groups respectively by using 5 Ticron sutures. Results: In 13 tendons in group 1 and 15 tendons in group 2 and in all tendons in group 3 and 4, implants and sutures pulled out of the tendon in longitudinal axis at the point of maximum load. The mean tensile strengths were the largest in group 1 and smallest in group 3. Conclusion: In conclusion, the new stainless steel tendon suturing implants applied from outside the tendons using steel wires enable a biomechanically stronger repair with less tendon trauma when compared to previously developed tendon repair implants and the traditional suturing techniques. PMID:25067965

  10. An insight on multiscale tendon modeling in muscle-tendon integrated behavior.

    PubMed

    Maceri, Franco; Marino, Michele; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    This paper aims to highlight the need for a refined tendon model to reproduce the main mechanical features of the integrated muscle-tendon unit (MTU). Elastic nonlinearities of the tendon, both at the nano and microscale, are modeled by a multiscale approach, accounting for the hierarchical arrangement (from molecules up to the fibers) of the collagen structures within the tissue. This model accounts also for the variation of tendon stiffness due to physical activity. Since the proposed tendon model is based on tissue-structured histology, the training-driven adaptation laws are directly formulated starting from histological evidences. Such a tendon description is integrated into a viscoelastic Hill-type model of the whole MTU. A fixed-end contraction test is numerically simulated, and results based on both linear and nonlinear tendon elastic model are compared. Sound and effective time-histories of muscle contractile force and fiber length are obtained only accounting for tendon elastic nonlinearities, which allow to quantitatively recover some experimental data. Finally, proposed numerical results give clear indications toward a rational explanation of the influence of tendon remodeling induced by physical activity on muscular contractile force. PMID:21739087

  11. Multi-layer electrospun membrane mimicking tendon sheath for prevention of tendon adhesions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shichao; Yan, Hede; Fan, Dapeng; Song, Jialin; Fan, Cunyi

    2015-01-01

    Defect of the tendon sheath after tendon injury is a main reason for tendon adhesions, but it is a daunting challenge for the biomimetic substitute of the tendon sheath after injury due to its multi-layer membrane-like structure and complex biologic functions. In this study, a multi-layer membrane with celecoxib-loaded poly(l-lactic acid)-polyethylene glycol (PELA) electrospun fibrous membrane as the outer layer, hyaluronic acid (HA) gel as middle layer, and PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the inner layer was designed. The anti-adhesion efficacy of this multi-layer membrane was compared with a single-layer use in rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model. The surface morphology showed that both PELA fibers and celecoxib-loaded PELA fibers in multi-layer membrane were uniform in size, randomly arrayed, very porous, and smooth without beads. Multi-layer membrane group had fewer peritendinous adhesions and better gliding than the PELA membrane group and control group in gross and histological observation. The similar mechanical characteristic and collagen expression of tendon repair site in the three groups indicated that the multi-layer membrane did not impair tendon healing. Taken together, our results demonstrated that such a biomimetic multi-layer sheath could be used as a potential strategy in clinics for promoting tendon gliding and preventing adhesion without poor tendon healing. PMID:25822877

  12. IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee report 2014: from the IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee (Chairman: Jin Bo Tang).

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin Bo; Chang, James; Elliot, David; Lalonde, Donald H; Sandow, Michael; Vögelin, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Hand surgeons continue to search for the best surgical flexor tendon repair and treatment of the tendon sheaths and pulleys, and they are attempting to establish postoperative regimens that fit diverse clinical needs. It is the purpose of this report to present the current views, methods, and suggestions of six senior hand surgeons from six different countries - all experienced in tendon repair and reconstruction. Although certainly there is common ground, the report presents provocative views and approaches. The report reflects an update in the views of the committee. We hope that it is helpful to surgeons and therapists in treating flexor tendon injuries. PMID:23962872

  13. Interfibrillar shear stress is the loading mechanism of collagen fibrils in tendon

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Spencer E.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the critical role tendons play in transmitting loads throughout the musculoskeletal system, little is known about the microstructural mechanisms underlying their mechanical function. Of particular interest is whether collagen fibrils in tendon fascicles bear load independently or if load is transferred between fibrils through interfibrillar shear forces. We conducted multiscale experimental testing and developed a microstructural shear lag model to explicitly test whether interfibrillar shear load transfer is indeed the fibrillar loading mechanism in tendon. Experimental correlations between fascicle macroscale mechanics and microscale interfibrillar sliding suggest that fibrils are discontinuous and share load. Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrate that a shear lag model can replicate the fascicle macroscale mechanics as well as predict the microscale fibrillar deformations. Since interfibrillar shear stress is the fundamental loading mechanism assumed in the model, this result provides strong evidence that load is transferred between fibrils in tendon and possibly other aligned collagenous tissues. Conclusively establishing this fibrillar loading mechanism and identifying the involved structural components should help develop repair strategies for tissue degeneration and guide the design of tissue engineered replacements. PMID:24530560

  14. Multiscale mechanical integrity of human supraspinatus tendon in shear after elastin depletion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Lake, Spencer P

    2016-10-01

    Human supraspinatus tendon (SST) exhibits region-specific nonlinear mechanical properties under tension, which have been attributed to its complex multiaxial physiological loading environment. However, the mechanical response and underlying multiscale mechanism regulating SST behavior under other loading scenarios are poorly understood. Furthermore, little is known about the contribution of elastin to tendon mechanics. We hypothesized that (1) SST exhibits region-specific shear mechanical properties, (2) fiber sliding is the predominant mode of local matrix deformation in SST in shear, and (3) elastin helps maintain SST mechanical integrity by facilitating force transfer among collagen fibers. Through the use of biomechanical testing and multiphoton microscopy, we measured the multiscale mechanical behavior of human SST in shear before and after elastase treatment. Three distinct SST regions showed similar stresses and microscale deformation. Collagen fiber reorganization and sliding were physical mechanisms observed as the SST response to shear loading. Measures of microscale deformation were highly variable, likely due to a high degree of extracellular matrix heterogeneity. After elastase treatment, tendon exhibited significantly decreased stresses under shear loading, particularly at low strains. These results show that elastin contributes to tendon mechanics in shear, further complementing our understanding of multiscale tendon structure-function relationships. PMID:27472764

  15. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... the length of the tendon when walking or running. Your pain and stiffness might increase in the ... or decrease activities that cause pain, such as running or jumping. Do activities that do not strain ...

  16. Pectoralis Major Tendon Repair Post Surgical Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Prohaska, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Pectoralis major tendon rupture is a rare shoulder injury, most commonly seen in weight lifters. This injury is being seen more regularly due to the increased emphasis on healthy lifestyles. Surgical repair of the pectoralis major tendon rupture has been shown to provide superior outcomes regarding strength return. Thus it appears that surgical repair is the treatment of choice for those wishing to return to competitive or recreational athletic activity. This article describes the history and physical examination process for the athlete with pectoralis tendon major rupture. Surgical vs conservative treatment will be discussed. This manuscript provides post surgical treatment guidelines that can be followed after surgical repair of the pectoralis tendon rupture. PMID:21522200

  17. Position Control of Tendon-Driven Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Hargrave, B.; Pementer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, tendon-driven manipulators implement some force control scheme based on tension feedback. This feedback allows the system to ensure that the tendons are maintained taut with proper levels of tensioning at all times. Occasionally, whether it is due to the lack of tension feedback or the inability to implement sufficiently high stiffnesses, a position control scheme is needed. This work compares three position controllers for tendon-driven manipulators. A new controller is introduced that achieves the best overall performance with regards to speed, accuracy, and transient behavior. To compensate for the lack of tension feedback, the controller nominally maintains the internal tension on the tendons by implementing a two-tier architecture with a range-space constraint. These control laws are validated experimentally on the Robonaut-2 humanoid hand. I

  18. Flexor tendon repair in zone III.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2011-01-01

    There is a paucity of the literature on the outcome of zone III flexor tendon injuries. In this paper, we report on the results of zone III flexor tendon repair in 35 consecutive adult patients with clean cut lacerations of both flexor tendons in 42 fingers. There were 25 men and 10 women with an average age of 32 years. Repair of both flexor tendons was performed using 'figure of eight' core sutures and a continuous epitendinous suture. Postoperatively, an immediate active range of motion protocol was applied to ensure full active extension of the interphalangeal joints. The results were assessed using the Strickland-Glogovac grading system. There were no ruptures. One patient with two injured fingers developed complex regional pain syndrome and the final outcome was fair in both fingers. In the remaining 34 patients (40 fingers), 33 patients (38 fingers) had an excellent outcome and the remaining patient (two fingers) had a good outcome. PMID:20807720

  19. [Flexor tendon repair: a short story].

    PubMed

    Moutet, F; Corcella, D; Forli, A; Mesquida, V

    2014-12-01

    This short story of flexor tendon repair aims to illustrate hesitations and wanderings of this surgery. Obviously tendon repair was very early considered, but it developed and diffused rather lately. It became a routine practice only in 20th century. This was due on the one hand, in Occident, to the Galen's dogmatic interdiction, on the other hand, to the repair difficulties of this paradoxical structure. Actually tendon is made of fibroblasts and collagen (sticky substances), and then its only goal is to move. According to this necessity, whatever the used techniques are, gliding is the final purpose. Technical evolutions are illustrated by historical contributions to flexor tendon surgery of several "giants" of hand surgery. PMID:24837978

  20. Structure of the tendon connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P

    2000-12-01

    Tendons consist of collagen (mostly type I collagen) and elastin embedded in a proteoglycan-water matrix with collagen accounting for 65-80% and elastin approximately 1-2% of the dry mass of the tendon. These elements are produced by tenoblasts and tenocytes, which are the elongated fibroblasts and fibrocytes that lie between the collagen fibers, and are organized in a complex hierarchical scheme to form the tendon proper. Soluble tropocollagen molecules form cross-links to create insoluble collagen molecules which then aggregate progressively into microfibrils and then into electronmicroscopically clearly visible units, the collagen fibrils. A bunch of collagen fibrils forms a collagen fiber, which is the basic unit of a tendon. A fine sheath of connective tissue called endotenon invests each collagen fiber and binds fibers together. A bunch of collagen fibers forms a primary fiber bundle, and a group of primary fiber bundles forms a secondary fiber bundle. A group of secondary fiber bundles, in turn, forms a tertiary bundle, and the tertiary bundles make up the tendon. The entire tendon is surrounded by a fine connective tissue sheath called epitenon. The three-dimensional ultrastructure of tendon fibers and fiber bundles is complex. Within one collagen fiber, the fibrils are oriented not only longitudinally but also transversely and horizontally. The longitudinal fibers do not run only parallel but also cross each other, forming spirals. Some of the individual fibrils and fibril groups form spiral-type plaits. The basic function of the tendon is to transmit the force created by the muscle to the bone, and, in this way, make joint movement possible. The complex macro- and microstructure of tendons and tendon fibers make this possible. During various phases of movements, the tendons are exposed not only to longitudinal but also to transversal and rotational forces. In addition, they must be prepared to withstand direct contusions and pressures. The above

  1. [Tendinosis and ruptures of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2012-02-01

    Tendinosis of the Achilles tendon is a degenerative-reparative structural change of the tendon with microdefects, increases in cross-section due to cicatricial tendon regeneration, neoangiogenesis and reduction of elasticity. The previously used term tendinitis is only rarely used for the chronic form since signs of inflammation such as redness and hyperthermia or elevated levels of inflammatory parameters on laboratory testing are generally absent. Duplex sonography with visualization of the neovascularization has become a valuable supplement not only for diagnostics but also for therapy planning. The classic, conservative therapy for painful tendinosis consists of oral anti-inflammatory drugs, pain-adapted load reduction, raising the heel, stretching the calf musculature, and various physiotherapeutic interventions. When conservative treatment over a period of 4 - 6 months fails to produce any or non-adequate pain relief, an indication for surgical treatment should be considered. In the therapy for fresh ruptures of the Achilles tendon further developments in minimally invasive techniques have led to a worldwide paradigm change over the past 10 years. The decisive advantage of minimally invasive surgical techniques is the lower risk of wound infection as compared to the sutures of the open technique. When compared with conservative functional therapy the minimally invasive repair has the advantage of being less dependent on the compliance of the patient since, in the early phase of tendon healing the suture prevents a separation of the tendon ends upon controlled movements. However, not every patient with a ruptured Achilles tendon should be treated with a minimally invasive repair. Open tendon reconstruction and functional conservative therapy are still justified when the correct indication is given. PMID:22344862

  2. Dynamic ultrasound of peroneal tendon instability.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Guillo, Stéphane; Poussange, Nicolas; Pele, Eric; Meyer, Philippe; Dallaudière, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    Ankle snapping may be caused by peroneal tendon instability. Anterior instability occurs after traumatic superior peroneal retinaculum injury, whereas peroneal tendon intrasheath subluxation is atraumatic. Whereas subluxation is mainly dynamic, ultrasound allows for the diagnosis and classification of peroneal instability because it allows for real-time exploration. The purpose of this review is to describe the anatomic and physiologic bases for peroneal instability and to heighten the role of dynamic ultrasound in the diagnosis of snapping. PMID:26943704

  3. Grasp Assist Device with Shared Tendon Actuator Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bergelin, Bryan J. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A grasp assist device includes a glove with first and second tendon-driven fingers, a tendon, and a sleeve with a shared tendon actuator assembly. Tendon ends are connected to the respective first and second fingers. The actuator assembly includes a drive assembly having a drive axis and a tendon hook. The tendon hook, which defines an arcuate surface slot, is linearly translatable along the drive axis via the drive assembly, e.g., a servo motor thereof. The flexible tendon is routed through the surface slot such that the surface slot divides the flexible tendon into two portions each terminating in a respective one of the first and second ends. The drive assembly may include a ball screw and nut. An end cap of the actuator assembly may define two channels through which the respective tendon portions pass. The servo motor may be positioned off-axis with respect to the drive axis.

  4. Acute Patellar Tendon Rupture after Total Knee Arthroplasty Revision

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seung Joon; Pham, The Hien

    2015-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a catastrophic complication following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Though revision TKA has been suspected of being a predisposing factor for the occurrence of patellar tendon rupture, there are few reports on patellar tendon rupture after revision TKA. Here, we present a case of acute patellar tendon rupture that occurred after TKA revision. In the patient, the patellar tendon was so thin and could not be repaired, and accordingly was sutured end to end. We used the anterior tibialis tendon allograft to augment the poor quality patellar tendon tissue. Fixation of the allograft was done by using the bone tunnel created through tibial tuberosity and suturing the allograft to the patellar tendon and quadriceps tendon. The patient was instructed to wear a full extension knee splint and was kept non-weight bearing for 6 weeks after operation. Full knee extension could be achieved 6 weeks postoperatively. PMID:26060612

  5. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  6. The cell biology of suturing tendons

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J.K.F.; Alyouha, S.; Kadler, K.E.; Ferguson, M.W.J.; McGrouther, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Trauma by suturing tendon form areas devoid of cells termed “acellular zones” in the matrix. This study aimed to characterise the cellular insult of suturing and acellular zone formation in mouse tendon. Acellular zone formation was evaluated using single grasping sutures placed using flexor tendons with time lapse cell viability imaging for a period of 12 h. Both tension and injury were required to induce cell death and cell movement in the formation of the acellular zone. DNA fragmentation studies and transmission electron microscopy indicated that cells necrosed. Parallel in vivo studies showed that cell-to-cell contacts were disrupted following grasping by the suture in tensioned tendon. Without tension, cell death was lessened and cell-to-cell contacts remained intact. Quantitative immunohistochemistry and 3D cellular profile mapping of wound healing markers over a one year time course showed that acellular zones arise rapidly and showed no evidence of healing whilst the wound healing response occurred in the surrounding tissues. The acellular zones were also evident in a standard modified “Kessler” clinical repair. In conclusion, the suture repair of injured tendons produces acellular zones, which may potentially cause early tendon failure. PMID:20600895

  7. The cell biology of suturing tendons.

    PubMed

    Wong, J K F; Alyouha, S; Kadler, K E; Ferguson, M W J; McGrouther, D A

    2010-07-01

    Trauma by suturing tendon form areas devoid of cells termed "acellular zones" in the matrix. This study aimed to characterise the cellular insult of suturing and acellular zone formation in mouse tendon. Acellular zone formation was evaluated using single grasping sutures placed using flexor tendons with time lapse cell viability imaging for a period of 12h. Both tension and injury were required to induce cell death and cell movement in the formation of the acellular zone. DNA fragmentation studies and transmission electron microscopy indicated that cells necrosed. Parallel in vivo studies showed that cell-to-cell contacts were disrupted following grasping by the suture in tensioned tendon. Without tension, cell death was lessened and cell-to-cell contacts remained intact. Quantitative immunohistochemistry and 3D cellular profile mapping of wound healing markers over a one year time course showed that acellular zones arise rapidly and showed no evidence of healing whilst the wound healing response occurred in the surrounding tissues. The acellular zones were also evident in a standard modified "Kessler" clinical repair. In conclusion, the suture repair of injured tendons produces acellular zones, which may potentially cause early tendon failure. PMID:20600895

  8. Laminar Tendon Composites with Enhanced Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Kyle A.; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Illeperuma, Widusha R.; Suo, Zhigang; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A strong isotropic material that is both biocompatible and biodegradable is desired for many biomedical applications, including rotator cuff repair, tendon and ligament repair, vascular grafting, among others. Recently, we developed a technique, called “bioskiving” to create novel 2D and 3D constructs from decellularized tendon, using a combination of mechanical sectioning, and layered stacking and rolling. The unidirectionally aligned collagen nanofibers (derived from sections of decellularized tendon) offer good mechanical properties to the constructs compared with those fabricated from reconstituted collagen. Methods In this paper, we studied the effect that several variables have on the mechanical properties of structures fabricated from tendon slices, including crosslinking density and the orientation in which the fibers are stacked. Results We observed that following stacking and crosslinking, the strength of the constructs is significantly improved, with crosslinked sections having an ultimate tens ile strength over 20 times greater than non-crosslinked samples, and a modulus nearly 50 times higher. The mechanism of the mechanical failure mode of the tendon constructs with or without crosslinking was also investigated. Conclusions The strength and fiber organization, combined with the ability to introduce transversely isotropic mechanical properties makes the laminar tendon composites a biocompatiable material that may find future use in a number of biomedical and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25691802

  9. Reconstruction of a Severely Crushed Leg with Interpositional Vessel Grafts and Latissimus Dorsi Flap

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Woo; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Kim, Jeong Tae

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a near total amputation at the distal tibial level, in which the patient emphatically wanted to save the leg. The anterior and posterior tibial nerves were intact, indicating a high possibility of sensory recovery after revascularization. The patient had open fractures at the tibia and fibula, but no bone shortening was performed. The posterior tibial vessels were reconstructed with an interposition saphenous vein graft from the contralateral side and a usable anterior tibial artery graft from the undamaged ipsilateral distal portions. The skin and soft tissue defects were covered using a subatmospheric pressure system for demarcating the wound, and a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous free flap for definite coverage of the wound. At 6 months after surgery, the patient was ambulatory without requiring additional procedures. Replantation without bone shortening, with use of vessel grafts and temporary coverage of the wound with subatmospheric pressure dressings before definite coverage, can shorten recovery time. PMID:22872848

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of longissimus dorsi muscle in immuno- and surgically castrated male pigs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuebin; Li, Chunbao; Cao, Miaodan; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong; Xiong, Youling L

    2016-05-15

    We compared proteomic profiles of male pig muscles after active immunization against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and surgical castration. Longissimus dorsi samples were collected from immunocastration (IC) and surgical castration (SC) groups (n=15 each). Muscle proteins were extracted and then identified by data-independent label-free nano LC-MS/MS. A total of 610 proteins were identified, 50 of which were differentially expressed (P<0.05) between immuno- and surgical castration. Twenty-two of 50 differentially expressed proteins were higher in abundance for IC group and 27 proteins with abundance change folds greater than 1.5 differed with castration methods. Proteins involved in cytoskeleton and immunity were abundant in IC group. Several heat shock proteins (HSPs) and laminins were abundant in SC group. PMID:26776048

  11. Unusual Presentation of Elastofibroma Dorsi on 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Steve P.; Gariani, Joanna; Tabouret Viaud, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 70-year-old male patient underwent an Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography for staging of a left parahilar lung neoplasm found during work-up for fatigue and asthenia. The scan demonstrated a hypermetabolic lung tumor, a hypermetabolic pleural effusion and 4 hypermetabolic bilateral soft tissue lesions of the chest wall corresponding to 4 elastofibroma dorsi. Initially, the oncologic disease was classified as stage IV because of the hypermetabolic pleural effusion. A transbronchial biopsy showed squamous cell carcinoma and the cytology of the pleural effusion revealed no malignant cells. As the other 4 hypermetabolic thoracic wall lesions were correctly diagnosed as benign despite their unusual presentation, the patient underwent surgery by left pneumonectomy and mediastinal lymphadenectomy. The lymph node involvement required adjuvant chemotherapy. Diagnostic confidence of the benignity of the hypermetabolic chest wall lesions allowed a more aggressive treatment with a better outcome after a malignant pleural effusion was excluded. PMID:26886641

  12. Changes in meat quality of ovine longissimus dorsi muscle in response to repeated freeze and thaw.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jun; Li, Chunbao; Chen, Yinji; Gao, Feifei; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2012-12-01

    Changes in eating and technological quality attributes of ovine longissimus dorsi muscle during repeated freeze and thaw were investigated. Shear force value, L* value, a* value and fiber diameter decreased (P<0.05) but lipid oxidation increased (P<0.05) with repeated freeze-thaw cycles. Sarcomere length and pH decreased (P<0.05) within the first 10 freeze-thaw cycles but increased (P<0.05) after 5 further cycles. Total and myofibrillar protein solubility, and intramuscular free fatty acids concentration decreased (P<0.05) after 1 cycle of freeze and thaw but then increased (P<0.05) gradually with further cycles. Hardness, chewiness, cohesiveness and resilience of comminuted lamb products decreased (P<0.05) with increased freeze-thaw cycles. And therefore, repeated freeze and thaw should be minimized in terms of meat color for commercial value and water holding capacity for further processing. PMID:22749539

  13. Following rotator cuff tears, the remaining (intact) tendons are mechanically altered

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Stephanie M.; Getz, Charles L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Although presumed, damage in the remaining (intact) rotator cuff tendons in the presence of an isolated supraspinatus tendon tear or multiple tendon tear has not been well studied. This study utilized an animal model of multiple rotator cuff tendon tears to investigate alterations in the remaining (intact) tendon mechanical properties at 4 and 8 weeks post-injury. Twenty-four animals served as uninjured controls, while seventy-two were divided among the tendon detachment groups (supraspinatus tendon detachment, supraspinatus+infraspinatus tendon detachment, supraspinatus+subscapularis tendon detachment). We found the remaining (intact) rotator cuff tendons have decreased mechanical properties in the presence of rotator cuff tears. Remaining (intact) subscapularis and infraspinatus tendon cross-sectional area increased, while tendon modulus decreased after both one and two tendon tears. Additionally, the remaining (intact) tendon cross-sectional areas continued to increase with time post-injury. These alterations could potentially lead to further tendon damage and tear progression. PMID:19095175

  14. Achilles tendon disorders in runners--a review.

    PubMed

    Smart, G W; Taunton, J E; Clement, D B

    1980-01-01

    The Achilles tendon and the classification, etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and management of Achilles tendon disorders in runners are reviewed. Due to the presence of a paratenon sheath, the classification of Achilles tendon disease should be revised. Several etiological mechanisms have been proposed in Achilles tendon disease. The authors recognize: faulty foot biomechanics; poor lower leg flexibility; poorly designed athletic footwear; training surfaces; training intensity; overuse through excessive mileage; inactivity; local steroid injections; rheumatic conditions; and indirect violence. An accurate, thorough differential diagnosis is essential when the athlete presents with an Achilles tendon disorder. Except in total rupture and in extensive partial rupture, the authors do not recommend cast immobilization in the treatment of Achilles tendon disease. When the athlete presents with total rupture of the Achilles tendon, the authors believe that surgical repair is the treatment method of choice. Rehabilitation programs to follow successful treatment of Achilles tendon disease are also presented. PMID:6999281

  15. Nutritional research may be useful in treating tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Luke

    2016-06-01

    Tendon injures cause a great deal of disability and pain, and increase medical costs. However, relatively little is known about tendon biology and healing. Many tendon-related surgical procedures are not very successful and leave the patient with essentially a chronic injury. New therapeutic approaches for tendon injury are needed. Preliminary evidence suggests that various nutrients such as proteins, amino acids (leucine, arginine, glutamine), vitamins C and D, manganese, copper, zinc, and phytochemicals may be useful in improving tendon growth and healing. More research on nutrition and tendon health is needed. Because many nutrients are required for tendon health, nutritional interventions involving multiple nutrients may be more effective than single-nutrient strategies. In the future, ideal treatment regimens for tendon injuries may include a multifaceted "bundle" of nutrition, drugs, biologic products, extracellular matrix therapies, exercise/physical therapy, and possibly surgery. PMID:26921066

  16. Robot Arm with Tendon Connector Plate and Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor); Millerman, Alexander (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic system includes a tendon-driven end effector, a linear actuator, a flexible tendon, and a plate assembly. The linear actuator assembly has a servo motor and a drive mechanism, the latter of which translates linearly with respect to a drive axis of the servo motor in response to output torque from the servo motor. The tendon connects to the end effector and drive mechanism. The plate assembly is disposed between the linear actuator assembly and the tendon-driven end effector and includes first and second plates. The first plate has a first side that defines a boss with a center opening. The second plate defines an accurate through-slot having tendon guide channels. The first plate defines a through passage for the tendon between the center opening and a second side of the first plate. A looped end of the flexible tendon is received within the tendon guide channels.

  17. No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Bellan, Valeria; Wallwork, Sarah B.; Stanton, Tasha R.; Reverberi, Carlo; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    The tendon vibration illusion has been extensively used to manipulate the perceived position of one’s own body part. However, findings from previous research do not seem conclusive sregarding the perceptual effect of the concurrent stimulation of both agonist and antagonist tendons over one joint. On the basis of recent data, it has been suggested that this paired stimulation generates an inconsistent signal about the limb position, which leads to a perceived shrinkage of the limb. However, this interesting effect has never been replicated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of a simultaneous and equal vibration of the biceps and triceps tendons on the perceived location of the hand. Experiment 1 replicated and extended the previous findings. We compared a dual tendon stimulation condition with single tendon stimulation conditions and with a control condition (no vibration) on both ‘upward-downward’ and ‘towards-away from the elbow’ planes. Our results show a mislocalisation towards the elbow of the position of the vibrated arm during dual vibration, in line with previous results; however, this did not clarify whether the effect was due to arm representation contraction (i.e., a ‘telescoping’ effect). Therefore, in Experiment 2 we investigated explicitly and implicitly the perceived arm length during the same conditions. Our results clearly suggest that in all the vibration conditions there was a mislocalisation of the entire arm (including the elbow), but no evidence of a contraction of the perceived arm length. PMID:27305112

  18. Adeno-associated virus-2-mediated TGF-β1 microRNA transfection inhibits adhesion formation after digital flexor tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y F; Mao, W F; Zhou, Y L; Wang, X T; Liu, P Y; Tang, J B

    2016-02-01

    Adhesion formation after digital flexor tendon injury greatly affects gliding function of the tendon, which is a major clinical complication after hand surgery. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) has a critical role in adhesion formation during tendon healing. Persistent regulation of TGF-β1 through application of microRNA (miRNA) specifically inhibiting the function of TGF-β1 (TGF-β1-miRNA) holds promise for treatment of such a complication. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) was used to transfer TGF-β1-miRNA to the chicken digital flexor tendons, which had been injured and surgically repaired. Four doses of AAV2-TGF-β1-miRNA (2 × 10(11), 2 × 10(10), 2 × 10(9) and 2 × 10(8) vector genomes (vg)) were used to determine the transfection efficiency. At postoperative 3 weeks, we found a positive correlation between the administered AAV2-TGF-β1-miRNA doses and transfection efficiency. The transfection rate ranged from 10% to 77% as the doses increased. Production of TGF-β1 protein in the tendons decreased on increasing vector dosage. When 2 × 10(11) and 2 × 10(10) vg were injected into the tendon, gliding excursion of the repaired tendon and work of flexion of chicken toes were significantly increased and adhesion score decreased 6 and 8 weeks later, indicating the improvement of tendon gliding and decreases in adhesion formations. However, the ultimate strength of the tendons transfected at the dose of 2 × 10(10) vg was 12-24% lower than that of the control tendons. The results of this study demonstrate that application of TGF-β1-miRNA had a mixed impact on tendon healing: adhesion around the tendon is reduced but strength of the tendon healing is adversely affected. Future studies should aim at maintaining the beneficial effects of reducing tendon adhesions, while eliminating the adverse effects of decreasing the healing strength. PMID:26381218

  19. Vascular changes in the ruptured Achilles tendon and paratenon.

    PubMed

    Kvist, M; Józsa, L; Järvinen, M

    1992-01-01

    Thirty patients with ruptures of the Achilles tendon were studied. There were 21 men and 9 women with an average age of 36 years. Specimens from the tendon and paratenon in 24 were examined histologically. Tissue samples of 20 were studied by electron microscopy. Marked degenerative, obliterative and/or inflammatory vascular changes were found in all the ruptured tendons and their paratenon. Our findings indicate that poor vascularity play a role in the aetiology of rupture of the Achilles tendon. PMID:1473893

  20. p38 MAPK Signaling in Postnatal Tendon Growth and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Sarver, Dylan C.; Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Dzierzawski, Justin T.; Gumucio, Jonathan P.; Mendias, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon is a dynamic tissue whose structure and function is influenced by mechanical loading, but little is known about the fundamental mechanisms that regulate tendon growth and remodeling in vivo. Data from cultured tendon fibroblasts indicated that the p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in tendon fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis in vitro. To gain greater insight into the mechanisms of tendon growth, and explore the role of p38 MAPK signaling in this process, we tested the hypotheses that inducing plantaris tendon growth through the ablation of the synergist Achilles tendon would result in rapid expansion of a neotendon matrix surrounding the original tendon, and that treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 would prevent this growth. Rats were treated with vehicle or SB203580, and subjected to synergist ablation by bilateral tenectomy of the Achilles tendon. Changes in histological and biochemical properties of plantaris tendons were analyzed 3, 7, or 28 days after overload, and comparisons were made to non-overloaded animals. By 28 days after overload, tendon mass had increased by 30% compared to non-overloaded samples, and cross-sectional area (CSA) increased by around 50%, with most of the change occurring in the neotendon. The expansion in CSA initially occurred through the synthesis of a hyaluronic acid rich matrix that was progressively replaced with mature collagen. Pericytes were present in areas of active tendon growth, but never in the original tendon ECM. Inhibition of p38 MAPK resulted in a profound decrease in IL6 expression, and had a modest effect on the expression of other ECM and cell proliferation genes, but had a negligible impact on overall tendon growth. The combined results from this study provided novel insights into tendon mechanobiology, and suggest that p38 MAPK signaling does not appear to be necessary for tendon growth in vivo. PMID:25768932

  1. Tendon neuroplastic training: changing the way we think about tendon rehabilitation: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Ebonie; Kidgell, Dawson; Moseley, G Lorimer; Docking, Sean; Purdam, Craig; Cook, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy can be resistant to treatment and often recurs, implying that current treatment approaches are suboptimal. Rehabilitation programmes that have been successful in terms of pain reduction and return to sport outcomes usually include strength training. Muscle activation can induce analgesia, improving self-efficacy associated with reducing one's own pain. Furthermore, strength training is beneficial for tendon matrix structure, muscle properties and limb biomechanics. However, current tendon rehabilitation may not adequately address the corticospinal control of the muscle, which may result in altered control of muscle recruitment and the consequent tendon load, and this may contribute to recalcitrance or symptom recurrence. Outcomes of interest include the effect of strength training on tendon pain, corticospinal excitability and short interval cortical inhibition. The aims of this concept paper are to: (1) review what is known about changes to the primary motor cortex and motor control in tendinopathy, (2) identify the parameters shown to induce neuroplasticity in strength training and (3) align these principles with tendon rehabilitation loading protocols to introduce a combination approach termed as tendon neuroplastic training. Strength training is a powerful modulator of the central nervous system. In particular, corticospinal inputs are essential for motor unit recruitment and activation; however, specific strength training parameters are important for neuroplasticity. Strength training that is externally paced and akin to a skilled movement task has been shown to not only reduce tendon pain, but modulate excitatory and inhibitory control of the muscle and therefore, potentially tendon load. An improved understanding of the methods that maximise the opportunity for neuroplasticity may be an important progression in how we prescribe exercise-based rehabilitation in tendinopathy for pain modulation and potentially restoration of the corticospinal

  2. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a... flexor tendon of the hand. The device is implanted for a period of 2 to 6 months to aid growth of a new tendon sheath. The device is not intended as a permanent implant nor to function as a replacement for...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a... flexor tendon of the hand. The device is implanted for a period of 2 to 6 months to aid growth of a new tendon sheath. The device is not intended as a permanent implant nor to function as a replacement for...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a... flexor tendon of the hand. The device is implanted for a period of 2 to 6 months to aid growth of a new tendon sheath. The device is not intended as a permanent implant nor to function as a replacement for...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or a... flexor tendon of the hand. The device is implanted for a period of 2 to 6 months to aid growth of a new tendon sheath. The device is not intended as a permanent implant nor to function as a replacement for...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  7. Effect of pulley excision on flexor tendon biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Peterson, W W; Manske, P R; Bollinger, B A; Lesker, P A; McCarthy, J A

    1986-01-01

    Flexor tendon function following excision of various portions of the fibro-osseous pulley system was measured biomechanically using a tensile testing machine. The biomechanical parameters measured were tendon excursion (the excursion of the tendon required to fully flex the digit) and work of flexion (the area under the force-excursion curve, representing all the forces that resist tendon flexion). In this experiment, work of flexion included the forces necessary to accomplish full digital flexion against a 15-g counter-weight, as well as the frictional forces that resist tendon gliding. The results indicate that the work of flexion was affected to a greater degree by pulley loss than was tendon excursion, suggesting that it is a more sensitive measurement of tendon function. A2 was found to be the single most important pulley for flexor tendon function, followed by A4. However, both A2 and A4 had to be present if near-normal hand function was to be achieved; sacrificing the A1 pulley was not associated with a significant loss of flexion. The "pulley effect" of the skin and soft tissue as a supplement to the fibro-osseous pulleys in reducing tendon bow-stringing was also noted. Although the parameters of tendon excursion and work of flexion were used in this study to determine the effect of pulley loss on tendon function, they can also be used to evaluate other flexor tendon studies, such as pulley reconstruction. PMID:3950813

  8. Biodegradable synthetic scaffolds for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reverchon, Ernesto; Baldino, Lucia; Cardea, Stefano; De Marco, Iolanda

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue regeneration is aimed at producing biological or synthetic scaffolds to be implanted in the body for regenerate functional tissues. Several techniques and materials have been used to obtain biodegradable synthetic scaffolds, on which adhesion, growth, migration and differentiation of human cells has been attempted. Scaffolds for tendon regeneration have been less frequently proposed, because they have a complex hierarchical structure and it is very difficult to mimic their peculiar mechanical properties. In this review, we critically analyzed the proposed materials and fabrication techniques for tendon tissue engineering and we indicated new preparation processes, based on the use of supercritical fluids, to produce scaffolds with characteristics very similar to the native tendon structure. PMID:23738295

  9. Ultrasonic properties of tendon: velocity, attenuation, and backscattering in equine digital flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Miles, C A

    1996-05-01

    Ultrasound velocity, attenuation, and backscattering were measured in vitro in samples of equine digital flexor tendon sandwiched between plane, parallel rexolite buffer rods. The buffer rods were coupled to transmitting and receiving transducers (nominally 10 MHz) mounted in-line and facing one another on the jaws of a digital caliper. Six superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendons and six deep digital flexor (DDF) tendons were measured in three orthogonal directions: along the long axis of the tendon (D), and across the tendon in the dorsal-volar (C), and lateral (L) directions. Substantial anisotropy was apparent in all the measured properties. The velocity data, which in both tendons showed a higher velocity along the fibers than across (e.g., in the DDF tendon at 0 degrees C: 1713 +/- 9 m/s in the D direction compared with 1650 +/- 5 m/s in the C direction), were consistent with a composite comprising stiff fibers embedded in a less stiff medium of lower speed. The apparent backscattering coefficient adjusted for the tissue's frequency-dependent attenuation (e.g., in the C direction of the DDF tendon at 0 degrees C: 7.4 x 10(-3) cm-1 sr-1), was independent of frequency in both transverse directions and larger than that measured along the long axis of the tendon (e.g., in DDF tendon at 0 degrees C: 1.2 x 10(-3) cm-1 sr-1 at 7 MHz) in which direction the apparent backscattering coefficient increased with frequency as f4.0 +/- 1.2. The frequency-independent backscattering was thought to be due to specular reflection from the boundaries between the fascicles, i.e., the bundles of fibers making up the tendon, while backscattering along the axis was due to structures of unknown origin, but of a size much smaller than 45 microns. Attenuation of ultrasound directed along the fibers was higher than that across (at 7 MHz in DDF tendon at 0 degrees C: 58 dB/cm in the D direction compared with 11.3 dB/cm in the C direction). Calculations indicated that the attenuation was

  10. Anabolic and Catabolic Signaling Pathways in mouse Longissimus Dorsi after 30-day BION-M1 Spaceflight and Subsequent Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoev, Timur; Blottner, Dieter; Shenkman, Boris; Lomonosova, Yulia; Vilchinskaya, Natalia; Nemirovskaya, Tatiana; Salanova, Michele

    The aim of the study was to analyze some of the key markers regulating anabolic and catabolic processes in mouse m. longissimus dorsi, an important back muscle system for trunk stabilization, following 30-day spaceflight and 8-day recovery period. C57/black mice were divided into 3 groups: 1) Vivarium Control (n=7), 2) Flight (n=5), 3) Recovery (n=5). The experiment was carried out in accordance with the rules of biomedical ethics certified by the Russian Academy of Sciences Committee on Bioethics. Using Western-blotting analysis we determined the content of IRS-1, p-AMPK, MURF-1 and eEF2 in m. longissimus dorsi. The content of IRS-1 in mice m. longissimus dorsi after the 30-day flight did not differ from the control group, however, in the Recovery group IRS-1 level was 80% higher (p<0.05) as compared to Control. Phospho-AMPK content remained unchanged. In the Recovery group there was an increase of eEF2 by 75% compared to the Control (p<0.05). After spaceflight MuRF-1 content was increased more than 2 times compared to the control animals. Thus, our findings showed that the work of the IRS-1 - dependent signaling pathway is only active in the recovery period. The content of the ubiquitin-ligase MURF-1 that takes parts in degrading myosin heavy chain was increased after the spaceflight, however, after 8-day recovery period MURF-1 level did not exceed the control indicating normalization of protein degradation in m. longissimus dorsi. The work was supported by the program of basic research of RAS and Federal Space Program of Russia for the period of 2006-2015.

  11. Tendon and ligament injuries: the genetic component

    PubMed Central

    September, Alison V; Schwellnus, Martin P; Collins, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments within the upper and lower limbs are some of the more common sites of musculoskeletal injuries during physical activity. Several extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been shown to be associated with these injuries. More recently, studies have suggested that there is also, at least in part, a genetic component to the Achilles tendon, rotator cuff and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. However, specific genes have not been suggested to be associated with rotator cuff or anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Sequence variants of the tenascin C (TNC) gene, on the other hand, have been shown to be associated with Achilles tendinopathies and Achilles tendon ruptures, whereas a variant of the collagen V α 1 (COL5A1) gene has also been shown to be associated with Achilles tendinopathies. Both genes encode for important structural components of tendons and ligaments. The COL5A1 gene encodes for a component of type V collagen, which has an important role in regulating collagen fibre assembly and fibre diameters. The TNC gene, on the other hand, encodes for TNC, which regulates the tissue's response to mechanical load. To date, only variants in two genes have been shown to be associated with Achilles tendon injuries. In addition, although specific genes have not been identified, investigators have suggested that there is also a genetic component to both rotator cuff and anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In future, specific genotypes associated with increased risk of injury to specific tendons and ligaments can prevent these injuries by identifying individuals at higher risk. PMID:17261551

  12. Scalp reconstruction by microvascular free tissue transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Furnas, H.; Lineaweaver, W.C.; Alpert, B.S. )

    1990-05-01

    We report on a series of patients with scalp defects who have been treated with a variety of free flaps, spanning the era of microvascular free tissue transfer from its incipient stages to the present. Between 1971 and 1987, 18 patients underwent scalp reconstruction with 21 free flaps: 11 latissimus dorsi, 3 scalp transfers between identical twins, 3 groin, one combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior, two serratus anterior, and one omentum. These flaps were used to cover scalp defects resulting from burns, trauma, radiation, and tumors in patients ranging from 7 to 79 years of age. Follow-up has ranged from 3 weeks to 7 years. All of our flaps survived and covered complex defects, many of which had failed more conservative attempts at cover. One patient received radiation therapy to his flap without unfavorable sequelae. This experience began with a pioneering omental flap and includes cutaneous and muscle flaps. The latissimus dorsi is our first choice for free flap reconstruction of extensive, complicated scalp wounds because of its large size, predictable blood supply, ease of harvesting, and provision of excellent vascularity to compromised beds.

  13. CT scanning carcases has no detrimental effect on the colour stability of M. longissimus dorsi from beef and sheep.

    PubMed

    Jose, C G; Pethick, D W; Jacob, R H; Gardner, G E

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of computerised tomography imaging (CT scan), for carcase composition determination, on the oxy/metmyoglobin ratio, hue and L(∗), a(∗) and b(∗) scores of M. longissimus dorsi from both beef and lamb. Beef and lamb M. longissimus dorsi were divided into four proportions and randomly allocated to one of the following treatments; CT 30 day aged; CT fresh; control 30 day aged; control fresh. Colour measurements were made over a 96h retail display period. CT scan had little effect on the colour of both lamb and beef across all colour parameters. There was a small negative affect observed in CT aged samples (P<0.05) for ratio, hue, a(∗) and b(∗) values, however these differences were so small that they are unlikely to impact upon the commercial shelf-life of the product. Other factors such as aging, species and vitamin E concentration play a much greater role in colour stability than CT. Aged M. longissimus dorsi clearly had a worse colour stability than the fresh packaged samples, while beef was a lot more colour stable than lamb. It appears that CT scan for the purpose of body composition determination will not have any commercially relevant impact on colour stability of both beef and lamb. PMID:22063980

  14. Expression of MMP-1, -2, and -8 in longissimus dorsi muscle and their relationship with meat quality traits in cattle.

    PubMed

    Qi, Y X; Zhang, X H; Wang, Y Q; Pang, Y Z; Zhang, Z B; Zhang, T L; Zhang, Z X

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the major macromolecule in skeletal muscle, which affects meat quality greatly. The remodeling of the ECM is mainly regulated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The expression patterns of MMP-1, -2, and -8 in longissimus dorsi muscle were explored using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results show that the expression of MMP-1, -2, and -8 decreased significantly from 135 days of pregnancy to postnatal 30 months. While the expression of MMP-1, -2, and -8 showed no significant relationships with intramuscular fat contents, MMP-1 and -2 showed significant negative correlations with the shearing force of the longissimus dorsi muscle in cattle. The expression of MMP-1 also showed a significant negative correlation with cooking loss and a positive correlation with water holding capacity. The expression levels of MMP-1 and -2 were usually higher in fat than in skeletal muscle tissue. The expression of MMP-8 was significantly higher in the mammary fat pad and the longissimus dorsi muscle than in all other tissues. This study indicates that the remodeling of the ECM has important effects both on the development of postnatal skeletal muscle and on meat quality. PMID:26985938

  15. [Comprehensive treatment in Achilles tendon rupture].

    PubMed

    Matus-Jiménez, Juan; Avalos, Cecilia Henríquez

    2007-01-01

    Due to incapacity caused by calcaneal tendon injuries for the reintegration of patients back to their daily activities and/or sparts it is necessary to decrease the time of reinstatement of patients. At present these times have improved by a good surgical technique and an early rehabilitation, and the patient is returned quickly as he sees less disability. It is proposed in this paper a type of surgical treatment and an early rehabilitation program, which have shortened the time of disability and incorporation to their daily activities and sports to eight weeks in 10 patients with Achilles tendon plasty. PMID:18159917

  16. [Isolated injury of the subscapular muscle tendon].

    PubMed

    Thielemann, F W; Kley, U; Holz, U

    1992-03-01

    Avulsion of the subscapularis tendon is caused by a combined abduction and external rotation trauma of the upper limb. Weakness of internal rotation and a positive apprehension test are clinical signs of the injury. A fracture of the lesser tuberosity in the x-ray film or a disruption of the subscapularis tendon documented in dynamic sonography of the shoulder clarify the diagnosis. Operative treatment is indicated of prevent weakness of internal rotation as well as anterior instability. This recommendation is supported by four cases with full range of motion and good anterior stability after surgery. PMID:1585252

  17. A new device for flexor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Dymarczyk, M

    2001-01-01

    Managing the treatment of patients with zone II flexor tendon injuries for successful outcomes has always been a challenge for the hand therapist. Working closely with the patient to help ensure follow-through with the protocol is frequently necessary. If a patient is compliant, the therapist's concern then becomes one of "scar wars" (to use a phrase coined by Ken Flowers). Early active range of motion and tendon gliding are critical parts of most programs. This author has developed a new idea in conjunction with the Indiana Hand Center protocol. PMID:11511017

  18. An unusual cause of Achilles tendon xanthoma.

    PubMed

    Parente, Fabienne; Vesnaver, Matthew; Massie, Rami; Baass, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Tendinous xanthomas are often thought to be pathognomonic for familial hypercholesterolemia. In this report, we present the case of a young man with a normal lipid profile and Achilles tendon xanthoma. Biochemical and genetic studies confirmed the diagnosis of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis in this patient. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with xanthoma in tendons and the brain as well as progressive neurologic deficits. Unfortunately, this rare form of reversible dementia is thought to be underdiagnosed. Early diagnosis and treatment of this disease with chenodeoxycholic acid is essential and has been shown to greatly improve the patient's symptoms and prognosis. PMID:27578138

  19. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Ja’afreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  20. Differential Adhesion Selection for Enrichment of Tendon-Derived Progenitor Cells During In Vitro Culture.

    PubMed

    Durgam, Sushmitha; Schuster, Brooke; Cymerman, Anna; Stewart, Allison; Stewart, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Preplating, a technique used to separate rapidly adherent fibroblasts from the less-adherent progenitor cells, has been used successfully to isolate skeletal muscle-derived stem cells. The objective of this study was to determine if preplating could also be applied to enrich tendon-derived progenitor cells (TDPCs) before monolayer expansion. Cell suspensions obtained by collagenase digestion of equine lateral digital extensor tendon were serially transferred into adherent plates every 12 h for 4 days. TDPC fractions obtained from initial (TPP0), third (TPP3), and seventh (TPP7) preplate were passaged twice and used for subsequent analyses. Growth/proliferation and basal tenogenic gene expression of the three TDPC fractions were largely similar. Preplating and subsequent monolayer expansion did not alter the immunophenotype (CD29(+), CD44(+), CD90(+), and CD45(-)) and trilineage differentiation capacity of TDPC fractions. Overall, TDPCs were robustly osteogenic, but exhibited comparatively weak adipogenic and chondrogenic capacities. These outcomes indicate that preplating does not enrich for tendon-derived progenitors during in vitro culture, and "whole tendon digest"-derived cells are as appropriate for cell-based therapies. PMID:27406327

  1. Application of lariat lock catch knot suture in the achilles tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baocang; Feng, Xiaona; Yan, Ming; Wang, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to summarize the clinical experience of repairing the Achilles tendon rupture by lariat lock catch knot suture. Between January 2011 and February, 2014, 32 cases of the Achilles tendon rupture were treated by lariat lock catch knot suture. There were 26 males and 6 females, with the average age of 39 years (range 17-53 years), including 13 left knees and 19 right knees. 29 wounds healed by first intention, and 3 cases who were performed local flap transfer due to necrosis of skin were healed by second intention. Thirty-two cases were followed up 10-25 months (13 months on average). No re-rupture of Achilles tendon or deep infection occurred during follow-up period. According to Arner-Lindholm assessment standard, the results were excellent in 19 cases and good in 13 cases, the excellent and good rate was 100%. Lariat lock catch knot suture is a safe and effective method for repairing Achilles tendon. PMID:26770612

  2. Mechanical properties of UV irradiated rat tail tendon (RTT) collagen.

    PubMed

    Sionkowska, Alina; Wess, Tim

    2004-04-01

    The mechanical properties of RTT collagen tendon before and after UV irradiation have been investigated by mechanical testing (Instron). Air-dried tendon were submitted to treatment with UV irradiation (wavelength 254 nm) for different time intervals. The changes in such mechanical properties as breaking strength and percentage elongation have been investigated. The results have shown, that the mechanical properties of the tendon were greatly affected by time of UV irradiation. Ultimate tensile strength and ultimate percentage elongation decreased after UV irradiation of the tendon. Increasing UV irradiation leads to a decrease in Young's modulus of the tendon. PMID:15178003

  3. The role of animal models in tendon research

    PubMed Central

    Hast, M. W.; Zuskov, A.; Soslowsky, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a debilitating musculoskeletal condition which can cause significant pain and lead to complete rupture of the tendon, which often requires surgical repair. Due in part to the large spectrum of tendon pathologies, these disorders continue to be a clinical challenge. Animal models are often used in this field of research as they offer an attractive framework to examine the cascade of processes that occur throughout both tendon pathology and repair. This review discusses the structural, mechanical, and biological changes that occur throughout tendon pathology in animal models, as well as strategies for the improvement of tendon healing. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:193–202. PMID:24958818

  4. A Rare Case of Simultaneous Acute Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Unilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Wei Yee; Gheorghiu, Daniel; Rao, Janardhan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: There have been multiple reported cases of bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures (QTR) in the literature. These injuries frequently associated with delayed diagnosis, which results in delayed surgical treatment. In very unusual cases, bilateral QTRs can be associated with other simultaneous tendon ruptures. Case Report: We present a rare case of bilateral QTR with a simultaneous Achilles Tendon Rupture involving a 31 years old Caucasian man who is a semi-professional body builder taking anabolic steroids. To date bilateral QTR with additional TA rupture has only been reported once in the literature and to our knowledge this is the first reported case of bilateral QTR and simultaneous TA rupture in a young, fit and healthy individual. Conclusion: The diagnosis of bilateral QTR alone can sometimes be challenging and the possibility of even further tendon injuries should be carefully assessed. A delay in diagnosis could result in delay in treatment and potentially worse outcome for the patient. PMID:27298913

  5. Tendon Injuries of the Hand in Kirikkale, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Elif

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tendon injuries are one of the most common injuries of the hand and challenging problems in trauma surgery. They usually require surgical repair and unlike the single tendon injuries, flexor tendon injuries have higher morbidities when accompanied with nerve injuries. In the present study, I aimed to report the clinical experiences and outcomes about tendon injuries. METHODS A total of 180 patients (149 males, 31 females) between 17 and 56 years old were operated in the clinic due to tendon injury. Seventy isolated extensor tendon injuries, 60 isolated flexor tendon injuries, 30 multiple flexor tendon and major nerve injuries, 18 combined extensor and flexor tendon injuries, and 2 combined extensor, flexor and major nerve injuries were treated. All patients were admitted to the clinic in acute phase and operated immediately. Physiotherapy was started in the third day of the operation. RESULTS Patients were followed up between 6 and 18 months (mean 12.4 months). There was not any major complications except one female patient (0.5%) who did not conform to the treatment protocol after flexor tendon injury. Fifteen patients (8.5%) had poor flexor range of motion. The other patients were healed uneventfully. CONCLUSION Tendon healing may cause some complications from mild to severe degrees. However, atraumatic surgery and a comprehensive postoperative early physiotherapy could decrease these complication rates.

  6. Changes in Activation of Serratus Anterior, Trapezius and Latissimus Dorsi With Slouched Posture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seok Tae; Moon, Jinkyoo; Lee, Seung Hoon; Cho, Kye Hee; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, MinYoung

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare quantitative muscle activation between erect and slouched sitting postures in the muscles around the scapula, and to investigate the correlation between the angle of thoracic kyphosis and the alteration of muscle activity depending on two different sitting postures. Methods Ten healthy males participated in the study. Unilateral surface electromyography (SEMG) was performed for serratus anterior, middle trapezius (MT), and lower trapezius (LT), which are scapular stabilizer muscles, as well as latissimus dorsi. Participants elevated their shoulders for 3 seconds up to 90° abduction in the scapular plane, tilting 30° anterior in the coronal plane. They were told to hold the position for 10 seconds and voluntary isometric contractions were recorded by SEMG. These movement procedures were conducted for three times each for erect and slouched sitting postures and data were averaged. Results Activities of MT and LT increased significantly more in the slouched sitting posture than in the erect one. There was no significant correlation between kyphotic angle and the area under curve of each muscle. Conclusion Because MT and LT are known as prime movers of scapular rotation, the findings of this study support the notion that slouched sitting posture affects scapular movement. Such scapular dyskinesis during arm elevation leads to scapular stabilizers becoming overactive, and is relevant to muscle fatigue. Thus, slouched sitting posture could be one of the risk factors involved in musculoskeletal pain around scapulae. PMID:27152283

  7. Elastofibroma dorsi: a case report with an immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Kakudo, Natsuko; Morimoto, Naoki; Ogawa, Takeshi; Hihara, Masakatsu; Koseki, Rina; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Elastofibroma is a rare, benign, fibrous tumor formed by the proliferation of characteristic elastic fibers that commonly occurs between the lower margin of the scapula and the ribcage. We undertook a histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study of an elastofibroma dorsi beneath the right scapula of a 77-year-old woman. Tumor cells comprised collagen fiber bundles, numerous elastic fibers, and spindle cells resembling fibroblasts. The elastic and collagen fibers in the tumor were stained positively with Elastic van Gieson and Masson trichrome staining, respectively. Immunostaining showed that the fibroblasts were strongly positive for CD34, positive for vimentin, and weakly positive for α-smooth muscle actin. Ultrastructural observations revealed elastin and microfibrils between numerous irregularly arranged collagen fiber bundles. Signs suggestive of elastin deposition were also evident in the tangled collagen fibers themselves. The fibroblasts contained a large amount of rough endoplasmic reticulum and were surrounded on the outside of cells by microfibrils and collagen fibers. Although fibroblasts may produce large quantities of elastin, microfibrils, and collagen, our findings suggested that the deposition of elastin on collagen fibers may be involved in the formation of abnormal elastic fibers. PMID:26040573

  8. Spectral absorption index in hyperspectral image analysis for predicting moisture contents in pork longissimus dorsi muscles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Sun, Da-Wen; Pu, Hongbin

    2016-04-15

    Spectral absorption index was proposed to extract the morphological features of the spectral curves in pork meat samples (longissimus dorsi) under the conditions including fresh, frozen-thawed, heated-dehydrated and brined-dehydrated. Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were used for calibrating both the spectral reflectance and absorbance values. The absorption values were better than the reflectance values and the calibrated spectra by MSC were better than the raw and SG smoothing corrected spectra in building moisture content predictive models. The optimized partial least square regression (PLSR) model attained good results with the MSC calibrated spectral absorption values based on the spectral absorption index features (R(2)P=0.952, RMSEP=1.396) and the optimal wavelengths selected by regression coefficients (R(2)P=0.966, RMSEP=0.855), respectively. The models proved spectral absorption index was promising in spectral analysis to predict moisture content in pork samples using HSI techniques for the first time. PMID:26617026

  9. Do surface electrode recordings validly represent latissimus dorsi activation patterns during shoulder tasks?

    PubMed

    Ginn, Karen A; Halaki, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Because of its superficial location surface electrodes are commonly used to record latissimus dorsi (LD) activity. Despite the fact that the recommended electrode placement is over the belly where LD is quite thin no studies have investigated the possibility of signal contamination from muscles lying deep to LD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the validity of using surface electrodes to record activity from LD. Eight asymptomatic subjects performed ramped isometric (0-100% maximum load) and dynamic (70% maximum load) shoulder tasks. Intramuscular electrodes were inserted into LD and the adjacent erector spinae. Surface electrodes were placed over LD around the intramuscular electrodes. Results indicated that while there was no difference in activity level or activation pattern (ICC>0.94) recorded by the two electrode types during shoulder tasks in which LD would be expected to be active (extension and adduction), significantly lower (p<0.05) LD activity was recorded via intramuscular electrodes during the shoulder flexion and abduction tasks. Therefore, recordings of LD activity by surface electrodes overestimate LD activity during shoulder tasks when this muscle would be expected to be activated at minimum levels. Erector spinae immediately deep to LD was confirmed as a source of crosstalk contamination. PMID:25467544

  10. Latissimus Dorsi and Teres Major Injuries in Major League Baseball Pitchers: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Syed K; Frangiamore, Salvatore J; Schickendantz, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the upper extremity in baseball pitchers are not uncommon, with extensive literature on shoulder and elbow pathology. However, there is minimal literature on isolated teres major (TM) and latissimus dorsi (LD) injuries. As a result, there is no consensus on an optimal treatment method. An extensive Medline search on studies focusing on the treatment of isolated LD and TM injuries in professional baseball pitchers was performed to explore this topic. Of the 20 retrieved articles, 5 met our inclusion criteria. There were a total of 29 patients who underwent conservative treatment and 1 who underwent surgical treatment. The average time required to return to pitching was 99.8 days in the conservative group and 140 days in the surgically treated group. Five patients in the conservative group suffered from complications and/or setbacks during their treatment and rehabilitation. The lone surgical patient suffered no complications, returned to preinjury form, and was elected an all-star the following year. The goal of this review is to provide a concise summary of the current literature in order to assist physicians when discussing treatment options with their patients. PMID:26991570

  11. The evolving breast reconstruction: from latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap to a propeller thoracodorsal fasciocutaneous flap

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to give an update on the use of the propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator flap (TAP/TDAP-flap) within the field of breast reconstruction. The TAP-flap can be dissected by a combined use of a monopolar cautery and a scalpel. Microsurgical instruments are generally not needed. The propeller TAP-flap can be designed in different ways, three of these have been published: (I) an oblique upwards design; (II) a horizontal design; (III) an oblique downward design. The latissimus dorsi-flap is a good and reliable option for breast reconstruction, but has been criticized for morbidity and complications. The TAP-flap does not seem to impair the function of the shoulder or arm and the morbidity appears to be scarce. However, an implant is often needed in combination with the TAP-flap, which results in implant related morbidity over time. The TAP-flap seems to be a promising tool for oncoplastic and reconstructive breast surgery and will certainly become an invaluable addition to breast reconstructive methods. PMID:25207206

  12. A computer simulation study of isometric contraction of latissimus dorsi muscle used for cardiac assistance.

    PubMed

    Minoura, T; Mizuhara, H; Tsutsumi, S; Nishimura, K; Ban, T

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the feasibility of a skeletal muscle pump employing latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) for cardiac assistance. We developed and used a 2-dimensional mathematical model for LDM to investigate how the size of pneumatic balloons (30, 38, and 45 ml) and the three different locations (proximal, center, and distal) affect the pressure applied to the balloon by LDM. The computer simulation was performed by coding a visco-elastic and nonlinear 2-dimensional program that employed the finite element method (FEM). The muscle specific parameters of LDM were obtained from animal experiment results. The model is based on Hill's characteristic equation and composed of a contractile component and a passive element. The simulation results indicated that the intermediate and largest sized balloon lead to the highest and the lowest power (volume reduction per unit time interval), respectively. On the other hand, when the balloon is inserted in the distal LDM, the power is lower than in the other two positions, regardless of the balloon size. The above results suggest that the optimal size of the balloon should be selected depending on the muscle specific parameters of the actuator, and that the balloon should be inserted either in the proximal portion or center of the actuator. PMID:9360153

  13. Video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy preserves more latissimus dorsi muscle than conventional surgery.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Nakajima, Jun; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Fukami, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Kusakabe, Masashi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2009-03-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy for early lung cancer has become technically feasible. We sought to determine if VATS preserved chest wall muscle postoperatively better than thoracotomy. Consecutive patients who underwent lobectomy between 2004 and 2006 for clinical Stage IA non-small cell lung cancer through VATS (VATS group) or posterolateral thoracotomy (PLT group) at our institution were eligible for the study. The cross-sectional areas of bilateral latissimus dorsi muscle (LDM) at the lower end of the scapula were obtained by computed tomography preoperatively and one year after surgery. These were quantified with image analysis by two researchers in a blinded manner. Fourteen patients in the VATS group (mean age, 68 years; 8 men, 6 women) and 24 patients in the PLT group (mean age, 62 years; 14 men, 10 women) were assessed. Postoperative/preoperative ratios of the LDM cross-section areas on the surgical side were 89+/-20% (Mean+/-S.D.) in the VATS group and 57+/-16% in the PLT group (P<0.001). Those on the non-surgical side were 89+/-23% in the VATS group and 97+/-16% in the PLT group (P=0.23). We conclude that VATS may prevent atrophy of LDM on the surgical side better than conventional thoracotomy. PMID:19059949

  14. Transcriptome profiling of Musculus longissimus dorsi in two cattle breeds with different intramuscular fat deposition.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Elke; Komolka, Katrin; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Gotoh, Takafumi; Wimmers, Klaus; Maak, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) deposition is a physiological process in cattle and is highly variable among breeds suggesting a large influence of genetic factors besides environmental factors. In order to elucidate molecular pathways underlying the genetic variation in this trait we compared transcriptomes of Musculus longissimus dorsi (MLD) in steers of Japanese Black and Holstein Friesian cattle breeds fed a high energy diet typically applied in Japan to achieve maximum IMF content. We identified a total of 569 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with the majority (433) up-regulated in Japanese Black cattle. This breed is characterized by an extreme capacity for IMF deposition. Subsequent Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) revealed a gene network linking parameters of cell morphology and maintenance with lipid metabolism. The data from this study were deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE75348. We provide here a dataset which is of potential value to dissect molecular pathways influencing differences in fat deposition under high-energy nutrition. PMID:26981380

  15. Myosin Isoforms and Contractile Properties of Single Fibers of Human Latissimus Dorsi Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pacelli, Quirico F.; Cancellara, Pasqua; Toniolo, Luana; Moro, Tatiana; Canato, Marta; Miotti, Danilo; Reggiani, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate fiber type distribution and contractile characteristics of Latissimus Dorsi muscle (LDM). Samples were collected from 18 young healthy subjects (9 males and 9 females) through percutaneous fine needle muscle biopsy. The results showed a predominance of fast myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHC) with 42% of MyHC 2A and 25% of MyHC 2X, while MyHC 1 represented only 33%. The unbalance toward fast isoforms was even greater in males (71%) than in females (64%). Fiber type distribution partially reflected MyHC isoform distribution with 28% type 1/slow fibers and 5% hybrid 1/2A fibers, while fast fibers were divided into 30% type 2A, 31% type A/X, 4% type X, and 2% type 1/2X. Type 1/slow fibers were not only less abundant but also smaller in cross-sectional area than fast fibers. During maximal isometric contraction, type 1/slow fibers developed force and tension significantly lower than the two major groups of fast fibers. In conclusion, the predominance of fast fibers and their greater size and strength compared to slow fibers reveal that LDM is a muscle specialized mainly in phasic and powerful activity. Importantly, such specialization is more pronounced in males than in females. PMID:23971027

  16. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Marie C; Singh, Vinay K

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  17. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Marie C.; Singh, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  18. Anatomical heterogeneity of tendon: Fascicular and interfascicular tendon compartments have distinct proteomic composition

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Peffers, Mandy J.; Simpson, Deborah; Halliwell, Elizabeth; Screen, Hazel R. C.; Clegg, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon is a simple aligned fibre composite, consisting of collagen-rich fascicles surrounded by a softer interfascicular matrix (IFM). The composition and interactions between these material phases are fundamental in ensuring tissue mechanics meet functional requirements. However the IFM is poorly defined, therefore tendon structure-function relationships are incompletely understood. We hypothesised that the IFM has a more complex proteome, with faster turnover than the fascicular matrix (FM). Using laser-capture microdissection and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that the IFM contains more proteins, and that many proteins show differential abundance between matrix phases. The IFM contained more protein fragments (neopeptides), indicating greater matrix degradation in this compartment, which may act to maintain healthy tendon structure. Protein abundance did not alter with ageing, but neopeptide numbers decreased in the aged IFM, indicating decreased turnover which may contribute to age-related tendon injury. These data provide important insights into how differences in tendon composition and turnover contribute to tendon structure-function relationships and the effects of ageing. PMID:26842662

  19. Minimally Invasive Approach to Achilles Tendon Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hegewald, Kenneth W; Doyle, Matthew D; Todd, Nicholas W; Rush, Shannon M

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical procedures have been described for Achilles tendon pathology; however, no overwhelming consensus has been reached for surgical treatment. Open repair using a central or paramedian incision allows excellent visualization for end-to-end anastomosis in the case of a complete rupture and detachment and reattachment for insertional pathologies. Postoperative wound dehiscence and infection in the Achilles tendon have considerable deleterious effects on overall functional recovery and outcome and sometimes require plastic surgery techniques to achieve coverage. With the aim of avoiding such complications, foot and ankle surgeons have studied less invasive techniques for repair. We describe a percutaneous approach to Achilles tendinopathy using a modification of the Bunnell suture weave technique combined with the use of interference screws. No direct end-to-end repair of the tendon is performed, rather, the proximal stump is brought in direct proximity of the distal stump, preventing overlengthening and proximal stump retraction. This technique also reduces the suture creep often seen with end-to-end tendon repair by providing a direct, rigid suture to bone interface. We have used the new technique to minimize dissection and exposure while restoring function and accelerating recovery postoperatively. PMID:26385574

  20. Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique

    PubMed Central

    Keyhani, Sohrab; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Abbasian, Mohammadreza; Emami-Moghaddam Tehrani, Mohammad; Lahiji, Farivar Abdollahzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Wound complications following open repair for acute Achilles tendon ruptures (AATR) remain the subject of significant debate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of covering repaired AATR using well-nourished connective tissues (paratenon and deep fascia) to avoid complications after open repair. Methods: In this case series study, open repair was performed for 32 active young patients with AATR. After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for two years and any wound complication was recorded. During the last visit, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hind foot score was completed for all patients. Calf circumference and ankle range of motion were measured and compared with the contralateral side. Patients were asked about returning to previous sports activities and limitations with footwear. Results: Only, one patient developed deep wound infection (3%). None of the patients had any discomfort around the operation area, limitation with footwear, sural nerve injury, re-rupture, and skin adhesion. The AOFAS score averaged 92.5±6. Two patients (7%) were unable to return to previous sports activities because of moderate pain in heavy physical exercises. The calf circumference and ankle ROM were similar between healthy and operated sides. Conclusion: The present study showed that fascial envelope for full covering of the repaired Achilles tendon may help to prevent the occurrence of wound complications. PMID:25207295

  1. In vitro fatigue of human tendons.

    PubMed

    Schechtman, H; Bader, D L

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the fatigue behaviour of human tendons in vitro. The testing was accomplished with the use of specially designed grips and the local measurement of tendon cross-sectional area. Ninety specimens prepared from Extensor digitorum longus (EDL) tendons of the foot were subjected to a cyclic square tension-tension stress waveform at physiological frequencies. The maximum tensile stress was normalised to values corresponding to prescribed levels between 10% and 90% of the calculated ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 100 MPa. The minimum stress was set at 1% of the UTS. A replication of 10 specimens per stress level allowed the use of statistical models for the distribution of fatigue life. Results followed a linear model, of form S = 101.3 - 14.8 log(N), relating the normalised stress to the median number of cycles to failure, therefore suggesting the absence of an endurance limit. The Weibull distribution was found to describe adequately the probability of failure at each stress level. A model which takes into account in vivo healing was proposed. This model was able to explain the presence of intact tendons throughout the lifetime of an individual. PMID:9239568

  2. On muscle, tendon and high heels.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Maganaris, C N; Seynnes, O R; Narici, M V

    2010-08-01

    Wearing high heels (HH) places the calf muscle-tendon unit (MTU) in a shortened position. As muscles and tendons are highly malleable tissues, chronic use of HH might induce structural and functional changes in the calf MTU. To test this hypothesis, 11 women regularly wearing HH and a control group of 9 women were recruited. Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) fascicle length, pennation angle and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), the Achilles' tendon (AT) length, cross-sectional area (CSA) and mechanical properties, and the plantarflexion torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were assessed in both groups. Shorter GM fascicle lengths were observed in the HH group (49.6+/-5.7 mm vs 56.0+/-7.7 mm), resulting in greater tendon-to-fascicle length ratios. Also, because of greater AT CSA, AT stiffness was higher in the HH group (136.2+/-26.5 N mm(-1) vs 111.3+/-20.2 N mm(-1)). However, no differences in the GM PCSA to AT CSA ratio, torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were found. We conclude that long-term use of high-heeled shoes induces shortening of the GM muscle fascicles and increases AT stiffness, reducing the ankle's active range of motion. Functionally, these two phenomena seem to counteract each other since no significant differences in static or dynamic torques were observed. PMID:20639419

  3. Changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties following eccentric heel drop exercise are specific to the free tendon.

    PubMed

    Obst, S J; Newsham-West, R; Barrett, R S

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical loading of the Achilles tendon during isolated eccentric contractions could induce immediate and region-dependent changes in mechanical properties. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to examine the immediate effect of isolated eccentric exercise on the mechanical properties of the distal (free tendon) and proximal (gastrocnemii) regions of the Achilles tendon. Participants (n = 14) underwent two testing sessions in which tendon measurements were made at rest and during a 30% and 70% isometric plantar flexion contractions immediately before and after either: (a) 3 × 15 eccentric heel drops or (b) 10-min rest. There was a significant time-by-session interaction for free tendon length and strain for all loading conditions (P < 0.05). Pairwise comparisons revealed a significant increase in free tendon length and strain at all contraction intensities after eccentric exercise (P < 0.05). There was no significant time-by-session interaction for the gastrocnemii (medial or lateral) aponeurosis or tendon for any of the measured parameters. Immediate changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties were specific to the free tendon and consistent with changes due to mechanical creep. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of the free tendon may be more vulnerable to change with exercise compared with the gastrocnemii aponeurosis or tendon. PMID:25919320

  4. An Artificial Tendon to Connect the Quadriceps Muscle to the Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan; Litsky, Alan; Mayerson, Joel; Stringer, Keith; Melvin, David; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    No permanent, reliable artificial tendon exists clinically. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device as a versatile connector, fixed at one end to a muscle, and adaptable at the other end to inert implants such as prosthetic bones or to bone anchors. The objective of this study was to evaluate four configurations of the device to replace the extensor mechanism of the knee in goats. Within muscle, the four groups had: (A) needle-drawn uncoated bundles, (B) needle-drawn coated bundles, (C) barbed uncoated bundles, and (D) barbed coated bundles. The quadriceps tendon, patella, and patellar tendon were removed from the right hind limb in 24 goats. The four groups (n=6 for each) were randomly assigned to connect the quadriceps muscle to the tibia (with a bone plate). Specimens were collected from each operated leg and contralateral unoperated controls both for mechanical testing and histology at 90 days post-surgery. In strength testing, maximum forces in the operated leg (vs. unoperated control) were 1288±123 N (vs. 1387±118 N) for group A, 1323±144 N (vs. 1396±779 N) for group B, 930±125 N (vs. 1337±126 N) for group C, and 968±109 N (vs. 1528±146 N) for group D (mean ± SEM). The strengths of the OrthoCoupler™ legs in the needled device groups were equivalent to unoperated controls (p=0.6), while both barbed device groups had maximum forces significantly lower than their controls (p=0.001). We believe this technology will yield improved procedures for clinical challenges in orthopaedic oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and tendon injury reconstruction. PMID:21520259

  5. The effect of tendon excursion velocity on longitudinal median nerve displacement: differences between carpal tunnel syndrome patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R; Wang, Yuexiang; Passe, Sandra M; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2015-04-01

    The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) is a viscoelastic structure connecting the median nerve (MN) and the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. Increased strain rates increases stiffness in viscoelastic tissues, and thereby its capacity to transfer shear load. Therefore, tendon excursion velocity may impact the MN displacement. In carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) the SSCT is fibrotic and may be ruptured, and this may affect MN motion. In this study, ultrasonography was performed on 14 wrists of healthy controls and 25 wrists of CTS patients during controlled finger motions performed at three different velocities. Longitudinal MN and tendon excursion were assessed using a custom speckle tracking algorithm and compared across the three different velocities. CTS patients exhibited significantly less MN motion than controls (p ≤ 0.002). While in general, MN displacement increased with increasing tendon excursion velocity (p ≤ 0.031). These findings are consistent with current knowledge of SSCT mechanics in CTS, in which in some patients the fibrotic SSCT appears to have ruptured from the tendon surface. PMID:25640903

  6. Morphometrics of the Anterior Belly and Intermediate Tendon of the Digastric Muscle: Sexual Dimorphism and Implications for Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zdilla, Matthew J; Pancake, Alex R; Lambert, H Wayne

    2016-07-01

    The anterior belly of the digastric muscle (ABDM) is important in a variety of surgeries including submental lipectomy, rhytidectomy, alteration of the cervicomental angle via muscle resection, the "digastric corset" procedure for submental rejuvenation, the submental artery flap, and reanimation of the mouth after facial nerve palsy. Despite its clinical significance, little information exists regarding the morphometrics of the ABDM or its associated intermediate tendon. This study analyzed a total of 35 intact ABDMs and 43 intact intermediate tendons from 23 cadavers. Measurements were taken of the following parameters: muscle belly area, muscle belly length, intermediate tendon length, and intermediate tendon width at mid-tendon. Normative descriptive statistics are included within the report. Males were found to have significantly longer left-sided muscle bellies than right-sided bellies from males (U = 23.0; P = 0.044), left-sided bellies from females (U = 19.0; P = 0.020), and right-sided bellies from females (U = 12.0; P = 0.035). The morphometry, including sexual dimorphism, presented in this report can aid in the surgical planning and execution of numerous operations performed in head and neck, especially digastric muscle transfer surgery. PMID:27258716

  7. A new strategy for the decellularisation of large equine tendons as biocompatible tendon substitutes.

    PubMed

    Bottagisio, M; Pellegata, A F; Boschetti, F; Ferroni, M; Moretti, M; Lovati, A B

    2016-01-01

    Tendon ruptures and/or large losses remain to be a great clinical challenge and often require full replacement of the damaged tissue. The use of auto- and allografts or engineered scaffolds is an established approach to restore severe tendon injuries. However, these grafts are commonly related to scarce biocompatibility, site morbidity, chronic inflammation and poor biomechanical properties. Recently, the decellularisation techniques of allo- or xenografts using specific detergents have been studied and have been found to generate biocompatible substitutes that resemble the native tissue. This study aims to identify a novel decellularisation protocol for large equine tendons that would produce an extracellular matrix scaffold suitable for the regeneration of injured tendons in humans. Specifically, equine tendons were treated either with tri (n-butyl) phosphate alone, or associated to multiple concentrations of peracetic acid (1, 3 and 5 %), which has never before been tested in vitro.Samples were then analysed by histology and with biochemical, biomechanical, and cytotoxicity tests. The best decellularisation protocol, resulting from these examinations, was selected and the chosen scaffold was re-seeded with murine fibroblasts. Resulting grafts were tested for cell viability, histologic analysis, DNA and collagen content. The results identified 1 % tri (n-butyl) phosphate combined with 3 % peracetic acid as the most suitable decellularised matrix in terms of biochemical and biomechanical properties. Moreover, the non-cytotoxic nature of the decellularised matrix allowed for good fibroblast reseeding, thus demonstrating a biocompatible matrix that will be suitable for tendon tissue engineering and hopefully as substitutes in severe tendon damages. PMID:27386840

  8. Decellularized and Engineered Tendons as Biological Substitutes: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Lovati, Arianna B.; Bottagisio, Marta; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Tendon ruptures are a great burden in clinics. Finding a proper graft material as a substitute for tendon repair is one of the main challenges in orthopaedics, for which the requirement of a biological scaffold would be different for each clinical application. Among biological scaffolds, the use of decellularized tendon-derived matrix increasingly represents an interesting approach to treat tendon ruptures. We analyzed in vitro and in vivo studies focused on the development of efficient protocols for the decellularization and for the cell reseeding of the tendon matrix to obtain medical devices for tendon substitution. Our review considered also the proper tendon source and preclinical animal models with the aim of entering into clinical trials. The results highlight a wide panorama in terms of allogenic or xenogeneic tendon sources, specimen dimensions, physical or chemical decellularization techniques, and the cell type variety for reseeding from terminally differentiated to undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells and their static or dynamic culture employed to generate implantable constructs tested in different animal models. We try to identify the most efficient approach to achieve an optimal biological scaffold for biomechanics and intrinsic properties, resembling the native tendon and being applicable in clinics in the near future, with particular attention to the Achilles tendon substitution. PMID:26880985

  9. Multiparametric MR Imaging Depicts Glycosaminoglycan Change in the Achilles Tendon during Ciprofloxacin Administration in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Juras, Vladimir; Winhofer, Yvonne; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Vosshenrich, Jan; Hager, Benedikt; Wolf, Peter; Weber, Michael; Luger, Anton; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques (sodium MR imaging, glycosaminoglycan [GAG] chemical exchange saturation transfer [CEST], and T2* mapping) could be used as potential markers for biochemical changes in the Achilles tendon induced by ciprofloxacin intake. Materials and Methods The ethics committee of the Medical University of Vienna approved the protocol (number 1225/2012), and all patients gave written informed consent. Fourteen ankles from seven men (mean age, 32 years ± 12 [standard deviation]) were included in the study. All patients underwent 7-T MR imaging examinations of the Achilles tendon at baseline and 10 days and 5 months after ciprofloxacin intake. Sodium signal and T2* maps were acquired with the variable echo-time sequence and the GAG CEST values were acquired with a three-dimensional radiofrequency spoiled gradient-recalled-echo sequence. Results The mean sodium signal was significantly decreased by 25% in the whole tendon (from baseline to 10 days after ciprofloxacin intake, 130 arbitrary units [au] ± 8 to 98 au ± 5, respectively; P = .023) and returned to baseline after 5 months (116 au ± 10), as observed also at the tendon insertion (baseline, 10 days after ciprofloxacin intake, and 5 months after ciprofloxacin intake, 134 au ± 8, 105 au ± 5, and 119 au ± 9, respectively; P = .034). The mean GAG CEST value in the whole tendon was parallel to the sodium signal with a decrease from baseline to 10 days after ciprofloxacin intake, 4.74% ± 0.75 to 4.50% ± 0.23, respectively (P = .028) and an increase at 5 months after ciprofloxacin intake to 4.88% ± 1.02. Conclusion In conclusion, this study demonstrates a ciprofloxacin-induced reversible reduction of the normalized sodium MR imaging signal and the GAG CEST effect in the Achilles tendon of healthy volunteers. Changes in sodium MR imaging and GAG CEST in men may reflect a decrease of GAG content in the Achilles tendon after ciprofloxacin intake

  10. EGR1 and EGR2 involvement in vertebrate tendon differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lejard, Véronique; Blais, Frédéric; Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Bonnet, Aline; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Havis, Emmanuelle; Malbouyres, Maryline; Bidaud, Christelle Bonod; Maro, Géraldine; Gilardi-Hebenstreit, Pascale; Rossert, Jérome; Ruggiero, Florence; Duprez, Delphine

    2011-02-18

    The molecules involved in vertebrate tendon formation during development remain largely unknown. To date, only two DNA-binding proteins have been identified as being involved in vertebrate tendon formation, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Scleraxis and, recently, the Mohawk homeobox gene. We investigated the involvement of the early growth response transcription factors Egr1 and Egr2 in vertebrate tendon formation. We established that Egr1 and Egr2 expression in tendon cells was correlated with the increase of collagen expression during tendon cell differentiation in embryonic limbs. Vertebrate tendon differentiation relies on a muscle-derived FGF (fibroblast growth factor) signal. FGF4 was able to activate the expression of Egr genes and that of the tendon-associated collagens in chick limbs. Egr gene misexpression experiments using the chick model allowed us to establish that either Egr gene has the ability to induce de novo expression of the reference tendon marker scleraxis, the main tendon collagen Col1a1, and other tendon-associated collagens Col3a1, Col5a1, Col12a1, and Col14a1. Mouse mutants for Egr1 or Egr2 displayed reduced amounts of Col1a1 transcripts and a decrease in the number of collagen fibrils in embryonic tendons. Moreover, EGR1 and EGR2 trans-activated the mouse Col1a1 proximal promoter and were recruited to the tendon regulatory regions of this promoter. These results identify EGRs as novel DNA-binding proteins involved in vertebrate tendon differentiation by regulating type I collagen production. PMID:21173153

  11. Fatty Acid and Transcriptome Profiling of Longissimus Dorsi Muscles between Pig Breeds Differing in Meat Quality

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kaifan; Shu, Gang; yuan, Fangfang; Zhu, Xiaotong; Gao, Ping; Wang, Songbo; Wang, Lina; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Shouquan; Zhang, Yongliang; Li, Yan; Wu, Tongshan; Yuan, Li; Jiang, Qingyan

    2013-01-01

    Fat and lean pig breeds show obvious differences in meat quality characteristics including the fatty acid composition of muscle. However, the molecular mechanism underlying these phenotypes differences remains unknown. This study compared meat quality traits between Lantang (a Chinese indigenous breed) and Landrace (a typical lean breed). The Lantang pigs showed higher L* values and intramuscular fat content, lower pH45min, pH24h and shear force in longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle than Landrace (P < 0.05). Fatty acid analysis demonstrated the lower monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and higher polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) percentage in Lantang LD than that in Landrace LD (P < 0.05). To further identify candidate genes for fatty acid composition, the transcriptome of LD muscle from the two breeds were measured by microarrays. There were 586 transcripts differentially expressed, of which 267 transcripts were highly expressed in Lantang pigs. After the validation by real-time quantitative PCR, 13 genes were determined as candidate genes for fatty acid composition of muscle, including Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD). Then, a SCD over-expression plasmid was transfected into C2C12 cells to reveal the effect of SCD on the fatty acid composition in vitro. The results showed that SCD over-expression significantly increased PUFA proportion, while reduced that of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in C2C12 cells (P < 0.05). In summary, this study compared the differences of fatty acid composition and transcriptome in two breeds differing in meat quality, and further identified the novel role of SCD in the regulation of PUFA deposition. PMID:23355796

  12. Two-Stage Latissimus Dorsi Flap with Implant for Unilateral Breast Reconstruction: Getting the Size Right

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiajun; Pardoe, Cleone I; Mota, Ashley Manuel; Chui, Christopher Hoe Kong

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of unilateral breast reconstruction after mastectomy is to craft a natural-looking breast with symmetry. The latissimus dorsi (LD) flap with implant is an established technique for this purpose. However, it is challenging to obtain adequate volume and satisfactory aesthetic results using a one-stage operation when considering factors such as muscle atrophy, wound dehiscence and excessive scarring. The two-stage reconstruction addresses these difficulties by using a tissue expander to gradually enlarge the skin pocket which eventually holds an appropriately sized implant. Methods We analyzed nine patients who underwent unilateral two-stage LD reconstruction. In the first stage, an expander was placed along with the LD flap to reconstruct the mastectomy defect, followed by gradual tissue expansion to achieve overexpansion of the skin pocket. The final implant volume was determined by measuring the residual expander volume after aspirating the excess saline. Finally, the expander was replaced with the chosen implant. Results The average volume of tissue expansion was 460 mL. The resultant expansion allowed an implant ranging in volume from 255 to 420 mL to be placed alongside the LD muscle. Seven patients scored less than six on the relative breast retraction assessment formula for breast symmetry, indicating excellent breast symmetry. The remaining two patients scored between six and eight, indicating good symmetry. Conclusions This approach allows the size of the eventual implant to be estimated after the skin pocket has healed completely and the LD muscle has undergone natural atrophy. Optimal reconstruction results were achieved using this approach. PMID:27018318

  13. Myofascial force transmission between the latissimus dorsi and gluteus maximus muscles: an in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Carvalhais, Viviane Otoni do Carmo; Ocarino, Juliana de Melo; Araújo, Vanessa Lara; Souza, Thales Rezende; Silva, Paula Lanna Pereira; Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira

    2013-03-15

    There are extensive connections between the latissimus dorsi (LD) and gluteus maximus (GMax) muscles and the thoracolumbar fascia (TLF), which suggests a possible pathway for myofascial force transmission. The present study was designed to provide empirical evidence of myofascial force transmission from LD to contralateral GMax through TFL in vivo. To accomplish this goal, we evaluated whether active or passive tensioning of the LD results in increased passive tension of the contralateral GMax, indexed by changes in the hip resting position (RP) or passive stiffness. The hip RP was defined as the angular position in which the passive joint torque equals zero, and passive hip stiffness was calculated as the change in passive torque per change in joint angle. Thirty-seven subjects underwent an assessment of their passive hip torque against medial rotation by means of an isokinetic dynamometer. These measures were carried out under three test conditions: (1) control, (2) passive LD tensioning and (3) active LD tensioning. Electromyography was used to monitor the activity of the hip muscles and the LD under all conditions. Repeated measures analyses of variance demonstrated that passive LD tensioning shifted the hip RP towards lateral rotation (p=0.009) but did not change the passive hip stiffness (p>0.05). Active LD tensioning shifted the hip RP towards lateral rotation (p<0.001) and increased the passive hip stiffness (p≤0.004). The results demonstrated that manipulation of the LD tension modified the passive hip variables, providing evidence of myofascial force transmission in vivo. PMID:23394717

  14. A Tendon Cell Specific RNAi Screen Reveals Novel Candidates Essential for Muscle Tendon Interaction.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Prabhat; Kumar, Arun; Das, Rudra Nayan; Malhotra, Vivek; VijayRaghavan, K

    2015-01-01

    Tendons are fibrous connective tissue which connect muscles to the skeletal elements thus acting as passive transmitters of force during locomotion and provide appropriate body posture. Tendon-derived cues, albeit poorly understood, are necessary for proper muscle guidance and attachment during development. In the present study, we used dorsal longitudinal muscles of Drosophila and their tendon attachment sites to unravel the molecular nature of interactions between muscles and tendons. We performed a genetic screen using RNAi-mediated knockdown in tendon cells to find out molecular players involved in the formation and maintenance of myotendinous junction and found 21 candidates out of 2507 RNAi lines screened. Of these, 19 were novel molecules in context of myotendinous system. Integrin-βPS and Talin, picked as candidates in this screen, are known to play important role in the cell-cell interaction and myotendinous junction formation validating our screen. We have found candidates with enzymatic function, transcription activity, cell adhesion, protein folding and intracellular transport function. Tango1, an ER exit protein involved in collagen secretion was identified as a candidate molecule involved in the formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 knockdown was found to affect development of muscle attachment sites and formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 was also found to be involved in secretion of Viking (Collagen type IV) and BM-40 from hemocytes and fat cells. PMID:26488612

  15. A Tendon Cell Specific RNAi Screen Reveals Novel Candidates Essential for Muscle Tendon Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Prabhat; Malhotra, Vivek; VijayRaghavan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Tendons are fibrous connective tissue which connect muscles to the skeletal elements thus acting as passive transmitters of force during locomotion and provide appropriate body posture. Tendon-derived cues, albeit poorly understood, are necessary for proper muscle guidance and attachment during development. In the present study, we used dorsal longitudinal muscles of Drosophila and their tendon attachment sites to unravel the molecular nature of interactions between muscles and tendons. We performed a genetic screen using RNAi-mediated knockdown in tendon cells to find out molecular players involved in the formation and maintenance of myotendinous junction and found 21 candidates out of 2507 RNAi lines screened. Of these, 19 were novel molecules in context of myotendinous system. Integrin-βPS and Talin, picked as candidates in this screen, are known to play important role in the cell-cell interaction and myotendinous junction formation validating our screen. We have found candidates with enzymatic function, transcription activity, cell adhesion, protein folding and intracellular transport function. Tango1, an ER exit protein involved in collagen secretion was identified as a candidate molecule involved in the formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 knockdown was found to affect development of muscle attachment sites and formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 was also found to be involved in secretion of Viking (Collagen type IV) and BM-40 from hemocytes and fat cells. PMID:26488612

  16. Comparison of longissimus dorsi Fatty Acids Profiles in Gansu Black Yak and Chinese Yellow Cattle Steers and Heifers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. G.; Liu, T.; Brown, M. A.; Wu, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid (FA) composition of longissimus dorsi intramuscular fat in Black Yak and Chinese Yellow Cattle were evaluated in 44 Black Yak and 41 Chinese Yellow Cattle of both genders. Interactions of species with gender were observed for total saturated fatty acid (SFA), unsaturated fatty acid (UFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linolenic acid, arachidonic acid, EPA, and DHA concentrations, as well as PUFA/SFA ratio in the longissimus dorsi (p<0.05). The SFA percentage was greater in yellow cattle than yak in both genders but the species difference in heifers was greater than in steers (p<0.05). Yak had greater UFA, MUFA and PUFA percentages than yellow cattle in both steers and heifers (p<0.05) but the difference between yak and yellow cattle heifers was greater than yak and yellow cattle steers. The percentages of inolenic acid, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid; and PUFA/SFA were greater in yak than yellow cattle in both steers and heifers (p<0.05). In addition, the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFA in yak was lesser than in yellow cattle (p<0.05). These results indicated that FA composition generally differed between yak and yellow cattle but the differences were not the same in heifers as compared to steers. Results also suggested that species differences in FA composition tended to favor Black Yak over Chinese Yellow Cattle, indicating that the longissimus dorsi of Black Yak may have a higher nutritive value than that of Chinese Yellow Cattle and potential for development as a desirable natural product. PMID:26761841

  17. Mechanical properties of stapedial tendon in human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tao; Gan, Rong Z

    2007-12-01

    Measurement on mechanical properties of the stapedial tendon in human middle ear has not been reported in the literature. In this paper, we used the material testing system to conduct uniaxial tensile, stress relaxation, and failure tests on stapedial tendon specimens harvested from human temporal bones. The digital image correlation method was employed to assess the boundary effect on experimental data. The stress-strain relationship of the tendon obtained from experiments was analyzed using the hyperelastic Ogden model. The results presented include (1) the constitutive equation of the tendon for stretch ratio of 1-1.4 or stress range of 0-1.45 MPa, (2) the mean ultimate stress and stretch ratio of the tendon at 4.04 MPa and 1.65, respectively, and (3) the hysteresis and normalized stress relaxation function of the tendon. The data reported in this paper contribute to ear mechanics, especially for theoretical analysis of human ear function. PMID:18067396

  18. Biceps femoris tendon injuries sustained while playing hockey

    PubMed Central

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old female nurse presented in March 2008 with a left proximal hamstring tendon injury sustained while playing hockey. At surgery, the proximal biceps femoris tendon and semitendonosus were found to be ruptured and were repaired. The patient made a good recovery but sustained a further hockey injury in January 2010 involving a complete tear and rupture of the biceps femoris tendon distally. This was managed conservatively and the patient was able to return to playing hockey 10 months later. Biceps femoris tendon injuries have been reported in sport but this is the first documented case of the injury occurring while playing hockey and is also the first reported case of a biceps tendon rupture proximally (hamstring tendon) followed by distal biceps femoris rupture at the knee in the same leg. PMID:22715185

  19. [Evaluation of patients' satisfaction after breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and immediate permanent breast implant].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Gőgh, Bettina; Novák, András; István, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    Current surgical treatment modalities for breast reconstruction include latissimus dorsi mycotaneous flap with immediate permanent breast implant (LDI). The aim of the present study was to analyze reconstruction with LDI in terms of quality of life, cosmesis and patient satisfaction. A chart analysis was carried out with the first ten patients who underwent breast reconstruction with LDI. The patients were interviewed and self-assessment quality of life was administered. They also underwent assessment of satisfaction and cosmesis. The high satisfaction and cosmesis scores in the breast reconstruction group indicate the superior results that can be achieved with breast reconstruction. PMID:24747404

  20. Effects of high intensity canoeing training on fibre area and fibre type in the latissimus dorsi muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, S J; Hardy, L

    1989-01-01

    A high intensity short duration exercise training programme was undertaken by nine subjects on three occasions each week for nine weeks. Muscle samples from the latissimus dorsi were taken by needle biopsy, at rest, before and after training. The results revealed that there was no change in either Type I or Type II muscle fibre distribution following training. Type I fibre area did not alter significantly as a result of the training stress. Mean cross-sectional area of Type II fibres was 82 per cent greater post-training than pre-training. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2730995

  1. Tendon graft substitutes-rotator cuff patches.

    PubMed

    Coons, David A; Alan Barber, F

    2006-09-01

    Over the past few years, many biologic patches have been developed to augment repairs of large or complex tendon tears. These patches include both allograft and xenografts. Regardless of their origins, these products are primarily composed of purified type I collagen. Many factors should be considered when choosing an augmentation patch including tissue origin, graft processing, cross-linking, clinical experience, and physical properties. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the sports medicine community with several tendon augmentation grafts: GraftJacket (Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, TN), CuffPatch (Organogenesis, Canton, MA, licensed to Arthrotek, Warsaw, IN), Restore (Depuy, Warsaw, IN), Zimmer Collagen Repair (Permacol) patch (Tissue Science Laboratories Covington, GA, licensed to Zimmer, Warsaw, IN), TissueMend (TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA, licensed to Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Kalamazoo, MI), OrthoADAPT (Pegasus Biologics, Irvine, CA), and BioBlanket (Kensey Nash, Exton, PA). PMID:17135966

  2. An efficient robotic tendon for gait assistance.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Kevin W; Ilg, Robert; Sugar, Thomas G; Herring, Donald

    2006-10-01

    A robotic tendon is a spring based, linear actuator in which the stiffness of the spring is crucial for its successful use in a lightweight, energy efficient, powered ankle orthosis. Like its human analog, the robotic tendon uses its inherent elastic nature to reduce both peak power and energy requirements for its motor. In the ideal example, peak power required of the motor for ankle gait is reduced from 250 W to just 77 W. In addition, ideal energy requirements are reduced from nearly 36 J to just 21 J. Using this approach, an initial prototype has provided 100% of the power and energy necessary for ankle gait in a compact 0.95 kg package, seven times less than an equivalent motor/gearbox system. PMID:16995768

  3. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  4. Ligament reconstruction tendon interposition with mersilene augmentation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew J; Schofield, Jennifer L; Marsh, Mike; Paulo, Jerry

    2011-03-01

    Many surgical procedures have been described for the treatment of thumb basilar joint osteoarthritis. Augmentation of the standard ligament reconstruction tendon interposition procedure with the use of a Mersilene suture tape suspension-plasty, to recreate the stability provided by the anterior oblique ligament and increase pinch strength, will be described. Satisfaction with this procedure was evaluated through surveys completed by patients. In addition, independent physical assessments were performed to demonstrate stability, range of motion, and strength. PMID:21358518

  5. A 3-Dimensional Anatomic Study of the Distal Biceps Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Christine; Li, Zhi; Pennings, Amanda; Agur, Anne; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon from its osseous attachment is most often treated with operative intervention. Knowledge of the overall tendon morphology as well as the orientation of the collagenous fibers throughout the musculotendinous junction are key to intraoperative decision making and surgical technique in both the acute and chronic setting. Unfortunately, there is little information available in the literature. Purpose To comprehensively describe the morphology of the distal biceps tendon. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods The distal biceps terminal musculature, musculotendinous junction, and tendon were digitized in 10 cadaveric specimens and data reconstructed using 3-dimensional modeling. Results The average length, width, and thickness of the external distal biceps tendon were found to be 63.0, 6.0, and 3.0 mm, respectively. A unique expansion of the tendon fibers within the distal muscle was characterized, creating a thick collagenous network along the central component between the long and short heads. Conclusion This study documents the morphologic parameters of the native distal biceps tendon. Reconstruction may be necessary, especially in chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures, if the remaining tendon morphology is significantly compromised compared with the native distal biceps tendon. Knowledge of normal anatomical distal biceps tendon parameters may also guide the selection of a substitute graft with similar morphological characteristics. Clinical Relevance A thorough description of distal biceps tendon morphology is important to guide intraoperative decision making between primary repair and reconstruction and to better select the most appropriate graft. The detailed description of the tendinous expansion into the muscle may provide insight into better graft-weaving and suture-grasping techniques to maximize proximal graft incorporation. PMID:26665092

  6. Triceps tendon avulsion and associated injuries of the elbow

    PubMed Central

    Canbora, Kerem; Ozyurek, Selahattin; Gumussuyu, Gurkan; Kose, Ozkan

    2013-01-01

    A rupture or avulsion of the triceps tendon is very rare but concomitant elbow injuries with avulsion of the triceps tendon are even rarer. In this study, an extraordinary and unusual injury combination (radial head and trochlear fracture associated with triceps tendon avulsion), which happened during a fall onto the elbow with outstretched hand, was identified and has been discussed in the literature. PMID:23667221

  7. Low level laser therapy in healing tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, P. T. C.; Batista, Cheila O. C.; Fabíola, C.

    2005-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effects of AsGa Laser in the scarring of tendon lesion in rats with low nourishment condition and to analyze the ideal light density by means of histopathologic findings highlighted by light microscopy. After the proposed nutritional condition was verified the animals were divided into 3 groups denominated as follows: GI control group, GII laser 1 J/sq.cm. and GIII laser 4 J/sq.cm. The lesions were induced by means of routine surgical process for tendon exposure: There was a crushing process with Allis pincers followed by saturated incision. The data obtained in relation to the amount of macrophage, leukocyte, fibroblast, vessel neoformation, fibrosis and collagen were submitted to parametric statistic procedures of variance analysis and "Tukey" Test and the result obtained was p < 0,05. According to the obtained results it can be concluded that low power laser therapy proved to be efficient in tendon repairing even though the animals suffered from malnutrition as well as the 1 J energy density proved to be more efficient in this case.

  8. How High Glucose Levels Affect Tendon Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Snedeker, Jess G

    2016-01-01

    Among the many factors playing a role in tendon disease, unregulated biochemical reactions between glucose and the collagen extracellular matrix are coming increasingly into focus. We have shown that formation of advanced glycation end-products that cross-link the collagen extracellular matrix can drastically affect cellular level mechanical properties of the matrix, and in turn affect cell-level biomechanical stimuli during physiological loading of the tissue. We suggest that these may adversely affect tendon cell response to matrix damage, as well as the quality of the consequent repair. If such mechanical feedback loops are altered, the ability of tendon cells to maintain tissue in a functional, healthy state may be compromised. Although key foundational elements of biochemical, biomechanical, and biological understanding are now in place, the full extent of how these aspects interact, including the precise mechanisms by which advanced glycation end-products pathologically disrupt connective tissue homeostasis and damage repair, are only beginning to be adequately appreciated. PMID:27535261

  9. Comparison of modified Kessler tendon suture at different levels in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon and porcine flexors and porcine extensors: an experimental biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Havulinna, J; Leppänen, O V; Järvinen, T L N; Göransson, H

    2011-10-01

    This study compared the biomechanical behaviour of repairs in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zones I, II and III with repairs of different segments of the porcine flexor tendon of the second digit and the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon, in order to assess the validity of porcine tendons as models for human flexor tendon repairs. These porcine tendons were selected after comparing their size with the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon. The tendon repairs were done in three segments of each porcine tendon and repairs in the human tendons were done in zones I,II and III. Ten tendons in each group yielded a total of 90 specimens. A modified Kessler repair was done with 3-0 coated braided polyester suture and subjected to uniaxial tensile testing. In human flexor tendons, the ultimate force was higher in zones I and II than in zone III. The porcine flexor digitorum profundus tendon from the second digit and the proximal segment of the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon behaved similarly to the human flexor tendon in zone III and can be considered as surrogates for the human flexor tendon. PMID:21816887

  10. Use of the semitendinosus tendon for foot and ankle tendon reconstructions☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Lutti Guerra de Aguiar Zink, Frederico; Glória Mendonça, Danilo; Kelly Bittar, Cintia; Luís Amim Zabeu, José; Salomão, Osny; Egydio de Carvalho Junior, Antonio; Tarso Torquato, Marcelo; Cerqueira de Moraes Filho, Décio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the results obtained from foot and ankle tendon reconstructions using the tendon of the semitendinosus muscle. The clinical results, the patient's degree of satisfaction and complications in the graft donor and recipient areas were evaluated. Methods This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of 38 patients who underwent this surgical procedure between 2006 and 2010 were surveyed. The functional results from this technique, the complications in the donor and recipient areas and the patients’ degree of satisfaction were evaluated. Results Three patients presented complications in the recipient area (skin necrosis); one patient showed complications in the donor area (pain and insensitivity); and all patients had satisfactory functional results, with complete range of motion. Conclusion The semitendinosus muscle is a good option for treatments for foot and ankle tendon injuries. PMID:26229856

  11. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfer for Calcific Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Howell, Michael A; Catanzariti, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Calcific insertional Achilles tendinopathy can result in significant pain and disability. Although some patients respond to nonoperative therapy, many patients are at risk for long-term morbidity and unpredictable clinical outcomes. There is no evidence-based data to support the timing of operative invention, choice of procedures, or whether equinus requires treatment. This article suggests the need for a classification system based on physical examination and imaging to help guide treatment. There is an obvious need for evidence-based studies evaluating outcomes and for properly conducted scientific research to establish appropriate treatment protocols. PMID:26590729

  12. A novel postoperative immobilization model for murine Achilles tendon sutures.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Yoichiro; Takayama, Yuzo; Kushige, Hiroko; Jacinto, Sandra; Sekido, Mitsuru; Kida, Yasuyuki S

    2016-08-01

    The body's motion and function are all in part effected by a vital tissue, the tendon. Tendon injury often results in limited functioning after postoperative procedures and even for a long time after rehabilitation. Although numerous studies have reported surgical procedures using animal models which have contributed to both basic and clinical research, modeling of tendon sutures or postoperative immobilizations has not been performed on small experimental animals, such as mice. In this study we have developed an easy Achilles tendon suture and postoperative ankle fixation model in a mouse. Right Achilles tendons were incised and 10-0 nylons were passed through the proximal and distal ends using a modified Kessler method. Subsequently, the right ankle was immobilized in a plantarflexed position with novel splints, which were made from readily available extension tubes. Restriction of the tendon using handmade splints reduced swelling, as opposed to fixating with the usual plaster of Paris. Using this method, the usage of the right Achilles tendons began on postoperative days 13.5 ± 4.6, which indicated healing within two weeks. Therefore our simple short-term murine Achilles tendon suture procedure is useful for studying immediate tendon repair mechanisms in various models, including genetically-modified mice. PMID:26678297

  13. Collagen fibril biosynthesis in tendon: a review and recent insights.

    PubMed

    Canty, E G; Kadler, K E

    2002-12-01

    The development and evolution of multicellular animals relies on the ability of certain cell types to synthesise an extracellular matrix (ECM) comprising very long collagen fibrils that are arranged in very ordered 3-dimensional scaffolds. Tendon is a good example of a highly ordered ECM, in which tens of millions of collagen fibrils, each hundreds of microns long, are synthesised parallel to the tendon long axis. This review highlights recent discoveries showing that the assembly of collagen fibrils in tendon is hierarchical, and involves the formation of fairly short "collagen early fibrils" that are the fusion precursors of the very long fibrils that occur in mature tendon. PMID:12485687

  14. Nanoparticles for Tendon Healing and Regeneration: Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Parchi, Paolo D; Vittorio, Orazio; Andreani, Lorenzo; Battistini, Pietro; Piolanti, Nicola; Marchetti, Stefano; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Tendon injuries are commonly met in the emergency department. Unfortunately, tendon tissue has limited regeneration potential and usually the consequent formation of scar tissue causes inferior mechanical properties. Nanoparticles could be used in different way to improve tendon healing and regeneration, ranging from scaffolds manufacturing (increasing the strength and endurance or anti-adhesions, anti-microbial, and anti-inflammatory properties) to gene therapy. This paper aims to summarize the most relevant studies showing the potential application of nanoparticles for tendon tissue regeneration. PMID:27597828

  15. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  16. Inflammation activation and resolution in human tendon disease

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie G; Martinez, Fernando O; Yapp, Clarence; Wells, Graham; Oppermann, Udo; Dean, Benjamin JF; Smith, Richard DJ; Wheway, Kim; Watkins, Bridget; Roche, Lucy; Carr, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Improved understanding of the role of inflammation in tendon disease is required to facilitate therapeutic target discovery. We studied supraspinatus tendons from patients experiencing pain before and after surgical subacromial decompression treatment. Tendons were classified as having early, intermediate or advanced disease and inflammation was characterized through activation of pathways mediated by Interferon, NF-κB, glucocorticoid receptor and STAT-6. Inflammation signatures revealed expression of genes and proteins induced by Interferon and NF-κB in early stage disease and genes and proteins induced by STAT-6 and glucocorticoid receptor activation in advanced stage disease. The pro-resolving proteins FPR2/ALX and ChemR23 were increased in early stage disease compared to intermediate-advanced stage disease. Patients who were pain-free post-treatment had tendons with increased expression of CD206 and ALOX15 mRNA compared to tendons from patients who continued to experience pain post-treatment, suggesting that these genes and their pathways may moderate tendon pain. Stromal cells from diseased tendons cultured in vitro showed increased expression of NF-κB and Interferon target genes after treatment with lipopolysaccharide or IFNγ compared to stromal cells derived from healthy tendons. We identified 15-epi Lipoxin A4, a stable lipoxin metabolite derived from aspirin treatment, as potentially beneficial in the resolution of tendon inflammation. PMID:26511510

  17. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Youngstrom, Daniel W.; Barrett, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems. PMID:26839559

  18. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems. PMID:26839559

  19. A non-invasive method of tendon force measurement.

    PubMed

    Pourcelot, Philippe; Defontaine, Marielle; Ravary, Bérangère; Lemâtre, Mickaël; Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie

    2005-10-01

    The ability to measure the forces exerted in vivo on tendons and, consequently, the forces produced by muscles on tendons, offers a unique opportunity to investigate questions in disciplines as varied as physiology, biomechanics, orthopaedics and neuroscience. Until now, tendon loads could be assessed directly only by means of invasive sensors implanted within or attached to these collagenous structures. This study shows that the forces acting on tendons can be measured, in a non-invasive way, from the analysis of the propagation of an acoustic wave. Using the equine superficial digital flexor tendon as a model, it is demonstrated that the velocity of an ultrasonic wave propagating along the main axis of a tendon increases with the force applied to this tendon. Furthermore, we show that this velocity measurement can be performed even in the presence of skin overlying the tendon. To validate this measurement technique in vivo, the ultrasonic velocity plots obtained in the Achilles tendon at the walk were compared to the loads plots reported by other authors using invasive transducers. PMID:16084214

  20. The atypical homeodomain transcription factor Mohawk controls tendon morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjin; Watson, Spencer S; Lan, Yu; Keene, Douglas R; Ovitt, Catherine E; Liu, Han; Schweitzer, Ronen; Jiang, Rulang

    2010-10-01

    The Mohawk homeobox (Mkx) gene encodes a new atypical homeodomain-containing protein with transcriptional repressor activity. Mkx mRNA exhibited dynamic expression patterns during development of the palate, somite, kidney, and testis, suggesting that it may be an important regulator of multiple developmental processes. To investigate the roles of Mkx in organogenesis, we generated mice carrying a null mutation in this gene. Mkx(-/-) mice survive postnatally and exhibit a unique wavy-tail phenotype. Close examination revealed that the mutant mice had smaller tendons than wild-type littermates and that the rapid postnatal growth of collagen fibrils in tendons was disrupted in Mkx(-/-) mice. Defects in tendon development were detected in the mutant mouse embryos as early as embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5). Although collagen fibril assembly initially appeared normal, the tendons of Mkx(-/-) embryos expressed significantly reduced amounts of collagen I, fibromodulin, and tenomodulin in comparison with control littermates. We found that Mkx mRNA was strongly expressed in differentiating tendon cells during embryogenesis and in the tendon sheath cells in postnatal stages. In addition to defects in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis, Mkx(-/-) mutant mice exhibited abnormal tendon sheaths. These results identify Mkx as an important regulator of tendon development. PMID:20696843

  1. Tendon synovial cells secrete fibronectin in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Banes, A.J.; Link, G.W.; Bevin, A.G.; Peterson, H.D.; Gillespie, Y.; Bynum, D.; Watts, S.; Dahners, L.

    1988-01-01

    The chemistry and cell biology of the tendon have been largely overlooked due to the emphasis on collagen, the principle structural component of the tendon. The tendon must not only transmit the force of muscle contraction to bone to effect movement, but it must also glide simultaneously over extratendonous tissues. Fibronectin is classified as a cell attachment molecule that induces cell spreading and adhesion to substratum. The external surface of intact avian flexor tendon stained positively with antibody to cellular fibronectin. However, if the surface synovial cells were first removed with collagenase, no positive reaction with antifibronectin antibody was detected. Analysis of immunologically stained frozen sections of tendon also revealed fibronectin at the tendon synovium, but little was associated with cells internal in tendon. The staining pattern with isolated, cultured synovial cells and fibroblasts from the tendon interior substantiated the histological observations. Analysis of polyacrylamide gel profiles of /sup 35/S-methionine-labeled proteins synthesized by synovial cells and internal fibroblasts indicated that fibronectin was synthesized principally by synovial cells. Fibronectin at the tendon surface may play a role in cell attachment to prevent cell removal by the friction of gliding. Alternatively, fibronectin, with its binding sites for hyaluronic acid and collagen, may act as a complex for boundary lubrication.

  2. Nanoparticles for Tendon Healing and Regeneration: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo D.; Vittorio, Orazio; Andreani, Lorenzo; Battistini, Pietro; Piolanti, Nicola; Marchetti, Stefano; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Tendon injuries are commonly met in the emergency department. Unfortunately, tendon tissue has limited regeneration potential and usually the consequent formation of scar tissue causes inferior mechanical properties. Nanoparticles could be used in different way to improve tendon healing and regeneration, ranging from scaffolds manufacturing (increasing the strength and endurance or anti-adhesions, anti-microbial, and anti-inflammatory properties) to gene therapy. This paper aims to summarize the most relevant studies showing the potential application of nanoparticles for tendon tissue regeneration. PMID:27597828

  3. Giant Cell Tumor of the Peroneus Brevis Tendon Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Ch, Li; TH, Lui

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath is most commonly found in the flexor aspect of hand and wrist and is rare in the foot and ankle. Case report: A 49-year-old lady noticed a right lateral foot mass for 10 years. Magnetic resonance imaging suggested that the mass is originated from the peroneal tendons. The mass was excised and intra-operative findings showed that the tumor came from the peroneus brevis tendon sheath. Histological study confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell tumor. Conclusion: Giant cell tumor, although rare, should be one of the differential diagnoses of tendon sheath tumor of the foot and ankle. PMID:27299104

  4. Biological Augmentation of Flexor Tendon Repair: A Challenging Cellular Landscape.

    PubMed

    Loiselle, Alayna E; Kelly, Meghan; Hammert, Warren C

    2016-01-01

    Advances in surgical technique and rehabilitation have transformed zone II flexor tendon injuries from an inoperable no-man's land to a standard surgical procedure. Despite these advances, many patients develop substantial range of motion-limiting adhesions after primary flexor tendon repair. These suboptimal outcomes may benefit from biologic augmentation or intervention during the flexor tendon healing process. However, there is no consensus biological approach to promote satisfactory flexor tendon healing; we propose that insufficient understanding of the complex cellular milieu in the healing tendon has hindered the development of successful therapies. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the cellular components of flexor tendon healing and adhesion formation, including resident tendon cells, synovial sheath, macrophages, and bone marrow-derived cells. In addition, it examines molecular approaches that have been used in translational animal models to improve flexor tendon healing and gliding function, with a specific focus on progress made using murine models of healing. This information highlights the importance of understanding and potentially exploiting the heterogeneity of the cellular environment during flexor tendon healing, to define rational therapeutic approaches to improve healing outcomes. PMID:26652792

  5. What Is the Ideal Free Flap for Soft Tissue Reconstruction? A Ten-Year Experience of Microsurgical Reconstruction Using 334 Latissimus Dorsi Flaps From a Universal Donor Site.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Sang Wha; Youn, Seungki; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2015-07-01

    Microsurgical free tissue transfer is regarded as the best available method of tissue reconstruction for intractable defects. The ideal soft tissue flap is thought to be the anterolateral thigh flap. On the basis of 334 procedures involving the latissimus dorsi (LD) flap, we discuss the advantages of the LD flap over the current universal option, and we aimed to establish whether the LD could also gain universal status in all reconstructive fields.Three hundred thirty-four reconstructive procedures using the LD flap were performed in 322 patients between September 2002 and July 2012. In accordance with defect characteristics, we performed 334 procedures using flaps, which included the LD muscle flap with skin graft, the myocutaneous flap, the muscle-sparing flap, the perforator flap, the chimeric flap, and the 2-flap technique using the serratus anterior branch.Flap-related complications occurred in 21 patients (6.3%), including total and partial flap failure. In 253 cases, the donor site was closed primarily, and in the remaining cases, we used split-thickness skin grafts. Donor-site complications occurred in 20 cases (6%). In 11 of the 182 cases, no suitable perforators were identified during surgery.The advantages of the LD as a donor site include the possibility of various harvesting positions without position change, versatility of components, availability of muscle to fill extensive defects, and presence of thick fascia to enable full abdominal reconstruction. On the basis of our experience, we concluded that this flap has the potential to be used as widely as, or in preference to, the anterolateral thigh flap in most reconstructive areas. PMID:25785382

  6. Simultaneous traumatic rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon in a healthy individual

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Rachakatla, N; Kerin, C; Kumar, R

    2010-01-01

    A simultaneous traumatic complete rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon is reported to occur in patients with renal failure and other inflammatory diseases, but is extremely rare in a healthy individual because of the different contributory factors and mechanisms of injury. We present a rare case report of such a combination of injuries in a 48-year-old healthy man. To our knowledge only three such cases have been reported in the English literature. This is an unusual combination and hence there is potential for missed diagnosis leading to suboptimal treatment. PMID:22791858

  7. Tendon Progenitor Cells in Injured Tendons Have Strong Chondrogenic Potential: The CD105-Negative Subpopulation Induces Chondrogenic Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J.; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L.; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous BMPs or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a co-receptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair. PMID:25220576

  8. The promoting effect of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on tendon healing involves tendon outgrowth, cell survival, and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Lin, Miao-Sui; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2011-03-01

    Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, composed of 15 amino acids, is a partial sequence of body protection compound (BPC) that is discovered in and isolated from human gastric juice. Experimentally it has been demonstrated to accelerate the healing of many different wounds, including transected rat Achilles tendon. This study was designed to investigate the potential mechanism of BPC 157 to enhance healing of injured tendon. The outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants cultured with or without BPC 157 was examined. Results showed that BPC 157 significantly accelerated the outgrowth of tendon explants. Cell proliferation of cultured tendon fibroblasts derived from rat Achilles tendon was not directly affected by BPC 157 as evaluated by MTT assay. However, the survival of BPC 157-treated cells was significantly increased under the H(2)O(2) stress. BPC 157 markedly increased the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as revealed by transwell filter migration assay. BPC 157 also dose dependently accelerated the spreading of tendon fibroblasts on culture dishes. The F-actin formation as detected by FITC-phalloidin staining was induced in BPC 157-treated fibroblasts. The protein expression and activation of FAK and paxillin were determined by Western blot analysis, and the phosphorylation levels of both FAK and paxillin were dose dependently increased by BPC 157 while the total amounts of protein was unaltered. In conclusion, BPC 157 promotes the ex vivo outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants, cell survival under stress, and the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts, which is likely mediated by the activation of the FAK-paxillin pathway. PMID:21030672

  9. Simultaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon with contralateral rupture of the patellar tendon in an otherwise healthy athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, N I; Mbubaegbu, C E

    1996-01-01

    A case of a healthy athlete with simultaneous rupture of quadriceps tendon and rupture of the contralateral patella tendon is reported. Both tendons rupturing in the same patient is rare and this is the first reported case in a previously healthy person. Different mechanisms are implicated in the different ruptures. The rarity is because the simultaneous presence of contributory factors for either injury in the same person is uncommon. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8799608

  10. In vivo tendon forces correlate with activity level and remain bounded: evidence in a rabbit flexor tendon model.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, P; Butler, D L; Korvick, D L; Proch, F S

    1998-11-01

    While some tendons and ligaments in the lower extremity develop peak forces proportional to the intensity of activity (Komi 1990; Komi et al., 1992; Korvick et al., 1996), others maintain a steady force regardless of activity level (Herzog et al., 1993; Prilutsky et al., 1994). Investigators (Biewener et al., 1988; Korvick et al., 1996) have also shown that peak knee and ankle tendon forces approach one-quarter to one-third of ultimate or failure force values. In the rabbit flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon model we tested several hypotheses, chiefly that peak in vivo forces not only increase with increasing activity but do not exceed one-third of their ultimate or failure values. The FDP tendon was instrumented in three animals, and each rabbit subjected to an experimental design involving three activity levels. Peak tensile forces and rates of rise and fall in tendon force increased significantly with increasing activity (p < 0.01). Further, the tendon maintained a non-zero force level throughout all trials. For the most vigorous activity, inclined hopping, tensile forces and stresses were, on average, within 30% of the tendon's ultimate force and stress values, respectively. Such in vivo measurements in different tendon systems should help investigators better understand the recruitment and contribution of important muscle-tendon units to joint stability and gait. PMID:9880061

  11. Biomechanical comparison of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) and PTFE interpositional patches and direct tendon-to-bone repair for massive rotator cuff tears in an ovine model

    PubMed Central

    McKeown, Andrew DJ; Beattie, Rebekah F; Murrell, George AC

    2015-01-01

    Background Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears are a difficult problem. Modalities such as irrigation and debridement, partial repair, tendon transfer and grafts have been utilized with high failure rates and mixed results. Synthetic interpositional patch repairs are a novel and increasingly used approach. The present study aimed to examine the biomechanical properties of common synthetic materials for interpositional repairs in contrast to native tendon. Methods Six ovine tendons, six polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt sections and six expanded PTFE (ePTFE) patch sections were pulled-to-failure to analyze their biomechanical and material properties. Six direct tendon-to-bone surgical method repairs, six interpositional PTFE felt patch repairs and six interpositional ePTFE patch repairs were also constructed in ovine shoulders and pulled-to-failure to examine the biomechanical properties of each repair construct. Results Ovine tendon had higher load-to-failure (591 N) and had greater stiffness (108 N/mm) than either PTFE felt (296 N, 28 N/mm) or ePTFE patch sections (323 N, 34 N/mm). Both PTFE felt and ePTFE repair techniques required greater load-to-failure (225 N and 177 N, respectively) than direct tendon-to-bone surgical repairs (147 N) in ovine models. Conclusions Synthetic materials lacked several biomechanical properties, including strength and stiffness, compared to ovine tendon. Interpositional surgical repair models with these materials were significantly stronger than direct tendon-to-bone model repairs. PMID:27582997

  12. Effect of Footwear Modifications on Oscillations at the Achilles Tendon during Running on a Treadmill and Over Ground: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Meinert, Ilka; Brown, Niklas; Alt, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Achilles tendon injuries are known to commonly occur in runners. During running repeated impacts are transferred in axial direction along the lower leg, therefore possibly affecting the oscillation behavior of the Achilles tendon. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of different footwear modifications and different ground conditions (over ground versus treadmill) on oscillations at the Achilles tendon. Methods Oscillations were measured in 20 male runners using two tri-axial accelerometers. Participants ran in three different shoe types on a treadmill and over ground. Data analysis was limited to stance phase and performed in time and frequency space. Statistical comparison was conducted between oscillations in vertical and horizontal direction, between running shoes and between ground conditions (treadmill versus over ground running). Results Differences in the oscillation behavior could be detected between measurement directions with peak accelerations in the vertical being lower than those in the horizontal direction, p < 0.01. Peak accelerations occurred earlier at the distal accelerometer than at the proximal one, p < 0.01. Average normalized power differed between running shoes (p < 0.01) with harder damping material resulting in higher power values. Little to no power attenuation was found between the two accelerometers. Oscillation behavior of the Achilles tendon is not influenced by ground condition. Conclusion Differences in shoe configurations may lead to variations in running technique and impact forces and therefore result in alterations of the vibration behavior at the Achilles tendon. The absence of power attenuation may have been caused by either a short distance between the two accelerometers or high stiffness of the tendon. High stiffness of the tendon will lead to complete transmission of the signal along the Achilles tendon and therefore no attenuation occurs. PMID:27010929

  13. Primary Combined Latissimus Dorsi and Serratus Anterior Flap Repair of Right-Sided Congenital Diaphragmatic Agenesis in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Madan; Parapurath, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Large diaphragmatic defects can be repaired with latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior muscle flaps. We report the first successful primary repair of complete congenital diaphragmatic agenesis using a combination of autologous living bio-tissue and synthetic mesh in a neonate born in the NMC Specialty Hospital in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in May 2014. Poor Apgar scores, a scaphoid abdomen and absent breath sounds over the right hemithorax were observed at birth. Chest and abdominal X-rays revealed a diaphragmatic hernia. The neonate was stabilised using high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, nitric oxide and sildenafil. The right diaphragm was reconstructed using combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior muscle flaps reinforced by a flexible composite mesh. At 12 months old, the infant had normal respiratory function and the diaphragm was intact. No disabilities of the shoulder or scapula were observed. This case indicates that a combination of living tissue and synthetic mesh can be used to reconstruct a functional diaphragm with efficient pleuroperitoneal separation. PMID:26909223

  14. The outcome of Jarcho–Levin syndrome treated with a functional latissimus dorsi flap – A series of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Gangurde, Bipin A.; Raut, Binita; Mehta, Rujuta; Thatte, Mukund R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Jarcho-Levin syndrome is manifested by vertebral body and rib malformations. Large rib defects with paradoxical chest motion lead to early deathdue to progressive respiratory insufficiency, hence it is a lethal syndrome. The only means of improving survival is early stabilisation of the chest wall defect by containing the thoracic herniation. Nitcher et al. and Thatte et al. showed that reconstruction of the chest wall was life saving. Thatte et al. had postulated that early coverage of the lungs and thoracic contents with functional latissimus dorsi may prevent the visceral overgrowth and secondary pleural changes. Materials and Methods: Our three cases which had medium- and long-term follow-up help to support this postulation. Three patients were assessed retrospectively. Their ages at surgery were 6 months, 8 months and 1 year, respectively. All had laboured breathing and paradoxical respiration. All of them were operated with ipsilateral latissimus dorsi flap. Results: The results were evaluated clinically. The patients had reduced or no respiratory infections. The lung compliance improved and they had no tachypnoea on walking, running or playing. Conclusion: Hence, this can be used as a life-saving procedure for Jarcho-Levin syndrome on a long-term basis. PMID:22754151

  15. Incorporating Plasticity of the Interfibrillar Matrix in Shear Lag Models is Necessary to Replicate the Multiscale Mechanics of Tendon Fascicles

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Spencer E.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite current knowledge of tendon structure, the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying tendon mechanics and failure are unknown. We recently showed that a shear lag model, which explicitly assumed plastic interfibrillar load transfer between discontinuous fibrils, could explain the multiscale fascicle mechanics, suggesting that fascicle yielding is due to plastic deformation of the interfibrillar matrix. However, it is unclear whether alternative physical mechanisms, such as elastic interfibrillar deformation or fibril yielding, also contribute to fascicle mechanical behavior. The objective of the current work was to determine if plasticity of the interfibrillar matrix is uniquely capable of explaining the multiscale mechanics of tendon fascicles including the tissue post-yield behavior. This was examined by comparing the predictions of a continuous fibril model and three separate shear lag models incorporating an elastic, plastic, or elastoplastic interfibrillar matrix with multiscale experimental data. The predicted effects of fibril yielding on each of these models were also considered. The results demonstrated that neither the continuous fibril model nor the elastic shear lag model can successfully predict the experimental data, even if fibril yielding is included. Only the plastic or elastoplastic shear lag models were capable of reproducing the multiscale tendon fascicle mechanics. Differences between these two models were small, although the elastoplastic model did improve the fit of the experimental data at low applied tissue strains. These findings suggest that while interfibrillar elasticity contributes to the initial stress response, plastic deformation of the interfibrillar matrix is responsible for tendon fascicle post-yield behavior. This information sheds light on the physical processes underlying tendon failure, which is essential to improve our understanding of tissue pathology and guide the development of successful repair. PMID:25262202

  16. Measurement of stress strain and vibrational properties of tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian Marco; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo

    2003-08-01

    The authors present a new non-intrusive experimental procedure based on laser techniques for the measurement of mechanical properties of tendons. The procedure is based on the measurement of the first resonance frequency of the tendon by laser Doppler vibrometry during in vitro tensile experiments, with the final aim of establishing a measurement procedure to perform the mechanical characterization of tendons by extracting parameters such as the resonance frequency, also achievable during in vivo investigation. The experimental procedure is reported, taking into account the need to simulate the physiological conditions of the Achilles tendon, and the measurement technique used for the non-invasive determination of tendon cross-sectional area during tensile vibration tests at different load levels is described. The test procedure is based on a tensile machine, which measures longitudinal tendons undergoing controlled load conditions. Cross-sectional area is measured using a new non-contact procedure for the measurement of tendon perimeter (repeatability of 99% and accuracy of 2%). For each loading condition, vibration resonance frequency and damping, cross-sectional area and tensile force are measured, allowing thus a mechanical characterization of the tendon. Tendon stress-strain curves are reported. Stress-strain curves have been correlated to the first vibration resonance frequency and damping of the tendon measured using a single-point laser Doppler vibrometer. Moreover, experimental results have been compared with a theoretical model of a vibrating cord showing discrepancies. In vitro tests are reported, demonstrating the validity of the method for the comparison of different aged rabbit tendons.

  17. The development of zebrafish tendon and ligament progenitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jessica W; Galloway, Jenna L

    2014-05-01

    Despite the importance of tendons and ligaments for transmitting movement and providing stability to the musculoskeletal system, their development is considerably less well understood than that of the tissues they serve to connect. Zebrafish have been widely used to address questions in muscle and skeletal development, yet few studies describe their tendon and ligament tissues. We have analyzed in zebrafish the expression of several genes known to be enriched in mammalian tendons and ligaments, including scleraxis (scx), collagen 1a2 (col1a2) and tenomodulin (tnmd), or in the tendon-like myosepta of the zebrafish (xirp2a). Co-expression studies with muscle and cartilage markers demonstrate the presence of scxa, col1a2 and tnmd at sites between the developing muscle and cartilage, and xirp2a at the myotendinous junctions. We determined that the zebrafish craniofacial tendon and ligament progenitors are neural crest derived, as in mammals. Cranial and fin tendon progenitors can be induced in the absence of differentiated muscle or cartilage, although neighboring muscle and cartilage are required for tendon cell maintenance and organization, respectively. By contrast, myoseptal scxa expression requires muscle for its initiation. Together, these data suggest a conserved role for muscle in tendon development. Based on the similarities in gene expression, morphology, collagen ultrastructural arrangement and developmental regulation with that of mammalian tendons, we conclude that the zebrafish tendon populations are homologous to their force-transmitting counterparts in higher vertebrates. Within this context, the zebrafish model can be used to provide new avenues for studying tendon biology in a vertebrate genetic system. PMID:24803652

  18. Achilles tendon suture deteriorates tendon capillary blood flow with sustained tissue oxygen saturation – an animal study

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Robert; Lorenzen, Johan; Rotter, Robert; Vogt, Peter M; Knobloch, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendons currently constitutes of conservative early functional treatment or surgical treatment either by open or minimal invasive techniques. We hypothesize that an experimental Achilles tendon suture in an animal model significantly deteriorates Achilles tendon microcirculation immediately following suturing. Methods Fifteen Achilles tendons of eight male Wistar rats (275–325 g) were included. After preparation of the Achilles tendon with a medial paratendinous approach, Achilles tendon microcirculation was assessed using combined Laser-Doppler and spectrophotometry (Oxygen-to-see) regarding: - tendinous capillary blood flow [arbitrary units AU] - tendinous tissue oxygen saturation [%] - tendinous venous filling pressure [rAU] The main body of the Achilles tendon was measured in the center of the suture with 50 Hz. 10 minutes after Achilles tendon suture (6-0 Prolene), a second assessment of microcirculatory parameters was performed. Results Achilles tendon capillary blood flow decreased by 57% following the suture (70 ± 30 AU vs. 31 ± 16 AU; p < 0.001). Tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remained at the same level before and after suture (78 ± 17% vs. 77 ± 22%; p = 0.904). Tendinous venous filling pressure increased by 33% (54 ± 16 AU vs. 72 ± 20 AU; p = 0.019) after suture. Conclusion Achilles tendon suture in anaesthetised rats causes an acute loss of capillary perfusion and increases postcapillary venous filling pressures indicating venous stasis. The primary hypothesis of this study was confirmed. In contrast, tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remains unchanged excluding acute intratendinous hypoxia within the first 10 minutes after suture. Further changes of oxygen saturation remain unclear. Furthermore, it remains to be determined to what extent reduced capillary blood flow as well as increased postcapillary stasis might influence tendon healing from a microcirculatory point of view in this animal setting

  19. Granuloma formation secondary to Achilles tendon repair with nonabsorbable suture

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Adnan; Celik, Haluk; Seker, Ali; Uysal, Mehmet Ali; Uzun, Metin; Malkoc, Melih

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Several complications can be observed after Achilles tendon repairs. In this study we aimed to report granuloma formation secondary to Achilles tendon repair with Ethibond (Ethicon INC, Somerville, New Jersey) suture. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 31 year-old man operated for Achilles tendon rupture. The Ethibond suture was used for primary repair. The patient attended to polyclinic with the complaints of swelling and discharge around the operation site four months after operation. A mass around distal portion of the Achilles tendon was detected. The granulomatous tissue was excised. Inside the mass Ethibond suture was detected. On histopathologic examination, typical findings of the foreign body reaction were observed. No microorganism was cultivated in the tissue culture. The patient has no complaint on the twelfth month control after surgery. DISCUSSION The results of primary repair of Achilles tendon are good but several complications were reported. In tendon repairs generally nonabsorbable sutures are used. The Ethibond is nonabsorbable, braided suture. In the literature, granuloma formations secondary to the suture materials such as polygylactine and braided polyethylen–polyester after Achilles tendon repair were reported but granuloma secondary to the Ethibond is very rare. CONCLUSION Although Ethibond suture is a strong and safe material for Achilles tendon repairs it may cause soft tissue problems such as granuloma. PMID:25212905

  20. Harnessing endogenous stem/progenitor cells for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang H.; Lee, Francis Y.; Tarafder, Solaiman; Kao, Kristy; Jun, Yena; Yang, Guodong; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Current stem cell–based strategies for tissue regeneration involve ex vivo manipulation of these cells to confer features of the desired progenitor population. Recently, the concept that endogenous stem/progenitor cells could be used for regenerating tissues has emerged as a promising approach that potentially overcomes the obstacles related to cell transplantation. Here we applied this strategy for the regeneration of injured tendons in a rat model. First, we identified a rare fraction of tendon cells that was positive for the known tendon stem cell marker CD146 and exhibited clonogenic capacity, as well as multilineage differentiation ability. These tendon-resident CD146+ stem/progenitor cells were selectively enriched by connective tissue growth factor delivery (CTGF delivery) in the early phase of tendon healing, followed by tenogenic differentiation in the later phase. The time-controlled proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells by CTGF delivery successfully led to tendon regeneration with densely aligned collagen fibers, normal level of cellularity, and functional restoration. Using siRNA knockdown to evaluate factors involved in tendon generation, we demonstrated that the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates CTGF-induced proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells. Together, our findings support the use of endogenous stem/progenitor cells as a strategy for tendon regeneration without cell transplantation and suggest this approach warrants exploration in other tissues. PMID:26053662

  1. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture After Statin Use

    PubMed Central

    Nesselroade, Ryan D.; Nickels, Leslie Connor

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury. We report the case of bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture sustained with minimal force while refereeing a football game. The injury was suspected to be associated with statin use as the patient had no other identifiable risk factors. The diagnosis was confirmed using bedside ultrasound. PMID:21079697

  2. A rare knee extensor mechanism injury: Vastus intermedius tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Engin; Aydin, Canan Gonen; Akman, Yunus Emre; Gul, Murat; Arikan, Yavuz; Aycan, Osman Emre; Kabukcuoglu, Yavuz Selim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Quadriceps tendon injuries are rare. There is a limited number of studies in the literature, reporting partial quadriceps tendon ruptures. We did not find any study reporting an isolated vastus intermedius tendon injury in the literature. Presentation of case A 22 years old professional rugby player with the complaints of pain in the right lower limb, decreased range of motion in right knee and a mass in the mid-anterior of the right thigh applied following an overloading on his hyperflexed knee during a rugby match. T2 sequence magnetic resonance images revealed discontinuity in the vastus intermedius tendon and intramuscular hematoma. The patient has been conservatively treated. Discussion Quadriceps tendon ruptures generally occur after the 4th decade in the presence of degenerative changes. Our case is a young professional rugby player. Isolated vastus intermedius tendon rupture is unusual. Conservative treatment is performed as the intermedius tendon is in the deepest layer of the quadriceps muscle. Conclusion We report the first case of isolated rupture of the vastus intermedius tendon in the literature and we claim that disorder may be succesfully treated with conservative treatment and adequate physiotheraphy. PMID:26298093

  3. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture while playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Jooma, N

    2002-04-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome. PMID:11916903

  4. Single-Stage Flexor Tendon Grafting: Refining the Steps.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Derek R; McClinton, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Single-stage tendon grafting for reconstruction of zone I and II flexor tendon injuries is a challenging procedure in hand surgery. Careful patient selection, strict indications, and adherence to sound surgical principles are mandatory for return of digital motion. PMID:26026357

  5. New finding in the radiographic diagnosis of Achilles tendon rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, H.; Mellon, W.S. Jr.; Malhotra, A.K.; Olken, S.M.; Halls, J.

    1982-06-01

    The authors describe a new radiographic sign of rupture of the Achilles tendon system. It is a fracture, with separation through an osteophyte at the insertion of this tendon. Previously reported signs are also discussed as well as the present case report.

  6. Influence of cathodic polarization upon bond strength of pretensioned tendons in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, E.; Hartt, W.H.

    1996-11-01

    The possibility of bond loss for pretensioned tendon in concrete in response to cathodic protection has the potential for limiting applicability of this corrosion control methodology to this material class. To investigate the possible occurrence and significance of such bond loss, a series of pretensioned concrete beams were cathodically polarized utilizing current densities in the range 50--5,000 mA/m{sup 2} (tendon steel surface area basis), during which time specimen dimensional changes were monitored using strain gages which were both mounted upon the tendon and embedded in the concrete. Experimental difficulties were encountered in that the strain gages were not adequately durable; and the results were variable in that the strain data for some specimens at a given current density indicated partial bond loss whereas there was no indication of this for others. In the case of specimens that may have experienced partial bond loss, the results showed that this transpired at a lower total charge transfer the higher the applied cathodic current density and that, if current density upon an actual pretensioned concrete structure is uniform and in the range typical for cathodic protection, bond loss should not occur within the remaining service life of most structures.

  7. Response of rabbit Achilles tendon to chronic repetitive loading.

    PubMed

    Archambault, J M; Hart, D A; Herzog, W

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the response of tendon to chronic repetitive loading. Controlled muscle stimulation was used to load the rabbit Achilles tendon at a frequency of 1.25 Hz for two hours per day, three days per week for a period of 11 weeks. Average peak tendon force was 26 N during the protocol. The loading protocol did not modify the gross morphology of the tissue, nor its water content or cellularity. Increases in mRNA expression of collagen Type III and MMPs were observed, but no signs of injury were detected by histologic examination of tendon and paratenon structures. The lack of a detectable injury response suggests that the tendons were not loaded beyond their capacity for repair. Factors additional to mechanical loading such as aging, illness or stress may be necessary to produce pathology. PMID:11696985

  8. Specialisation of extracellular matrix for function in tendons and ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Helen L.; Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Rumian, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tendons and ligaments are similar structures in terms of their composition, organisation and mechanical properties. The distinction between them stems from their anatomical location; tendons form a link between muscle and bone while ligaments link bones to bones. A range of overlapping functions can be assigned to tendon and ligaments and each structure has specific mechanical properties which appear to be suited for particular in vivo function. The extracellular matrix in tendon and ligament varies in accordance with function, providing appropriate mechanical properties. The most useful framework in which to consider extracellular matrix differences therefore is that of function rather than anatomical location. In this review we discuss what is known about the relationship between functional requirements, structural properties from molecular to gross level, cellular gene expression and matrix turnover. The relevance of this information is considered by reviewing clinical aspects of tendon and ligament repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:23885341

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF A TENDON PHENOTYPE IN GDF6 DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Mikic, Borjana; Rossmeier, Kerri; Bierwert, LouAnn

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the growth/differentiation factors, GDFs 5, 6, and 7 in particular, may play a role in tendon and ligament biology. Mice with genetic mutations in Gdf5 have altered tendon composition and mechanical behavior, while animals with functional null mutations in Gdf7 have a more subtle tendon phenotype. The present study demonstrates for the first time that a null mutation in Gdf6 is associated with substantially lower levels of tail tendon collagen content (−33%) in four-week-old male mice, which has direct functional consequences for the mechanical integrity of the tissue (45-50% reduction in material properties). These data support a role for GDF6 in tendon matrix modeling. PMID:19248159

  10. System and Method for Tensioning a Robotically Actuated Tendon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A tendon tensioning system includes a tendon having a proximal end and a distal end, an actuator, and a motor controller. The actuator may include a drive screw and a motor, and may be coupled with the proximal end of the tendon and configured to apply a tension through the tendon in response to an electrical current. The motor controller may be electrically coupled with the actuator, and configured to provide an electrical current having a first amplitude to the actuator until a stall tension is achieved through the tendon; provide a pulse current to the actuator following the achievement of the stall tension, where the amplitude of the pulse current is greater than the first amplitude, and return the motor to a steady state holding current following the conclusion of the pulse current.

  11. Neglected bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon: A case report.

    PubMed

    Cherrad, Taoufik; Louaste, Jamal; Kasmaoui, El Houcine; Bousbaä, Hicham; Rachid, Khaled

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon (PT) is extremely rare and is generally associated to some chronic diseases. When the rupture becomes chronic, it is more difficult to repair that as it remained untreated. The diagnosis, which is clinical, is often delayed, guided by standard radiography and confirmed by ultrasound or MRI. The management of a bilateral neglected, chronic patellar tendon rupture must address some serious difficulties: the proximally retracted patella, the reconstruction of the patellar tendon, finally, the temporary protection of this repair. We report a case of neglected bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon in a chronic hemodialysis patient, treated with a plastic surgery of the ipsilateral quadriceps tendon. PMID:26566349

  12. Force Model for Control of Tendon Driven Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pena, Edward; Thompson, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Knowing the tendon forces generated for a given task such as grasping via a model, an artificial hand can be controlled. A two-dimensional force model for the index finger was developed. This system is assumed to be in static equilibrium, therefore, the equations of equilibrium were applied at each joint. Constraint equations describing the tendon branch connectivity were used. Gaussian elimination was used to solve for the unknowns of the Linear system. Results from initial work on estimating tendon forces in post-operative hands during active motion therapy were discussed. The results are important for understanding the effects of hand position on tendon tension, elastic effects on tendon tension, and overall functional anatomy of the hand.

  13. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  14. Pectoralis major tendon rupture. Surgical procedures review.

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pectoralis major (PM) muscle is the powerful dynamic stabiliser of the shoulder that acts as a flexor, adductor and internal rotator. The rupture of the PM tendon is a relatively rare injury that was firstly described in a French boy by Patissier in 1822 and later, in 1861, by Letenneur who reported another similiar case. To date, over 200 cases have been published. In this article we describe the clinical anatomy and the mechanism of injuries of PM and we review the surgical procedures for acute and chronic ruptures. PMID:23738281

  15. Do Dietary Factors Influence Tendon Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Scott, Alex; Nordin, Cara

    2016-01-01

    There is very little direct research to conclusively prove the relevance of diet in primary tendinopathies, however it seems prudent to ask whether our current knowledge about the impact of nutrition on collagen metabolism could be useful in assessing, preventing, or treating tendinopathy. The objective of this chapter is to discuss the potential impact (negative or positive) that nutrition may have on the metabolism of tendons by summarizing the related research. The chapter briefly discusses the roles that specific vitamins, amino acids, lipids, and antioxidants have in various processes of the body that may be directly or indirectly related to tenocyte metabolism. PMID:27535270

  16. Mechanical model of a single tendon finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical model of a single tendon three phalanxes finger is presented. By means of the model both kinematic and dynamical behavior of the finger itself can be studied. This finger is a part of a more complex mechanical system that consists in a four finger grasping device for robots or in a five finger human hand prosthesis. A first prototype has been realized in our department in order to verify the real behavior of the model. Some results of both kinematic and dynamical behavior are presented.

  17. Modeling Implantable Passive Mechanisms for Modifying the Transmission of Forces and Movements Between Muscle and Tendons.

    PubMed

    Homayouni, Taymaz; Underwood, Kelsey N; Beyer, Kamin C; Martin, Elon R; Allan, Christopher H; Balasubramanian, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    This paper explores the development of biomechanical models for evaluating a new class of passive mechanical implants for orthopedic surgery. The proposed implants take the form of passive engineered mechanisms, and will be used to improve the functional attachment of muscles to tendons and bone by modifying the transmission of forces and movement inside the body. Specifically, we present how two types of implantable mechanisms may be modeled in the open-source biomechanical software OpenSim. The first implant, which is proposed for hand tendon-transfer surgery, differentially distributes the forces and movement from one muscle across multiple tendons. The second implant, which is proposed for knee-replacement surgery, scales up the forces applied to the knee joint by the quadriceps muscle. This paper's key innovation is that such mechanisms have never been considered before in biomechanical simulation modeling and in surgery. When compared with joint function enabled by the current surgical practice of using sutures to make the attachment, biomechanical simulations show that the surgery with 1) the differential mechanism (tendon network) implant improves the fingers' ability to passively adapt to an object's shape significantly during grasping tasks (2.74× as measured by the extent of finger flexion) for the same muscle force, and 2) the force-scaling implant increases knee-joint torque by 84% for the same muscle force. The critical significance of this study is to provide a methodology for the design and inclusion of the implants into biomechanical models and validating the improvement in joint function they enable when compared with current surgical practice. PMID:25850081

  18. Scx-transduced tendon-derived stem cells (tdscs) promoted better tendon repair compared to mock-transduced cells in a rat patellar tendon window injury model.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chunlai; Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Lee, Yuk Wa; Wong, Yin Mei

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the transplantation of Scx-transduced tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) promoted better tendon repair compared to the transplantation of mock-transduced cells. This study thus aimed to investigate the effect of Scx transduction on the expression of lineage markers in TDSCs and the effect of the resulting cell line in the promotion of tendon repair. Rat non-GFP or GFP-TDSCs were transduced with Scx or empty lentiviral vector (Mock) and selected by blasticidin. The mRNA expressions of Scx and different lineage markers were examined by qRT-PCR. The effect of the transplantation of GFP-TDSC-Scx on tendon repair was then tested in a rat unilateral patellar tendon window injury model. The transplantation of GFP-TDSC-Mock and scaffold-only served as controls. At week 2, 4 and 8 post-transplantation, the repaired patellar tendon was harvested for ex vivo fluorescent imaging, vivaCT imaging, histology, immunohistochemistry and biomechanical test. GFP-TDSC-Scx consistently showed higher expressions of most of tendon- and cartilage- related markers compared to the GFP-TDSC-Mock. However, the effect of Scx transduction on the expressions of bone-related markers was inconclusive. The transplanted GFP-TDSCs could be detected in the window wound at week 2 but not at week 4. Ectopic mineralization was detected in some samples at week 8 but there was no difference among different groups. The GFP-TDSC-Scx group only statistically significantly improved tendon repair histologically and biomechanically compared to the Scaffold-only group and the GFP-TDSC-Mock group at the early stage of tendon repair. There was significant higher expression of collagen type I in the window wound in the GFP-TDSC-Scx group compared to the other two groups at week 2. The transplantation of GFP-TDSC-Scx promoted healing at the early stage of tendon repair in a rat patellar tendon window injury model. PMID:24831949

  19. Murine patellar tendon biomechanical properties and regional strain patterns during natural tendon-to-bone healing after acute injury

    PubMed Central

    Gilday, Steven D.; Casstevens, E. Chris; Kenter, Keith; Shearn, Jason T.; Butler, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Tendon-to-bone healing following acute injury is generally poor and often fails to restore normal tendon biomechanical properties. In recent years, the murine patellar tendon (PT) has become an important model system for studying tendon healing and repair due to its genetic tractability and accessible location within the knee. However, the mechanical properties of native murine PT, specifically the regional differences in tissue strains during loading, and the biomechanical outcomes of natural PT-to-bone healing have not been well characterized. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the global biomechanical properties and regional strain patterns of both normal and naturally healing murine PT at three time points (2, 5, and 8 weeks) following acute surgical rupture of the tibial enthesis. Normal murine PT exhibited distinct regional variations in tissue strain, with the insertion region experiencing approximately 2.5 times greater strain than the midsubstance at failure (10.80 ± 2.52% vs. 4.11 ± 1.40%; mean ± SEM). Injured tendons showed reduced structural (ultimate load and linear stiffness) and material (ultimate stress and linear modulus) properties compared to both normal and contralateral sham-operated tendons at all healing time points. Injured tendons also displayed increased local strain in the insertion region compared to contralateral shams at both physiologic and failure load levels. 93.3% of injured tendons failed at the tibial insertion, compared to only 60% and 66.7% of normal and sham tendons, respectively. These results indicate that 8 weeks of natural tendon-to-bone healing does not restore normal biomechanical function to the murine PT following injury. PMID:24210849

  20. Calcium phosphate-hybridized tendon graft to enhance tendon-bone healing two years after ACL reconstruction in goats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We developed a novel technique to improve tendon-bone attachment by hybridizing calcium phosphate (CaP) with a tendon graft using an alternate soaking process. However, the long-term result with regard to the interface between the tendon graft and the bone is unclear. Methods We analyzed bone tunnel enlargement by computed tomography and histological observation of the interface and the tendon graft with and without the CaP hybridization 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in goats using EndoButton and the postscrew technique (CaP, n = 4; control, n = 4). Results The tibial bone tunnel enlargement rates in the CaP group were lower than those in the control group (p < 0.05). In the CaP group, in the femoral and tibial bone tunnels at the anterior and posterior of the joint aperture site, direct insertion-like formation that contained a cartilage layer without tidemarks was more observed at the tendon-bone interface than in the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the gap area between the tendon graft and the bone was more observed at the femoral bone tunnel of the joint aperture site in the control group than in the CaP group (p < 0.05). The maturation of the tendon grafts determined using the ligament tissue maturation index was similar in both groups. Conclusions The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced the tendon-bone healing 2 years after ACL reconstruction in goats. The use of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts can reduce the bone tunnel enlargement and gap area associated with the direct insertion-like formation in the interface near the joint. PMID:22166674

  1. Free Flap Functional Muscle Transfers.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ryan M; Ruch, David S

    2016-08-01

    Free functional muscle transfers remain a powerful reconstructive tool to restore upper extremity function when other options such as tendon or nerve transfers are not available. This reconstructive technique is commonly used for patients following trauma, ischemic contractures, and brachial plexopathies. Variable outcomes have been reported following free functional muscle transfers that are related to motor nerve availability and reinnervation. This article highlights considerations around donor motor nerve selection, dissection, and use of the gracilis muscle, and the surgical approach to performing a free functional muscle transfer to restore elbow flexion and/or digit flexion. PMID:27387083

  2. The Mohawk homeobox gene is a critical regulator of tendon differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshiaki; Toriuchi, Naoya; Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Ueno-Kudoh, Hiroe; Sato, Tempei; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Nishida, Keiichiro; Akimoto, Takayuki; Takahashi, Michiko; Miyaki, Shigeru; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Mohawk (Mkx) is a member of the Three Amino acid Loop Extension superclass of atypical homeobox genes that is expressed in developing tendons. To investigate the in vivo functions of Mkx, we generated Mkx(-/-) mice. These mice had hypoplastic tendons throughout the body. Despite the reduction in tendon mass, the cell number in tail tendon fiber bundles was similar between wild-type and Mkx(-/-) mice. We also observed small collagen fibril diameters and a down-regulation of type I collagen in Mkx(-/-) tendons. These data indicate that Mkx plays a critical role in tendon differentiation by regulating type I collagen production in tendon cells. PMID:20498044

  3. Squamous cell carcinoma of the heel with free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap reconstruction: case report and technical note.

    PubMed

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed Mahmoud; Barsoum, Adel K; Moneer, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common skin cancer; however, it is relatively rare on the foot. Wide excision of SCC is the recommended surgical treatment. The extent of the excision may involve resection of muscles and bone in cases of deep lesions. The functional and anatomic properties and lack of sufficient locally available tissues make the reconstruction of post-oncosurgical defects of the foot a challenging process. Heel reconstruction poses the biggest challenge due to the unique weight-bearing requirements. We present a case of a Marjolin's ulcer on the heel in a 62-year-old woman complicating a chronic non-healing wound. The heel defect was reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with delayed secondary closure. The outcome was successful both functionally and cosmetically. No further procedures were needed. PMID:27161144

  4. Bronchopleural fistula after pneumonectomy: interdisciplinary surgical closure by an ipsilateral pedicled latissimus dorsi flap supported by video-assisted thoracoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolter, A; Scholz, T; Diedrichson, J; Arens-Landwehr, A; Schroeder-Finckh, R; Liebau, J

    2013-11-01

    Post-pneumonectomy bronchopleural fistula (BPF) remains a rare but often life-threatening complication and therapeutic challenge. Traditional surgical procedures include chronic open drainage, attempts at direct stump closure, thoracoplasty with or without chest wall muscle transposition and trans-sternal bronchial closure. We describe a case with successful closure of a chronic BPF after pneumonectomy by intrathoracic transposition of a pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap circumferentially fixed on the surrounding pleural tissue under continuous video-assisted thoracoscopic overview. The postoperative course was without complications; no tumour, empyema or fistula re-occurred. In this article we want to present the potential advantages of video-assisted thoracoscopic support and interdisciplinary teamwork to improve the outcome of patients with BPFs after pneumonectomy. PMID:23587680

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma of the heel with free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap reconstruction: case report and technical note

    PubMed Central

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed Mahmoud; Barsoum, Adel K.; Moneer, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common skin cancer; however, it is relatively rare on the foot. Wide excision of SCC is the recommended surgical treatment. The extent of the excision may involve resection of muscles and bone in cases of deep lesions. The functional and anatomic properties and lack of sufficient locally available tissues make the reconstruction of post-oncosurgical defects of the foot a challenging process. Heel reconstruction poses the biggest challenge due to the unique weight-bearing requirements. We present a case of a Marjolin’s ulcer on the heel in a 62-year-old woman complicating a chronic non-healing wound. The heel defect was reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with delayed secondary closure. The outcome was successful both functionally and cosmetically. No further procedures were needed. PMID:27161144

  6. Reconstruction of severely infected gluteal osteoradionecrosis using negative-pressure wound therapy and latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Youn, Dong Geun; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is mandatory for aggressive cancer treatment. Unfortunately, the high-energy radiation used can lead to severe osteoradionecrosis. Radical debridement of devitalized bone and soft tissue coupled with reconstruction using well-vascularized tissues is the accepted treatment for this condition. However, osteoradionecrosis cannot be controlled easily or rapidly. The aim of this study was to present the results of the use of serial negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in combination with a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap for treatment of gluteal osteoradionecrosis in a consecutive series of patients. Between January 2003 and December 2012, nine patients underwent reconstruction using serial NPWT and latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps. We applied negative-pressure dressings for at least 8 weeks. Final reconstruction was performed after the infection was controlled. The superior gluteal artery and vein were used as recipient vessels in all the cases. The mean interval between operation and radiation therapy was 28.3 ± 8.3 years, and the mean number of debridement performed was 6.3 ± 1. NPWT dressings were applied for 8-12 weeks (mean, 9.3 ± 2 weeks). The defects ranged in size from 14 × 8 cm to 18 × 15 cm. The flap size ranged from 15 × 10 cm to 18 × 15 cm. All flaps survived uneventfully except in one patient who experienced chronic seroma and wound dehiscence. There were no recurrences of osteomyelitis during the follow-up periods (mean, 14 ± 6.1 months). Based on the results obtained from this consecutive series of patients, we suggest that this methodology may provide an alternative approach for the treatment of severe osteoradionecrosis of the gluteal region. PMID:25641653

  7. Miniopen Repair of Ruptured Achilles Tendon in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acute degenerative Achilles tendons ruptures may be managed either operatively or nonoperatively with the superiority of the operative treatment in reducing the risk of rerupture. Acute rupture of Achilles tendon is commonly seen in diabetic patients. Open techniques for Achilles tendon repair have been associated with significant complications as deep infection and wound-related problems. Patients and Methods. Thirteen type II diabetic patients with acute degenerative rupture of the Achilles tendon were managed by miniopen repair augmented by peroneus brevis tendon. Results. All repairs healed successfully. The patients were able to return to preinjury level of activity after a mean of 5 months. The mean ATRS score improved from 15.1 preoperatively to 74.8 postoperatively. The mean Leppilahti ankle score was 59.6. Three patients suffered from superficial wound infection which was successfully managed. However, no patients suffered any major complications such as DVT, deep infection, or reruptures during the period of the study. Conclusion. Repair of acute degenerative tear of the Achilles tendon with peroneus brevis tendon augmentation could be successfully performed through a miniopen technique with minimization of wound complications in diabetic patients. PMID:27437478

  8. Overuse tendon conditions: time to change a confusing terminology.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, N; Khan, K M; Puddu, G

    1998-01-01

    In overuse clinical conditions in and around tendons, frank inflammation is infrequent, and is associated mostly with tendon ruptures. Tendinosis implies tendon degeneration without clinical or histological signs of intratendinous inflammation, and is not necessarily symptomatic. Patients undergoing an operation for Achilles tendinopathy show similar areas of degeneration. When the term tendinitis is used in a clinical context, it does not refer to a specific histopathological entity. However, tendinitis is commonly used for conditions that are truly tendinoses, and this leads athletes and coaches to underestimate the proven chronicity of the condition. Paratenonitis is characterized by acute edema and hypermia of the paratenon, with infiltration of inflammatory cells, possibly with production of a fibrinous exudate that fills the tendon sheath, causing the typical crepitus that can be felt on clinical examination. The term partial tear of a tendon should describe a macroscopically evident subcutaneous partial tear of a tendon, an uncommon acute lesion. Most articles describing the surgical treatment of 'partial tears' of a given tendon in reality deal with degenerative tendinopathies. The combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance should be labeled tendinopathy. According to the tissues affected, the terms tendinopathy, paratendinopathy, or pantendinopathy should be used. PMID:9848596

  9. Conflicts, snapping and instability of the tendons. Pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Fantino, Olivier; Borne, J.; Bordet, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Conflicts, snapping and instability of the tendons are common, and ultrasound (US) is the method of choice for evidencing these conditions thanks to the possibility to perform dynamic maneuvers during imaging studies. A conflict can occur between a tendon and a bone structure, other tendons, the retinacula or pulleys. Snapping can occur due to instability caused by rupture of the retinaculum, conflict between a thickened retinaculum and a bone prominence or due to an abnormal position of the tendon. Instability can occur due to insufficient ability of the retinaculum to keep the tendons in the bone groove or its failure to hold the tendons applied to the bone. The technique for evidencing conflicts, snapping and instability of the tendons is very demanding because it requires a thorough knowledge of the US appearance and dynamic maneuvers. However, at the present time US examination completed with dynamic maneuvers is the investigation of choice for evidencing these disorders and providing the clinicians with the necessary information. PMID:23396604

  10. The tendon injury response is influenced by decorin and biglycan.

    PubMed

    Dunkman, Andrew A; Buckley, Mark R; Mienaltowski, Michael J; Adams, Sheila M; Thomas, Stephen J; Satchell, Lauren; Kumar, Akash; Pathmanathan, Lydia; Beason, David P; Iozzo, Renato V; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2014-03-01

    Defining the constituent regulatory molecules in tendon is critical to understanding the process of tendon repair and instructive to the development of novel treatment modalities. The purpose of this study is to define the structural, expressional, and mechanical changes in the tendon injury response, and elucidate the roles of two class I small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs). We utilized biglycan-null, decorin-null and wild type mice with an established patellar tendon injury model. Mechanical testing demonstrated functional changes associated with injury and the incomplete recapitulation of mechanical properties after 6 weeks. In addition, SLRP deficiency influenced the mechanical properties with a marked lack of improvement between 3 and 6 weeks in decorin-null tendons. Morphological analyses of the injury response and role of SLRPs demonstrated alterations in cell density and shape as well as collagen alignment and fibril structure resulting from injury. SLRP gene expression was studied using RT-qPCR with alterations in expression associated with the injured tendons. Our results show that in the absence of biglycan initial healing may be impaired while in the absence of decorin later healing is clearly diminished. This suggests that biglycan and decorin may have sequential roles in the tendon response to injury. PMID:24072490

  11. The Tendon Injury Response Is Influenced by Decorin and Biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Dunkman, Andrew A.; Buckley, Mark R.; Mienaltowski, Michael J.; Adams, Sheila M.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Satchell, Lauren; Kumar, Akash; Pathmanathan, Lydia; Beason, David P.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Birk, David E.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Defining the constituent regulatory molecules in tendon is critical to understanding the process of tendon repair and instructive to the development of novel treatment modalities. The purpose of this study is to define the structural, expressional, and mechanical changes in the tendon injury response, and elucidate the roles of two class I small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs). We utilized biglycan-null, decorin-null and wild type mice with an established patellar tendon injury model. Mechanical testing demonstrated functional changes associated with injury and the incomplete recapitulation of mechanical properties after six weeks. In addition, SLRP deficiency influenced the mechanical properties with a marked lack of improvement between three and six weeks in decorin-null tendons. Morphological analyses of the injury response and role of SLRPs demonstrated alterations in cell density and shape as well as collagen alignment and fibril structure resulting from injury. SLRP gene expression was studied using RT-qPCR with alterations in expression associated with the injured tendons. Our results show that in the absence of biglycan initial healing may be impaired while in the absence of decorin later healing is clearly diminished. This suggests that biglycan and decorin may have sequential roles in the tendon response to injury. PMID:24072490

  12. Current Concepts in Examination and Treatment of Elbow Tendon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Todd S.; Nirschl, Robert; Renstrom, Per

    2013-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the tendons of the elbow occur frequently in the overhead athlete, creating a significant loss of function and dilemma to sports medicine professionals. A detailed review of the anatomy, etiology, and pathophysiology of tendon injury coupled with comprehensive evaluation and treatment information is needed for clinicians to optimally design treatment programs for rehabilitation and prevention. Evidence Acquisitions: The PubMed database was searched in January 2012 for English-language articles pertaining to elbow tendon injury. Results: Detailed information on tendon pathophysiology was found along with incidence of elbow injury in overhead athletes. Several evidence-based reviews were identified, providing a thorough review of the recommended rehabilitation for elbow tendon injury. Conclusions: Humeral epicondylitis is an extra-articular tendon injury that is common in athletes subjected to repetitive upper extremity loading. Research is limited on the identification of treatment modalities that can reduce pain and restore function to the elbow. Eccentric exercise has been studied in several investigations and, when coupled with a complete upper extremity strengthening program, can produce positive results in patients with elbow tendon injury. Further research is needed in high-level study to delineate optimal treatment methods. PMID:24427389

  13. Temporal Healing in Rat Achilles Tendon: Ultrasound Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E.; Okotie, Gregory; Brounts, Sabrina H.; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Vanderby, Ray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether a new ultrasound-based technique correlates with mechanical and biological metrics that describe the tendon healing. Achilles tendons in 32 rats were unilaterally transected and allowed to heal without repair. At 7, 9, 14, or 29 days post-injury, tendons were collected and examined for healing via ultrasound image analysis, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemistry. Consistent with previous studies, we observe that the healing tendons are mechanically inferior (ultimate stress, ultimate load, and normalized stiffness) and biologically altered (cellular and ECM factors) compared to contralateral controls with an incomplete recovery over healing time. Unique to this study, we report: 1) Echo intensity (defined by gray-scale brightness in the ultrasound image) in the healing tissue is related to stress and normalized stiffness. 2) Elongation to failure is relatively constant so that tissue normalized stiffness is linearly correlated with ultimate stress. Together, 1 and 2 suggest a method to quantify mechanical compromise in healing tendons. 3) The amount and type of collagen in healing tendons associates with their strength and normalized stiffness as well as their ultrasound echo intensity. 4) A significant increase of periostin in the healing tissues suggests an important but unexplored role for this ECM protein in tendon healing. PMID:23149902

  14. Successful management of bilateral patellar tendon rupture in a dog.

    PubMed

    Shipov, A; Shahar, R; Joseph, R; Milgram, J

    2008-01-01

    A seven-year-old, 41 kg, intact, cross breed dog, was presented with a history of bilateral hind limb lameness after falling from a height of 1 m. Clinical and radiographic findings were consistent with bilateral patellar tendon rupture. Surgical repair was performed bilaterally. The tendons were sutured primarily, and an internal splint of nylon leader was added. Good apposition of the severed tendon ends had been achieved intraoperatively; however, post operative radiographs showed supra-trochlear displacement of both patellae. The casts used to immobilize the stifle joints slipped distally and three days post operatively the tendon repair had broken down, bilaterally. Revision surgery was undertaken and the tendons were re-sutured. Nylon leader was placed through holes that had been drilled in the patellae and tibiae. The stifle joints were immobilized with type I external skeletal fixators (ESFs). Both freeform polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) connecting bars were found to be broken at the level of the stifle joints two days later, without any disruption of the primary tendon repair. Each connecting bar was replaced with two connecting bars of PMMA reinforced with 3 mm steel wire. The dog was fully weight-bearing with a reduced range of motion in flexion immediately after removal of the ESFs at six weeks and was still sound 18 months post-operatively. Primary tendon repair in combination with adequate immobilization allowed for an excellent outcome in a complicated bilateral pathology. PMID:18545725

  15. Tenocyte contraction induces crimp formation in tendon-like tissue

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, David F.; Hill, Patrick; Kadler, Karl E.; Margetts, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are composed of longitudinally aligned collagen fibrils arranged in bundles with an undulating pattern, called crimp. The crimp structure is established during embryonic development and plays a vital role in the mechanical behaviour of tendon, acting as a shock absorber during loading. However, the mechanism of crimp formation is unknown, partly because of the difficulties of studying tendon development in vivo. Here we used a 3D cell culture system in which embryonic tendon fibroblasts synthesize a tendon-like construct comprised of collagen fibrils arranged in parallel bundles. Investigations using polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy showed that tendon-constructs contained a regular pattern of wavy collagen fibrils. Tensile testing indicated that this superstructure was a form of embryonic crimp producing a characteristic toe region in the stress-strain curves. Furthermore, contraction of tendon fibroblasts was the critical factor in the buckling of collagen fibrils during the formation of the crimp structure. Using these biological data, a finite element model was built that mimics the contraction of the tendon fibroblasts and monitors the response of the ECM. The results show that the contraction of the fibroblasts is a sufficient mechanical impulse to build a planar wavy pattern. Furthermore, the value of crimp wavelength was determined by the mechanical properties of the collagen fibrils and inter-fibrillar matrix. Increasing fibril stiffness combined with constant matrix stiffness led to an increase in crimp wavelength. The data suggest a novel mechanism of crimp formation, and the finite element model indicates the minimum requirements to generate a crimp structure in embryonic tendon. PMID:21735243

  16. Spatial variations in Achilles tendon shear wave speed

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Slane, Laura C.; Lee, Kenneth S.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) is an ultrasound imaging modality that can provide insight into tissue mechanics by measuring shear wave propagation speed, a property that depends on tissue elasticity. SSI has previously been used to characterize the increase in Achilles tendon shear wave speed that occurs with loading, an effect attributable to the strain-stiffening behavior of the tissue. However, little is known about how shear wave speed varies spatially, which is important, given the anatomical variation that occurs between the calcaneus insertion and the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction. The purpose of this study was to investigate spatial variations in shear wave speed along medial and lateral paths of the Achilles tendon for three different ankle postures: resting ankle angle (R, i.e. neutral), plantarflexed (P; R − 15 deg), and dorsiflexed (D; R + 15 deg). We observed significant spatial and posture variations in tendon shear wave speed in ten healthy young adults. Shear wave speeds in the Achilles free tendon averaged 12 ± 1.2 m/s in a resting position, but decreased to 7.2 ± 1.8 m/s with passive plantarflexion. Distal tendon shear wave speeds often reached the maximum tracking limit (16.3 m/s) of the system when the ankle was in the passively dorsiflexed posture (+15 deg from R). At a fixed posture, shear wave speeds decreased significantly from the free tendon to the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction, with slightly higher speeds measured on the medial side than on the lateral side. Shear wave speeds were only weakly correlated with the thickness and depth of the tendon, suggesting that the distal-to-proximal variations may reflect greater compliance in the aponeurosis relative to the free tendon. The results highlight the importance of considering both limb posture and transducer positioning when using SSI for biomechanical and clinical assessments of the Achilles tendon. PMID:24933528

  17. Imaging horse tendons using multimodal 2-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Eichorst, John Paul; Durgam, Sushmitha; Fried, Glenn A; Stewart, Allison A; Stewart, Matthew C

    2014-03-15

    Injuries and damage to tendons plague both human and equine athletes. At the site of injuries, various cells congregate to repair and re-structure the collagen. Treatments for collagen injury range from simple procedures such as icing and pharmaceutical treatments to more complex surgeries and the implantation of stem cells. Regardless of the treatment, the level of mechanical stimulation incurred by the recovering tendon is crucial. However, for a given tendon injury, it is not known precisely how much of a load should be applied for an effective recovery. Both too much and too little loading of the tendon could be detrimental during recovery. A mapping of the complex local environment imparted to any cell present at the site of a tendon injury may however, convey fundamental insights related to their decision making as a function of applied load. Therefore, fundamentally knowing how cells translate mechanical cues from their external environment into signals regulating their functions during repair is crucial to more effectively treat these types of injuries. In this paper, we studied systems of tendons with a variety of 2-photon-based imaging techniques to examine the local mechanical environment of cells in both normal and injured tendons. These tendons were chemically treated to instigate various extents of injury and in some cases, were injected with stem cells. The results related by each imaging technique distinguish with high contrast and resolution multiple morphologies of the cells' nuclei and the alignment of the collagen during injury. The incorporation of 2-photon FLIM into this study probed new features in the local environment of the nuclei that were not apparent with steady-state imaging. Overall, this paper focuses on horse tendon injury pattern and analysis with different 2-photon confocal modalities useful for wide variety of application in damaged tissues. PMID:23871762

  18. Rupture of the triceps tendon - A case series.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Atin; Kacchap, Naiman-Deep; Tanwar, Yashwant-Singh; Kumar, Devendra; Kumar, Birendra

    2016-08-01

    Triceps rupture is the least common among all tendon injuries. The usual mechanism of injury is a fall on an outstretched hand, although direct contact injuries have also been reported to cause this injury. The diagnosis of acute triceps tendon rupture may be missed, which can result in prolonged disability and delayed operative management. We presented three cases of acute triceps tendon rupture each at different site showing the spectrum of injury to the muscle and mechanism of injury and management were also discussed. PMID:27578383

  19. Patellar Tendinosis: Acute Patellar Tendon Rupture and Jumper's Knee.

    PubMed

    Depalma, Michael James; Perkins, Robert Harrison

    2004-05-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) may affect athletes who engage in explosive lower-limb movements. An eccentric contraction of the quadriceps when landing after a jump may lead to acute patellar tendon rupture, the end-stage of patellar tendinopathy. Plain x-rays will usually confirm the diagnosis. Treatment centers around reducing the stress placed on the patellar tendon. Postoperative functional restoration and preventive measures must address biomechanic abnormalities that may predispose patients to disruptive patellar tendon strain. As this case report shows, counseling patients who have early-stage tendinopathy on appropriate flexibility and plyometric exercises may prevent more serious damage. PMID:20086412

  20. Tendon bottom connector for a tension leg platform

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, R.M.

    1991-04-02

    This patent describes a floating tension-leg platform having anchoring tendons extending from the platform with the lower ends of the tendons being connected in tension to anchor means fixedly secured to the ocean floor in deep water, the connection being made by underwater-actuatable and remotely-connectable and releasable tendon connector means. It includes first and second connector portions a first inwardly-directed camming surface; a circumferential latching groove; a latching shoulder; a second camming surface; a latching sleeve; collet spring fingers; and outwardly-extending latches.

  1. Human iPSC-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells Promote Tendon Repair in a Rat Patellar Tendon Window Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Yequan; Liu, Erfu; Sun, Yanjun; Luo, Ziwei; Xu, Zhiling; Liu, Wanqian; Zhong, Li; Lv, Yonggang; Wang, Aijun; Tang, Zhenyu; Li, Song

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) are multipotent that are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal lineages. In this study, we investigated whether iPSC-derived NCSCs (iPSC-NCSCs) have potential for tendon repair. Human iPSC-NCSCs were suspended in fibrin gel and transplanted into a rat patellar tendon window defect. At 4 weeks post-transplantation, macroscopical observation showed that the repair of iPSC-NCSC-treated tendons was superior to that of non-iPSC-NCSC-treated tendons. Histological and mechanical examinations revealed that iPSC-NCSCs treatment significantly enhanced tendon healing as indicated by the improvement in matrix synthesis and mechanical properties. Furthermore, transplanted iPSC-NCSCs produced fetal tendon-related matrix proteins, stem cell recruitment factors, and tenogenic differentiation factors, and accelerated the host endogenous repair process. This study demonstrates a potential strategy of employing iPSC-derived NCSCs for tendon tissue engineering. PMID:23815150

  2. The suture loop holding capacity of flexor digitorum profundus tendon within and outside the digital tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Havulinna, J; Leppänen, O V; Göransson, H

    2013-09-01

    In a previous study we found that the strength of a Kessler core suture in the flexor tendon was greater in flexor zone 2 than in zone 3. To further investigate the material properties of the flexor tendon without the influence of a locking suture configuration, we measured the ultimate strength of a simple loop suture in the flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zones 1, 2, and 3. Eight cadaver flexor digitorum profundus tendons were tested in 10 mm increments with a 3-0 polyester suture loop pull-out test in the mid-substance of the tendon. The mean strength in zones 1 and 2 (26.7 N, SD 5.6) was significantly higher than the mean strength in zone 3 (17.7 N, SD 5.4). We conclude that the difference is owing to variations of the structure of the flexor tendon in different sections of the tendon, as the suture configuration was a simple loop without a locking or grasping component. PMID:23315625

  3. Rehabilitating psoas tendonitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Jaime

    2009-02-01

    This case report describes the examination and physical therapy intervention for a woman with anterior hip pain whose medical diagnosis following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was bilateral labral tears and psoas tendinitis. Her physical therapy evaluation revealed findings consistent with psoas tendonitis. Utilizing theories of neuromuscular patterning and knowledge of normal muscle function, the patient was successfully treated in physical therapy following six physical therapy sessions, once a week for 6 weeks. The patient was found to have an overactive psoas muscle, as indicated by hip flexion being the primary mover in her movement patterns, and dysfunctional abdominal and pelvic floor muscles. Functionally based therapeutic exercise and electrical stimulation were used to reeducate the muscles of the abdomen, pelvic floor, and hips in order to create muscular balance and correct muscle dysfunction. PMID:19048347

  4. Rehabilitating Psoas Tendonitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This case report describes the examination and physical therapy intervention for a woman with anterior hip pain whose medical diagnosis following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was bilateral labral tears and psoas tendinitis. Her physical therapy evaluation revealed findings consistent with psoas tendonitis. Utilizing theories of neuromuscular patterning and knowledge of normal muscle function, the patient was successfully treated in physical therapy following six physical therapy sessions, once a week for 6 weeks. The patient was found to have an overactive psoas muscle, as indicated by hip flexion being the primary mover in her movement patterns, and dysfunctional abdominal and pelvic floor muscles. Functionally based therapeutic exercise and electrical stimulation were used to reeducate the muscles of the abdomen, pelvic floor, and hips in order to create muscular balance and correct muscle dysfunction. PMID:19048347

  5. Tension Stiffened and Tendon Actuated Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R. (Inventor); Dorsey, John T. (Inventor); Ganoe, George G. (Inventor); King, Bruce D. (Inventor); Jones, Thomas C. (Inventor); Mercer, Charles D. (Inventor); Corbin, Cole K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A tension stiffened and tendon actuated manipulator is provided performing robotic-like movements when acquiring a payload. The manipulator design can be adapted for use in-space, lunar or other planetary installations as it is readily configurable for acquiring and precisely manipulating a payload in both a zero-g environment and in an environment with a gravity field. The manipulator includes a plurality of link arms, a hinge connecting adjacent link arms together to allow the adjacent link arms to rotate relative to each other and a cable actuation and tensioning system provided between adjacent link arms. The cable actuation and tensioning system includes a spreader arm and a plurality of driven and non-driven elements attached to the link arms and the spreader arm. At least one cable is routed around the driven and non-driven elements for actuating the hinge.

  6. Extended Healing Validation of an Artificial Tendon to Connect the Quadriceps Muscle to the Tibia: 180-day Study

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan J.; Litsky, Alan S.; Mayerson, Joel L.; Stringer, Keith; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Whenever a tendon or its bone insertion is disrupted or removed, existing surgical techniques provide a temporary connection or scaffolding to promote healing, but the interface of living to nonliving materials soon breaks down under the stress of these applications, if it must bear the load more than acutely. Patients are thus disabled whose prostheses, defect size, or mere anatomy limit the availability or outcomes of such treatments. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to join skeletal muscle to prosthetic or natural structures without this interface breakdown. In this study, the goat knee extensor mechanism (quadriceps tendon, patella, and patellar tendon) was removed from the right hind limb in 16 goats. The device connected the quadriceps muscle to a stainless steel bone plate on the tibia. Mechanical testing and histology specimens were collected from each operated leg and contra lateral unoperated control legs at 180 days. Maximum forces in the operated leg (vs. unoperated) were 1400± 93N (vs. 1179± 61 N), linear stiffnesses were 33± 3 N/mm (vs. 37 ± 4N/mm), and elongations at failure were 92.1 ± 5.3 mm (vs. 68.4 ± 3.8 mm; mean ± SEM). Higher maximum forces (p = 0.02) and elongations at failure (p = 0.008) of legs with the device versus unoperated controls were significant; linear stiffnesses were not (p = 0.3). We believe this technology will yield improved procedures for clinical challenges in orthopaedic oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and tendon injury reconstruction. PMID:22179930

  7. Prestressed concrete using KEVLAR reinforced tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    KEVLAR is a high strength, high modulus synthetic fiber manufactured by the E.I. DuPont de Nemours Company. The fiber is resistant to chloride and alkali attack. The resistance is enhanced when the fibers are assembled into a resin matrix and fabricated as rods. These properties suggest that KEVLAR reinforced rods may be a substitute for high strength steel prestress tendons in certain applications such as bridge decks and parking structures. This dissertation presents the background, theoretical development, and experimental investigations of KEVLAR reinforced rod strength, anchorage, fabrication and performance in prestressed concrete structures. The study concludes that KEVLAR has significant potential for these prestressed concrete applications. However, the reliability of the long term anchorage of the KEVLAR reinforced rods must be improved before production applications are undertaken. KEVLAR has a low shear strength compared to its tensile capacity. The anchorage of KEVLAR reinforced rods is sensitive to the shear forces generated in the anchorage assembly. Finite element analyses, using interface elements to simulate the addition of a mold release agent in a conic anchor, predict the behavior of resin socketed anchors. Test results confirm that mold release agents reduce the anchor shear stresses and suggest that moderate strength resins may be used in the anchor. KEVLAR is nearly linearly elastic to failure, yet ductility of a structure is an important design concern. Prestressed concrete beam tests using both bonded and unbonded tendons demonstrated that ductile structural behavior is obtained. Methods of predicting the strength and deflection behavior of the prestressed beams are presented and the theoretical predictions are compared to the experimental results. The overall correlation between predicted and theoretical results is satisfactory.

  8. Decorin expression is important for age-related changes in tendon structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Dunkman, Andrew A; Buckley, Mark R; Mienaltowski, Michael J; Adams, Sheila M; Thomas, Stephen J; Satchell, Lauren; Kumar, Akash; Pathmanathan, Lydia; Beason, David P; Iozzo, Renato V; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    The aging population is at an increased risk of tendon injury and tendinopathy. Elucidating the molecular basis of tendon aging is crucial to understanding the age-related changes in structure and function in this vulnerable tissue. In this study, the structural and functional features of tendon aging are investigated. In addition, the roles of decorin and biglycan in the aging process were analyzed using transgenic mice at both mature and aged time points. Our hypothesis is that the increase in tendon injuries in the aging population is the result of altered structural properties that reduce the biomechanical function of the tendon and consequently increase susceptibility to injury. Decorin and biglycan are important regulators of tendon structure and therefore, we further hypothesized that decreased function in aged tendons is partly the result of altered decorin and biglycan expression. Biomechanical analyses of mature (day 150) and aged (day 570) patellar tendons revealed deteriorating viscoelastic properties with age. Histology and polarized light microscopy demonstrated decreased cellularity, alterations in tenocyte shape, and reduced collagen fiber alignment in the aged tendons. Ultrastructural analysis of fibril diameter distributions indicated an altered distribution in aged tendons with an increase of large diameter fibrils. Aged wild type tendons maintained expression of decorin which was associated with the structural and functional changes seen in aged tendons. Aged patellar tendons exhibited altered and generally inferior properties across multiple assays. However, decorin-null tendons exhibited significantly decreased effects of aging compared to the other genotypes. The amelioration of the functional deficits seen in the absence of decorin in aged tendons was associated with altered tendon fibril structure. Fibril diameter distributions in the decorin-null aged tendons were comparable to those observed in the mature wild type tendon with the absence

  9. Decorin expression is important for age-related changes in tendon structure and mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Dunkman, Andrew A.; Buckley, Mark R.; Mienaltowski, Michael J.; Adams, Sheila M.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Satchell, Lauren; Kumar, Akash; Pathmanathan, Lydia; Beason, David P.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Birk, David E.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    The aging population is at an increased risk of tendon injury and tendinopathy. Elucidating the molecular basis of tendon aging is crucial to understanding the age-related changes in structure and function in this vulnerable tissue. In this study, the structural and functional features of tendon aging are investigated. In addition, the roles of decorin and biglycan in the aging process were analyzed using transgenic mice at both mature and aged time points. Our hypothesis is that the increase in tendon injuries in the aging population is the result of altered structural properties that reduce the biomechanical function of the tendon and consequently increase susceptibility to injury. Decorin and biglycan are important regulators of tendon structure and therefore, we further hypothesized that decreased function in aged tendons is partly the result of altered decorin and biglycan expression. Biomechanical analyses of mature (day 150) and aged (day 570) patellar tendons revealed deteriorating viscoelastic properties with age. Histology and polarized light microscopy demonstrated decreased cellularity, alterations in tenocyte shape, and reduced collagen fiber alignment in the aged tendons. Ultrastructural analysis of fibril diameter distributions indicated an altered distribution in aged tendons with an increase of large diameter fibrils. Aged wild type tendons maintained expression of decorin which was associated with the structural and functional changes seen in aged tendons. Aged patellar tendons exhibited altered and generally inferior properties across multiple assays. However, decorin-null tendons exhibited significantly decreased effects of aging compared to the other genotypes. The amelioration of the functional deficits seen in the absence of decorin in aged tendons was associated with altered tendon fibril structure. Fibril diameter distributions in the decorin-null aged tendons were comparable to those observed in the mature wild type tendon with the absence

  10. Cellular therapy in bone-tendon interface regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-01-01

    The intrasynovial bone-tendon interface is a gradual transition from soft tissue to bone, with two intervening zones of uncalcified and calcified fibrocartilage. Following injury, the native anatomy is not restored, resulting in inferior mechanical properties and an increased risk of re-injury. Recent in vivo studies provide evidence of improved healing when surgical repair of the bone-tendon interface is augmented with cells capable of undergoing chondrogenesis. In particular, cellular therapy in bone-tendon healing can promote fibrocartilage formation and associated improvements in mechanical properties. Despite these promising results in animal models, cellular therapy in human patients remains largely unexplored. This review highlights the development and structure-function relationship of normal bone-tendon insertions. The natural healing response to injury is discussed, with subsequent review of recent research on cellular approaches for improved healing. Finally, opportunities for translating in vivo findings into clinical practice are identified. PMID:24326955

  11. Zone III flexor tendon injuries - A proposed modification to rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Chinchalkar, Shrikant J; Pipicelli, Joey G; Agur, Anne; Athwal, George S

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, these authors have utilized years of clinical experience to suggest rehabilitation modifications for Zone III flexor tendon injuries. - VictoriaPriganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. PMID:26089286

  12. Peroneus Brevis Tendon Variant Insertion on the Calcaneus

    PubMed Central

    Cecava, Nathan D.; Campbell, Scot E.

    2015-01-01

    Insertion of the peroneus brevis tendon normally occurs at the lateral aspect of the fifth metatarsal base. However, there is new evidence that congenital variant insertion of the tendon on the calcaneal peroneal tubercle occurs in a small segment of the population. We report a case of 24-year old male presenting with non-traumatic ankle pain who underwent ankle magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging demonstrated insertion of the peroneus brevis tendon on the calcaneal peroneal tubercle with absence of the tendon distal to the calcaneus. Furthermore, in reviewing 200 consecutive ankle magnetic resonance examinations, the authors discovered one additional case of this variant. We discuss the magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of this anatomic variant, the implications for clinical management, and review the literature on peroneal anatomic variations. PMID:26622930

  13. Acute Bilateral Traumatic Achilles Tendon Rupture – A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Maulik; Golwala, Paresh; Merh, Aditya; Patel, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the body, which is commonly ruptured in male athletes. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon is a rare condition with very few reported cases in the literature. It poses a challenge in management, and hence, we report a case with traumatic bilateral Achilles tendon rupture in a young male patient and its management. One side was treated conservatively as the rupture was partial and the other side, which had a complete tear, was operated. At nine months follow-up, the patient has had a satisfactory result and is now bearing full weight without any problems. We suggest this method of treatment to be worthwhile for this unusual entity. PMID:27588227

  14. Histological Study of Fresh Versus Frozen Semitendinous Muscle Tendon Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Santos, Luiz Augusto Ubirajara; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Pereira, João Alberto Ramos Maradei; França Bisneto, Edgard N.; Giovani, Arlete Mazzini Miranda; Oliveira, Claudia Regina G. C. M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to histologically analyze allografts from cadaveric semitendinous muscle after cryopreservation at −80°C in comparison to a control group kept at only −4°C to test the hypothesis that the histological characteristics of the tissue are maintained when the tendons are kept at lower temperatures. METHODS: In a tissue bank, 10 semitendinous tendons from 10 cadavers were frozen at −80ºC as a storage method for tissue preservation. They were kept frozen for 40 days, and then a histological study was carried out. Another 10 tendon samples were analyzed while still “fresh”. RESULTS: There was no histological difference between the fresh and frozen samples in relation to seven variables. CONCLUSIONS: Semitendinous muscle tendon allografts can be submitted to cryopreservation at −80ºC without suffering histological modifications. PMID:20360921

  15. Cost effective TLP installation methods and tendon top connectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wybro, P.G.; Chaison, M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a novel TLP tendon top connector and motion arrest system. The top connector and motion arrest system is inherently linked to the method used to install the platform, and methods for platform installation are described. This method of installation is most suitable for deepwater and/or large TLP structures, but can also be used in moderate water depth as well. The tendon installation method utilizes the so-called Platform Arrestor Concept (PAC). The installation is procedurally not complex and calls for relatively simple installation equipment, and also enables the use of simple tendon tie-off equipment, such as a single piece nut. The tendons can be pre-installed to the foundation prior to platform arrival, or can be co-installed, i.e., installed while the platform is on location.

  16. Cyclic tensile strain upregulates collagen synthesis in isolated tendon fascicles

    SciTech Connect

    Screen, Hazel R.C. . E-mail: H.R.C.Screen@qmul.ac.uk; Shelton, Julia C.; Bader, Dan L.; Lee, David A.

    2005-10-21

    Mechanical stimulation has been implicated as an important regulatory factor in tendon homeostasis. In this study, a custom-designed tensile loading system was used to apply controlled mechanical stimulation to isolated tendon fascicles, in order to examine the effects of 5% cyclic tensile strain at 1 Hz on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. Sample viability and gross structural composition were maintained over a 24 h loading period. Data demonstrated no statistically significant differences in cell proliferation or glycosaminoglycan production, however, collagen synthesis was upregulated with the application of cyclic tensile strain over the 24 h period. Moreover, a greater proportion of the newly synthesised matrix was retained within the sample after loading. These data provide evidence of altered anabolic activity within tendon in response to mechanical stimuli, and suggest the importance of cyclic tensile loading for the maintenance of the collagen hierarchy within tendon.

  17. Nonlinear optical imaging characteristics in rat tail tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Zhang, X. Z.; Qiu, Y. S.; Chen, R.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the characteristics of skeletal muscle fibers in tail tendons, explore the content of intrinsic components at different depths and ascertain the optimum excitation wavelength, which will help to establish a relationship between diagnosis and therapy and the tendon injury. A multiphoton microscopic imaging system was used to achieve the images and spectra via an imaging mode and a Lambda mode, respectively. This work demonstrates that the skeletal muscle fibers of the tail tendon are in good order. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals originating from certain intrinsic components are varied with depth, and the SHG/TPEF intensity ratios are varied at different excitation wavelengths. Below 800 nm is the optimum for cell TPEF, while above 800 nm is the optimum for SHG. With the development of imaging techniques, a nonlinear optical imaging system will be helpful to represent the functional behaviors of tissue related to tendon injury.

  18. Tendon-driven manipulators: Analysis, synthesis, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jyh-Jone

    As the development of light-weight, small volume, and versatile manipulators has grown in the field of robotics, the need for more efficient and relevant power transmission systems in the manipulators has become increasingly apparent. It is clear that the advent of efficient, low friction, and backlash-free actuation systems promises to provide significant gains in manipulator performance. Tendon transmission has been widely used to actuate small volume and light-weight articulated manipulators, such as dextrous mechanical hands, for it permits actuators to be installed remotely from the end-effector, thus reducing the bulk and inertia of the manipulator system. Current research on such actuation systems is accomplished on the basis of specialized designs. The lack of systematic approaches has limited our scope in realizing performance of such transmission systems. Therefore, when associated with systematic methodologies, the study of tendon-driven manipulators promises to be of major importance in the field of robotics. This dissertation is concerned with four issues to enhance our use and understanding of tendon-driven manipulators. First, a systematic approach for the kinematics analysis of tendon-driven manipulators is established. A graph is used to represent the kinematic structure of tendon-driven manipulators. It is shown that the kinematic structure of tendon-driven manipulators is in every way similar to that of epicyclic gear trains. The fundamental circuit equation developed for the kinematic analysis of epicyclic gear trains can thus be applied to this type of mechanism. The displacement equation governing joint angle space and tendon space can easily be obtained. Secondly, the concept of structural isomorphism and the structural characteristics of tendon-driven manipulators are investigated. Based on the explored properties, a methodology for the enumeration of tendon-driven manipulators is developed. By applying the methodology, a class of kinematic

  19. USP6 genetic rearrangements in cellular fibroma of tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jodi M; Wang, Xiaoke; Dong, Jie; Westendorf, Jennifer; Chou, Margaret M; Oliveira, Andre M

    2016-08-01

    Fibroma of tendon sheath is a benign (myo)fibroblastic neoplasm of the tenosynovial soft tissues, typically affecting the distal extremities. It is classically described as a paucicellular, densely collagenized tumor; however, cellular variants have been described. A subset of cellular fibromas of tendon sheath shares similar histological features with nodular fasciitis. As nodular fasciitis very frequently harbors rearrangement of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 6 (USP6), we hypothesized that cellular fibromas of tendon sheath with nodular fasciitis-like features may also contain USP6 rearrangements. Cases of fibroma of tendon sheath (n=19), including cellular (n=9) and classic (n=10) variants, were evaluated for USP6 rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization studies. A subset of cases was tested for MYH9 rearrangements and MYH9-USP6 and CDH11-USP6 fusion products. Classic fibroma of tendon sheath occurred in 5 males and 5 females (median age 67 years, range 23-77 years) as soft tissue masses of the hand (n=4), finger (n=3), forearm (n=1) and foot (n=2). Cellular fibroma of tendon sheath occurred in 5 males and 4 females in a younger age group (median age 32 years, range 12-46 years) as small soft tissue masses of the finger (n=5), hand (n=3) and wrist (n=1). USP6 rearrangements were detected in 6/9 cellular fibromas of tendon sheath. Among cellular fibromas of tendon sheath with USP6 rearrangements, no MYH9 rearrangements were detected. By RT-PCR, neither the MYH9-USP6 or the CDH11-USP6 fusion products were detected in any case. Neither USP6 nor MYH9 rearrangement were detected in any classic fibroma of tendon sheath. We report for the first time the presence of USP6 rearrangements in a subset of cellular fibroma of tendon sheath. Based on the similar morphological and molecular genetic features, we suspect that a subset of cellular fibromas of tendon sheath are under-recognized examples of tenosynovial nodular fasciitis, driven by alternate USP6 fusion

  20. Mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in adults and children.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Thomas D; Reeves, Neil D; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Jones, David A; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2010-04-19

    It is not currently known how the mechanical properties of human tendons change with maturation in the two sexes. To address this, the stiffness and Young's modulus of the patellar tendon were measured in men, women, boys and girls (each group, n=10). Patellar tendon force (F(pt)) was calculated from the measured joint moment during a ramped voluntary isometric knee extension contraction, the antagonist knee extensor muscle co-activation quantified from its electromyographical activity, and the patellar tendon moment arm measured from magnetic resonance images. Tendon elongation was imaged using the sagittal-plane ultrasound scans throughout the contraction. Tendon cross-sectional area was measured at rest from ultrasound scans in the transverse plane. Maximal F(pt) and tendon elongation were (mean+/-SE) 5453+/-307 N and 5+/-0.5 mm for men, 3877+/-307 N and 4.9+/-0.6 mm for women, 2017+/-170 N and 6.2+/-0.5 mm for boys and 2169+/-182 N and 5.9+/-0.7 mm for girls. In all groups, tendon stiffness and Young's modulus were examined at the level that corresponded to the maximal 30% of the weakest participant's F(pt) and stress, respectively; these were 925-1321 N and 11.5-16.5 MPa, respectively. Stiffness was 94% greater in men than boys and 84% greater in women than girls (p<0.01), with no differences between men and women, or boys and girls (men 1076+/-87 N/mm; women 1030+/-139 N/mm; boys 555+/-71 N/mm and girls 561.5+/-57.4 N/mm). Young's modulus was 99% greater in men than boys (p<0.01), and 66% greater in women than girls (p<0.05). There were no differences in modulus between men and women, or boys and girls (men 597+/-49 MPa; women 549+/-70 MPa; boys 255+/-42 MPa and girls 302+/-33 MPa). These findings indicate that the mechanical stiffness of tendon increases with maturation due to an increased Young's modulus and, in females due to a greater increase in tendon cross-sectional area than tendon length. PMID:20045111

  1. The flexor tendon pulley system and rock climbing.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Timothy P

    2012-06-01

    Rock climbing has increased in popularity over the past two decades. Closed traumatic rupture of the finger flexor tendon pulleys is rare among the general population but is seen much more commonly in rock climbers. This article reviews the anatomy and biomechanics of the finger flexor tendon pulleys, how they may be injured in rock climbing and how these injuries are best diagnosed and managed. PMID:23730085

  2. Direct Repair without Augmentation of Patellar Tendon Avulsion following TKA

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nishikant; Yadav, Chandrashekhar; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Complications involving the extensor mechanism after TKA are potentially disastrous. We are reporting a case of patellar tendon rupture from tibial tuberosity following total knee arthroplasty. We managed it by direct repair with fiberwire using Krackow suture technique without augmentation. Our long term result has been very encouraging. Our method is a safe and better method of management of patellar tendon avulsion following TKA when it happens without any tissue loss. PMID:25632362

  3. A method to estimate the initial length of equine tendons.

    PubMed

    Riemersma, D J; van den Bogert, A J

    1993-01-01

    A procedure is described by which the length of a tendon at the onset of loading is determined objectively. The procedure includes the fitting of third-order polynomial functions on the load-elongation data. The onset of loading is detected by an increasing fit of the polynomial by selective data reduction of the initial part of the load-elongation curve. The procedure results in an objective and reproducible definition of the zero strain level of a tendon. PMID:8470453

  4. Tendon Reconstruction with Tissue Engineering Approach--A Review.

    PubMed

    Verdiyeva, Gunay; Koshy, Kiron; Glibbery, Natalia; Mann, Haroon; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-09-01

    Tendon injuries are a common and rising occurrence, associated with significant impairment to quality of life and financial burden to the healthcare system. Clinically, they represent an unresolved problem, due to poor natural tendon healing and the inability of current treatment strategies to restore the tendon to its native state. Tissue engineering offers a promising alternative, with the incorporation of scaffolds, cells and growth factors to support the complete regeneration of the tendon. The materials used in tendon engineering to date have provided significant advances in structural integrity and biological compatibility and in many cases the results obtained are superior to those observed in natural healing. However, grafts fail to reproduce the qualities of the pre-injured tendon and each has weaknesses subject to its constituent parts. Furthermore, many materials and cell types are being investigated concurrently, with seemingly little association or comparison between research results. In this review the properties of the most-investigated and effective components have been appraised in light of the surrounding literature, with research from early in-vitro experiments to clinical trials being discussed. Extensive comparisons have been made between scaffolds, cell types and growth factors used, listing strengths and weaknesses to provide a stable platform for future research. Promising future endeavours are also described in the field of nanocomposite material science, stem cell sources and growth factors, which may bypass weaknesses found in individual elements. The future of tendon engineering looks bright, with growing understanding in material technology, cell and growth factor application and encouraging recent advances bringing us ever closer to regenerating the native tendon. PMID:26485923

  5. Proximal humerus shaft fracture after pectoralis major tendon rupture repair.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Jeff A; Goldberg, Ben; Wolin, Preston

    2011-06-01

    Surgical repair of a complete pectoralis major tendon rupture at the humeral insertion has superior results compared to nonoperative treatment. To our knowledge, a proximal humerus shaft fracture occurring at the site of the bone trough and cortical drill holes after a pectoralis major tendon rupture repair has not been reported in the literature.A 45-year-old man sustained an acute left pectoralis major tendon rupture at the humeral insertion while performing a bench press maneuver. He underwent acute surgical repair. Approximately 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient fell from a standing height and sustained a proximal humerus shaft fracture through the repair site at the bone trough. Three days after the fracture, the patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation of the proximal humerus shaft fracture and exploration of the pectoralis major tendon repair. The fracture was found to be at the level of the repair site, and the pectoralis major tendon was completely intact to the distal fragment. The fracture healed uneventfully, and the patient regained full motion and strength of his extremity with no limitations.Any type of surgical fixation that creates a hole in the humerus or decreases the cross-sectional area such as a bone trough creates a stress riser. Patients undergoing pectoralis tendon repair that involves violating the humerus with a bone trough or hole have a slight risk of postoperative humerus fracture, especially if sustaining an early traumatic event such as a fall. PMID:21667914

  6. Biomimetic Scaffold Design for Functional and Integrative Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Bogdanowicz, Danielle; Erisken, Cevat; Lee, Nancy M.; Lu, Helen H.

    2012-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent the most common shoulder injuries in the United States. The debilitating effect of this degenerative condition coupled with the high incidence of failure associated with existing graft choices underscore the clinical need for alternative grafting solutions. The two critical design criteria for the ideal tendon graft would require the graft to not only exhibit physiologically relevant mechanical properties but also be able to facilitate functional graft integration by promoting the regeneration of the native tendon-to-bone interface. Centered on these design goals, this review will highlight current approaches to functional and integrative tendon repair. In particular, the application of biomimetic design principles through the use of nanofiber- and nanocomposite-based scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering will be discussed. This review will begin with nanofiber-based approaches to functional tendon repair, followed by a section highlighting the exciting research on tendon-to-bone interface regeneration, with an emphasis on implementation of strategic biomimicry in nanofiber scaffold design and the concomitant formation of graded multi-tissue systems for integrative soft tissue repair. This review will conclude with a summary and future directions section. PMID:22244070

  7. Substantial creep in healing human Achilles tendons. A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Aspenberg, Per; Schepull, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background healing after rupture of the Achilles tendon can be described in terms of mechanical properties of the new-formed tissue, constituting the tendon callus. In previous human studies, the elastic modulus and the density remained almost constant during 3 months after mobilization started, and then improved up to one year. So far, time-dependent deformation of the healing human tendon has not been reported. Methods in a series of 16 patients, operated with Achilles tendon suture, we implanted tantalum beads into the tendon and measured the distance between them repeatedly during 3 min of constant loading, using an ordinary image intensifier. The patients unloaded their leg for 30 min before the test. To avoid bias, all images were investigated in a randomized and blinded order. Results total strain during 3 min of constant loading at 7 weeks post injury amounted to 5%, and at 19 weeks to 3%. About half of the strain, after the loading was applied, occurred during the second and third min. Considerable strain also occurred just before loading, when the patient was told that a load would be applied, but before this was actually done. Conclusion the measurements were crude, and this study should be seen as a pilot. Still, visco-elastic properties seem to dominate the mechanical behavior the healing Achilles tendon from start of mobilization to 19 weeks, at least when tested after 30 min rest. This deserves further studies with more precise methods. PMID:26605187

  8. Rat model of Achilles tendon disorder. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Messner, K; Wei, Y; Andersson, B; Gillquist, J; Räsänen, T

    1999-01-01

    Three-month-old male rats were subjected 3 times weekly for 1 h to eccentric exercise of one triceps surae muscle (30 stimulations/min) under general anesthesia in order to induce Achilles tendon disorder corresponding to paratenonitis and tendinosis in man. Net muscle work during the sessions ranged between 0.67 and 4.37 mJ (mean 1.72, SD 0.77). After 9 and 13 sessions, respectively, 2 rats started to show gait alterations during the functional test which was performed 2-3 times weekly. These rats were killed after additional sessions which showed a worsening of the limp. The other trained rats and controls did not limp and were killed after 7-11 weeks. Histologic evaluation of the Achilles tendons from the exercised limb showed in the majority of the cases hypervascularization, increased number of nerve filaments and increased immunoreactivity for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. The tendons from the nonstimulated limb looked normal. The distribution of collagen types I and II appeared normal in the tendon and its insertion to the calcaneus. Inflammation of the epi- and paratenon could be provoked in the rat, but tendon changes corresponding to chronic tendinosis did not develop within 11 weeks with the used training regime. The clinical relevance of this model for chronic tendon disease needs to be evaluated further. PMID:10460971

  9. Tendon Tissue Engineering: Progress, Challenges, and Translation to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Shearn, Jason T.; Kinneberg, Kirsten R.C.; Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Galloway, Marc T.; Kenter, Keith; Wylie, Christopher; Butler, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The tissue engineering field has made great strides in understanding how different aspects of tissue engineered constructs (TECs) and the culture process affect final tendon repair. However, there remain significant challenges in developing strategies that will lead to a clinically effective and commercially successful product. In an effort to increase repair quality, a better understanding of normal development, and how it differs from adult tendon healing, may provide strategies to improve tissue engineering. As tendon tissue engineering continues to improve, the field needs to employ more clinically relevant models of tendon injury such as degenerative tendons. We need to translate successes to larger animal models to begin exploring the clinical implications of our treatments. By advancing the models used to validate our TECs, we can help convince our toughest customer, the surgeon, that our products will be clinically efficacious. As we address these challenges in musculoskeletal tissue engineering, the field still needs to address the commercialization of products developed in the laboratory. TEC commercialization faces numerous challenges because each injury and patient is unique. This review aims to provide tissue engineers with a summary of important issues related to engineering tendon repairs and potential strategies for producing clinically successful products. PMID:21625053

  10. Catabolism of aggrecan, decorin and biglycan in tendon.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, S G; Flannery, C R; Little, C B; Hughes, C E; Caterson, B; Dent, C M

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the catabolism of the proteoglycans aggrecan, decorin and biglycan in fresh tendon samples and in explant cultures of tissue from the tensional and compressed regions of young and mature bovine tendons. A panel of well-characterized antibodies that recognize glycosaminoglycan or protein (linear or neoepitope) sequences was used to detect proteoglycans and proteoglycan degradation products that were both retained within the tissue and released into the culture medium. In addition, a reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR analysis was used to examine the mRNA expression patterns of tendon proteoglycans and aggrecanases. The results of this study indicate a major role for aggrecanase(s) in the catabolism of aggrecan in bovine tendon. The study also provides a characterization of glycosaminoglycan epitopes associated with the proteoglycans of tendon, illustrating age-related changes in the isomers of chondroitin sulphate disaccharides that remain attached to the core protein glycosaminoglycan linkage region after digestion with chondroitinase ABC. Evidence for a rapid turnover of the small proteoglycans decorin and biglycan was also observed, indicating additional molecular pathways that might compromise the integrity of the collagen matrix and potentially contribute to tendon dysfunction after injury and during disease. PMID:10926842

  11. Human Achilles tendon glycation and function in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Kongsgaard, Mads; Kovanen, Vuokko; Grosset, Jean-Francois; Snorgaard, Ole; Bencke, Jesper; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Bandholm, Thomas; Christensen, Tomas Møller; Boesen, Anders; Helmark, Ida Carøe; Aagaard, Per; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, Stig Peter

    2016-01-15

    Diabetic patients have an increased risk of foot ulcers, and glycation of collagen may increase tissue stiffness. We hypothesized that the level of glycemic control (glycation) may affect Achilles tendon stiffness, which can influence gait pattern. We therefore investigated the relationship between collagen glycation, Achilles tendon stiffness parameters, and plantar pressure in poorly (n = 22) and well (n = 22) controlled diabetic patients, including healthy age-matched (45-70 yr) controls (n = 11). There were no differences in any of the outcome parameters (collagen cross-linking or tendon stiffness) between patients with well-controlled and poorly controlled diabetes. The overall effect of diabetes was explored by collapsing the diabetes groups (DB) compared with the controls. Skin collagen cross-linking lysylpyridinoline, hydroxylysylpyridinoline (136%, 80%, P < 0.01) and pentosidine concentrations (55%, P < 0.05) were markedly greater in DB. Furthermore, Achilles tendon material stiffness was higher in DB (54%, P < 0.01). Notably, DB also demonstrated higher forefoot/rearfoot peak-plantar-pressure ratio (33%, P < 0.01). Overall, Achilles tendon material stiffness and skin connective tissue cross-linking were greater in diabetic patients compared with controls. The higher foot pressure indicates that material stiffness of tendon and other tissue (e.g., skin and joint capsule) may influence foot gait. The difference in foot pressure distribution may contribute to the development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients. PMID:26542519

  12. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient's tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient's tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient's tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  13. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient’s tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient’s tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient’s tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  14. Should tendon and aponeurosis be considered in series?

    PubMed

    Epstein, Marcelo; Wong, Max; Herzog, Walter

    2006-01-01

    Fibres, aponeuroses, and tendons are often considered mechanically "in series" in skeletal muscles. This notion has led to oversimplified calculations of fibre forces from tendon forces, to incorrect derivations of constitutive laws for aponeuroses, and to misinterpretations of the recovery of elastic energy in stretch-shortening cycles of muscles. Here, we demonstrate theoretically, using examples of increasing complexity, that tendon and aponeurosis are not in series in a muscle fibre-aponeurosis-tendon complex. We then demonstrate that assuming the tendon and aponeurosis to be in series can lead to the appearance of mechanical work creation in these passive viscoelastic structures, a result that is mechanically impossible. Finally, we explain the mechanical role of the incompressible muscle matrix in force transmission from fibres to aponeuroses and tendon, and emphasize that incompressibility necessitates the introduction of extra forces necessary to maintain this constraint. Unfortunately, this requirement eliminates, for all but the simplest cases, a theoretical approach of muscle modeling based on intuitive free-body diagrams. PMID:16085074

  15. Combined Use of the Latissimus Dorsi Musculocutaneous Flap and the Anterolateral Thigh Flap to Reconstruct an Extensive Shoulder Defect in an NF-1 Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, Masahide; Sakisaka, Masanobu; Kawai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Soft tissue coverage after the resection of a large malignant peripheral neural sheath tumor (MPNST) is a challenge. We report the successful reconstruction of an extensive shoulder defect after MPNST resection in a patient with a type 1 neurofibromatosis with a novel combination of flaps. A 70-year-old man with type 1 neurofibromatosis presented with a recurrent MPNST on his right shoulder. He underwent a wide excision of the tumor, which resulted in a huge soft tissue defect around the shoulder joint. The resultant defect was reconstructed with a pedicled latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap and a free anterolateral thigh flap. The flaps survived, and the wounds healed uneventfully. His affected arm was useful. The combination of a pedicled latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap and a free anterolateral thigh flap is a versatile option for the reconstruction of an extensive shoulder defect. PMID:27200231

  16. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature. PMID:26564735

  17. Effects of Gaps Induced Into the ACL Tendon Graft on Tendon-Bone Healing in a Rodent ACL Reconstruction Model

    PubMed Central

    Lovric, Vedran; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Nakamura, Yoshinari; Oliver, Rema A.; Yu, Yan; Walsh, William Robert

    2011-01-01

    Summary Graft necrosis following ACL reconstruction is often associated with the use of autologous grafts. Host cells rather than graft cells contribute to the repair of the tendon-bone interface and the remodeling of the autologous graft. The native tendon-bone interface is not recreated and the biomechanical properties are not restored back to native values. We examined the effects of introducing gaps within the tendon graft prior to ACL reconstruction in a rodent model. We hypothesised that gaps will make physical way for host cells to infiltrate and repopulate the graft and thus enhance healing. Animals were sacrificed at seven, fourteen, and twenty-eight days for biomechanical testing and histology. Our findings indicate that graft necrosis, usually observed in the initial two weeks of the healing process, is averted. Histological observations showed that tendon-bone healing stages were hastened however this didn’t translate into improved biomechanical properties. PMID:23738254

  18. Musculoskeletal integration at the wrist underlies the modular development of limb tendons.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Pryce, Brian; Weibel, Jennifer L; Watson, Spencer S; Long, Fanxin; Lefebvre, Veronique; Harfe, Brian D; Stadler, H Scott; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tufa, Sara F; Keene, Douglas R; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2015-07-15

    The long tendons of the limb extend from muscles that reside in the zeugopod (arm/leg) to their skeletal insertions in the autopod (paw). How these connections are established along the length of the limb remains unknown. Here, we show that mouse limb tendons are formed in modular units that combine to form a functional contiguous structure; in muscle-less limbs, tendons develop in the autopod but do not extend into the zeugopod, and in the absence of limb cartilage the zeugopod segments of tendons develop despite the absence of tendons in the autopod. Analyses of cell lineage and proliferation indicate that distinct mechanisms govern the growth of autopod and zeugopod tendon segments. To elucidate the integration of these autopod and zeugopod developmental programs, we re-examined early tendon development. At E12.5, muscles extend across the full length of a very short zeugopod and connect through short anlagen of tendon progenitors at the presumptive wrist to their respective autopod tendon segment, thereby initiating musculoskeletal integration. Zeugopod tendon segments are subsequently generated by proximal elongation of the wrist tendon anlagen, in parallel with skeletal growth, underscoring the dependence of zeugopod tendon development on muscles for tendon anchoring. Moreover, a subset of extensor tendons initially form as fused structures due to initial attachment of their respective wrist tendon anlage to multiple muscles. Subsequent individuation of these tendons depends on muscle activity. These results establish an integrated model for limb tendon development that provides a framework for future analyses of tendon and musculoskeletal phenotypes. PMID:26062940

  19. Tendon entrapments and dislocations in ankle and hindfoot fractures: evaluation with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Campbell, Kevin J; Blanton, Lee E; Williams, Jason T; Sangster, Guillermo; Hollister, Anne M; Simoncini, Alberto A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of tendon entrapments and tendon dislocations associated with ankle and hindfoot fractures in patients studied by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Additionally, we describe particular tendon injuries associated with specific fractures. This was a retrospective review of all individuals with a trauma-protocol CT for suspected ankle and/or hindfoot fractures during a consecutive 41-month time period at a single Level I Trauma Center. Each patient's images were evaluated by two radiologists and an orthopedic surgeon for tendon entrapment, tendon dislocation, and bone(s) fractured or dislocated. There were 398 patients with ankle and/or hindfoot fractures that showed tendon entrapment or dislocation in 64 (16.1 %) patients. There were 30 (46.9 %) patients with 40 tendon entrapments, 31 (48.4 %) patients with 59 tendon dislocations, and three (4.7 %) patients with both tendon entrapment and dislocation. All patients with tendon entrapments were seen with either pilon fractures and/or a combination of posterior, medial, or lateral malleolar fractures. The most frequently entrapped tendon was the posterior tibialis tendon (PTT) in 27 patients (27/30, 90.0 %). The peroneal tendons were the most frequently dislocated, representing 27 (87.1 %) of patients with tendon dislocation; all resulted from a talar or calcaneal fracture or subluxation. This study demonstrates that tendon entrapments and tendon dislocations are commonly seen in complex fractures of the ankle and hindfoot. Pilon fractures were associated with the majority of tendon entrapments, whereas calcaneus fractures were associated with the majority of tendon dislocations. PMID:27234977

  20. Musculoskeletal integration at the wrist underlies the modular development of limb tendons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alice H.; Riordan, Timothy J.; Pryce, Brian; Weibel, Jennifer L.; Watson, Spencer S.; Long, Fanxin; Lefebvre, Veronique; Harfe, Brian D.; Stadler, H. Scott; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tufa, Sara F.; Keene, Douglas R.; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    The long tendons of the limb extend from muscles that reside in the zeugopod (arm/leg) to their skeletal insertions in the autopod (paw). How these connections are established along the length of the limb remains unknown. Here, we show that mouse limb tendons are formed in modular units that combine to form a functional contiguous structure; in muscle-less limbs, tendons develop in the autopod but do not extend into the zeugopod, and in the absence of limb cartilage the zeugopod segments of tendons develop despite the absence of tendons in the autopod. Analyses of cell lineage and proliferation indicate that distinct mechanisms govern the growth of autopod and zeugopod tendon segments. To elucidate the integration of these autopod and zeugopod developmental programs, we re-examined early tendon development. At E12.5, muscles extend across the full length of a very short zeugopod and connect through short anlagen of tendon progenitors at the presumptive wrist to their respective autopod tendon segment, thereby initiating musculoskeletal integration. Zeugopod tendon segments are subsequently generated by proximal elongation of the wrist tendon anlagen, in parallel with skeletal growth, underscoring the dependence of zeugopod tendon development on muscles for tendon anchoring. Moreover, a subset of extensor tendons initially form as fused structures due to initial attachment of their respective wrist tendon anlage to multiple muscles. Subsequent individuation of these tendons depends on muscle activity. These results establish an integrated model for limb tendon development that provides a framework for future analyses of tendon and musculoskeletal phenotypes. PMID:26062940

  1. An extensive defect on the tibia covered by a free cross flap using m. latissimus dorsi.

    PubMed

    Tvrdek, M; Kletenský, J; Pros, Z; Stehlík, J

    1992-01-01

    Using a clinical case, the authors demonstrate the technique of covering an extensive tibial defect unmanageable, due to blood supply to the limb and extent of the defect, by conventional methods. The required amount of tissue was provided by a flap obtained from m. latissimus dorst transferred to the site of defect as a free cross flap. PMID:1284265

  2. Use of Latissimus Dorsi Pedicled Myocutaneous Flap for Reconstruction in the Chest Area of an 8-Month-Old Female Infant with Ectopia Cordis

    PubMed Central

    Dastagir, Khaled; Breymann, Thomas; Heckmann, Andreas; Horke, Alexander; Vogt, Peter Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ectopia cordis (EC) is characterized by a complete or partial malposition of the heart outside the thorax. Despite the interdisciplinary treatment, the repair of EC is still very difficult and offers new surgical challenges because of its complexity and various combinations with other anomalies. We report the successful outcome after using a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap in reconstructive surgery in the setting of chronic wound dehiscence in an 8-month-old female infant born with a thoracic EC and omphalocele. PMID:25798359

  3. The Expression of Carnosine and Its Effect on the Antioxidant Capacity of Longissimus dorsi Muscle in Finishing Pigs Exposed to Constant Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peige; Hao, Yue; Feng, Jinghai; Lin, Hai; Feng, Yuejin; Wu, Xin; Yang, Xin; Gu, Xianhong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of constant high ambient temperatures on meat quality, antioxidant capacity, and carnosine expression in longissimus dorsi muscle of finishing pigs. Castrated 24 male DLY (crossbreeds between Landrace×Yorkshire sows and Duroc boars) pigs were allocated to one of three treatments: constant ambient temperature at 22°C and ad libitum feeding (CON, n = 8); constant high ambient temperature at 30°C and ad libitum feeding (H30, n = 8); and constant ambient temperature at 22°C and pair-fed with H30 (PF, n = 8). Meat quality, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, antioxidant capacity, carnosine content, and carnosine synthetase (CARNS1) mRNA expression in longissimus dorsi muscle were measured after three weeks. The results revealed that H30 had lower pH24 h, redness at 45 min, and yellowness at 24 h post-mortem (p<0.05), and higher drip loss at 48 h and lightness at 24 h post-mortem (p<0.01). Constant heat stress disrupted the pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance in longissimus dorsi muscle with higher MDA content (p<0.01) and lower antioxidant capacity (p<0.01). Carnosine content and CARNS1 mRNA expression in longissimus dorsi muscle of H30 pigs were significantly decreased (p<0.01) after three weeks at 30°C. In conclusion, constant high ambient temperatures affect meat quality and antioxidant capacity negatively, and the reduction of muscle carnosine content is one of the probable reasons. PMID:25358371

  4. Recurrent cystosarcoma phylloides of breast: extensive full-thickness excision of chest wall with immediate repair using steel mesh and a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Mindikoğlu, A N; Aktan, K

    1983-10-01

    The case of a young woman with a massive recurrent cystosarcoma phylloides of the breast is presented in whom a full thickness excision of the chest wall was carried out en bloc together with four ribs. The large full-thickness defect of the chest wall was reconstructed with stainless steel mesh and covered by a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. The management of post-operative paradoxical movement is also described. PMID:6313105

  5. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament With Quadricipital Tendon and the Medial Patellotibial Ligament With Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Although the medial patellotibial ligament (MPTL) has been neglected regarding its function in patellar stability, recently, its importance in terminal extension and during flexion has been recognized. Indications for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament combined with the MPTL are extension subluxation, flexion instability, children with anatomic risk factors for patellar instability, and knee hyperextension associated with generalized laxity. We describe a combined reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament with quadricipital tendon and reconstruction of the MPTL with patellar tendon autografts. PMID:27073782

  6. A case of post-upper lobectomy empyema treated by serratus anterior muscle and pedicled latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps plombage via open-window thoracostomy.

    PubMed

    Kitami, Akihiko; Suzuki, Takashi; Suzuki, Shuichi; Noriyoshi, Sumiya

    2004-06-01

    A 62-year-old male was admitted to our hospital for operation for Aspergillus empyema with a fungus ball in the right upper lobe. We performed a right upper lobectomy and decortication of the middle and lower lobes through a standard posterolateral thoracotomy with dissection of the latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior muscles, in October 2000. Twenty-one days postoperatively (POD), he developed an empyema and a bronchopleural fistula. We performed open-window thoracostomy through the axilla with removal of the third and fourth ribs at 41 POD, and sterilized the open drainage cavity in the out-patient clinic 11 months after discharge. Although the condition of the bronchopleural fistulas was not improved, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was found in the purulent discharge, the discharge decreased. Finally, a pedicled latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous and serratus anterior muscle flap plombage was performed 11 months after initial operation. The patient is now well and works as a driver 21 months after discharge. We conclude that muscle flaps of the pedicled latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior muscles can be useful for plombage of the cavity in cases of post-standard thoracotomy. PMID:15312015

  7. The blood-tendon barrier: identification and characterisation of a novel tissue barrier in tendon blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Lehner, C; Gehwolf, R; Ek, J C; Korntner, S; Bauer, H; Bauer, H C; Traweger, A; Tempfer, H

    2016-01-01

    Tissue barriers function as "gate keepers" between different compartments (usually blood and tissue) and are formed by specialised membrane-associated proteins, localising to the apicolateral plasma membrane domain of epithelial and endothelial cells. By sealing the paracellular space, the free diffusion of solutes and molecules across epithelia and endothelia is impeded. Thereby, tissue barriers contribute to the establishment and maintenance of a distinct internal and external environment, which is crucial during organ development and allows maintenance of an organ-specific homeostatic milieu. So far, various epithelial and endothelial tissue barriers have been described, including the blood-brain barrier, the blood-retina barrier, the blood-testis barrier, the blood-placenta barrier, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-brain barrier, which are vital for physiological function and any disturbance of these barriers can result in severe organ damage or even death. Here, we describe the identification of a novel barrier, located in the vascular bed of tendons, which we term the blood-tendon barrier (BTB). By using immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and tracer studies we demonstrate the presence of a functional endothelial barrier within tendons restricting the passage of large blood-borne molecules into the surrounding tendon tissue. We further provide in vitro evidence that the BTB potentially contributes to the creation of a distinct internal tissue environment impacting upon the proliferation and differentiation of tendon-resident cells, effects which might be fundamental for the onset of tendon pathologies. PMID:27227787

  8. Evaluating Changes in Tendon Crimp with Fatigue Loading as an ex vivo Structural Assessment of Tendon Damage

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Zuskov, Andrey; Sarver, Joseph J.; Buckley, Mark R.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    The complex structure of tendons relates to their mechanical properties. Previous research has associated the waviness of collagen fibers (crimp) during quasi-static tensile loading to tensile mechanics, but less is known about the role of fatigue loading on crimp properties. In this study (IACUC approved), mouse patellar tendons were fatigue loaded while an integrated plane polariscope simultaneously assessed crimp properties. We demonstrate a novel structural mechanism whereby tendon crimp amplitude and frequency are altered with fatigue loading. In particular, fatigue loading increased the crimp amplitude across the tendon width and length, and these structural alterations were shown to be both region and load dependent. The change in crimp amplitude was strongly correlated to mechanical tissue laxity (defined as the ratio of displacement and gauge length relative to the first cycle of fatigue loading assessed at constant load throughout testing), at all loads and regions evaluated. Together, this study highlights the role of fatigue loading on tendon crimp properties as a function of load applied and region evaluated, and offers an additional structural mechanism for mechanical alterations that may lead to ultimate tendon failure. PMID:25773654

  9. Fatigue and fracture reliability and maintainability of TLP tendons. [Fatigue and fracture analysis of offshore, tension leg platform tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, C.J. ); Wirsching, P.H. . Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-05-01

    A tension leg platform (TLP) tendon system experiences oscillatory tensile stresses, and therefore is vulnerable to fatigue and fracture. Because design factors have significant uncertainty, a reliability analysis to quantify structural performance is appropriate. A maintenance program of periodic inspection and repair shows promise for improving system reliability and enhancing structural integrity. The performance of a TLP tendon system was simulated in order to study the relationship of design factors to system reliability. Effects on system reliability and maintenance performance (repair and replacement rates) can be studied as a function of (a) number of joints, J; (b) number of members, M; (c) inspection frequency; (d) inspection sensitivity as defined by the POD (probability of detection) curve; (e) ultimate strength; (f) repair policy; etc. The performance of an initially damaged or flawed tendon system is investigated. The reliability of a system that uses pressurized tendons to detect through-thickness cracks is studied, as is the vulnerability of the tendon system before replacement of broken tendons.

  10. A Rare Case of Bilateral Patellar Tendon Ruptures: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, Nadim; O'loughlin, Padhraig; Amin, Amin; Keogh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon ruptures are rare. The majority of case reports describing bilateral patellar tendon ruptures have occurred in patients with predisposing factors to tendinopathy. We describe a case of bilateral patellar tendon rupture sustained following minimal trauma by a patient with no systemic disease or history of steroid use. Due to the rarity of this injury, clinical suspicion is low. It is reported that 38% of patellar tendon ruptures are misdiagnosed initially. Therefore careful history taking and physical examination is integral in ensuring a diagnosis is achieved for early primary repair. We discuss the aetiology of spontaneous tendon rupture and report a literature review of bilateral patellar tendon ruptures. PMID:27200200

  11. Evaluation of Elastic Stiffness in Healing Achilles Tendon After Surgical Repair of a Tendon Rupture Using In Vivo Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-ning; Wan, Wen-bo; Wang, Yue-xiang; Jiao, Zi-yu; Zhang, Li-hai; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been no published report assessing the mechanical properties of a repaired Achilles tendon after surgery using shear wave elastography (SWE). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in mechanical properties of the healing Achilles tendon after surgical repair of a tendon rupture using ultrasound SWE and how these changes correlate with tendon function. Material/Methods Twenty-six patients who underwent surgical repair for Achilles tendon rupture were examined with ultrasound SWE coupled with a linear array transducer (4–15 MHz). The elasticity values of the repaired Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view were measured at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. Functional outcomes were assessed with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. General linear regression analysis and correlation coefficients were used to analyze the relationship between elasticity and the AOFAS score. Results There were significant differences with respect to the mean elasticity values and functional scores of the repaired Achilles tendon at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively (all P<0.05). Tendon function was positively correlated with the elasticity of the repaired Achilles tendon (P=0.0003). Conclusions Our findings suggest that SWE can provide biomechanical information for evaluating the mechanical properties of healing Achilles tendon and predict Achilles tendon function. PMID:27072885

  12. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Jun; Dong, Weiqiang; Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Bin

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation.

  13. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assessment of tissue properties for Achilles tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yung-Fu; Chen, Pei-Jarn; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chen, Tainsong; Lin, Chii-Jeng

    2007-09-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques have recently been widely applied for the characterization of tissues. For example, they can be used for the quantification of Achilles tendon properties based on the broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and the speed of sound (SOS) when the ultrasound wave passes through the tissues. This study is to develop an integrated system to investigate the properties of Achilles tendons using QUS images from UBIS 5000 (DMS, Montpellier, France) and B-mode ultrasound images from HDI 5000 (ATL, Ultramark, USA). Subjects including young (32 females and 17 males; mean age: 23.7 ± 2.0) and middle-aged groups (8 female and 8 males; mean age: 47.3 ± 8.5 s) were recruited and tested for this study. Only subjects who did not exercise regularly and had no record of tendon injury were studied. The results show that the BUA is significantly higher for the young group (45.2 ± 1.6 dB MHz-1) than the middle-age group (40.5 ± 1.9 dB MHz-1), while the SOS is significantly lower for the young (1601.9 ± 11.2 ms-1) compared to the middle-aged (1624.1 ± 8.7 m s-1). On the other hand, the thicknesses of Achilles tendons for both groups (young: 4.31 ± 0.23 mm; middle age: 4.24 ± 0.23 mm) are very similar. For one patient who had an Achilles tendon lengthening (ATL) surgery, the thickness of the Achilles tendon increased from 4 mm to 4.33 mm after the surgery. In addition, the BUA increased by about 7.2% while the SOS decreased by about 0.6%. In conclusion, noninvasive ultrasonic assessment of Achilles tendons is useful for assisting clinical diagnosis and for the evaluation of a therapeutic regimen.

  14. Effects of BMP-12-Releasing Sutures on Achilles Tendon Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Lee, Jae-Sung; Leiferman, Ellen M.; Maassen, Nicholas X.; Baer, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon healing is a complex coordinated event orchestrated by numerous biologically active proteins. Unfortunately, tendons have limited regenerative potential and as a result, repair may be protracted months to years. Current treatment strategies do not offer localized delivery of biologically active proteins, which may result in reduced therapeutic efficacy. Surgical sutures coated with nanostructured minerals may provide a potentially universal tool to efficiently incorporate and deliver biologically active proteins directly to the wound. Additionally, previous reports indicated that treatment with bone morphogenetic protein-12 (BMP-12) improved tendon healing. Based on this information, we hypothesized that mineral-coated surgical sutures may be an effective platform for localized BMP-12 delivery to an injured tendon. The objective of this study was, therefore, to elucidate the healing effects of mineral-coated sutures releasing BMP-12 using a rat Achilles healing model. The effects of BMP-12-releasing sutures were also compared with standard BMP-12 delivery methods, including delivery of BMP-12 through collagen sponge or direct injection. Rat Achilles tendons were unilaterally transected and repaired using BMP-12-releasing suture (0, 0.15, 1.5, or 3.0 μg), collagen sponge (0 or 1.5 μg BMP-12), or direct injection (0 or 1.5 μg). By 14 days postinjury, repair with BMP-12-releasing sutures reduced the appearance of adhesions to the tendon and decreased total cell numbers. BMP-12 released from sutures and collagen sponge also tended to improve collagen organization when compared with BMP-12 delivered through injection. Based on these results, the release of a protein from sutures was able to elicit a biological response. Furthermore, BMP-12-releasing sutures modulated tendon healing, and the delivery method dictated the response of the healing tissue to BMP-12. PMID:25354567

  15. Tensile properties of a morphologically split supraspinatus tendon.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, Tomoya; Hooke, Alexander W; Zhao, Kristin D; Goto, Akira; Sperling, John W; Steinmann, Scott P; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-07-01

    The supraspinatus tendon consists morphologically of two sub-regions, anterior and posterior. The anterior sub-region is thick and tubular while the posterior is thin and strap-like. The purpose of this study was to compare the structural and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior sub-regions of the supraspinatus tendon. The supraspinatus tendons from seven human cadaveric shoulders were morphologically divided into the anterior and posterior sub-regions. Length, width, and thickness were measured. A servo-hydraulic testing machine (MTS Systems Corporation, Minneapolis, MN) was used for tensile testing. The maximal load at failure, modulus of elasticity and ultimate tendon stress were calculated. Repeated measures were used for statistical comparisons. The mean anterior tendon cross-sectional area was 47.3 mm(2) and the posterior was 32.1 mm(2) . Failure occurred most often at the insertion site: anterior (5/7) and posterior (6/7). All parameters of the anterior sub-region were significantly greater than those of the posterior sub-region. The moduli of elasticity at the insertion site were 592.4 MPa in the anterior sub-region and 217.7 MPa in the posterior (P = 0.01). The ultimate failure loads were 779.2 N in the anterior sub-region and 335.6 N in the posterior (P = 0.003). The ultimate stresses were 22.1 MPa in the anterior sub-region and 11.6 MPa in the posterior (P = 0.008). We recognized that the anterior and posterior sub-regions of the SSP tendon have significantly different mechanical properties. In a future study, we need to evaluate how best to repair an SSP tendon considering these region-specific properties. PMID:24214830

  16. Nonoperative biological treatment approach for partial Achilles tendon lesion.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Presti, Mirco Lo; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2010-02-01

    Tendon injuries, especially those of the Achilles tendon, are major concerns in sports medicine. The clinical presentation can be acute or chronic and the pathologic findings can range from peritendonitis to full-thickness tendon rupture. Nonsurgical treatment is not always successful; in particular, significant partial ruptures seem to respond poorly to conservative measures and do not improve with time. Surgery is most often considered the favored treatment option for this kind of lesion to obtain pain relief and full functionality with long-standing effects.This article describes a case of a partial tear of the Achilles tendon in a 34-year-old competitive athlete where surgical treatment was avoided in favor of a new biological approach. We applied autologous platelet growth factors through multiple platelet-rich plasma injections; approximately 6.5 billion platelets were injected into the lesion 3 times, 7 days apart. The treatment with platelet-rich plasma and a progressive rehabilitation program allowed the patient to play for 20 minutes in a basketball game 64 days after the trauma and in a full game 75 days after the trauma. To date, 18 months later, he has participated regularly in all the season's games and received no further treatment for his tendon.The fast tissue repair, confirmed by magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, allowed a swift return to full functionality and competitive sports activity, suggesting a possible role of platelet growth factors in promoting rapid tendon healing with high-quality tissue. This biological approach may represent a less-invasive therapeutic option even in cases where severe tendon lesions are candidates for surgical treatment. PMID:20192152

  17. Contribution of biomechanics to management of ligament and tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Woo, Savio L Y; Fisher, Matthew B; Feola, Andrew J

    2008-03-01

    The contribution of biomechanics to the advancement of management of ligament and tendon injuries has been significant. Thanks to Professor Y.C. Fung's writing and guidance, our field of research has done fundamental work on anatomy and biology of ligaments and tendons, developed methods to accurately determine mechanical properties, identified various experimental factors which could change the outcome measurements as well as examined biological factors that change tissue properties in-vivo. Professor Fung also gave us his quasi-linear viscoelastic theory for soft tissues so that the time and history dependent properties of ligaments and tendons could be properly described. We have further adopted Professor Fung's eight steps on methods of approach for biomechanical investigation to understand as well as enhance the treatment of ligament and tendon injuries during work or sports related activities. Examples on how to better treat the tears of the medial collateral ligament of the knee, as well as how to improve reconstruction procedures for the anterior cruciate ligament are presented in detail. Currently the use of functional tissue engineering for ligament and tendon healing is a topic of great interest. Here the use of biological scaffolds, such as porcine small intestinal submucosa, has shown promise. For the last 35 to 40 years, the field of biomechanics has made great strides in the treatment of ligament and tendon injuries, and many patients have benefited. The future is even brighter because of what has been done properly in the past. Exciting advances can be made in the field of tissue engineering through novel in-vitro culture and bioscaffold fabrication techniques. Recent technology can also allow the collection of in-vivo data so that ligament and tendon injuries can be better understood. Yet, solving new and more complex problems must still follow the stepwise methods of approach as taught by Professor Fung. PMID:18524246

  18. Distal biceps tendon injuries--current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Quach, Tony; Jazayeri, Reza; Sherman, Orrin H; Rosen, Jeffrey E

    2010-01-01

    Three percent of all biceps tendon ruptures occur at the distal aspect, where the tendon inserts into the radial tuberosity. Distal bicep tendon ruptures typically occur in middle-aged males after an eccentric extension load is applied to the elbow. Patients usually complain of a sudden, sharp, and painful tearing sensation in the antecubital region, with a palpable defect. The biceps squeeze and hook tests are specific maneuvers by which to diagnose distal biceps ruptures on physical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound maybe be helpful to distinguish between partial and complete tears. Anatomic studies suggest there are two distinct insertions for the short and long heads of the distal biceps. The short head may be a more powerful flexor, and the long head may be a more powerful supinator. Nonoperative treatment typically results in loss of flexion and supination strength and endurance. Early anatomic re-attachment is the goal. Surgical approaches include one- or two-incision techniques, and tendon fixation methods include the use of suture anchors, bone tunnels, an endobutton, or biotenodesis screws. Biomechanical studies have shown that endobuttons have higher load-to-failure strengths, compared to the other fixation methods. However, clinical studies have demonstrated that patients do well regardless of surgical approach or fixation method. Possible complications include nerve injuries, heterotopic ossification, postoperative fracture, tendon rerupture, complex regional pain syndrome, and wound infection. Partial ruptures are significantly less common and initially can be treated conservatively. Chronic tears are more difficult to treat because of possible tendon retraction and poor tissue quality. Tendon grafts using semitendinosus, fascia lata, hamstring, Achilles (calcaneal), or flexor carpi radialis have been successfully used for length restoration in these cases. PMID:20632985

  19. Pathological tendons maintain sufficient aligned fibrillar structure on ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC).

    PubMed

    Docking, S I; Cook, J

    2016-06-01

    Structural disorganization in the tendon is associated with tendinopathy, with little research investigating whether disorganization overwhelms the overall structural integrity of the tendon. This study investigated the mean cross-sectional area (CSA) of aligned fibrillar structure as detected by ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) in the pathological and normal Achilles and patellar tendons. Ninety-one participants had their Achilles and/or patellar tendons scanned using UTC to capture a three-dimensional image of the tendon and allow a semi-quantification of the echopattern. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure (echo type I + II) and disorganized structure (echo type III + IV) was calculated based on UTC algorithms. Each tendon was classified as either pathological or normal based solely on gray-scale ultrasound. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure was significantly greater (P ≤ 0.001) in the pathological tendon compared with the normal tendon, despite the pathological tendon containing greater amounts of disorganized structure (P ≤ 0.001). A significant relationship was observed between the mean CSA of disorganized structure and anteroposterior diameter of the Achilles (R(2)  = 0.587) and patellar (R(2)  = 0.559) tendons. This study is the first to show that pathological tendons have sufficient levels of aligned fibrillar structure. Pathological tendons may compensate for areas of disorganization by increasing in tendon thickness. PMID:26059532

  20. Actin Cytoskeleton Contributes to the Elastic Modulus of Embryonic Tendon During Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Nathan R.; von Flotow, Friedrich; Tochka, Zachary L.; Hockaday, Laura A.; Marturano, Joseph E.; Thibodeau, Jeffrey J.; Kuo, Catherine K.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and heal poorly. Strategies to regenerate or replace injured tendons are challenged by an incomplete understanding of normal tendon development. Our previous study showed that embryonic tendon elastic modulus increases as a function of developmental stage. Inhibition of enzymatic collagen crosslink formation abrogated increases in tendon elastic modulus at late developmental stages, but did not affect increases in elastic modulus of early stage embryonic tendons. Here, we aimed to identify potential contributors to the mechanical properties of these early stage embryonic tendons. We characterized tendon progenitor cells in early stage embryonic tendons, and the influence of actin cytoskeleton disruption on tissue elastic modulus. Cells were closely packed in embryonic tendons, and did not change in density during early development. We observed an organized network of actin filaments that seemed contiguous between adjacent cells. The actin filaments exhibited a crimp pattern with a period and amplitude that matched the crimp of collagen fibers at each developmental stage. Chemical disruption of the actin cytoskeleton decreased tendon tissue elastic modulus, measured by atomic force microscopy. Our results demonstrate that early developmental stage embryonic tendons possess a well organized actin cytoskeleton network that contributes significantly to tendon tissue mechanical properties. PMID:25721681

  1. High-affinity glutamate transporter and glutamine synthetase content in longissimus dorsi and adipose tissues of growing Angus steers differs among suckling, weanling, backgrounding, and finishing production stages.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J C; Huang, J; Rentfrow, G

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle and adipose tissues play important roles in maintaining whole-body Glu and N homeostasis by the uptake of Glu and release of Gln. To test the hypothesis that expression of high-affinity Glu transporters (GLAST1, EAAT4, EAAC1, GLT-1) and glutamine synthetase (GS) would increase in longissimus dorsi and adipose tissue of newborn Angus steers randomly assigned ( = 6) to develop through suckling (S; 32 d) and/or weanling (W; 184 d), backgrounding (B; 248 d), and finishing (F; 423 d) production stages. Carcass quality was determined at slaughter to verify shifts in adipose and lean deposition with development. Expression of mRNA (RT-PCR/Southern) and relative protein abundance (Western analysis) were determined in tissue homogenates isolated from longissimus dorsi, and kidney and subcutaneous adipose. The effect of production stage or tissue type on carcass and protein abundance was assessed by 1-way ANOVA using the GLM procedure of SAS, and Fisher's protected LSD procedure was used to separate data means. Neither GLAST1 nor EAAT4 mRNA or protein was detected. EAAC1, GLT-1, and GS mRNA were identified in all tissues, but GLT-1 and GS protein were not detected in kidney or subcutaneous adipose, and GS protein was not detected in longissimus dorsi. The EAAC1 content of subcutaneous ( = 0.06) and kidney ( = 0.02) adipose was 2 times greater in B and F than W steers, whereas GS was 5 times greater ( < 0.07) in B than F steers (B = W > F). For longissimus dorsi, EAAC1 ( < 0.01) and GLT-1 ( < 0.04) content decreased with development (S > W > B = F, S = W > B = F, respectively). Within F steers, EAAC1 and GLT-1 mRNA was expressed by subcutaneous, kidney, omental, mesenchymal, and intramuscular adipose tissues, whereas GS mRNA was expressed by all except for intramuscular. Only EAAC1 protein was detected in any adipose tissue, with EAAC1 content being 104% and 112% greater ( < 0.01) in intramuscular than in kidney or subcutaneous adipose, respectively, and not

  2. Ultrasound elastography for imaging tendons and muscles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a recently developed ultrasound-based method which allows the qualitative or quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of tissue. Strain (compression) ultrasound elastography is the commonest technique performed by applying mild compression with the hand-held transducer to create real-time strain distribution maps, which are color-coded and superimposed on the B-mode images. There is increasing evidence that ultrasound elastography can be used in the investigation of muscle, tendon and soft tissue disease in the clinical practice, as a supplementary tool to conventional ultrasound examination. Based on preliminary data, potential clinical applications include early diagnosis, staging, and guiding interventions musculotendinous and neuromuscular disease as well as monitoring disease during rehabilitation. Ultrasound elastography could also be used for research into the biomechanics and pathophysiology of musculotendinous disease. Despite the great interest in the technique, there is still limited evidence in the literature and there are several technical issues which limit the reproducibility of the method, including differences in quantification methods, artefacts, limitations and variation in the application of the technique by different users. This review presents the published evidence on musculoskeletal applications of strain elastography, discusses the technical issues and future perspectives of this method and emphasizes the need for standardization and further research. PMID:26673318

  3. Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Briët, Jan Paul; Becker, Stéphanie JE; Oosterhoff, Thijs CH; Ring, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) is often thought of as a volar finger mass. We hypothesized that GCTTS are equally common on the dorsal and volar aspects of the hand. In addition, we hypothesized that there are no factors associated with the location (volar versus dorsal) and largest measured dimension of a GCTTS. Methods: A total of 126 patients with a pathological diagnosis of a GCTTS of the hand or finger were reviewed. Basic demographic and GCTTS specific information was obtained. Bivariable analyses were used to assess predicting factors for location (volar or dorsal side) and largest measured diameter of a GCTTS. Results: Seventy-two tumors (57%) were on the volar side of the hand, 47 (37%) were dorsal, 6 (4.8%) were both dorsal and volar, and one was midaxial (0.79%). The most common site of a GCTTS was the index finger (30%). There were no factors significantly associated with the location (volar or dorsal, n=119) of the GCTTS. There were also no factors significantly associated with a larger diameter of a GCTTS. Conclusions: A GCTTS was more frequently seen on the volar aspect of the hand. No significant factors associated with the location or an increased size of a GCTTS were found in this study. PMID:25692164

  4. Dietary influence on the m. longissimus dorsi fatty acid composition of lambs in relation to protein source.

    PubMed

    Turner, T D; Karlsson, L; Mapiye, C; Rolland, D C; Martinsson, K; Dugan, M E R

    2012-08-01

    Dietary lipid effect, as a consequence of protein supplement, on lamb m. longissimus dorsi fatty acid composition was investigated, with emphasis on biohydrogenation intermediates. Crossbred lambs (White Swedish Landrace × Texel) were fed a barley-based diet without (CON) or with protein supplements including peas (PEA), rapeseed cake (RC) or hempseed cake (HC). The HC diet resulted in the highest muscle 22:6n-3 proportion, with the RC diet being similar (P<0.05). Protein supplement did not affect the c9,t11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) proportion, however the HC diet increased some minor CLA isomers, including t10,c12 CLA (P<0.05). The t10-18:1 and total trans-18:1 were lowest for the RC diet (P<0.05), likely relating to rumen conditions and precursor availability. The saturated, monounsaturated and branched-chain fatty acids were largely unaffected by protein supplement. In conclusion, feeding the RC diet lowered the t10-18:1 and total trans-18:1 in meat, and modestly increased 22:6n-3 content. The direction of these changes would be beneficial, making the RC diet the preferred protein supplement; however the magnitude of the changes in the present experiment may not be sufficient to have an impact on human health. PMID:22459498

  5. Influence of Restricted Grazing Time Systems on Productive Performance and Fatty Acid Composition of Longissimus dorsi in Growing Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yong; Luo, Hailing; Liu, Xueliang; Liu, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Fifty 3-month-old male Tan lambs (similar in body weight) were divided into 5 groups to investigate the effects of different restricted pasture grazing times and indoor supplementation on the productive performances and fatty acid composition of the intramuscular fat in growing lambs. The lambs grazed for different periods of time (12 h/d, 8 h/d, 4 h/d, 2 h/d, and 0 h) and received various amounts of supplementary feedings during the 120-day trial. Pasture dry matter intake (DMI), total DMI, average daily gains and the live body weights of the lambs were measured during the experiment. The animals were slaughtered at the end of the study, their carcass traits were measured, and their longissimus dorsi muscles were sampled to analyze the intramuscular fat (IMF) content and fatty acid profiles. The results indicated that the different durations of grazing and supplementary feedings affected the animal performances and the composition of fatty acids. Grazing for 8 h/d or 2 h/d with the corresponding supplementary concentrate resulted in lambs with higher body weights, carcass weights and IMF contents. Lambs with longer grazing times and less concentrate accumulated more healthy fatty acids such as conjugated linoleic acid and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid and had higher n-3/n-6 ratios. Overall, a grazing allowance of 8 h/d and the corresponding concentrate was recommended to maintain a high quantity and quality of lamb meat. PMID:26104518

  6. Integrative transcriptomics and proteomics analysis of longissimus dorsi muscles of Canadian double-muscled Large White pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuqin; Han, Wenpeng; Jiang, Shunyan; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wu, Changxin

    2016-02-10

    Canadian double-muscled Large White pigs are characterized by notable muscle mass, showing high daily gain and lean rate and good meat quality. In order to identify the major genes or proteins involved in muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy, three pairs of full-sib pigs with extreme muscle mass difference from Canadian Large White were selected as experimental animals at 3 months age. The phenotypic differences of longissimus dorsi muscles (LD) were investigated with microarray and proteomics (2-DE, MALDI-TOF-MS), and results were verified by real-time PCR and western bolting respectively. The gene expressing profiling identified 57 and 260 and 147 differently expressed genes (DEGs) from the three pairs respectively with Bayesian statistics and significant analysis of microarrays (SAM) (p<0.05, q<0.05, fold>2). From the network of these DEGs, some major genes were displayed, such as EGF, PPARG, FN1, SERPINE1, MYC, JUN, involved in Wnt, MAPK and TGF-β signal pathway respectively, which mainly participated in cell differentiation and proliferation. In parallel, proteomics analyses revealed 50 differently expressed protein (DEP) spots with mass spectrum, and 33 spots of them were found annotated, which took part in energy metabolism and the structure and contraction of muscle fiber. In brief, our integrated study provides a good foundation for the further study on the genetic mechanism of the double muscle traits in pigs. PMID:26602029

  7. Effect of Dietary Supplementation with Processed Sulfur on Meat Quality and Oxidative Stability in Longissimus dorsi of Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ha-Young; Kim, Gyeom-Heon; Kim, Soo-Ki

    2015-01-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation of processed sulfur in pigs according to the level provided during the fattening phase were examined. The pigs were divided into three groups: control (CON), non-sulfur fed pigs; T1, 0.1% processed sulfur fed pigs; T2, 0.3% processed sulfur fed pigs. Physicochemical and sensory properties, as well as meat quality and oxidative stability of the Longissimus dorsi muscle were investigated. The feeding of processed sulfur did not affect moisture and protein contents (p>0.05). However, the crude fat content of T2 was significantly decreased compared to CON (p<0.05), while the pH value of T2 was significantly higher than those of both CON and T1 (p<0.05). Cooking loss and expressible drip of T2 were also significantly lower than that of CON (p<0.05). The redness of meat from T1 was significantly higher than both CON and T2 (p<0.01). During storage, lipid oxidation of the meat from sulfur fed pigs (T1 and T2) was inhibited compared to CON. Examination of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids revealed T2 to have significantly higher content than CON (p<0.05). In the sensory test, the juiciness and overall acceptability of T2 recorded higher scores than CON. This study demonstrated that meat from 0.3% processed sulfur fed pigs had improved nutrition and quality, with extended shelf-life. PMID:26761847

  8. Identification of genes in longissimus dorsi muscle differentially expressed between Wannanhua and Yorkshire pigs using RNA-sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, X-J; Zhou, J; Liu, L-Q; Qian, K; Wang, C-L

    2016-06-01

    Western commercial pig breeds have been intensively selected, resulting in a sizeable, rapid and efficient accretion of muscle but a reduction in meat quality. When compared with Western commercial pig breeds, Chinese indigenous pig breeds exhibited slower growth rates and reduced lean meat content but superior perceived meat quality. To study the factors that determine meat quality, we examined piglets of one Western commercial breed (Yorkshire) and one Chinese indigenous breed (Wannanhua) and sequenced the longissimus dorsi muscle using RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We analyzed their transcriptomes, focusing on identifying candidate genes that may influence porcine muscle growth, meat quality and adipose deposition. Gene Ontology functional enrichment and pathway enrichment analyses identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) primarily associated with glycolytic metabolism, biological processes of muscle development and signaling pathways related to fatty acid metabolism, growth and carcass traits. This finding suggests that the DEGs may play important roles in determining meat quality traits. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction confirmed the differential expression of 12 selected DEG. This study identified a number of novel candidate genes for porcine meat quality and carcass traits that merit further investigation to elucidate the molecular mechanisms responsible for muscle growth and fat deposition. PMID:27038141

  9. Radiostereometric Evaluation of Tendon Elongation after Distal Biceps Repair

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Nathan; Keller, Robert A.; Guest, John-Michael; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Operative repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures have shown successful outcomes. However, little is known about the amount of tendon or repair site lengthening or creep. Treatment algorithms in regards to repair fixation, immobilization, initiation of activity and physical therapy are largely made on previous tendon healing principles and anecdotal findings. The purpose of our study was to evaluate distal biceps tendon repair via intratendinous radiostereometric analysis to evaluate tendon lengthening/creep at different time intervals of healing. Methods: Ten patients were recruited who sustained a distal biceps rupture requiring operative repair. Distal biceps repairs were performed using an endobutton only, single incision technique. Intraoperatively, two 2-mm tantalum beads with laser-etched holes were sutured to the distal biceps tendon. One bead was placed at the radius tendon interface and the other placed 1cm proximal to the first bead. Beads were evaluated via both CT scans immediately post-operatively and at 16 weeks and x-rays obtained at time 0 and then at 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Measurements were made using the endobutton to bead and bead-to-bead distances in order to assess repair site elongation as well as tendon elongation over time. Following final follow-up, patients underwent a DASH questionnaire and ultrasound to confirm the integrity of the tendon. Results: Ten patients were included in the study. Nine patients had complete ruptures with one having a partial rupture that underwent completion and subsequent repair. All patients showed statistically significant lengthening after surgery. The mean amount of lengthening after surgery was 21.8 mm (range 10.1-29.7 mm, p < 0.05). The repair site lengthened a mean of 12.5 mm (range 8.8-17.0 mm, p <0.05) and the tendon lengthened a mean of 9.4 mm (range: 4.0-18.8 mm, p<0.05) from surgery to final follow-up. The greatest change in lengthening was noted between time 0 and week 4 (mean: 11.8 mm

  10. Methods of Assessing Human Tendon Metabolism and Tissue Properties in Response to Changes in Mechanical Loading.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a number of methodological developments have improved the opportunities to study human tendon. Microdialysis enables sampling of interstitial fluid in the peritendon tissue, while sampling of human tendon biopsies allows direct analysis of tendon tissue for gene- and protein expression as well as protein synthesis rate. Further the (14)C bomb-pulse method has provided data on long-term tissue turnover in human tendon. Non-invasive techniques allow measurement of tendon metabolism (positron emission tomography (PET)), tendon morphology (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), and tendon mechanical properties (ultrasonography combined with force measurement during movement). Finally, 3D cell cultures of human tendon cells provide the opportunity to investigate cell-matrix interactions in response to various interventions. PMID:27535251

  11. Diclofenac Patch for Treatment of Mild to Moderate Tendonitis or Bursitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-08-05

    Rotator Cuff Tendonitis; Bicipital Tendonitis; Subdeltoid Bursitis of the Shoulder; Subacromial Bursitis of the Shoulder; Medial Epicondylitis of the Elbow; Lateral Epicondylitis of the Elbow; DeQuervain's Tenosynovitis of the Wrist

  12. Insertional Characteristics of the Peroneus Tertius Tendon: Revisiting the Anatomy of an Underestimated Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ercikti, Nurcan; Apaydin, Nihal; Kocabiyik, Necdet; Yazar, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to describe the morphologic characteristics of the peroneus tertius (PT) tendon, evaluate the variations in its insertion point, investigate the interconnections with the tendons of the extensor digitorum longus, and discuss whether these insertion differences of the muscle tension might have an effect on fracture formation. The length and width of the PT tendon and the width at its midpoint were measured in 44 lower extremities. The data obtained were compared statistically. The PT was found to occur in 2 types according to the number of tendons: type 1, a single tendon without a slip; and type 2, 2 tendons with a slip. It has been suggested that the PT tendon could contribute to avulsion fractures of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal bone. Therefore, to understand the mechanism of Jones fracture, knowledge of the PT tendon would be beneficial to determine the insertion points. PMID:26860045

  13. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline M; Tanaka, Denise M; Barbosa, Rafael I; Marcolino, Alexandre M; Elui, Valeria MC; Mazzer, Nilton

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis) and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis) during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05). A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32). Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary. PMID:26770674

  14. Symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cyst of the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jean; O'Donnell, Kevin; Lesniak, Bryson

    2011-02-01

    Ganglion cysts have been previously described throughout the body, most commonly about the wrist, hand, knee, ankle, and feet. When symptomatic, they may interfere with joint mechanics, resulting in snapping, catching, and locking. Intratendinous ganglion cysts lack a synovial epithelial lining and are thought to develop from the mucoid degeneration of connective tissue caused by chronic irritation, chronic repetitive injury, and chronic ischemia. On magnetic resonance imaging, ganglion cysts originating from tendons, ligaments, tendon sheaths, menisci, or joint capsules appear as well-defined lobulated masses that follow simple or complex fluid signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with enhancing walls and internal septations on post-contrast images. There may be appreciable degeneration and partial tearing of the structure of origin, particularly if associated with tendons. On ultrasonography, they present as hypoechoic masses, with internal septations and lobulations of varying sizes, without significant vascularity on power or color Doppler sampling. A thin fluid neck extending from the structure of origin (tail sign), when present, is a reliable sign of a ganglion cyst. This article describes a sonographically guided technique to treat symptomatic ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon. Complete evacuation of the ganglion cyst, with disappearance of the tail sign, is considered the determining factor for a successful procedure. A similar technique can be used for the treatment of other symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts elsewhere in the body. To our knowledge, symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon and their treatment have not been previously reported. PMID:21323277

  15. In vivo behaviour of human muscle tendon during walking.

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, T.; Kubo, K.; Kawakami, Y.; Fukashiro, S.; Kanehisa, H.; Maganaris, C. N.

    2001-01-01

    In the present study we investigated in vivo length changes in the fascicles and tendon of the human gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle during walking. The experimental protocol involved real-time ultrasound scanning of the GM muscle, recording of the electrical activity of the muscle, measurement of knee- and ankle-joint rotations, and measurement of ground reaction forces in six men during walking at 3 km h(-1) on a treadmill. Fascicular lengths were measured from the sonographs recorded. Musculotendon complex length changes were estimated from anatomical and joint kinematic data. Tendon length changes were obtained combining the musculotendon complex and fascicular length-change data. The fascicles followed a different length-change pattern from those of the musculotendon complex and tendon throughout the step cycle. Two important features emerged: (i) the muscle contracted near-isometrically in the stance phase, with the fascicles operating at ca. 50 mm; and (ii) the tendon stretched by ca. 7 mm during single support, and recoiled in push-off. The behaviour of the muscle in our experiment indicates consumption of minimal metabolic energy for eliciting the contractile forces required to support and displace the body. On the other hand, the spring-like behaviour of the tendon indicates storage and release of elastic-strain energy. Either of the two mechanisms would favour locomotor economy PMID:11217891

  16. Rehabilitation of Tendon Problems in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jonathan; Gaida, Jamie E; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Zwerver, Johannes; Anthony, Joseph S; Scott, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is crucial in the management of diabetes mellitus and its associated complications. However, individuals with diabetes have a heightened risk of musculoskeletal problems, including tendon pathologies. Diabetes has a significant impact on the function of tendons due to the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products in the load-bearing collagen. In addition, tendon vascularity and healing may be reduced due to diabetes-induced changes in the peripheral vascular system, and impaired synthesis of collagen and glycosaminoglycan. The current chapter presents an evidence-based discussion of considerations for the rehabilitation of tendon problems in people with diabetes. The following conditions are discussed in detail - calcific tendinopathy, tenosynovitis, tendon rupture, and non-calcifying tendinopathy. Common diabetes-related findings are presented, along with their potential impact on tendinopathy management and suggested modifications to standard tendinopathy treatment protocols. A holistic approach should be used to optimize musculotendinous function, including a comprehensive exercise prescription addressing strength, flexibility, and aerobic fitness. PMID:27535262

  17. Tendon Mechanobiology: Current Knowledge and Future Research Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Michael; Wall, Michelle E.; Little, Dianne; Banes, Albert J.; Guilak, Farshid; Arnoczky, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Tendons mainly function as load-bearing tissues in the muscloskeletal system, transmitting loads from muscle to bone. Tendons are dynamic structures that respond to the magnitude, direction, frequency, and duration of physiologic as well as pathologic mechanical loads via complex interactions between cellular pathways and the highly specialized extracellular matrix. This paper reviews the evolution and current knowledge of mechanobiology in tendon development, homeostasis, disease, and repair. In addition, we review several novel mechanotransduction pathways that have been identified recently in other tissues and cell types, providing potential research opportunities in the field of tendon mechanobiology. We also highlight current methods, models, and technologies being used in a wide variety of mechanobiology research that could be investigated in the context of their potential applicability for answering some of the fundamental unanswered questions in this field. The article concludes with a review of the major questions and future goals discussed during the recent ORS/ISMMS New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference held September 10–11, 2014 in New York City. PMID:25763779

  18. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  19. The structural synthesis of tendon-driven manipulators having a pseudotriangular structure matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jyhjone Lee; Lungwen Tsai )

    1991-06-01

    Tendons have been widely used for power transmission in the field of anthropomorphic manipulating systems. This article deals with the identification and enumeration of the kinematic structure of tendon-driven robotic mechanisms. The structural isomorphism of tendon-driven manipulators is defined, and the structural characteristics of such mechanical systems are described. Applying these structural characteristics, a methodology for the enumeration of tendon-driven robotic mechanisms is developed. Mechanism structures with up to six degrees of freedom are enumerated.

  20. The interface between bone and tendon at an insertion site: a study of the quadriceps tendon insertion

    PubMed Central

    CLARK, JOHN; STECHSCHULTE, DANIEL J.

    1998-01-01

    Traumatic avulsions of ligament or tendon insertions rarely occur at the actual interface with bone, which suggests that this attachment is strong or otherwise protected from injury by the structure of the insertion complex. In this study we describe the terminal extent of quadriceps tendon fibres where they insert into the patellae of adult rabbits, humans, dogs and sheep. Specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy (LM). To facilitate tracing of tendon fibres the specimens were decalcified for SEM, and polarised light microscopy (PLM) was used in the LM segment of the study. By SEM it was possible to identify mature bone by the presence of osteocytes and a lamellar organisation. PLM and SEM showed that, unlike tendon fibres elsewhere, those in the calcified fibrocartilage were not crimped. No specific cement line was identified by SEM. Tendon fibres interdigitated among separate bone lamellar systems, (osteons or marrow spaces), but did not merge with the collagen systems of individual lamellae. The interdigitation was more extensive and the margin between tendon and bone was less distinct in the anterior third of the insertion. The segment of calcified tendon which interdigitated with bone stained less intensely blue and was less cellular than the more proximal calcified fibrocartilage zone adjacent to the tidemark. Lamellar collagen fibres of the bony trabeculae in the anterior patella were unusually parallel and longitudinal in orientation, making distinction of interposed tendon fibres difficult on LM and PLM sections. LM, SEM and transmission electron microscopy of rabbit patellae at birth revealed that anterior quadriceps tendon fibres extended over the patella in a fibrous cellular layer. By 2 wk of age, this layer had acquired chondroid features (i.e. cell lacunae and metachromasia) and contained vessels extending from patellar marrow. At 6 wk of age, part of this fibrocartilaginous layer was replaced by mature bone

  1. Co-electrospun dual scaffolding system with potential for muscle-tendon junction tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ladd, Mitchell R; Lee, Sang Jin; Stitzel, Joel D; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2011-02-01

    Tissue engineering has had successes developing single tissue types, but there is a need for methods that will allow development of composite tissues. For instance, muscle-tendon junctions (MTJ) require a seamless interface to allow force transfer from muscle to tendon. One challenge in engineering MTJs is designing a continuous scaffold suitable for both tissue types. We aimed to create a dual scaffold that exhibits regional mechanical property differences that mimic the trends seen in native MTJ. Poly(ε-caprolactone)/collagen and poly(l-lactide)/collagen were co-electrospun onto opposite ends of a mandrel to create a scaffold with 3 regions. Scaffolds were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing (uniaxial, cyclic, and video strain), for cytocompatibility using MTS, and seeded with C2C12 myoblasts and NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Native porcine diaphragm MTJs were also analyzed with video strain for comparison. Integrated scaffolds were created with fiber diameters from 452-549 nm. Scaffolds exhibited regional variations in mechanical properties with moduli from 4.490-27.62 MPa and generally withstood cyclic testing, although with hysteresis. Video analysis showed scaffold strain profiles exhibited similar trends to native MTJ. The scaffolds were cytocompatible and accommodated cell attachment and myotube formation. The properties engineered into these scaffolds make them attractive candidates for tissue engineering of MTJs. PMID:21093046

  2. The concentration of stress at the rotator cuff tendon-to-bone attachment site is conserved across species.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Fatemeh; Deymier, Alix C; Birman, Victor; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Genin, Guy M

    2016-09-01

    The tendon-to-bone attachment site integrates two distinct tissues via a gradual transition in composition, mechanical properties, and structure. Outcomes of surgical repair are poor, in part because surgical repair does not recreate the natural attachment, and in part because the mechanical features that are most critical to mechanical and physiological functions have not been identified. We employed allometric analysis to resolve a paradox about how the architecture of the rotator cuff contributes to load transfer: whereas published data suggest that the mean muscle stresses expected at the tendon-to-bone attachment are conserved across species, data also show that the relative dimensions of key anatomical features vary dramatically, suggesting that the amplification of stresses at the interface between tendon and bone should also vary widely. However, a mechanical model that enabled a sensitivity analysis revealed that the degree of stress concentration was in fact highly conserved across species: the factors that most affected stress amplification were most highly conserved across species, while those that had a lower effect showed broad variation across a range of relative insensitivity. Results highlight how micromechanical factors can influence structure-function relationships and cross-species scaling over several orders of magnitude in animal size, and provide guidance on physiological features to emphasize in surgical and tissue engineered repair of the rotator cuff. PMID:27161959

  3. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon in patients on steroid therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, J F

    1983-01-01

    Three patients are presented who sustained bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon while on systemic steroid therapy for chest disease; a fourth patient with polymyalgia rheumatica on steroids is also presented. This is further evidence that tendon rupture can be a direct complication of steroid treatment. The English-language literature on bilateral Achilles tendon rupture is reviewed. PMID:6651370

  4. Continuous Shear Wave Elastography: a New Method to Measure in-vivo Viscoelastic Properties of Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Daniel H.; Suydam, Stephen M.; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties are frequently altered after tendon injuries and during recovery. Therefore, non-invasive measurements of shear viscoelastic properties may help evaluate tendon recovery and compare the effectiveness of different therapies. The objectives of this study are to present an elastography method to measure localized viscoelastic properties of tendon and to present initial results in healthy and injured human Achilles and semitendinosus tendons. The technique used an external actuator to generate the shear waves in the tendon at different frequencies and plane wave imaging to measure shear wave displacements. For each of the excitation frequencies, maps of direction specific wave speeds were calculated using Local Frequency Estimation. Maps of viscoelastic properties were obtained using a pixel wise curve-fit of wave speed and frequency. The method was validated by comparing measurements of wave speed in agarose gels to those obtained using magnetic resonance elastography. Measurements in human healthy Achilles tendons revealed a pronounced increase in wave speed as function of frequency that highlights the importance of tendon viscoelasticity. Additionally, the viscoelastic properties of the Achilles tendon were larger than those reported for other tissues. Measurements in a tendinopathic Achilles tendon showed that it is feasible to quantify local viscoeasltic properties. Similarly, measurement in the semitendinosus tendon showed a substantial differences in viscoelastic properties between the healthy and contralateral tendons. Consequently, this technique has the potential of evaluating localized changes in tendon viscoelastic properties due to injury and during recovery in a clinical setting. PMID:25796414

  5. Effects of lubricant and autologous bone marrow stromal cell augmentation on immobilized flexor tendon repairs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Haruhiko; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory; Moran, Steven L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to test a novel treatment that carbodiimide-derivatized-hyaluronic acid-lubricin (cd-HA-lubricin) combined cell-based therapy in an immobilized flexor tendon repair in a canine model. Seventy-eight flexor tendons from 39 dogs were transected. One tendon was treated with cd-HA-lubricin plus an interpositional graft of 8 × 10(5) BMSCs and GDF-5. The other tendon was repaired without treatment. After 21 day of immobilization, 19 dogs were sacrificed; the remaining 20 dogs underwent a 21-day rehabilitation protocol before euthanasia. The work of flexion, tendon gliding resistance, and adhesion score in treated tendons were significantly less than the untreated tendons (p < 0.05). The failure strength of the untreated tendons was higher than the treated tendons at 21 and 42 days (p < 0.05). However, there is no significant difference in stiffness between two groups at day 42. Histologic analysis of treated tendons showed a smooth surface and viable transplanted cells 42 days after the repair, whereas untreated tendons showed severe adhesion formation around the repair site. The combination of lubricant and cell treatment resulted in significantly improved digit function, reduced adhesion formation. This novel treatment can address the unmet needs of patients who are unable to commence an early mobilization protocol after flexor tendon repair. PMID:26177854

  6. Conservative management of partial extensor tendon lacerations greater than half the width of the tendon in manual workers.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2015-04-01

    Conservative management (without suturing or splints) of partial extensor tendon lacerations greater than half the width of the tendon has not been previously investigated. In this prospective study, a total of 45 injured tendons (with lacerations involving 55%-90% of the width of the tendon) in 39 patients were treated conservatively. Injury zones I, III, and V of the fingers; and zones I and III of the thumb were excluded. Immediate non-resistive active mobilization was initiated and continued for 4 weeks, followed by resistive exercises. Patients were allowed to go back to work after 6 weeks. There were no cases of ruptures, triggering, infection, or complex regional pain syndrome. At final follow-up (8-9 months after injury), all patients obtained full range of motion with no extension lags. All patients were able to go back to normal duties. We conclude that early active motion without the use of splints or sutures in major extensor tendon lacerations in zones II, IV, VI-VIII of the fingers; and zones II, IV, and V of the thumb is safe. PMID:25749213

  7. Ultrasound elasticity imaging of human posterior tibial tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is a common degenerative condition leading to a severe impairment of gait. There is currently no effective method to determine whether a patient with advanced PTTD would benefit from several months of bracing and physical therapy or ultimately require surgery. Tendon degeneration is closely associated with irreversible degradation of its collagen structure, leading to changes to its mechanical properties. If these properties could be monitored in vivo, it could be used to quantify the severity of tendonosis and help determine the appropriate treatment. Ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) is a real-time, noninvasive technique to objectively measure mechanical properties in soft tissue. It consists of acquiring a sequence of ultrasound frames and applying speckle tracking to estimate displacement and strain at each pixel. The goals of my dissertation were to 1) use acoustic simulations to investigate the performance of UEI during tendon deformation with different geometries; 2) develop and validate UEI as a potentially noninvasive technique for quantifying tendon mechanical properties in human cadaver experiments; 3) design a platform for UEI to measure mechanical properties of the PTT in vivo and determine whether there are detectable and quantifiable differences between healthy and diseased tendons. First, ultrasound simulations of tendon deformation were performed using an acoustic modeling program. The effects of different tendon geometries (cylinder and curved cylinder) on the performance of UEI were investigated. Modeling results indicated that UEI accurately estimated the strain in the cylinder geometry, but underestimated in the curved cylinder. The simulation also predicted that the out-of-the-plane motion of the PTT would cause a non-uniform strain pattern within incompressible homogeneous isotropic material. However, to average within a small region of interest determined by principal component analysis (PCA

  8. An Investigation of Tendon Corrosion-Inhibitor Leakage into Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, J.F.; Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1999-07-05

    During inspections performed at US nuclear power plants several years ago, some of the prestressed concrete containment had experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler. A study was conducted to indicate the extent of the leakage into the concrete and its potential effects on concrete properties. Concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant. Examination and testing of the core samples indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the surface was due to leakage of the filler from the conduits and its subsequent migration to the concrete surface through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks with no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength tests indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased relative to the strength at 28 days age.

  9. Torque resolver design for tendon-driven manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.; Tsai, Lung-Wen

    1992-08-01

    Given a set of desired joint torques in an n-DOF tendon-driven manipulator with n + 1 control tendons, the determination of tendon forces is an indeterminate problem. Usually, the pseudo-inverse technique is used to solve for such a problem. In this paper, rather than using the pseudo-inverse technique is used to solve for such a problem. In this paper, rather than using the pseudo-inverse technique, an efficient methodology for transforming joint torques (n elements) to motor torques (n + 1 elements) has been developed. This technique called ``torque resolver``, utilizes two circuit-like operators to transform torques between the two different vector spaces. It can be easily programmed on a digital computer or implemented into an analog-circuit system. It is hoped that this technique will make real-time computed-torque control feasible. The technique has been demonstrated through the dynamic simulation of a three-DOF manipulator.

  10. Torque resolver design for tendon-driven manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.; Tsai, Lung-Wen.

    1992-01-01

    Given a set of desired joint torques in an n-DOF tendon-driven manipulator with n + 1 control tendons, the determination of tendon forces is an indeterminate problem. Usually, the pseudo-inverse technique is used to solve for such a problem. In this paper, rather than using the pseudo-inverse technique is used to solve for such a problem. In this paper, rather than using the pseudo-inverse technique, an efficient methodology for transforming joint torques (n elements) to motor torques (n + 1 elements) has been developed. This technique called torque resolver'', utilizes two circuit-like operators to transform torques between the two different vector spaces. It can be easily programmed on a digital computer or implemented into an analog-circuit system. It is hoped that this technique will make real-time computed-torque control feasible. The technique has been demonstrated through the dynamic simulation of a three-DOF manipulator.

  11. Mechanoreceptors of the ligaments and tendons around the knee.

    PubMed

    Çabuk, Haluk; Kuşku Çabuk, Fatmagül

    2016-09-01

    Proprioceptive inputs from the joints and limbs arise from mechanoreceptors in the muscles, ligaments and tendons. The knee joint has a wide range of movements, and proper neuroanatomical organization is critical for knee stability. Four ligaments (the anterior (ACL) and posterior (PCL) cruciate ligaments and the medial (MCL) and lateral (LCL) collateral ligaments) and four tendons (the semitendinosus (STT), gracilis (GT), popliteal (PoT), and patellar (PaT) tendons) from eight fresh frozen cadavers were harvested. Each harvested tissue was divided into its bone insertion side and its tendinous part for immunohistochemical examination using S100 staining. Freeman-Wyke's classification was used to identify the mechanoreceptors. The mechanoreceptors were usually located close to the bone insertion. Free nerve endings followed by Ruffini endings were the most common mechanoreceptors overall. No Pacini corpuscles were observed; free nerve endings and Golgi-like endings were most frequent in the PCL (PCL-PaT: P = 0.0.1, PCL-STT: P = 0.00), and Ruffini endings in the popliteal tendon (PoT-PaT: P = 0.00, Pot-STT: P = 0.00, PoT-LCL: P = 0.00, PoT-GT: P = 0.00, PoT-ACL: P = 0.09). The cruciate ligaments had more mechanoreceptors than the medial structures (MS) or the patellar tendon (CR-Pat: P = 0.000, CR-MS: P = 0.01). The differences in mechanoreceptor distributions between the ligaments and tendons could reflect the different roles of these structures in the dynamic coordination of knee motion. Clin. Anat. 29:789-795, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27376635

  12. Finger Tendon Travel Associated with Sequential Trigger Nail Gun Use

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Brian; Albers, James; Hudock, Stephen; Krieg, Edward

    2015-01-01

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT Background Pneumatic nail guns used in wood framing are equipped with one of two triggering mechanisms. Sequential actuation triggers have been shown to be a safer alternative to contact actuation triggers because they reduce traumatic injury risk. However, the sequential actuation trigger must be depressed for each individual nail fired as opposed to the contact actuation trigger, which allows the trigger to be held depressed as nails are fired repeatedly by bumping the safety tip against the workpiece. As such, concerns have been raised about risks for cumulative trauma injury, and reduced productivity, due to repetitive finger motion with the sequential actuation trigger. Purpose This study developed a method to predict cumulative finger flexor tendon travel associated with the sequential actuation trigger nail gun from finger joint kinematics measured in the trigger actuation and productivity standards for wood-frame construction tasks. Methods Finger motions were measured from six users wearing an instrumented electrogoniometer glove in a simulation of two common framing tasks–wall building and flat nailing of material. Flexor tendon travel was calculated from the ensemble average kinematics for an individual nail fired. Results Finger flexor tendon travel was attributable mostly to proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joint motion. Tendon travel per nail fired appeared to be slightly greater for a wall-building task than a flat nailing task. The present study data, in combination with construction industry productivity standards, suggest that a high-production workday would be associated with less than 60 m/day cumulative tendon travel per worker (based on 1700 trigger presses/day). Conclusion and Applications These results suggest that exposure to finger tendon travel from sequential actuation trigger nail gun use may be below levels that have been previously associated with high musculoskeletal disorder risk. PMID

  13. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Genevay, Muriel; Abrassart, Sophie; Schwitzguébel, Adrien Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described. PMID:26380138

  14. Computer assisted tendon tensioning operations on the Auger TLP

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, C.M. III

    1995-05-01

    One of the most critical phases of the tendon installation operation is the tension adjustment of the tendons. During these phases of the operation, length adjustments must be performed that result in correctly distributed tension loads, at the design platform draft, and without net platform inclination. Instrumentation integrated with an on-line computer advisory system accelerates the operation, thereby reducing spread time and risk associated with prolonged exposure. The paper includes a brief discussion of the instrumentation and data gathering and processing system on Auger, the advisory functions that use these data, and the step-by-step procedure to achieve an installed configuration consistent with the design premise.

  15. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures. PMID:25553671

  16. Tendon material properties vary and are interdependent among turkey hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Matson, Andrew; Konow, Nicolai; Miller, Samuel; Konow, Pernille P; Roberts, Thomas J

    2012-10-15

    The material properties of a tendon affect its ability to store and return elastic energy, resist damage, provide mechanical feedback and amplify or attenuate muscle power. While the structural properties of a tendon are known to respond to a variety of stimuli, the extent to which material properties vary among individual muscles remains unclear. We studied the tendons of six different muscles in the hindlimb of Eastern wild turkeys to determine whether there was variation in elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and resilience. A hydraulic testing machine was used to measure tendon force during quasi-static lengthening, and a stress-strain curve was constructed. There was substantial variation in tendon material properties among different muscles. Average elastic modulus differed significantly between some tendons, and values for the six different tendons varied nearly twofold, from 829±140 to 1479±106 MPa. Tendons were stretched to failure, and the stress at failure, or ultimate tensile stress, was taken as a lower-limit estimate of tendon strength. Breaking tests for four of the tendons revealed significant variation in ultimate tensile stress, ranging from 66.83±14.34 to 112.37±9.39 MPa. Resilience, or the fraction of energy returned in cyclic length changes was generally high, and one of the four tendons tested was significantly different in resilience from the other tendons (range: 90.65±0.83 to 94.02±0.71%). An analysis of correlation between material properties revealed a positive relationship between ultimate tensile strength and elastic modulus (r(2)=0.79). Specifically, stiffer tendons were stronger, and we suggest that this correlation results from a constrained value of breaking strain, which did not vary significantly among tendons. This finding suggests an interdependence of material properties that may have a structural basis and may explain some adaptive responses observed in studies of tendon plasticity. PMID:22771746

  17. Study on Growth Curves of Longissimus dorsi Muscle Area, Backfat Thickness and Body Conformation for Hanwoo (Korean Native) Cows

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. H.; Oh, S.-H.; Lee, Y. M.; Kim, Y. S.; Son, H. J.; Jeong, D. J.; Whitley, N. C.; Kim, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the parameters of Gompertz growth curves with the measurements of body conformation, real-time ultrasound longissimus dorsi muscle area (LMA) and backfat thickness (BFT) in Hanwoo cows. The Hanwoo cows (n = 3,373) were born in 97 Hanwoo commercial farms in the 17 cities or counties of Gyeongbuk province, Korea, between 2000 and 2007. A total of 5,504 ultrasound measurements were collected for the cows at the age of 13 to 165 months in 2007 and 2008. Wither height (HW), rump height (HR), the horizontal distance between the top of the hips (WH), and girth of chest (GC) were also measured. Analysis of variance was conducted to investigate variables affecting LMA and BFT. The effect of farm nested in location was included in the statistical model, as well as the effects of HW, HR, WH, and GC as covariates. All of the effects were significant in the analysis of variance for LMA and BFT (p<0.01), except for the HR effect for LMA. The two ultrasound measures and the four body conformation traits were fitted to a Gompertz growth curve function to estimate parameters. Upper asymptotic weights were estimated as 54.0 cm2, 7.67 mm, 125.6 cm, 126.4 cm, 29.3 cm, and 184.1 cm, for LMA, BFT, HW, HR, WH, and GC, respectively. Results of ultrasound measurements showed that Hanwoo cows had smaller LMA and greater BFT than other western cattle breeds, suggesting that care must be taken to select for thick BFT rather than an increase of only beef yield. More ultrasound records per cow are needed to get accurate estimates of growth curve, which, thus, helps producers select animals with high accuracy. PMID:25178367

  18. Micromechanical poroelastic finite element and shear-lag models of tendon predict large strain dependent Poisson's ratios and fluid expulsion under tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Freedman, Benjamin R; Connizzo, Brianne K; Soslowsky, Louis J; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2015-08-01

    As tendons are loaded, they reduce in volume and exude fluid to the surrounding medium. Experimental studies have shown that tendon stretching results in a Poisson's ratio greater than 0.5, with a maximum value at small strains followed by a nonlinear decay. Here we present a computational model that attributes this macroscopic observation to the microscopic mechanism of the load transfer between fibrils under stretch. We develop a finite element model based on the mechanical role of the interfibrillar-linking elements, such as thin fibrils that bridge the aligned fibrils or macromolecules such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the interfibrillar sliding and verify it with a theoretical shear-lag model. We showed the existence of a previously unappreciated structure-function mechanism whereby the Poisson's ratio in tendon is affected by the strain applied and interfibrillar-linker properties, and together these features predict tendon volume shrinkage under tensile loading. During loading, the interfibrillar-linkers pulled fibrils toward each other and squeezed the matrix, leading to the Poisson's ratio larger than 0.5 and fluid expulsion. In addition, the rotation of the interfibrillar-linkers with respect to the fibrils at large strains caused a reduction in the volume shrinkage and eventual nonlinear decay in Poisson's ratio at large strains. Our model also predicts a fluid flow that has a radial pattern toward the surrounding medium, with the larger fluid velocities in proportion to the interfibrillar sliding. PMID:25934322

  19. Two cases of chronic knee pain caused by unusual injuries to the popliteus tendon

    PubMed Central

    DAVALOS, ERIC A.; BARANK, DAVID; VARMA, RAJEEV K.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the popliteus tendon are less frequent than injuries to the menisci or ligamentous structures of the knee. When they do occur, injuries to the popliteus tendon tend to be the result of trauma and associated with injuries to other components of the knee. The most commonly seen injuries include tears at the musculotendinous junction and avulsion tears at the lateral femoral condyle insertion site. This report presents two unusual injuries of the popliteus tendon in patients with chronic knee pain: an isolated split tear of the tendon and a subluxed tendon residing within the lateral joint space. PMID:27386449

  20. Variant course of extensor pollicis longus tendon in the second wrist extensor compartment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Lee, Jae Hoon; Baek, Jong Hun

    2016-05-01

    Among the muscles involved in thumb movement, the extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon of the hand is considered the most consistent structure with the least variation among individuals. There have been a few reports regarding different types of supernumerary tendons; however, an abnormal course of the EPL tendon is extremely rare. We describe a case of a variant course of a single EPL tendon appearing in the second extensor compartment of the wrist. This case was observed incidentally during wrist surgery, and demonstrates a unique variation of tendon course, which has not been reported previously. The knowledge of this anatomic variation is helpful in surgical planning and for making accurate diagnoses. PMID:26253859

  1. The Effects of Bag Style on Muscle Activity of the Trapezius, Erector Spinae and Latissimus Dorsi During Walking in Female University Students

    PubMed Central

    Hardie, Rebecca; Haskew, Rachel; Harris, Joel; Hughes, Gerwyn

    2015-01-01

    Back pain is common in adolescents which has been associated with carrying a bag. However, there is little research examining the effects of bag style in female adolescents. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of different bag conditions on muscle activity of the trapezius, erector spinae and latissimus dorsi muscles in female university students during walking. Twelve female university students walked on a treadmill for 5 minutes at 1.1 m/s during five conditions; control, 1 strapped rucksack, 2 strapped rucksack, ipsilateral shoulder strap and contralateral shoulder strap, each containing 10% bodyweight. Electromyography for the trapezius, erector spinae and latissimus dorsi was recorded for the last 30 s of each condition. Two-way ANOVA and paired t-tests were used to identify differences between right and left muscles and between bag conditions. Results showed that muscle activity of the left trapezius was significantly higher than the right trapezius during the 1 strap rucksack condition. For the left trapezius, the 2 strapped rucksack and the control condition had significantly lower muscle activity compared to the 1 strapped rucksack and the ipsilateral shoulder strap. For the left erector spinae muscle, there was significantly greater muscle activity when wearing the contralateral shoulder strap compared to the control. For the right erector spinae, significantly lower muscle activity was observed when wearing the 2 strapped rucksack compared to the ipsilateral shoulder strap and contralateral shoulder strap. There were no significant differences in muscle activity of the latissimus dorsi muscles between any of the bag conditions. These findings suggest that a two strapped rucksack should be used when carrying loads to reduce spinal muscle activity which may, in turn, reduce reports of back pain in female adolescents. PMID:25964808

  2. Ultrasound characteristics of the patellar and quadriceps tendons among young elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Visnes, H; Tegnander, A; Bahr, R

    2015-04-01

    Tendons adapt in response to sports-specific loading, but sometimes develop tendinopathy. If the presence of ultrasound changes like hypoechoic areas and neovascularization in asymptomatic tendons precede (and predict) future tendon problems is unknown. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate the relationship between the development of ultrasound changes in the patellar and quadriceps tendons and symptoms of jumper's knee, as well to examine the medium-term effects of intensive training on tendon thickness among adolescent athletes. Elite junior volleyball athletes were followed with semi-annual ultrasound and clinical examinations (average follow-up: 1.7 years). Of the 141 asymptomatic athletes included, 22 athletes (35 patellar tendons) developed jumper's knee. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, a baseline finding of a hypoechoic tendon area (odds ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 9.2) increased the risk of developing symptoms of jumper's knee. Patellar tendon thickness among healthy athletes did not change (Wilk's lambda, P = 0.07) while quadriceps tendon thickness increased (P = 0.001). In conclusion, ultrasound changes at baseline were risk factors for developing symptoms of jumper's knee. Also, among healthy athletes, we observed a 7-11% increase in quadriceps tendon thickness, while there was no increase in patellar tendon thickness. PMID:24612006

  3. Histopathological and biomechanical evaluation of tenocyte seeded allografts on rat Achilles tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Güngörmüş, Cansın; Kolankaya, Dürdane; Aydin, Erkin

    2015-05-01

    Tendon injuries in humans as well as in animals' veterinary medicine are problematic because tendon has poor regenerative capacity and complete regeneration of the ruptured tendon is never achieved. In the last decade there has been an increasing need of treatment methods with different approaches. The aim of the current study was to improve the regeneration process of rat Achilles tendon with tenocyte seeded decellularized tendon matrices. For this purpose, Achilles tendons were harvested, decellularized and seeded as a mixture of three consecutive passages of tenocytes at a density of 1 × 10(6) cells/ml. Specifically, cells with different passage numbers were compared with respect to growth characteristics, cellular senescence and collagen/tenocyte marker production before seeding process. The viability of reseeded tendon constructs was followed postoperatively up to 6 months in rat Achilles tendon by histopathological and biomechanical analysis. Our results suggests that tenocyte seeded decellularized tendon matrix can significantly improve the histological and biomechanical properties of tendon repair tissue without causing adverse immune reactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first long-term study in the literature which was accomplished to prove the use of decellularized matrix in a clinically relevant model of rat Achilles tendon and the method suggested herein might have important implications for translation into the clinic. PMID:25771002

  4. The structure and vascularization of the biceps brachii long head tendon.

    PubMed

    Kolts, I; Tillmann, B; Lüllmann-Rauch, R

    1994-01-01

    In the present study we examined the structure and the blood supply of the long biceps tendon as well as the surface of the intertubercular sulcus, using tissue samples from children and adults. The applied methods were light and electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and arterial injection techniques. The tendon represents a sliding tendon with the intertubercular sulcus and humeral head as hypomochlion. The parts facing the humerus show some ultrastructural features of fibrous cartilage, the ovoid chondrocyte-like cells of the tendon lying within felt-like matrix. In the opposite part adjacent to the capsule, the tendon resembles a traction tendon. The intertubercular sulcus is covered by fibrous cartilage. The tendon is supplied with arteries from three different sources. The density of intratendinous vessels in the traction zone is comparable to that of other tendons, while in the sliding zone it is markably decreased. The immediate vicinity of the sliding surface is avascular. Our findings show that the long biceps tendon is structurally adapted to both its functions as sliding and traction tendon. The blood supply seems to be related to the metabolic requirements of the different parts of the tendon. PMID:8304595

  5. Flexor tendon excursion and load during passive and active simulated motion: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, A; Yoon, H K; Karia, R; Lee, S K

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the amount of tendon excursion and load experienced during simulated active and passive rehabilitation exercises. Six cadaver specimens were utilized to examine tendon excursion and load. Lateral fluoroscopic images were used to measure the excursions of metal markers placed in the flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus tendons of the index, middle, and ring fingers. Measurements were performed during ten different passive and active simulated motions. Mean tendon forces were higher in all active versus passive movements. Blocking movements placed the highest loads on the flexor tendons. Active motion resulted in higher tendon excursion than did passive motion. Simulated hook position resulted in the highest total tendon excursion and the highest inter-tendinous excursion. This knowledge may help optimize the management of the post-operative exercise therapy regimen. PMID:23221181

  6. Interstitial Tear of the Subscapularis Tendon, Arthroscopic Findings and Technique of Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Tears of the subscapularis tendon have been significantly recognized as a source of shoulder pain and dysfunction in the past decade, thanks to arthroscopic evaluation of the shoulder and biomechanical and anatomical studies of the tendon. Current classification of subscapularis tendon tear is based on insertion site of the tendon. Recently, a classification for non-insertional types of subscapularis tendon tear has been published. Interstitial tear of subscapularis tendon has not been described in classifications available in the literature. This report describes significant interstitial tear of the subscapularis tendon. This tear looks normal in superior, bursal and articular sides. Then its specific arthroscopic findings as “Air bag sign” and repair technique of the pathology is explained. PMID:27200399

  7. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  8. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  9. Strain mapping in the Achilles tendon - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, Stijn; Desmet, Hannelore; Slagmolen, Pieter; Peers, Koen

    2016-06-14

    Achilles tendinopathy remains one of the most prevalent overuse injuries in elite as well as recreational athletes. Regardless of the fact that the aetiology of tendinopathy has not been fully understood, therapeutic mechanical loading programs have emerged as being the treatment of choice. In this light, mechanical properties of the tendon and their response to changes in loading or unloading have been the subject of many previous investigations. One of these properties often investigated is strain, a measure of relative deformation. By means of a systematic review, an overview was given of research in this field, with a primary objective to list the methods used and secondary aim to synthesize data on strain mapping in the Achilles tendon. Following the guidelines of the PRISMA statement, 47 articles were found appropriate for qualitative assessment. Achilles tendon strain has been investigated across a variety of contexts, including the response to exercise, walking, unloading, ageing, hormonal changes and weight. Only three studies investigated the effect of the presence of tendinopathy on strain. Ultrasound was the most often used imaging modality to measure or estimate strain. Further methodological parameters, e.g. the location of measurement, differed greatly between all different studies. Nearly all studies considered global strain. Some studies investigated the transverse strain response of the Achilles tendon. Recently, however, the role of local - intratendinous - strain distribution has been found to be of critical importance and further studies should focus on imaging modalities to investigate these local changes. PMID:27113537

  10. Editorial commentary: biologic enhancement of muscle and tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-05-01

    Review of biologic enhancement of muscle and tendon healing reveals substantial clinical study of platelet rich plasma, but an inadequate basis for evidence-based treatment recommendations. In this context, the literature shows that augmentation of rotator cuff repair is not shown to be of benefit, while treatment of knee and ankle tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis shows positive results. PMID:25953230

  11. Does Platelet-Rich Plasma Increase Tendon Metabolism?

    PubMed

    de Vos, Robert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Acute and overuse tendon disorders are frequently observed in the middle-aged active population. Tendon overuse injuries are currently designated as "tendinopathy". Histopathological studies have shown that chronic tendinopathy is frequently characterised by degenerative changes, such as decreased organisation of collagen, altered cell distribution and neovascularisation. In the recent years, scientific research and technology in the field of regenerative medicine has provided a new perspectives on managing chronic tendinopathy. An initiation of tissue healing can be attempted by local delivery of growth factors. Nowadays, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a commonly applied approach to achieve this. Platelet degranulation leads to a release of various growth factors and cytokines. There is a classification system to define the different forms of PRP. In the past decade, a number of studies have been published on the effects of PRP in different basic science studies. These studies suggest that PRP modulates some aspects of tendon metabolic activity. This is one of the reasons why PRP is increasingly used by many clinicians as treatment option for tendinopathy in daily clinical practice. There is, however, evidence from the literature that it does not lead to improved outcome on imaging findings and on patient-reported outcomes. This questions the role of PRP injections as regular treatment for tendinopathy. Moreover, it results in a broader discussion on the required effects that need to occur for tendon healing and symptom relieve. PMID:27535268

  12. ARTHROSCOPY FOR TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY CALCIFIC TENDONITIS OF THE SHOULDER

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi; Fernandes, Rui José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from arthroscopic treatment in patients with calcific tendonitis of the shoulder. Methods: Between September 2001 and June 2006, 55 patients with calcific tendonitis of the shoulder that was resistant to conservative treatment were evaluated, with follow-up of 12 to 70 months. The mean age was 42 years, ranging from 30 to 64 years; 44 patients were female (80%). There were 37 right shoulders, and 63.63% of the cases were on the dominant side. Pain was the main symptom, and the mean time between onset of symptoms and arthroscopy was 38 months (range: five to 120 months). The tendon affected was the supraspinatus in 42 cases, the infraspinatus in 11 cases and an association between these in two cases. Acromioplasty was carried out in 12 patients (21.82%) and subacromial bursectomy was performed in all cases. Results: According to the UCLA criteria, 46 cases were excellent and six were good, making a total of 52 satisfactory results (94.54%). Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendonitis of the shoulder appears to be an effective method, with high rates of satisfactory results. Associated acromioplasty is not necessary. PMID:27019839

  13. Gelatin yarns inspired by tendons--structural and mechanical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Selle, Hila Klein; Bar-On, Benny; Marom, Gad; Wagner, H Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Tendons are among the most robust structures in nature. Using the structural properties of natural tendon as a foundation for the development of micro-yarns may lead to innovative composite materials. Gelatin monofilaments were prepared by casting and spinning and small yarns--with up to ten filaments--were assembled into either parallel or 15° twisted yarns. The latter were intended as an attempt to generate mechanical effects similar to those arising from the crimp pattern in tendon. The mechanical properties of parallel and 15° twisted gelatin yarns were compared. The effect of an increasing number of filaments per yarn was also examined. The mechanical properties were mostly affected by the increasing number of filaments, and no benefit arose from twisting small yarns by 15°. However, since gelatin filaments are elasto-plastic rather than fully elastic, much increased toughness (by up to a factor of five for a ten filament yarn) can be achieved with yarns made of elasto-plastic filaments, as demonstrated by experiments and numerical simulations. The resulting effect shows some resemblance to the effect of crimp in tendons. Finally, we developed a dependable procedure to measure the toughness of single filaments based on the test of a yarn rather than on a large number of individual filament tests. PMID:25492166

  14. Bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy in 2 cats.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Maureen A; Laverty, Peter H; Soiderer, Emily E

    2005-03-01

    Two cats presented with bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy. This previously unreported complication proved to be painful and debilitating. Deep digital flexor tenectomy successfully resolved the problem. Twelve months after surgery, the first cat remains free of complications. The second cat recovered full limb function, but died of unrelated causes. PMID:15884646

  15. Bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy in 2 cats

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Two cats presented with bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy. This previously unreported complication proved to be painful and debilitating. Deep digital flexor tenectomy successfully resolved the problem. Twelve months after surgery, the first cat remains free of complications. The second cat recovered full limb function, but died of unrelated causes. PMID:15884646

  16. The use of Zylon fibers in ULDB tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, Loren; Zimmerman, Mike; McLaughlin, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Early in the development of the ultra long duration balloon (ULDB), Zylon was selected as the tendon material due to its favorable stress-strain properties. It is a next generation fiber whose strength and modulus are almost double those of the Kevlar fibers. In addition there are two versions of the Zylon, as spun (AS) and high modulus (HM). Data will be presented on why HM was chosen. Early in the development process, it was learned that this material exhibited an unusual sensitivity to degradation by ambient light. This is in addition to the expected sensitivity to UV (Ultraviolet) radiation. The fiber manufacturer reported all of these properties in their literature. Due to the operating environment of the ULDB it is necessary to protect the tendons from both visible and UV radiation. Methods to protect the tendons will be discussed. In addition, information on the long term exposure of the braided tendon over a thirty-two month period in a controlled manufacturing plant will be provided. Special testing methods will be noted.

  17. Calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon (Gluteus maximus tendinitis)

    SciTech Connect

    Wepfer, J.F.; Reed, J.G.; Cullen, G.M.; McDevitt, W.P.

    1983-02-01

    Seven cases of calcific tendinitis of the gluteus maximus tendon are presented. Awareness of the precise anatomic location of the calcific deposit is essential for the accurate diagnosis of this uncommon site of tendinitis. Clinically, the presenting complaint is that of pain. In some instances, however, the patients are asymptomatic and the calcification is an incidental finding.

  18. Direct-current electrical stimulation of tendon healing in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Nessler, J.P.; Mass, D.P.

    1987-04-01

    The intrinsic capacity of tendons to heal in response to injury has recently been demonstrated by many investigators. Electrical stimulation is often assumed to augment regeneration of various tissues. Using newly developed methods of whole-tendon culture, the authors examined the effect of direct-current electricity on healing in vitro. Deep flexor tendons of rabbits were excised, transected, repaired, and grown in an acellular culture medium for seven, 14, 21, or 42 days. Tendons through which a continuous 7-microAmp current was passed at the repair site were compared with nonstimulated controls. The incorporation of (/sup 14/C)proline and its conversion to (/sup 14/C)hydroxyproline was measured at seven days. The mean (/sup 14/C)proline and (/sup 14/C)hydroxyproline activities were 91% and 255% greater, respectively, in the stimulated group. The activity was also higher in the stimulated group, by 42 days. Histologic sections showed that intrinsic tenoblastic repair may be enhanced with electrical stimulation in vitro.

  19. ggstThe role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and lidocaine. PMID:18447938

  20. Endoscopic Achilles tenolysis for management of heel cord pain after repair of acute rupture of Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon pain after repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture can result from suture granuloma formation, modification of the threshold of the pain receptors inside the tendon by scar tissue, expansion of the paratenon by tendon enlargement with secondary stimulation of mechanoreceptors, or underlying tendon degeneration. In the present technique report, an endoscopic technique of Achilles tenolysis for denervation and debulking is described that might be applicable in cases in which conservative treatment fails to alleviate the pain. PMID:23085384

  1. Tendon Adaptation to Sport-specific Loading in Adolescent Athletes.

    PubMed

    Cassel, M; Carlsohn, A; Fröhlich, K; John, M; Riegels, N; Mayer, F

    2016-02-01

    Tendon adaptation due to mechanical loading is controversially discussed. However, data concerning the development of tendon thickness in adolescent athletes is sparse. The purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in Achilles (AT) and patellar tendon (PT) thickness in adolescent athletes while considering age, gender and sport-specific loading. In 500 adolescent competitive athletes of 16 different sports and 40 recreational controls both ATs and PTs were sonographically measured. Subjects were divided into 2 age groups (< 13; ≥ 13 years) and 6 sport type categories (ball, combat, and water sports, combined disciplines, cycling, controls). In addition, 3 risk groups (low, moderate, high) were created according to the athlete's risk of developing tendinopathy. AT and PT thickness did not significantly differ between age groups (AT/PT:<13: 5.4±0.7 mm/3.6±0.5 mm;≥13: 5.3±0.7 mm/3.6±0.5 mm). In both age groups males presented higher tendon thickness than females (p<0.001). AT thickness was highest in ball sports/cyclists and lowest in controls (p≤0.002). PT thickness was greatest in water sports and lowest in controls (p=0.02). High risk athletes presented slightly higher AT thickness compared to the low risk group (p=0.03). Increased AT and PT thickness in certain sport types compared to controls supports the hypothesis of structural tendon adaptation due to sport-specific loading. PMID:26509367

  2. Genetic Response of Rat Supraspinatus Tendon and Muscle to Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Sarah Ilkhanipour; Tobias, John W.; Bhatt, Pankti R.; Kuntz, Andrew F.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex, biologic event that aims to protect and repair tissue. Previous studies suggest that inflammation is critical to induce a healing response following acute injury; however, whether similar inflammatory responses occur as a result of beneficial, non-injurious loading is unknown. The objective of this study was to screen for alterations in a subset of inflammatory and extracellular matrix genes to identify the responses of rat supraspinatus tendon and muscle to a known, non-injurious loading condition. We sought to define how a subset of genes representative of specific inflammation and matrix turnover pathways is altered in supraspinatus tendon and muscle 1) acutely following a single loading bout and 2) chronically following repeated loading bouts. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats in the acute group ran a single bout of non-injurious exercise on a flat treadmill (10 m/min, 1 hour) and were sacrificed 12 or 24 hours after. Rats in the chronic group ran 5 days/wk for 1 or 8 weeks. A control group maintained normal cage activity. Supraspinatus muscle and tendon were harvested for RNA extractions, and a custom Panomics QuantiGene 2.0 multiplex assay was used to detect 48 target and 3 housekeeping genes. Muscle/tendon and acute/chronic groups had distinct gene expression. Components of the arachidonic acid cascade and matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors were altered with acute and chronic exercise. Collagen expression increased. Using a previously validated model of non-injurious exercise, we have shown that supraspinatus tendon and muscle respond to acute and chronic exercise by regulating inflammatory- and matrix turnover-related genes, suggesting that these pathways are involved in the beneficial adaptations to exercise. PMID:26447778

  3. The Prevalence and Role of Low Lying Peroneus Brevis Muscle Belly in Patients with Peroneal Tendon Pathologies: A Potential Source for Tendon Subluxation

    PubMed Central

    Mirmiran, Roya; Squire, Chad; Wassell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A low lying peroneus brevis muscle belly is a rare anomaly. There are few published studies that support presence of this anomaly as an etiology for peroneal tendon tear. However, the association between a low lying peroneus muscle belly (LLMB) and tendon subluxation is not well explored. In this retrospective study, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings of 50 consecutive patients undergoing a primary peroneal tendon surgery, in a five year period, were assessed. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI, in comparison to intraoperative findings for identifying peroneal tendon disease was investigated. Presence of associated peroneal tendon pathologies in patients with and without LLMB was compared. Sensitivity of MRI was high in identifying peroneal tenosynovitis (81.58%) and tear (85.71%). Although the sensitivity of MRI for detecting a LLMB (3.23%) and tendon subluxation (10.00%) was low, MRI had high specificity at 94.74% and 100%, respectively. Intraoperatively, LLMB was seen in 62.00% of patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and was associated with 64.52% cases of tenosynovitis, 29.03% cases of tendon subluxation, and 80.65% cases of peroneus brevis tendon tear. While presence of a LLMB did not show any statistically significant association with peroneus brevis tendon subluxation, among the 10 patients with intraoperatively observed tendon subluxation, 9 had a concomitant LLMB. More studies with a larger patient population are needed to better study the role of a low lying muscle belly as a mass occupying lesion resulting in peroneal tendon subluxation. PMID:25998478

  4. Prevalence and Role of a Low-Lying Peroneus Brevis Muscle Belly in Patients With Peroneal Tendon Pathologic Features: A Potential Source of Tendon Subluxation.

    PubMed

    Mirmiran, Roya; Squire, Chad; Wassell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A peroneus brevis low-lying muscle belly (LLMB) is a rare anomaly. A few published studies have supported the presence of this anomaly as an etiology for a peroneal tendon tear. However, the association between a peroneus brevis LLMB and tendon subluxation has not been well explored. In the present retrospective study, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings of 50 consecutive patients undergoing primary peroneal tendon surgery during a 5-year period were assessed. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI compared with the intraoperative findings for identifying peroneal tendon disease were investigated. The presence of associated peroneal tendon pathologic features in patients with and without a peroneus brevis LLMB was also compared. The sensitivity of MRI was high for identifying peroneal tenosynovitis (81.58%) and tear (85.71%). Although the sensitivity of MRI for detecting a peroneus brevis LLMB (3.23%) and tendon subluxation (10.00%) was low, MRI had high specificity at 94.74% and 100%, respectively. Intraoperatively, a peroneus brevis LLMB was seen in 62.00% of the patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and was associated with 64.52% of the patients with tenosynovitis, 29.03% of those with tendon subluxation, and 80.65% of those with a peroneus brevis tendon tear. Although the presence of a peroneus brevis LLMB did not show any statistically significant association with peroneus brevis tendon subluxation, of the 10 patients with intraoperatively observed tendon subluxation, 9 had a concomitant peroneus brevis LLMB. More studies with larger patient populations are needed to better investigate the role of a peroneus brevis LLMB as a mass-occupying lesion resulting in peroneal tendon subluxation. PMID:25998478

  5. Reconstruction of large defect of foot with extensive bone loss exclusively using a latissimus dorsi muscle free flap: a potential new indication for this flap.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Manuel Macemino; Casal, Diogo

    2012-01-01

    In cases of extensive damage to the foot, with significant bone loss, it is generally accepted that reconstruction must include bone flaps or grafts either in the emergency setting or subsequently. In this report, we describe the case of an 18-year-old student with an avulsion injury of the dorsum of his right foot. Consequently, he lost most of the soft tissue over the dorsum of the foot and the cuboid, navicular, and cuneiform bones. A latissimus dorsi free flap was used to reconstruct the defect. A functional pseudoarthrosis developed between the remaining bones of the foot, and the patient experienced satisfactory foot function after rehabilitation. For this reason, no additional reconstructive procedure was undertaken. This case suggests that it might be adequate to use the latissimus dorsi muscle flap more liberally than previously reported in the reconstruction of extensive defects of the dorsum of the foot, including cases with significant bone loss. This option could avoid the morbidity and inconvenience of a second surgery and the need to harvest a bone flap or graft. PMID:21945400

  6. Myofascial force transmission between transferred rat flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and former synergistic palmaris longus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Huub; Huijing, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We investigated the extent of mechanical interaction between rat flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL) muscles following transfer of FCU to the distal tendons of extensor carpi radialis brevis and longus (ECRB/L) muscles. Five weeks after recovery from surgery, isometric forces exerted at the distal tendons of FCU and PL were quantified at various FCU lengths. PL was kept at a constant length. Changing the muscle-tendon complex length of transferred FCU (by maximally 3.5 mm) decreased PL force significantly (by 7%). A linear relationship was found between changes in FCU muscle belly length, being a measure of muscle relative positions, and PL force. These results indicate that despite transfer of FCU muscle to the extensor side of the forearm, changing FCU length still affects force transmission of its, now, antagonistic PL muscle. We conclude that a transferred muscle may still be mechanically linked to its former synergistic muscles. PMID:23738260

  7. Tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps tendon: histopathologic analysis of the extra-articular biceps tendon and tenosynovium

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Rodgers, Mark; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-01-01

    Background Bicipital tendinitis is a common cause of anterior shoulder pain, but there is no evidence that acute inflammation of the extra-articular long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is the root cause of this condition. We evaluated the histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath in order to compare those findings to known histologic changes seen in other tendinopathies. Methods Twenty-six consecutive patients (mean age 45.4±13.7 years) underwent an open subpectoral biceps tenodesis for anterior shoulder pain localized to the bicipital groove. Excised tendons were sent for histologic analysis. Specimens were graded using a semiquantitative scoring system to evaluate tenocyte morphology, the presence of ground substance, collagen bundle characteristics, and vascular changes. Results Chronic inflammation was noted in only two of 26 specimens, and no specimen demonstrated acute inflammation. Tenocyte enlargement and proliferation, characterized by increased roundness and size of the cell and nucleus with proteoglycan matrix expansion and myxoid degenerative changes, was found in all 26 specimens. Abundant ground substance, collagen bundle changes, and increased vascularization were visualized in all samples. Conclusion Anterior shoulder pain attributed to the biceps tendon does not appear to be due to an inflammatory process in most cases. The histologic findings of the extra-articular portion of the LHB tendon and synovial sheath are similar to the pathologic findings in de Quervain tenosynovitis at the wrist, and may be due to a chronic degenerative process similar to this and other tendinopathies of the body. PMID:25792859

  8. Somatomedin C immunoreactivity in the Achilles tendon varies in a dynamic manner with the mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Hansson, H A; Engström, A M; Holm, S; Rosenqvist, A L

    1988-10-01

    Distribution of the trophic peptide somatomedin C (Sm-C; insulin-like growth factor I; IGF-I) immunoreactivity was mapped in normal Achilles and tibialis anterior tendons. The spindle-shaped tendon fibroblasts showed faint perinuclear staining. Fibroblasts in the paratenon mostly had a more intense IGF-I immunoreactivity, i.e. faint to moderate. When analysing either tendon in detail, areas with more intense IGF-I immunoreactivity could be recognized and seemed to correlate with areas of high mechanical stress. Increased mechanical load induced over 3 days elevated IGF-I immunoreactivity throughout the cytoplasm of tendon fibroblasts. Peak intensity was reached in 7 days, and thereafter the IGF-I immunoreactivity seemed to decrease irrespective of persistent high mechanical load. Training the animals on a treadmill for from 20 up to 60 min per day for 5 days induced after 3-5 days increased IGF-I immunoreactivity throughout the cytoplasm of the tendon and paratenon fibroblasts. Sudden curtailment of loading the Achilles tendon resulted in a marked reduction of the IGF-I immunoreactivity in most fibroblasts within 3 days. After a week only a small number of tendon fibroblasts showed any IGF-I immunoreactivity. The IGF-I immunoreactivity of tendon fibroblasts thus correlates to mechanical loading of the tendon. It is proposed that IGF-I may have a trophic influence on tendon and paratenon cells by autocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms. PMID:3067520

  9. Deleterious effects of local corticosteroid injections on the Achilles tendon of rats.

    PubMed

    Tatari, H; Kosay, C; Baran, O; Ozcan, O; Ozer, E

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pathological changes in the Achilles tendon and its paratenon after intratendinous corticosteroid injections and to reveal the effects of this drug on healthy tendon. We also sought for the effects of these injections compared with compression with a clamp on the Achilles tendons of the rats. Fifty-two Achilles tendons in 26 male Wistar rats were included in the study. Betamethasone injections were applied to the left tendons at different intervals, while the right tendons served for compression with mosquito clamps for varied periods. At the end of 30 days, all of the tendons were excised and examined histopathologically according to a semiquantitative scoring system. Histopathologic evaluation demonstrated some degree of degeneration in both groups. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference among the two groups, but in macroscopic evaluation, the tendons in the betamethasone group demonstrated enlargement and strong adhesion to the subcutaneous tissue. We conclude that intratendinous betamethasone injections are as harmful as compression with a clamp and can be used as a degeneration-producing model in further studies. Enlargement of the tendon mass and strong adhesion to the subcutaneous tissue can be due to injection of the betamethasone partly outside the tendon. PMID:11482466

  10. Augmentation of tendon attachment to porous ceramics by bone marrow stromal cells in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Yu; Yokoya, Shin; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2006-01-01

    Tendon attachment to interconnected porous calcium hydroxyapatite ceramics (IP-CHA) with cultured bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) was analysed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether BMSC in IP-CHA could augment the tendon attachment to IP-CHA histologically and biomechanically. Eighteen Japanese white rabbits were used. Cultured BMSCs were subcultured in IP-CHA. The grafted tendon and IP-CHA with BMSC complex were implanted in a bone defect of the knee [BMSC(+) group]. In the contralateral knee, a tendon and IP-CHA without BMSC complex were implanted [BMSC(-) group]. Histological findings of the interface between the tendon and IP-CHA were similar in the two groups 3 weeks after the operation. However, 6 weeks after the operation, more abundant bone formation around the tendon was observed in the BMSC(+) group. The direct apposition of the tendon to bone in pores and collagen fibre continuity between the tendon and fibrous tissue in pores were observed. In biomechanical evaluation, the maximum pull-out load of the tendon from the IP-CHA in the BMSC(+) group was significantly higher than that in the BMSC(-) group 6 weeks after the operation. BMSCs cultured in IP-CHA could augment tendon attachment to IP-CHA. PMID:16909253

  11. Exogenous collagen cross-linking recovers tendon functional integrity in an experimental model of partial tear.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Gion; Wernli, Jeremy; Li, Yufei; Gerber, Christian; Snedeker, Jess G

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that exogenous collagen cross-linking can augment intact regions of tendon to mitigate mechanical propagation of partial tears. We first screened the low toxicity collagen cross-linkers genipin, methylglyoxal and ultra-violet (UV) light for their ability to augment tendon stiffness and failure load in rat tail tendon fascicles (RTTF). We then investigated cross-linking effects in load bearing equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT). Data indicated that all three cross-linking agents augmented RTTF mechanical properties but reduced native viscoelasticity. In contrast to effects observed in fascicles, methylglyoxal treatment of SDFT detrimentally affected tendon mechanical integrity, and in the case of UV did not alter tendon mechanics. As in the RTTF experiments, genipin cross-linking of SDFT resulted in increased stiffness, higher failure loads and reduced viscoelasticity. Based on this result we assessed the efficacy of genipin in arresting tendon tear propagation in cyclic loading to failure. Genipin cross-linking secondary to a mid-substance biopsy-punch significantly reduced tissue strains, increased elastic modulus and increased resistance to fatigue failure. We conclude that genipin cross-linking of injured tendons holds potential for arresting tendon tear progression, and that implications of the treatment on matrix remodeling in living tendons should now be investigated. PMID:22102295

  12. Parameters influencing prevalence and outcome of tendonitis in Thoroughbred and Arabian racehorses.

    PubMed

    Kalisiak, O

    2012-01-01

    Flexor tendonitis and suspensory desmitis are among most prevalent musculoskeletal injuries observed in racehorses. The aim of this study was to determine which horse and race-related parameters can help to diminish the possibility of injury or--when injury has occurred--to evaluate the potential for the horse to continue a successful career after convalescence. Special attention was given to the comparison of Arabian and Thoroughbred racehorses. 187 horses with ultrasonographically visible lesions were included in the study. Following parameters were analyzed: structure (Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon [SDFT], Deep Digital Flexor Tendon [DDFT], Suspensory Ligament [SL]); percentage of cross sectional area increase; hypoechogenic lesion character; in horses with SDF tendonitis - tendonitis grade according to Genovese. This study showed that Thoroughbreds are more at risk of musculoskeletal problems than Arabian racehorses. In both breeds, the most frequent injuries concern SDFT, then SL. Over 95% of tendonitis concern forelimbs. In Thoroughbreds, the prevalence of tendonitis is higher in bigger horses, in males when compared to females and in fence/steeple racehorses when compared to flat track racehorses. The inside limb is more at risk of SDF tendonitis, when the external limb - of SL desmitis. Tendonitis severity increases with age and is greater in steeplechasers when compared to flat track racehorses. The outcome of tendonitis without hypoechogenic lesion is much better than that with hypoechogenic lesion. Evaluation of hypoechogenic lesion length is an easy and accurate prognosis tool, as the chances of returning to racing drop dramatically with lesions longer than 12 cm. PMID:22708365

  13. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing.

    PubMed

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A; Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc-/- tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc-/- tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  14. Operative technique for human composite flexor tendon allograft procurement and engraftment.

    PubMed

    DeGeorge, Brent R; Rodeheaver, George T; Drake, David B

    2014-01-01

    Devastating volar hand injuries with significant damage to the pulley structures and fibro-osseous sheath, flexor tendons, and volar plates pose a major problem to the reconstructive hand surgeon. Despite advances in tendon handling, operative technique, and postoperative hand rehabilitation, patients who have undergone flexor tendon reconstruction are often plagued by chronic pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion with resultant decreased ability to work and poor quality of life. Postoperative adhesion formation and lack of suitable donor material for tendon autograft are 2 fundamental problems that continue to challenge the hand surgeon. In 1967, Erle E. Peacock, Jr, described a technique of flexor tendon reconstruction using cadaveric composite flexor tendon allograft, which consisted of both the flexor digitorum profundus and superficialis tendons in their respective fibro-osseous sheaths consisting of the digital pulley structures and the underlying periosteum and volar plates. This technique never gained widespread acceptance due to concerns regarding tissue antigenicity, infectious disease transmission, and the rising popularity of the method of Hunter for silastic rod-based flexor tendon reconstruction initially described during the same period. With modern-day advances in tissue processing with acellularization and extensive donor screening for transmissible diseases, this technique should be revisited to address the reconstructive needs of patients with extensive volar soft tissue and tendon injury. Herein, we describe the operative technique of composite flexor tendon procurement and reconstruction with key modifications from the initial technique described by Peacock for improved composite construct elevation, soft tissue inset, and bony attachment. PMID:24691346

  15. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc−/− tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc−/− tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  16. Stretching Your Energetic Budget: How Tendon Compliance Affects the Metabolic Cost of Running

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Thomas K.; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Dembia, Christopher L.; Delp, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    Muscles attach to bones via tendons that stretch and recoil, affecting muscle force generation and metabolic energy consumption. In this study, we investigated the effect of tendon compliance on the metabolic cost of running using a full-body musculoskeletal model with a detailed model of muscle energetics. We performed muscle-driven simulations of running at 2–5 m/s with tendon force–strain curves that produced between 1 and 10% strain when the muscles were developing maximum isometric force. We computed the average metabolic power consumed by each muscle when running at each speed and with each tendon compliance. Average whole-body metabolic power consumption increased as running speed increased, regardless of tendon compliance, and was lowest at each speed when tendon strain reached 2–3% as muscles were developing maximum isometric force. When running at 2 m/s, the soleus muscle consumed less metabolic power at high tendon compliance because the strain of the tendon allowed the muscle fibers to operate nearly isometrically during stance. In contrast, the medial and lateral gastrocnemii consumed less metabolic power at low tendon compliance because less compliant tendons allowed the muscle fibers to operate closer to their optimal lengths during stance. The software and simulations used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and enable examination of muscle energetics with unprecedented detail. PMID:26930416

  17. Regional variation of tibialis anterior tendon mechanics is lost following denervation.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Ellen M; Calve, Sarah; Dennis, Robert G; Mundy, Kevin; Baar, Keith

    2006-10-01

    Denervation or inactivity is known to decrease the mass and alter the phenotype of muscle. The mechanical response of tendon to inactivity that has been determined experimentally differs from what is reported by patients. We investigated the hypothesis that this difference was the result of artifacts of the testing process and did not represent what occurred in vivo. To test this hypothesis, a novel approach was used to determine the mechanical properties of the tibialis anterior (TA) tendon by optically measuring the end-to-end mechanical strains as well as the local strains at specific regions of excised TA tendon units. When the end-to-end strain of normal TA tendon is determined, stress-strain response curves show considerably more extensibility than when strain is measured across only the midsection of the tendon (mid-tendon). The strain experienced by the region close to the muscle (muscle tendon) is five times greater than the strain in either the mid-tendon or near the bone (bone-tendon). Five weeks of denervation decreased muscle mass by 67%; increased tendon mass by 10%; and changed the entire shape of the nonlinear response curve, including a loss in regional variation in strain, a 3.9-fold increase in end-to-end tangent modulus, and a 70% reduction in the toe region, as a result of a drastic reduction of the extensibility in the muscle-tendon region. The stress-strain response in the mid-tendon region of a normal TA tendon is therefore not indicative of its overall ability to deform in vivo as it transmits forces from muscle to bone. PMID:16728516

  18. Functionally distinct tendon fascicles exhibit different creep and stress relaxation behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Legerlotz, Kirsten; Demirci, Taylan; Klemt, Christian; Riley, Graham P; Screen, Hazel RC

    2014-01-01

    Most overuse tendinopathies are thought to be associated with repeated microstrain below the failure threshold, analogous to the fatigue failure that affects materials placed under repetitive loading. Investigating the progression of fatigue damage within tendons is therefore of critical importance. There are obvious challenges associated with the sourcing of human tendon samples for in vitro analysis so animal models are regularly adopted. However, data indicates that fatigue life varies significantly between tendons of different species and with different stresses in life. Positional tendons such as rat tail tendon or the bovine digital extensor are commonly applied in in vitro studies of tendon overuse, but there is no evidence to suggest their behaviour is indicative of the types of human tendon particularly prone to overuse injuries. In this study, the fatigue response of the largely positional digital extensor and the more energy storing deep digital flexor tendon of the bovine hoof were compared to the semitendinosus tendon of the human hamstring. Fascicles from each tendon type were subjected to either stress or strain controlled fatigue loading (cyclic creep or cyclic stress relaxation respectively). Gross fascicle mechanics were monitored after cyclic stress relaxation and the mean number of cycles to failure investigated with creep loading. Bovine extensor fascicles demonstrated the poorest fatigue response, while the energy storing human semitendinosus was the most fatigue resistant. Despite the superior fatigue response of the energy storing tendons, confocal imaging suggested a similar degree of damage in all three tendon types; it appears the more energy storing tendons are better able to withstand damage without detriment to mechanics. PMID:24285289

  19. Equine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells have a Reduced Tendon Differentiation Capacity Compared to Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bavin, Emma P.; Smith, Olivia; Baird, Arabella E. G.; Smith, Lawrence C.; Guest, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries occur commonly in horses and their repair through scar tissue formation predisposes horses to a high rate of re-injury. Pluripotent stem cells may provide a cell replacement therapy to improve tendon tissue regeneration and lower the frequency of re-injury. We have previously demonstrated that equine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiate into the tendon cell lineage upon injection into the damaged horse tendon and can differentiate into functional tendon cells in vitro to generate artificial tendons. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have now been derived from horses but, to date, there are no reports on their ability to differentiate into tendon cells. As iPSCs can be produced from adult cell types, they provide a more accessible source of cells than ESCs, which require the use of horse embryos. The aim of this study was to compare tendon differentiation by ESCs and iPSCs produced through two independent methods. In two-dimensional differentiation assays, the iPSCs expressed tendon-associated genes and proteins, which were enhanced by the presence of transforming growth factor-β3. However, in three-dimensional (3D) differentiation assays, the iPSCs failed to differentiate into functional tendon cells and generate artificial tendons. These results demonstrate the utility of the 3D in vitro tendon assay for measuring tendon differentiation and the need for more detailed studies to be performed on equine iPSCs to identify and understand their epigenetic differences from pluripotent ESCs prior to their clinical application. PMID:26664982

  20. Concurrent deficits of soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fascicles and Achilles tendon post stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Roth, Elliot J.; Harvey, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Calf muscles and Achilles tendon play important roles in functional activities. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the uniarticular soleus (SOL) and biarticular gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles tendon, including the fascicle length, pennation angle, and stiffness, change concurrently post stroke. Biomechanical properties of the medial gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus muscles were evaluated bilaterally in 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors using combined ultrasonography-biomechanical measurements. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon including the length, cross-sectional area (CSA), stiffness, and Young's modulus were evaluated, together with calf muscle biomechanical properties. Gastrocnemius and SOL contributions were separated using flexed and extended knee positions. The impaired side showed decreased fascicle length (GM: 6%, P = 0.002 and SOL: 9%, P = 0.03, at full knee extension and 0° ankle dorsiflexion) and increased fascicular stiffness (GM: 64%, P = 0.005 and SOL: 19%, P = 0.012, at a common 50 N force level). In contrast, Achilles tendon on the impaired side showed changes in the opposite direction as the muscle fascicles with increased tendon length (5%, P < 0.001), decreased tendon CSA (5%, P = 0.04), decreased tendon stiffness (42%, P < 0.001) and Young's modulus (30%, P < 0.001) compared with the unimpaired side. The fascicle and tendon stiffness changes were correlated negatively to the corresponding fascicle and tendon length changes, and decrease in Achilles tendon stiffness was correlated to the increases of SOL and GM fascicular stiffness (P < 0.05). Characterizations of calf muscle fascicles and Achilles tendon biomechanical properties help us better understand concurrent changes of fascicles and tendon as part of the calf muscle-tendon unit and facilitate development of more effective treatments. PMID:25663670