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Sample records for dose 28-day oral

  1. Evaluation of Genotoxicity and 28-day Oral Dose Toxicity on Freeze-dried Powder of Tenebrio molitor Larvae (Yellow Mealworm)

    PubMed Central

    Han, So-Ri; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae Sam; Jeong, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The larval form of Tenebrio molitor (T. molitor) has been eaten in many countries and provides benefits as a new food source of protein for humans. However, no information exists regarding its safety for humans. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxicity and repeated dose oral toxicity of the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae. The genotoxic potential was evaluated by a standard battery testing: bacterial reverse mutation test, in vitro chromosome aberration test, and in vivo micronucleus test. To assess the repeated dose toxicity, the powder was administered once daily by oral gavage to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at dose levels of 0, 300, 1000 and 3000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. The parameters which were applied to the study were mortality, clinical signs, body and organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, serum chemistry, gross findings and histopathologic examination. The freezedried powder of T. molitor larvae was not mutagenic or clastogenic based on results of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays. Furthermore, no treatment-related changes or findings were observed in any parameters in rats after 28 days oral administration. In conclusion, the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae was considered to be non-genotoxic and the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) was determined to be 3000 mg/kg/day in both sexes of SD rats under our experimental conditions. PMID:25071922

  2. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...indication of immunological effects and reproductive organ toxicity. (c) Definitions...least 10 animals (five female and five male) should be used at each dose level...carefully recorded, preferably using scoring systems, explicitly defined by the...

  3. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...indication of immunological effects and reproductive organ toxicity. (c) Definitions...least 10 animals (five female and five male) should be used at each dose level...carefully recorded, preferably using scoring systems, explicitly defined by the...

  4. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...indication of immunological effects and reproductive organ toxicity. (c) Definitions...least 10 animals (five female and five male) should be used at each dose level...carefully recorded, preferably using scoring systems, explicitly defined by the...

  5. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...indication of immunological effects and reproductive organ toxicity. (c) Definitions...least 10 animals (five female and five male) should be used at each dose level...carefully recorded, preferably using scoring systems, explicitly defined by the...

  6. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...indication of immunological effects and reproductive organ toxicity. (c) Definitions...least 10 animals (five female and five male) should be used at each dose level...carefully recorded, preferably using scoring systems, explicitly defined by the...

  7. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The...-pregnant. Dosing should begin as soon as possible after weaning and, in any case, before the animals are 9... interfere with the general metabolism of the animals and, particularly in feeding studies, may disturb...

  8. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The...-pregnant. Dosing should begin as soon as possible after weaning and, in any case, before the animals are 9... interfere with the general metabolism of the animals and, particularly in feeding studies, may disturb...

  9. Cuprizone decreases intermediate and late-stage progenitor cells in hippocampal neurogenesis of rats in a framework of 28-day oral dose toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hajime; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Saito, Fumiyo; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-09-15

    Developmental exposure to cuprizone (CPZ), a demyelinating agent, impairs intermediate-stage neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rat offspring. To investigate the possibility of alterations in adult neurogenesis following postpubertal exposure to CPZ in a framework of general toxicity studies, CPZ was orally administered to 5-week-old male rats at 0, 120, or 600mg/kg body weight/day for 28days. In the subgranular zone (SGZ), 600mg/kg CPZ increased the number of cleaved caspase-3(+) apoptotic cells. At ?120mg/kg, the number of SGZ cells immunoreactive for TBR2, doublecortin, or PCNA was decreased, while that for SOX2 was increased. In the granule cell layer, CPZ at ?120mg/kg decreased the number of postmitotic granule cells immunoreactive for NEUN, CHRNA7, ARC or FOS. In the dentate hilus, CPZ at ?120mg/kg decreased phosphorylated TRKB(+) interneurons, although the number of reelin(+) interneurons was unchanged. At 600mg/kg, mRNA levels of Bdnf and Chrna7 were decreased, while those of Casp4, Casp12 and Trib3 were increased in the dentate gyrus. These data suggest that CPZ in a scheme of 28-day toxicity study causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of granule cell lineages, resulting in aberrations of intermediate neurogenesis and late-stage neurogenesis and following suppression of immediate early gene-mediated neuronal plasticity. Suppression of BDNF signals to interneurons caused by decreased cholinergic signaling may play a role in these effects of CPZ. The effects of postpubertal CPZ on neurogenesis were similar to those observed with developmental exposure, except for the lack of reelin response, which may contribute to a greater decrease in SGZ cells. PMID:26057786

  10. Acute toxicity and the 28-day repeated dose study of a Siddha medicine Nuna Kadugu in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nuna Kadugu (NK), a Siddha medicine prepared from leaves and fruits of Morinda Pubescens, used for the treatment of various skin diseases. Though NK has been widely used for several decades, no scientific report was available on its safety. Present study was undertaken to demonstrate the oral toxicity of NK in Sprague Dawley rats. Methods Acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicity studies were performed following OECD test guidelines 423 and 407, respectively, with minor modifications. In acute oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 2000mg/kg b.wt., p.o and animals were observed for toxic signs at 0, 0.5, 1, 4, 24 h and for next 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. In repeated dose, the 28- day oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg b.wt./p.o/day. Two satellite groups (control and high dose) were also maintained to determine the delayed onset toxicity of NK. Animals were observed for mortality, morbidity, body weight changes, feed and water intake. Haematology, clinical biochemistry, electrolytes, gross pathology, relative organ weight and histopathological examination were performed. Results In acute toxicity study, no treatment related death or toxic signs were observed with NK administration. In the repeated dose study, no significant differences in body weight changes, food / water intake, haematology, clinical biochemistry and electrolytes content were observed between control and NK groups. No gross pathological findings and difference in relative organ weights were observed between control and NK treated rats. Histopathological examination revealed no abnormalities with NK treatment. Conclusion Acute study reveals that the LD50 of NK is greater than 2000mg/kg, b.wt. in fasted female rats and can be classified as Category 5. 28-day repeated oral toxicity demonstrates that the No Observed Adverse Effect Level of NK is greater than 900 mg/kg b.wt./day, p.o in rats. There were no delayed effects in NK satellite group. In conclusion, NK was found to be non-toxic in the tested doses and experimental conditions. PMID:23088610

  11. Acute and 28-Day Subchronic Oral Toxicity of an Ethanol Extract of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia Ju; Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Liu, I-Min

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute and subacute toxicity (28 days) of the ethanol extract of Z. zerumbet rhizomes (EEZZ) via the oral route in Wistar rats of both sexes. In the acute toxicity study, Wistar rats were administered a single dose of 15?g?kg?1 of body weight by gavage, and were monitored for 14 days. EEZZ did not produce any toxic signs or deaths; the 50% lethal dose must be higher than 15?g?kg?1. In the subchronic toxicity study, EEZZ was administered by gavage at doses of 1000, 2000 and 3000?mg/kg daily for 4 weeks to Wistar rats. The subacute treatment with EEZZ did not alter either the body weight gain or the food and water consumption. The hematological and biochemical analysis did not show significant differences in any of the parameters examined in female or male groups. Necropsy and histopathological examination, did not reveal any remarkable and treatment related changes. A no-observed adverse-effect level for EEZZ is 3000?mg?kg?1 for rats under the conditions of this study. Hence, consumption of EEZZ for various medicinal purposes is safe. PMID:22536288

  12. Genotoxicity analysis of cerium oxide micro and nanoparticles in Wistar rats after 28 days of repeated oral administration.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Monika; Kumari, Srinivas Indu; Grover, Paramjit

    2014-11-01

    The applications of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs; nanoceria) extend to polishing agents, diesel fuel additives and as a putative antioxidant in therapeutics. Therefore, understanding the long-term toxic effects of CeO2 NPs is of particular importance. This study investigated the 28 days of repeated toxicity of 30, 300 and 600 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day of nanoceria and CeO2 microparticles (MPs) in Wistar rats after oral exposure. Genotoxicity was analysed using comet, micronucleus (MN) and chromosomal aberration (CA) assays. The results demonstrated a significant increase in DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes and liver, MN and CA in bone marrow as well as MN in peripheral blood after exposure to CeO2 NPs at 300 and 600 mg/kg bw/day. Significant alterations were observed in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase activity in serum and reduced glutathione content in the liver, kidneys and brain at 300 and 600 mg/kg bw/day in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, CeO2 MPs did not induce any significant toxicological changes. A much higher absorptivity and significant tissue distribution of CeO2 NPs was perceived in comparison to CeO2 MPs in a dose-dependent manner. A substantial fraction of CeO2 NPs was cleared by urine and faeces. Histopathological analysis revealed that CeO2 NPs caused alterations in liver, spleen and brain. Further, distinct difference in the data among genders was not obvious. In general, the results suggested that prolonged oral exposure to nanoceria has the potential to cause genetic damage, biochemical alterations and histological changes after retention in vital organs of rats at high concentrations. PMID:25209125

  13. 28-day oral safety evaluation of extracellular polysaccharopeptides produced in submerged culture from the turkey tail medicinal mushroom Trametes versicolor (L.:Fr.) Pilát LH-1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Hong; Teng, Ju-Fang; Hsu, Tai-Hao; Lin, Fang-Yi; Yang, Po-Wen; Lo, Hui-chen

    2011-01-01

    Turkey tail medicinal mushroom, Trametes versicolor (TV), is a species with a variety of pharmacological activities. Its intracellular polysaccharopeptides are widely commercialized. Recently, we found a novel TV strain LH-1 in Taiwan and demonstrated that the extracellular polysaccharopeptide (ePSP) of LH-1 obtained from submerged culture exhibits significant immunomodulatory activity. In this in vivo study, we further evaluated the safety of orally administered LH-1 ePSP using both male and female ICR mice. The LH-1 ePSP was orally administered to mice at levels of 0 (water), 100 (low dose), 500 (medium dose), or 1000 mg/kg/day (high dose) for 28 days. Clinical observations, growth, food consumption, histopathological examination, and clinical biochemical analyses revealed no adverse effects of LH-1 ePSP in mice. There were no significant differences in the results of target organ weights, hematological analyses, and urinalysis examination among groups. However, male mice that ingested high doses of LH-1 ePSP tended to have decreased lung weights and platelet numbers. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that oral administration of LH-1 ePSP for 28 days is accompanied by no obvious signs of toxicity. The lack of toxicity supports the potential use of LH-1 ePSP as a food or dietary supplement. PMID:22135874

  14. Reproducibility and robustness of metabolome analysis in rat plasma of 28-day repeated dose toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Kamp, H; Strauss, V; Wiemer, J; Leibold, E; Walk, T; Mellert, W; Looser, R; Prokoudine, A; Fabian, E; Krennrich, G; Herold, M; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2012-11-30

    BASF has developed a rat plasma metabolomics database (MetaMap®Tox) containing the metabolome of more than 500 chemicals, agrochemicals and drugs, for which the toxicity is well known, derived from 28-day repeated dose toxicity studies in rats. The quality/reproducibility of data was assessed by comparing the metabolome of 16 reference compounds tested at least twice under identical experimental conditions at three time points (day 7, day 14 and day 28). Statistical correlation analysis showed that the repeated treatment induced very similar changes to the metabolome. For all repetitions the modes of action of the compounds were always correctly identified. Moreover, when compared against the metabolome of all compounds available in the MetaMap®Tox database, the repetitions showed in most cases the highest degree of overall similarity with the metabolome of the original study. In addition, we also evaluated the robustness of our metabolomics technique, displayed by constancy of variability in control groups over time. Based on these results, it can be concluded, that metabolomics can reproducibly be applied during toxicological in vivo testing in rats under the conditions applied here. PMID:23103988

  15. A 28-day oral toxicity evaluation of small interfering RNAs and a long double-stranded RNA targeting vacuolar ATPase in mice.

    PubMed

    Petrick, Jay S; Moore, William M; Heydens, William F; Koch, Michael S; Sherman, James H; Lemke, Shawna L

    2015-02-01

    New biotechnology-derived crop traits have been developed utilizing the natural process of RNA interference (RNAi). However, plant-produced double stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) are not known to present a hazard to mammals because numerous biological barriers limit uptake and potential for activity. To evaluate this experimentally, dsRNA sequences matching the mouse vATPase gene (an established target for control of corn rootworms) were evaluated in a 28-day toxicity study with mice. Test groups were orally gavaged with escalating doses of either a pool of four 21-mer vATPase small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or a 218-base pair vATPase dsRNA. There were no treatment-related effects on body weight, food consumption, clinical observations, clinical chemistry, hematology, gross pathology, or histopathology endpoints. The highest dose levels tested were considered to be the no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) for the 21-mer siRNAs (48 mg/kg/day) and the 218 bp dsRNA (64 mg/kg/day). As an additional exploratory endpoint, vATPase gene expression, was evaluated in selected gastrointestinal tract and systemic tissues. The results of this assay did not indicate treatment-related suppression of vATPase. The results of this study indicate that orally ingested dsRNAs, even those targeting a gene in the test species, do not produce adverse health effects in mammals. PMID:25445299

  16. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The..., phosphate, fasting triglycerides, specific hormones, methemoglobin and cholinesterase. These must to...

  17. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The..., phosphate, fasting triglycerides, specific hormones, methemoglobin and cholinesterase. These must to...

  18. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The..., phosphate, fasting triglycerides, specific hormones, methemoglobin and cholinesterase. These must to...

  19. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The..., phosphate, fasting triglycerides, specific hormones, methemoglobin and cholinesterase. These must to...

  20. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The..., phosphate, fasting triglycerides, specific hormones, methemoglobin and cholinesterase. These must to...

  1. Phase I trial of low-dose oral Clofarabine in myelodysplastic syndromes patients who have failed frontline therapy.

    PubMed

    Rudrapatna, Venkatesh K; Morley, Kimberly; Boucher, Kenneth M; Pierson, Andrew S; Shull, Christian T; Kushner, James P; Shami, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    We investigated protracted low-dose oral Clofarabine for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Adults with an International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score of INT-1 or higher who had failed first line therapy were eligible. INT-1 patients had to be transfusion-dependent. We started with oral Clofarabine at 5mg (fixed dose) daily for 10 consecutive days on a 28-day cycle. Toxicity prompted a modification to 1mg PO daily for 10 days and then 1mg PO daily for 7 days. Patients received treatment indefinitely until loss of response or unacceptable toxicity. Nine patients (5 women) were enrolled and evaluable (median age 65 years; range 55-81). A 10-day regimen of oral Clofarabine at 5mg/day induced Grade IV pancytopenia. A dose of 1 mg/day for 7/28 days was very well tolerated without significant toxicity. Three patients had responses (2 with responses lasting up to 21 and 51 cycles) defined as stable disease in spite of no significant change on bone marrow evaluation. Low-dose oral Clofarabine (1mg daily for 7/28 days) proved both effective and safe for patients with MDS who had failed prior therapy. This patient population is particularly sensitive to more protracted Clofarabine treatment schedules. PMID:26038120

  2. Multinational, multicentre, randomised, open-label study evaluating the impact of a 91-day extended regimen combined oral contraceptive, compared with two 28-day traditional combined oral contraceptives, on haemostatic parameters in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Anna Maria; Volpe, Annibale; Chiovato, Luca; Howard, Brandon; Weiss, Herman; Ricciotti, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of a 91-day extended regimen combined oral contraceptive (150 ?g levonorgestrel [LNG]/30 ?g ethinylestradiol [EE] for 84 days, followed by 10 ?g EE for seven days [Treatment 1]) compared with two traditional 21/7 regimens (21 days 150 ?g LNG/30 ?g EE [Treatment 2] or 150 ?g desogestrel [DSG]/30 ?g EE [Treatment 3], both with seven days’ hormone free), on several coagulation factors and thrombin formation markers. Methods Randomised, open-label, parallel-group comparative study involving healthy women (18–40 years). The primary endpoint was change from baseline in prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) levels over six months. Results A total of 187 subjects were included in the primary analysis. In all groups, mean F1 + 2 values were elevated after six months of treatment. Changes were comparable between Treatments 1 and 2 (least squares mean change: 170 pmol/L and 158 pmol/L, respectively) but noticeably larger after Treatment 3 (least squares mean change: 592 pmol/L). The haemostatic effects of Treatment 1 were comparable to those of Treatment 2 and noninferior to those of Treatment 3 (lower limit of 95% confidence interval [? 18.3 pmol/L] > ? 130 pmol/L). Conclusions The LNG/EE regimens had similar effects on F1 + 2. Noninferiority was demonstrated between extended regimen LNG/EE and DSG/EE. PMID:24923685

  3. Flexibility of Oral Cholera Vaccine Dosing—A Randomized Controlled Trial Measuring Immune Responses Following Alternative Vaccination Schedules in a Cholera Hyper-Endemic Zone

    PubMed Central

    Kanungo, Suman; Desai, Sachin N.; Nandy, Ranjan Kumar; Bhattacharya, Mihir Kumar; Kim, Deok Ryun; Sinha, Anuradha; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Yang, Jae Seung; Lopez, Anna Lena; Manna, Byomkesh; Bannerjee, Barnali; Ali, Mohammad; Dhingra, Mandeep Singh; Chandra, Ananga Mohan; Clemens, John D.; Sur, Dipika; Wierzba, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background A bivalent killed whole cell oral cholera vaccine has been found to be safe and efficacious for five years in the cholera endemic setting of Kolkata, India, when given in a two dose schedule, two weeks apart. A randomized controlled trial revealed that the immune response was not significantly increased following the second dose compared to that after the first dose. We aimed to evaluate the impact of an extended four week dosing schedule on vibriocidal response. Methodology/Principal Findings In this double blind randomized controlled non-inferiority trial, 356 Indian, non-pregnant residents aged 1 year or older were randomized to receive two doses of oral cholera vaccine at 14 and 28 day intervals. We compared vibriocidal immune responses between these schedules. Among adults, no significant differences were noted when comparing the rates of seroconversion for V. cholerae O1 Inaba following two dose regimens administered at a 14 day interval (55%) vs the 28 day interval (58%). Similarly, no differences in seroconversion were demonstrated in children comparing the 14 (80%) and 28 day intervals (77%). Following 14 and 28 day dosing intervals, vibriocidal response rates against V. cholerae O1 Ogawa were 45% and 49% in adults and 73% and 72% in children respectively. Responses were lower for V. cholerae O139, but similar between dosing schedules for adults (20%, 20%) and children (28%, 20%). Conclusions/Significance Comparable immune responses and safety profiles between the two dosing schedules support the option for increased flexibility of current OCV dosing. Further operational research using a longer dosing regimen will provide answers to improve implementation and delivery of cholera vaccination in endemic and epidemic outbreak scenarios. PMID:25764513

  4. Norfloxacin disposition after sequentially increasing oral doses.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, B N; Boppana, V K; Vlasses, P H; Rotmensch, H H; Ferguson, R K

    1983-01-01

    Single doses of norfloxacin (200, 400, 800, 1,200, and 1,600 mg) or placebo were administered orally at weekly intervals to 14 healthy male volunteers in a double-blind study. Norfloxacin was measured in serum and urine by high-pressure liquid chromatography with UV detection. The concentrations of this drug in serum peaked 1 to 2 h after each dose; the mean peak values for increasing doses were 0.75, 1.58, 2.41, 3.15, and 3.87 micrograms/ml. Mean area under the serum concentration-time curves for the first 12 h after each dose were 3.56, 6.26, 11.4, 16.1, and 19.7 micrograms . h/ml, respectively. The elimination half-life of norfloxacin was about 7 h and was similar for all doses. The concentrations of the drug in urine also peaked 1 to 2 h after dosage; mean peak values for increasing doses were 200, 478, 697, 992, and 1,045 micrograms/ml. Renal clearances approximated 285 ml/min. About 30% of each dose was excreted into urine as unmetabolized norfloxacin. Crystals of the drug were occasionally observed during microscopic examination of freshly voided urine collected after the 1,200- and 1,600-mg doses. Crystalluria was not encountered at lower doses. PMID:6220672

  5. Single dose oral diclofenac for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Philip; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), available as a potassium salt (immediate-release) or sodium salt (delayed-release). This review updates an earlier review published in The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Issue 2, 2004) on ‘Single dose oral diclofenac for postoperative pain’. Objectives To assess single dose oral diclofenac for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. Search methods Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Biological Abstracts, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, and reference lists of articles were searched; last search December 2008. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of single dose, oral diclofenac (sodium or potassium) for acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and quality, and extracted data. The area under the pain relief versus time curve was used to derive the proportion of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, using validated equations. Relative benefit (risk) and number needed to treat to benefit (NNT) were calculated. Information on adverse events, time to remedication, and participants needing additional analgesia was also collected. Main results Fifteen studies (eight additional studies) with 1512 participants more than doubled the information available at each dose. Overall 50% to 60% of participants experienced at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours at any dose with diclofenac, compared to 10 to 20% with placebo, giving NNTs of about 2.5 for doses of 25 mg to 100 mg (similar to earlier review); no dose response was demonstrated. At 50 mg and 100 mg, NNTs for diclofenac potassium (2.1 (1.8 to 2.4) and 1.9 (1.7 to 2.2)) were significantly lower (better) than for diclofenac sodium (6.7 (4.2 to 17) and 4.5 (3.2 to 7.7)). The median time to use of rescue medication was 2 hours for placebo, 4.3 hours for diclofenac 50 mg and 4.9 hours for diclofenac 100 mg. Adverse events were reported at a similar rate to placebo, with no serious events. Authors’ conclusions Oral diclofenac is an effective single-dose treatment for moderate to severe postoperative pain. Significantly more participants experienced at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours with diclofenac potassium than with diclofenac sodium. There was no significant difference between diclofenac and placebo in the incidence of adverse events. PMID:19370609

  6. Disposition of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole in rats dosed orally or intravenously

    SciTech Connect

    El Dareer, S.M.; Kalin, J.R.; Tillery, K.F.; Hill, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    The disposition of (/sup 14/C)-labeled 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) in male Fischer-344 rats dosed orally (49 or 0.5 mg/kg) or intravenously (0.5 mg/kg) was determined. Absorption of the oral dose was evident, since, in 72 h, most of the radioactivity administered by either route appeared in the urine. Smaller amounts appeared in the feces. In 4 h, 12% of the radioactivity from an intravenous dose of 0.5 mg/kg was excreted in the bile of rats with biliary cannulas. For rats dosed intravenously, the half-life for disappearance of unchanged MBI from plasma was 125 min. In contrast, the terminal half-life for loss of radioactivity from blood was 83 h. The concentration of total radioactivity was higher in liver and kidney tissue than in blood. One of the major urinary metabolites was identified as benzimidazole, and a minor component was tentatively identified as unchanged MBI. Neither of these could be detected in bile. 8 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  7. Disposition of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole in rats dosed orally or intravenously.

    PubMed

    El Dareer, S M; Kalin, J R; Tillery, K F; Hill, D L

    1984-01-01

    The disposition of [14C]-labeled 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) in male Fischer-344 rats dosed orally (49 or 0.5 mg/kg) or intravenously (0.5 mg/kg) was determined. Absorption of the oral dose was evident, since, in 72 h, most of the radioactivity administered by either route appeared in the urine. Smaller amounts appeared in the feces. In 4 h, 12% of the radioactivity from an intravenous dose of 0.5 mg/kg was excreted in the bile of rats with biliary cannulas. For rats dosed intravenously, the half-life for disappearance of unchanged MBI from plasma was 125 min. In contrast, the terminal half-life for loss of radioactivity from blood was 83 h. The concentration of total radioactivity was higher in liver and kidney tissue than in blood. One of the major urinary metabolites was identified as benzimidazole, and a minor component was tentatively identified as unchanged MBI. Neither of these could be detected in bile. PMID:6512884

  8. Low-dose weekly oral methotrexate therapy for inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boh, L E; Schuna, A A; Pitterle, M E; Adams, E M; Sundstrom, W R

    1986-06-01

    The efficacy and toxicity of low-dose, weekly oral methotrexate (MTX) therapy for inflammatory arthritis was evaluated. Fifty-nine patients with a diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis who had failed to respond to or developed toxicity to gold, penicillamine, or hydroxychloroquine therapy were treated with MTX 10-20 mg administered orally or intravenously once a week in divided doses. Various tests to assess arthritis were performed upon each patient's entrance into the study and at specified intervals throughout the 24-month study period. The mean duration of methotrexate therapy was 15.5 months. Patients showed significant improvement in number of swollen joints, duration of morning stiffness, amount of pain, and amount of activity during the study period. Of the 35 patients who had had roentgenographic studies of their hands performed initially and after one year of MTX therapy, 23 had no evidence of new joint erosions after one year. Biopsies of hepatic tissue from 20 patients showed no progressive changes when compared with pretreatment biopsies. Gastrointestinal symptoms, mucocutaneous lesions, or small increases in liver enzyme concentrations were observed in 31 patients; three patients developed pulmonary toxicity and had to be withdrawn from the study. MTX is an effective agent for the treatment of inflammatory arthritis in patients who do not respond to therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or slow-acting antirheumatic drugs. Short-term weekly oral MTX therapy does not appear to result in clinically important liver disease. PMID:3720217

  9. Single dose oral ibuprofen for acute postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McQuay, Henry J

    2014-01-01

    Background This review updates a 1999 Cochrane review showing that ibuprofen at various doses was effective in postoperative pain in single dose studies designed to demonstrate analgesic efficacy. New studies have since been published. Ibuprofen is one of the most widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) analgesics both by prescription and as an over-the-counter medicine. Ibuprofen is used for acute and chronic painful conditions. Objectives To assess analgesic efficacy of ibuprofen in single oral doses for moderate and severe postoperative pain in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies to May 2009. Selection criteria Randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trials of single dose orally administered ibuprofen (any formulation) in adults with moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Pain relief or pain intensity data were extracted and converted into the dichotomous outcome of number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over 4 to 6 hours, from which relative risk and number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) were calculated. Numbers of participants using rescue medication over specified time periods, and time to use of rescue medication, were sought as additional measures of efficacy. Information on adverse events and withdrawals were collected. Main results Seventy-two studies compared ibuprofen and placebo (9186 participants). Studies were predominantly of high reporting quality, and the bulk of the information concerned ibuprofen 200 mg and 400 mg. For at least 50% pain relief compared with placebo the NNT for ibuprofen 200 mg (2690 participants) was 2.7 (2.5 to 3.0) and for ibuprofen 400 mg (6475 participants) it was 2.5 (2.4 to 2.6). The proportion with at least 50% pain relief was 46% with 200 mg and 54% with 400 mg. Remedication within 6 hours was less frequent with higher doses, with 48% remedicating with 200 mg and 42% with 400 mg. The median time to remedication was 4.7 hours with 200 mg and 5.4 hours with 400 mg. Sensitivity analysis indicated that pain model and ibuprofen formulation may both affect the result, with dental impaction models and soluble ibuprofen salts producing better efficacy estimates. Adverse events were uncommon, and not different from placebo. Authors’ conclusions The very substantial amount of high quality evidence demonstrates that ibuprofen is an effective analgesic in treating postoperative pain. NNTs for 200 mg and 400 mg ibuprofen did not change significantly from the previous review even when a substantial amount of new information was added. New information is provided on remedication. PMID:19588326

  10. Single dose oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) for postoperative pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Toms, Laurence; McQuay, Henry J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2004 - this original review had been split from a previous title on ‘Single dose paracetamol (acetaminophen) with and without codeine for postoperative pain’. The last version of this review concluded that paracetamol is an effective analgesic for postoperative pain, but additional trials have since been published. This review sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of paracetamol using current data, and to compare the findings with other analgesics evaluated in the same way. Objectives To assess the efficacy of single dose oral paracetamol for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database and reference lists of articles to update an existing version of the review in July 2008. Selection criteria Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of paracetamol for acute postoperative pain in adults. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Area under the “pain relief versus time” curve was used to derive the proportion of participants with paracetamol or placebo experiencing at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours, using validated equations. Number-needed-to-treat-to-benefit (NNT) was calculated, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The proportion of participants using rescue analgesia over a specified time period, and time to use, were sought as measures of duration of analgesia. Information on adverse events and withdrawals was also collected. Main results Fifty-one studies, with 5762 participants, were included: 3277 participants were treated with a single oral dose of paracetamol and 2425 with placebo. About half of participants treated with paracetamol at standard doses achieved at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours, compared with about 20% treated with placebo. NNTs for at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours following a single dose of paracetamol were as follows: 500 mg NNT 3.5 (2.7 to 4.8); 600 to 650 mg NNT 4.6 (3.9 to 5.5); 975 to 1000 mg NNT 3.6 (3.4 to 4.0). There was no dose response. Sensitivity analysis showed no significant effect of trial size or quality on this outcome. About half of participants needed additional analgesia over four to six hours, compared with about 70% with placebo. Five people would need to be treated with 1000 mg paracetamol, the most commonly used dose, to prevent one needing rescue medication over four to six hours, who would have needed it with placebo. Adverse event reporting was inconsistent and often incomplete. Reported adverse events were mainly mild and transient, and occurred at similar rates with 1000 mg paracetamol and placebo. No serious adverse events were reported. Withdrawals due to adverse events were uncommon and occurred in both paracetamol and placebo treatment arms. Authors’ conclusions A single dose of paracetamol provides effective analgesia for about half of patients with acute postoperative pain, for a period of about four hours, and is associated with few, mainly mild, adverse events. PMID:18843665

  11. Single dose oral pharmacokinetic profile of ?-mangostin in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramaiya, Atulkumar; Li, Gongbo; Petiwala, Sakina M; Johnson, Jeremy J

    2012-12-01

    The mangosteen fruit (Garcinia mangostana) is a rich source of dietary xanthones with the most prominent being ?-mangostin. Dietary xanthones have been reported to have a variety of health promoting properties. Until now, in vivo studies on the pharmacokinetic profile of ?-mangostin are limited. For this study we employed an LC/MS/MS assay to determine the pharmacokinetic properties of ?-mangostin suspension in cottonseed oil in C57BL/6 Mice. Mice were administered 100 mg/kg of ?-mangostin by oral gavage and the plasma levels were analyzed over a 24 hour period. We observed the degree of exposure (i.e. area under the curve) of ?-mangostin to be 5,736 nmol/L/hr and the maximum plasma concentration was 1,382 nmol/L. Furthermore, we provide evidence that ?-mangostin undergoes glucuronidation into monoglucuronide and diglucuronide metabolites. Our study demonstrated that ?-mangostin when administered in cotton seed oil to mice at a dose equivalent to 615 mg in a 90kg human adult achieves an approximate maximum plasma concentration of 1,300 nmol/L and is detectable for up to 24 hours. Further research is needed to understand the relationship between the pharmacokinetic properties of ?-mangostin following oral administration and reported health benefits. PMID:23140281

  12. Fibrinolytic response in women on low-dose oral contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Ishak, R; Ahmad, R; Gudum, H R; Hassan, K; Ang, E S

    1992-06-01

    Long term use of low doses of combination oral contraceptives appears to increase plasminogen level, thereby increasing fibrinolytic activity and reducing the risk of thromboembolism. Blood levels of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), were measured before and after stress (5 minutes of stair climbing) in a group of 30 women, 23-40 years old, who had taken 30 mcg of ethinyl estradiol with 150 mcg of desogestrel or levonorgestrel for at least 1 year. Similar measurements were taken from a control group of 30 women matched for age, height, and weight. Plasminogen and tPA levels in both groups increased significantly after exercise. The level of PAI did not change significantly with stress in either group. The level of plasminogen was significantly higher in the group taking contraceptives, whether before or after exercise, when compared to the control group. Levels of tPA and PAI, although slightly increased in the oral contraceptive group, were not significantly different between the two groups. The increase in plasminogen may be due to the estrogen component of the contraceptives. Stress seems to increase fibrinolytic response. PMID:12345026

  13. Effects of oral doses of fluoride on nestling European starlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.; Schuler, C.A.; Bunck, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Nestling European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), raised and fed by free-living adults, were given daily oral doses of either distilled water, 193 mg sodium as Na2CO3 per kg of body weight (sodium control group), or 6, 10, 13, 17,23, 30, 40, 80, 160 mg of the fluoride ion as NaF in distilled water per kg of body weight (mg/kg). Dosing began when nestlings were 24-48 hr old and continued for 16 days. The 24-hr LD50 of fluoride for day-old starlings was 50 mg/kg. The 16-day LD50 was 17 mg/kg. The sodium control group did not differ from the water control group with respect to any of the measured variables. Growth rates were significantly reduced in the 13 and 17 mg of fluoride/kg groups; weights of birds given higher dose levels were omitted from growth comparisons because of high, fluoride-induced mortality. Although pre-fledging weights for the 10, 13, and 17 mg of fluoride/kg groups averaged 3.6 to 8.6% less than controls at 17 days, this difference was not significant. Feather and bone growth of the fluoride and control groups were not different, except for keel length measured at 17 days of age which averaged less in the fluoride groups. Liver and spleen weights were not affected by fluoride treatments. No histological damage related to fluoride treatments was found in liver, spleen, or kidney. The logarithm of bone fluoride and magnesium concentration increased with the logarithm of increasing fluoride treatment levels and were significantly correlated with each other. Fluoride treatments had no effect on percent calcium or phosphorus in bone or plasma alkaline phosphatase activity. Oral doses of fluoride appear to be more toxic than equivalent dietary levels. Most birds probably acquire fluoride through their diet. Therefore, the results of the study may overestimate the potential effects of fluorides on songbirds living in fluoride-contaminated environments.

  14. Toxicological evaluation of ammonium perfluorobutyrate in rats: Twenty-eight-day and ninety-day oral gavage studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential 28-day and 90-day oral toxicity studies were performed in male and female rats with ammonium perfluorobutyrate (NH4+PFBA) at doses up to 150 and 30 mg/kg/d, respectively. Ammonium perfluorooctanoate was used as a comparator at a dose of 30 mg/kg/d in the 28-d study. Fe...

  15. SODIUM BICARBONATE FACILITATES LOW-DOSE ORAL TOLERANCE TO PEANUT IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Oral tolerance specifically inhibits production of allergic IgE antibody and is therefore a potential method for suppressing food allergy. We have previously demonstrated that a single oral dose of one mg is sufficient to induce oral tolerance to egg white but not pean...

  16. Reexamination of pharmacokinetics of oral testosterone undecanoate in hypogonadal men with a new self-emulsifying formulation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Anthony Y; Htun, Michelle; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Diaz-Arjonilla, Maruja; Dudley, Robert E; Faulkner, Sandra; Bross, Rachelle; Leung, Andrew; Baravarian, Sima; Hull, Laura; Longstreth, James A; Kulback, Steven; Flippo, Gregory; Wang, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Many hypogonadal men prefer oral testosterone (T) treatment. Oral T undecanoate (TU) is available in many countries, but not in the United States. We aimed to assess the pharmacokinetics of oral TU in a new self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulation. Pharmacokinetics studies were conducted in 3 parts: 12 hypogonadal men were enrolled in 2 centers for a 1-day dosing study; 29 participants were enrolled from 3 centers for a 7-day dosing study; and 15 participants were enrolled from 1 center for a 28-day dosing study. Serial blood samples for serum sex hormone measurements by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were drawn for up to 36 hours after oral TU administration. Mean serum T levels (C(avg)) after oral dosing of T 200 mg as TU twice daily with food were within the adult male range in most participants in the 1-, 7-, and 28-day dosing studies but were much lower in the fasting state. The dose-proportional increase in C(avg) of serum T after oral T 300 mg twice daily resulted in more participants with supraphysiologic serum T levels. In the 28-day study, trough serum T reached a steady state at day 7. Serum dihydrotestosterone and estradiol levels tracked serum T concentration. Dihydrotestosterone-testosterone ratios increased 3-fold after oral TU administration. Oral T 200 mg twice daily as TU in a new SEDDS formulation may be a viable therapy for hypogonadal men. PMID:21474786

  17. Reexamination of Pharmacokinetics of Oral Testosterone Undecanoate in Hypogonadal Men With a New Self-Emulsifying Formulation

    PubMed Central

    SWERDLOFF, RONALD S.; DIAZ-ARJONILLA, MARUJA; DUDLEY, ROBERT E.; FAULKNER, SANDRA; BROSS, RACHELLE; LEUNG, ANDREW; BARAVARIAN, SIMA; HULL, LAURA; LONGSTRETH, JAMES A.; KULBACK, STEVEN; FLIPPO, GREGORY; WANG, CHRISTINA

    2014-01-01

    Many hypogonadal men prefer oral testosterone (T) treatment. Oral T undecanoate (TU) is available in many countries, but not in the United States. We aimed to assess the pharmacokinetics of oral TU in a new self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulation. Pharmacokinetics studies were conducted in 3 parts: 12 hypogonadal men were enrolled in 2 centers for a 1-day dosing study; 29 participants were enrolled from 3 centers for a 7-day dosing study; and 15 participants were enrolled from 1 center for a 28-day dosing study. Serial blood samples for serum sex hormone measurements by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry were drawn for up to 36 hours after oral TU administration. Mean serum T levels (Cavg) after oral dosing of T 200 mg as TU twice daily with food were within the adult male range in most participants in the 1-, 7-, and 28-day dosing studies but were much lower in the fasting state. The dose-proportional increase in Cavg of serum T after oral T 300 mg twice daily resulted in more participants with supraphysiologic serum T levels. In the 28-day study, trough serum T reached a steady state at day 7. Serum dihydrotestosterone and estradiol levels tracked serum T concentration. Dihydrotestosterone-testosterone ratios increased 3-fold after oral TU administration. Oral T 200 mg twice daily as TU in a new SEDDS formulation may be a viable therapy for hypogonadal men. PMID:21474786

  18. A 28-day gavage toxicity study in Fischer 344 rats with 3-methylfuran.

    PubMed

    Gill, Santokh; Kavanagh, Meghan; Cherry, Wendy; Barker, Michael; Weld, Madeline; Cooke, Gerard M

    2015-02-01

    3-Methylfuran is produced in foods during food processing and preservation techniques that involve heat treatment such as cooking, jarring, canning, and pasteurization. Currently, there are no studies available on the toxicity of 3-methylfuran. We conducted a 28-day gavage toxicity study (7 days per week) using doses of 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0, and 25.0 mg/kg bw/day in order to determine the dose range needed to establish a no observed adverse effect level and to better characterize nonneoplastic effects including those affecting hematology, clinical biochemistry, gross morphology, and histopathology. Histological changes of the liver were noted in all treated animals and gross changes were noted beginning at 3.0 mg/kg bw/kg. Alterations in the activity of serum enzymes indicative of effects on the liver were observed, including increases in levels of alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase at the highest dose. There was a significant increase in serum thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which was not accompanied by histological changes in the thyroid. For the most part, statistically significant changes were seen only at the highest dose for hematology and at the 2 highest doses for clinical chemistry parameters. In contrast, mild histological lesions in the liver were observed even at the lowest dose of 0.1 mg/kg bw/day. PMID:24907037

  19. Physiological effects following administration of Citrus aurantium for 28 days in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Deborah K.; Pellicore, Linda S.

    2012-06-15

    Background: Since ephedra-containing dietary supplements were banned from the US market, manufacturers changed their formulations by eliminating ephedra and replacing with other botanicals, including Citrus aurantium, or bitter orange. Bitter orange contains, among other compounds, synephrine, a chemical that is chemically similar to ephedrine. Since ephedrine may have cardiovascular effects, the goal of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of various doses of bitter orange extract and pure synephrine in rats. Method: Female Sprague–Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage for 28 days with synephrine from two different extracts. One extract contained 6% synephrine, and the other extract contained 95% synephrine. Doses were 10 or 50 mg synephrine/kg body weight from each extract. Additionally, caffeine was added to these doses, since many dietary supplements also contain caffeine. Telemetry was utilized to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature and QT interval in all rats. Results and conclusion: Synephrine, either as the bitter orange extract or as pure synephrine, increased heart rate and blood pressure. Animals treated with 95% synephrine showed minimal effects on heart rate and blood pressure; more significant effects were observed with the bitter orange extract suggesting that other components in the botanical can alter these physiological parameters. The increases in heart rate and blood pressure were more pronounced when caffeine was added. None of the treatments affected uncorrected QT interval in the absence of caffeine.

  20. Disposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid dimethylamine by Fischer 344 rats dosed orally and dermally

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, O.; Ritter, L.; Caron, J.; Somers, D. )

    1989-01-01

    The dimethylamine salt of 14C-ring-labeled 2,4-D was administered to Fischer 344 rats orally (1 and 0.4 mg/kg body weight) and dermally (10 mg/kg body weight). Absorption, distribution, and elimination were determined from 14C-labeled 2,4-D in blood, tissues, and excreta. Quantitatively, most of the orally administered dose (94-96%) became systemically available within 6 h. Following dermal administration 10% of the dose became systemically available over 72 h. However, peak concentrations in blood and kidneys were achieved within 30 min of dosing by either route. By 1.5 h after dosing, 2,4-D concentrations in blood, muscle, liver, and kidneys had decreased in both the orally dosed and dermally dosed animals. Between 2 and 8 h, the blood, muscle, liver and kidney concentrations in dermally dosed animals maintained a plateau while urinary excretion increased, presumably due to continued absorption of 2,4-D from the skin. The concentrations in orally dosed animals continued to decrease. Following 7 h of dermal exposure, skin cleansing removed about 63% of the applied dose; about 17% of the applied dose remained at the site of dermal dosing. At 8 h, 2,4-D concentrations in blood, muscle, liver, and kidneys of dermally dosed animals began to decrease, most likely a result of the removal of the reservoir on the skin. However, 2,4-D continued to be absorbed from skin site, resulting in a slower decline of the 2,4-D concentrations in these tissues over remainder of the 72-h study period. By comparison, in animals that had been orally dosed, the absorbed dose was almost completely excreted within 24 h.

  1. Material Safety Data Sheet Product: CIDEX Plus 28 Day Solution

    E-print Network

    Wikswo, John

    in this product are not considered hazardous to your health. Components CAS Number Weight % J&J - OEL Data (TWA: Not expected to be flammable or be a significant health hazard. Properties affecting health: May cause sensitization by repeated inhalation and skin contact. Principle routes of exposure: Oral: Can irritate

  2. Efficacy and tolerability of low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone for chronic nononcological pain in older patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Fabio; Sgarlata, Carmelo; Marcassa, Claudio; Ricevuti, Giovanni; Rollone, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chronic pain is highly prevalent in older adults. Increasing evidence indicates strong opioids as a valid option for chronic pain management in geriatrics. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone–naloxone (OXN-PR) in patients aged ?70 years. Methods This open-label prospective study assessed older patients naïve to strong opioids presenting with moderate-to-severe chronic pain. Patients were prescribed OXN-PR at an initial dose of 10/5 mg/day for 28 days. In case of insufficient analgesia, the initial daily dose could be increased gradually. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline, assessed by a ten-point Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) at day 28 (T28). Changes in cognitive state, daily functioning, quality of life, constipation, and other adverse events were assessed. Results Of 53 patients enrolled (mean 81.7±6.2 years [range 70–92 years]), 52 (98.1%) completed the 28-day observation. At T28, the primary end point (?30% reduction in mean pain from baseline in the absence of bowel function deterioration) was achieved in 38 patients (71.7%). OXN-PR significantly relieved pain (NRS score –3.26; P<0.0001), as well as daily need for rescue paracetamol (from 86.8% at baseline to 40.4% at T28; P<0.001), and reduced impact of pain on daily activities (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form from 6.2±1.5 to 3.4±2.1; P<0.0001). OXN-PR was also associated with significant improvement in daily functioning (Barthel Index from 53.3±14.1 to 61.3±14.3; P<0.01). No changes were observed in cognitive status and bowel function. OXN-PR was well tolerated; only one patient (1.9%) prematurely withdrew from treatment, due to drowsiness. Conclusion Findings from this open-label prospective study suggest that low-dose OXN-PR may be effective and well tolerated for treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in older patients. Besides its effectiveness, these data indicate that low-dose OXN-PR may be considered a safe analgesic option in this fragile population and warrants further investigation in randomized controlled studies. PMID:25565782

  3. Single- and Repeat-dose Oral Toxicity Studies of Lithospermum erythrorhizon Extract in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae-Sik; Kim, Myoung-Jun; Choi, Young Whan; Han, Kyoung-Goo; Kang, Jong-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Lithospermum erythrorhizon has long been used in traditional Asian medicine for the treatment of diseases, including skin cancer. The oral toxicity of a hexane extract of Lithospermum erythrorhizon root (LEH) was investigated in Beagle dogs by using single escalating doses, two-week dose range-finding, and 4-week oral repeat dosing. In the single dose-escalating oral toxicity study, no animal died, showed adverse clinical signs, or changes in body weight gain at LEH doses of up to 2,000 mg/kg. In a 2 week dose range-finding study, no treatment-related adverse effects were detected by urinalysis, hematology, blood biochemistry, organ weights, or gross and histopathological examinations at doses of up to 500 mg LEH/kg/day. In the 4 week repeat-dose toxicity study, a weight loss or decreased weight gain was observed at 300 mg/kg/day. Although levels of serum triglyceride and total bilirubin were increased in a dose dependent manner, there were no related morphological changes. Based on these findings, the sub-acute no observable adverse effect level for 4-week oral administration of LEH in Beagles was 100 mg/kg/day. PMID:25874036

  4. Biotransformation and pharmacokinetics of ethylmorphine after a single oral dose.

    PubMed Central

    Aasmundstad, T A; Xu, B Q; Johansson, I; Ripel, A; Bjørneboe, A; Christophersen, A S; Bodd, E; Mørland, J

    1995-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of ethylmorphine after administration of a single dose of the cough mixture Cosylan were investigated in 10 healthy subjects. 2. The median urinary recovery of ethylmorphine and measured metabolites was 77% over 48 h. The median tmax of unchanged ethylmorphine was 45 min, and the terminal elimination t1/2 was 2 h. Ethylmorphine-6-glucuronide was found to be the major metabolite. 3. Two subjects had significantly lower urinary recovery (0.48 h) of morphine and morphine-glucuronides than the remainder. Furthermore, these two had urinary metabolic ratios (MRO) and partial metabolic clearances (CLmO) for O-deethylation of ethylmorphine tentatively classifying them phenotypically as poor metabolisers of the debrisoquine/sparteine type. 4. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 alleles revealed five homozygote (wt/wt) and five heterozygote subjects. Two subjects phenotypically classified as poor metabolisers were genotypically CYP2D6A/wt and CYP2D6D/wt, respectively. 5. Serum and urine samples taken more than 8 and 24 h after administration of ethyl-morphine respectively, contained morphine and morphine-glucuronides, but no ethylmorphine, ethylmorphine-6-glucuronide or (serum only) norethylmorphine. Norethylmorphine could be detected after hydrolysis of urine samples in all subjects. The urinary recovery of the active metabolites morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide after administration of ethylmorphine varied by a factor of 9 between individuals. 6. The wide variation in recovery of morphine and morphine-glucuronides after oral administration of ethylmorphine could not be explained simply by a difference in CYP2D6 genotype. Constitutional variation in other enzymatic pathways involved in ethylmorphine metabolism is probably crucial. Ratios of morphine to parent drug cannot be used to distinguish the source of morphine after administration of ethylmorphine. Norethylmorphine should be included in urine assays for opiates in forensic toxicology, and no firm conclusions about the source of morphine are possible based on serum samples obtained more than 24 h after drug administration. PMID:7654478

  5. Biotransformation and pharmacokinetics of ethylmorphine after a single oral dose.

    PubMed

    Aasmundstad, T A; Xu, B Q; Johansson, I; Ripel, A; Bjørneboe, A; Christophersen, A S; Bodd, E; Mørland, J

    1995-06-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of ethylmorphine after administration of a single dose of the cough mixture Cosylan were investigated in 10 healthy subjects. 2. The median urinary recovery of ethylmorphine and measured metabolites was 77% over 48 h. The median tmax of unchanged ethylmorphine was 45 min, and the terminal elimination t1/2 was 2 h. Ethylmorphine-6-glucuronide was found to be the major metabolite. 3. Two subjects had significantly lower urinary recovery (0.48 h) of morphine and morphine-glucuronides than the remainder. Furthermore, these two had urinary metabolic ratios (MRO) and partial metabolic clearances (CLmO) for O-deethylation of ethylmorphine tentatively classifying them phenotypically as poor metabolisers of the debrisoquine/sparteine type. 4. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 alleles revealed five homozygote (wt/wt) and five heterozygote subjects. Two subjects phenotypically classified as poor metabolisers were genotypically CYP2D6A/wt and CYP2D6D/wt, respectively. 5. Serum and urine samples taken more than 8 and 24 h after administration of ethyl-morphine respectively, contained morphine and morphine-glucuronides, but no ethylmorphine, ethylmorphine-6-glucuronide or (serum only) norethylmorphine. Norethylmorphine could be detected after hydrolysis of urine samples in all subjects. The urinary recovery of the active metabolites morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide after administration of ethylmorphine varied by a factor of 9 between individuals. 6. The wide variation in recovery of morphine and morphine-glucuronides after oral administration of ethylmorphine could not be explained simply by a difference in CYP2D6 genotype. Constitutional variation in other enzymatic pathways involved in ethylmorphine metabolism is probably crucial. Ratios of morphine to parent drug cannot be used to distinguish the source of morphine after administration of ethylmorphine. Norethylmorphine should be included in urine assays for opiates in forensic toxicology, and no firm conclusions about the source of morphine are possible based on serum samples obtained more than 24 h after drug administration. PMID:7654478

  6. Phase I dose escalation and pharmacokinetic evaluation of two different schedules of LY2334737, an oral gemcitabine prodrug, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Sandrine J; Olszanski, Anthony J; Weigang-Köhler, Karin; Riess, Hanno; Cohen, Roger B; Wang, Xuejing; Myrand, Scott P; Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R; Horn, Candice L; Ouyang, Haojun; Callies, Sophie; Benhadji, Karim A; Raymond, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Background This Phase-I-study aimed to determine the recommended Phase-II-dosing-schedule of LY2334737, an oral gemcitabine prodrug, in patients with advanced/metastatic solid tumors. Pharmacokinetics, cytokeratin-18 (CK18) levels, genetic polymorphisms, and antitumor activity were additionally evaluated. Methods Patients received escalating doses of LY2334737 either every other day for 21 days (d) followed by 7 days-drug-free period (QoD-arm) or once daily for 7 days every other week (QD-arm). The 28 days-cycles were repeated until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Standard 3?+?3 dose-escalation was succeeded by a dose-confirmation phase (12 additional patients to be enrolled on the maximum tolerated dose [MTD]). Results Forty-one patients received QoD- (40-100 mg) and 32 QD-dosing (40-90 mg). On QoD, 3/9 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) on the 100 mg dose (2?×?G3 diarrhea, 1?×?G3 transaminase increase); 1 additional DLT (G3 diarrhea) occurred during dose confirmation at 90 mg (12 patients). On QD, 1 patient each experienced DLTs on 60 mg (G3 transaminase increase) and 80 mg (G3 prolonged QTcF-interval); 2/7 patients had 3 DLTs on the 90 mg dose (diarrhea, edema, liver-failure; all G3). The MTD was established at 90 mg for the QoD-arm. Seven patients on QoD and 4 on QD achieved SD (no CR + PR). Pharmacokinetics showed a dose-proportional increase in exposure of LY2334737 and dFdC without accumulation after repeated dosing. Significant increases in CK18 levels were observed. Genetic polymorphism of the cytidine deaminase gene (rs818202) could be associated with???G3 hepatotoxicity. Conclusions Both schedules displayed linear pharmacokinetics and acceptable safety profiles. The recommended dose and schedule of LY2334737 for subsequent Phase-II-studies is 90 mg given QoD for 21 day. PMID:26377590

  7. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili; Lin Zhixiong

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of cisapride in normal healthy cats and recommended oral dosing regimen 

    E-print Network

    LeGrange, Suzanne Nauman

    1996-01-01

    tolerated all doses with no apparent adverse effects. Based on these data an oral dose of 1 mg/kg given every 8 hours should maintain an average concentration at steady state that lies within the published therapeutic range for people....

  9. Comparative metabolism studies of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers in male rats following a single oral dose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed orally with 3 mg/kg of one of three hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers. Each diastereomer was well absorbed (73-83%), and distributed preferentially to lipophilic tissues. Feces were the major route of excretion; cumulatively 42% of dose for alpha-HBCD,...

  10. Prescription Opioids. IV: Disposition of Hydrocodone in Oral Fluid and Blood Following Single-Dose Administration.

    PubMed

    Cone, Edward J; DePriest, Anne Z; Heltsley, Rebecca; Black, David L; Mitchell, John M; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ron

    2015-09-01

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is currently evaluating hydrocodone (HC) for inclusion in the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs. This study evaluated the time course of HC, norhydrocodone (NHC), dihydrocodeine (DHC) and hydromorphone (HM) in paired oral fluid and whole blood specimens by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (limit of quantitation = 1 ng/mL of oral fluid, 5 ng/mL of blood) over a 52-h period. A single dose of HC bitartrate, 20 mg, was administered to 12 subjects. Analyte prevalence was as follows: oral fluid, HC > NHC > DHC; and blood, HC > NHC. HM was not detected in any specimen. HC was frequently detected within 15 min in oral fluid and 30 min in blood. Mean oral fluid to blood (OF : BL) ratios and correlations were 3.2 for HC (r = 0.73) and 0.7 for NHC (r = 0.42). The period of detection for oral fluid exceeded blood at all evaluated thresholds. At a 1-ng/mL threshold for oral fluid, mean detection time was 30 h for HC and 18 h for NHC and DHC. This description of HC and metabolite disposition in oral fluid following single-dose administration provides valuable interpretive guidance of HC test results. PMID:25962610

  11. Pharmacokinetic overview of ethinyl estradiol dose and bioavailability using two transdermal contraceptive systems and a standard combined oral contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Birte; Reinecke, Isabel; Schuett, Barbara; Merz, Martin; Zurth, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relative bioavailability of ethinyl estradiol (EE) and gestodene (GSD) after application of a novel transdermal contraceptive patch vs. a standard combined oral contraceptive (COC) pill (study 1), and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of EE after application of the EE/GSD patch compared with an EE/norelgestromin (NGMN) patch (study 2). Materials: Participants were healthy, non-obese women aged 18 – 45 years (study 1) or 18 – 35 years (study 2). Compositions of study treatments were as follows: 0.55 mg EE/2.1 mg GSD (EE/GSD patch); 0.02 mg EE/0.075 mg GSD (standard COC); 0.6 mg EE/6 mg NGMN (EE/NGMN patch). Methods: In study 1, which consisted of 3 treatment periods (each followed by 7 patch- or pill-free days), treatments were administered in one of two randomized orders: either P–M–E (EE/GSD patch (P) every 7 days for 28 days ? COC (M) once-daily for 21 days ? two 7-day patch-wearing periods followed by one 10-day patch-wearing phase (E)), or the same treatments administered in sequence M–P–E. For study 2, participants received either the EE/GSD patch or EE/NGMN patch for seven treatment cycles (one patch per week for 3 weeks followed by a 7-day patch-free interval). Results: In study 1, average daily exposure to EE was similar for treatments P and M; the mean daily area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) ratio of treatment P vs. treatment M for EE was 1.06 (90% confidence interval (CI): 0.964 – 1.16), indicating average daily delivery similar to oral administration of 0.019 – 0.023 mg EE. For unbound GSD, average daily exposure was lower for treatment P vs. treatment M. The mean AUC ratio of treatment P vs. treatment M for unbound GSD was 0.820 (90% CI: 0.760 – 0.885), indicating average daily delivery from the patch of 0.057 – 0.066 mg GSD. Prolonged patch wearing did not result in a distinct decline in GSD and EE serum concentrations. In study 2, AUC at steady state (AUC0–168,ss), average steady-state serum concentration, and maximum steady-state serum concentration for EE was 2.0 – 2.7-fold higher for the EE/NGMN patch vs. the EE/GSD patch. The EE/GSD patch was well tolerated in both studies. Conclusions: Based on the 90% CI of the AUC ratio of oral treatment vs. patch application for unbound GSD and EE, the daily doses of GSD and EE released from the EE/GSD patch over the 7-day application period provided the same systemic exposure as those recorded after daily oral administration of a COC containing 0.02 mg EE and 0.06 mg GSD. The EE/GSD patch showed reduced EE exposure compared with the EE/NGMN patch. Together with its good tolerability, these properties support the EE/GSD patch as an effective and well-tolerated alternative to available transdermal and oral contraceptives. PMID:25295716

  12. Safety and Immunogenicity of Single-Dose Live Oral Cholera Vaccine Strain CVD 103-HgR, Prepared from New Master and Working Cell Banks

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard N.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Livio, Sofie; Lock, Michael; Gurwith, Marc; Levine, Myron M.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no cholera vaccine is available for persons traveling from the United States to areas of high cholera transmission and who for reasons of occupation or host factors are at increased risk for development of the disease. A single-dose oral cholera vaccine with a rapid onset of protection would be particularly useful for such travelers and might also be an adjunct control measure for cholera outbreaks. The attenuated Vibrio cholerae O1 vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR harbors a 94% deletion of the cholera toxin A subunit gene (ctxA) and has a mercury resistance gene inserted in the gene encoding hemolysin A. We undertook a phase I randomized placebo-controlled two-site trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity of a preliminary formulation of CVD 103-HgR prepared from new master and working cell banks. Healthy young adults were randomized (5:1 vaccinees to placebo recipients) to receive a single oral dose of ?4.4 × 108 CFU of vaccine or a placebo. Blood serum vibriocidal and cholera toxin-specific IgG antibodies were measured before and 10, 14, and 28 days following vaccination or placebo. Excretion of the vaccine strain in the stool was assessed during the first week postvaccination. A total of 66 subjects were enrolled, comprising 55 vaccinees and 11 placebo recipients. The vaccine was well tolerated. The overall vibriocidal and anti-cholera toxin seroconversion rates were 89% and 57%, respectively. CVD 103-HgR is undergoing renewed manufacture for licensure in the United States under the auspices of PaxVax. Our data mimic those from previous commercial formulations that elicited vibriocidal antibody seroconversion (a correlate of protection) in ?90% of vaccinees. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01585181.) PMID:24173028

  13. Safety and immunogenicity of single-dose live oral cholera vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR, prepared from new master and working cell banks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wilbur H; Greenberg, Richard N; Pasetti, Marcela F; Livio, Sofie; Lock, Michael; Gurwith, Marc; Levine, Myron M

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no cholera vaccine is available for persons traveling from the United States to areas of high cholera transmission and who for reasons of occupation or host factors are at increased risk for development of the disease. A single-dose oral cholera vaccine with a rapid onset of protection would be particularly useful for such travelers and might also be an adjunct control measure for cholera outbreaks. The attenuated Vibrio cholerae O1 vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR harbors a 94% deletion of the cholera toxin A subunit gene (ctxA) and has a mercury resistance gene inserted in the gene encoding hemolysin A. We undertook a phase I randomized placebo-controlled two-site trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity of a preliminary formulation of CVD 103-HgR prepared from new master and working cell banks. Healthy young adults were randomized (5:1 vaccinees to placebo recipients) to receive a single oral dose of ?4.4 × 10(8) CFU of vaccine or a placebo. Blood serum vibriocidal and cholera toxin-specific IgG antibodies were measured before and 10, 14, and 28 days following vaccination or placebo. Excretion of the vaccine strain in the stool was assessed during the first week postvaccination. A total of 66 subjects were enrolled, comprising 55 vaccinees and 11 placebo recipients. The vaccine was well tolerated. The overall vibriocidal and anti-cholera toxin seroconversion rates were 89% and 57%, respectively. CVD 103-HgR is undergoing renewed manufacture for licensure in the United States under the auspices of PaxVax. Our data mimic those from previous commercial formulations that elicited vibriocidal antibody seroconversion (a correlate of protection) in ?90% of vaccinees. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01585181.). PMID:24173028

  14. Detection of marijuana use by oral fluid and urine analysis following single-dose administration of smoked and oral marijuana.

    PubMed

    Niedbala, R S; Kardos, K W; Fritch, D F; Kardos, S; Fries, T; Waga, J; Robb, J; Cone, E J

    2001-01-01

    We compared oral fluid testing to urine testing in subjects who were administered single doses of marijuana by smoked and oral routes. Oral fluid specimens were collected with the Intercept DOA Oral Specimen Collection Device, screened for THC with the Cannabinoids Intercept MICRO-PLATE Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA) utilizing a 1.0-ng/mL cutoff concentration, and confirmed for THC by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS) with a 0.5-ng/mL cutoff concentration. Urine specimens were screened for 11-nor-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) by immunoassay utilizing a 50-ng/mL cutoff concentration and confirmed for THCCOOH by GC-MS with a 15-ng/mL cutoff concentration. Oral fluid specimens tested positive following smoked marijuana (N = 10) consecutively for average periods (+/-SEM; range) of 15 (+/-2; 1-24) and 13 h (+/-3; 1-24) by EIA and GC-MS-MS, respectively. The average THC detection times of the last oral fluid positive specimen following smoked marijuana by EIA and GC-MS-MS were 31 (+/-9; 1-72) and 34 h (+/-11; 1-72), respectively. In comparison to oral fluid, urine specimens generally tested negative for THCCOOH immediately after marijuana use. The average times to detection of the first urine specimen positive for THCCOOH by EIA and GC-MS were 6 (+/-2; 1-16) and 4 h (+/-1; 2-8), respectively. Urine specimens tested positive consecutively for average periods of 26 (+/-9; 2-72) and 33 h (+/-10; 4-72) for EIA and GC-MS, respectively. The average THCCOOH detection times of the last specimen by EIA and GC-MS were 42 (+/-10; 2-72) and 58 h (+/-6; 16-72), respectively. Considering the noninvasive nature of oral fluid collection and improved detection of recent marijuana use compared to urine testing, it was concluded that oral fluid testing for THC offers specific advantages over other means of marijuana testing when used in safety-sensitive testing programs. PMID:11499881

  15. Bortezomib in combination with intermediate-dose dexamethasone and continuous low-dose oral cyclophosphamide for relapsed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kropff, Martin; Bisping, Guido; Schuck, Elke; Liebisch, Peter; Lang, Nicola; Hentrich, Markus; Dechow, Tobias; Kröger, Nicolaus; Salwender, Hans; Metzner, Bernd; Sezer, Orhan; Engelhardt, Monika; Wolf, Hans-Heinrich; Einsele, Hermann; Volpert, Sarah; Heinecke, Achim; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Kienast, Joachim

    2007-08-01

    A phase 2 trial was performed to study the combination of bortezomib (VELCADE) with intermediate-dose dexamethasone (DEX), and continuous low-dose oral cyclophosphamide (CY) in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma (MM). Fifty-four patients with advanced MM were enroled to receive eight 3-week treatment cycles with bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2) on days 1, 4, 8, and 11, followed by three 5-week cycles with bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22. Within all cycles, DEX 20 mg/d was given orally on the day of bortezomib injection and the day thereafter. In addition, patients received CY continuous oral treatment at a dose of 50 mg/d p.o. once daily. Fifty patients completing at least one treatment cycle were evaluable for response. Complete, partial, and minor responses occurred in 16%, 66% and 8% of patients, respectively; overall response rate 90% (efficacy analysis). Median event-free survival was 12 months, with a median overall survival of 22 months. Adverse events (AE) of grades 3 or 4 occurring in at least 10% of patients comprised leucopenia, infection, herpes zoster, thrombocytopenia, neuropathy and fatigue. Bortezomib combined with DEX and CY is a highly effective treatment for relapsed MM at an acceptable rate of grade 3/4 AE. Antiviral prophylaxis appears to be mandatory. PMID:17614819

  16. Single and repeated oral dose toxicity study of fucoxanthin (FX), a marine carotenoid, in mice.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Fumiaki; Niwano, Yoshimi; Tsukui, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2009-10-01

    Fucoxanthin (FX), a xanthophyll derivative, is an orange-colored pigment present in edible brown algae. As a part of safety evaluation, single and repeated oral dose toxicity study of FX was conducted. In a single dose study, FX purified from seaweed was orally administered to male and female ICR mice at doses of 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg. In a repeated doses study, FX at doses of 500 and 1,000 mg/kg was orally administered for 30 days. In both studies, no mortality and no abnormalities in gross appearance were observed. In the repeated doses study, histological observation revealed no abnormal changes in liver, kidney, spleen and gonadal tissues of any of the FX-treated groups. However, significantly increased total cholesterol concentrations were shown by plasma biochemical analyses in all FX-treated groups. Although total bilirubin concentrations were increased by FX, it was established that presence of fucoxanthinol, a major metabolite of FX, interfered with bilirubin determination in plasma. To further ascertain the safety of FX, the mechanism by which FX induces hypercholesterolemia in mice and species differences in the induction of hypercholesterolemia should be elucidated. PMID:19797858

  17. Oral carvedilol in escalating doses in the acute treatment of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chitrapu, Ravi Venkatachelam; Rao, Pentakota Ramana; Reddy, Gangireddy Venkateswara

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the efficacy of oral carvedilol in acute treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) with fast ventricular rate. Materials and Methods: In an open-label, single-arm trial, oral carvedilol was administered to 35 patients of AF in escalating doses from 3.125 mg o.d. to 12.5 mg b.i.d. Results: A successful result was seen in 25 patients (71.4%) with 4 converting to sinus rhythm, rate control to less than 90 bpm in 16 and a 20% rate reduction in 5 patients. Two patients developed hypotension needing withdrawal of the drug. Conclusion: Escalating doses of oral carvedilol can be effectively and safely used in the acute treatment of AF with fast ventricular rate. PMID:25422563

  18. PROPOSED ORAL REFERENCE DOSE (RFD) FOR BARIUM AND COMPOUNDS (Final Report) 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the final report for the 2004 external peer review of the Proposed Oral Reference Dose (RfD) for Barium and Compounds, prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA), for the Integrated Risk Informa...

  19. Single intravenous and oral dose pharmacokinetics of florfenicol in the channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasma distribution and elimination of florfenicol in channel catfish were investigated after a single dose (10mg/kg) of intravenous i.v.) or oral administration in freshwater at a mean water temperature of 25.4°C. Florfenicol concentrations in plasma were analyzed by means of liquid chromatography...

  20. Micro-thermography in millimeter-scale animals by using orally-dosed fluorescent nanoparticle thermosensors.

    PubMed

    Arai, Satoshi; Ferdinandus; Takeoka, Shinji; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Madoka

    2015-10-26

    We propose an instant micro-thermography method using a fluorescent-nanoparticle thermosensor capable of reporting temperature as the fluorescence intensity ratio of the temperature-sensitive dye to the reference. We demonstrate "temperature mapping" inside a fruit fly larva that was orally dosed with nanoparticle thermosensors. PMID:26304996

  1. Comparative oral dose toxicokinetics of selenium compounds commonly found in selenium accumulator plants.

    PubMed

    Davis, T Z; Stegelmeier, B L; Welch, K D; Pfister, J A; Panter, K E; Hall, J O

    2013-09-01

    Consumption of Se accumulator plants by livestock can result in Se intoxication. Recent research indicates that the Se forms most common in Se accumulator plants are selenate and Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys). In this study the absorption, distribution, and elimination kinetics of Se in serum and whole blood of lambs dosed with a single oral dose of (1, 2, 3, or 4 mg Se/kg BW) of sodium selenate or MeSeCys were determined. The Se concentrations in serum and whole blood for both chemical forms of Se followed simple dose-dependent relationships. Se-methylselenocysteine was absorbed more quickly and to a greater extent in whole blood than sodium selenate, as observed by a greater peak Se concentration (Cmax; P < 0.0001), and faster time to peak concentration (Tmax; P < 0.0001) and rate of absorption (P < 0.0001). The rate of absorption and Tmax were also faster (P < 0.0001) in serum of lambs dosed with MeSeCys compared with those dosed sodium selenate at equimolar doses; however, Cmax in serum was greater (P < 0.0001) in lambs dosed with sodium selenate compared with those dosed MeSeCys at equimolar doses. The MeSeCys was absorbed 4 to 5 times faster into serum and 9 to 14 times faster into whole blood at equimolar Se doses. There were dose-dependent increases in the area under the curve (AUC) for Se in serum and whole blood of lambs dosed with both sodium selenate and MeSeCys. In whole blood the MeSeCys was approximately twice as bioavailable as sodium selenate at equimolar doses as observed by the AUC, whereas in serum there were no differences (P > 0.05) in AUC at the same doses. At 168 h postdosing the Se concentration in whole blood remained much greater (P < 0.0001) in lambs dosed with MeSeCys as compared with lambs dosed with sodium selenate; however, the serum Se concentrations were not different between treatments at the same time point. The results presented in this study demonstrate that there are differences between the kinetics of different selenocompounds when orally dosed to sheep. Therefore, in cases of acute selenosis, it is important to understand the chemical form to which an intoxicated animal was exposed when determining the importance and meaning of Se concentration in serum or whole blood obtained at various times postexposure. PMID:23825349

  2. Miltefosine Lipid Nanocapsules for Single Dose Oral Treatment of Schistosomiasis Mansoni: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Maha M.; El-Moslemany, Riham M.; Ramadan, Alyaa A.; Amer, Eglal I.; El-Azzouni, Mervat Z.; El-Khordagui, Labiba K.

    2015-01-01

    Miltefosine (MFS) is an alkylphosphocholine used for the local treatment of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer and oral therapy of visceral leishmaniasis. Recently, the drug was reported in in vitro and preclinical studies to exert significant activity against different developmental stages of schistosomiasis mansoni, a widespread chronic neglected tropical disease (NTD). This justified MFS repurposing as a potential antischistosomal drug. However, five consecutive daily 20 mg/kg doses were needed for the treatment of schistosomiasis mansoni in mice. The present study aims at enhancing MFS efficacy to allow for a single 20mg/kg oral dose therapy using a nanotechnological approach based on lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) as oral nanovectors. MFS was incorporated in LNCs both as membrane-active structural alkylphospholipid component and active antischistosomal agent. MFS-LNC formulations showed high entrapment efficiency (EE%), good colloidal properties, sustained release pattern and physical stability. Further, LNCs generally decreased MFS-induced erythrocyte hemolytic activity used as surrogate indicator of membrane activity. While MFS-free LNCs exerted no antischistosomal effect, statistically significant enhancement was observed with all MFS-LNC formulations. A maximum effect was achieved with MFS-LNCs incorporating CTAB as positive charge imparting agent or oleic acid as membrane permeabilizer. Reduction of worm load, ameliorated liver pathology and extensive damage of the worm tegument provided evidence for formulation-related efficacy enhancement. Non-compartmental analysis of pharmacokinetic data obtained in rats indicated independence of antischistosomal activity on systemic drug exposure, suggesting possible gut uptake of the stable LNCs and targeting of the fluke tegument which was verified by SEM. The study findings put forward MFS-LNCs as unique oral nanovectors combining the bioactivity of MFS and biopharmaceutical advantages of LNCs, allowing targeting via the oral route. From a clinical point of view, data suggest MFS-LNCs as a potential single dose oral nanomedicine for enhanced therapy of schistosomiasis mansoni and possibly other diseases. PMID:26574746

  3. PHARMACOKINETICS OF SINGLE-DOSE ORALLY ADMINISTERED CIPROFLOXACIN IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn P; Papich, Mark G; Gulland, Frances

    2015-06-01

    Ciprofloxacin is commonly selected for clinical use due to its broad-spectrum efficacy and is a frequently administered antibiotic at The Marine Mammal Center, a marine mammal rehabilitation facility. Ciprofloxacin is used for treatment of California sea lions ( Zalophus californianus ) suffering from a variety of bacterial infections at doses extrapolated from other mammalian species. However, as oral absorption is variable both within and across species, a more accurate determination of appropriate dosage is needed to ensure effective treatment and avoid emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains. A pharmacokinetic study was performed to assess plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin in California sea lions after a single oral dose. Twenty healthy California sea lions received a single 10-mg/kg oral dose of ciprofloxacin administered in a herring fish. Blood was then collected at two of the following times from each individual: 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 12, 18, and 24 hr postingestion. Plasma ciprofloxacin concentration was assessed via high-performance liquid chromatography. A population pharmacokinetics model demonstrated that an oral ciprofloxacin dose of 10 mg/kg achieved an area under the concentration vs. time curve of 6.01 ?g hr/ml. Absorption was rapid, with ciprofloxacin detectable in plasma 0.54 hr after drug administration; absorption half-life was 0.09 hr. A maximum plasma concentration of 1.21 ?g/ml was observed at 1.01 hr, with an elimination half-life of 3.09 hr. Ciprofloxacin administered orally at 10 mg/kg produced therapeutic antibacterial exposure for only some of the most susceptible bacterial organisms commonly isolated from California sea lions. PMID:26056878

  4. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Single Oral Doses of BCH-10652 in Healthy Adult Males

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Patrick F.; Forrest, Alan; Ballow, Charles H.; Martin, David E.; Proulx, Louise

    2000-01-01

    Racemic dOTC (BCH-10652) is a novel nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor consisting of two enantiomers of 2?-deoxy-3?-oxa-4?-thiocytidine, (?)dOTC and (+)dOTC, that have both shown activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1. The objectives of this study were to characterize the safety, tolerability, and stereospecific pharmacokinetics of single oral doses of racemic dOTC in healthy, nonsmoking adult male volunteers. Subjects received single oral doses of 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1,600 mg of racemic dOTC in a placebo-controlled, dose-rising, incomplete crossover study design, and the pharmacokinetics of both (+)dOTC and (?)dOTC were determined. At least six subjects were studied at each dose level, with each subject studied in three of five periods, receiving two different doses of racemic dOTC and one placebo dose. Plasma and urine drug concentrations were measured for 24 to 48 h after each dose. Pharmacokinetic models were fitted to the plasma concentrations of (+)dOTC and (?)dOTC using maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori Bayesian procedures. Statistical hypothesis testing was by nonparametric analysis of variance (where possible) and, when tests with dose as a covariate were performed, by linear mixed-effects modeling. The mean terminal elimination half-lives for (+)dOTC and (?)dOTC were 15.3 h (coefficient of variation [CV], 28%) and 11.3 h (CV, 43%), respectively (P < 0.05). The mean CV for total oral clearance (liter/h/65 kg) was 17.5 (25%) for (+)dOTC and 21.5 (24%) for (?)dOTC; for oral steady-state volume of distribution (liter/65 kg), values were 61.8 (24%) for (+)dOTC and 34.1 (33%) for (?)dOTC (P < 0.05). The mean CV for renal clearance (liter/h/65 kg) of (+)dOTC was 10.4 (19%) and for (?)dOTC was 13.6 (20%) (P < 0.05). There was no significant effect of dose size on the pharmacokinetics of racemic dOTC. All doses were well tolerated, and no serious adverse events or laboratory abnormalities were observed. PMID:10991865

  5. One dose of oral hexarelin protects chronic cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuanjie; Tokudome, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Otani, Kentaro; Miyazato, Mikiya; Kangawa, Kenji

    2014-06-01

    Both hexarelin and its natural analog ghrelin exert comparable cardioprotective activities. A single dose of ghrelin administered at the very acute phase after experimental myocardial infarction positively affects cardiac function in chronic heart failure. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether a single dose of oral hexarelin has the same effect in the chronic disease phase. Myocardial infarction or sham operation was generated by left coronary artery ligation in male C57BL/6J mice, which subsequently received one dose of hexarelin or vehicle treatment by oral gavage 30 min after operation. Although the mortality within 14 days after myocardial infarction did not differ between the groups, hexarelin treatment protected cardiac function in the chronic phase as evidenced by higher ejection fraction and fractional shortening, as well as lower lung weight/body weight and lung weight/tibial length ratios, compared with vehicle treatment. Hexarelin treatment concurrently lowered plasma epinephrine and dopamine levels, and shifted the balance of autonomic nervous activity toward parasympathetic nervous activity as evidenced by a smaller low/high-frequency power ratio and larger normalized high-frequency power on heart rate variability analysis. The results first demonstrate that one dose of oral hexarelin treatment potentially protects chronic cardiac function after acute myocardial infarction, and implicate that activating growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a might be beneficial for cardioprotection, although other mechanism may also be involved. PMID:24747279

  6. Pharmacokinetics of metamizol metabolites in healthy subjects after a single oral dose of metamizol sodium.

    PubMed

    Vlahov, V; Badian, M; Verho, M; Bacracheva, N

    1990-01-01

    The linearity of the pharmacokinetics of the metamizol metabolites 4-methyl-amino-antipyrine (4-MAA), 4-amino-antipyrine (4-AA), 4-formyl-aminoantipyrine (4-FAA), and 4-acetyl-amino-antipyrine (4-AcAA) has been studied after administration to 15 healthy male volunteers of single oral doses of 750, 1500, and 3000 mg metamizol. The trial was open, randomized, and cross-over, with a one-week interval between dosing days. Metabolite concentrations in serum and urine were measured using reverse-phase HPLC. The mean Cmax of 4-MAA increased linearly with dose whereas its AUC was not proportional to dose after administration of 1500 and 3000 mg. With 4-AA, the increase in mean Cmax was linear, but the increase in AUC was not. The increases in mean Cmax and AUC for 4-FAA after doses of 1500 and 3000 mg were not proportional to the dose. The increases in mean Cmax and AUC for 4-AcAA were roughly proportional to the increase in dose. There were no significant differences in renal clearance between doses for any of the four metabolites. The observed non-linearities reflect the saturability of metabolic pathways. However, although they were statistically significant, the deviations from linearity were marginal and should not be of clinical relevance to the analgesic efficacy of metamizol in the dose range tested. PMID:2328750

  7. Oral dosing of chemical indicators for in vivo monitoring of Ca2+ dynamics in insect muscle.

    PubMed

    Ferdinandus; Arai, Satoshi; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Suzuki, Madoka; Sato, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a remarkably facile staining protocol to visually investigate dynamic physiological events in insect tissues. We attempted to monitor Ca2+ dynamics during contraction of electrically stimulated living muscle. Advances in circuit miniaturization and insect neuromuscular physiology have enabled the hybridization of living insects and man-made electronic components, such as microcomputers, the result of which has been often referred as a Living Machine, Biohybrid, or Cyborg Insect. In order for Cyborg Insects to be of practical use, electrical stimulation parameters need to be optimized to induce desired muscle response (motor action) and minimize the damage in the muscle due to the electrical stimuli. Staining tissues and organs as well as measuring the dynamics of chemicals of interest in muscle should be conducted to quantitatively and systematically evaluate the effect of various stimulation parameters on the muscle response. However, existing staining processes require invasive surgery and/or arduous procedures using genetically encoded sensors. In this study, we developed a non-invasive and remarkably facile method for staining, in which chemical indicators can be orally administered (oral dosing). A chemical Ca2+ indicator was orally introduced into an insect of interest via food containing the chemical indicator and the indicator diffused from the insect digestion system to the target muscle tissue. We found that there was a positive relationship between the fluorescence intensity of the indicator and the frequency of electrical stimulation which indicates the orally dosed indicator successfully monitored Ca2+ dynamics in the muscle tissue. This oral dosing method has a potential to globally stain tissues including neurons, and investigating various physiological events in insects. PMID:25590329

  8. Oral Dosing of Chemical Indicators for In Vivo Monitoring of Ca2+ Dynamics in Insect Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ferdinandus; Arai, Satoshi; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi; Suzuki, Madoka; Sato, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a remarkably facile staining protocol to visually investigate dynamic physiological events in insect tissues. We attempted to monitor Ca2+ dynamics during contraction of electrically stimulated living muscle. Advances in circuit miniaturization and insect neuromuscular physiology have enabled the hybridization of living insects and man-made electronic components, such as microcomputers, the result of which has been often referred as a Living Machine, Biohybrid, or Cyborg Insect. In order for Cyborg Insects to be of practical use, electrical stimulation parameters need to be optimized to induce desired muscle response (motor action) and minimize the damage in the muscle due to the electrical stimuli. Staining tissues and organs as well as measuring the dynamics of chemicals of interest in muscle should be conducted to quantitatively and systematically evaluate the effect of various stimulation parameters on the muscle response. However, existing staining processes require invasive surgery and/or arduous procedures using genetically encoded sensors. In this study, we developed a non-invasive and remarkably facile method for staining, in which chemical indicators can be orally administered (oral dosing). A chemical Ca2+ indicator was orally introduced into an insect of interest via food containing the chemical indicator and the indicator diffused from the insect digestion system to the target muscle tissue. We found that there was a positive relationship between the fluorescence intensity of the indicator and the frequency of electrical stimulation which indicates the orally dosed indicator successfully monitored Ca2+ dynamics in the muscle tissue. This oral dosing method has a potential to globally stain tissues including neurons, and investigating various physiological events in insects. PMID:25590329

  9. Risk Factors and Dose-Effect Relationship for Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik Jae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Yong Bae; Yoo, Sei Whan; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Gwi Eon; Choi, Eun Chang; Cha, In Ho

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze risk factors and the dose-effect relationship for osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible after radiotherapy of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: One-hundred ninety-eight patients with oral (45%) and oropharyngeal cancer (55%) who had received external radiotherapy between 1990 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had a dental evaluation before radiotherapy. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 16-75 Gy), and the median biologically effective dose for late effects (BED{sub late}) in bone was 114 Gy{sub 2} (range, 30-167 Gy{sub 2}). Results: The frequency of ORN was 13 patients (6.6%). Among patients with mandibular surgery, eight had ORN at the surgical site. Among patients without mandibular surgery, five patients had ORN on the molar area of the mandible. The median time to ORN was 22 months (range, 1-69 months). Univariate analysis revealed that mandibular surgery and Co-60 were significant risk factors for ORN (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). In multivariate analysis, mandibular surgery was the most important factor (p = 0.001). High radiation doses over BED 102.6 Gy{sub 2} (conventional dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction) were also a significant factor for ORN (p = 0.008) and showed a positive dose-effect relationship in logistic regression (p = 0.04) for patients who had undergone mandibular surgery. Conclusions: Mandibular surgery was the most significant risk factor for ORN of mandible in oral and oropharyngeal cancers patients. A BED of 102.6 Gy{sub 2} or higher to the mandible also significantly increases the risk of ORN.

  10. Single dose intravenous methyl prednisolone versus oral prednisolone in Bell's palsy: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Prithvi; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Singh, Maneesh Kumar; Verma, Rajesh; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Corticosteroids have been used in the treatment of Bell's palsy and several other postinfectious neurological conditions. We hypothesized that administration of a single dose of intravenous (IV) methylprednisolone might be an effective alternative to oral prednisolone. Materials and Methods: In this open label, randomized trial, patients with acute Bell's palsy were randomized into two groups. One group received single dose (500 mg) of IV methylprednisolone while the other group received 10 days of oral prednisone. Outcome was assessed at 1 and 3 months with House–Brackmann scale. Results: At 3 months, 93 (79.48%) patients had completely recovered. IV methylprednisolone and oral prednisolone groups had similar recovery rates (80% vs. 78.33%, P > 0.05). Patients with Grade 2 and 3 recovered completely. In patients with Grade 6, the recovery rate was 20%. A better outcome was observed if corticosteroids were administered within 3 days of onset of palsy. Conclusion: Intravenous methylprednisolone and oral prednisolone showed equivalent benefit in patients with acute Bell's palsy. PMID:25878371

  11. Evidence for CVD 103-HgR as an effective single-dose oral cholera vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sarah S; Chen, Wilbur H

    2015-01-01

    We propose the ideal oral cholera vaccine (OCV) should be an inexpensive, single, oral dose that rapidly confers immunity for a long duration, and is well tolerated by individuals vulnerable to cholera. Vaccine trials in industrialized countries of a single oral dose of 5 × 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) of the live, attenuated cholera strain CVD 103-HgR have shown 88-97% serum vibriocidal antibody seroconversion rates, a correlate of protection and documented vaccine efficacy of ?80% using volunteer challenge studies with wild-type cholera. For individuals of developing countries, a 5 × 10(9) CFU dose of CVD 103-HgR is necessary to elicit similar antibody responses. Presently, a reformulation of CVD 103-HgR is in late-stage clinical development for prospective US FDA licensure; making a cholera vaccine for US travelers potentially accessible in 2016. The availability of CVD 103-HgR should be a welcome addition to the currently available OCVs. PMID:26228388

  12. Evaluation of neuropathic pain occurring after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of oral tongue

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Kapoor, Rakesh; Ahuja, Chirag K.; Oinam, Arun S.; Ghoshal, Sushmita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To recognize neuropathic pain as a complication of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy of oral tongue and to evaluate the possible causes of neuropathy. Material and methods Twenty one patients who underwent interstitial brachytherapy for early cancer of oral tongue were evaluated. The patients either underwent primary brachytherapy (42-48 Gy at 3-4 Gy/fraction) or a boost (18-24 Gy at 3 Gy/fraction) after external radiation to 40 Gy. Lingual nerve was the nerve concerned and the sublingual space (SLS) was contoured as its surrogate. Dosimetric parameters were correlated with onset of pain. Results Ten patients out of 21 (47.61%) developed painful neuropathy. Five patients of six (5/6) who underwent primary brachytherapy developed neuropathy. Five out of 15 (5/15) patients who underwent brachytherapy as a boost developed neuropathy. The patients who underwent primary brachytherapy were ten times more likely to develop neuropathy. Among the patients receiving boost treatment, the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) to 2 cc of SLS was higher (39.25 Gy) in the patients who developed pain compared to those without pain (10.29 Gy). Conclusions This is the first report to recognize neuropathic pain as a complication of HDR brachytherapy of oral tongue. Patients undergoing primary brachytherapy were more likely to develop pain. Among other factors like dose to SLS, number of catheters, size of the primary tumor, and the dose rate, only dose to 2 cc of the SLS correlated with onset of pain. The SLS (containing the lingual nerve) may be considered an organ at risk to prevent the occurrence of this complication. PMID:26034495

  13. PULMONARY FUNCTION AND PATHOLOGY IN CATS EXPOSED 28 DAYS TO DIESEL EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young adult male cats were exposed 28 days, 20 hours per day, to a 1:14 dilution of diesel exhaust emissions. Following termination of exposure, the following pulmonary function measurements were carried out: lung volumes, maximum expiratory flow rates (MEF), MEF at 50%, 25% and ...

  14. Single, Escalating Dose Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Food Effects of a New Oral Androgen Dimethandrolone Undecanoate in Man: A prototype oral male hormonal contraceptive

    PubMed Central

    Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Nya-Ngatchou, Jean Jacques; Liu, Peter Y.; Amory, John K.; Leung, Andrew; Hull, Laura; Blithe, Diana L.; Woo, Jason; Bremner, William J.; Wang, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The novel androgen, dimethandrolone (DMA) has both androgenic and progestational activities, properties that may maximize gonadotropin suppression. We assessed the pharmacokinetics of dimethandrolone undecanoate (DMAU), an orally bioavailable, longer-acting ester of DMA, for male contraceptive development. Our objective was to examine the safety and pharmacokinetics of single, escalating doses of DMAU (powder in capsule formulation) administered orally with or without food in healthy men. We conducted a randomized, double-blind Phase 1 study. For each dose of DMAU (25 to 800 mg), ten male volunteers received DMAU and two received placebo at two academic medical centers. DMAU was administered both fasting and after a high fat meal (200–800 mg doses). Serial serum samples were collected over 24h following each dose. DMAU was well tolerated without significant effects on vital signs, safety laboratory tests or electrocardiograms. When administered while fasting, serum DMA (active compound) was detectable in only 4/10 participants after the 800mg dose. When administered with a 50% fat meal, serum DMA was detectable in all participants given 200mg DMAU and showed a dose-incremental increase up to 800mg, with peak levels 4 to 8h after taking the dose. Serum gonadotropins and sex hormone concentrations were significantly suppressed 12h after DMAU administration with food at doses above 200mg. This first-in-man study demonstrated that a single, oral dose of DMAU up to 800 mg is safe. A high-fat meal markedly improved DMAU/DMA pharmacokinetics. PMID:24789057

  15. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered low-dose rapamycin in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Larson, Jeanne C; Allstadt, Sara D; Fan, Timothy M; Khanna, Chand; Lunghofer, Paul J; Hansen, Ryan J; Gustafson, Daniel L; Legendre, Alfred M; Galyon, Gina D; LeBlanc, Amy K; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of orally administered rapamycin in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 5 healthy purpose-bred hounds. PROCEDURES The study consisted of 2 experiments. In experiment 1, each dog received rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after administration. In experiment 2, each dog received rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once daily for 5 days; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 3, 6, 24, 27, 30, 48, 51, 54, 72, 75, 78, 96, 96.5, 97, 98, 100, 102, 108, 120, 144, and 168 hours after the first dose. Blood rapamycin concentration was determined by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by compartmental and noncompartmental analyses. RESULTS Mean ± SD blood rapamycin terminal half-life, area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 48 hours after dosing, and maximum concentration were 38.7 ± 12.7 h, 140 ± 23.9 ng•h/mL, and 8.39 ± 1.73 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 1, and 99.5 ± 89.5 h, 126 ± 27.1 ng•h/mL, and 5.49 ± 1.99 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 2. Pharmacokinetic parameters for rapamycin after administration of 5 daily doses differed significantly from those after administration of 1 dose. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that oral administration of low-dose (0.1 mg/kg) rapamycin to healthy dogs achieved blood concentrations measured in nanograms per milliliter. The optimal dose and administration frequency of rapamcyin required to achieve therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing dogs, as well as toxicity after chronic dosing, need to be determined. PMID:26709938

  16. High-Dose Oral Ibuprofen in Treatment of Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Full-Term Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Pourarian, Shahnaz; Rezaie, Mehrdad; Amoozgar, Hamid; Shakiba, Ali-Mohammad; Edraki, Mohammad-Reza; Mehdizadegan, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is an important risk for heart failure due to left to right shunt in term neonates. Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the effect of high dose ibuprofen in closure of PDA in term neonates. Patients and Methods: We used double dose ibuprofen (20 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, and 10 mg/kg) for 3 - 30 day old term neonates with PDA who were admitted in the neonatal wards of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The results of this study were compared to the data of the previous study in our center which used the low dose of ibuprofen (10 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg, and 5 mg/kg). Results: 29 full term neonates received high-dose ibuprofen, in 18 neonates, PDA was closed after 4 days (62.1% versus 43.3% for the standard dose and 4.7% for the control group in the previous study) (P = 0.001). The results showed no significant correlation between the closure rate and gestational age, postnatal age, sex, and weight. In the 4th day of treatment, size of the pulmonic end of ductus arteriosus decreased from 2.09 mm to 0.77 mm compared to 1.68 mm to 0.81 mm in the standard dose of oral ibuprofen and 2.1 mm to 1.4 mm in the control group (P = 0.046). Conclusions: This study indicated that high-dose oral ibuprofen was more effective in closing or decreasing the size of PDA. PMID:26396694

  17. Single Dose Pharmacokinetics of Oral Tenofovir in Plasma, Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, Colonic Tissue, and Vaginal Tissue

    E-print Network

    Louissaint, Nicolette A.

    HIV seroconversion outcomes in preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trials of oral tenofovir (TFV)-containing regimens are highly sensitive to drug concentration, yet less-than-daily dosing regimens are under study. Description ...

  18. Mass vaccination with a two-dose oral cholera vaccine in a refugee camp.

    PubMed Central

    Legros, D.; Paquet, C.; Perea, W.; Marty, I.; Mugisha, N. K.; Royer, H.; Neira, M.; Ivanoff, B.

    1999-01-01

    In refugee settings, the use of cholera vaccines is controversial since a mass vaccination campaign might disrupt other priority interventions. We therefore conducted a study to assess the feasibility of such a campaign using a two-dose oral cholera vaccine in a refugee camp. The campaign, using killed whole-cell/recombinant B-subunit cholera vaccine, was carried out in October 1997 among 44,000 south Sudanese refugees in Uganda. Outcome variables included the number of doses administered, the drop-out rate between the two rounds, the proportion of vaccine wasted, the speed of administration, the cost of the campaign, and the vaccine coverage. Overall, 63,220 doses of vaccine were administered. At best, 200 vaccine doses were administered per vaccination site and per hour. The direct cost of the campaign amounted to US$ 14,655, not including the vaccine itself. Vaccine coverage, based on vaccination cards, was 83.0% and 75.9% for the first and second rounds, respectively. Mass vaccination of a large refugee population with an oral cholera vaccine therefore proved to be feasible. A pre-emptive vaccination strategy could be considered in stable refugee settings and in urban slums in high-risk areas. However, the potential cost of the vaccine and the absence of quickly accessible stockpiles are major drawbacks for its large-scale use. PMID:10593032

  19. Single-dose oral toxicity of fermented rice extracts (FREs): a 14-day observation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Kim, Joo-Wan; Kim, Ki-Young; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Sohn, Jae Hak

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present research was to determine the acute oral toxicity of fermented rice extracts (FREs), in female and male ICR mice. To investigate the toxicity and identify target organs, FREs were orally administered once to male and female ICR mice at doses of 0 (vehicle control), 500, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg body weight (BW). Effects on mortality, BW, and clinical signs were monitored over 14 days, including changes in the weights and histopathological characteristics of 14 organs, as described in the Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) Guidelines (2009-116, 2009). No treatment-related mortality was observed during the 14-day observation period in either gender. In addition, no FRE-related change was observed in BW or organ weight (OW), clinical indicators, or histopathological findings in this study. Our results suggest that the FRE is non-toxic in mice and is therefore likely to be safe for clinical use. The approximate LD and LD50 in mice after single oral dose of FRE are greater than 2000 mg/kg in female and male ICR mice. Additionally, no specific target organ or negative clinical indicator was detected in this study. PMID:24374435

  20. Toxicokinetics of acrylamide in rats and humans following single oral administration of low doses

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Eva Katharina; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    The rodent carcinogen acrylamide (AA) is formed during preparation of starch-containing foods. AA is partly metabolized to the genotoxic epoxide glycidamide (GA). After metabolic processing, the mercapturic acids N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA), rac-N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA) and rac-N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-moyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA) are excreted with urine. In humans, AAMA can be sulfoxidized to AAMA-sulfoxide. The aim of this study was to assess potential species-differences in AA-toxicokinetics in rats and humans after single oral administration of doses similar to the daily human dietary exposure. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 5/dose group) were administered 20 and 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AA in deionized water via oral gavage. Human subjects (n = 3/gender) were orally administered 0.5 and 20 {mu}g/kg b.w. {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AA with drinking water. Urine samples were collected in intervals for 96 and 94 h, respectively. Urinary concentrations of {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA and {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide were monitored by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recovered urinary metabolites accounted for 66.3% and 70.5% of the 20 and 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. doses in rats and for 71.3% and 70.0% of the 0.5 and 20 {mu}g/kg b.w. doses in humans. In rats, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA accounted for 33.6% and 38.8% of dose and 32.7% and 31.7% of dose was recovered as {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA; {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide was not detected in rat urine. In humans, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA and {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide accounted for 51.7% and 49.2%, 6.3% and 6.4% and 13.2% and 14.5% of the applied dose, respectively. The obtained results suggest that the extent of AA bioactivation to GA in humans is lower than in rodents.

  1. Safety and pharmacokinetics of dicloxacillin in healthy Chinese volunteers following single and multiple oral doses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guolan; Zheng, Yunliang; Zhou, Huili; Hu, Xingjiang; Liu, Jian; Zhai, You; Zhu, Meixiang; Wu, Lihua; Shentu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Dicloxacillin, a semisynthetic isoxazolyl penicillin antibiotic, has antimicrobial activity against a wide variety of gram-positive bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumonia, Streptococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus viridans, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Neisseria meningitidis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of dicloxacillin after single and multiple oral dose in healthy Chinese volunteers. Methods A single-center, open-label, randomized, two-phase study was conducted in 16 subjects. In the single-dose phase, subjects were randomly assigned to receive single doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g of dicloxacillin sodium capsule in a 4-way crossover design with a 5-day washout period between administrations. In the multiple-dose phase, subjects were assigned to receive 0.25 or 0.5 g every 6 hours for 3 days in a 2-way crossover design. Plasma and urine pharmacokinetic samples were assayed by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and analyzed statistically. Safety assessments were conducted throughout the study. Results Following a single oral dose of 0.25–2.0 g dicloxacillin sodium, the maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax) and the corresponding values for the area under the concentration– time curve from 0 to 10 hours (AUC0–10 h) increased in a dose-proportional manner. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was in the range of 1.38–1.71 hours. Dicloxacillin was excreted in its unchanged form via the kidney, with no tendency of accumulation, and varied from 38.65% to 50.10%. No appreciable accumulation of drug occurred with multiple oral doses of dicloxacillin. No serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events were generally mild. Conclusion Dicloxacillin was safe and well tolerated in the volunteers and displayed linear increases in the Cmax and AUC0–10 h values. PMID:26527863

  2. Safety of fluralaner, a novel systemic antiparasitic drug, in MDR1(-/-) Collies after oral administration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fluralaner is a novel systemic ectoparasiticide for dogs providing long-acting flea- and tick-control after a single oral dose. This study investigated the safety of oral administration of fluralaner at 3 times the highest expected clinical dose to Multi Drug Resistance Protein 1 (MDR1(-/-)) gene defect Collies. Methods Sixteen Collies homozygous for the MDR1 deletion mutation were included in the study. Eight Collies received fluralaner chewable tablets once at a dose of 168 mg/kg; eight sham dosed Collies served as controls. All Collies were clinically observed until 28 days following treatment. Results No adverse events were observed subsequent to fluralaner treatment of MDR1(-/-) Collies at three times the highest expected clinical dose. Conclusions Fluralaner chewable tablets are well tolerated in MDR1(-/-) Collies following oral administration. PMID:24602342

  3. Repeat oral dose toxicity studies of melamine in rats and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Early, Richard J; Yu, Hong; Mu, Xueyan Peter; Xu, Haiyan; Guo, Lei; Kong, Qingxue; Zhou, Junma; He, Bruce; Yang, Xiuying; Huang, Hailiang; Hu, Edward; Jiang, Ying

    2013-03-01

    Melamine is an important and widely used organic industrial chemical. Recently, clinical findings of renal failure and kidney stones in infants have been associated with ingestion of melamine-contaminated infant formula. To understand the toxicity and clinical outcome of melamine exposure, repeated oral dose studies in rats and monkeys were performed to characterize the subchronic toxicity of melamine. Assessment of toxicity was based on mortality, clinical signs, body weights, ophthalmic findings, clinical pathology, gross pathology, organ weights, and microscopic observations. The first rat study was intended to be a 14-day oral study followed by an 8-day recovery period. The dose levels were 140, 700, and 1,400 mg/kg/day (lowered to 1,000 mg/kg/day subsequently due to mortality). Oral administration of melamine at 700 mg/kg/day for 14 consecutive days in rats produced compound-related clinical signs (red urine), decreased body weights, and changes in clinical pathology (increased serum urea nitrogen and creatinine) and anatomical pathology (renal tubular cell debris, crystal deposition, and hyperactive regeneration of renal tubular epithelium). The kidney was identified as the target organ. Oral administration at 1,400 mg/kg/day (subsequently lowered to 1,000 mg/kg/day) resulted in animal death and moribundity. There were no treatment-related findings in the 140 mg/kg/day group. There were no compound-related findings in the high-dose recovery animals. The second rat study was a 5-day oral toxicity study with genomic biomarkers assayed in the kidney tissues. At the top dose of 1,050 mg/kg/day, similar clinical and anatomical pathology findings as described above were observed. The genes measured, Kim-1, Clu, Spp1, A2m, Lcn2, Tcfrsf12a, Gpnmb, and CD44, were significantly up-regulated (fivefold to 550-fold), while Tff3 was significantly down-regulated (fivefold). These results indicated that genomic markers could sensitively diagnose melamine-induced kidney injury. A 3-month oral study with 4-week recovery in monkeys was also conducted. In this monkey study, the animals were treated with melamine at doses of 60, 200, or 700 mg/kg/day. The administration of 700 mg/kg/day melamine by nasal-gastric gavage to monkeys resulted in test article-related clinical signs including turbid and whitish urine, urine crystals, red blood cell changes, increased serum alanine aminotransferase and kidney and/or liver weights, and microscopic findings including nephrotoxicity, pericarditis, and increased hematopoiesis. Nephrotoxicity was also noted at 200 mg/kg/day. It was concluded that the kidney is the primary target organ and the NOAEL was estimated to be 140 mg/kg/day in rats following a 14-day oral administration and 60 mg/kg/day in the monkey study. PMID:23052191

  4. Comparative disposition of codeine and pholcodine in man after single oral doses.

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, J W; Fowle, A S; Butz, R F; Jones, E C; Weatherley, B C; Welch, R M; Posner, J

    1986-01-01

    Four healthy male subjects received single oral doses of 15, 30 and 60 mg of codeine and pholcodine according to a balanced cross-over design with an interval of 7 days between the six treatments. Blood samples were collected for 8 h after each drug administration. In phase 2 of the study six different male volunteers received single oral doses of 60 mg of codeine and pholcodine with a 14 day interval between successive drug treatments. Blood was sampled for 12 h after codeine and 121 h after pholcodine administration. Plasma concentrations of free (unconjugated) and total (unconjugated plus conjugated) codeine, pholcodine and morphine were determined by radioimmunoassay and selected pharmacokinetic parameters were derived from these data. Pharmacokinetics of both drugs were independent of dose. Codeine was absorbed and eliminated relatively rapidly [elimination t1/2 = 2.3 +/- 0.4 h (mean +/- s.d.)]. While codeine kinetics were adequately described by a one-compartment open model with first-order absorption, a two-compartment model was required to describe pholcodine elimination from plasma (t1/2,z = 37.0 +/- 4.2 h). Plasma concentrations of conjugated codeine were much greater than those of the unconjugated alkaloid. By contrast, pholcodine appeared to undergo little conjugation. Biotransformation of codeine to morphine was evident in all subjects, although the extent of this metabolic conversion varied considerably between subjects. Morphine was not detectable in the plasma of any subject after pholcodine administration. PMID:3741728

  5. Development of a chronic noncancer oral reference dose and drinking water screening level for sulfolane using benchmark dose modeling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Gaylor, David W; Tachovsky, J Andrew; Perry, Camarie; Carakostas, Michael C; Haws, Laurie C

    2013-12-01

    Sulfolane is a widely used industrial solvent that is often used for gas treatment (sour gas sweetening; hydrogen sulfide removal from shale and coal processes, etc.), and in the manufacture of polymers and electronics, and may be found in pharmaceuticals as a residual solvent used in the manufacturing processes. Sulfolane is considered a high production volume chemical with worldwide production around 18 000-36 000 tons per year. Given that sulfolane has been detected as a contaminant in groundwater, an important potential route of exposure is tap water ingestion. Because there are currently no federal drinking water standards for sulfolane in the USA, we developed a noncancer oral reference dose (RfD) based on benchmark dose modeling, as well as a tap water screening value that is protective of ingestion. Review of the available literature suggests that sulfolane is not likely to be mutagenic, clastogenic or carcinogenic, or pose reproductive or developmental health risks except perhaps at very high exposure concentrations. RfD values derived using benchmark dose modeling were 0.01-0.04?mg?kg(-1) per day, although modeling of developmental endpoints resulted in higher values, approximately 0.4?mg?kg(-1) per day. The lowest, most conservative, RfD of 0.01?mg?kg(-1) per day was based on reduced white blood cell counts in female rats. This RfD was used to develop a tap water screening level that is protective of ingestion, viz. 365 µg l(-1). It is anticipated that these values, along with the hazard identification and dose-response modeling described herein, should be informative for risk assessors and regulators interested in setting health-protective drinking water guideline values for sulfolane. PMID:22936336

  6. Dose escalation of intravenous irinotecan using oral cefpodoxime: a phase I study in pediatric patients with refractory solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Lisa M.; Stewart, Clinton F.; Crews, Kristine R.; Tagen, Michael; Wozniak, Amy; Wu, Jianrong; McCarville, M. Beth; Navid, Fariba; Santana, Victor M.; Houghton, Peter J.; Furman, Wayne L.; Galindo, Carlos Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    Background Administration of an oral cephalosporin allowed advancement of the dosage of oral irinotecan. This study investigates whether administration of an oral cephalosporin increases the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of intravenous irinotecan. Procedure Irinotecan was administered intravenously on Days 1– 5 and Days 8 – 12 of a 21-day cycle with continuous oral cefpodoxime starting 2 days prior to irinotecan. Cohorts of 3 to 6 pediatric patients with refractory solid tumors were enrolled at 4 dosage levels, starting at the single-agent irinotecan MTD of 20 mg/m2/dose. Results The 17 evaluable patients received 39 courses of therapy. None of the patients treated with 20 mg/m2/dose experienced dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). One of 6 patients treated at 30 mg/m2/dose experienced dose-limiting neutropenia. Two of 3 patients treated with 45 mg/m2/dose and 2 of 5 treated with 40 mg/m2/dose experienced dose-limiting diarrhea, with associated dehydration and anorexia. Two unconfirmed partial responses were observed after one course in a patient with Ewing sarcoma and one with paraganglioma. A child with refractory neuroblastoma had disease stabilization through 12 courses of therapy. Median (range) systemic exposure to SN-38 at the MTD (30 mg/m2/dose) was 67 ng-h/mL (36 to 111 ng-h/mL). Conclusions The MTD of intravenous irinotecan administered on a protracted schedule was increased by 50% from 20 to 30 mg/m2/dose with the addition of oral cefpodoxime. The most prominent DLT remained diarrhea. High interpatient variability in irinotecan pharmacokinetics was observed; however, SN-38 exposure at the MTD was greater than most reported exposures with the 20 mg/m2 dosage. PMID:21509928

  7. Pulmonary function and pathology in cats exposed 28 days to diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Pepelko, W.E.; Mattox, J.K.; Yang, Y.Y.; Moore, W. Jr.

    1980-09-01

    Young adult male cats were exposed 28 days, 20 hrs per day, to a 1:14 dilution of diesel exhaust emissions. Following termination of exposure, the following pulmonary function measurements were carried out: lung volumes, maximum expiratory flow rates (MEF), MEF at 50%, 25% and 10% of vital capacity (VC): forced expiratory volume (FEV) after 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 sec, dynamic compliance, resistance and helium washout at 25, 50, 75, and 100 breaths per min. The only significant functional change was a decrease in MEF at 10% of VC (P x .02). The lungs of the exposed cats appeared charcoal grey with frequent focal black spots visible on the pleural surface. Pathologic changes in the exposed cats included a predominantly peribronchiolar localization of black-pigmented macrophages within the alveoli producing a focal pneumonitis or alveolitis. In general, evidence of serious lung damage was not observed following the 28-day exposure period.

  8. The optimal oral dose selection of ibandronate in Japanese patients with osteoporosis based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kiyohiko; Tobinai, Masato; Hashimoto, Junko; Iida, Satofumi; Kawanishi, Takehiko

    2014-12-01

    Ibandronate is a drug widely used outside Japan for the treatment of osteoporosis. It is available in formulations for intermittent intravenous (i.v.) administration and for intermittent (once monthly) oral administration. Ibandronate was recently approved in Japan as an i.v. injection with a dosing regimen of 1.0 mg once a month. To establish the optimal dose for oral administration of ibandronate in Japanese osteoporotic patients, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of and pharmacodynamic response to ibandronate following oral and intravenous administrations to Japanese subjects. Ibandronate (20, 50, 100, or 150 mg) was given orally to healthy postmenopausal Japanese women and to Japanese patients with primary osteoporosis. Serial measurements were obtained for the concentrations of serum ibandronate and urinary cross-linked C-telopeptide of Type I collagen (uCTX). Pharmacokinetic parameters and the time profiles of creatinine-corrected uCTX were compared with those obtained from postmenopausal Japanese women with osteopenia after administration of 1.0 mg i.v. ibandronate. Following oral administration of ibandronate, the area under the serum ibandronate concentration-time curve (AUCinf) increased dose-proportionally for doses up to 100 mg; at 150 mg, AUCinf increased beyond the dose-proportionality seen with doses up to 100 mg. The AUCinf within the linear range following administration of 100 mg oral ibandronate was similar to that following 1.0 mg i.v. ibandronate. Additionally, corrected uCTX decreased after administration of 100 mg oral ibandronate and remained decreased for 1 month; the magnitude of the decrease was similar to or greater than that obtained after 1.0 mg i.v. ibandronate. From a clinical pharmacological perspective, administration of 100 mg/month oral ibandronate was equivalent to that of 1.0 mg/month i.v. ibandronate. PMID:25476995

  9. Pharmacokinetics of Solithromycin (CEM-101) after Single or Multiple Oral Doses and Effects of Food on Single-Dose Bioavailability in Healthy Adult Subjects?

    PubMed Central

    Still, J. Gordon; Schranz, Jennifer; Degenhardt, Thorsten P.; Scott, Drusilla; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Clark, Kay

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of orally administered solithromycin (CEM-101), a novel fluoroketolide, were evaluated in healthy subjects in three phase 1 studies. In two randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies, escalating single oral doses of solithromycin (50 to 1,600 mg) or seven oral daily doses (200 to 600 mg) of solithromycin were administered. A third study evaluated the effects of food on the bioavailability of single oral doses (400 mg) of solithromycin. Following single doses, the median time to peak concentration (Tmax) ranged from 1.5 h to 6 h. The mean maximum measured plasma concentration (Cmax) ranged from 0.0223 ?g/ml to 19.647 ?g/ml, and the area under the concentration-versus-time curve from time zero to time t (AUC0–t) ranged from 0.0402 ?g · h/ml to 28.599 ?g · h/ml. There was no effect of high-fat food on the oral bioavailability of solithromycin. In the multiple-dose study, after 7 days, the mean maximum measured plasma solithromycin concentration at steady-state (Cmax,ss) ranged from 0.248 to 1.50 ?g/ml, and the area under the concentration-versus-time curve over the final dosing interval (AUC?) ranged from 2.310 to 18.41 ?g · h/ml. These values indicate a greater than proportional increase in exposure at 200 and 400 mg but a proportional exposure at 600 mg. Median Tmax values remained constant between day 1 and day 7. Moderate accumulation ratios of solithromycin were observed after 7 days of dosing. All dose regimens of solithromycin were well tolerated, and no discontinuations due to an adverse event occurred. The human pharmacokinetic profile and tolerability of solithromycin, combined with its in vitro potency and efficacy in animal models against a broad spectrum of pathogens, support further development of solithromycin. PMID:21282444

  10. Coagulation profile in women on low-dose oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Roshidah, I; Khalid, H; Baharum, Y

    1990-12-01

    The effect of low dose combined oral contraceptives containing 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol and either 150 mcg levonorgestrel or 150 mcg desogestrel on coagulation indices in Malaysian women was examined. 50 women who had been using the pills for 1 year or more, were compared to 75 non-users. All were attending the Maternity Clinic of the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. Pill users registered shorter prothrombin time, 11.5 vs. 11.1 seconds (p=0.016), and partial thromboplastin time, 40.1 vs 35.1 seconds (p=0.000). Since there were no significant differences in Factors II, V, VII, or VIII, the overall effects of low-dose pills on coagulation is probably not clinically significant. PMID:12343152

  11. Refining dosing by oral gavage in the dog: A protocol to harmonise welfare

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Laura E.; Robinson, Sally; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dog is a frequently-used, non-rodent species in the safety assessment of new chemical entities. We have a scientific and ethical obligation to ensure that the best quality of data is achieved from their use. Oral gavage is a technique frequently used to deliver a compound directly into the stomach. As with other animals, in the dog, gavage is aversive and the frequency of its use is a cause for welfare concern but little research has been published on the technique nor how to Refine it. A Welfare Assessment Framework (Hall, 2014) was previously developed for use with the laboratory-housed dog and a contrasting pattern of behaviour, cardiovascular and affective measures were found in dogs with positive and negative welfare. Methods Using the framework, this study compared the effects of sham dosing (used to attempt to habituate dogs to dosing) and a Refined training protocol against a control, no-training group to determine the benefit to welfare and scientific output of each technique. Results Our findings show that sham dosing is ineffective as a habituation technique and ‘primes’ rather than desensitises dogs to dosing. Dogs in the control group showed few changes in parameters across the duration of the study, with some undesirable changes during dosing, while dogs in the Refined treatment group showed improvements in many parameters. Discussion It is recommended that if there is no time allocated for pre-study training a no-sham dosing protocol is used. However, brief training periods show a considerable benefit for welfare and quality of data to be obtained from the dogs' use. PMID:25575806

  12. A Randomised Trial Evaluating the Safety and Immunogenicity of the Novel Single Oral Dose Typhoid Vaccine M01ZH09 in Healthy Vietnamese Children

    PubMed Central

    Hien, Tran Tinh; Dung, Nguyen Thi; Truong, Nguyen Thanh; Van, Ninh Thi Thanh; Bich Chau, Tran Nguyen; Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh; Nga, Tran Thi Thu; Thuy, Cao Thu; Minh, Pham Van; Binh, Nguyen Thi Cam; Ha, Tran Thi Diem; Toi, Pham Van; Song Diep, To; Campbell, James I.; Stockwell, Elaine; Schultsz, Constance; Simmons, Cameron P.; Glover, Clare; Lam, Winnie; Marques, Filipe; May, James P.; Upton, Anthony; Budhram, Ronald; Dougan, Gordon; Farrar, Jeremy; Vinh Chau, Nguyen Van; Dolecek, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Background The emergence of drug resistant typhoid fever is a major public health problem, especially in Asia. An oral single dose typhoid vaccine would have major advantages. M01ZH09 is a live oral single dose candidate typhoid vaccine containing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Ty2 aroC? ssaV?) ZH9 with two independently attenuating deletions. Studies in healthy adults demonstrated immunogenicity and an acceptable safety profile. Objectives We conducted a randomised placebo controlled, single-blind trial to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of M01ZH09 in healthy Vietnamese children aged 5 to 14 years. Methods Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either a nominal dose of 5×109 CFU of M01ZH09 or placebo and were followed up for 28 days. The primary safety outcome was the proportion of subjects with any adverse event attributed to M01ZH09. The primary immunogenicity endpoint was the proportion of subjects who showed a positive immune response to M01ZH09 in the Salmonella Typhi lipopolysaccharide (LPS) specific serum IgA and IgG ELISA. Principal Findings One hundred and fifty-one children were enrolled, 101 subjects received M01ZH09 and 50 subjects received placebo. An intention to treat analysis was conducted. There were no serious adverse events and no bacteraemias. In the M01ZH09 group, 26 (26%; 95% CI, 18–5%) of 101 subjects experienced adverse events compared to 11 (22%; 95% CI, 12–36%) of 50 subjects in the placebo group (odds ratio (OR) [95%CI] ?=?1.23 [0.550–2.747]; p?=?0.691). Faecal shedding of S. Typhi (Ty2 aroC? ssaV?) ZH9 was detected in 51 (51%; 95% CI, 41–61%) of 100 M01ZH09 subjects. No shedding was detected beyond day 3. A positive immune response, defined as 70% increase (1.7 fold change) in LPS specific serum IgG (day 14 or 28) and/or 50% increase (1.5 fold change) in LPS specific serum IgA (day 7 or 14) from baseline was detected in 98 (97%; 95% CI, 92–99%) of 101 M01ZH09 recipients and 8 (16%; 95% CI, 7–29%) of 50 placebo recipients. Twenty-eight (100%; 95% CI, 88–100%) of 28 vaccine recipients who were evaluated in the LPS specific IgA ELISPOT assay showed a positive response compared to none of the 14 placebo recipients tested. Conclusions This was the first phase II trial of a novel oral candidate typhoid vaccine in children in an endemic country. M01ZH09 had an appropriate safety profile and was immunogenic in children. Trial Registration Controlled-trials.comISRCTN91111837 PMID:20668668

  13. Single oral dose toxicity study of prebrewed armeniacae semen in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Ha; Seo, Bu-Il; Cho, Su-Yeon; Park, Kyu-Ryul; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Han, Chang-Kyun; Song, Chang-Hyun; Park, Soo-Jin; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2013-06-01

    Armeniacae semen (AS) has been considered a toxic herb in the Korean medicine as it contains hydrogen cyanide and amygdalin, especially in its endocarp. Therefore, prebrewed AS that is devoid of endocarp has been traditionally used. In the present study, amygdalin content of the prebrewed AS was significantly lower (2.73 ± 0.32 ?g/ml; p < 0.01) than the content in the extract that contained the endocarps (28.50 ± 6.71 ?g/ml); amygdalin content corresponded to 10% of the extract in the present study. Because of single oral dose toxicity of prebrewed AS according to the recommendation of Korea Food and Drug Administration Guidelines (2009-116, 2009), which was based on single oral dose toxicity study of prebrewed AS, mortality due to toxic principles was significantly reduced. In this study, 2,000 mg/kg of prebrewed AS led to death of 1 female rat and 1 male rat at the end of 2 hr of administration. Based on these results, the 50% lethal dose in both male and female rats was determined to be 9279.5 mg/kg. Seizure, loss of locomotion, and increases in respiration and heart rate were observed as prebrewed AS treatment-related toxicological signs; these signs were restrictedly manifested in the prebrewed AS (2,000 mg/kg)-treated rats. In addition, no changes were observed in body weight, organ weight, gross features, and histopathological parameters with 2,000 mg/kg of AS in both male and female rats. These findings serve as direct evidence that amygdalin in AS is the toxic principle, which can be reduced by the traditional prebrewing method involving the exclusion of endocarp. PMID:24278634

  14. [Exercise-induced asthma in children and oral terbutaline. A dose-response relationship study].

    PubMed

    Hertz, B; Fuglsang, G; Holm, E B

    1994-09-26

    We wanted to assess the protective effects on exercise-induced asthma as well as the clinical efficacy and safety of increasing doses of a new sustained-release formulation of terbutaline sulphate in 17 asthmatic children aged 6-12 years (mean 9 years). Placebo, 2, 4, and 6 mg terbutaline were given b.i.d. for 14 days in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. At the end of each two week period, an exercise test was performed and plasma terbutaline was measured. Compared with placebo, no significant effect was seen on asthma symptoms monitored at home, or on exercise-induced asthma. The percentage falls in FEV1 after the exercise test were 36, 35, 27 and 28%, after placebo, 4, 8 and 12 mg terbutaline/day, respectively. A small but statistically significant dose-related increase was seen in morning and evening peak expiratory flow (PEF) recordings. It is concluded that continuous treatment, even with high doses or oral terbutaline, does not offer clinically useful protection against exercise-induced asthma. PMID:7985255

  15. Comparative Metabolism Studies of Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) Diastereomers in Male Rats Following a Single Oral Dose.

    PubMed

    Hakk, Heldur

    2016-01-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed orally with 3 mg/kg of one of three hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers. Each diastereomer was well absorbed (73-83%), and distributed preferentially to lipophilic tissues. Feces were the major route of excretion; cumulatively accounting for 42% of dose for ?-HBCD, 59% for ß-HBCD, and 53% for ?-HBCD. Urine was also an important route of HBCD excretion, accounting for 13% of dose for ?-HBCD, 30% for ß-HBCD, and 21% for ?-HBCD. Total metabolism of HBCD diastereomers followed the rank order ß > ? > ?, and was >65% of that administered. The metabolites formed were distinct in male rats: ?-HBCD did not debrominate or stereoisomerize, but formed two hydroxylated metabolites; ß- and ?-HBCD were both extensively metabolized via pathways of stereoisomerization, oxidation, dehydrogenation, reductive debromination, and ring opening. ß-HBCD was biotransformed to two mercapturic acid pathway metabolites. The metabolites of ß- and ?-HBCD were largely distinct, and could possibly be used as markers of exposure. These isomer-specific data suggest that ?-HBCD would be the most dominant HBCD diastereomer in biological tissues because it was metabolized to the lowest degree and also accumulated from the stereoisomerization of the ?- and ?- diastereomers. PMID:26629593

  16. Prospective Evaluation to Establish a Dose Response for Clinical Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Head-and-Neck Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Samir Lehmann, Joerg; Coleman, Matthew A.; Vaughan, Andrew; Yang, Claus Chunli; Enepekides, Danny; Farwell, Gregory; Purdy, James A.; Laredo, Grace; Nolan, Kerry A.S.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to correlate oral cavity dose with clinical mucositis, perform in vivo dosimetry, and determine the feasibility of obtaining buccal mucosal cell samples in patients undergoing head-and-neck radiation therapy. The main objective is to establish a quantitative dose response for clinical oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively studied. Four points were chosen in separate quadrants of the oral cavity. Calculated dose distributions were generated by using AcQPlan and Eclipse treatment planning systems. MOSFET dosimeters were used to measure dose at each sampled point. Each patient underwent buccal sampling for future RNA analysis before and after the first radiation treatment at the four selected points. Clinical and functional mucositis were assessed weekly according to National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, Version 3. Results: Maximum and average doses for sampled sites ranged from 7.4-62.3 and 3.0-54.3 Gy, respectively. A cumulative point dose of 39.1 Gy resulted in mucositis for 3 weeks or longer. Mild severity (Grade {<=} 1) and short duration ({<=}1 week) of mucositis were found at cumulative point doses less than 32 Gy. Polymerase chain reaction consistently was able to detect basal levels of two known radiation responsive genes. Conclusions: In our sample, cumulative doses to the oral cavity of less than 32 Gy were associated with minimal acute mucositis. A dose greater than 39 Gy was associated with longer duration of mucositis. Our technique for sampling buccal mucosa yielded sufficient cells for RNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction.

  17. Quality of Life of Oral Cancer Patients After Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi Shibuya, Hitoshi; Miura, Masahiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ayukawa, Fumio; Hayashi, Keiji; Toda, Kazuma

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the quality of life (QOL) of oral cancer patients treated with low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (LDR-BT) alone. Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and July 2006, a total of 56 patients with oral cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. QOL was assessed by means of the core questionnaire and head and neck questionnaire module of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 [QLQ-C30] and QLQ Head and Neck 35 [H and N35]). The questionnaires were distributed to the patients before the start of treatment and 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the start of LDR-BT. Results: It was possible to analyze the results for 20 of the initial 56 patients because they did not experience metastasis or recurrence during this study. No functions or symptoms asked about in the QLQ-C30 deteriorated during the first year. The emotional function score steadily and significantly increased. No symptoms in the QLQ-H and N35 significantly deteriorated. The scores for pain, trouble with social eating, and weight loss on the QLQ-H and N35 steadily and significantly decreased. Age, gender, and LDR-BT source had no effect on the change in QOL during the first year, but T-stage significantly affected the change in global health status, tumor site affected the changes in swallowing, sensory problems, sticky saliva, and complications affected the changes in pain, swallowing, and mouth opening. Conclusions: QOL of oral cancer patients treated with LDR-BT is high. However, tumor stage, tumor site, and complications affected the changes in a few functions and symptoms during the first year.

  18. The serum concentrations of lupine alkaloids in orally-dosed Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Lee, Stephen T; Welch, Kevin D; Gardner, Dale R; Stegelmeier, Bryan L; Davis, T Zane

    2015-06-01

    Teratogenic alkaloid-containing Lupinus spp. cause congenital defects known as crooked calf disease that is periodically economically devastating for the cattle industry. Previous research indicates that cattle breeds may eliminate plant toxins differently, potentially altering their susceptibility. The objective of this study was to describe the toxicokinetics in Holsteins of anagyrine, the teratogenic lupine alkaloid that produces crooked calf disease. Other alkaloids including lupanine, an unidentified alkaloid and 5,6-dehydrolupanine were also evaluated. Dried ground Lupinus leucophyllus was orally dosed to four Holstein steers and blood samples were collected for 96?h, analyzed for serum alkaloid concentrations and toxicokinetic parameters calculated. The serum elimination of anagyrine in Holstein steers was faster than those reported for beef breeds. This suggests that Holsteins may be less susceptible to lupine-induced crooked calf disease. Additional work is needed to confirm these findings and to verify if there is a breed difference in disease incidence or severity. PMID:25912242

  19. Chemoprophylaxis of coccidiosis in lambs with a single oral dose of toltrazuril.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, B; Helle, O

    1991-03-01

    The prophylactic efficacy of a single oral dose of toltrazuril against coccidiosis (mixed Eimeria infections) in naturally infected lambs was evaluated in two experiments. Toltrazuril at 20 mg kg-1, given on Day 7 or Day 10 after turnout on pasture, proved to be highly efficacious in preventing clinical coccidiosis under Norwegian conditions. Toltrazuril reduced the oocyst output to very low levels, prevented the development of diarrhoea and improved weight gain during the first 4-5 weeks after treatment. Treatment on Day 7 was superior to treatment on Day 10 with respect to improving weight gain and preventing the development of soft faeces. Lambs treated with toltrazuril on Day 7 seemed to be as immune as untreated lambs to natural reinfections with coccidia later in the grazing season. In one of the experiments, natural infections with the nematode Nematodirus battus produced a coccidiosis-like disease in some lambs simultaneously with the outbreak of coccidiosis. PMID:1858295

  20. Porcine focal symmetrical poliomyelomalacia: experimental reproduction with oral doses of encapsulated sodium selenite.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, T M; Hammerstedt, R H; Palmer, I S; deLahunta, A

    1988-01-01

    Sodium selenite (encapsulated as doses of 1.4 mg, 2.6 mg and 4.2 mg per kilogram of body weight) was given orally on a daily basis to male weaner pigs, and features of these animals were compared to a control group. Porcine focal symmetrical poliomyelomalacia was produced in all experimental groups between 3 and 20 days after initiation of the treatment. Analysis of blood and several tissues revealed an elevated selenium content for all pigs. Histological lesions in the brain and the cervical lumbar/sacral spinal cord enlargements included endothelial proliferation, neuronal degeneration, microcavitation and glial cell reaction. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3349404

  1. Mineral and nitrogen balance study - Results of metabolic observations on Skylab II 28-day orbital mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whedon, G. D.; Lutwak, L.; Reid, J.; Rambaut, P.; Whittle, M.; Smith, M.; Leach, C.

    1975-01-01

    The prediction that various stresses of flight, particularly weightlessness, would bring about significant derangements in the metabolism of the musculoskeletal system has been based on various balance-study observations of long-term immobilized or inactive bed rest. The three astronauts of Skylab II consumed a planned dietary intake of major metabolic elements in mixed foods and beverages and provided virtually complete collections of excreta for 31 days preflight, 28 days inflight, and 17 days postflight. Analyses showed that, in varying degree among the crewmen, urinary calcium increased gradually during flight in a pattern similar to that observed in bed-rest studies. Fecal calcium excretion did not change significantly, but calcium balance, owing to the urinary calcium rise, became either negative or less positive than in preflight measurement. Increased excretion and negative nitrogen and phosphorus balances inflight indicated appreciable loss of muscle tissue in all three crewmen. Significant losses also occurred inflight in potassium, sodium, and magnesium. Based on the similarity in pattern and degree between these observations of calcium, phosphorus, and nitrogen loss, musculoskeletal integrity would not be threatened in space flights of up to at least 3 months. However, if similar changes occur in the planed Skylab flights for considerably more than 28 days, concern for capable musculoskeletal function should be serious for flights of very many months' duration.

  2. Single Oral Dose Toxicity Test of Blue Honeysuckle Concentrate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-In; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Song, Chang-Hyun; Park, Soo-Jin; Shin, Yong-Kook; Han, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Young Joon; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain single oral dose toxicity information for concentrated and lyophilized powder of blue honeysuckle (Lonicera caerulea L., Caprifoliaceae; BHcL) in female and male ICR mice to aid in the process of developing natural origin medicinal ingredients or foods following proximate analysis and phytochemical profile measurement. The proximate analysis revealed that BHcL had an energy value of 3.80 kcal/g and contained 0.93 g/g of carbohydrate, 0.41 g/g of sugar, 0.02 g/g of protein, and 0.20 mg/g of sodium. BHcL did not contain lipids, including saturated lipids, trans fats, or cholesterols. Further, BHcL contained 4.54% of betaine, 210.63 mg/g of total phenols, 159.30 mg/g of total flavonoids, and 133.57 mg/g of total anthocyanins. Following administration of a single oral BHcL treatment, there were no treatment-related mortalities, changes in body weight (bw) or organ weight, clinical signs, necropsy or histopathological findings up to 2,000 mg/kg bw, the limited dosage for rodents of both sexes. We concluded that BHcL is a practically non-toxic material in toxicity potency. PMID:25874034

  3. Lack of effect of tenoxicam on dynamic responses to concurrent oral doses of glucose and glibenclamide.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, D; Korn, A; Komjati, M; Heinz, G; Haefelfinger, P; Defoin, R; Waldhäusl, W K

    1990-01-01

    1. In a single-blind, placebo controlled study the influence of tenoxicam on responses of glucose, insulin and C-peptide to oral doses of glucose and glibenclamide was examined in 16 healthy male volunteers. 2. The subjects received once daily doses of 2.5 mg glibenclamide for 12 days. From day 5 through 12 eight subjects received concomitantly 20 mg tenoxicam once daily and the remaining eight subjects received placebo. 3. On days 1, 4, 5 and 12 glibenclamide was taken with 75 g glucose and blood glucose, serum insulin and C-peptide were measured over 5 h. Plasma levels of glibenclamide and tenoxicam (where appropriate) were followed over 10 h. 4. Characteristic parameters of blood glucose and insulin and C-peptide responses did not change significantly with time (day) and there was no difference between both treatment groups. 5. Baseline insulin increased from 11.7 mu l-1 on day 1 to 15.6 mu l-1 on day 4 (P = 0.009), likewise baseline C-peptide increased from 478 pmol l-1 to 530 pmol l-1 (P = 0.05), but there was no further change in the subsequent treatment period. 6. The AUC of the glibenclamide plasma concentration-time curve did not show changes with time or differences between treatment groups. The mean (s.d.) oral clearance of tenoxicam was 2.5 (1.5) ml min-1 and appeared slightly higher than in previous studies. 7. It was concluded that tenoxicam did not affect overall glycoregulation in healthy subjects under glibenclamide steady state conditions. PMID:2119677

  4. Oral exposure to low-dose of nonylphenol impairs memory performance in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Shinichiro; Kuwahara, Rika; Kohara, Yumi; Uchida, Yutaro; Oku, Yushi; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2015-02-01

    Nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPE) is a non-ionic surfactant, that is degraded to short-chain NPE and 4-nonylphenol (NP) by bacteria in the environment. NP, one of the most common environmental endocrine disruptors, exhibits weak estrogen-like activity. In this study, we investigated whether oral administration of NP (at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg doses) affects spatial learning and memory, general activity, emotionality, and fear-motivated learning and memory in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. SD rats of both sexes were evaluated using a battery of behavioral tests, including an appetite-motivated maze test (MAZE test) that was used to assess spatial learning and memory. In the MAZE test, the time required to reach the reward in male rats treated with 0.5 mg/kg NP group and female rats administered 5 mg/kg NP was significantly longer than that for control animals of the corresponding sex. In other behavioral tests, no significant differences were observed between the control group and either of the NP-treated groups of male rats. In female rats, inner and ambulation values for animals administered 0.5 mg/kg NP were significantly higher than those measured in control animals in open-field test, while the latency in the group treated with 5 mg/kg NP was significantly shorter compared to the control group in step-through passive avoidance test. This study indicates that oral administration of a low-dose of NP slightly impairs spatial learning and memory performance in male and female rats, and alters emotionality and fear-motivated learning and memory in female rats only. PMID:25560395

  5. A chronic oral reference dose for hexavalent chromium-induced intestinal cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Chad M; Kirman, Christopher R; Proctor, Deborah M; Haws, Laurie C; Suh, Mina; Hays, Sean M; Hixon, J Gregory; Harris, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    High concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water induce villous cytotoxicity and compensatory crypt hyperplasia in the small intestines of mice (but not rats). Lifetime exposure to such cytotoxic concentrations increases intestinal neoplasms in mice, suggesting that the mode of action for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal tumors involves chronic wounding and compensatory cell proliferation of the intestine. Therefore, we developed a chronic oral reference dose (RfD) designed to be protective of intestinal damage and thus intestinal cancer. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for chromium in mice was used to estimate the amount of Cr(VI) entering each intestinal tissue section (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) from the lumen per day (normalized to intestinal tissue weight). These internal dose metrics, together with corresponding incidences for diffuse hyperplasia, were used to derive points of departure using benchmark dose modeling and constrained nonlinear regression. Both modeling techniques resulted in similar points of departure, which were subsequently converted to human equivalent doses using a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. Applying appropriate uncertainty factors, an RfD of 0.006?mg?kg–1?day–1 was derived for diffuse hyperplasia—an effect that precedes tumor formation. This RfD is protective of both noncancer and cancer effects in the small intestine and corresponds to a safe drinking water equivalent level of 210 µg l–1. This concentration is higher than the current federal maximum contaminant level for total Cr (100 µg l–1) and well above levels of Cr(VI) in US drinking water supplies (typically???5 µg l–1). © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23943231

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Ro 44–3888 after single ascending oral doses of sibrafiban, an oral platelet aggregation inhibitor, in healthy male volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Wittke, Bärbel; Mackie, Ian J; Machin, Samuel J; Timm, Uwe; Zell, Manfred; Goggin, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    Aims This study constituted the first administration of the oral platelet inhibitor, sibrafiban, to humans. The aim was to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Ro 44–3888, the active principle of sibrafiban, after single ascending oral doses of sibrafiban. Particular emphasis was placed on intersubject variability of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of Ro 44–3888. Methods The study consisted of three parts. Part I was an open ascending-dose study to determine target effect ranges of sibrafiban. Part II, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study, addressed the intersubject variability of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of the active principle at a sibrafiban dose achieving an intermediate effect. Part III was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending-dose design covering the complete plasma concentration vs pharmacodynamic response curve of sibrafiban. Results At sibrafiban doses between 5 mg and 12 mg, the pharmacokinetics of free Ro 44–3888 in plasma were linear whereas those of total Ro 44–3888 were non-linear because of the saturable binding to the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa receptor. Saturation of the GP IIb–IIIa receptor was reached at plasma concentrations of 15.9 ng ml?1. At sibrafiban doses up to 2 mg, ADP-induced platelet aggregation was inhibited by 50%, whereas the inhibition of TRAP-induced platelet aggregation was about 20–30%. At the higher doses, ADP-induced platelet aggregation was almost completely inhibited while a clear dose-response could be observed with TRAP-induced inhibition of platelet aggregation at sibrafiban doses of 5 to 12 mg. Ivy bleeding time increased very steeply with dose with a significant prolongation observed at doses of 5 to 7 mg of sibrafiban (5–7 min, >30 min in one case). At a sibrafiban dose of 12 mg, the stopping criterion for dose escalation (prolongation of the Ivy bleeding time >30 min in three out of four subjects per dose group) was reached. The interindividual coefficients of variation of the integrated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters (AUC and AUE) were below 20%, thus lying well within the pre-set level of acceptance. Conclusions With a low intersubject variability of its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, linear pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic effects closely related to its plasma concentrations, Ro 44–3888 has good pharmacological prerequisites for a well controllable therapy of secondary prevention of arterial thrombosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome. PMID:10336576

  7. 29 CFR 553.230 - Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days-section 7(k).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days...employees engaged in fire protection activities who have a work period of at least...nearest whole hour): Work period (days) Maximum hours standards Fire protection Law...

  8. 29 CFR 553.230 - Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days-section 7(k).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days...employees engaged in fire protection activities who have a work period of at least...nearest whole hour): Work period (days) Maximum hours standards Fire protection Law...

  9. 29 CFR 553.230 - Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days-section 7(k).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days...employees engaged in fire protection activities who have a work period of at least...nearest whole hour): Work period (days) Maximum hours standards Fire protection Law...

  10. 29 CFR 553.230 - Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days-section 7(k).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days...employees engaged in fire protection activities who have a work period of at least...nearest whole hour): Work period (days) Maximum hours standards Fire protection Law...

  11. 29 CFR 553.230 - Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days-section 7(k).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Maximum hours standards for work periods of 7 to 28 days...employees engaged in fire protection activities who have a work period of at least...nearest whole hour): Work period (days) Maximum hours standards Fire protection Law...

  12. Novel and distinct metabolites identified following a single oral dose of alpha- or gamma-hexabromocyclododecane in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The metabolism of alpha- and gamma-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was investigated in adult C57BL/6 female mice. Alpha- or gamma-[14C]HBCD (3 mg/kg bw) was orally administered with subsequent urine and feces collection for 4 consecutive days; a separate group of mice were dosed and sacrificed 3 hour...

  13. Novel and Distinct Metabolites Identified Following a Single Oral Dose of Alpha- or Gamma-Hexabromocyclododecane in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metabolism of alpha- and gamma-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was investigated in adult C57BL/6 female mice. Alpha- or gamma-[14C]HBCD (3 mg/kg bw) was orally administered with subsequent urine and feces collection for 4 consecutive days; a separate group of mice were dosed a...

  14. Subchronic Oral Dose Toxicity of Freeze-dried Powder of Allomyrina dichotoma Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jung-Ho; Yun, Eun-Young; Park, Heejin; Jung, Kyung-Jin; Hwang, Jae Sam; Jeong, Eun Ju; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the toxicological information of freeze-dried powder from Allomyrina dichotoma (A. dichotoma) larvae as a food ingredient. The powder, suspended in distilled water, was administered once daily by oral gavage to four groups of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at dose levels of 0 (vehicle control), 250, 850, and 2500 mg/kg/day. After 13 wks of repeated administration, the standard toxicological parameters such as mortality, clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, ophthalmologic examination, clinical pathology, organ weights and macro/microscopic examination were applied for assessment of general toxicity. In addition, serum IgE and histamine levels were determined to evaluate allergenicity. The freeze-dried powder from A. dichotoma larvae did not produce treatmentrelated changes or findings in any toxicological parameters in either sex of any dosed groups except for slight increases in serum histamine levels at 2500 mg/kg/day. The changes were considered not to be adverse since the magnitude was minimal. In conclusion, the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) of the freeze-dried powder from A. dichotoma larvae was determined to be 2500 mg/kg/day or more in both sexes of SD rats and it is considered a candidate to be edible material. PMID:25874035

  15. Biological monitoring for exposure to methamidophos: a human oral dosing study.

    PubMed

    Garner, F; Jones, K

    2014-12-01

    An oral dose of the organophosphate insecticide methamidophos was administered to six volunteers at the acceptable daily intake (ADI, 0.004 mg/kg). Urine was collected from the volunteers at timed intervals for 24 h post-exposure. Methamidophos itself was quantified in urine using liquid/liquid extraction and LC-MS-MS analysis (detection limit 7 nmol/L/1 ?g/L). Methamidophos exhibited a rapid elimination half-life of 1.1h, (range 0.4-1.5 h). Mean metabolite levels found in 24h total urine collections (normalised for a 70 kg volunteer) were 9.2 nmol/L (range 1.0-19.1). One volunteer was anomalous; excluding this result the range was 6.7-19.1 nmol/L, with a mean of 10.9 nmol/L. Individual urine samples collected during the first 24 h ranged from below the detection limit (ND) to 237 nmol/L. The mean dose recovery excreted as methamidophos in urine was 1.1% (range 0.04-1.71%). Three environmental studies have been reported in the literature with levels ranging from ND to 66 nmol/L. The number of positive results in all three studies was low (<1.5% of total samples analyzed). When compared with our results (ND - 237 nmol/L), the studies suggest general population exposures are within the ADI. However, the very short half-life makes determining intermittent environmental exposures difficult. PMID:25310994

  16. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of voriconazole in body fluids of dogs after repeated oral dosing.

    PubMed

    Lemetayer, J D; Dowling, P M; Taylor, S M; Papich, M G

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole and its concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), aqueous humor, and synovial fluid in five healthy dogs following once daily oral dose of 6 mg/kg for 2 weeks. Body fluid and plasma drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mild to moderate gastrointestinal adverse effects were seen. The mean AUC0-24 : minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratio was 15.23 for a chosen MIC of 1 ?g/mL, which is lower than the recommended target of 20-25 and also lower than previously reported in dogs, perhaps reflecting induction of metabolizing enzymes by multiple dosing. Voriconazole concentrations in the CSF, aqueous humor, and synovial fluid were only 13-30% the concurrent plasma concentration, which is lower than previously reported in other species. Results of this study suggest that twice daily, administration may be necessary to maintain therapeutic plasma concentrations in dogs but further studies are warranted. PMID:25691353

  17. Consuming a multi-ingredient thermogenic supplement for 28 days is apparently safe in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Roxanne M.; Joy, Jordan M.; Falcone, Paul H.; Mosman, Matt M.; Kim, Michael P.; Moon, Jordan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thermogenic (TRM) supplements are often used by people seeking to decrease body weight. Many TRM supplements are formulated with multiple ingredients purported to increase energy expenditure and maximize fat loss. However, in the past some TRM ingredients have been deemed unsafe and removed from the market. Therefore, it is important to verify the safety of multi-ingredient TRM supplements with chronic consumption. Objective To assess the safety of daily consumption of a multi-ingredient TRM supplement over a 28-day period in healthy adults. Design Twenty-three recreationally active adults (11M, 12F; 27.1±5.4 years, 171.6±9.6 cm, 76.8±16.1 kg, 26±5 BMI) were randomly assigned either to consume a multi-ingredient TRM supplement (SUP; n=9) or remain unsupplemented (CRL; n=14) for 28 days. Participants maintained their habitual dietary and exercise routines for the duration of the study. Fasting blood samples, resting blood pressure, and heart rate were taken before and after the supplementation period. Samples were analyzed for complete blood counts, comprehensive metabolic, and lipid panels. Results Significant (p<0.05) group by time interactions were present for diastolic BP, creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), chloride, CO2, globulin, albumin:globulin (A/G), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Dependent t-tests conducted on significant variables revealed significant (p<0.05) within-group differences in SUP for diastolic BP (+6.2±5.3 mmHG), creatinine (+0.09±0.05 mg/dL), eGFR (?11.2±5.8 mL/min/1.73), globulin (?0.29±0.24 g/dL), A/G (+0.27±0.23), and HDL (?5.0±5.5 mg/dL), and in CRL for CO2 (?1.9±1.5 mmol/L) between time points. Each variable remained within the accepted physiological range. Conclusion Results of the present study support the clinical safety of a multi-ingredient TRM containing caffeine, green tea extract, and cayenne powder. Although there were statistically significant (p<0.05) intragroup differences in SUP from pre- to postsupplementation for diastolic BP, creatinine, eGFR, globulin, A/G, and HDL, all remained within accepted physiological ranges and were not clinically significant. In sum, it appears as though daily supplementation with a multi-ingredient TRM is safe for consumption by healthy adults for a 28-day period. PMID:26205229

  18. Effect of a single oral dose of rabeprazole on nocturnal acid breakthrough and nocturnal alkaline amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jin-Yan; Niu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Xue-Qin; Zhu, You-Ling; Gong, Jun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of rabeprazole (RAB) on nocturnal acid breakthrough (NAB) and nocturnal alkaline amplitude (NAKA) and to compare it with omeprazole (OME) and pantoprazole (PAN). METHODS: By an open comparative study, forty patients with active peptic ulcer were randomly assigned to receive one of the three PPIs (proton pump inhibitor) with a single oral dose. They were divided into RAB group (10 mg), OME group (20 mg) and PAN group (40 mg). Twenty healthy volunteers were enrolled to the control group (without taking any drug). Intragastric pH monitoring was then performed 1 h before and 24 h after the dose was given. RESULTS: No clinically undesirable signs and symptoms possibly attributed to the administration of RAB or OME and PAN were recognizable throughout the study period. All subjects completed the study according to the protocol. All data were processed by a computer using the Student t test or t’ test followed by an analysis of covariance. P < 0.05 was considered to have statistical significance. The intragastric pH of NAB was significantly higher in RAB group (1.84 ± 0.55) than in either OME group (1.15 ± 0.31) or PAN group (1.10 ± 0.30) (both P < 0.01). RAB produced a longer sustaining time (4.65 ± 1.22 h) on NAKA than OME (3.22 ± 1.89 h) (P < 0.05), PAN (3.15 ± 1.92 h) (P < 0.05), and the sustaining time of NAKA in RAB group was longer than that in the healthy control group (P < 0.01) too. In addition, RAB produced a much higher pH on NAKA (6.41 ± 0.45) in comparison with PAN (6.01 ± 0.92) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: A single oral dose of 10 mg RAB may increase the pH of NAB and shorten the sustaining time of NAB, and it may increase the pH of NAKA as well as prolong the sustaining time of NAKA. PMID:14606102

  19. Safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of multiple oral doses of apixaban, a factor Xa inhibitor, in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Charles; Nepal, Sunil; Wang, Jessie; Schuster, Alan; Byon, Wonkyung; Boyd, Rebecca A; Yu, Zhigang; Shenker, Andrew; Barrett, Yu Chen; Mosqueda-Garcia, Rogelio; LaCreta, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Aim Apixaban is an oral factor Xa inhibitor approved for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and thromboprophylaxis in patients who have undergone elective hip or knee replacement surgery and under development for treatment of venous thromboembolism. This study examined the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of multiple dose apixaban. Method This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group, multiple dose escalation study was conducted in six sequential dose panels – apixaban 2.5, 5, 10 and 25 mg twice daily and 10 and 25 mg once daily– with eight healthy subjects per panel. Within each panel, subjects were randomized (3:1) to oral apixaban or placebo for 7 days. Subjects underwent safety assessments and were monitored for adverse events (AEs). Blood samples were taken to measure apixaban plasma concentration, international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and modified prothrombin time (mPT). Results Forty-eight subjects were randomized and treated (apixaban, n = 36; placebo, n = 12); one subject receiving 2.5 mg twice daily discontinued due to AEs (headache and nausea). No dose limiting AEs were observed. Apixaban maximum plasma concentration was achieved ?3 h post-dose. Exposure increased approximately in proportion to dose. Apixaban steady-state concentrations were reached by day 3, with an accumulation index of 1.3–1.9. Peak : trough ratios were lower for twice daily vs. once daily regimens. Clotting times showed dose-related increases tracking the plasma concentration–time profile. Conclusion Multiple oral doses of apixaban were safe and well tolerated over a 10-fold dose range, with pharmacokinetics with low variability and concentration-related increases in clotting time measures. PMID:23451769

  20. High- and Low-Dose Oral Delayed-Release Mesalamine in Children With Mild-to-Moderately Active Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Harland S.; Krzeski, Piotr; Heyman, Melvin B.; Ibarguen-Secchia, Eduardo; Iwanczak, Barbara; Kaczmarski, Maciej; Kierkus, Jaroslaw; Kola?ek, Sanja; Osuntokun, Bankole; Quiros, J. Antonio; Shah, Manoj; Yacyshyn, Bruce; Dunnmon, Preston M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the safety and efficacy of high- and low-dose oral, delayed-release mesalamine in a randomized, double-blind, active control study of children with mild-to-moderately active ulcerative colitis. Methods: Patients ages 5 to 17 years, with a Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index (PUCAI) score of ?10 to ?55 and a truncated Mayo Score of ?1 for both rectal bleeding and stool frequency, were enrolled. They received body weight–dependent doses of oral, delayed-release mesalamine for 6 weeks in a low- (27–71 mg · g?1 · day?1) or high-dose group (53–118 mg · g?1 · day?1). The primary endpoint was treatment success, defined as the proportion of patients who achieved remission (PUCAI score <10) or partial response (PUCAI score ?10 with a decrease from baseline by ?20 points). Secondary endpoints included truncated Mayo Score and global assessment of change of disease activity. Results: The modified intent-to-treat population included 81 of 83 patients enrolled. Treatment success by PUCAI was achieved by 23 of 41 (56%) and 22 of 40 (55%) patients in the mesalamine low- and high-dose groups, respectively (P?=?0.924). Truncated Mayo Score (low-dose 30 [73%] and high-dose 28 [70%] patients) and other efficacy results did not differ between the groups. The type and severity of adverse events were consistent with those reported in previous studies of adults with ulcerative colitis and did not differ between groups. Conclusions: Both low- and high-dose oral, delayed-release mesalamine doses were equally effective as short-term treatment of mild-to-moderately active ulcerative colitis in children, without a specific benefit or risk to using either dose. PMID:25419597

  1. Development of an oral solid dispersion formulation for use in low-dose metronomic chemotherapy of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Moes, Johannes; Koolen, Stijn; Huitema, Alwin; Schellens, Jan; Beijnen, Jos; Nuijen, Bastiaan

    2013-01-01

    For the clinical development of low-dose metronomic (LDM) chemotherapy of paclitaxel, oral administration is vital. However, the development of an oral formulation is difficult due to paclitaxel's low oral bioavailability, caused by its low permeability and low solubility. We increased the oral bioavailability of paclitaxel by combining a pharmacokinetic booster, ritonavir, with a new oral solid dispersion formulation of paclitaxel. The combined use of Hansen solubility parameters and dissolution experiments resulted in the development of a solid dispersion formulation containing 1/11 w/w paclitaxel, 9/11 w/w polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K30, and 1/11 w/w sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). Analysis of the solid dispersion formulation by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC) confirmed the amorphous nature of paclitaxel and the fine dispersion of paclitaxel in the matrix of PVP-K30 and SLS. Furthermore, in vitro tests showed a major increase in the apparent solubility and dissolution rate of paclitaxel. To test the clinical significance of these findings, the solid dispersion formulation of paclitaxel (ModraPac001 10mg capsule) was compared to the paclitaxel premix solution in four patients with advanced cancer. Although the mean systemic exposure to paclitaxel after oral administration of the solid dispersion formulation was slightly lower compared to the paclitaxel premix solution (190±63.1ng/mLh for vs. 247±100ng/mLh), the systemic exposure to paclitaxel is clinically relevant [1,2]. In addition to this, the favorable pharmaceutical characteristics, for example, neutral taste, dosing accuracy, and the 2-year ambient shelf life, make the ModraPac001 10mg capsule an attractive candidate for oral paclitaxel chemotherapy. Currently, the ModraPac001 formulation is applied in the first clinical trial with oral LDM chemotherapy of paclitaxel. PMID:23085332

  2. Phase I evaluation of XL019, an oral, potent, and selective JAK2 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Verstovsek, Srdan; Tam, Constantine S.; Wadleigh, Martha; Sokol, Lubomir; Smith, Catherine C.; Bui, Lynne A.; Song, Chunyan; Clary, Douglas O.; Olszynski, Patrycja; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Shah, Neil P.

    2015-01-01

    This phase I study evaluated selective JAK2 inhibitor XL019 in 30 patients with myelofibrosis. The initial dose cohorts were 100, 200, and 300 mg orally on days 1–21 of a 28-day cycle. Central and/or peripheral neurotoxicity developed in all patients. Subsequently, patients were treated on lower doses; neurotoxicity was again observed, leading to study termination. Peripheral neuropathy resolved in 50%, and central neurotoxicity in all patients within months after therapy cessation. Myelosuppression was minimal. The terminal half-life of XL019 was approximately 21 h, with steady state reached by Day 8. International Working Group defined responses were seen in three (10%) patients. PMID:24374145

  3. Incremental effects of 28 days of beta-alanine supplementation on high-intensity cycling performance and blood lactate in masters female cyclists.

    PubMed

    Glenn, J M; Gray, M; Stewart, R; Moyen, N E; Kavouras, S A; DiBrezzo, R; Turner, R; Baum, J

    2015-12-01

    Within the aging population, there exists a subset of individuals termed masters athletes (MA). As masters-level competition increases in popularity, MA must find methods to enhance individual athletic performance. Longitudinal beta-alanine (BA) supplementation is suggested to enhance physical capability during exercise; however, these effects have not been evaluated in MA. To examine the longitudinal effects of BA on time to exhaustion (TTE), total work completed (TWC), and lactate clearance in female MA cyclists. Twenty-two female MA (age = 53.3 ± 1.0) participated in this double-blind design. Subjects were randomly assigned to BA (n = 11; 800 mg BA + 8 g dextrose) or placebo (PLA; n = 11; 8 g dextrose) groups and supplemented 4 doses/day over 28 days. Every 7 days, subjects completed a cycling TTE at 120 % VO2max, and TWC was calculated. Blood lactate was measured at baseline, immediate post, and 20-min post each TTE. No significant differences existed between groups for any variable at baseline (p > 0.05). After 28 days supplementation, BA had greater TTE (23 vs 1 % change) and TWC (21 vs 2 % change) than PLA (p < 0.05). Following the 20-min TTE recovery, lactate was 24 % lower in BA compared to PLA (4.35 vs. 5.76 mmol/L, respectively). No differences existed for variables during intermittent weeks. 28 days of BA supplementation increased cycling performance via an enhanced time to exhaustion and total work completed with associated lactate clearance during passive rest in female MA. PMID:26255281

  4. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of 5,7-dimethoxyflavone in mice following single dose oral administration.

    PubMed

    Bei, Di; An, Guohua

    2016-02-01

    5,7-Dimethoxyflavone (5,7-DMF) is a major active constituent of many herbal plants, such as Kaempferia paviflora, Piper caninum, and Leptospermum scoparium. 5,7-DMF has demonstrated many beneficial pharmacological effects in vitro, including anti-infammatory, anti-oxidant, cardioprotection effects, as well as chemopreventive and chemosensitizing properties. In contrast to the extensive in vitro investigations, the information of the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of 5,7-DMF in vivo is very limited. In this study we investigated the PK and tissue distribution of 5,7-DMF in mice following single oral dose of 10mg/kg 5,7-DMF. Mouse plasma, heart, lung, liver, kidney, intestine, brain, spleen, muscle and fat tissues were collected and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Maximal 5,7-DMF concentrations in plasma and tissues were reached within 30min. The peak plasma concentration (Cmax) was 1870±1190ng/mL, and area under the curve (AUCt) was 532±165hng/mL and terminal half-life was 3.40±2.80h. The volume of distribution was 90.1±62.0L/kg. Clearance was 20.2±7.5L/h/kg. Except for muscle and adipose, other tissues had higher Cmax than plasma, ranging from 1.75- to 9.96-fold. After oral administration, 5,7-DMF was most abundant in gut, followed by liver, kidney, brain, spleen, heart, lung, adipose and muscle. The partition coefficient (Kp) of these tissues were 0.65 to 12.9. In conclusion, we reported for the first time the PK and tissue distribution of 5,7-DMF in mice. These results will be critical in evaluating if those beneficial in vitro effects can be translated in vivo. PMID:26657177

  5. Immunization with Single Oral Dose of Alginate-Encapsulated BCG Elicits Effective and Long-Lasting Mucosal Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, M; Dobakhti, F; Pakzad, S R; Ajdary, S

    2015-12-01

    Effective vaccination against pathogens, which enter the body through mucosal surfaces, requires the induction of both mucosal and systemic immune responses. Here, mucosal as well as systemic immune responses in the lung and spleen of BALB/c mice which were orally vaccinated with a single dose of alginate-encapsulated bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) were evaluated. Twenty weeks after immunization, the vaccinated mice were challenged intranasally with BCG. Twelve weeks after immunization and 5 weeks after challenge, the immune responses were evaluated. Moreover, immune responses were compared with those of mice that were vaccinated with free BCG by subcutaneous (sc) and oral routes. Twelve weeks after the immunization, serum IgG level was higher in the sc-immunized mice, while serum IgA level was higher in the orally immunized mice with encapsulated BCG. Significant productions of both IgG and IgA were only detected in lungs of mice orally immunized with encapsulated BCG. Proliferative and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and IFN-? production were significantly higher in mice immunized orally with encapsulated BCG, compared to mice immunized orally with free BCG. After challenge, the levels of IFN-? were comparable between sc-immunized mice with free BCG and orally immunized with encapsulated BCG; however, significantly less IL-4 was detected in mice which had received encapsulated BCG via oral route. Moreover, significant control of the bacilli growth in the lung of the immunized mice after intranasal challenge with BCG was documented in mice vaccinated with encapsulated BCG. These results suggest that oral immunization with alginate-encapsulated BCG is an effective mean of inducing mucosal and systemic specific immune responses. PMID:26286252

  6. Toxicity evaluation of zinc aluminium levodopa nanocomposite via oral route in repeated dose study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kura, Aminu Umar; Cheah, Pike-See; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Hassan, Zurina; Tengku Azmi, Tengku Ibrahim; Hussein, Nor Fuzina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology, through nanomedicine, allowed drugs to be manipulated into nanoscale sizes for delivery to the different parts of the body, at the same time, retaining the valuable pharmacological properties of the drugs. However, efficient drug delivery and excellent release potential of these delivery systems may be hindered by possible untoward side effects. In this study, the sub-acute toxicity of oral zinc aluminium nanocomposite with and without levodopa was assessed using the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines. No sign or symptom of toxicity was observed in orally treated rats with the nanocomposite at 5 and 500 mg/kg concentrations. Body weight gain, feeding, water intake, general survival and organosomatic index were not significantly different between control and treatment groups. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in 500 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (169 ± 30 U/L), 5 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (172 ± 49 U/L), and 500 mg/kg layered double hydroxides (LDH) nanocomposite (175 ± 25 U/L) were notably elevated compared to controls (143 ± 05 U/L); but the difference were not significant ( p > 0.05). However, the differences in aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio of 500 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (0.32 ± 0.12) and 500 mg/kg LDH nanocomposite (0.34 ± 0.12) were statistically significant ( p < 0.05) compared to the control (0.51 ± 0.07). Histology of the liver, spleen and brain was found to be of similar morphology in both control and experimental groups. The kidneys of 500-mg/kg-treated rats with levodopa nanocomposite and LDH nanocomposite were found to have slight inflammatory changes, notably leukocyte infiltration around the glomeruli. The ultra-structure of the neurons from the substantia nigra of nanocomposite-exposed group was similar to those receiving only normal saline. The observed result has suggested possible liver and renal toxicity in orally administered levodopa intercalated nanocomposite; it is also dose-dependent that needs further assessment.

  7. Toxicity evaluation of zinc aluminium levodopa nanocomposite via oral route in repeated dose study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, through nanomedicine, allowed drugs to be manipulated into nanoscale sizes for delivery to the different parts of the body, at the same time, retaining the valuable pharmacological properties of the drugs. However, efficient drug delivery and excellent release potential of these delivery systems may be hindered by possible untoward side effects. In this study, the sub-acute toxicity of oral zinc aluminium nanocomposite with and without levodopa was assessed using the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines. No sign or symptom of toxicity was observed in orally treated rats with the nanocomposite at 5 and 500 mg/kg concentrations. Body weight gain, feeding, water intake, general survival and organosomatic index were not significantly different between control and treatment groups. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in 500 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (169?±?30 U/L), 5 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (172?±?49 U/L), and 500 mg/kg layered double hydroxides (LDH) nanocomposite (175?±?25 U/L) were notably elevated compared to controls (143?±?05 U/L); but the difference were not significant (p?>?0.05). However, the differences in aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio of 500 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (0.32?±?0.12) and 500 mg/kg LDH nanocomposite (0.34?±?0.12) were statistically significant (p?orally administered levodopa intercalated nanocomposite; it is also dose-dependent that needs further assessment. PMID:24948886

  8. Polaprezinc prevents oral mucositis in patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Ryo; Suzuki, Akio; Ishihara, Masashi; Nakamura, Nobuhiko; Kitagawa, Junichi; Kanemura, Nobuhiro; Kasahara, Senji; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki; Hara, Takeshi; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    We have previously reported that polaprezinc in sodium alginate suspension (P-AG) inhibited the incidence of oral mucositis induced by radiochemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. The present study was designed to investigate whether P-AG prevents oral mucositis in all patients (36 patients) with hematological malignancy receiving high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). P-AG dramatically reduced the incidence of moderate-to-severe oral mucositis as compared to the control group treated with azulene gargle (20% versus 82% for grade ? 2, p<0.01; 0% versus 45% for grade ? 3, p<0.01). Pain associated with oral mucositis was also significantly (p=0.004) relieved by P-AG, resulting in a reduction in the use of analgesic agents (28% versus 73%, p=0.025). The incidence of xerostomia and taste disturbance tended to be lowered but not significantly by P-AG. On the other hand, P-AG had no influence on the incidence of other adverse events, tumor remission rate or the survival rate. Therefore, P-AG was found to be highly effective in preventing oral mucositis induced not only by radiochemotherapy for head and neck cancer but also by high-dose chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by HSCT. PMID:25503160

  9. FV-162 is a novel, orally bioavailable, irreversible proteasome inhibitor with improved pharmacokinetics displaying preclinical efficacy with continuous daily dosing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Dove, P; Wang, X; Shamas-Din, A; Li, Z; Nachman, A; Oh, Y J; Hurren, R; Ruschak, A; Climie, S; Press, B; Griffin, C; Undzys, E; Aman, A; Al-awar, R; Kay, L E; O'Neill, D; Trudel, S; Slassi, M; Schimmer, A D

    2015-01-01

    Approved proteasome inhibitors have advanced the treatment of multiple myeloma but are associated with serious toxicities, poor pharmacokinetics, and most with the inconvenience of intravenous administration. We therefore sought to identify novel orally bioavailable proteasome inhibitors with a continuous daily dosing schedule and improved therapeutic window using a unique drug discovery platform. We employed a fluorine-based medicinal chemistry technology to synthesize 14 novel analogs of epoxyketone-based proteasome inhibitors and screened them for their stability, ability to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like proteasome, and antimyeloma activity in vitro. The tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic activity, and antimyeloma efficacy of our lead candidate were examined in NOD/SCID mice. We identified a tripeptide epoxyketone, FV-162, as a metabolically stable, potent proteasome inhibitor cytotoxic to human myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells. FV-162 had limited toxicity and was well tolerated on a continuous daily dosing schedule. Compared with the benchmark oral irreversible proteasome inhibitor, ONX-0192, FV-162 had a lower peak plasma concentration and longer half-life, resulting in a larger area under the curve (AUC). Oral FV-162 treatment induced rapid, irreversible inhibition of chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in murine red blood cells and inhibited tumor growth in a myeloma xenograft model. Our data suggest that oral FV-162 with continuous daily dosing schedule displays a favorable safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic profile in vivo, identifying it as a promising lead for clinical evaluation in myeloma therapy. PMID:26158521

  10. Ingesting a preworkout supplement containing caffeine, creatine, ?-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days is both safe and efficacious in recreationally active men.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Kristina L; Moon, Jordan R; Fairman, Ciaran M; Spradley, Brandon D; Tai, Chih-Yin; Falcone, Paul H; Carson, Laura R; Mosman, Matt M; Joy, Jordan M; Kim, Michael P; Serrano, Eric R; Esposito, Enrico N

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of consuming a preworkout supplement (SUP) containing caffeine, creatine, ?-alanine, amino acids, and B vitamins for 28 days. We hypothesized that little to no changes in kidney and liver clinical blood markers or resting heart rate and blood pressure (BP) would be observed. In addition, we hypothesized that body composition and performance would improve in recreationally active males after 28 days of supplementation. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, participants were randomly assigned to ingest one scoop of either the SUP or placebo every day for 28 days, either 20 minutes before exercise or ad libitum on nonexercise days. Resting heart rate and BP, body composition, and fasting blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. Aerobic capacity as well as muscular strength and endurance were also measured. Significant (P < .05) main effects for time were observed for resting heart rate (presupplementation, 67.59 ± 7.90 beats per minute; postsupplementation, 66.18 ± 7.63 beats per minute), systolic BP (presupplementation, 122.41 ± 11.25 mm Hg; postsupplementation, 118.35 ± 11.58 mm Hg), blood urea nitrogen (presupplementation, 13.12 ± 2.55 mg/dL; postsupplementation, 15.24 ± 4.47 mg/dL), aspartate aminotransferase (presupplementation, 34.29 ± 16.48 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.76 ± 4.71 IU/L), and alanine aminotransferase (presupplementation, 32.76 ± 19.72 IU/L; postsupplementation, 24.88 ± 9.68 IU/L). Significant main effects for time were observed for body fat percentage (presupplementation, 15.55% ± 5.79%; postsupplementation, 14.21% ± 5.38%; P = .004) and fat-free mass (presupplementation, 70.80 ± 9.21 kg; postsupplementation, 71.98 ± 9.27 kg; P = .006). A significant decrease in maximal oxygen consumption (presupplementation, 47.28 ± 2.69 mL/kg per minute; postsupplementation, 45.60 ± 2.81 mL/kg per minute) and a significant increase in percentage of oxygen consumption per unit time at which ventilatory threshold occurred (presupplementation, 64.38% ± 6.63%; postsupplementation, 70.63% ± 6.39%) and leg press one-repetition maximum (presupplementation, 218.75 ± 38.43 kg; postsupplementation, 228.75 ± 44.79 kg) were observed in the SUP only. No adverse effects were noted for renal and hepatic clinical blood markers, resting heart rate, or BP. Supplements containing similar ingredients and doses should be safe for ingestion periods lasting up to 28 days in healthy, recreationally trained, college-aged men. PMID:24916558

  11. A novel method for delineation of oral mucosa for radiotherapy dose-response studies

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jamie A; Welsh, Liam C; Gulliford, Sarah L; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Summary There is currently no standard method for delineating the oral mucosa and most attempts are oversimplified. A new method to obtain anatomically accurate contours of the oral mucosa surfaces was developed and applied to 11 patients. This is expected to represent an opportunity for improved toxicity modelling of oral mucositis. PMID:25779721

  12. Toxicological evaluation of isopropylparaben and isobutylparaben mixture in Sprague-Dawley rats following 28 days of dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ji; Kwack, Seung Jun; Lim, Seong Kwang; Kim, Yeon Joo; Roh, Tae Hyun; Choi, Seul Min; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Byung Mu

    2015-11-01

    The alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (Parabens) have been of concern due to their probable endocrine disrupting property especially in baby consumer products. The safety of parabens for use as a preservative in cosmetics has come into controversy, and thus consumer demand for paraben-free products is ever increasing. Thus, more comprehensive studies are needed to conclusively determine the safety of the multiple prolonged exposure to parabens with cosmetic ingredients. This study was conducted to investigate the potential repeated 28 days dermal toxicity (50, 100, 300, or 600 mg/kg bw/day) of isopropylparaben (IPP), isobutylparaben (IBP), or the mixture of IPP and IBP in rats. There were no significant changes in body and organ weights in any group. However, histopathological examinations showed that weak or moderate skin damages were observed in female rats by macroscopic and microscopic evaluations. In female rats, no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) of IPP with no skin lesion and IBP for skin hyperkeratosis, were estimated to be 600 mg/kg bw/day, and 50 mg/kg bw/day, respectively. With regard skin hyperkeratosis, the lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) of the mixture of IPP and IBP was estimated to be 50 mg/kg bw/day. Analysis of six serum hormones (estrogen, testosterone, insulin, T3, TSH, or FSH) in animals showed that only FSH was dose-dependently decreased in the mixture groups of 100 mg/kg bw/day or higher. These data suggest that the mixture of IPP and IBP showed a synergistic dermal toxicity in rats and should be considered for future use in consumer products. PMID:26359141

  13. A 13-week repeated-dose oral toxicity and bioaccumulation of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Sim, Jaehoon; Kim, Younghun; Han, Beom Seok; Yoon, Cheolho; Lee, Somin; Cho, Myung-Haing; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Because of an increase in the commercial applications of manufactured nanoparticles, the issue of potential adverse health effects of nanoparticles following intended or unintended exposure is rapidly gaining attention. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (AlNPs, rod-type, 1.5, 3, and 6 mg/kg) after oral administration to mice for 13 weeks. Compared with the control group, the consumption of diet and drinking water and body weight gain decreased in the group treated with AlNPs. The group treated with 6 mg/kg AlNPs also showed a marked elevation in the count of white blood cells that associated with a significant decrease and increase to the proportion of eosinophils and lymphocytes, respectively. In addition, the secretion of IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased in a dose-dependent manner in the treated groups. Furthermore, AlNPs showed the highest accumulation in the liver and kidneys compared with the control group, increased the lactate dehydrogenase level in the blood, and induced the development of a pathological lesion in the liver and kidneys. Taken together, we suggest that the target organs of rod-type AlNPs may be the liver, kidneys and the immune system, and the not-observed adverse effect level may be lower than 6 mg/kg. PMID:24798085

  14. Novel and Distinct Metabolites Identified Following a Single Oral Dose of ?- or ?-Hexabromocyclododecane in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, David T.; Huwe, Janice; Diliberto, Janet; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolism of ?- and ?-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was investigated in adult C57BL/6 female mice. ?- or ?-[14C]HBCD (3 mg/kg bw) was orally administered with subsequent urine and feces collection for 4 consecutive days; a separate group of mice were dosed and sacrificed 3 hours post-exposure to investigate tissue metabolite levels. Extractable and non-extractable HBCD metabolites were quantitated in liver, blood, fat, brain, bile, urine and feces and characterized by LC/MS (ESI-). Metabolites identified were distinct between the two stereoisomers. In mice exposed to ?-HBCD, four hydroxylated metabolites were detected in fecal extracts, and one of these metabolite isomers was consistently characterized in liver, brain, and adipose tissue extracts. In contrast, mice exposed to ?-HBCD contained multiple isomers of monohydroxy-pentabromocyclododecene, dihydroxy-pentabromocyclododecene, and dihydroxy-pentabromocyclododecadiene in the feces while only a single monohydroxy-pentabromocyclododecane metabolite was measured in liver and adipose tissue. Both stereoisomers were transformed to metabolites which formed covalent bonds to proteins and/or lipids in the gut as evidenced by high fecal non-extractables. Although the potential toxicity of these free and bound metabolites remains to be determined, the presence of distinct metabolic products from the two main HBCD stereoisomers should allow biomarkers to be selected that may aid in characterizing sources of HBCD exposure. PMID:23171393

  15. A comparative study of two low-dose combined oral contraceptives: results from a multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Dunson, T R; McLaurin, V L; Israngkura, B; Leelapattana, B; Mukherjee, R; Perez-Palacios, G; Saleh, A A

    1993-08-01

    A comparative multicenter clinical trial of two low-dose combined oral contraceptives (OCs) was conducted in Malaysia, Egypt, Thailand, and Mexico. Efficacy, safety and acceptability were investigated in women taking either a norgestrel-based (NG) OC or a norethindrone acetate-based (NA) OC. This paper includes analysis of 892 women, all of whom were at least 42 days but within 26 weeks postpartum and randomly allocated to one of the above OCs. Follow-up visits were scheduled at 1, 4, 8 and 12 months after admission. Baseline sociodemographic characteristics were similar for both groups, as well as compliance. There were nine unintended pregnancies reported; eight of these occurring in the NA group. Adverse experiences were minor with headaches and dizziness being the most common complaints; frequency of reports was similar in both groups. The group taking the NG-based OC had significantly (p < .05) fewer menstrual-related complaints. Discontinuations due to menstrual problems were significantly more common among NA users (primarily amenorrhea). Discontinuations in the NG group were primarily for other personal reasons, e.g. unable to return to the clinic. There was also a significant difference between the two groups for the 11-month gross cumulative life table discontinuation rates due to menstrual problems (p < .01); the NA group had the higher rate. PMID:8403908

  16. Evaluation of 2-week repeated oral dose toxicity of 100 nm zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Je-Won; Hong, Eun-Taek; Lee, In-Chul; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Park, Jong-Il; Seong, Nak-Won; Hong, Jeong-Sup; Yun, Hyo-In

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify subacute oral dose toxicity of positively charged 100 nm zinc oxide (ZnOAE100[+]) nanoparticles (NPs) in Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnOAE100[+] NPs were administered to rats of each sex by gavage at 0, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg/day for 14 days. During the study period, clinical signs, mortality, body weight, food consumption, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross pathology, organ weight, and histopathology were examined. Increased mortality and clinical signs, decreased body weight, feed consumption, hemoglobin (HB), hematocrit (HCT), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), platelet (PT), and lymphocyte (LYM) and increased white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophils (NEUs), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and histopathological alterations in the spleen, stomach, and pancreas were observed at 2,000 mg/kg/day. Increased clinical signs, decreased body weight, feed consumption, HB, HCT, MCV, MCH, MCHC, and LYM and increased WBCs, NEUs, ALP, and histopathological alterations in the spleen, stomach, and pancreas were seen at 1,000 mg/kg/day. Increased clinical signs, decreased MCV and MCH and increased histopathological alterations in the stomach and pancreas were found at 500 mg/kg/day. These results suggest that the target organs were the spleen, stomach, and pancreas in rats. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was <500 mg/kg for both sexes. PMID:26472967

  17. Quantitative oral dosing of water soluble and lipophilic contaminants in the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv; Reed, Stacey M.; Pratt, Amanda V.; Skillman, Ann D.

    2007-02-01

    Quantitative oral dosing in fish can be challenging, particularly with water soluble contaminants, which can leach into the aquarium water prior to ingestion. We applied a method of bioencapsulation using newly hatched brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) nauplii to study the toxicokinetics of five chlorinated and brominated halogenated acetic acids (HAAs), which are drinking water disinfection by-products. These results are compared to those obtained in a previous study using a polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE-47), a highly lipophilic chemical. The HAAs and PBDE-47 were bioencapsulated using freshly hatched A. franciscana nauplii after incubation in concentrated solutions of the study chemicals for 18 h. Aliquots of the brine shrimp were quantitatively removed for chemical analysis and fed to individual fish that were able to consume 400–500 nauplii in less than 5min. At select times after feeding, fish were euthanized and the HAA or PBDE-47 content determined. The absorption of HAAs was quantitatively similar to previous studies in rodents: rapid absorptionwith peak body levels occurringwithin 1–2 h, then rapidly declining with elimination half-life of 0.3–3 h depending on HAA. PBDE-47 was more slowly absorbed with peak levels occurring by 18 h and very slowly eliminated with an elimination half-life of 281 h.

  18. Evaluation of 2-week repeated oral dose toxicity of 100 nm zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats.

    PubMed

    Ko, Je-Won; Hong, Eun-Taek; Lee, In-Chul; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Park, Jong-Il; Seong, Nak-Won; Hong, Jeong-Sup; Yun, Hyo-In; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to verify subacute oral dose toxicity of positively charged 100 nm zinc oxide (ZnO(AE100[+])) nanoparticles (NPs) in Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnO(AE100[+]) NPs were administered to rats of each sex by gavage at 0, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg/day for 14 days. During the study period, clinical signs, mortality, body weight, food consumption, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross pathology, organ weight, and histopathology were examined. Increased mortality and clinical signs, decreased body weight, feed consumption, hemoglobin (HB), hematocrit (HCT), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), platelet (PT), and lymphocyte (LYM) and increased white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophils (NEUs), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and histopathological alterations in the spleen, stomach, and pancreas were observed at 2,000 mg/kg/day. Increased clinical signs, decreased body weight, feed consumption, HB, HCT, MCV, MCH, MCHC, and LYM and increased WBCs, NEUs, ALP, and histopathological alterations in the spleen, stomach, and pancreas were seen at 1,000 mg/kg/day. Increased clinical signs, decreased MCV and MCH and increased histopathological alterations in the stomach and pancreas were found at 500 mg/kg/day. These results suggest that the target organs were the spleen, stomach, and pancreas in rats. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was <500 mg/kg for both sexes. PMID:26472967

  19. Stimulation of colonic motility by oral PEG electrolyte bowel preparation assessed by MRI: comparison of split vs single dose

    PubMed Central

    Marciani, L; Garsed, K C; Hoad, C L; Fields, A; Fordham, I; Pritchard, S E; Placidi, E; Murray, K; Chaddock, G; Costigan, C; Lam, C; Jalanka-Tuovinen, J; De Vos, W M; Gowland, P A; Spiller, R C

    2014-01-01

    Background Most methods of assessing colonic motility are poorly acceptable to patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can monitor gastrointestinal motility and fluid distributions. We predicted that a dose of oral polyethylene glycol (PEG) and electrolyte solution would increase ileo-colonic inflow and stimulate colonic motility. We aimed to investigate the colonic response to distension by oral PEG electrolyte in healthy volunteers (HVs) and to evaluate the effect of single 2 L vs split (2 × 1 L) dosing. Methods Twelve HVs received a split dose (1 L the evening before and 1 L on the study day) and another 12 HVs a single dose (2 L on the main study day) of PEG electrolyte. They underwent MRI scans, completed symptom questionnaires, and provided stool samples. Outcomes included small bowel water content, ascending colon motility index, and regional colonic volumes. Key Results Small bowel water content increased fourfold from baseline after ingesting both split (p = 0.0010) and single dose (p = 0.0005). The total colonic volume increase from baseline was smaller for the split dose at 35 ± 8% than for the single dose at 102 ± 27%, p = 0.0332. The ascending colon motility index after treatment was twofold higher for the single dose group (p = 0.0103). Conclusions & Inferences Ingestion of 1 and 2 L PEG electrolyte solution caused a rapid increase in the small bowel and colonic volumes and a robust rise in colonic motility. The increase in both volumes and motility was dose dependent. Such a challenge, being well-tolerated, could be a useful way of assessing colonic motility in future studies. PMID:25060551

  20. Oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) for the treatment of breakthrough pain in cancer patients: a controlled dose titration study.

    PubMed

    Portenoy, R K; Payne, R; Coluzzi, P; Raschko, J W; Lyss, A; Busch, M A; Frigerio, V; Ingham, J; Loseth, D B; Nordbrock, E; Rhiner, M

    1999-02-01

    Oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) is a novel opioid formulation in which the potent synthetic mu-agonist fentanyl is embedded in a sweetened matrix that is dissolved in the mouth. It is undergoing investigation as a treatment for cancer-related breakthrough pain, a prevalent phenomenon defined as a transitory flare of moderate to severe pain that interrupts otherwise controlled persistent pain. There have been no controlled trials of other treatments for this condition. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ascending doses of OTFC, a novel controlled dose titration methodology was developed that applied blinding and randomization procedures to the evaluation of recurrent pains in the home environment. The study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind dose titration study in ambulatory cancer patients. The sample comprised adult patients receiving a scheduled oral opioid regimen equivalent to 60-1000 mg oral morphine per day, who were experiencing at least one episode per day of breakthrough pain and had achieved at least partial relief of this pain by use of an oral opioid rescue dose. After collection of 2 days of baseline data concerning the efficacy of the usual rescue drug, patients were randomly treated with either 200 or 400 microg OTFC unit doses in double-blind fashion. Up to two breakthrough pains each day could be treated with up to four OTFC unit doses per pain. OTFC in unit doses containing 200, 400, 600, 800, 1200 or 1600 microg of fentanyl citrate were available for the study. The unit dose was titrated upward in steps until the patient had 2 consecutive days on which breakthrough pain could be treated with the single unit dose, titration was ineffective at a 1600 microg unit dose, or 20 days elapsed. To maintain the double-blind, orders to titrate up were ignored one-third of the time according to a pre-defined randomization schedule accessible only to an unblinded study pharmacist. Main outcome measures included, numeric or categorical measures of pain intensity, pain relief, and global assessment of drug performance. Dose response relationships were found suggesting that the methodology was sensitive to opioid effects. Seventy-four percent of patients were successfully titrated. There was no relationship between the total daily dose of the fixed schedule opioid regimen and the dose of OTFC required to manage the breakthrough pain. Although the study was not designed to provide a definitive comparison between OTFC and the usual rescue drug, exploratory analyses found that OTFC provided significantly greater analgesic effect at 15, 30 and 60 min, and a more rapid onset of effect, than the usual rescue drug. Adverse effects of the OTFC were typically opioid-related, specifically somnolence, nausea and dizziness. Very few adverse events were severe or serious. This study demonstrated the feasibility of controlled trial methodology in studies of breakthrough pain. OTFC appears to be a safe and effective therapy for breakthrough pain, and dose titration can usually identify a unit dose capable of providing adequate analgesia. If the lack of a relationship between the effective OTFC dose and fixed schedule opioid regimen is confirmed, dose titration may be needed in the clinical use of this formulation. Further investigation of OTFC as a specific treatment for breakthrough pain is warranted. PMID:10068176

  1. Application of physiologically-based toxicokinetic modelling in oral-to-dermal extrapolation of threshold doses of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, M; Worth, A; Urani, C; Briesen, H; Schramm, K-W

    2014-06-16

    The application of physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) modelling in route-to-route (RtR) extrapolation of three cosmetic ingredients: coumarin, hydroquinone and caffeine is shown in this study. In particular, the oral no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) doses of these chemicals are extrapolated to their corresponding dermal values by comparing the internal concentrations resulting from oral and dermal exposure scenarios. The PBTK model structure has been constructed to give a good simulation performance of biochemical processes within the human body. The model parameters are calibrated based on oral and dermal experimental data for the Caucasian population available in the literature. Particular attention is given to modelling the absorption stage (skin and gastrointestinal tract) in the form of several sub-compartments. This gives better model prediction results when compared to those of a PBTK model with a simpler structure of the absorption barrier. In addition, the role of quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs) in predicting skin penetration is evaluated for the three substances with a view to incorporating QSPR-predicted penetration parameters in the PBTK model when experimental values are lacking. Finally, PBTK modelling is used, first to extrapolate oral NOAEL doses derived from rat studies to humans, and then to simulate internal systemic/liver concentrations - Area Under Curve (AUC) and peak concentration - resulting from specified dermal and oral exposure conditions. Based on these simulations, AUC-based dermal thresholds for the three case study compounds are derived and compared with the experimentally obtained oral threshold (NOAEL) values. PMID:24731971

  2. ANALYTICAL RESULTS OF MOX COLEMANITE CONCRETE SAMPLE POURED JULY 25, 2012 - CURED 28 DAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A. D.; Best, D. R.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-18

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) will use Colemanite bearing concrete neutron absorber panels credited with attenuating neutron flux in the criticality design analyses and shielding operators from radiation. The Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with measuring the total density, partial hydrogen density, and partial boron density of the colemanite concrete. Samples 8.1.2, 8.2.2, 8.3.2, and 8.4.2 were received on 8/1/2012 and analyzed after curing for 28 days. The average total density measured by the ASTM method C 642 was 2.09 g/cm{sup 3}, within the lower bound of 1.88 g/cm{sup 3}. The average partial hydrogen density was 7.48E-02 g/cm{sup 3} as measured using method ASTM E 1311 and met the lower bound of 6.04E-02 g/cm{sup 3}. The average measured partial boron density was 1.71E-01 g/cm{sup 3} which met the lower bound of 1.65E-01 g/cm{sup 3} measured by the ASTM C 1301 method.

  3. 5-Day repeated inhalation and 28-day post-exposure study of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Han, Sung Gu; Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Boo Wook; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Lee, Jong Seong; Lee, Ji Hyun; Baek, Jin Ee; Kim, Tae Gyu; Kim, Keun Soo; Lee, Heon Sang; Song, Nam Woong; Ahn, Kangho; Yu, Il Je

    2015-11-01

    Graphene has recently been attracting increasing attention due to its unique electronic and chemical properties and many potential applications in such fields as semiconductors, energy storage, flexible electronics, biosensors and medical imaging. However, the toxicity of graphene in the case of human exposure has not yet been clarified. Thus, a 5-day repeated inhalation toxicity study of graphene was conducted using a nose-only inhalation system for male Sprague-Dawley rats. A total of three groups (20 rats per group) were compared: (1) control (ambient air), (2) low concentration (0.68?±?0.14?mg/m(3) graphene) and (3) high concentration (3.86?±?0.94?mg/m(3) graphene). The rats were exposed to graphene for 6?h/day for 5 days, followed by recovery for 1, 3, 7 or 28 days. The bioaccumulation and macrophage ingestion of the graphene were evaluated in the rat lungs. The exposure to graphene did not change the body weights or organ weights of the rats after the 5-day exposure and during the recovery period. No statistically significant difference was observed in the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, protein and albumin between the exposed and control groups. However, graphene ingestion by alveolar macrophages was observed in the exposed groups. Therefore, these results suggest that the 5-day repeated exposure to graphene only had a minimal toxic effect at the concentrations and time points used in this study. PMID:25697182

  4. Dose-related distribution of codeine, cocaine, and metabolites into human hair following controlled oral codeine and subcutaneous cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Scheidweiler, Karl B; Cone, Edward J; Moolchan, Eric T; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2005-05-01

    Hair testing for the determination of drug exposure has many useful applications. Drug incorporated into hair can be found for extended periods following drug exposure. There are few controlled drug administration studies investigating drug distribution into human hair. Ten volunteers participated in a 10-week controlled cocaine and codeine administration study while residing in the secure research ward. Weekly hair samples were collected by electric razor. During the low-dose week (week 4), volunteers received 75 mg/70 kg cocaine subcutaneously and 60 mg/70 kg codeine orally on alternating days, a total of three doses for each drug. Similarly, during week 7, volunteers received three doses 150 mg/70 kg cocaine and 120 mg/70 kg codeine. Maximum hair concentrations (C(max)) were found 1 to 3 weeks after low and high doses. Dose-related C(max) values of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, norcocaine, cocaethylene, and codeine were found following low and high doses. Hair analysis was performed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. A positive linear relationship was found between total melanin content of hair and C(max) of codeine, cocaine, and metabolites following high dosing. This study demonstrated dose-related concentrations of cocaine and metabolites in human hair following controlled cocaine administration. These data are the first demonstrating melanin-related incorporation of cocaine and metabolites into human hair following controlled cocaine administration. PMID:15743923

  5. Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose-response relationship of an environmental mixture of pyrethroids following an acute oral administration in the rat M.F. Hughes1, D.G. Ross1, J.M. Starr1, E.J. Scollon1,2, M.J. Wolansky1,3, K.M. Crofton1, M.J. DeVito1,4 1U.S. EPA, ORD, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2U.S. EPA,...

  6. Apixaban, an oral, direct factor Xa inhibitor: single dose safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and food effect in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Charles; Wang, Jessie; Nepal, Sunil; Schuster, Alan; Barrett, Yu Chen; Mosqueda-Garcia, Rogelio; Reeves, Richard A; LaCreta, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Aims To evaluate apixaban single dose safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and assess the effect of food on apixaban pharmacokinetics. Methods A double-blind, placebo-controlled, single ascending-dose, first-in-human study assessed apixaban safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in healthy subjects randomized to oral apixaban (n = 43; 0.5–2.5 mg as solution or 5–50 mg as tablets) or placebo (n = 14) under fasted conditions. An open label, randomized, two treatment crossover study investigated apixaban pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in healthy subjects (n = 21) administered apixaban 10 mg in fasted and fed states. Both studies measured apixaban plasma concentration, international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) or a modified PT (mPT). Results In the single ascending-dose study increases in apixaban exposure appeared dose-proportional. Median tmax occurred 1.5–3.3 h following oral administration. Mean terminal half-life ranged between 3.6 and 6.8 h following administration of solution doses ?2.5 mg and between 11.1 and 26.8 h for tablet doses ?5 mg. Concentration-related changes in pharmacodynamic assessments were observed. After a 50 mg dose, peak aPTT, INR and mPT increased by 1.2-, 1.6- and 2.9-fold, respectively, from baseline. In the food effect study: 90% confidence intervals of geometric mean ratios of apixaban Cmax and AUC in a fed vs. fasted state were within the predefined no effect (80–125%) range. Apixaban half-life was approximately 11.5 h. The effect of apixaban on INR, PT and aPTT was comparable following fed and fasted administration. Conclusions Single doses of apixaban were well tolerated with a predictable pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile and a half-life of approximately 12 h. Apixaban can be administered with or without food. PMID:22759198

  7. A New Orally Active, Aminothiol Radioprotector-Free of Nausea and Hypotension Side Effects at Its Highest Radioprotective Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Soref, Cheryl M.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Fahl, William E.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: A new aminothiol, PrC-210, was tested for orally conferred radioprotection (rats, mice; 9.0 Gy whole-body, which was otherwise lethal to 100% of the animals) and presence of the debilitating side effects (nausea/vomiting, hypotension/fainting) that restrict use of the current aminothiol, amifostine (Ethyol, WR-2721). Methods and Materials: PrC-210 in water was administered to rats and mice at times before irradiation, and percent-survival was recorded for 60 days. Subcutaneous (SC) amifostine (positive control) or SC PrC-210 was administered to ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) and retching/emesis responses were recorded. Intraperitoneal amifostine (positive control) or PrC-210 was administered to arterial cannulated rats to score drug-induced hypotension. Results: Oral PrC-210 conferred 100% survival in rat and mouse models against an otherwise 100% lethal whole-body radiation dose (9.0 Gy). Oral PrC-210, administered by gavage 30-90 min before irradiation, conferred a broad window of radioprotection. The comparison of PrC-210 and amifostine side effects was striking because there was no retching or emesis in 10 ferrets treated with PrC-210 and no induced hypotension in arterial cannulated rats treated with PrC-210. The tested PrC-210 doses were the ferret and rat equivalent doses of the 0.5 maximum tolerated dose (MTD) PrC-210 dose in mice. The human equivalent of this mouse 0.5 MTD PrC-210 dose would likely be the highest PrC-210 dose used in humans. By comparison, the mouse 0.5 MTD amifostine dose, 400 {mu}g/g body weight (equivalent to the human amifostine dose of 910 mg/m{sup 2}), when tested at equivalent ferret and rat doses in the above models produced 100% retching/vomiting in ferrets and 100% incidence of significant, progressive hypotension in rats. Conclusions: The PrC-210 aminothiol, with no detectable nausea/vomiting or hypotension side effects in these preclinical models, is a logical candidate for human drug development to use in healthy humans in a wide variety of radioprotection settings, including medical radiation, space travel, and nuclear accidents.

  8. The protective effects of oral low-dose quercetin on diabetic nephropathy in hypercholesterolemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Isabele B. S.; Porto, Marcella L.; Santos, Maria C. L. F. S.; Campagnaro, Bianca P.; Gava, Agata L.; Meyrelles, Silvana S.; Pereira, Thiago M. C.; Vasquez, Elisardo C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most important causes of chronic renal disease, and the incidence of DN is increasing worldwide. Considering our previous report (Gomes et al., 2014) indicating that chronic treatment with oral low-dose quercetin (10 mg/Kg) demonstrated anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic and renoprotective effects in the C57BL/6J model of DN, we investigated whether this flavonoid could also have beneficial effects in concurrent DN and spontaneous atherosclerosis using the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse (apoE?/?). Methods: Streptozotocin was used to induce diabetes (100 mg/kg/day, 3 days) in male apoE?/? mice (8 week-old). After 6 weeks, the mice were randomly separated into DQ: diabetic apoE?/? mice treated with quercetin (10 mg/kg/day, 4 weeks, n = 8), DV: diabetic ApoE?/? mice treated with vehicle (n = 8) and ND: non-treated non-diabetic mice (n = 8). Results: Quercetin treatment diminished polyuria (~30%; p < 0.05), glycemia (~25%, p < 0.05), normalized the hypertriglyceridemia. Moreover, this bioflavonoid diminished creatininemia (~30%, p < 0.01) and reduced proteinuria but not to normal levels. We also observed protective effects on the renal structural changes, including normalization of the index of glomerulosclerosis and kidney weight/body weight. Conclusions: Our data revealed that quercetin treatment significantly reduced DN in hypercholesterolemic mice by inducing biochemical changes (decrease in glucose and triglycerides serum levels) and reduction of glomerulosclerosis. Thus, this study highlights the relevance of quercetin as an alternative therapeutic option for DN, including in diabetes associated with dyslipidemia. PMID:26388784

  9. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of different ?-cyclodextrin-based nanosponge formulations.

    PubMed

    Shende, Pravin; Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Gaud, R S; Deshmukh, Kiran; Cavalli, Roberta; Trotta, Francesco; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    Nanosponges (NS) show promising results in different fields such as medicine, agriculture, water purification, fire engineering and so on. The present study was designed to evaluate toxicity of different NS formulations (namely, S1-S6) synthesized with different cross-linking agents such as carbonyl diimidazole, pyromellitic dianhydride and hexamethylene diisocynate; and preparation methods in experimental animals. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of formulations were carried out as per OECD guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. For acute toxicity study, formulations were administered to female rats at doses of 300 and 2000 mg/kg orally. The general behaviour of the rats was continuously monitored for 1 h after dosing, periodically during the first 24 h and daily thereafter for a total of 14 days. On day 14, animals were fasted overnight, weighed, and sacrificed. After sacrification, animals were subjected to necropsy. For repeated dose toxicity study, rats of either sex were orally administered with formulations at the dose of 300 mg/kg per day for a period of 28 days. The maximally tolerated dose of all formulations was found to be 2000 mg/kg. Repeated administration of formulations for 28 days did not show any significant changes in haematological and biochemical parameters in experimental animals. These results indicate that the formulations are safe, when tested in experimental animals. PMID:25754724

  10. No protection by oral terbutaline against exercise-induced asthma in children: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, G; Hertz, B; Holm, E B

    1993-04-01

    We wanted to assess the protective effects on exercise-induced asthma as well as the clinical efficacy and safety of increasing doses of a new sustained-release formulation of terbutaline sulphate, in 17 asthmatic children aged 6-12 yrs (mean 9 yrs). Placebo, 2, 4 and 6 mg terbutaline were given b.i.d. for 14 days, in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. At the end of each two week period, an exercise test was performed and plasma terbutaline was measured. Compared with placebo, no significant effect was seen on asthma symptoms monitored at home, or on exercise-induced asthma. The percentage falls in FEV1 after the exercise test were 36, 35, 27 and 28%, after placebo, 4, 8 and 12 mg terbutaline.day-1, respectively. There was no correlation between plasma terbutaline and dose of terbutaline. A small but statistically significant dose-related increase in morning and evening peak expiratory flow (PEF) recordings occurred, but the incidence of side-effects also increased with the dose given. There was a trend towards more side-effects when the high doses were used, and two patients withdrew from the study because of side-effects at this dose. It is concluded that continuous treatment, even with high doses of oral terbutaline, does not offer clinically useful protection against exercise-induced asthma. PMID:8491302

  11. The Impact of a One-Dose versus Two-Dose Oral Cholera Vaccine Regimen in Outbreak Settings: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Andrew S.; Luquero, Francisco J.; Ciglenecki, Iza; Grais, Rebecca F.; Sack, David A.; Lessler, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2013, a stockpile of oral cholera vaccine (OCV) was created for use in outbreak response, but vaccine availability remains severely limited. Innovative strategies are needed to maximize the health impact and minimize the logistical barriers to using available vaccine. Here we ask under what conditions the use of one dose rather than the internationally licensed two-dose protocol may do both. Methods and Findings Using mathematical models we determined the minimum relative single-dose efficacy (MRSE) at which single-dose reactive campaigns are expected to be as or more effective than two-dose campaigns with the same amount of vaccine. Average one- and two-dose OCV effectiveness was estimated from published literature and compared to the MRSE. Results were applied to recent outbreaks in Haiti, Zimbabwe, and Guinea using stochastic simulations to illustrate the potential impact of one- and two-dose campaigns. At the start of an epidemic, a single dose must be 35%–56% as efficacious as two doses to avert the same number of cases with a fixed amount of vaccine (i.e., MRSE between 35% and 56%). This threshold decreases as vaccination is delayed. Short-term OCV effectiveness is estimated to be 77% (95% CI 57%–88%) for two doses and 44% (95% CI ?27% to 76%) for one dose. This results in a one-dose relative efficacy estimate of 57% (interquartile range 13%–88%), which is above conservative MRSE estimates. Using our best estimates of one- and two-dose efficacy, we projected that a single-dose reactive campaign could have prevented 70,584 (95% prediction interval [PI] 55,943–86,205) cases in Zimbabwe, 78,317 (95% PI 57,435–100,150) in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and 2,826 (95% PI 2,490–3,170) cases in Conakry, Guinea: 1.1 to 1.2 times as many as a two-dose campaign. While extensive sensitivity analyses were performed, our projections of cases averted in past epidemics are based on severely limited single-dose efficacy data and may not fully capture uncertainty due to imperfect surveillance data and uncertainty about the transmission dynamics of cholera in each setting. Conclusions Reactive vaccination campaigns using a single dose of OCV may avert more cases and deaths than a standard two-dose campaign when vaccine supplies are limited, while at the same time reducing logistical complexity. These findings should motivate consideration of the trade-offs between one- and two-dose campaigns in resource-constrained settings, though further field efficacy data are needed and should be a priority in any one-dose campaign. PMID:26305226

  12. A comprehensive study of the association between drug hepatotoxicity and daily dose, liver metabolism, and lipophilicity using 975 oral medications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibo; Shi, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    It was recently suggested that daily dose, liver metabolism and lipophilicity were associated with an oral drug's potential to cause hepatotoxicity, but this has not been widely accepted. A likely reason is that published data lack comprehensiveness, as they were based on only about one third of all FDA approved single-active-ingredient oral prescription drugs. Here the 975 oral drugs used worldwide which have a Defined Daily Dose (DDD) designated in the World Health Organization's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system and whose hADRs potential and metabolism data are available in the Micromedex Drugdex® compendium were studied, with their lipophilicity calculated by the partition coefficient LogP. Of the 975 drugs examined, 49% (478) have the potential to induce at least one type of hepatic adverse drug reactions (hADRs) such as fatal hepatotoxicity, acute liver failure, significant ALT/AST elevation, hepatitis, and jaundice. By single factor analysis, a higher DDD (?100 mg) was found to be associated with all types of hADRs, and extensive liver metabolism (?50%) was associated with a subset of hADRs including fatal hADRs, hepatitis and jaundice, while LogP showed no relation to any types of hADRs. Contrary to previous reports, none of the combination, neither DDD and liver metabolism, nor DDD and LogP, was found to be more predictive of hADRs than using DDD or liver metabolism alone. These data provide convincing evidence that a higher daily dose and extensive liver metabolism, but not lipophilicity, are independent but not synergistic risk factors for oral drugs to induce hepatotoxicity. PMID:26220713

  13. The pharmacokinetics, CNS pharmacodynamics and adverse event profile of brivaracetam after multiple increasing oral doses in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Rolan, Paul; Sargentini-Maier, Maria Laura; Pigeolet, Etienne; Stockis, Armel

    2008-01-01

    AIMS Brivaracetam is a novel synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand that has shown potent activity in animal models of epilepsy. This study examined the pharmacokinetics, central nervous system pharmacodynamics and adverse event profile of multiple oral doses of brivaracetam in healthy male subjects. METHODS Three successive panels of 12 healthy male subjects received double-blind brivaracetam 200, 400 or 800 mg day?1 (all doses well above the expected therapeutic range) or placebo (9 : 3), in two divided doses, for 14 days. RESULTS Brivaracetam was rapidly absorbed (tmax?2 h) and eliminated (t1/2 7–8 h). Volume of distribution was slightly lower than total body water. A small fraction of the dose (5–8%) was excreted unchanged in urine together with significant levels of metabolites, suggesting predominantly metabolic clearance. Based on 6-?-hydroxycortisol/cortisol ratios in urine, there was no evidence of induction of CYP3A4 activity. Saliva and plasma brivaracetam levels were highly correlated. Adverse events were mostly mild to moderate, central nervous system-related and resolved within the first day of treatment. No clinically relevant changes were observed in laboratory tests, vital signs, physical examinations or ECGs. Pharmacodynamic tests showed dose-related sedation and decreased alertness that only persisted at 800 mg daily. CONCLUSIONS Brivaracetam was well tolerated by healthy male volunteers at doses of 200–800 mg daily for 2 weeks, well above the expected clinically effective dose range. Brivaracetam had a favourable pharmacokinetic profile in this population, characterized by rapid absorption, volume of distribution limited to total body water, apparent single-compartment elimination and dose proportionality. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT The pharmacokinetic profile, metabolism and proof of concept of a single oral dose of brivaracetam have been reported.Previous studies have shown that it was well absorbed, had linear kinetics and was well tolerated, and suggested effective doses of 10–80 mg in photoparoxysmal epilepsy. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS We now report the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and tolerability in healthy volunteers after multiple doses. PMID:18341673

  14. A mathematical model of the biologically effective dose of solar UVA received by patients undergoing oral psoralen photochemotherapy for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Diffey, B L

    1981-11-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the biologically effective dose of the solar long wave ultraviolet radiation (UVA) received by patients who are being treated for psoriasis by oral psoralen photochemotherapy. It is shown that patients treated during the summer months in the UK may well receive a UV dose which is comparable with, or even in excess of, the dose of artificial UVA received in the treatment centre and consequently should be advised about limiting their exposure to sunlight on the treatment days. In the winter months in the UK the UVA intensity in sunlight is such that no unduly restrictive precaution need apply. However, at locations between about 40 degrees N and 40 degrees S, the solar UVA intensity in midwinter is still sufficiently high that unnecessary sunlight exposure on treatment days should be avoided. PMID:7323150

  15. Hepatic and intestine alterations in mice after prolonged exposure to low oral doses of Microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Sedan, Daniela; Laguens, Martín; Copparoni, Guido; Aranda, Jorge Oswaldo; Giannuzzi, Leda; Marra, Carlos Alberto; Andrinolo, Darío

    2015-09-15

    Oral intake of Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is the principal route of exposure to this toxin, with prolonged exposure leading to liver damage of unspecific symptomatology. The aim of the present paper was therefore to investigate the liver and intestine damage generated by prolonged oral exposure to low MC-LR doses (50 and 100 ?g MC-LR/kg body weight, administrated every 48 h during a month) in a murine model. We found alterations in TBARS, SOD activity and glutathione content in liver and intestine of mice exposed to both doses of MC-LR. Furthermore, the presence of MC-LR was detected in both organs. We also found hepatic steatosis (3.6 ± 0.6% and 15.3 ± 1.6%) and a decrease in intraepithelial lymphocytes (28.7 ± 5.0% and 44.2 ± 8.7%) in intestine of 50- and 100-?g MC-LR/kg treated animals, respectively. This result could have important implications for mucosal immunity, since intraepithelial lymphocytes are the principal effectors of this system. Our results indicate that prolonged oral exposure at 50 ?g MC-LR/kg every 48 h generates significant damage not only in liver but also in intestine. This finding calls for a re-appraisal of the currently accepted NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level), 40 ?g MC-LR/kg body weight, used to derive the guideline value for MC-LR in drinking water. PMID:26210502

  16. The pharmacokinetics, CNS pharmacodynamics and adverse event profile of brivaracetam after single increasing oral doses in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Sargentini-Maier, Maria Laura; Rolan, Paul; Connell, John; Tytgat, Dominique; Jacobs, Tom; Pigeolet, Etienne; Riethuisen, Jean-Michel; Stockis, Armel

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Brivaracetam is a new chemical entity structurally related to levetiracetam, displaying a markedly higher affinity for the binding site believed to be primarily involved in the antiepileptic effect of levetiracetam. Studies to evaluate the pharmacological profile of brivaracetam demonstrate an approximately 10-fold higher potency than levetiracetam as well as a higher efficacy in models of epilepsy. If translated into therapeutic effects in humans, this would mean a greater decrease in seizure frequency and a higher number of responders and seizure-free patients in refractory epileptic patients as seen with levetiracetam. What this study adds This article reports the results of the first in human study with brivaracetam. Its pharmacokinetics and adverse events profile after single administration are evaluated, together with the effect of food on the former. Aims The objective of the study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (and how they are affected by food), CNS pharmacodynamics and the adverse event profile of brivaracetam after single increasing doses. Methods Healthy males (n = 27, divided into three alternating panels of nine subjects) received two different single oral doses of brivaracetam (10–1400 mg) and one dose of placebo during three periods of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The effect of food on its pharmacokinetics was assessed using a standard two-way crossover design in a further eight subjects who received two single oral doses of brivaracetam (150 mg) in the fasting state and after a high fat meal. Results Adverse events, none of which were serious, were mostly CNS-related and included somnolence, dizziness, and decreased attention, alertness, and motor control. Their incidence, severity and duration were dose-related. The maximum tolerated dose was established to be 1000 mg. Severe somnolence lasting 1 day occurred in one subject following 1400 mg. Brivaracetam was rapidly absorbed under fasting conditions, with a median tmax of approximately 1 h. Cmax was dose-proportional from 10 to 1400 mg, whereas AUC deviated from dose linearity above 600 mg. A high-fat meal had no effect on AUC (point estimate 0.99, 90%CI: 0.92–1.07) but delayed tmax (3 h) and decreased Cmax (point estimate 0.72, 90%CI: 0.66–0.79). Conclusions Brivaracetam was well tolerated after increasing single doses that represent up to several times the expected therapeutic dose. Brivaracetam was found to have desirable pharmacokinetic properties. The most common adverse events were somnolence and dizziness. PMID:17223857

  17. Single Oral Dose Pharmacokinetics of Decursin and Decursinol Angelate in Healthy Adult Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Li, Li; Hale, Thomas W.; Chee, Wayne; Xing, Chengguo; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-01-01

    The ethanol extract of Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) root has promising anti-cancer and other bioactivities in rodent models. It is currently believed that the pyranocoumarin isomers decursin (D) and decursinol angelate (DA) contribute to these activities. We and others have documented that D and DA were rapidly converted to decursinol (DOH) in rodents. However, our in vitro metabolism studies suggested that D and DA might be metabolized differently in humans. To test this hypothesis and address a key question for human translatability of animal model studies of D and DA or AGN extract, we conducted a single oral dose human pharmacokinetic study of D and DA delivered through an AGN-based dietary supplement Cogni.Q (purchased from Quality of Life Labs, Purchase, NY) in twenty healthy subjects, i.e., 10 men and 10 women, each consuming 119 mg D and 77 mg DA from 4 vegicaps. Analyses of plasma samples using UHPLC-MS/MS showed mean time to peak concentration (Tmax) of 2.1, 2.4 and 3.3 h and mean peak concentration (Cmax) of 5.3, 48.1 and 2,480 nmol/L for D, DA and DOH, respectively. The terminal elimination half-life (t1/2) for D and DA was similar (17.4 and 19.3 h) and each was much longer than that of DOH (7.4 h). The mean area under the curve (AUC0-48h) for D, DA and DOH was estimated as 37, 335 and 27,579 h?nmol/L, respectively. Gender-wise, men absorbed the parent compounds faster and took shorter time to reach DOH peak concentration. The human data supported an extensive conversion of D and DA to DOH, even though they metabolized DA slightly slower than rodents. Therefore, the data generated in rodent models concerning anti-cancer efficacy, safety, tissue distribution and pharmacodynamic biomarkers will likely be relevant for human translation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02114957 PMID:25695490

  18. Phase 1 study of weekly dosing with the investigational oral proteasome inhibitor ixazomib in relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bensinger, William I.; Zimmerman, Todd M.; Reeder, Craig B.; Berenson, James R.; Berg, Deborah; Hui, Ai-Min; Gupta, Neeraj; Di Bacco, Alessandra; Yu, Jiang; Shou, Yaping; Niesvizky, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition is an effective treatment strategy for multiple myeloma. With improving survival, attention is increasingly focusing on ease of administration and toxicity profile. Ixazomib is an investigational, orally bioavailable 20S proteasome inhibitor. Sixty patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma were enrolled on this phase 1 trial to evaluate safety and tolerability and determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of single-agent, oral ixazomib given weekly for 3 of 4 weeks. Upon MTD determination, patients were enrolled to 4 different cohorts based on relapsed/refractory status and prior bortezomib and carfilzomib exposure. The MTD was determined to be 2.97 mg/m2. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea in 2 patients, and grade 3 skin rash in 1 patient. Common drug-related adverse events were thrombocytopenia (43%), diarrhea (38%), nausea (38%), fatigue (37%), and vomiting (35%). The observed rate of peripheral neuropathy was 20%, with only 1 grade 3 event reported. Nine (18%) patients achieved a partial response or better, including 8 of 30 (27%) evaluable patients treated at the MTD. Pharmacokinetic studies suggested a long terminal half-life of 3.6 to 11.3 days, supporting once-weekly dosing. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00963820. PMID:24904120

  19. Dose Response of Listeria monocytogenes Invasion, Fetal Morbidity, and Fetal Mortality after Oral Challenge in Pregnant and Nonpregnant Mongolian Gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Roulo, Rebecca M.; Fishburn, Jillian D.; Amosu, Mayowa; Etchison, Ashley R.

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that can result in adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as stillbirth or premature delivery. The Mongolian gerbil was recently proposed as the most appropriate small-animal model of listeriosis due to its susceptibility to the same invasion pathways as humans. The objectives of this study were to investigate invasion and adverse pregnancy outcomes in gerbils orally exposed to L. monocytogenes, to compare the dose-response data to those of other animal models, and to investigate differences in the responses of pregnant versus nonpregnant gerbils. Gerbils were orally exposed to 0 (control), 103, 105, 107, or 109 CFU L. monocytogenes in whipping cream. L. monocytogenes was recovered in a dose-dependent manner from fecal samples, adult organs, and pregnancy-associated tissues. Dams exposed to 109 CFU had more invaded organs and higher concentrations of L. monocytogenes in almost all organs than nonpregnant animals, though no differences in fecal shedding were seen between the two groups. Adverse pregnancy outcomes occurred only in the dams treated with 109 CFU. A 50% infectivity dose (ID50) of 2.60 × 106 CFU for fetuses was calculated by fitting the data to a logistic model. Our results suggest that the 50% lethal dose (LD50) falls within the range of 5 × 106 to 5 × 108 CFU. This range includes the guinea pig and nonhuman primate LD50s, but the observation that L. monocytogenes-induced stillbirths can be seen in guinea pigs and primates exposed to lower doses than those at which stillbirths were seen in gerbils indicates that gerbils are not more sensitive to L. monocytogenes invasion. PMID:25156729

  20. VS411 Reduced Immune Activation and HIV-1 RNA Levels in 28 Days: Randomized Proof-of-Concept Study for AntiViral-HyperActivation Limiting Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lori, Franco; De Forni, Davide; Katabira, Elly; Baev, Denis; Maserati, Renato; Calarota, Sandra A.; Cahn, Pedro; Testori, Marco; Rakhmanova, Aza; Stevens, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Background A new class of antiretrovirals, AntiViral-HyperActivation Limiting Therapeutics (AV-HALTs), has been proposed as a disease-modifying therapy to both reduce Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) RNA levels and the excessive immune activation now recognized as the major driver of not only the continual loss of CD4+ T cells and progression to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), but also of the emergence of both AIDS-defining and non-AIDS events that negatively impact upon morbidity and mortality despite successful (ie, fully suppressive) therapy. VS411, the first-in-class AV-HALT, combined low-dose, slow-release didanosine with low-dose hydroxycarbamide to accomplish both objectives with a favorable toxicity profile during short-term administration. Five dose combinations were administered as VS411 to test the AV-HALT Proof-of-Concept in HIV-1-infected subjects. Methods Multinational, double-blind, 28-day Phase 2a dose-ranging Proof-of-Concept study of antiviral activity, immunological parameters, safety, and genotypic resistance in 58 evaluable antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected adults. Randomization and allocation to study arms were carried out by a central computer system. Results were analyzed by ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, ANCOVA, and two-tailed paired t tests. Results VS411 was well-tolerated, produced significant reductions of HIV-1 RNA levels, increased CD4+ T cell counts, and led to significant, rapid, unprecedented reductions of immune activation markers after 28 days despite incomplete viral suppression and without inhibiting HIV-1-specific immune responses. The didanosine 200 mg/HC 900 mg once-daily formulation demonstrated the greatest antiviral efficacy (HIV-1 RNA: ?1.47 log10 copies/mL; CD4+ T cell count: +135 cells/mm3) and fewest adverse events. Conclusions VS411 successfully established the Proof-of-Concept that AV-HALTs can combine antiviral efficacy with rapid, potentially beneficial reductions in the excessive immune system activation associated with HIV-1 disease. Rapid reductions in markers of immune system hyperactivation and cellular proliferation were obtained despite the fact that VS411 did not attain maximal suppression of HIV RNA, suggesting this effect was due to the HALT component. Trial Registration ITEudraCT 2007-002460-98 PMID:23094055

  1. A Study on the Single-dose Oral Toxicity of Super Key in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinhee; Lee, Jongcheol; Kim, Sungchul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the single-dose oral toxicity of the super key (processed sulfur). Methods: All experiments were conducted at Medvill, an institution authorized to perform non-clinical studies, under the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations. In order to investigate the oral toxicity of super key We administered it orally to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The SD rats were divided into four groups of five male and five female animals per group: group 1 being the control group and groups 2, 3, and 4 being the experimental groups. Doses of super key 500 mg/kg, 1,000 mg/kg and 2,000 mg/kg were administered to the experimental groups, and a dose of normal saline solution, 10 mL/kg, was administered to the control group. We examined the survival rates, weights, clinical signs, gross findings and necropsy findings. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. (Approval number: A01-14018). Results: No deaths or abnormalities occurred in any of the four groups. Although slight decreases in the weights of some female rats were noted, no significant changes in weights or differences in the gross findings between the control group and the experimental groups were observed. To check for abnormalities in organs, we used microscopy to examine representative histological sections of each specified organ; the results showed no significant differences in any of the organs. Conclusion: The results of this research showed that administration of 500 ? 2,000 mg/kg of super key did not cause any changes in the weights or in the results of necropsy examinations. Neither did it result in any mortalities. The above findings suggest that treatment with super key is relatively safe. Further studies on this subject are needed to yield more concrete evidence. PMID:26392913

  2. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of the Antiorthopoxvirus Compound ST-246 following Repeat Oral Dosing in Healthy Adult Subjects?

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Robert; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Bolken, Tove' C.; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R.; Tien, Deborah; Jones, Kevin F.; Frimm, Annie; Corrado, Michael L.; Pickens, Margaret; Landis, Patrick; Clarke, Jean; Marbury, Thomas C.; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2010-01-01

    ST-246, a novel compound that inhibits egress of orthopoxvirus from infected cells, is being evaluated as a treatment for pathogenic orthopoxvirus infections in humans. This phase I, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, escalating multiple-dose study was conducted to determine the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of ST-246 administered as a single daily oral dose of 250, 400, or 800 mg for 21 days to nonfasting healthy human volunteers. ST-246 appeared to be well tolerated, with no serious adverse events (AEs). Headache, for which one subject in the 800-mg group discontinued the study, was the most commonly reported AE in all treatment groups. The multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of ST-246 was well characterized. The day 21 mean elimination half-lives were calculated at 18.8, 19.8, and 20.7 h for each of the 250-, 400-, and 800-mg/day dose groups, respectively. Steady state was reached by day 6 (within 3 to 5 half-lives), saturable absorption was observed at the 800-mg dose level, and the fraction of parent drug excreted in the urine was very low. Based on these results, administration of 400 mg/day ST-246 can be expected to provide plasma concentrations above the efficacious concentration demonstrated in nonhuman primate models in earlier studies. PMID:20385870

  3. First report on the pharmacokinetics of tramadol and O-desmethyltramadol in exhaled breath compared to plasma and oral fluid after a single oral dose.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Markus R; Rosenborg, Staffan; Stenberg, Marta; Beck, Olof

    2015-12-01

    Exhaled breath (EB) is a promising matrix for bioanalysis of non-volatiles and has been routinely implemented for drugs of abuse analysis. Nothing is known regarding the pharmacokinetics of therapeutics and their metabolites in EB. Therefore, we used tramadol as a model drug. Twelve volunteers received a single oral dose of tramadol and repeated sampling of EB, plasma, and oral fluid (OF) was done for 48h using a particle filter device for EB and the Quantisal-device for OF. Samples were analyzed with LC-MS/MS and the pharmacokinetic correlations between matrices were investigated. The initial tramadol half-life in EB was shorter than in plasma but it reappeared in EB after 8-24h. The ratio of O-desmethyltramadol to tramadol was considerably lower in EB and OF compared to plasma. This pilot study compared for the first time the pharmacokinetics of a therapeutic drug and active metabolite in different biomatrices including EB and demonstrated its potential for bioanalysis. PMID:26388171

  4. Supra-nutritional vitamin E supplementation for 28days before slaughter maximises muscle vitamin E concentration in finisher pigs.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Jose, C G; Trezona, M; Moore, K L; Pluske, J R; Mullan, B P

    2015-12-01

    A 4×3 factorial experiment (n=8 pigs per treatment combination) was conducted with 96 female Landrace×Large White pigs to examine the required level of dietary vitamin E and optimum feeding duration before slaughter to maximise muscle vitamin E content in the Longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) muscle. The respective factors were four dietary levels of vitamin E (supplemented as dl-?-tocopheryl acetate; 35, 300, 500, and 700IU/kg) and three feeding durations (14, 28 and 42days before slaughter). Vitamin E concentration in the LTL was maximised at 6mg/kg, which was achieved by feeding a 700IU vitamin E diet for 28days before slaughter (P<0.001). There was no further increase in the vitamin E content of the LTL by feeding the high vitamin E diet more than 28days before slaughter. PMID:26313847

  5. Effects of 28-Day Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Isokinetic Exercise Performance and Body Composition in Female Masters Athletes.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jordan M; Gray, Michelle; Stewart, Rodger W; Moyen, Nicole E; Kavouras, Stavros A; DiBrezzo, Ro; Turner, Ronna; Baum, Jamie I; Stone, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Glenn, JM, Gray, M, Stewart, RW Jr, Moyen, NE, Kavouras, SA, DiBrezzo, R, Turner, R, Baum, JI, and Stone, MS. Effects of 28-day beta-alanine supplementation on isokinetic exercise performance and body composition in female masters athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(1): 200-207, 2016-Beta-alanine (BA) supplementation increases exercise performance due to increases in the intramuscular lactate buffer, carnosine. Females are more sensitive to these increases and results are further pronounced in trained individuals. Baseline intramuscular carnosine levels also naturally decrease with age; therefore, trained older females may experience augmented benefits from BA supplementation. However, the ability of BA to increase lower-body isokinetic strength (ISO) in female masters athletes (MA) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal effects of BA supplementation on ISO, handgrip strength (HG), and body composition in female MA cyclists. Twenty-two subjects participated in this double-blind randomized study. Subjects were randomized into 2 groups (placebo [PLA] = 8 g dextrose; BA = 800 mg + 8 g dextrose) and supplemented 4 times per day for 28 days. ISO, HG, and body composition were evaluated at baseline and at the same day/time each week over the 28-day intervention. No differences existed between groups at baseline or at the 7, 14, and 21 days time points for any variables (p > 0.05). When evaluating ISO (isokinetic) after 28 days, total work performed during the final third of the assessment (24.0 vs. -16.8% change) in flexion and average peak torque (5.4 vs. 2.9% change) in extension were significantly increased from baseline in BA compared with PLA (p ? 0.05). No differences existed for HG or body composition after supplementation. Twenty-eight days of BA supplementation increased peak torque and work completed, indicating BA improves lower-body exercise performance in female MA. PMID:26110349

  6. Preventive effects of low-dose dexmedetomidine on postoperative cognitive function and recovery quality in elderly oral cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yong; Sun, Lulu; Zhang, Junfeng; Li, Qifang; Jiang, Hong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the preventive effects of low-dose dexmedetomidine on postoperative cognitive function and recovery quality in elderly oral cancer patients by observing the perioperative kinetics of inflammatory cytokines, cortisol and melatonin.A total of 149 elderly oral cancer patients who had undergone tumor resection surgery were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups, Group D and Group S. After surgery, Group D was assigned to take intravenous dexmedetomidine at a dose of 0.2 ?g/kg/h for 12 h, while Group S was administered physiological saline in the same manner. On the day of surgery and for the first three postoperative days, the patients were assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and a 40-item quality of recovery score questionnaire (QoR40) at 7:00 am every morning. Venous blood was harvested at the same time. Then, IL-6, CRP, cortisol and melatonin levels were measured. There were no significant between-group differences in the baseline characteristics. After surgery, the MMSE and QoR40 scores in Group D were better than those in Group S. No between-group differences were observed in the incidences of severe hypotension and bradycardia. Moreover, respiratory depression was not observed in the 2 groups. The peaks of IL-6, CRP and cortisol concentrations in Group D were lower than those in Group S. However, the melatonin levels did not differ between the 2 groups. In elderly patients, intravenous dexmedetomidine administered postoperatively for 12 h at a dose of 0.2 ug/kg/h could improve postoperative cognitive function and recovery quality by decreasing excessive inflammation and stress levels. PMID:26629132

  7. A 15-day oral dose toxicity study of aspirin eugenol ester in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianyong; Yu, Yuanguang; Yang, Yajun; Liu, Xiwang; Zhang, Jiyu; Li, Bing; Zhou, Xuzheng; Niu, Jianrong; Wei, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zhiqi

    2012-06-01

    The subchronic toxicity of aspirin eugenol ester (AEE) was evaluated after 15-day intragastrically administration in rats at daily doses of 50, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg. AEE at low-dose showed no toxicity to the tested rats. Following repeated exposure to medium- or high-dose of AEE, apparent changes were observed in the levels of blood glucose, AST, ALP, ALT and TB in both male and female rats, and appeared to be dose-independent. There were no significant gender differences in most indexes of subchronic toxicity throughout the experimental period with the exception of food consumption and body weight. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of AEE was considered to be 50 mg/kg/day under the present study conditions. PMID:22516304

  8. Failure of antimony trioxide to induce micronuclei or chromosomal aberrations in rat bone-marrow after sub-chronic oral dosing.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, David; Whitwell, James; Deyo, James; Serex, Tessa

    2007-03-01

    Antimony trioxide (Sb2O3, CAS 1309-64-4) is widely used as a flame retardant synergist in a number of household products, as a fining agent in glass manufacture, and as a catalyst in the manufacture of various types of polyester plastics. It does not induce point mutations in bacteria or mammalian cells, but is able to induce chromosomal aberrations (CA) in cultured cells in vitro. Although no CA or micronuclei (MN) have been induced after acute oral dosing of mice, repeated oral dosing for 14 or 21 days resulted in increased CA in one report, but did not result in increased MN in another. In order to further investigate its in vivo genotoxicity, Sb2O3 was dosed orally to groups of rats for 21 days at 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg day. There were no clinical signs of toxicity in the Sb2O3-exposed animals except for some reductions in body-weight gain in the top dose group. Toxicokinetic measurements in a separate study confirmed bone-marrow exposure, and at higher levels than would have been achieved by single oral dosing. Large numbers of cells were scored for CA (600 metaphases/sex group) and MN (12,000 PCE/sex group) but frequencies of CA or MN in Sb2O3-treated rats were very similar to controls, and not biologically or statistically different, at all doses. These results provide further indication that Sb2O3 is not genotoxic to the bone marrow of rodents after 21 days of oral administration at high doses close to the maximum tolerated dose. PMID:17174592

  9. DOSE DEPENDENT DISPOSITION OF SODIUM ARSENATE IN MICE FOLLOWING ACUTE ORAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of dose on arsenate disposition was studied in adult female B6C3F, mice, dosed po with 0.5 to 5000 ug/kg [73As]-arsenate in water. rine was collected at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 hr and feces at 24 and 48 hr postexposure. he mice were sacrificed at 48 hr and tissues we...

  10. The pharmacokinetics of a single oral or rectal dose of concurrently administered isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    P Brock, A; Isaza, R; Egelund, E F; Hunter, R P; Peloquin, C A

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a disease of concern in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Treatment for tuberculosis in elephants utilizes multidrug protocols combining isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and/or ethambutol. In this study, a single, coformulated dose of isoniazid 5 mg/kg, rifampin 10 mg/kg, pyrazinamide 30 mg/kg, and ethambutol 30 mg/kg was administered orally to six Asian elephants, and rectally to five elephants using a cross-over design. Blood samples were collected serially over 24 h. Pyrazinamide and ethambutol concentrations were determined using validated gas chromatography assays. Isoniazid and rifampin concentrations were determined using validated high-performance liquid chromatography assays. Rectal isoniazid produced an earlier Tmax compared with oral administration. Oral isoniazid resulted in a comparatively lower Cmax , but higher AUC values compared with rectal isoniazid. Oral rifampin and oral ethambutol were well absorbed while rectal rifampin was not. Oral pyrazinamide produced comparatively higher Cmax and AUC values compared with rectal pyrazinamide. Results of this study indicate that currently recommended therapeutic monitoring sample collection times for rectal isoniazid and oral rifampin do not provide an accurate assessment of exposure for these drugs. This study demonstrates notable individual variability, indicating that dosing of these medications requires individual monitoring and provides additional information to guide the clinician when treating elephants. PMID:24684601

  11. Oral Reference Dose for ethylene glycol based on oxalate crystal-induced renal tubule degeneration as the critical effect

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, William M.; Corley, Richard A.; McMartin, K. E.; Kirman, Christopher R.; Bobst, Sol M.

    2013-03-31

    Several risk assessments have been conducted for ethylene glycol (EG). These assessments identified the kidney as the primary target organ for chronic effects. None of these assessments have incorporated the robust database of species-specific toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic studies with EG and its metabolites in defining uncertainty factors used in reference value derivation. Pertinent in vitro and in vivo studies related to one of these metabolites, calcium oxalate, and its role in crystal-induced nephropathy are summarized, and the weight of evidence to establish the mode of action for renal toxicity is reviewed. Previous risk assessments were based on chronic rat studies using a strain of rat that was later determined to be less sensitive to the toxic effects of EG. A recently published 12-month rat study using the more sensitive strain (Wistar) was selected to determine the point of departure for a new risk assessment. This approach incorporated toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic data and used Benchmark Dose methods to calculate a Human Equivalent Dose. Uncertainty factors were chosen, depending on the quality of the studies available, the extent of the database, and scientific judgment. The Reference Dose for long-term repeat oral exposure to EG was determined to be 15 mg/kg bw/d.

  12. Comparative pharmacokinetics and bile transformation of R-enantiomer and racemic bambuterol after single-dose intravenous, oral administration in rats and beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Guan, Su; Hu, Chun-Yun; He, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ying; Tang, Yu-Xin; Chen, Jie-di; Huang, Li-Jie; Tan, Wen

    2015-12-01

    This study was to compare pharmacokinetics and bile transformation of R-enantiomer bambuterol with its racemate. Pharmacokinetics of R-enantiomer was investigated after single-dose intravenous and three doses of oral administration to rats and beagle dogs. To compare the pharmacokinetics with racemic bambuterol, the same oral doses of racemic bambuterol were also administrated; the blood and bile samples were collected by cannulation. A validated LC-MS/MS method was used to assess the level of bambuterol in plasma and bile. After single intravenous administration, no significant differences were observed between the two drugs in pharmacokinetic data. After oral dosing of R-bambuterol, the AUCs of R-enantiomer presented linear correlation. After same oral dosing of R-enantiomer and its racemate, all the pharmacokinetic parameters were equivalent. However, the clearance and apparent distribution had different results due to species and administration route difference. The bile transformation of these two compounds was similar and implicated that liver transformation accounted for the major metabolism of them. The bioavailability of R-enantiomer and racemate were comparative and relatively high in beagle dogs. Thus, R-enantiomer had a comparative pharmacokinetic profile and bile transformation with racemic bambuterol in rats and beagle dogs. These findings provided references for further clinical study. PMID:25281237

  13. A single dose of sodium nitrate does not improve oral glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cermak, Naomi M; Hansen, Dominique; Kouw, Imre W K; van Dijk, Jan-Willem; Blackwell, Jamie R; Jones, Andrew M; Gibala, Martin J; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-08-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation has been proposed as an emerging treatment strategy for type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that ingestion of a single bolus of dietary NO3(-) ingestion improves oral glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Seventeen men with type 2 diabetes (glycated hemoglobin, 7.3% ± 0.2%) participated in a randomized crossover experiment. The subjects ingested a glucose beverage 2.5 hours after consumption of either sodium NO3(-) (0.15 mmol NaNO3(-) · kg(-1)) or a placebo solution. Venous blood samples were collected before ingestion of the glucose beverage and every 30 minutes thereafter during a 2-hour period to assess postprandial plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. The results show that plasma NO3(-) and nitrite levels were increased after NaNO3(-) as opposed to placebo ingestion (treatment-effect, P = .001). Despite the elevated plasma NO3(-) and nitrite levels, ingestion of NaNO3(-) did not attenuate the postprandial rise in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations (time × treatment interaction, P = .41 for glucose, P = .93 for insulin). Despite the lack of effect on oral glucose tolerance, basal plasma glucose concentrations measured 2.5 hours after NaNO3(-) ingestion were lower when compared with the placebo treatment (7.5 ± 0.4 vs 8.3 ± 0.4 mmol/L, respectively; P = .04). We conclude that ingestion of a single dose of dietary NO3(-) does not improve subsequent oral glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26092495

  14. Oral dependent-dose toxoplasmic infection model induced by oocysts in rats: Myenteric plexus and jejunal wall changes.

    PubMed

    Vicentino-Vieira, Suellen Laís; Nogueira de Melo, Gessilda de Alcantara; Biondaro Góis, Marcelo; Martins Moreira, Neide; de Araujo Pereira, Luana Gabriela; de Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Garcia, João Luiz; de Mello Gonçales Sant'Ana, Débora

    2015-09-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a widely distributed disease caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii that is mainly transmitted orally. Once ingested, the parasite crosses the intestinal barrier to reach the blood and lymph systems to migrate to other regions of the host. The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes in the myenteric plexus and the jejunal wall of Wistar rats caused by oral infection with T. gondii oocysts (ME-49 strain). Inocula of 10, 100, 500 and 5000 oocysts were used. The total population of myenteric neurons and the most metabolically active subpopulation (NADH-diaphorase positive - NADH-dp) exhibited a decrease proportional to the dose of T. gondii. There was also a quantitative increase in the subpopulation of NADPH-diaphorase-positive (NADPH-dp) myenteric neurons, indicating greater expression of the NOS enzyme. Neuronal atrophy was observed, and morphological and morphometric alterations such as jejunal atrophy were found in the infected groups. Hypertrophy of the external muscle with the presence of inflammatory foci was observed in the group infected with 5000 oocysts. The changes observed in the infected groups were proportional to the number of oocysts inoculated. PMID:26008610

  15. Population pharmacokinetic model of THC integrates oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dosing and characterizes short- and long-term pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules A A C; Guan, Zheng; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Klumpers, Linda; Morrison, Paul D; Beumer, Tim L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Cohen, Adam F; Freijer, Jan

    2015-02-01

    ?(9)-Tetrahydrocannobinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound of Cannabis, is known to have a long terminal half-life. However, this characteristic is often ignored in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of THC, which may affect the accuracy of predictions in different pharmacologic areas. For therapeutic use for example, it is important to accurately describe the terminal phase of THC to describe accumulation of the drug. In early clinical research, the THC challenge test can be optimized through more accurate predictions of the dosing sequence and the wash-out between occasions in a crossover setting, which is mainly determined by the terminal half-life of the compound. The purpose of this study is to better quantify the long-term pharmacokinetics of THC. A population-based PK model for THC was developed describing the profile up to 48 h after an oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dose of THC in humans. In contrast to earlier models, the current model integrates all three major administration routes and covers the long terminal phase of THC. Results show that THC has a fast initial and intermediate half-life, while the apparent terminal half-life is long (21.5 h), with a clearance of 38.8 L/h. Because the current model characterizes the long-term pharmacokinetics, it can be used to assess the accumulation of THC in a multiple-dose setting and to forecast concentration profiles of the drug under many different dosing regimens or administration routes. Additionally, this model could provide helpful insights into the THC challenge test used for the development of (novel) compounds targeting the cannabinoid system for different therapeutic applications and could improve decision making in future clinical trials. PMID:25316574

  16. Inhibition of prolactin with bromocriptine for 28days increases blood-brain barrier permeability in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Hernandez, H; Ramirez, M; Ramirez-Lee, M A; Ali, S F; Gonzalez, C

    2015-08-20

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is necessary for the proper function of the brain. Its maintenance is regulated by endogenous factors. Recent evidences suggest prolactin (PRL) regulates the BBB properties in vitro, nevertheless no evidence of these effects have been reported in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of PRL in the maintenance of the BBB in the rat. Male Wistar rats were treated with Bromocriptine (Bromo) to inhibit PRL production for 28days in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). BBB permeability was evaluated through the Evans Blue dye and fluorescein-dextran extravasation as well as through edema formation. The expression of claudin-5, occludin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and the PRL receptor (PRLR) was evaluated through western blot. Bromo reduced the physiological levels of PRL at 28days. At the same time, Bromo increased BBB permeability and edema formation associated with a decrement in claudin-5 and occludin and potentiated the increase in BBB permeability induced by LPS. However, no neuroinflammation was detected, since the expression of GFAP was unchanged, as well as the expression of the PRLR. These data provide the first evidence that inhibition of PRL with Bromo affects the maintenance of the BBB through modulating the expression of tight junction proteins in vivo. PMID:26047726

  17. Duration-dependent effects of clinically relevant oral alendronate doses on cortical bone toughness in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Burr, David B; Liu, Ziyue; Allen, Matthew R

    2015-02-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) have been shown to significantly reduce bone toughness in vertebrae within one year when given at clinical doses to dogs. Although BPs also reduce toughness in the cortical bone when given at high doses, their effect on cortical bone material properties when given at clinical doses is less clear. In part, this may be due to the use of small sample sizes that were powered to demonstrate differences in bone mineral density rather than the bone's material properties. Our lab has conducted several studies in which dogs were treated with alendronate at a clinically relevant dose. The goal of this study was to examine these published and unpublished data collectively to determine whether there is a significant time-dependent effect of alendronate on toughness of the cortical bone. This analysis seemed particularly relevant given the recent occurrence of atypical femoral fractures in humans. Differences in the toughness of ribs taken from dogs derived from five separate experiments were measured. The dogs were orally administered saline (CON, 1ml/kg/day) or alendronate (ALN) at a clinical dose (0.2mg/kg/day). Treatment duration ranged from 3months to 3years. Groups were compared using ANOVA, and time trends analyzed with linear regression analysis. Linear regressions of the percent difference in toughness between CON and ALN at each time point revealed a significant reduction in toughness with longer exposure to ALN. The downward trend was primarily driven by a downward trend in post-yield toughness, whereas toughness in the pre-yield region was not changed relative to CON. These data suggest that a longer duration of treatment with clinical doses of ALN results in deterioration of cortical bone toughness in a time-dependent manner. As the duration of treatment is lengthened, the cortical bone exhibits increasingly brittle behavior. This may be important in assessing the role that long-term BP treatments play in the risk of atypical fractures of the femoral cortical bone in humans. PMID:25445446

  18. Single oral dose pharmacokinetics of decursin, decursinol angelate, and decursinol in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Zhang, Jinhui; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lü, Junxuan

    2013-03-01

    Decursin and decursinol angelate are the major components in the alcoholic extract of the root of Angelica gigas Nakai. Our previous work convincingly demonstrated that both decursin and decursinol angelate were rapidly converted to decursinol in mice after administration by either oral gavage or i. p. injection. In the current study, we compared for the first time the plasma profiles of decursinol, when equal moles of decursin/decursinol angelate or decursinol were given to rats by oral gavage, and investigated the effect of different formulas and other chemicals in Angelica gigas extract on the bioavailability of decursinol. Our results show that gavage of decursinol led to a faster attainment of plasma decursinol peak (Tmax ~ 0.7 h) and much higher peak levels than an equal molar amount administered as decursin/decursinol angelate mixture or as Angelica gigas ethanol extract, resulting in 2-3 fold higher bioavailability as estimated by the area under the curve of the respective regimens (65 012 vs. 27 033 h · ng/mL for decursinol and decursin/decursinol angelate treatment groups, respectively). Compared to a formula based on ethanol-PEG400-Tween80, carboxyl methyl cellulose was a less optimized vehicle. In addition, we detected peak levels of decursin and decursinol angelate in the plasma of rats administered with decursin/decursinol angelate or Angelica gigas extract in the nM range (Tmax ~ 0.5 h) with a newly established sensitive UHPLC-MS/MS method. Furthermore, our data support the liver, instead of intestine, as a major organ site where decursin and decursinol angelate were hydrolyzed to decursinol with a S9 microsomal in vitro metabolism assay. Taken together, our study provided important PK, LC-MS/MS methodology, formulation and metabolism insights in a rodent model for the rational design of in vivo efficacy studies of the corresponding chemicals in the future. PMID:23364885

  19. Oral Postdialysis Cholecalciferol Supplementation in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis: A Dose-Response Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fellay, Benoit; Hemett, Ould Maouloud; Magnin, Jean-Luc; Fellay, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dose of postdialysis cholecalciferol needed to maintain the 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels in the optimal range of 75–150?nmol/L. Twenty-six patients who had low baseline 25(OH)D levels (mean 27.5 ± 14.9?nmol/L) were studied. The 25(OH)D levels were measured every 2 months for one year. During the first two months, all the patients received 2000?IU of cholecalciferol after each hemodialysis (=6000?IU/wk). Thereafter, the dose was individualized and adapted every 2 months by administering 1 to 6 cholecalciferol tablets (2000?IU each) per week (total weekly dose = 2000–12000?IU/wk). During cholecalciferol supplementation, the 25(OH)D concentrations rapidly increased from baseline to 140.1 ± 28.3?nmol/L at month 6 and 95.6 ± 20.9?nmol/L at month 12. At month twelve, 86% of the patients had 25(OH)D levels within the target range with a mean dose of 5917 ± 4106?IU/wk of cholecalciferol; however, the amount needed to maintain these levels varied widely from 0 (n = 2) to 12000?IU/wk (n = 5). In conclusion, postdialysis cholecalciferol prescription is quite effective in correcting vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency, but the amount of cholecalciferol needed to maintain the 25(OH)D levels within the optimal range over the long-term varies widely among patients and must be individualized. PMID:24579049

  20. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Clark, Joseph F; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the quantitative effects of a single-dose of Nattokinase (NK) administration on coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters comprehensively in healthy male subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over NK intervention study was carried out in 12 healthy young males. Following the baseline blood draw, each subject was randomized to receive either a single-dose of 2,000 FU NK (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd) or placebo with subsequent cross-over of the groups. Subjects donated blood samples at 2, 4, 6 and 8?hours following administration for analysis of coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters. As a result, D-dimer concentrations at 6, and 8?hours, and blood fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products at 4?hours after NK administration elevated significantly (p?dose of NK administration appears enhancing fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation via several different pathways simultaneously. PMID:26109079

  1. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Clark, Joseph F.; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the quantitative effects of a single-dose of Nattokinase (NK) administration on coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters comprehensively in healthy male subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over NK intervention study was carried out in 12 healthy young males. Following the baseline blood draw, each subject was randomized to receive either a single-dose of 2,000 FU NK (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd) or placebo with subsequent cross-over of the groups. Subjects donated blood samples at 2, 4, 6 and 8?hours following administration for analysis of coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters. As a result, D-dimer concentrations at 6, and 8?hours, and blood fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products at 4?hours after NK administration elevated significantly (p?dose of NK administration appears enhancing fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation via several different pathways simultaneously. PMID:26109079

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of a booster dose of Vibrio cholerae CVD 103-HgR live oral cholera vaccine in Swiss adults.

    PubMed

    Cryz, S J; Levine, M M; Losonsky, G; Kaper, J B; Althaus, B

    1992-09-01

    Adult volunteers received a booster dose (4 x 10(8) CFU) of attenuated Vibrio cholerae CVD 103-HgR oral vaccine 15 or 24 months after primary immunization. The immune response was modest, presumably due to rapid clearance of the vaccine strain by a primed immune system. PMID:1500200

  3. Prescription opioids. III. Disposition of oxycodone in oral fluid and blood following controlled single-dose administration.

    PubMed

    Cone, Edward J; DePriest, Anne Z; Heltsley, Rebecca; Black, David L; Mitchell, John M; LoDico, Charles; Flegel, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Oxycodone (OC) is recommended to be included as an analyte tested in the proposed Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA's) Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs using Oral Fluid (OF) Specimens. This study demonstrates the time course of OC and metabolites, noroxycodone (NOC), oxymorphone (OM) and noroxymorphone (NOM), in near-simultaneous paired OF and whole blood (BL) specimens by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) (limit of detection = 1 ng/mL OF, 5 ng/mL BL). A single dose of OC 20 mg controlled-release was administered to 12 healthy subjects followed by specimen collections for 52 h. Analyte prevalence was as follows: OF, OC > NOC > OM; and BL, OC > NOC > NOM. OC and NOC were frequently detected within 15-30 min in OF and 30 min to 2 h in BL. NOM and OM appeared between 1.5-5 h post-dose. The mean OF-to-BL (OF:BL) ratios and correlations were 5.4 for OC (r = 0.719) and 1.0 for NOC (r = 0.651). The period of detection for OF exceeded BL by ?2-fold at similar cutoff concentrations. At a 1 ng/mL cutoff for OF, the mean detection time was 34 h for OC and NOC. These data provide new information that should facilitate interpretation of OC test results. PMID:25589778

  4. Performance properties of the population bioequivalence approach for in vitro delivered dose for orally inhaled respiratory products.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Beth; Strickland, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory agencies, industry, and academia have acknowledged that in vitro assessments serve a role in establishing bioequivalence for second-entry drug product approvals as well as innovator post-approval drug product changes. For orally inhaled respiratory products (OIPs), the issues of correctly analyzing in vitro data and interpreting the results within the broader context of therapeutic equivalence have garnered significant attention. One of the recommended statistical tests for in vitro data is the population bioequivalence method (PBE). The current literature for assessing the PBE statistical approach for in vitro data assumes a log normal distribution. This paper focuses on an assessment of that assumption for in vitro delivered dose. Concepts in development of a statistical model are presented. The PBE criterion and hypotheses are written for the case when data follows a normal distribution, rather than log normal. Results of a simulation study are reported, characterizing the performance of the PBE approach when data are expected to be normally distributed, rather than log normal. In these cases, decisions using the PBE approach are not consistent for the same absolute mean difference that the test product is from the reference product. A conclusion of inequivalency will occur more often if the test product dose is lower than the reference product for the same deviation from target. These features suggest that more research is needed for statistical equivalency approaches for in vitro data. PMID:24249218

  5. Medical Castration Using the Investigational Oral GnRH Antagonist TAK-385 (Relugolix): Phase 1 Study in Healthy Males

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hongliang; Faessel, Hélène M.; Saad, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Context: TAK-385 is a highly selective, oral, nonpeptide GnRH antagonist being investigated as a possible prostate cancer treatment. Objective: The objectives were to evaluate safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of TAK-385 on LH and testosterone. Design, Setting, and Participants: This was a three-part, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 dose-escalation study in 176 healthy male UK volunteers. Interventions: Part 1, single doses of TAK-385 (0 [placebo], 80, 120, 180, or 360 mg). Part 2, 14-day TAK-385 (0, 20, 40, 80, or 180 mg) daily. Part 3, 28-day TAK-385 (40 [with loading dose], 60, 80, or 160 mg) or placebo daily. Parts 2 and 3 included men aged 40–75 years. Main Outcome Measures: Main outcome measures included plasma concentrations of TAK-385, LH, and testosterone. Results: Oral TAK-385 was readily absorbed, and steady state was reached in ?14 days. Food reduced TAK-385 systemic exposure by 47–52%. Mean serum testosterone levels declined ?6 hours after TAK-385 administration. Loading doses up to 360 mg on day 1 or 360 mg on day 1 followed by 240 mg on day 2 reduced the time to achieve castrate testosterone levels from ?7 to <3 days. TAK-385 doses ?80 mg/d achieved sustained medical castration and trough TAK-385 concentrations >4 ng/mL. After discontinuation of TAK-385 on day 28, testosterone levels normalized in most subjects in ? 28 days. Common adverse events included bradycardia, headache, and hot flush (all grade ?2). Conclusions: Oral TAK-385 (40–180 mg/d) was well tolerated and effectively lowered testosterone in healthy men. Planned phase 2 doses in men with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer are 80 and 120 mg/d. PMID:26502357

  6. Trends of 28 days case fatality rate after first acute myocardial infarction in Isfahan, Iran, from 2000 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, Mahdi; Hosseini, Shidokht; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Salehiniya, Hamid; Roohafza, Hamidreza; Khazaei, Salman; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of the present study was the analysis of the trends in case fatality rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Isfahan, Iran. This analysis was performed based on gender, age groups, and type of AMI according to the International Classification of Diseases, version 10, during 2000-2009. METHODS Disregarding the Multinational Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease (MONICA), this cohort study considered all AMI events registered between 2000 and 2009 in 13 hospitals in Isfahan. All patients were followed for 28 days. In order to assess the case fatality rate, the Kaplan-Meier analysis, and to compare survival rate, log-rank test were used. Using the Cox regression model, 28 days case fatality hazard ratio (HR) was calculated. RESULTS In total, 12,900 patients with first AMI were entered into the study. Among them, 9307 (72.10%) were men and 3593 (27.90%) women. The mean age in all patients increased from 61.36 ± 12.19 in 2000-2001 to 62.15 ± 12.74 in 2008-2009, (P = 0.0070); in women, from 65.38 ± 10.95 to 67.15 ± 11.72 (P = 0.0200), and in men, from 59.75 ± 12.29 to 59.84 ± 12.54 (P = 0.0170),. In addition, the 28 days case fatality rate in 2000-2009 had a steady descending trend. Thus, it decreased from 11.20% in 2000-2001 to 07.90% in 2008-2009; in men, from 09.20% to 06.70%, and in women, from 16.10% to 10.90%. During the study, HR of case fatality rate in 2000-2001 declined; therefore, in 2002-2003, it was 0.93 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.77-1.11], in 2004-2005, 0.88 (95% CI = 0.73-1.04), in 2006-2007, 0.67 (95% CI = 0.56-0.82), and in 2008-2009, 0.69 (95% CI = 0.56-0.82). CONCLUSION In Isfahan, a reduction was observable in the trend of case fatality rate in both genders and all age groups. Thus, there was a 29.46% reduction in case fatality rate (27.17% in men, 32.29% in women) during the study period. PMID:26478731

  7. Safety, immunogenicity, and excretion pattern of single-dose live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR in Peruvian adults of high and low socioeconomic levels.

    PubMed

    Gotuzzo, E; Butron, B; Seas, C; Penny, M; Ruiz, R; Losonsky, G; Lanata, C F; Wasserman, S S; Salazar, E; Kaper, J B

    1993-09-01

    Groups of 122 Peruvian adults of low socioeconomic level (SEL) and 125 of high SEL received a randomly allocated 5 x 10(9)- or 5 x 10(8)-CFU dose of CVD 103-HgR live oral cholera vaccine or a placebo. The vaccine was well tolerated. Vibriocidal seroconversions occurred in 78% of high-SEL and 72% of low-SEL subjects who ingested the high dose and in 78 and 49%, respectively, of those who received the low dose. PMID:8359923

  8. Oral Repeated Dose Toxicity Studies of Coenzyme Q10 in Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Yerramilli-Rao, Padmaja; Beal, M. Flint; Watanabe, Dai; Kieburtz, Karl; de Blieck, Elisabeth A.; Kitano, Mitsuaki; Hosoe, Kazunori; Funahashi, Iwao; Cudkowicz, Merit E.

    2011-01-01

    To support phase III testing of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in humans, we conducted pharmacokinetic and toxicology studies in beagle dogs. Following single gavage administration of CoQ10 at 600, 1200, 1800 or 2400mg/kg/day no obvious dose response was observed in maximum concentration (Cmax) or area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) at the three highest dosages. In a repeated dose study of CoQ10 at 600, 1200, 1800 or 2400mg/kg/day for four weeks, CoQ10 reached steady state in plasma by two weeks at all dosages. Cmax and AUC increased with increasing dosage of CoQ10. The highest plasma levels were recorded at 1800mg/kg/day. In a 39-week chronic toxicity study of CoQ10 at 1200, 1800mg/kg/day or placebo, CoQ10 reached steady state in plasma by 13 weeks. Behaviors, blood chemistries and detailed histopathology were normal. No deaths occurred. These results support the use of a 2400mg/day dosage of CoQ10 in human clinical trials. PMID:22267890

  9. Oral dosing with papaya latex is an effective anthelmintic treatment for sheep infected with Haemonchus contortus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The cysteine proteinases in papaya latex have been shown to have potent anthelmintic properties in monogastric hosts such as rodents, pigs and humans, but this has not been demonstrated in ruminants. Methods In two experiments, sheep were infected concurrently with 5,000 infective larvae of Haemonchus contortus and 10,000 infective larvae of Trichostrongylus colubriformis and were then treated with the supernatant from a suspension of papaya latex from day 28 to day 32 post-infection. Faecal egg counts were monitored from a week before treatment until the end of the experiment and worm burdens were assessed on day 35 post-infection. Results We found that the soluble fraction of papaya latex had a potent in vivo effect on the abomasal nematode H. contortus, but not on the small intestinal nematode T. colubriformis. This effect was dose-dependent and at tolerated levels of gavage with papaya latex (117 ?mol of active papaya latex supernatant for 4 days), the H. contortus worm burdens were reduced by 98%. Repeated treatment, daily for 4 days, was more effective than a single dose, but efficacy was not enhanced by concurrent treatment with the antacid cimetidine. Conclusions Our results provide support for the idea that cysteine proteinases derived from papaya latex may be developed into novel anthelmintics for the treatment of lumenal stages of gastro-intestinal nematode infections in sheep, particularly those parasitizing the abomasum. PMID:21406090

  10. SU-D-16A-02: A Novel Methodology for Accurate, Semi-Automated Delineation of Oral Mucosa for Radiation Therapy Dose-Response Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J; Welsh, L; Gulliford, S; Harrington, K; Nutting, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The significant morbidity caused by radiation-induced acute oral mucositis means that studies aiming to elucidate dose-response relationships in this tissue are a high priority. However, there is currently no standardized method for delineating the mucosal structures within the oral cavity. This report describes the development of a methodology to delineate the oral mucosa accurately on CT scans in a semi-automated manner. Methods: An oral mucosa atlas for automated segmentation was constructed using the RayStation Atlas-Based Segmentation (ABS) module. A radiation oncologist manually delineated the full surface of the oral mucosa on a planning CT scan of a patient receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the head and neck region. A 3mm fixed annulus was added to incorporate the mucosal wall thickness. This structure was saved as an atlas template. ABS followed by model-based segmentation was performed on four further patients sequentially, adding each patient to the atlas. Manual editing of the automatically segmented structure was performed. A dose comparison between these contours and previously used oral cavity volume contours was performed. Results: The new approach was successful in delineating the mucosa, as assessed by an experienced radiation oncologist, when applied to a new series of patients receiving head and neck RT. Reductions in the mean doses obtained when using the new delineation approach, compared with the previously used technique, were demonstrated for all patients (median: 36.0%, range: 25.6% – 39.6%) and were of a magnitude that might be expected to be clinically significant. Differences in the maximum dose that might reasonably be expected to be clinically significant were observed for two patients. Conclusion: The method developed provides a means of obtaining the dose distribution delivered to the oral mucosa more accurately than has previously been achieved. This will enable the acquisition of high quality dosimetric data for use in dose-response studies. We would like to thank the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council for funding. We acknowledge support from the NIHR RM/ICR Biomedical Research Centre. RayStatation was used under an evaluation agreement with RaySearch Laboratories AB.

  11. Protective effect of an acute oral loading dose of trimetazidine on myocardial injury following percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bonello, Laurent; Sbragia, Pascal; Amabile, Nicolas; Com, Olivier; Pierre, Sandrine V; Levy, Samuel; Paganelli, Franck

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of pre?procedural acute oral administration of trimetazidine (TMZ) on percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)?induced myocardial injury. Design Single?centre, prospective, randomised evaluation study. Setting Patients with stable angina pectoris and single?vessel disease undergoing PCI. Patients 582 patients were prospectively randomised. Patients who underwent more than one inflation during PCI were excluded, resulting in 266 patients randomly assigned to 2 groups. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned to receive or not an acute loading dose of 60?mg of TMZ prior to intervention. Main outcome The frequency and the increase in the level of cardiac troponin Ic (cTnI) after successful PCI. cTnI levels were measured before and 6, 12, 18 and 24?h after PCI. Results 136 patients were assigned to the TMZ group and 130 to the control group. Although no statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of cTnI increase between the two groups, post?procedural cTnI levels were significantly reduced in the TMZ group at all time points (6?h: mean (SD) 4.2 (0.8) vs 1.7 (0.2), p<0.001; 12?h: 5.5 (1.5) vs 2.3 (0.4), p<0.001; 18?h: 9 (2.3) vs 3 (0.5), p<0.001; and 24?h: 3.2 (1.2) vs 1 (0.5), p<0.001). Moreover, the total amount of cTnI released after PCI, as assessed by the area under the curve of serial measurement, was significantly reduced in the TMZ group (p<0.05). Conclusion Pre?procedural acute oral TMZ administration significantly reduces PCI?induced myocardial infarction. PMID:17488771

  12. Effect of combined low-dose oral contraceptives on blood viscosity and haematocrit.

    PubMed

    Ishak, R; Loh Chooi Khim

    1991-06-01

    Researchers compared the results of hematocrit and blood viscosity tests of 16 women using a combined oral contraceptive (COC) with 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg desogestrel (group 1), 11 women using a COC with 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol/150 mcg levonorgestrel (group 2), and 16 women who did not use any OCs (control group), all who attended the National Population and Family Development Clinic at the General Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. They wanted to examine the effects of COCs on blood viscosity, which is inversely related to blood flow, and hematocrit. The women were matched for age. The hematocrit level of women who took the ethinyl estradiol/desogestrel COC was significantly higher than that of the control group (41.5% vs. 37.4%; p.001). On the other hand, the hematocrit level of women who took the ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel COC was close to that of the control group (38.5% vs. 37.4%). Even though the mean whole blood viscosity for group 2 was higher than that of group 1 and the control group (6.6 cps vs. 5.5 cps), the difference was insignificant. Yet whole blood viscosity of group 2 at the higher shear rates (46, 115, and 230 per second) was significantly higher than the control group (p.05). The whole blood viscosities of group 1 and the control group did not differ considerably. This supported the theory that hematocrit contributes to blood viscosity. Further these results agreed with those of another study which also showed increased blood viscosity and hematocrit in healthy women taking OCs. Thus thromboembolic events in women taking OCs could be a result of a drop in rate of blood flow which at the lower shear rates could increase red cell aggregation and clotting. In conclusion, health providers could use these indicators to monitor women who have used OCs over a considerable period for thrombotic risks to determine if OC use should continue. PMID:12317443

  13. Florfenicol residues in Rainbow Trout after oral dosing in recirculating and flow-through culture systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Hess, Karina R.; Bernady, Jeffry A.; Gaikowski, M. P.; Whitsel, Melissa; Endris, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaflor is a feed premix for fish containing the broad spectrum antibacterial agent florfenicol (FFC) incorporated at a ratio of 50% (w/w). To enhance the effectiveness of FFC for salmonids infected with certain isolates of Flavobacterium psychrophilum causing coldwater disease, the FFC dose must be increased from the standard 10 mg·kg?1 body weight (BW)·d?1 for 10 consecutive days. A residue depletion study was conducted to determine whether FFC residues remaining in the fillet tissue after treating fish at an increased dose would be safe for human consumption. Groups of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (total n = 144; weight range, 126–617 g) were treated with FFC at 20 mg·kg?1 BW·d?1 for 10 d in a flow-through system (FTS) and a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) each with a water temperature of ?13°C. The two-tank RAS included a nontreated tank containing 77 fish. Fish were taken from each tank (treated tank, n = 16; nontreated tank, n = 8) at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 120, 240, 360, and 480 h posttreatment. Florfenicol amine (FFA) concentrations (the FFC marker residue) in skin-on fillets from treated fish were greatest at 12 h posttreatment (11.58 ?g/g) in the RAS and were greatest at 6 h posttreatment (11.09 ?g/g) in the FTS. The half-lives for FFA in skin-on fillets from the RAS and FTS were 20.3 and 19.7 h, respectively. Assimilation of FFC residues in the fillets of nontreated fish sharing the RAS with FFC-treated fish was minimal. Florfenicol water concentrations peaked in the RAS-treated tank and nontreated tanks at 10 h (453 ?g/L) and 11 h (442 ?g/L) posttreatment, respectively. Monitoring of nitrite concentrations throughout the study indicated the nitrogen oxidation efficiency of the RAS biofilter was minimally impacted by the FFC treatment.

  14. Penetration of ciprofloxacin into prostatic fluid, ejaculate and seminal fluid in volunteers after an oral dose of 750 mg.

    PubMed

    Naber, K G; Sörgel, F; Kinzig, M; Weigel, D M

    1993-11-01

    To evaluate an effective dose for the treatment of bacterial prostatitis the concentrations of ciprofloxacin were measured in prostatic fluid, ejaculate and the cell-free seminal fluid of 15 healthy volunteers who received an oral dose of 750 mg. ciprofloxacin while in a fasting state. Venous blood samples were taken in all subjects at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours. In 6 subjects blood samples were also taken after 8 and 12 hours. Urine was collected in all subjects during 0 to 4 hours and in the 6 subjects also during 4 to 8 hours and 8 to 12 hours. Prostatic fluid could be obtained in 10 subjects by prostatic massage 4 hours after drug intake. So as not to contaminate the urethra with ciprofloxacin the subjects were not allowed to void until 4 hours after drug intake. Iopamidol (3.162 gm.), a renal contrast agent, was administered intravenously concomitantly with oral ciprofloxacin intake. After 8 hours iohexol (3.235 gm.) was administered intravenously. These agents were measured in prostatic fluid, ejaculate and seminal fluid to assess the contamination of those fluids by urine. All drug measurements were done by high pressure liquid chromatography. The median plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin were 2.1 mg./l. at 1 hour (maximum concentration), 0.9 mg./l. at 4 hours and 0.2 mg./l. at 12 hours. The median concentration in prostatic fluid was 0.23 mg./l. with a fluid-to-plasma concentration ratio of 0.23. The median concentration in the ejaculate (seminal fluid) after 4 hours was 7.4 mg./l. (6.6 mg./l.) and after 12 hours it was 2.0 mg./l. (1.9 mg./l.) with corresponding ejaculate (seminal fluid)-to-plasma concentration ratios of 8.4 (7.7) and 8.0 (6.6), respectively. Thus, ciprofloxacin is concentrated several-fold in ejaculate and seminal fluid but not in prostatic fluid. According to the results the concentrations of ciprofloxacin in prostatic fluid exceed the minimal inhibitory concentration-90% for Enterobacteriaceae but not for Pseudomonas, enterococci and staphylococci, whereas the concentrations in ejaculate and seminal fluid are sufficiently elevated to include the total spectrum of sensitive strains causing bacterial prostatis. PMID:8411457

  15. Efficacy of short period, low dose oral prednisolone for the prevention of stricture after circumferential endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Mikinori; Anzai, Sho; Shirasaki, Tomoaki; Ikemiyagi, Hidekazu; Fujii, Takashi; Mabuchi, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Shinji; Yoshida, Masashi; Kawai, Takashi; Kitajima, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was developed in Japan and has been performed on many patients with early stage esophageal cancer; however quality of life in patients with postoperative stricture is drastically decreased and repeat, periodic endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) is usually required over long periods. In this study, we evaluate the efficacy of short period, low dose oral prednisolone in controlling post-procedural esophageal stricture. Patients and methods: In total, 33 patients who underwent semicircular or complete circular ESD for esophageal superficial squamous cell carcinoma were included in this study. They were divided into two groups: those who underwent large-circumference ESD with no preventative treatment for stricture (ESD alone group) and those who received systemic steroid treatment for stricture (oral prednisolone group). We compared the two groups in terms of stricture rate and total number of EBD sessions. The ESD alone group underwent no preventative treatment. The oral prednisolone group started with 30?mg/day prednisolone on the second day post-ESD, and continued with a gradually tapering prednisolone dose, finally discontinuing systemic steroid administration 3 weeks later. Results: The stricture rate after ESD was significantly lower in the oral prednisolone group (3 of 17 patients; 17.6?%) than in the ESD alone group (11 of 16 patients; 68.7?%) (P?oral prednisolone group than in the ESD alone group (median 4.6, range 2?–?10 vs. median 8.1, range 1?–?18; P?dose oral prednisolone showed promising results for the prevention of stricture after ESD for early stage esophageal cancers. PMID:26135649

  16. In Silico Modeling for the Prediction of Dose and Pathway-Related Adverse Effects in Humans From In Vitro Repeated-Dose Studies.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sebastian; Maggioni, Silvia; Bucher, Joachim; Mueller, Daniel; Niklas, Jens; Shevchenko, Valery; Mauch, Klaus; Heinzle, Elmar; Noor, Fozia

    2016-01-01

    Long-term repeated-dose toxicity is mainly assessed in animals despite poor concordance of animal data with human toxicity. Nowadays advanced human in vitro systems, eg, metabolically competent HepaRG cells, are used for toxicity screening. Extrapolation of in vitro toxicity to in vivo effects is possible by reverse dosimetry using pharmacokinetic modeling. We assessed long-term repeated-dose toxicity of bosentan and valproic acid (VPA) in HepaRG cells under serum-free conditions. Upon 28-day exposure, the EC50 values for bosentan and VPA decreased by 21- and 33-fold, respectively. Using EC10 as lowest threshold of toxicity in vitro, we estimated the oral equivalent doses for both test compounds using a simplified pharmacokinetic model for the extrapolation of in vitro toxicity to in vivo effect. The model predicts that bosentan is safe at the considered dose under the assumed conditions upon 4 weeks exposure. For VPA, hepatotoxicity is predicted for 4% and 47% of the virtual population at the maximum recommended daily dose after 3 and 4 weeks of exposure, respectively. We also investigated the changes in the central carbon metabolism of HepaRG cells exposed to orally bioavailable concentrations of both drugs. These concentrations are below the 28-day EC10 and induce significant changes especially in glucose metabolism and urea production. These metabolic changes may have a pronounced impact in susceptible patients such as those with compromised liver function and urea cycle deficiency leading to idiosyncratic toxicity. We show that the combination of modeling based on in vitro repeated-dose data and metabolic changes allows the prediction of human relevant in vivo toxicity with mechanistic insights. PMID:26420750

  17. Evaluation of amitrole (aminotriazole) for potential carcinogenicity in orally dosed rats, mice, and golden hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, D.; Weber, H.; Mohr, U.; Boehme, K.

    1983-06-30

    Amitrole was evaluated for carcinogenic potential in lifespan studies on Wistar rats, NMRI mice, and golden hamsters. At the start of the studies the animals were 6 weeks old. Amitrole was administered, mixed with pulverized chow, at dietary concentrations of 0, 1, 10, and 100 micrograms/g (ppm). Each treated group and control group consisted of 75 male and 75 female rats and mice and of 76 male and 76 female golden hamsters. Additional animals were used to evaluate the functional state of the thyroid. Somewhat lower body weights, slightly reduced survival times, and transient effects on thyroid function were observed in golden hamsters at 100 ppm. In mice, a slight increase in pituitary gland hyperemias was seen at 100 ppm; also an effect on thyroid function usually occurred at the same concentration. In rats, a very large number of cystic dilatations of follicles in the thyroid at 100 ppm and a dose-unrelated increase in hemorrhages and hyperemias in the pituitary gland were indicative of an effect of amitrole on these organs. The strongest effect of amitrole on thyroid function, as compared to golden hamsters and mice, was seen in rats at 100 ppm. At this concentration a highly increased number of thyroid and pituitary gland tumors was observed in rats. In golden hamsters and mice, no tumor induction was seen.

  18. Daytime wakefulness following a bedtime oral dose of zolpidem 20 mg, flunitrazepam 2 mg and placebo.

    PubMed Central

    Bensimon, G; Foret, J; Warot, D; Lacomblez, L; Thiercelin, J F; Simon, P

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of zolpidem 20 mg, flunitrazepam 2 mg and placebo, administered at bed time, were studied in 12 healthy young male volunteers. 2. The assessments included, at awakening, subjective ratings of overnight sleep, cognitive function, psychomotor performance (digit symbol substitution, choice reaction time, flicker fusion threshold), subjective ratings of alertness, and plasma assay of residual drug concentration. Daytime sleep propensity during the day after dosing was evaluated with the multiple sleep latency test. 3. Compared with placebo, both active drugs improved subjective assessment of the ease of getting to sleep. At awakening, under flunitrazepam treatment, the reduction of performance, on memory and psychomotor tests, paralleled an increased subjective rating of sleepiness, but zolpidem treatment left subjects unimpaired compared with placebo. Similarly, daytime sleep propensity was enhanced throughout the following day under flunitrazepam treatment, but not under zolpidem treatment. Plasma assay for residual drug concentration at awakening found significant amounts of flunitrazepam and marginal amounts of zolpidem. 4. Results indicate that zolpidem 20 mg is devoid of residual effects in a range of tasks that were sensitive enough to demonstrate a prolonged wakefulness impairment following flunitrzepam 2 mg in healthy volunteers. PMID:2223425

  19. A study to determine the pharmacokinetics of gatifloxacin following a single oral dose.

    PubMed

    Mandal, U; Musmade, P; Ghosh, A; Chakraborty, Mita; Jayakumar, M; Rajan, D Senthil; Chakravarty, M; Pal, T K; Chattaraj, T K; Roy, Krishnangshu; Banerjee, S N

    2004-09-01

    Gatifloxacin is a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone that offers enhanced Gram-positive activity and anaerobic coverage to other fluoroquinolones. The pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax, AUCo-t, tmax) of this drug have been evaluated to compare the single dose (400mg) bioavailability of gatifloxacin with the reference formulation. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with U-V detector set at 290 nm has been used to determine plasma concentration of 12 human volunteers as per DCGI (Drug Controller General of India) guidelines. The method has been validated over a linear range of 0.25 to 8 microg/ml from plasma. The minimum quantifiable concentration has been set at 0.25 microg/ml (% CV < 10%). The pharmacokinetic parameters are: Cmax = 4.366 +/- 0.44 microg/ml at tmax = 1.83 +/- 0.44 hour, AUCO0-t = 25.26 +/- 2.91 microg hour/ml, AUCo-inf = 33.68 +/- 4.31 microg hour/ml, Kel = 0.094 +/- 0.024/hour and t1/2 = 8.0 +/- 1.92 hour. PMID:15887835

  20. Enhancement of Energy Expenditure following a Single Oral Dose of Flavan-3-Ols Associated with an Increase in Catecholamine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Yuta; Mikome, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Osakabe, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Numerous clinical studies have reported that ingestion of chocolate reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. In this murine study, the metabolic-enhancing activity of a 10 mg/kg mixture of flavan-3-ol fraction derived from cocoa (FL) was compared with the same single dose of (-)-epicatechin (EC). Resting energy expenditure (REE) was significantly increased in mice treated with the FL versus the group administered the distilled water vehicle (Cont) during periods of ad libitum feeding and fasting. Mice were euthanized under the effect of anesthesia 2, 5, and 20 hr after treatment with FL or Cont while subsequently fasting. The mRNA levels of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1?) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) were significantly increased 2 hr after administration of FL. UCP-3 and PGC-1? in the gastrocnemius were significantly increased 2 and 5 hr after administration of the FL. The concentrations of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) 1? were found to be significant in the gastrocnemius of mice 2 and 5 hr after ingesting FL. However, these changes were not observed following treatment with EC. Plasma was collected for measurement of catecholamine levels in other animals euthanized by decapitation 2 and 4 hr after their respective group treatment. Plasma adrenaline level was significantly elevated 2 hr after treatment with FL; however, this change was not observed following the administration of EC alone. The present results indicated that FL significantly enhanced systemic energy expenditure, as evidenced by an accompanying increase in the type of gene expression responsible for thermogenesis and lipolysis, whereas EC exhibited this less robustly or effectively. It was suggested the possible interaction between thermogenic and lipolytic effects and the increase in plasma catecholamine concentrations after administration of a single oral dose of FL. PMID:25375880

  1. The short- and long-term effects of orally administered high-dose reduced graphene oxide nanosheets on mouse behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Zhang, Zheyu; Liu, Yayun; Chu, Maoquan; Yang, Chengyu; Li, Wenhao; Shao, Yuxiang; Yue, Yan; Xu, Rujiao

    2015-11-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO), a carbon-based nanomaterial, has enormous potential in biomedical research, including in vivo cancer therapeutics. Concerns over the toxicity remain outstanding and must be investigated before clinical application. The effect of rGO exposure on animal behaviors, such as learning and memory abilities, has not been clarified. Herein, we explored the short- and long-term effects of orally administered rGO on mouse behaviors, including general locomotor activity level, balance and neuromuscular coordination, exploratory and anxiety behaviors, and learning and memory abilities using open-field, rotarod, and Morris water maze tests. Compared with mice administered buffer-dispersed mouse chow or buffer alone, mice receiving a high dose of small or large rGO nanosheets showed little change in exploratory, anxiety-like, or learning and memory behaviors, although general locomotor activity, balance, and neuromuscular coordination were initially affected, which the mechanisms (e.g. the influence of rGO exposure on the activity of superoxide dismutase in mouse serum) were discussed. The results presented in this work look to provide a deep understanding of the in vivo toxicity of rGO to animals, especially its effect on learning and memory and other behaviors. PMID:26276695

  2. Threshold dose for peanut: Risk characterization based upon diagnostic oral challenge of a series of 286 peanut-allergic individuals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve L; Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Crevel, Rene W R; Sheffield, David; Morisset, Martine; Dumont, P; Remington, Benjamin C; Baumert, Joseph L

    2010-03-01

    Clinical records of 286 consecutive patients reacting positively with objective symptoms to double-blind, placebo-controlled oral peanut challenges at University Hospital, Nancy, France were examined for individual No Observed Adverse Effect Levels (NOAELs) and Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Levels (LOAELs). After fitting to a log-normal probability distribution model, the ED(10) and ED(05) were 14.4 and 7.3mg (expressed as whole peanut), respectively, with 95% lower confidence intervals of 10.7 and 5.2mg, respectively. Compared to results from a previous study where the ED(10) was based upon individual peanut thresholds gleaned from 12 publications, a statistically significant difference was observed between the ED(50)'s, but not the ED(10)'s of the two probability distribution curves. The Nancy patient group contains more sensitive subjects than the group from the published literature thus contributing to the observed differences. Minimum eliciting dose-distributions for patients with histories of more severe reactions (grade 4 or 5; 40 subjects) did not differ significantly from those of patients with histories of less severe reactions (grades 1-3; 123 subjects). These data and this modeling approach could be used to establish population thresholds for peanut-allergic consumers and thereby provide a sound basis for allergen control measures in the food industry. PMID:20034533

  3. Oral integrity and salivary profile in myeloma patients undergoing high-dose therapy followed by autologous SCT.

    PubMed

    Avivi, I; Avraham, S; Koren-Michowitz, M; Zuckerman, T; Aviv, A; Ofran, Y; Benyamini, N; Nagler, A; Rowe, J M; Nagler, R M

    2009-05-01

    The underlying mechanism of high-dose therapy (HDT)-related oral mucositis (OM) may be partly mediated by alterations in the normal salivary composition. This study evaluated salivary antioxidant and immunological capacities observed in myeloma patients suffering from HDT-related OM, and assessed potential contribution of these factors to OM development. Twenty-five consecutive myeloma patients treated with melphalan 200 mg/m(2) followed by autologous SCT were enrolled. Patients underwent a daily assessment for OM, and salivary samples were collected on days -3 and +7 of transplantation and analyzed for secretory IgA and antioxidant capacity. The degree of mucosal damage was assessed by measuring the salivary carbonyl and albumin (Alb) levels. OM, reported in 96% of patients, appeared to be most severe on 8 day after transplantation (range: +2 to +14). Clinical mucositis was associated with significant reduction in salivary secretory IgA (54%; P=0.05), and antioxidant activity, measured by total antioxidant status (40%; P=0.0004), antioxidant capacity (ImAnOx) (23%; P=0.002) and uric acid level (51%; P=0.006). The increase found in salivary Alb (119%; P=0.024) and carbonyl (28%; P=0.047) levels, indicates mucosal and oxidative damage, respectively. These salivary changes might enhance mucositis development and symptoms. Therapeutic interventions, enhancing antioxidative and immunological activities need to be investigated. PMID:19029961

  4. Characterization of pulmonary protein profiles in response to zinc oxide nanoparticles in mice: a 24-hour and 28-day follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chih-Hong; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Lai, Ching-Huang; Jones, Tim P; BéruBé, Kelly A; Hong, Gui-Bing; Ho, Kin-Fai; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Although zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are recognized to cause systemic disorders, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the time-dependent differences that occur after exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanistic differences at 24 hours and 28 days after the exposure of BALB/c mice to ZnONPs via intratracheal instillation. An isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the differential protein expression, biological processes, molecular functions, and pathways. A total of 18 and 14 proteins displayed significant changes in the lung tissues at 24 hours and 28 days after exposure, respectively, with the most striking changes being observed for S100-A9 protein. Metabolic processes and catalytic activity were the main biological processes and molecular functions, respectively, in the responses at the 24-hour and 28-day follow-up times. The glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway was continuously downregulated from 24 hours to 28 days, whereas detoxification pathways were activated at the 28-day time-point after exposure. A comprehensive understanding of the potential time-dependent effects of exposure to ZnONPs was provided, which highlights the metabolic mechanisms that may be important in the responses to ZnONP. PMID:26251593

  5. Oral iron supplements increase hepcidin and decrease iron absorption from daily or twice-daily doses in iron-depleted young women.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Diego; Goede, Jeroen S; Zeder, Christophe; Jiskra, Markus; Chatzinakou, Vaiya; Tjalsma, Harold; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Brittenham, Gary; Swinkels, Dorine W; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2015-10-22

    Iron supplements acutely increase hepcidin, but the duration and magnitude of the increase, its dose dependence, and its effects on subsequent iron absorption have not been characterized in humans. Better understanding of these phenomena might improve oral iron dosing schedules. We investigated whether the acute iron-induced increase in hepcidin influences iron absorption of successive daily iron doses and twice-daily iron doses. We recruited 54 nonanemic young women with plasma ferritin ?20 µg/L and conducted: (1) a dose-finding investigation with 40-, 60-, 80-, 160-, and 240-mg labeled Fe as [(57)Fe]-, [(58)Fe]-, or [(54)Fe]-FeSO4 given at 8:00 am fasting on 1 or on 2 consecutive days (study 1, n = 25; study 2, n = 16); and (2) a study giving three 60-mg Fe doses (twice-daily dosing) within 24 hours (study 3, n = 13). In studies 1 and 2, 24 hours after doses ?60 mg, serum hepcidin was increased (P < .01) and fractional iron absorption was decreased by 35% to 45% (P < .01). With increasing dose, fractional absorption decreased (P < .001), whereas absolute absorption increased (P < .001). A sixfold increase in iron dose (40-240 mg) resulted in only a threefold increase in iron absorbed (6.7-18.1 mg). In study 3, total iron absorbed from 3 doses (2 mornings and an afternoon) was not significantly greater than that from 2 morning doses. Providing lower dosages (40-80 mg Fe) and avoiding twice-daily dosing maximize fractional absorption. The duration of the hepcidin response supports alternate day supplementation, but longer-term effects of these schedules require further investigation. These clinical trials were registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT01785407 and #NCT02050932. PMID:26289639

  6. A Single Dose of Oral BCG Moreau Fails to Boost Systemic IFN-? Responses to Tuberculin in Children in the Rural Tropics: Evidence for a Barrier to Mucosal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Vaca, Maritza; Moncayo, Ana-Lucia; Cosgrove, Catherine A.; Chico, Martha E.; Castello-Branco, Luiz R.; Lewis, David J.; Cooper, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Immune responses to oral vaccines are impaired in populations living in conditions of poverty in developing countries, and there is evidence that concurrent geohelminth infections may contribute to this effect. We vaccinated 48 children living in rural communities in Ecuador with a single oral dose of 100?mg of BCG Moreau RDJ and measured the frequencies of tuberculin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells expressing IFN-? before and after vaccination. Vaccinated children had active ascariasis (n = 20) or had been infected but received short- (n = 13) or long-term (n = 15) repeated treatments with albendazole prior to vaccination to treat ascariasis. All children had a BCG scar from neonatal vaccination. There was no evidence of a boosting of postvaccination IFN-? responses in any of the 3 study groups. Our data provide support for the presence of a barrier to oral vaccination among children from the rural tropics that appeared to be independent of concurrent ascariasis. PMID:22287972

  7. Single oral dose toxicity test of polycalcium, a mixed composition of polycan and calcium lactate-gluconate 1:9 (G/G) in SD rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Wan; Choi, Jae-Suk; Ha, Yu-Mi; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Cho, Hyung-rae; Rha, Chae-hun; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2013-11-01

    The object of this study was to obtain acute oral toxicity information of Polycalcium, a mixed composition of Polycan and Calcium lactate-gluconate 1:9 (g/g), in Sprague-Dawely (SD) rats. In order to investigate the toxicity and identify target organs, Polycalcium were once orally administered to female and male SD rats at dose levels of 2000, 1000, 500 and 0 (control) mg/kg body weights. The mortality, changes on body weight and clinical signs were monitored during 14 days after treatment with gross observation, changes on the organ weights and histopathology of principle organs and treatment sites based on the recommendation of KFDA Guidelines [2009-116, 2009]. As the results of single oral treatment of Polycalcium, no treatment related mortalities were observed within 14 days after end of treatment up to 2000 mg/kg, the limited dosage of rodents in the both genders. In addition, no Polycalcium treatment related changes on the body and organ weights, clinical signs, necropsy and histopathological findings were detected. The results obtained in this study suggest that the Polycalcium is non-toxic in rats. The LD50 and approximate LD in rats after single oral dose of Polycalcium were considered over 2000 mg/kg in both female and male, respectively. PMID:24191319

  8. Bacterial Ghosts as an Oral Vaccine: a Single Dose of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Bacterial Ghosts Protects Mice against Lethal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Haller, Christoph; Haidinger, Wolfgang; Atrasheuskaya, Alena; Bukin, Eugenij; Lubitz, Werner; Ignatyev, Georgy

    2005-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a bacterial pathogen that is associated with several life-threatening diseases for humans. The combination of protein E-mediated cell lysis to produce EHEC ghosts and staphylococcal nuclease A to degrade DNA was used for the development of an oral EHEC vaccine. The lack of genetic material in the oral EHEC bacterial-ghost vaccine abolished any hazard of horizontal gene transfer of resistance genes or pathogenic islands to resident gut flora. Intragastric immunization of mice with EHEC ghosts without the addition of any adjuvant induced cellular and humoral immunity. Immunized mice challenged at day 55 showed 86% protection against lethal challenge with a heterologous EHEC strain after single-dose oral immunization and 93.3% protection after one booster at day 28, whereas the controls showed 26.7% and 30% survival, respectively. These results indicate that it is possible to develop an efficacious single-dose oral EHEC bacterial-ghost vaccine. PMID:16040994

  9. A comparative study between the efficacy of oral cimetidine and low-dose systemic meglumine antimoniate (MA) with a standard dose of systemic MA in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Shanehsaz, Siavash M; Ishkhanian, Silva

    2015-07-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a major world health problem, which is increasing in incidence. Pentavalent antimonials have been considered as standard treatment for leishmaniasis. Many studies are performed to find an effective and safe treatment for patients with CL. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of oral cimetidine and low-dose systemic meglumine antimoniate (MA) with standard dose of systemic MA in the treatment of CL. This study was, to our knowledge, the first to show the effect of combination therapy oral cimetidine and MA in the treatment of CL all over the world. In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 120 patients with suspected CL were referred to the Aleppo University Hospital Clinic; 90 of these patients with the clinical and parasitological diagnosis of CL were recruited and were randomly divided into three treatment groups of 30 subjects each. Group A was treated with MA 60 mg/kg/d IM and oral placebo. Groups B and C received MA 30 mg/kg/d IM and oral cimetidine 1200 mg/d, MA 30 mg/kg/d IM and oral placebo, respectively. The duration of treatment was three weeks for all groups. The effectiveness of the treatment was classified in three levels as complete response, partial response, and no response. Data were analyzed by SPSS 19 using KI square, Mann-Whitney, Kaplan-Mayer, and ANOVA tests. At the end of the study (12 weeks), the rate of complete response was 91.11% in the first group, and 84.66% and 78.33% in groups B and C, respectively (P < 0.05). The highest response rate was for the group treated with a standard dose of systemic MA and placebo. Our results showed that although oral cimetidine and low-dose systemic MA had less efficacy in comparison to a standard dose of systemic MA in the treatment of CL, it still can be considered as a replacement therapy in high-risk patients (such as patients with heart, kidney, and/or liver disease) under close supervision of physicians. PMID:26108265

  10. Prediction of Acute Radiation Mucositis using an Oral Mucosal Dose Surface Model in Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Musha, Atsushi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Yokoo, Satoshi; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dose-response relationship for development of acute radiation mucositis (ARM) using an oral mucosal dose surface model (OMDS-model) in carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) for head and neck tumors. Methods Thirty-nine patients receiving C-ion RT for head and neck cancer were evaluated for ARM (once per week for 6 weeks) according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 4.0, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring systems. The irradiation schedule typically used was 64 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE)] in 16 fractions for 4 weeks. Maximum point doses in the palate and tongue were compared with ARM in each patient. Results The location of the ARM coincided with the high-dose area in the OMDS-model. There was a clear dose-response relationship between maximum point dose and ARM grade assessed using the RTOG criteria but not the CTCAE. The threshold doses for grade 2–3 ARM in the palate and tongue were 43.0 Gy(RBE) and 54.3 Gy(RBE), respectively. Conclusions The OMDS-model was useful for predicting the location and severity of ARM. Maximum point doses in the model correlated well with grade 2–3 ARM. PMID:26512725

  11. Assessing sediment toxicity from navigational pools of the Upper Mississippi River using a 28-day Hyalella azteca test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemble, N.E.; Brunson, E.L.; Canfield, T.J.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the extent of sediment contamination in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) system after the flood of 1993, sediment samples were collected from 24 of the 26 navigational pools in the river and from one site in the Saint Croix River in the summer of 1994. Whole-sediment tests were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca for 28 days measuring the effects on survival, growth, and sexual maturation. Amphipod survival was significantly reduced in only one sediment (13B) relative to the control and reference sediments. Body length of amphipods was significantly reduced relative to the control and reference sediments in only one sample (26C). Sexual maturation was not significantly reduced in any treatment when compared to the control and reference sediments. No significant correlations were observed between survival, growth, and maturation to either the physical or chemical characteristics of the sediment samples from the river. When highly reliable effect range medians (ERMs) were used to evaluate sediment chemistry, 47 of 49 (96%) of the samples were correctly classified as nontoxic. These results indicate that sediment samples from the Upper Mississippi River are relatively uncontaminated compared to other areas of known contamination in the United States.

  12. Psychomotor performance during a 28 day head-down tilt with and without lower body negative pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traon, A. Pavy-le; de Feneyrols, A. Rous; Cornac, A.; Abdeseelam, R.; N'uygen, D.; Lazerges, M.; Güell, A.; Bes, A.

    Several factors may affect psychomotor performance in space: sensory-motor changes, sleep disturbances, psychological modifications induced by the social isolation and confinement. However, psychomotor performance is difficult to assess. A battery of standardized and computerized tests, so-called "Automated Portable Test System" (APTS) was devised to ascertain the cognitive, perceptive and motor abilities and their possible fluctuations according to environmental effects. Antiorthostatic bedrest, often used to simulate weightlessness, (particularly cardiovascular modifications) also constitutes a situation of social confinement and isolation. During two bedrest experiments (with head-down tilt of -6°) of 28 days each, we intended to assess psychomotor performance of 6 males so as to determine whether: —on the one hand, it could be altered by remaining in decubitus; —on the other, the Lower Body Negative Pressure sessions, designed to prevent orthostatic intolerance back on Earth, could improve the performance. To accomplish this, part of the APTS tests as well as an automated perceptive attention test were performed. No downgrading of psychomotor performance was observed. On the contrary, the tasks were more accurately performed over time. In order to assess the experimental conditions on the acquisition phase, the learning curves were modelled. A beneficial effect of the LBNP sessions on simple tests involving the visual-motor coordination and attention faculties can only be regarded as a mere trend. Methods used in this experiment are also discussed.

  13. Toxicological assessment of ?-(1-->6)-glucan (lasiodiplodan) in mice during a 28-day feeding study by gavage.

    PubMed

    Túrmina, Janaína A; Carraro, Emerson; Alves da Cunha, Mário A; Dekker, Robert F H; Barbosa, Aneli M; Dos Santos, Fábio Seidel; Silva, Luiz A; Malfatti, Carlos R M

    2012-01-01

    Studies evaluating the toxicity caused by fungal exopolysaccharides of the ?-(1-->6)-D-glucan type are rare. In this study, the toxicological effects of sub-chronic treatments with lasiodiplodan (?-(1-->6)-D-glucan from Lasiodiplodia theobromae MMPI) were evaluated in mice through the assessment of biochemical, hematological, and histopathological alterations. Thirty-two mice (16 male, 16 female) were used in this study divided in two groups; one group received lasiodiplodan (50 mg/kg body weight) daily for 28 days via gavage, and another (control group) received saline during the same period. Blood samples were collected via cardiac puncture for hematological and biochemical analyses. Liver, heart, kidney, and spleen were collected for histopathological analysis. Statistical analysis was performed through one-way analysis of variance and only p < 0.05 F-values were presented. Significant reduction in blood glucose in the male group (35%; p < 0.01), transaminases activity in both sexes (AST and ALT; ~35%; p < 0.05), and urea (20%; p < 0.01) in the female group was observed with the lasiodiplodan treatment. The results showed that sub-chronic treatments with lasiodiplodan did not generate hematological and histopathological alterations leading to signs of toxicity in healthy mice, independent of gender. PMID:23208465

  14. Repeated dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays using N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Tomomi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hori, Hisako; Fujii, Wataru; Ohyama, Wakako

    2015-03-01

    N-Methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) is a direct-acting mutagen that induces tumors in the glandular stomach, but not in the liver or colon, of rats after oral administration. To evaluate the performance of repeated dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus (MN) assays in young adult rats, MNNG was administered by oral gavage to male CD (SD) rats aged 6 weeks at doses of 0 (vehicle; 2.5% DMSO aqueous solution), 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, and 25mg/kg/day once daily for 14 and 28 days, and the MN frequencies were examined in the hepatocytes, glandular stomach cells, and colonic cells. The MN induction in immature erythrocytes in the bone marrow of these animals was also simultaneously evaluated. The frequencies of micronucleated (MNed) glandular stomach cells were significantly increased in all MNNG treatment groups in a dose-dependent manner in both repeated dose studies. In contrast, the frequencies of MNed hepatocytes and colonic cells were not significantly increased compared to the vehicle control. In the bone marrow, a small but significant increase in the frequency of MNed immature erythrocytes was observed only at the highest dose in the 28-day study. Since a clear positive result in the glandular stomach agrees with the tissue specificity of tumor induction by this chemical, the MN assay with the glandular stomach, which is a direct contact site with high concentrations of test substances administered by oral gavage, may be useful for detecting genotoxic compounds that are short-lived in vivo, such as MNNG. PMID:25892628

  15. [Effects of KS-R1 (ampicillin suppository) and ampicillin oral dosing on fecal flora of children].

    PubMed

    Motohiro, T; Tanaka, K; Koga, T; Shimada, Y; Tomita, N; Katabuchi, Y; Sakata, Y; Fujimoto, T; Ono, E; Nishiyama, T

    1985-04-01

    A newly developed product, KS-R1 (a suppository containing 250 mg potency of ampicillin (ABPC)), was given to 7 children (5 boys and 2 girls) ranging from 4 years and 5 months to 8 years and 10 months in age, 3 times a day (average daily dose, 62.4 mg/kg) for 5 days. As a control, the same amount of ABPC dry syrup was given orally to 7 children (4 boys and 3 girls) ranging from 2 years and 8 months to 7 years and 7 months in age, 3 times a day (average daily dose, 55.3 mg/kg) for 5 days. The effects of these 2 preparations on the bacterial flora of the feces were investigated, and concentrations of ABPC in the feces and sensitivities of the isolated strains to ABPC were determined. The results were as follows. As for Gram-negative bacilli in the feces from children given KS-R1, there was no change in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Citrobacter sp. and Enterobacter sp. which were isolated from many children 3 days after the end of treatment, but they did not show any constant pattern of change in mean number. Other species did not show any pattern of increase in the number of children from whom they were isolated, or in the number of bacteria during the course after the beginning of treatment. The total number of bacteria identified as Enterobacteriaceae was at the level of 10(8) cells/g on any day of examination. Of Gram-negative bacilli other than Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas sp. showed no constant pattern of change in number. On the other hand, of Gram-positive bacteria, there was no constant pattern of change in the number of Staphylococcus aureus, Coagulase-negative Staphylococci began to be isolated from many children 5 days after the beginning of treatment and were isolated from all children 5 days after the end of treatment, but there was no tendency for the mean number to increase. Enterococcus sp. was not isolated from 3 children 3 days after the beginning of treatment, and was decreased in number by one order in 3 out of other 4 children as compared with before-treatment. However, this species was isolated from all children 3 days after the end of treatment, and the mean number of bacteria was similar to that before-treatment although the number of bacteria was different in individual children.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3849603

  16. Pharmacokinetics of a single dose of intravenous and oral meloxicam in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and great horned owls (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Claude; Gamble, Kathryn C; Boothe, Dawn M

    2013-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic data were determined after a single dose of meloxicam in red-tailed hawks (RTH; Buteo jamaicensis) and great horned owls (GHO; Bubo virginianus). In a nonrandomized crossover design, individual birds of each species received 1 dose of intravenous meloxicam (0.5 mg/kg i.v.; n = 7 for each species) followed by a 2-week washout period, and then each received 1 dose of oral meloxicam (0.5 mg/kg PO; n = 5 for each species). Blood samples were collected intermittently after administration, and meloxicam was detected in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography. Time versus plasma concentration data were subjected to noncompartmental analysis. Red-tailed hawks were determined to have the shortest elimination half-life for meloxicam (0.49 +/- 0.5 hours) of any species documented. Great horned owls also eliminated meloxicam very rapidly (0.78 +/- 0.52 hours). Great horned owls achieved higher plasma concentrations (368 +/- 87 ng/mL) of meloxicam than RTH (182 +/- 167 ng/mL) after oral administration, although RTH had a markedly higher volume of distribution (832 +/- 711 mL/kg) than GHO (137.6 +/- 62.7 mL/kg). The differences in meloxicam pharmacokinetics between these 2 raptor species supports the need for species-dependent studies and underlines the challenges of extrapolating drug dosages between species. Results of this study suggest that the current recommended once-daily dosing interval of oral meloxicam is unlikely to maintain plasma concentrations anticipated to be therapeutic in either RTH or GHO, and practical dosing options are questionable for this nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drug in these raptor species. PMID:24344511

  17. Implications of dose-dependent target tissue absorption for linear and non-linear/threshold approaches in development of a cancer-based oral toxicity factor for hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Haney, J

    2015-07-01

    Dose-dependent changes in target tissue absorption have important implications for determining the most defensible approach for developing a cancer-based oral toxicity factor for hexavalent chromium (CrVI). For example, mouse target tissue absorption per unit dose is an estimated 10-fold lower at the CrVI dose corresponding to the federal maximum contaminant level (MCL) than at the USEPA draft oral slope factor (SFo) point of departure dose. This decreasing target tissue absorption as doses decrease to lower, more environmentally-relevant doses is inconsistent with linear low-dose extrapolation. The shape of the dose-response curve accounting for this toxicokinetic phenomenon would clearly be non-linear. Furthermore, these dose-dependent differences in absorption indicate that the magnitude of risk overestimation by a linear low-dose extrapolation approach (e.g., SFo) increases and is likely to span one or perhaps more orders of magnitude as it is used to predict risk at progressively lower, more environmentally-relevant doses. An additional apparent implication is that no single SFo can reliably predict risk across potential environmental doses (e.g., doses corresponding to water concentrations?the federal MCL). A non-linear approach, consistent with available mode of action data, is most scientifically defensible for derivation of an oral toxicity factor for CrVI-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25910675

  18. Low dose evaluation of the antiandrogen flutamide following a Mode of Action approach.

    PubMed

    Sarrabay, A; Hilmi, C; Tinwell, H; Schorsch, F; Pallardy, M; Bars, R; Rouquié, D

    2015-12-15

    The dose-response characterization of endocrine mediated toxicity is an on-going debate which is controversial when exploring the nature of the dose-response curve and the effect at the low-end of the curve. To contribute to this debate we have assessed the effects of a wide range of dose levels of the antiandrogen flutamide (FLU) on 7-week male Wistar rats. FLU was administered by oral gavage at doses of 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg/day for 28days. To evaluate the reproducibility, the study was performed 3 times. The molecular initiating event (MIE; AR antagonism), the key events (LH increase, Leydig cell proliferation and hyperplasia increases) and associated events involved in the mode of action (MOA) of FLU induced testicular toxicity were characterized to address the dose response concordance. Results showed no effects at low doses (<0.1mg/kg/day) for the different key events studied. The histopathological changes (Leydig cell hyperplasia) observed at 1 and 10mg/kg/day were associated with an increase in steroidogenesis gene expression in the testis from 1mg/kg/day, as well as an increase in testosterone blood level at 10mg/kg/day. Each key event dose-response was in good concordance with the MOA of FLU on the testis. From the available results, only monotonic dose-response curves were observed for the MIE, the key events, associated events and in effects observed in other sex related tissues. All the results, so far, show that the reference endocrine disruptor FLU induces threshold effects in a standard 28-day toxicity study on adult male rats. PMID:26485406

  19. Studies on combined effects of organophosphates and heavy metals in birds. I. Plasma and brain cholinesterase in Coturnix quail fed methyl mercury and orally dosed with parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Ludke, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    We found that mercury potentiated the toxicity and biochemical effects of parathion. Male Coturnix quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were fed a sublethal concentration of morsodren (4 ppm as methyl mercury) for 18 weeks. This resulted in an accumulation of 21.0 ppm of mercury in the liver and 8.4 ppm in the carcass. Birds fed clean feed and those fed morsodren-treated feed were orally dosed with 2, 4, 6, 8,and 10 mg/kg parathion, and their 48-h survival times compared. The computed LD50 was 5.86mg/kg in birds not fed morsodren and 4.24 in those fed the heavy metal. When challenged with a sublethal, oral dose of parathion (1.0 mg/kg), morsodren-fed birds exhibited significantly greater inhibition of plasma and brain cholinesterase activity than controls dosed with parathion. Brain cholinesterase activity was inhibited 41% in morsodren-fed birds and 26in clean-fed birds dosed with parathion, which suggested that the increase in parathion toxicity in the presence of morsodren was directly related to the inhibitation of brain cholinesterase.

  20. Opioid switch from low dose of oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl matrix patch for patients with stable thoracic malignancy-related pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effectiveness and safety of switch from oral oxycodone to fentanyl patch is little known. Here, we investigated if early phase opioid switch from low dose of oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl matrix patch provided any benefits for patients with thoracic malignancy and stable cancer-related pain. Methods This open-label two-centered prospective study enrolled patients with thoracic malignancy suffering persistent malignancy-related pain with numeric rating scale of pain intensity???3 which had been controlled by oral oxycodone???20 mg/day. Eligible patients switched from oral oxycodone to 12.5 ?g/h of transdermal fentanyl matrix patch. The dose was allowed to be titrated upwards every 3 day by 25-50%, except for the first increase from 12.5 ?g/hr to 25 ?g/hr,until achieving adequate pain control. The data on patients’ global assessment scores measured on a five-step scale, an 11-point numeric rating scale of pain intensity, the severity of adverse effects using a four-point categorical rating scale, and the Epworth sleepiness scale questionnaire were collected for 15 days. Results Forty-nine eligible patients were analyzed. Overall patients’ satisfaction score significantly improved from day 1 (2.7?±?0.9) to day 15 (2.3?±?0.9) (p?dose of fentanyl patch on day 8 and 15 from the opioid switch. There was a significant difference in sleepiness throughout the study period, though no difference was detected in pain intensity and other adverse effects. Conclusion Transdermal fentanyl matrix patch is an alternative analgesic option for a stable cancer pain in patients with thoracic malignancies. PMID:25313295

  1. Safety and immunogenicity of single-dose live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR in 5-9-year-old Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Suharyono; Simanjuntak, C; Witham, N; Punjabi, N; Heppner, D G; Losonsky, G; Totosudirjo, H; Rifai, A R; Clemens, J; Lim, Y L

    1992-09-19

    Oral vaccines offer great promise as public-health measures to prevent disease in less-developed countries. CVD 103-HgR, a genetically engineered, attenuated, Vibrio cholerae O1 strain has proved effective in industrialised countries. We have assessed the safety, immunogenicity, and excretion of this live cholera vaccine in children in north Jakarta, Indonesia. 412 children aged 5-9 years received single doses of 5 x 10(6), 5 x 10(7), 5 x 10(8), 5 x 10(9), or 1 x 10(10) colony forming units (CFU) of CVD 103-HgR or placebo (5 x 10(8) inactivated Escherichia coli K-12) with buffer. All doses were well tolerated. The 5 x 10(8) CFU dose, which is highly immunogenic in subjects in industrialised countries (greater than 90% seroconversion), elicited seroconversions of vibriocidal antibody in only 16% of Indonesian children. By contrast, a single 5 x 10(9) CFU dose of vaccine resulted in high rates (75% and 87%) of seroconversion with two different batches of vaccine. A batch prepared with a centrifugation step gave significantly higher geometric mean titres (16-fold increase over baseline) than did a batch in which there was a filtration step between fermentation and lyophilisation (10-fold increase over baseline). At a 5 x 10(9) CFU dose, CVD 103-HgR is well tolerated and highly immunogenic in Indonesian children and should therefore be further investigated for use as a one-dose live oral cholera vaccine in developing countries. PMID:1355798

  2. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of the Anti-Orthopoxvirus Compound ST-246 following a Single Daily Oral Dose for 14 Days in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Honeychurch, Kady M.; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R.; Leeds, Janet M.; Bolken, Tove' C.; Jones, Kevin F.; Jordan, Robert; Marbury, Thomas; Ruckle, Jon; Mee-Lee, Denis; Ross, Eric; Lichtenstein, Israel; Pickens, Margaret; Corrado, Michael; Clarke, Jean M.; Frimm, Annie M.

    2012-01-01

    ST-246 is being evaluated as a treatment for pathogenic orthopoxvirus infections in humans. To this end, a phase 2, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial was conducted to assess the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of ST-246 when administered as a single daily oral dose (400 mg or 600 mg) for 14 days in fed adult volunteers. ST-246 was safe and well tolerated, with no deaths or serious adverse events reported during the study. There was a low incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), the most common of which were mild nausea and headache. There were no clinically significant results from laboratory assessments, vital sign measurements, physical examinations, or electrocardiograms. The PK and dose proportionality of ST-246 were determined. The PK analysis showed that steady state was achieved by day 5 for the ST-246 400-mg treatment group and by day 6 for the 600-mg group. The dose proportionality analysis showed that the 400- and 600-mg ratio of dose-normalized peak drug concentration in plasma (Cmax) and relative exposure for each dosing interval (AUC?) ranged from 80% to 85%. However, the 90% confidence intervals did not include 1.0, so dose proportionality could not be concluded. Overall, ST-246 was shown to be safe, and the PK was predictable. These results support further testing of ST-246 in a multicenter pivotal clinical safety study for licensure application. PMID:22777041

  3. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Oral Testosterone Enanthate Plus Dutasteride for 4 Weeks in Normal Men: Implications for Male Hormonal Contraception

    PubMed Central

    AMORY, JOHN K.; KALHORN, THOMAS F.; PAGE, STEPHANIE T.

    2009-01-01

    Oral administration of testosterone enanthate (TE) and dutasteride increases serum testosterone and might be useful for male hormonal contraception. To ascertain the contraceptive potential of oral TE and dutasteride by determining the degree of gonadotropin suppression mediated by 4 weeks of oral TE plus dutasteride, 20 healthy young men were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of either 400 mg oral TE twice daily or 800 mg oral TE once daily in a double-blinded, controlled fashion at a single site. All men received 0.5 mg dutasteride daily. Blood for measurement of serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone, dihydrotesterone (DHT), and estradiol was obtained prior to treatment, weekly during treatment, and 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 13, 14, 16, 20, and 24 hours after the morning dose on the last day of treatment. FSH was significantly suppressed throughout treatment with 800 mg TE once daily and after 4 weeks of treatment with 400 mg TE twice daily. LH was significantly suppressed after 2 weeks of treatment with 800 mg TE, but not with 400 mg TE. Serum DHT was suppressed and serum estradiol increased during treatment in both groups. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was suppresed during treatment, but liver function tests, hematocrit, creatinine, mood, and sexual function were unaffected. The administration of 800 mg oral TE daily combined with dutasteride for 28 days significantly suppresses gonadotropins without untoward side effects and might have utility as part of a male hormonal contraceptive regimen. PMID:18046048

  4. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter, 28-Day, Polysomnographic Study of Gabapentin in Transient Insomnia Induced by Sleep Phase Advance

    PubMed Central

    Furey, Sandy A.; Hull, Steven G.; Leibowitz, Mark T.; Jayawardena, Shyamalie; Roth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate multiple doses of gabapentin 250 mg on polysomnography (PSG) and participant-reported sleep assessments in a 5-h phase advance insomnia model. Methods: Adults reporting occasional disturbed sleep received gabapentin 250 mg (n = 128) or placebo (n = 128). On Days 1 and 28, participants received medication 30 min before bedtime and were in bed from 17:00 to 01:00, ?5 h before their habitual bedtime. Sleep was assessed by PSG, a post sleep questionnaire, and the Karolinska Sleep Diary. Next-day residual effects and tolerability were evaluated. On Days 2-27, participants took medication at home 30 min before their habitual bedtime. Results: Treatment-group demographics were comparable. Gabapentin resulted in significantly less PSG wake after sleep onset (WASO) compared with placebo on Day 1 (primary endpoint, mean: 107.0 versus 149.1 min, p ? 0.001) and Day 28 (113.6 versus 152.3 min, p = 0.002), and significantly greater total sleep time (TST; Day 1: 347.6 versus 283.9 min; Day 28: 335.3 versus 289.1 min) (p ? 0.001). Participant-reported WASO and TST also showed significant treatment effects on both days. Gabapentin was associated with less %stage1 on Day 1, and greater %REM on Day 28, versus placebo. During home use, gabapentin resulted in significantly less participant-reported WASO and higher ratings of sleep quality. Gabapentin was well tolerated (most common adverse events: headache, somnolence) with no evidence of next-day impairment. Conclusion: Gabapentin 250 mg resulted in greater PSG and participant-reported sleep duration following a 5-h phase advance on Day 1 and Day 28 of use without evidence of next-day impairment, and greater sleep duration during at-home use. Citation: Furey SA, Hull SG, Leibowitz MT, Jayawardena S, Roth T. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, 28-day, polysomnographic study of gabapentin in transient insomnia induced by sleep phase advance. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(10):1101-1109. PMID:25317091

  5. Comparison of High-Dose Corticosteroid Pulse Therapy and Combination Therapy Using Oral Cyclosporine with Low-Dose Corticosteroid in Severe Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, In Kwon; Ko, Eun Jung; No, Yeon A; Lim, Ee Seok; Park, Kui Young; Li, Kapsok; Kim, Beom Joon; Seo, Seong Jun; Kim, Myeung Nam

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe alopecia areata (AA) is resistant to conventional treatment. Although systemic oral corticosteroids are an effective treatment for patients with severe AA, those drugs have many adverse effects. Corticosteroid pulse therapy has been introduced to increase therapeutic effects and reduce adverse effects. However, the treatment modality in severe AA is still controversial. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of corticosteroid pulse therapy in patients with severe AA compared with treatment with oral cyclosporine with corticosteroid. Methods A total of 82 patients with severe AA were treated with corticosteroid pulse therapy, and 60 patients were treated with oral cyclosporine with corticosteroid. Both groups were retrospectively evaluated for therapeutic efficacy according to AA type and disease duration. Results In 82 patients treated with corticosteroid pulse therapy, 53 (64.6%) were good responders (>50% hair regrowth). Patients with the plurifocal (PF) type of AA and those with a short disease duration (?3 months) showed better responses. In 60 patients treated with oral cyclosporine with corticosteroid, 30 (50.0%) patients showed a good response. The AA type or disease duration, however, did not significantly affect the response to treatment. Conclusion Corticosteroid pulse therapy may be a better treatment option than combination therapy in severe AA patients with the PF type. PMID:26719635

  6. Biodistribution of PLGA and PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles after repeat-dose oral delivery in F344 rats for 7 days

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Sara M; Darensbourg, Caleb; Cross, Linda; Stout, Rhett; Coulon, Diana; Astete, Carlos E; Morgan, Timothy; Sabliov, Cristina M

    2015-01-01

    Aim To quantify in vivo the biodistribution of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) and PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles (PLGA/Chi NPs) and assess if the positive charge of chitosan significantly enhances nanoparticle absorption in the GI tract. Material & methods PLGA and PLGA/Chi NPs covalently linked to tetramethylrhodamine-5-isothiocyanate (TRITC) were orally administered to F344 rats for 7 days, and the biodistribution of fluorescent NPs was analyzed in different organs. Results The highest amount of particles (% total dose/g) was detected for both treatments in the spleen, followed by intestine and kidney, and then by liver, lung, heart and brain, with no significant difference between PLGA and PLGA/Chi NPs. Conclusion Only a small percentage of orally delivered NPs was detected in the analyzed organs. The positive charge conferred by chitosan was not sufficient to improve the absorption of the PLGA/Chi NPs over that of PLGA NPs. PMID:25491670

  7. Evaluation of Oral and IntravenousRoute Pharmacokinetics, Plasma Protein Binding and Uterine Tissue Dose Metrics of Bisphenol A: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waechter, John M.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Covington, Tammie R.; Barton, H. A.

    2005-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact and other applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed to provide a physiological context in which the processes controlling BPA pharmacokinetics (e.g. plasma protein binding, enterohepatic recirculation of the glucuronide (BPAG)) could be incorporated. A uterine tissue compartment was included to allow the correlation of simulated ER binding of BPA with increases in uterine wet weight (UWW) in rats. Intravenous and oral-route blood kinetics of BPA in rats and oral-route plasma and urinary elimination kinetics in humans were well described by the model. Simulations of rat oral-route BPAG pharmacokinetics were less exact, most likely the result of oversimplification of the GI tract compartment. Comparison of metabolic clearance rates derived from fitting rat i.v. and oral-route data implied that intestinal glucuronidation of BPA is significant. In rats but not humans, terminal elimination rates were strongly influenced by enterohepatic recirculation. In the absence of BPA binding to plasma proteins, simulations showed high ER occupancy at doses without uterine effects. Restricting free BPA to the measured unbound amount demonstrated the importance of including plasma binding in BPA kinetic models: the modeled relationship between ER occupancy and UWW increases was consistent with expectations for a receptor mediated response with low ER occupancy at doses with no response and increasing occupancy with larger increases in UWW.

  8. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of single, oral doses of GSK1278863, a novel HIF-prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, in healthy Japanese and Caucasian subjects.

    PubMed

    Hara, Katsutoshi; Takahashi, Naoki; Wakamatsu, Akira; Caltabiano, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and safety of GSK1278863, a novel prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, following a single oral administration of GSK1278863 from 10 to 100 mg or placebo in Japanese (n = 19), and 10, 25 and 100 mg in Caucasians (n = 14). Dose-proportional increases were observed in AUCinf of GSK1278863 in both ethnic groups, with a 1.3-1.5-fold higher exposure seen in Japanese relative to Caucasians for all doses. This difference in exposure can be mainly explained by the observed differences in body weights between the two groups. Statistically significant increases in erythropoietin (EPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and reticulocyte counts were observed in Japanese subjects after the 50 and 100 mg dose as compared to placebo. In Caucasians, similar to Japanese, EPO and VEGF levels were observed to be increased in response to the 100 mg dose. Drug-related adverse events, including headache and abdominal pain were reported in 3 Japanese subjects, while headache was reported in 3 Caucasians. In conclusion, GSK1278863 was well tolerated, with dose-proportional increases in exposure observed in both groups. There was no evidence of ethnic differences between Japanese and Caucasian with regard to PK or PD. PMID:26643993

  9. Fosfomycin trometamol: a review of its use as a single-dose oral treatment for patients with acute lower urinary tract infections and pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2013-11-01

    Fosfomycin trometamol (fosfomycin tromethamine) [Monuril(®), Monurol(®), Monural(®)] is approved in numerous countries worldwide, mainly for the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Fosfomycin has good in vitro activity against common uropathogens, such as Escherichia coli (including extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-producing E. coli), Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and the susceptibility of uropathogens to fosfomycin has remained relatively stable over time. A single oral dose of fosfomycin trometamol 3 g (the approved dosage) achieves high concentrations in urine. Results of recent randomized trials indicate that single-dose fosfomycin trometamol had similar clinical and/or bacteriological efficacy to 3- to 7-day regimens of ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, cotrimoxazole or nitrofurantoin in women with uncomplicated lower UTIs. In addition, single-dose fosfomycin trometamol had similar bacteriological efficacy to a 5-day course of cefuroxime axetil or a 7-day course of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid in pregnant women with asymptomatic bacteriuria, and similar clinical and/or bacteriological efficacy to a 5-day course of cefuroxime axetil or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or a 3-day course of ceftibuten in pregnant women with a lower UTI. Single-dose fosfomycin trometamol was generally well tolerated, with gastrointestinal adverse events (e.g. diarrhoea, nausea) reported most commonly. In conclusion, single-dose fosfomycin trometamol is an important option for the first-line empirical treatment of uncomplicated lower UTIs. PMID:24202878

  10. Phase I/II Study of Sorafenib in Combination with Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Low-Dose Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Ueshima, Kazuomi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kumada, Takashi; Chung, Hobyung; Hagiwara, Satoru; Inoue, Tatsuo; Yada, Norihisa; Kitai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a phase I/II study in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to determine the recommended dose, as well as the safety and efficacy, of combination therapy of sorafenib with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) using low dose cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Cohorts consisting of 3-6 patients with HCC received an escalated dose of CDDP and 5-FU until a maximum-tolerated dose was achieved. The treatment regimen was as follows: oral administration of sorafenib (400 mg twice daily for 28 days) combined with HAIC using CDDP (14-20 mg/m2, on days 1 and 8) and 5-FU (170-330 mg/m2, continuously on days 1-5 and 8-12) via an implanted catheter system). Each treatment cycle consisted of 28 days and three cycles of combination therapy. At the end of the first cycle, adverse events were evaluated and future dose escalation was determined. Eighteen patients with advanced HCC were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in two patients from cohort 1 (erythema multiforme and grade 4 thrombocytopenia) and in one patient from cohort 2 (erythema multiforme). Seven of the 18 patients achieved a partial response, seven showed stable disease, two were diagnosed as progressive disease, and two were not assessable. The response rate was 38.9% and the disease control rate was 77.8%. The time-to-progression was 9.7 months and the 1-year survival rate was 88.2%. Oral administration of 400 mg of sorafenib twice daily, 20 mg/m2 of intra-arterial infusion of CDDP, and 5-FU at 330 mg/m2 are the recommended doses for combination therapy, which was well tolerated and efficacious. This combination therapy may be a promising treatment for patients with advanced HCC. A large prospective randomized multicenter study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01214343) is ongoing.

  11. Significance of higher drug concentration in erythrocytes of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum and treated orally with mefloquine at single doses.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Xue, Jian; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Hao-Bing; Xiao, Shu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to understand the pharmacokinetic feature of mefloquine measured by erythrocytes and plasma in Schistosoma japonicum (S. j.)-infected mice and non-infected mice after oral administration of the drug at single doses. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used to measure the plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of mefloquine at varying intervals posttreatment. Our results demonstrated that in non-infected mice treated orally with mefloquine at an ineffective dose of 50 mg/kg or effective dose of 200 mg/kg for 2-72 h, the erythrocyte-to-plasma ratios of mefloquine were 5.8-11.2 or 2-14.2. On the other hand, in S. j.-infected mice treated with the same single doses of the drug, the erythrocyte and plasma drug concentration ratios were 3.1-4.6 or 2.9-8.5, manifesting that either in infected mice or in non-infected mice that received oral mefloquine resulted in higher concentration of mefloquine in erythrocytes than that in plasma. Unexpectedly, under oral administration of mefloquine at a higher single dose of 200 mg/kg, the pharmacokinetic parameter C max values for plasma from S. j.-infected and non-infected mice were 1.6?±?0.3 and 2.0?±?0.4 ?g/mL, respectively, which were below the determined in vitro LC50 (50 % lethal concentration) value of 4.93 ?g/mL. Therefore, the plasma concentration of mefloquine may display a little effect against schistosomes during the treatment. Although the values of T 1/2 and AUC0-? for erythrocytes were significantly longer and higher in infected mice than those of corresponding non-infect mice that received the same single mefloqine dose of 50 mg/kg, the C max value was only 2.6?±?0.4 ?g/mL lower than the determined in vitro LC50, which may explain why this low single dose is ineffective against schistosomes in vivo. After administration of higher mefloquine dose of 200 mg/kg, the C max value for erythrocytes in infected mice was 30 % (7.4?±?0.7 versus 10.7?±?2.7 ?g/mL) lower than that in the corresponding non-infected mice, but its level was above the determined in vitro LC95 (95 % lethal concentration) value of 6.12 ?g/mL. Meanwhile, longer T 1/2 value of 159.2?±?129.3 h in infected mice led to significant increase in AUC0-? value (1969.3?±?1057.7 vs 486.4?±?53.0 ?g/mL·h), relative to corresponding non-infected mice. In addition, the mean residence time (MRT0-?) in infected mice was also significantly longer than that in non-infected mice. All these results may beneficial for the treatment. According to the results, we suggest that higher ratios of mefloquine concentration in erythrocytes to plasma may offer a way to transport mefloquine to the worm gut through ingestion of erythrocytes by the worms, where the gut is the site for displaying the effect by mefloquine. PMID:26341799

  12. Volume to dissolve applied dose (VDAD) and apparent dissolution rate (ADR): tools to predict in vivo bioavailability from orally applied drug suspensions.

    PubMed

    Muenster, Uwe; Pelzetter, Christian; Backensfeld, Thomas; Ohm, Andreas; Kuhlmann, Thomas; Mueller, Hartwig; Lustig, Klemens; Keldenich, Jörg; Greschat, Susanne; Göller, Andreas H; Gnoth, Mark Jean

    2011-08-01

    Low solubility of drug candidates generated in research contributes to their elimination during subsequent development due to insufficient oral bioavailability (BA) of crystalline compound. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to identify critical in vitro solubility and dissolution parameter that would predict critical in vivo dissolution by means of in vitro-in vivo correlation. Thermodynamic solubility and apparent dissolution rate (ADR) were determined using the shake-flask method and mini-flow-through-cell, respectively. Oral BA studies in rats and humans were conducted from drug solution and suspension/tablets. Relative BA was calculated using F(rel) [%]=AUC(suspension)/AUC(solution)*100, representing a measure of in vivo dissolution. Roughly, F(rel) rat >50% translates into F(rel) human of >90%. Both, ADR and log volume to dissolve applied dose (VDAD), when plotted against F(rel) rat, revealed certain threshold levels, (ADR, ?150-200 ?g of compound dissolved under respective assay conditions; VDAD, ?100-500 ml/kg) which translate into F(rel) in rats of >50%. Thus, assuming that F(rel)>50% in rats is indicative of sufficient in vivo dissolution in humans after oral application, drugs should exhibit a VDAD of ?100-500 ml/kg or less in aqueous media to avoid insufficient or varying drug absorption. PMID:21315152

  13. ABSORPTION, DISTRIBUTION, EXCRETION, AND METABOLISM OF A SINGLE ORAL DOSE OF O-ETHYL O-4-NITROPHENYL PHENYLPHOSPHONOTHIOATE IN HENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disposition and metabolism of a single oral 10 mg/kg (LD50) of uniformly phenyl-labeled (14C)EPN (O-ethyl O-4 nitrophenyl (14C) phenylphosphonothioate) were studied in adult hens. The birds were protected from acute toxicity with atropine sulfate. Three treated hens were kill...

  14. Strong Relationship between Oral Dose and Tenofovir Hair Levels in a Randomized Trial: Hair as a Potential Adherence Measure for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Albert Y.; Yang, Qiyun; Huang, Yong; Bacchetti, Peter; Anderson, Peter L.; Jin, Chengshi; Goggin, Kathy; Stojanovski, Kristefer; Grant, Robert; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Gandhi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trials using tenofovir-based regimens have demonstrated that high levels of adherence are required to evaluate efficacy; the incorporation of objective biomarkers of adherence in trial design has been essential to interpretation, given the inaccuracy of self-report. Antiretroviral measurements in scalp hair have been useful as a marker of long-term exposure in the HIV treatment setting, and hair samples are relatively easy and inexpensive to collect, transport, and store for analysis. To evaluate the relationship between dose and tenofovir concentrations in hair, we examined the dose proportionality of tenofovir in hair in healthy, HIV-uninfected adults. Methods A phase I, crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed in 24 HIV-negative adults receiving directly-observed oral tenofovir tablets administered 2, 4, and 7 doses/week for 6 weeks, with a ?3-week break between periods. Small samples of hair were collected after each six-week period and analyzed for tenofovir concentrations. Geometric-mean-ratios compared levels between each pair of dosing conditions. Intensive plasma pharmacokinetic studies were performed during the daily-dosing period to calculate areas-under-the-time-concentration curves (AUCs). Results Over 90% of doses were observed per protocol. Median tenofovir concentrations in hair increased monotonically with dose. A log-linear relationship was seen between dose and hair levels, with an estimated 76% (95% CI 60–93%) increase in hair level per 2-fold dose increase. Tenofovir plasma AUCs modestly predicted drug concentrations in hair. Conclusions This study found a strong linear relationship between frequency of dosing and tenofovir levels in scalp hair. The analysis of quantitative drug levels in hair has the potential to improve adherence measurement in the PrEP field and may be helpful in determining exposure thresholds for protection and explaining failures in PrEP trials. Hair measures for adherence monitoring may also facilitate adherence measurement in real-world settings and merit further investigation in upcoming PrEP implementation studies and programs. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov +NCT00903084. PMID:24421901

  15. Estimation by a 24-hour study of the daily dose of intra-oral mercury vapor inhaled after release from dental amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, A. )

    1990-10-01

    The difficulties associated with estimations of daily doses of inhaled mercury vapor released from dental amalgam are considerable. Existing data are often unreliable, especially if they are based on a single or a small series of samples of intra-oral concentrations of mercury vapor before, during, and after chewing stimulation. In the present paper, the aim was to obtain a more representative estimation of the daily dose of mercury vapor inhaled from amalgam fillings by measurement of amounts of mercury vapor released in the oral cavity during 24 h, under conditions that were as normal as possible. A series of measurements was carried out on each of 15 subjects, with at least nine occlusal surfaces restored with dental amalgam, and on five subjects without any amalgam restorations. The subjects had to follow a standardized schedule for 24 h, whereby they ate, drank, and brushed their teeth at pre-determined time periods. The amount of mercury vapor released per time unit was measured at intervals of 30-45 min by means of a measuring system based on atomic absorption spectrophotometry. None of the subjects was professionally exposed to mercury, and all of their amalgam fillings were more than one year old. Study casts were made for each subject, and the area of the amalgam surfaces was measured. Samples of urine and saliva were analyzed so that values for the mercury concentrations and the rate of release of mercury into saliva could be obtained. The average frequency of fish meals per month was noted.

  16. Efficacy trial of single-dose live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR in North Jakarta, Indonesia, a cholera-endemic area.

    PubMed

    Richie, E E; Punjabi, N H; Sidharta, Y Y; Peetosutan, K K; Sukandar, M M; Wasserman, S S; Lesmana, M M; Wangsasaputra, F F; Pandam, S S; Levine, M M; O'Hanley, P P; Cryz, S J; Simanjuntak, C H

    2000-05-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled efficacy trial of one dose of CVD 103-HgR live oral cholera vaccine was performed in Indonesia from 1993 to 1997. 67,508 persons aged 2-41 years ingested vaccine or placebo and were followed for four years, detecting cholera cases using hospital-based surveillance. A nested reactogenicity study (538 vaccinees, 535 controls) revealed no vaccine-attributable side effects. A nested immunogenicity study (N=657) showed vibriocidal seroresponses in 64-70% of vaccinees vs 1-2% of controls. Cholera incidence was lower than expected. 103 cases of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor diarrhea were detected, 93 evaluable for vaccine efficacy (43 vaccine, 50 placebo; efficacy=14%). A suggestion of protection was observed among persons with blood group O [P=0.12]. Only seven cases occurred within six months of vaccination, precluding assessment of short-term efficacy. In Jakarta, single-dose CVD 103-HgR did not confer long-term protection. Short-term protection from a single-dose and long-term protection from two doses have yet to be studied. PMID:10738097

  17. Mode of action analysis for liver tumors from oral 1,4-dioxane exposures and evidence-based dose response assessment.

    PubMed

    Dourson, Michael; Reichard, John; Nance, Patricia; Burleigh-Flayer, Heather; Parker, Ann; Vincent, Melissa; McConnell, Ernest E

    2014-04-01

    1,4-Dioxane is found in consumer products and is used as a solvent in manufacturing. Studies in rodents show liver tumors to be consistently reported after chronic oral exposure. However, there were differences in the reporting of non-neoplastic lesions in the livers of rats and mice. In order to clarify these differences, a reread of mouse liver slides from the 1978 NCI bioassay on 1,4-dioxane in drinking water was conducted. This reread clearly identified dose-related non-neoplastic changes in the liver; specifically, a dose-related increase in the hypertrophic response of hepatocytes, followed by necrosis, inflammation and hyperplastic hepatocellular foci. 1,4-Dioxane does not cause point mutations, DNA repair, or initiation. However, it appears to promote tumors and stimulate DNA synthesis. Using EPA Guidelines (2005), the weight of the evidence suggests that 1,4-dioxane causes liver tumors in rats and mice through cytotoxicity followed by regenerative hyperplasia. Specific key events in this mode of action are identified. A Reference Dose (RfD) of 0.05mg/kgday is proposed to protect against regenerative liver hyperplasia based on a benchmark dose (BMD) approach. Based on this RfD, a maximum contaminant level goal of 350?g/L is proposed using a default relative source contribution for water of 20%. PMID:24491968

  18. Oral Bisphenol A (BPA) given to rats at moderate doses is associated with erectile dysfunction, cavernosal lipofibrosis and alterations of global gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Kovanecz, I; Gelfand, R; Masouminia, M; Gharib, S; Segura, D; Vernet, D; Rajfer, J; Li, D K; Kannan, K; Gonzalez-Cadavid, N F

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a suspected reproductive biohazard and endocrine disruptor, released from plastics is associated with ED in occupationally exposed workers. However, in rats, despite the induction of hypogonadism, apoptosis of the penile corporal smooth muscle (SM), fat infiltration into the cavernosal tissue and changes in global gene expression with the intraperitoneal administration of high dose BPA, ED was not observed. We investigated whether BPA administered orally rather than intraperitoneally to rats for longer periods and lower doses will lead to ED. Main outcome measures are ED, histological, and biochemical markers in rat penile tissues. In all, 2.5-month-old rats were given drinking water daily without and with BPA at 1 and 0.1 mg kg(-1) per day. Two months later, erectile function was determined by cavernosometry and electrical field stimulation (EFS) and serum levels of testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and BPA were measured. Penile tissue sections were assayed by Masson (SM/collagen), Oil Red O (fat), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) (apoptosis), immunohistochemistry for Oct4 (stem cells), and ?-SM actin/calponin (SM and myofibroblasts), applying quantitative image analysis. Other markers were assayed by western blotting. DNA microarrays/microRNA (miR) assays defined transcription profiles. Orally administered BPA did not affect body weight, but (1) decreased serum T and E2; (2) reduced the EFS response and increased the drop rate; (3) increased within the corporal tissue the presence of fat, myofibroblasts and apoptosis; (4) lowered the contents of SM and stem cells, but not nerve terminals; and (5) caused alterations in the transcriptional profiles for both mRNA and miRs within the penile shaft. Long-term exposure of rats to oral BPA caused a moderate corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction (CVOD), possibly due to alterations within the corporal tissue that pose gene transcriptional changes related to inflammation, fibrosis and epithelial/mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:24305612

  19. Single-Dose Phase I Study To Evaluate the Pharmacokinetics of Posaconazole in New Tablet and Capsule Formulations Relative to Oral Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Martinho, Monika; O'Mara, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Posaconazole oral suspension, a marketed extended-spectrum triazole with proven efficacy as antifungal treatment and prophylaxis, should be taken with food to maximize absorption. New tablet and capsule formulations have been developed in an attempt to optimize absorption and bioavailability. The aims of this exploratory open-label, partially randomized, 2-part, 4-way, single-dose crossover study in 16 healthy adults were to characterize pharmacokinetics for posaconazole tablet and capsule formulations relative to those for posaconazole oral suspension under fasted and fed conditions and to assess safety and tolerability. Under fasted conditions, posaconazole exposures (area under the curve [AUC]) for the tablet and capsule formulations were similar (mean AUC from time zero to infinity [AUC0–?], tablet A, 11,700 ng · h/ml [coefficient of variation {CV}, 26%]; tablet B, 11,300 ng · h/ml [CV, 22%]; capsule, 11,000 ng · h/ml [CV, 25%]) and were substantially higher than the exposure for the oral suspension (mean AUC0–?, 3,420 ng · h/ml [CV, 44%]). Tablets and capsule showed less variability in exposure than the oral suspension. In fed subjects, tablets and capsule resulted in similar AUC values (mean AUC0–?, tablet A, 11,900 ng · h/ml [23%]; tablet B, 12,400 ng · h/ml [CV, 25%]; capsule, 12,300 ng · h/ml [CV, 28%]) and slightly higher exposure than the oral suspension (mean AUC0–?, 8,750 [CV, 24%]). Median times to the maximum concentration of drug in plasma were 4 to 5 h (fasted conditions) and 6 to 8 h (fed conditions). Mean half-lives values were similar for all formulations under fed and fasted conditions (23.1 to 29.2 h). Consistent with previous data, exposure for the oral suspension increased 2.5- to 3-fold when it was given with a high-fat meal. Conversely, exposures for tablets and capsule were not markedly affected by food. All formulations of posaconazole at 100 mg were safe and well tolerated. PMID:22615291

  20. Memory B Cell and Other Immune Responses in Children Receiving Two Doses of an Oral Killed Cholera Vaccine Compared to Responses following Natural Cholera Infection in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mohammad Arif; Mohasin, M.; Patel, Sweta M.; Aktar, Amena; Khanam, Farhana; Uddin, Taher; Riyadh, M. Asrafuzzaman; Saha, Amit; Alam, Mohammad Murshid; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Charles, Richelle; LaRocque, Regina; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    Current oral cholera vaccines induce lower protective efficacy and shorter duration of protection against cholera than wild-type infection provides, and this difference is most pronounced in young children. Despite this, there are limited data comparing immune responses in children following wild-type disease versus vaccination, especially with regard to memory responses associated with long-term immunity. Here, we report a comparison of immune responses in young children (2 to 5 years of age; n = 20) and older children (6 to 17 years of age; n = 20) given two doses of an oral killed cholera vaccine containing recombinant cholera toxin B subunit (CtxB) 14 days apart and compare these responses to those induced in similarly aged children recovering from infection with Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa in Bangladesh. We found that the two vaccine groups had comparable vibriocidal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific plasma antibody responses. Vaccinees developed lower levels of IgG memory B cell (MBC) responses against CtxB but no significant MBC responses against LPS. In contrast, children recovering from natural cholera infection developed prominent LPS IgG and IgA MBC responses, as well as CtxB IgG MBC responses. Plasma LPS IgG, IgA, and IgM responses, as well as vibriocidal responses, were also significantly higher in children following disease than after vaccination. Our findings suggest that acute and memory immune responses following oral cholera vaccination in children are significantly lower than those observed following wild-type disease, especially responses targeting LPS. These findings may explain, in part, the lower efficacy of oral cholera vaccination in children. PMID:22441386

  1. Pharmacokinetics of single oral dose trazodone: a randomized, two-period, cross-over trial in healthy, adult, human volunteers under fed condition

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Prashant; Agrawal, Yadvendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the bioequivalence of single dose trazodone hydrochloride USP 100 mg tablets administered as an oral dose under fed condition. Methods:This study was an open-label, balanced, randomized, two-sequence, two-treatment, two-period, single oral dose, crossover bioequivalence study in healthy, adult, human subjects under fed conditions. After an overnight fast of at least 10 h, the subjects were served a high fat and high calorie vegetarian breakfast, which they were required to consume within 30 min. A single oral dose (100 mg) of either the test or the reference product was administered to the subjects. The primary pharmacokinetic parameters, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) from time zero to last measurable concentration (AUC0?t) and extrapolated to infinity (AUC0??) were compared by an analysis of variance using log-transformed data. Bioequivalence was concluded if the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the adjusted geometric mean (gMean) ratios for Cmax and AUC were within the predetermined range of 80–125%, in accordance with regulatory requirements. Results:For the test formulation, the trazodone gMean Cmax was 1480.9 ng/mL (vs. 1520.2 ng/mL for reference), AUC0?t was 18193.0 ng·h/mL (vs. 18209.8 ng·h/mL) and AUC0?? was 19346.3 ng·h/mL (vs. 19393.4 ng·h/mL). The 90% CIs for the ratio (test/reference) were 93.0–102.0% for Cmax, 96.7–103.2% for AUC0?t and 96.1–103.5% for AUC0??. There were no deaths or serious adverse events during the conduct of the study. Conclusion:Test product when compared with the Reference product meets the bioequivalence criteria with respect to the extent of absorption of trazodone under fed condition. PMID:26483693

  2. PHARMACOKINETICS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE AND ITS METABOLITE O-DESMETHYLTRAMADOL FOLLOWING A SINGLE, ORALLY ADMINISTERED DOSE IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Jennifer L; Barbosa, Lorraine; Van Bonn, William G; Johnson, Shawn P; Gulland, Frances M D; Cox, Sherry K; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2015-09-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting, opiate-like analgesic that is structurally related to codeine and morphine. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride and its major active metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). A single dose of tramadol was administered orally in fish at 2 mg/kg to a total of 15 wild California sea lions admitted for rehabilitation. Twenty-four total blood samples were collected post drug administration at 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hr. Blood plasma was separated and stored at -80°C until analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography was performed to determine levels of tramadol and M1, the major active metabolite. The results indicate that the plasma levels of parent tramadol are low or negligible during the first 30-45 min and then reach the predicted mean maximum plasma concentration of 358 ng/ml at 1.52 hr. The M1 metabolite was not detectable in 21 of 24 plasma samples, below the level of quantification of 5 ng/ml in one sample, and detectable at 11 and 17 ng/ml in two of the samples. This study suggests that a 2 mg/kg dose would need to be administered every 6-8 hr to maintain concentrations of tramadol above the minimum human analgesic level for mild to moderate pain. Based on dosing simulations, a dose of 4 mg/kg q8 hr or q12 hr, on average, may represent an adequate compromise, but further studies are needed using a larger sample size. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to determine if tramadol provides analgesic effects in this species. The potential for tramadol toxicosis at any dose also has not been determined in this species. PMID:26352950

  3. Pharmacokinetic comparison of sustained- and immediate-release formulations of cilostazol after multiple oral doses in fed healthy male Korean volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yo Han; Ghim, Jong-Lyul; Jung, Jin Ah; Cho, Sang-Heon; Choe, Sangmin; Choi, Hee Youn; Bae, Kyun-Seop; Lim, Hyeong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Background A new extended-release form of cilostazol has recently been developed. This study was conducted to compare the pharmacokinetic characteristics of sustained-release (SR) and immediate-release (IR) formulations of cilostazol after multiple oral doses in healthy male Korean volunteers. Methods This was an open-label, randomized, multiple-dose, crossover study conducted in 30 healthy Korean subjects. In each treatment period, subjects received oral doses of 200 mg SR formulation every 24 hours or 100 mg IR formulation every 12 hours for 5 consecutive days in a fed state, with a washout period of 9 days. The plasma concentrations of cilostazol and its metabolites were determined using a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The area under the plasma concentration–time curve within a dosing interval (AUCT), the measured peak plasma concentration at steady state (Cmax,ss), and the time to reach Cmax,ss (tmax,ss) were analyzed using a noncompartmental method. Results A total of 24 healthy male subjects completed the study. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) AUCT (96–120 hours) values for SR and IR were 27,378.0 (10,301.6) ng·h/mL and 27,860.3 (7,152.3) ng·h/mL, respectively. The mean (SD) Cmax,ss values were 2,741.4 (836.0) ng/mL and 2,051.0 (433.2) ng/mL, respectively. The median tmax,ss values were 8.0 hours and 4.0 hours, respectively. The geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals) of the SR to IR formulations were 0.937 (0.863–1.017), 0.960 (0.883–1.043), and 0.935 (0.859–1.017) for AUCT and 0.644 (0.590–0.703), 0.586 (0.536–0.642), and 0.636 (0.577–0.702) for dose-normalized Cmax,ss of cilostazol, OPC-13015 (3,4-dehydro-cilostazol), and OPC-13213 (4?-trans-hydroxyl-cilostazol), respectively. All formulations were well tolerated. Conclusion At steady state, the AUCT of cilostazol SR 200 mg is comparable to that of cilostazol IR 100 mg twice a day in healthy male Korean subjects. Both formulations are well tolerated. PMID:26185423

  4. Subchronic oral toxicity study of Decitabine (DAC) in Combination with Tetrahydrouridine (THU) in CD-1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Terse, Pramod; Engelke, Kory; Chan, Kenneth; Ling, Yonghua; Sharpnack, Douglas; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Covey, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Decitabine (5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine; DAC) in combination with tetrahydrouridine (THU) is a potential oral therapy for sickle cell disease and ?-thalassemia. A study was conducted in mice to assess safety of this combination therapy using oral gavage of DAC and THU administered 1 hour prior to DAC on two consecutive days/week for up to 9-weeks followed by a 28-day recovery to support its clinical trials upto 9 week duration. THU, a competitive inhibitor of cytidine deaminase, was used in the combination to improve oral bioavailability of DAC. Doses were 167 mg/kg THU followed by 0, 0.2, 0.4, or 1.0 mg/kg DAC; or THU vehicle followed by 1.0 mg/kg DAC; or vehicle alone. Endpoints evaluated were clinical observations, body weights, food consumption, clinical pathology, gross/histopathology, bone marrow micronuclei, and toxicokinetics. There were no treatment-related effects noticed on body weight, food consumption, serum chemistry or urinalysis parameters. Dose- and gender- dependent changes in plasma DAC levels were observed with a Cmax within 1 hr. At the 1mg/kg dose tested, THU increased DAC plasma concentration (~10-fold) as compared to DAC alone. Severe toxicity occurred in females receiving high dose 1mg/kg DAC + THU, requiring treatment discontinuation at week 5. Severity and incidence of microscopic findings increased in a dose-dependent fashion; findings included bone marrow hypocellularity (with corresponding hematologic changes; decreases in white blood cells, red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, reticulocytes, neutrophils and lymphocytes), thymic/lymphoid depletion, intestinal epithelial apoptosis and testicular degeneration. Bone marrow micronucleus analysis confirmed bone marrow cytotoxicity, suppression of erythropoeisis, and genotoxicity. Following the recovery period, a complete or trend towards resolution of these effects was observed. In conclusion, the combination therapy resulted in an increased sensitivity to DAC toxicity correlating with DAC plasma levels, and females are more sensitive compared to their male counterparts. PMID:24639139

  5. Effectiveness of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention within 12 Hours to 28 Days of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction in a Real-World Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yusheng; Lu, Caiyi; Wang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Percutaneous coronary intervention( PCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been widely accepted for patient who come within 12 hours, but for those who come to the hospital late (12 hours to 28 days) the long-term data and possible predictors are limited regarding ‘hard’ endpoints in ‘real world’. Methods The registry data of all 5523 consecutive patients admitted due to an incident STEMI (12 hours to 28 days) in our center were analyzed. Patients were divided into 3 age groups (age<65; age?=?65–74; age ?75) and two therapeutic groups including conservative and PCI group. The primary endpoints included 30-day mortality and 1-year mortality. Results The clinical characteristics include female gender; history of diabetes mellitus, previous myocardial infarction, cerebral vascular disease, chronic renal failure, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, anemia, gastric bleeding; presentation of ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation, pneumonia, heart failure, multiple organ failure and cardiogenic shock. The ratio of all the above factors increased with the age getting older (all p<0.05), while that of the PCI decreased significantly with ageing (53.9%, 36.3% and 21.7%). Except hypertension, all the other factors were less seen in the PCI group than in the conservative group (p<0.01). Pooled estimates, based on type of therapy and age groups, PCI resulted in significantly lower 30-day and 1-year mortality. Cox analysis showed the positive predictors for 30 days and 1 year mortality were heart failure, cerebral vascular disease, chronic renal failure, ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation, age, female, gastric intestinal bleeding, cardiogenic shock, multiple organ failure, while PCI was a negative predictor. ROCs analysis showed AUCs were always higher for PCI group. Conclusions The elderly have more comorbidities and higher rates of mortality, mandating thorough evaluation before acceptance for PCI. PCI between 12 hours to 28 days in all ages of patients including the elderly with STEMI is significantly more effective than conservative therapy. PMID:23554888

  6. Review of oral fixed-dose combination netupitant and palonosetron (NEPA) for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Vito; Karthaus, Meinolf; Aapro, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend the combination of a neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonist (RA) and a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) RA, together with corticosteroids, in order to prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting with anthracycline-cyclophosphamide and highly emetogenic chemotherapy, and it is to be considered with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. Netupitant and palonosetron (NEPA) is a fixed-dose combination of netupitant, a novel, highly selective NK1 RA, and palonosetron, a new-generation 5-HT3 RA, targeting two major emetic pathways in a single oral capsule. In clinical trials, NEPA administered on day 1 together with dexamethasone was highly effective and well tolerated in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with solid tumors undergoing moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. NEPA offers maximal convenience, and as a simple guideline-based regimen, has the potential to improve adherence to guidelines. PMID:25360998

  7. Effects of short-term oral dosing of polychlorotrifluoroethylene (polyCTFE) on the rhesus monkey. (Reannouncement with new availability information). Final report, March 1989-March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Ballinger, M.B.; Seckel, C.; Vinegar, A.; Mattie, D.R.

    1991-12-31

    Polychlorotrifluoroethylene (polyCTFE-primarily oligomers with 3-4 monomer units), a nonflammable hydraulic fluid for aircraft, was given daily for 15 days by oral gavage to four Rhesus monkeys at a concentration of 0.725 g kg-1. The administered dose was at a level that had caused toxicity in rats. Steady-state blood and liver concentrations reached were the same in both species. In monkeys, polyCTFE did not cause the electrolyte, serum protein, liver enzyme and anemic disturbances previously seen in rats. Liver sections taken at 15 days, analyzed for palmitoyl Co-A beta-oxidation rates or by electron microscopy, showed no significant indication of peroxisomal proliferation. An increased blood urea nitrogen (BUN) at 15 days was the only clinical pathological abnormality seen in both monkeys and rats. Previously unobserved effects were increased triglycerides and glycogen depletion. polyGTFE; aircraft hydraulic fluid; toxicity; peroxisome proliferation.

  8. Thermoplastic polyurethanes for the manufacturing of highly dosed oral sustained release matrices via hot melt extrusion and injection molding.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Bart; Vervaeck, Anouk; Hillewaere, Xander K D; Possemiers, Sam; Hansen, Laurent; De Beer, Thomas; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUR) as matrix excipients for the production of oral solid dosage forms via hot melt extrusion (HME) in combination with injection molding (IM). We demonstrated that TPURs enable the production of solid dispersions - crystalline API in a crystalline carrier - at an extrusion temperature below the drug melting temperature (Tm) with a drug content up to 65% (wt.%). The release of metoprolol tartrate was controlled over 24h, whereas a complete release of diprophylline was only possible in combination with a drug release modifier: polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG 4000) or Tween 80. No burst release nor a change in tablet size and geometry was detected for any of the formulations after dissolution testing. The total matrix porosity increased gradually upon drug release. Oral administration of TPUR did not affect the GI ecosystem (pH, bacterial count, short chain fatty acids), monitored via the Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME). The high drug load (65 wt.%) in combination with (in vitro and in vivo) controlled release capacity of the formulations, is noteworthy in the field of formulations produced via HME/IM. PMID:25448075

  9. Effect of high oral doses of nitrate on salivary recirculation of nitrates and nitrites and on bacterial diversity in the saliva of young pigs.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, P; Casini, L; Nisi, I; Messori, S; Bosi, P

    2011-04-01

    Ingested nitrate is absorbed in the small intestine, recirculated into the saliva and reduced to nitrite by oral bacteria. In pigs receiving a moderate dietary addition of nitrate, the recirculation into the saliva is modest, so we aimed to assess the effect of higher nitrate doses to find out how the animal reacts to this new situation and to evaluate if a higher nitrate level could enhance the nitrate reduction process, improving the nitrite production Trial 1. Six piglets received 100 g of a commercial diet with 2.45% KNO(3) . In relation to baseline values, nitrate in blood serum and saliva increased 15 times, and declined after 6 h vs. 2 h. Salivary nitrite increased seven times after the addition and declined after 6 h vs. 2 h. Trial 2. Six piglets were fed a diet with or without 1.22% KNO(3) for 2 weeks. Salivary nitrate and nitrite increased with the addition of KNO3: nitrate increased from d0 to the end of the trial, nitrite increased 15 times after 1 week, but decreased after 2 weeks to 4.5-fold the control. After 2 weeks, nitrate reduced Shan diversity index of salivary microbiota. The present results indicate that the long exposure to high quantities of nitrates impairs the oral reduction of nitrate to nitrite and engenders a reduction of the mouth's microbiota diversity. PMID:20796080

  10. Improvement of the Cramer classification for oral exposure using the database TTC RepDose - A strategy description

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present report describes a strategy to refine the current Cramer classification of the TTC concept using a broad database (DB) termed TTC RepDose. Cramer classes 1-3 overlap to some extent, indicating a need for a better separation of structural classes likely to be toxic, mo...

  11. A single dose of live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR is safe and immunogenic in HIV-infected and HIV-noninfected adults in Mali.

    PubMed

    Perry, R T; Plowe, C V; Koumaré, B; Bougoudogo, F; Kotloff, K L; Losonsky, G A; Wasserman, S S; Levine, M M

    1998-01-01

    Despite considerable experience with single-dose, live, oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR in Asia, Europe, and the Americas, the vaccine had not been evaluated in sub-Saharan Africa or on individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We therefore conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over clinical trial in 38 HIV-seropositive (without clinical acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)) and 387 HIV-seronegative adults in Mali to assess its safety and immunogenicity. Adverse reactions (fever, diarrhoea and vomiting) were observed with similar frequency among vaccine and placebo recipients. The vaccine strain was not isolated from the coprocultures of any subject. The baseline geometric mean titre (GMT) of serum vibriocidal antibody was significantly lower in HIV-seropositives (1:23) than in HIV-seronegatives (1:65) (P = 0.002). Significant rises in vibriocidal antibody were observed in 71% of HIV-seronegatives and 58% of HIV-seropositives, and in 40% of HIV-seropositives with CD4+ counts below 500 per microliter. Following immunization, the peak vibriocidal GMT in HIV-seronegatives was 1:584 versus 1:124 in HIV-seropositives (P = 0.0006); in HIV-seropositives with CD4+ counts < 500 per microliter, the peak vibriocidal GMT was 1:40 (P = 0.03 versus other HIV-seropositives). CVD 103-HgR was safe in HIV-infected Malian adults, although serological responses were significantly attenuated among HIV-seropositives (particularly in those with CD4+ counts < 500 per microliter) relative to HIV-seronegatives. These results encourage further evaluations of this single-dose, oral cholera vaccine in high-risk populations such as refugees in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:9615498

  12. Orally administrated pterostilbene attenuates acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in a dose- and time-dependent manner in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Xue-mei; Ma, Ang; Zhang, Ya-li; Chen, Yan-yi; Zhou, Hao; Li, Wen-jun; Jin, Xin

    2015-08-01

    Pterostilbene (3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxystilbene) is a component of blueberry. It has been reported that long-term treatment with blueberry has a neuroprotective effect. However, it has not been reported whether pterostilbene is effective in attenuating cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. In the present study, focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 90min followed by reperfusion. To observe the dose-dependent effect, pterostilbene (2.5-80mg/kg, ig) was administered for 3days before ischemia. To determine the time-dependent effect, pterostilbene (10mg/kg, ig) was administered as a single dose at 0, 1, or 3h after reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after I/R, pterostilbene dose-dependently improved neurological function, reduced brain infarct volume, and alleviated brain edema. The most effective dose was 10mg/kg; the therapeutic time window was within 1h after I/R and treatment immediately after reperfusion showed the best protective effect. The protective effect is further confirmed by the results that post-ischemic treatment with pterostilbene (10mg/kg) significantly improved motor function, alleviated blood brain barrier disruption, increased neurons survival and reduced cell apoptosis in cortical penumbra after cerebral I/R. We also found that pterostilbene (10mg/kg) significantly reversed the increased content of malondialdehyde and the decreased activity of superoxide dismutase in the ipsilateral hemisphere. Furthermore, pterostilbene decreased the oxidative stress markers 4-hydroxynonenal and 8-hydroxyguanosine positive cells in the cortical penumbra. All these findings indicate that pterostilbene dose- and time-dependently exerts a neuroprotective effect against acute cerebral I/R injury. This neuroprotective effect of pterostilbene may be associated with its inhibition of oxidative stress and subsequent neuronal apoptosis in the cortical penumbra. PMID:26086685

  13. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics with Extended Dosing of CC-486 in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cogle, Christopher R.; Gore, Steven D.; Hetzer, Joel; Kumar, Keshava; Skikne, Barry; MacBeth, Kyle J.

    2015-01-01

    CC-486 (oral azacitidine) is an epigenetic modifier in development for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. In part 1 of this two-part study, a 7-day CC-486 dosing schedule showed clinical activity, was generally well tolerated, and reduced DNA methylation. Extending dosing of CC-486 beyond 7 days would increase duration of azacitidine exposure. We hypothesized that extended dosing would therefore provide more sustained epigenetic activity. Reported here are the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of CC-486 extended dosing schedules in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from part 2 of this study. PK and/or PD data were available for 59 patients who were sequentially assigned to 1 of 4 extended CC-486 dosing schedules: 300mg once-daily or 200mg twice-daily for 14 or 21 days per 28-day cycle. Both 300mg once-daily schedules and the 200mg twice-daily 21-day schedule significantly (all P < .05) reduced global DNA methylation in whole blood at all measured time points (days 15, 22, and 28 of the treatment cycle), with sustained hypomethylation at cycle end compared with baseline. CC-486 exposures and reduced DNA methylation were significantly correlated. Patients who had a hematologic response had significantly greater methylation reductions than non-responding patients. These data demonstrate that extended dosing of CC-486 sustains epigenetic effects through the treatment cycle. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00528983 PMID:26296092

  14. [Retrospective Analysis of the Afatinib Clinical Pathway during the 28-Day Introductory Period-The Japanese Style of Collaborative Drug Therapy Management(J-CDTM)].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kaori; Ryota, Noriko; Hikita, Ami; Sando, Masumi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tamiya, Motohiro; Azuma, Yuichiro; Tani, Eriko; Hamaguchi, Masanari; Tanaka, Ayako; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Morishita, Naoko; Okamoto, Norio; Futagami, Sumiko; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2015-08-01

    Afatinib is a newly approved second-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibito r(EGFR-TKI). Afatinib has been shown to prolongthe overall survival of patients with non-small cell lungcancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutations compared with the standard chemotherapy. However, Grade 3 or 4 toxicities, includingdiarrhea, rash, paronychia, and stomatitis, have been observed more frequently in patients treated with afatinib than in those treated with first-generation EGFR-TKIs. Accordingly, our institution developed an afatinib clinical pathway (the afatinib pathway), which was designed by certified nurses, medical physicians, and certified pharmacists, with the goal of reducing the severity of diarrhea and rash that occur most frequently duringthe 28-day introductory period of afatinib treatment. Between May and October 2014, afatinib was administered accordingto the afatinib pathway to 14 patients with NSCLC and EGFR mutations. Of these patients, only one (7.1%) experienced Grade 3 diarrhea. No other patient experienced Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. The afatinib pathway was effective in reducingthe severities of the diarrhea and rash duringthe 28-day introductory period of the afatinib treatment. Our implementation of the afatinib pathway could be considered the Japanese style of collaborative drugtherapy management (J-CDTM). PMID:26321711

  15. Repeated oral dosing of TAS-102 confers high trifluridine incorporation into DNA and sustained antitumor activity in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nozomu; Sakamoto, Kazuki; Okabe, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Akio; Yamamura, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Fumio; Nagase, Hideki; Yokogawa, Tatsushi; Oguchi, Kei; Ishida, Keiji; Osada, Akiko; Kazuno, Hiromi; Yamada, Yukari; Matsuo, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    TAS-102 is a novel oral nucleoside antitumor agent containing trifluridine (FTD) and tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI). The compound improves overall survival of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who are insensitive to standard chemotherapies. FTD possesses direct antitumor activity since it inhibits thymidylate synthase (TS) and is itself incorporated into DNA. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the incorporation into DNA and the inhibition of TS remain unclear. We found that FTD-dependent inhibition of TS was similar to that elicited by fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), another clinically used nucleoside analog. However, washout experiments revealed that FTD-dependent inhibition of TS declined rapidly, whereas FdUrd activity persisted. The incorporation of FTD into DNA was significantly higher than that of other antitumor nucleosides. Additionally, orally administered FTD had increased antitumor activity and was incorporated into DNA more effectively than continuously infused FTD. When TAS-102 was administered, FTD gradually accumulated in tumor cell DNA, in a TPI-independent manner, and significantly delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival, compared to treatment with 5-FU derivatives. TAS-102 reduced the Ki-67-positive cell fraction, and swollen nuclei were observed in treated tumor tissue. The amount of FTD incorporation in DNA and the antitumor activity of TAS-102 in xenograft models were positively and significantly correlated. These results suggest that TAS-102 exerts its antitumor activity predominantly due to its DNA incorporation, rather than as a result of TS inhibition. The persistence of FTD in the DNA of tumor cells treated with TAS-102 may underlie its ability to prolong survival in cancer patients. PMID:25230742

  16. Dose confirmation and non-interference evaluations of the oral efficacy of a combination of milbemycin oxime and spinosad against the dose limiting parasites, adult cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) and hookworm (Ancylostoma caninum), in dogs.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Daniel E; Wiseman, Scott

    2012-03-23

    Two separate controlled and blinded studies were conducted to confirm the dose and non-interference of spinosad and milbemycin oxime (MO) administered orally in combination or alone to dogs for the treatment and control of experimentally induced flea infestations (Ctenocephalides felis) and adult hookworm infections (Ancylostoma caninum). For each study, dogs were allocated randomly based on pre-treatment adult flea and hookworm egg counts to one of four treatment groups of 10 animals each. In each study, spinosad and MO in combination, using the lower half (30-45 mg/kg spinosad; 0.5-0.75 mg/kg MO) of the US commercial dose band (30-60 mg/kg spinosad; 0.5-1.0mg/kg MO) of each active ingredient, or individually alone using the full dose range, were given orally to dogs on Day 0 using a tablet formulation. A placebo control was treated similarly. In one study, on Days -1, 5, 12, 19, 28 and 35 each dog was infested with approximately 100 unfed adult C. felis obtained from the investigator's established flea colony. All dogs were infested via the same method. Forty-eight hour post-infestation flea comb counts were conducted on Days 1, 7, 14, 21, 30 and 37 and were used to determine the knockdown and residual flea activity. In the second study, on Day -27 each of 48 dogs were experimentally inoculated with 100 third-stage infective larvae of the hookworm, A. caninum. Dogs were treated on Day 0 and necropsied on Day 7 or Day 8. All nematodes in the intestinal tract were collected on Day 7 or Day 8, identified and counted by species and stage. Post-treatment, the geometric mean live flea counts were significantly different (p-value<0.0001) between the spinosad/MO combination and the spinosad only treatment groups as compared to the vehicle control group. The flea counts in the MO only group and the control group were not statistically different. The spinosad and MO combination group and the spinosad only treatment group demonstrated significantly different knockdown (100%) and post-treatment residual flea efficacy at Day 30 was 100% for both groups as compared to the vehicle control. The presence of MO in combination with spinosad did not interfere with the flea efficacy of spinosad as compared to the spinosad only group. MO alone did not demonstrate any flea efficacy. Post-treatment, the geometric mean A. caninum worm counts were significantly different (p-value<0.0001) between the spinosad and MO combination group as compared to the vehicle control group. The worm counts in the MO only group and the combination group were not statistically different. The spinosad and MO combination group (99.8% reduction) and the MO only treatment group (99.5% reduction) both demonstrated significantly different hookworm efficacy as compared to the vehicle control group. The presence of spinosad in combination with MO did not interfere with the hookworm efficacy of MO as compared to the MO only group. Spinosad alone did not demonstrate any hookworm efficacy. In summary, flavored spinosad and MO combination tablets administered orally to dogs at the lower end (30-45 mg/kg spinosad; 0.5-0.75 mg/kg MO) of the US commercial tablet unit dose range (30-60 mg/kg spinosad; 0.5-1.0mg/kg MO) were both safe and highly efficacious delivering 100% knockdown and 30 days of residual adult flea control on experimentally infested dogs as well as >99% adult hookworm efficacy evaluated under laboratory conditions. Interference between either drugs was not demonstrated for both of these dose limiting parasites. PMID:22226761

  17. Safety, immunogenicity, and transmissibility of single-dose live oral cholera vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR in 24- to 59-month-old Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Simanjuntak, C H; O'Hanley, P; Punjabi, N H; Noriega, F; Pazzaglia, G; Dykstra, P; Kay, B; Suharyono; Budiarso, A; Rifai, A R

    1993-11-01

    Recombinant A-B+ Vibrio cholerae O1 strain CVD 103-HgR is a safe, highly immunogenic, single-dose live oral vaccine in adults in industrialized countries. Safety, excretion, immunogenicity, vaccine transmissibility, and environmental introduction of CVD 103-HgR were investigated among 24- to 59-month-old children in Jakarta. In 81 households, 1 child was randomly allocated a single dose of vaccine (5 x 10(9) cfu) and another, placebo. Additionally, 139 unpaired children were randomly allocated vaccine or placebo. During 9 days of follow-up, diarrhea or vomiting did not occur more often among vaccines than controls. Vaccine was minimally excreted and was isolated from no controls and from 1 (0.6%) of 177 unvaccinated family contacts. A 4-fold or higher rise in serum vibriocidal antibody was observed in 75% of vaccines (10-fold rise in geometric mean titer over baseline). Of 135 paired placebo recipients or household contacts, 5 had vibriocidal seroconversions. Moore swabs placed in sewers and latrines near 97 households failed to detect vaccine. These observations pave the way for a large-scale field trial of efficacy. PMID:8228350

  18. Age and dose dependency of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of bisphenol A in neonatal sprague-dawley rats following oral administration.

    PubMed

    Domoradzki, J Y; Thornton, C M; Pottenger, L H; Hansen, S C; Card, T L; Markham, D A; Dryzga, M D; Shiotsuka, R N; Waechter, J M

    2004-02-01

    Previous studies demonstrated the rapid clearance of bisphenol A (BPA) from blood following oral administration to adult rats with the principal metabolite being BPA-monoglucuronide (BPA-glucuronide). Since the ontogeny of glucuronyl transferases (GT) differs with age, the pharmacokinetics of BPA were studied in neonatal animals. (14)C-BPA was administered via gavage at 1 or 10 mg/kg body weight to rats at postnatal day (pnd) 4, pnd 7, pnd 21, or to 11 week old adult rats (10 mg/kg dose only). Blood (neonates and adults) and selected tissues (neonates) were collected at 0.25, 0.75, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h postdosing. BPA and BPA-glucuronide in the plasma were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography; radioactivity in the plasma and tissues was quantified by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The data indicate that neonatal rats at all three ages metabolized BPA to BPA-glucuronide, although an age dependency in the number and concentration of plasma metabolites was observed, consistent with the ontogeny of GT. BPA-glucuronide and BPA concentrations in the plasma were greater in neonates than in adults, except at 24 h postdosing, suggesting an immaturity in the development of hepatic excretory function in neonatal rats. Nevertheless, the half-lives for the elimination of BPA-glucuronide in plasma were more rapid in neonatal animals than in adults, likely due to reduced microflora beta-glucuronidase activity and an absence of enterohepatic recirculation. A dose dependency in the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of BPA administered to neonates was also observed with nearly complete metabolism of BPA to BPA-glucuronide (94-100% of the plasma radioactivity) at a dose of 1 mg/kg. This was in contrast to finding up to 13 different plasma metabolites observed at the 10 mg/kg dose. These data indicate that, from early in neonatal life through pnd 21, there is sufficient GT activity in rats to efficiently metabolize BPA to its nonestrogenic metabolite at low doses. PMID:14691203

  19. Effects of food and gender on the pharmacokinetics of ginkgolides A, B, C and bilobalide in rats after oral dosing with ginkgo terpene lactones extract.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Zhang, Liang; Chai, Chuan; Qian, Xiao-Cui; Li, Wen; Li, Jun-Song; Di, Liu-Qing; Cai, Bao-Chang

    2014-11-01

    The ginkgo terpene lactones (GTL), mainly including bilobalide (BB), ginkgolide A (GA), ginkgolide B (GB) and ginkgolide C (GC) possess different biological activities such as peripheral vasoregulation, platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonism, neuroprotective properties and prevention of membrane damage caused by free radicals. To investigate the effects of food and gender on the bioavailability of BB, GA, GB and GC after oral administration of GTL extract, a rapid UPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated. A reversed phase C18 column (100mm×2.1mm, i.d., 1.7?m) and a mobile phase consisted of methanol and 1mM ammonium acetate (70/30, v/v) were employed. Compared with the fasted group, the t1/2 values for BB, GA, GB and GC in fed were all increased (p<0.05), AUC0-t and AUC0-? values of BB, GA, GB and GC were all significantly increased (p<0.05), but the Cmax values of BB, GA, GB and GC were significantly decreased (p<0.05). In comparison with the male group, all of the t1/2 values and AUC0-t values for BB, GA, GB and GC in female were higher (p<0.05), but no statistical difference in Tmax values for BB, GA, GB and GC between these two groups. Food and gender factor showed significant effects on the pharmacokinetics of BB, GA, GB, and GC. The results suggested that oral doses of GTL should be lowered for fasted and female subjects, compared with the fed and male subjects, respectively. PMID:25165009

  20. Hypocholesterolaemic effect of rat-administered oral doses of the isolated 7S globulins from cowpeas and adzuki beans.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ederlan S; Amaral, Ana Lucia S; Demonte, Aureluce; Zanelli, Cleslei F; Capraro, Jessica; Duranti, Marcello; Neves, Valdir A

    2015-01-01

    The role of seed proteins, especially soyabean 7S globulins, in controlling dyslipidaemia is widely acknowledged. Amino acid sequence homology among the proteins of this family could reflect similar biological functions in other species. The aim of the present study was to unveil a hypolipidaemic effect of the 7S globulins from cowpeas (7S-C) and adzuki beans (7S-A), administered orally to rats fed a hypercholesterolaemic (HC; high cholesterol and TAG) diet for 28 d. A total of forty-five rats were divided into five groups (nine rats per group): (1) standard (STD) diet; (2) HC diet; (3) HC diet + 7S-C (300 mg/kg per d); (4) HC diet + 7S-A (300 mg/kg per d); and (5) HC diet + simvastatin (SVT; 50 mg/kg per d), as a control. Significant decreases in food intake and final body weight of rats receiving HC + 7S-C and HC + 7S-A diets compared with groups fed the HC and STD diets were observed. Significant decreases in serum total and non-HDL-cholesterol of 7S-C, 7S-A and SVT groups were also observed. HDL-cholesterol levels increased in the 7S-C, 7S-A and SVT groups, while hepatic cholesterol and TAG concentrations were significantly lower than in the HC diet group for the 7S-C-supplemented group only. Faecal excretions of fat and cholesterol in HC diet groups were considerably higher in animals consuming the 7S globulins. The results show that cowpea and adzuki bean 7S globulins promote cholesterol-decreasing effects in hypercholesterolaemic rats even at low dosages, as already observed for other legume seed storage proteins of this family. This main effect is discussed in relation to the possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26090103

  1. Adverse reaction to ceftriaxone in a 28-day-old infant undergoing urgent craniotomy due to epidural hematoma: review of neonatal biliary pseudolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Bartkowska-?niatkowska, Alicja; Jo?czyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Zieli?ska, Marzena; Rosada-Kurasi?ska, Jowita

    2015-01-01

    The debate as to whether to administer ceftriaxone to neonates is likely to continue. Ceftriaxone has numerous advantages for critically ill pediatric patients. However, it is also known to contribute substantially to the development of biliary pseudolithiasis. Although pediatric patients rarely develop gallbladder disorders, this complication may lead to adverse events in high-risk patients with predisposing factors, particularly in neonates and infants treated with ceftriaxone. In this paper we present an interesting case report of a 28-day-old neonate with spontaneous severe epidural hematoma who developed biliary pseudolithiasis related to the use of ceftriaxone. We also discuss the efficacy of ceftriaxone in neonates and infants. Neonatologists and pediatric intensivists should be aware of the higher risk of co-existence of hyperbilirubinemia and gallbladder disorders while using ceftriaxone in pediatric settings. PMID:26170682

  2. Solid oral forms availability in children: a cost saving investigation

    PubMed Central

    Lajoinie, Audrey; Henin, Emilie; Kassai, Behrouz; Terry, David

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the suitability and potential cost savings, from both the hospital and community perspective, of prescribed oral liquid medicine substitution with acceptable solid forms for children over 2 years. Method Oral liquid medicines dispensed from a paediatric hospital (UK) in 1 week were assessed by screening for existence of the solid form alternative and evaluating the acceptability of the available solid form, firstly related to the prescribed dose and secondly to acceptable size depending on the child's age. Costs were calculated based on providing treatment for 28 days or prescribed duration for short term treatments. Results Over 90% (440/476) of liquid formulations were available as a marketed solid form. Considering dosage acceptability (maximum of 10% deviation from prescribed dosage or 0% for narrow therapeutic range drugs, maximum tablet divisions into quarters) 80% of liquids could be substituted with a solid form. The main limitation for liquid substitution would be solid form size. However, two-thirds of prescribed liquids could have been substituted with a suitable solid form for dosage and size, with estimated savings being of £5K and £8K in 1 week, respectively based on hospital and community costs, corresponding to a projected annual saving of £238K and £410K (single institution). Conclusion Whilst not all children over 2 years will be able to swallow tablets, drug cost savings if oral liquid formulations were substituted with suitable solid dosage forms would be considerable. Given the numerous advantages of solid forms compared with liquids, this study may provide a theoretical basis for investing in supporting children to swallow tablets/capsules. PMID:24965935

  3. Oral Warts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for providing oral care. NIDCR > Image Gallery > Oral Health > Oral Warts Oral Warts Main Content Title: Oral Warts Description: Warts are small, white, gray, or pinkish rough bumps that look like cauliflower. They can appear inside the lips and on ...

  4. Effect of feeding rate on biochemical measures and fate of a single oral dose of PCB in Arctic char

    SciTech Connect

    Delorme, P.D.; Brown, S.B.; Lockhart, W.L.; Metner, D.A.; Vandenbyllaardt, L.

    1995-12-31

    This study was done to determine the effects of reducing lipid stores and the resulting mobilization of associated contaminants. Individually tagged Arctic char (Saivelinus alpinus) were treated with single gavage doses of 6.1 ng/g {sup 14}C-3,3{prime}4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) in gelatin or vehicle (controls). Following treatment, the PCB was allowed 3 weeks to reach equilibrium distribution within the fish. After this 3 week period, treated and control groups of fish were fed one of three rations, (1.5%, 0.75% or 0.25% body wt/d). Fish were sampled at 0, 8, 24 and 48 weeks following the initiation of the different rations. PCB concentrations and lipid levels were measured in 5 tissues (muscle, liver, intestine, spleen and kidney). Biochemical response measured included hepatic EROD, retinoids and tocopherol. Growth was reduced in both treated and control groups fed the lowest ration. EROD activity was negatively correlated with growth and positively correlated with liver concentrations of PCB 126. Declines in mean lipid content were ration dependent. Changes in hepatic retinoids were related to both ration and treatment. The results indicate that a low ration resulted in greater utilization of stored lipids and higher tissue concentrations of contaminants compared to the other rations. These changes altered biochemical measures which are responsive to planar chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons.

  5. A randomised controlled trial to compare intravenous iron sucrose and oral iron in treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Avantika; Manaktala, Usha; Rathore, Asmita Muthal

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose with oral iron therapy in pregnant patients with anemia. The primary outcome of the study was increase in haemoglobin on day 7, 14 & 28 and rise of serum ferritin over 28 days. The study population consisted of 100 patients with singleton pregnancy between 24 and 34 weeks, hemoglobin levels between 7.0-9.0 gm/dL and serum ferritin levels less than 15 ng/mL. The participants in the oral group were given daily 180 mg elemental iron in three divided oral doses for 4 weeks. Total calculated dose of iron sucrose with a target hemoglobin of 11 gm %, was given in 200 mg dose on alternate days. Mean haemoglobin rise was 0.58 gm/dL in the IV group as compared to 0.23 gm/dL in the oral group on day 14 and 1.9 gm/dL in the IV group & 1.3 gm/dL in the oral group on day 28, (p <0.05). In the IV group, 76% of the subjects achieved haemoglobin levels of ?11 gm% at the time of delivery, as compared to only 54% of the subjects in the oral group who achieved these levels. Serum ferritin value was significantly higher in the IV group, 37.45 ± 5.73 ng/mL as compared to 13.96 ± 1.88 ng/mL in the oral group at 4th week (p <0.001). There was no major side effect in the IV group. 36% subjects in the oral group developed gastrointestinal side effects & 10% of the subjects were non compliant. The rate of hemoglobin rise is faster with intravenous iron sucrose therapy as compared to oral iron therapy which can be beneficial in pregnant women presenting with anemia at a later period of gestation. Intravenous iron sucrose is very well tolerated during pregnancy. PMID:24839366

  6. Oral calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Ronald C; Daley, Dane N

    2012-01-01

    Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through ?-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen(®) 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl)-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC) (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ). Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis) failed to meet key end points, and in December 2011, Novartis Pharma AG announced that it would not pursue further clinical development of oral calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis or osteoarthritis. A unique feature of calcitonin is that it is able to uncouple bone turnover, reducing bone resorption without affecting bone formation and therefore increasing bone mass and improving bone quality. This effect, however, may be dose-dependent, with higher doses inhibiting both resorption and formation. Because so many factors affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of calcitonin, especially orally administered calcitonin, much work remains to be done to explore the full pharmacologic spectrum and potential of calcitonin and determine the optimum dose and timing of administration, as well as water and food intake. PMID:23071417

  7. Effects of oral administration of different doses of purified micronized flavonoid fraction on microvascular reactivity after ischaemia/reperfusion in the hamster cheek pouch

    PubMed Central

    Bouskela, E; Cyrino, F Z G A; Lerond, L

    1997-01-01

    The effects of a purified micronized flavonoid fraction (S5682) on mean internal diameter and blood flow of arterioles and venules, as well as the functional capillary density (FCD) were evaluated in the hamster cheek pouch microvasculature before and after 90?min of total ischaemia. Male hamsters were treated for ten days, twice a day, with oral doses of S5682 (5, 20, 80 and 160?mg?kg?1?day?1) or placebo (10% lactose solution). The cheek pouch preparation was placed under an intravital microscope coupled to a closed circuit TV system. Local ischaemia was obtained by a cuff mounted around the neck of the everted pouch where it leaves the mouth of the hamster. Measurements were performed before ischaemia, at the onset of reperfusion and 10, 20, 30, 45 and 60?min thereafter. Diameters were measured by means of an image shearing device. Red blood cell (RBC) velocity was analysed by use of the dual-slit photometric technique. Blood flow was calculated from diameters and RBC velocities. FCD, defined as the number of capillaries with flowing blood per field of observation, was also assessed. During reperfusion, placebo-treated animals showed a significant vasodilatation, a decrease in blood flow and FCD and S5682-treated animals showed a clear trend, dose-dependent, towards maintaining these parameters closer to the value found before ischaemia. In conclusion, our results indicate that S5682 improves the microvascular reactivity and FCD after ischaemia/reperfusion. These data suggest that S5682 could function as an antioxidant, which may explain its beneficial therapeutic effect in chronic venous insufficiency where oxidative stress is involved in the pathological mechanism. PMID:9422805

  8. Bioequivalence of oral and intravenous carbamazepine formulations in adult patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, Dwain; Cloyd, James; Biton, Victor; Bekersky, Ihor; Walzer, Mark; Wesche, David; Drummond, Rebecca; Lee, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and comparative pharmacokinetics (PK) of intravenous and oral carbamazepine. Methods In this phase 1, open-label study, adult patients with epilepsy on a stable oral carbamazepine dosage (400–2,000 mg/day) were converted to intravenous carbamazepine (administered at 70% of the oral dosage). A 28-day outpatient period preceded an up to 10-day inpatient period and a 30-day follow-up period. Intravenous carbamazepine was administered over 15 or 30 min every 6 h on days 1–7; some patients in the 15-min group were eligible to receive four 2- to 5-min (rapid) infusions on day 8. Patients underwent blood sampling to determine the area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) for carbamazepine and metabolite carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide following oral (day 0) and intravenous carbamazepine administration (days 1, 7, and 8). Bioequivalence was evaluated in patients with normal renal function (creatinine clearance >80 ml/min). Safety assessments were conducted through day 38. Results Ninety-eight patients enrolled and 77 completed the PK component. The mean daily oral and intravenous carbamazepine dosage for 64 PK-evaluable patients with normal renal function was 962.5 and 675.1 mg (70% of oral dosage), respectively. Steady-state minimum concentration (Cmin) and overall exposure (AUC0–24) for intravenous carbamazepine infused over 30, 15, or 2–5 min were similar to oral carbamazepine. The 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the ratios of the adjusted means for AUC0–24, maximum concentration (Cmax), and Cmin were within the 80%–125% bioequivalence range for 30-min intravenous infusions versus oral administration, but exceeded the upper limit for Cmax for the 15-min and rapid infusions. All intravenous carbamazepine infusions were well tolerated. Significance Intravenous carbamazepine infusions (70% of oral daily dose) of 30-, 15-, and 2- to 5-min duration, given every 6 h, maintained patients’ plasma carbamazepine concentrations. Intravenous carbamazepine 30-min infusions were bioequivalent to oral carbamazepine in patients with normal renal function; rapid infusions were well-tolerated in this study. PMID:25982590

  9. Single and multiple dose pharmacokinetics of maritime pine bark extract (Pycnogenol) after oral administration to healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Tanja; Skrabala, Roswitha; Chovanová, Zuzana; Muchová, Jana; Sumegová, Katarína; Liptáková, Anna; ?ura?ková, Zde?ka; Högger, Petra

    2006-01-01

    Background Since plant extracts are increasingly used as phytotherapeutics or dietary supplements information on bioavailability, bioefficacy and safety are warranted. We elucidated the plasma kinetics of genuine extract components and metabolites after single and multiple ingestion of the standardized maritime pine bark extract Pycnogenol (USP quality) by human volunteers. Methods Eleven volunteers received a single dose of 300 mg pine bark extract, five volunteers ingested 200 mg daily for five days to reach steady state concentrations. Plasma samples were obtained before and at defined time points after intake of the extract. Samples were analyzed by HPLC with ion-pair reagents and simultaneous UV and electrochemical detection. Results We quantified total plasma concentrations of catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, taxifolin and the metabolite M1 (?-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl)-?-valerolactone). Additionally, we describe plasma time courses and steady state appearance of ten so far unknown compounds, U1 to U10. After single ingestion, compounds derived from the extract were rapidly absorbed and the majority of them were detectable over whole experimental period of 14 h. The analysis of steady state plasma samples revealed significant phase II metabolism. Conclusion We present the first systematic pharmacokinetic analysis of compounds derived from maritime pine bark extract. Beyond the known constituents and metabolites we uncovered the plasma time courses of ten unknown compounds. In concert with our previous detection of anti-inflammatory bioefficacy of these plasma samples ex vivo we suggest that constituents and metabolites of Pycnogenol bear potential for disclosure of novel active principles. PMID:16887024

  10. The acute effects of single-dose orally administered doramectin, eprinomectin and selamectin on natural infections of Syphacia muris in rats.

    PubMed

    Sevimli, Feride Kircali; Kozan, Esma; Sevimli, Alper; Do?an, Nurhan; Bülbül, Aziz

    2009-07-01

    This study was designed to determine the acute effects of a single-dose of orally administered doramectin, eprinomectin and selamectin on Syphacia muris infection in rats. Rats, naturally infected with S. muris, were divided into four groups: three different treatment groups (n=7) and one positive control (n=7). Cellophane tape preparations were obtained from the treated rats on day 0 pre-treatment and on days 2, 4 and 6 post-treatment. Syphacia sp. eggs were counted. Eprinomectin was found to be 100% effective in eliminating eggs on two post-treatment. However when egg counts on day 6 post-treatment were compared with pre-treatment egg counts, doramectin and selamectin were found to be 99.32 and 98.77% effective in eliminating eggs, respectively. On day 7 post-treatment, blood samples were obtained from all groups, and then the rats were necropsied. Doramectin, eprinomectin and selamectin were found to be 100% effective in eliminating adult S. muris, when compared with the positive control group. PMID:19318096

  11. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of a Single Oral Dose of Polymorph Form I versus Form V Capsules of the Antiorthopoxvirus Compound ST-246 in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Honeychurch, Kady M.; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R.; Bolken, Tove' C.; Jordan, Robert; Jones, Kevin F.; Marbury, Thomas; Lichtenstein, Israel; Pickens, Margaret; Corrado, Michael; Landis, Patrick; Clarke, Jean M.; Frimm, Annie M.

    2012-01-01

    ST-246, a novel compound that inhibits egress of orthopoxvirus from mammalian cells, is being tested as a treatment for pathogenic orthopoxvirus infections in humans. This phase I, double-blind, randomized, crossover, exploratory study was conducted to compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a single daily 400-mg oral dose of ST-246 polymorph form I versus polymorph form V administered to fed, healthy human volunteers. Both forms appeared to be well tolerated, with no serious adverse events. The order of administration of the two forms had no effect on the results of the PK analyses. Form I and form V both exhibited comparable plasma concentration versus time profiles, but complete bioequivalence between the two forms was not found. Maximum drug concentration (Cmax) met the bioequivalence criteria, as the 90% confidence interval (CI) was 80.6 to 96.9%. However, the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to time t (AUC0-t) and AUC0-? did not meet the bioequivalence criteria (CIs of 67.8 to 91.0% and 73.9 to 104.7%, respectively). The extent of absorption of form I, as defined by AUC0-?, was 11.7% lower than that of form V. Since ST-246 form I is more thermostable than form V, form I was selected for further development and use in all future studies. PMID:22526314

  12. Determination of influence of food intake after a single oral dose of mosapride in beagle dogs using nonlinear mixed effect modeling.

    PubMed

    Chae, J-W; Hwang, J-A; Baek, I-H; Pradhan, S; Song, B; Back, H-M; Yun, M; Pai, C; Bang, J S; Yun, H-Y; Kang, W; Kwon, K-I

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of mosapride under fasting and fed conditions. A single 5-mg oral dose of mosapride was administered to fasted (n = 15) and fed (n = 12) beagle dogs. Plasma concentrations of mosapride were subsequently measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Data were analyzed using modeling approaches with the NONMEM 7.2 software. A one-compartment open PK model utilizing model event time (MTIME) with first-order absorption and first-order elimination was found to be more appropriate than all other PK models tested. The absorption rate constants of mosapride were significantly decreased under fed conditions, compared to fasting conditions. The observed bootstrap medians of PK parameters were generally consistent with the corresponding population mean estimates. Furthermore, with the exception of some mosapride concentrations, most of observed data fell into the range of the 5th and 95th percentiles of the simulated values. Overall, the final model was able to describe the observed mosapride concentrations reasonably well. These findings suggest that food intake affects both the rate and extent of absorption of mosapride and that the pharmacological effect of mosapride can differ significantly depending on food intake. PMID:25955782

  13. Uterotrophic assay, Hershberger assay, and subacute oral toxicity study of 4,4'-butylidenebis(2-tert-butyl-5-methylphenol) and 3-(dibutylamino)phenol, based on the OECD draft protocols.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Kanji; Miyata, Katusi; Shiraishi, Keiji; Muroi, Takako; Higashihara, Nobuhiko; Oshima, Hiroshi; Minobe, Yasushi

    2008-05-01

    We performed a uterotrophic assay, the Hershberger assay, and a 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study [enhanced Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline No. 407] of 4,4'-butylidenebis(2-tert-butyl-5-methylphenol) and 3-(dibutylamino)phenol, based on the OECD draft protocols. In the uterotrophic assay of 4,4'-butylidenebis(2-tert-butyl-5-methylphenol), female SD rats were subcutaneously injected with the chemical at doses of 0, 100, 300, and 1,000 mg/kg on each of 3 days from postnatal day 20 to day 22, and no changes were observed. In the Hershberger assay of 4,4'-butylidenebis(2-tert-butyl-5-methylphenol), the test chemical was orally administered to castrated male SD rats at doses of 0, 50, 200, and 1,000 mg/kg/day for ten consecutive days beginning on postnatal day 56, and no changes were observed. When this chemical was orally administered at doses 0, 5, 25, and 125 mg/kg/day for at least 28 days in the subacute oral toxicity study, an increase in thyroid weight was observed in the female rats in the 125 mg/kg group, an increase in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) values in the male and female rats in the 125 mg/kg group, and a decrease in serum T3 and T4 values in the male rats in the 125 mg/kg group, and thyroid follicular epithelial cell hypertrophy was observed in some of the female rats in the 125 mg/kg group. These findings were concluded to be the result of endocrine-mediated effects of the chemical on thyroid function. In addition, increased liver weight, abnormal histological findings in the liver, and abnormal biochemical parameters related to liver function were observed in male and/or female rats in 5 mg/kg group and higher dose groups. The no-observed-effect level for 4,4'-butylidenebis(2-tert-butyl-5-methylphenol) was concluded to be <5 mg/kg/day. In the uterotrophic assay of 3-(dibutylamino)phenol, female SD rats were subcutaneously injected with the chemical at doses of 0, 100, 300, and 1,000 mg/kg on each of 3 days from postnatal day 20 to day 22, and no changes were observed. In the Hershberger assay of 3-(dibutylamino)phenol, the test chemical was orally administered at doses of 0, 50, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day to castrated male SD rats for ten consecutive days beginning on postnatal day 56, and no changes were observed. On the other hand, when this test chemical was orally administered at doses 0, 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg/day for at least 28 days in the subacute oral toxicity study, thyroid weight increased in the male rats in the 300 mg/kg group, thyroid follicular epithelial cell hypertrophy was observed in a small number of male rats in the 300 mg/kg group, serum T3-values decreased in the female rats in the 300 mg/kg group, and a tendency for TSH-values to increase was observed in the male and female rats in the 300 mg/kg group. Therefore, 3-(dibutylamino)phenol was also concluded to have slight anti-thyroid acting effects as the endocrine-mediated effects. On the other hand, increased hemosiderin deposition in the spleen, increased spleen weight, hematological abnormalities, and squamous epithelial hyperplasia of the forestomach were detected in male and/or female rats in the 100 and/or 300 mg/kg groups, and thus the no-observed-effect level for 3-(dibutylamino)phenol was concluded to be 30 mg/kg/day. PMID:17924095

  14. Acute and Subacute Oral Toxicity Evaluation of Crude Antifungal Compounds Produced by Lactobacillus plantarum HD1 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hee-Kyoung; Chang, Hae-Choon; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and subacute oral toxicity of crude antifungal compounds produced by Lactobacillus plantarum HD1 in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the acute toxicity study, the crude antifungal compounds (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 g/kg) did not produce mortality, significant changes in general behavior, or changes in the gross appearance of the organs. In the subacute toxicity study, the crude antifungal compounds were administered orally to rats at doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg daily for 28 days. There were no test article-related deaths, abnormal clinical signs, or body weight changes. The study also showed no significant differences between the control and treated groups in hematological and serum biochemical parameters, histopathological examination, or any other findings. These results suggest that acute or subacute oral administration of crude antifungal compounds from L. plantarum HD1 is not toxic in rats. PMID:26451356

  15. Acute and Subacute Oral Toxicity Evaluation of Crude Antifungal Compounds Produced by Lactobacillus plantarum HD1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Son, Hee-Kyoung; Chang, Hae-Choon; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and subacute oral toxicity of crude antifungal compounds produced by Lactobacillus plantarum HD1 in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the acute toxicity study, the crude antifungal compounds (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 g/kg) did not produce mortality, significant changes in general behavior, or changes in the gross appearance of the organs. In the subacute toxicity study, the crude antifungal compounds were administered orally to rats at doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg daily for 28 days. There were no test article-related deaths, abnormal clinical signs, or body weight changes. The study also showed no significant differences between the control and treated groups in hematological and serum biochemical parameters, histopathological examination, or any other findings. These results suggest that acute or subacute oral administration of crude antifungal compounds from L. plantarum HD1 is not toxic in rats. PMID:26451356

  16. Effect of a low dose combined oral contraceptive pill on the hormonal profile and cycle outcome following COS with a GnRH antagonist protocol in women over 35 years old.

    PubMed

    Bakas, Panagiotis; Hassiakos, Dimitrios; Grigoriadis, Charalampos; Vlahos, Nikolaos F; Liapis, Angelos; Creatsas, George

    2014-11-01

    This prospective study examines if pre-treatment with two different doses of an oral contraceptive pill (OCP) modifies significantly the hormonal profile and/or the IVF/ICSI outcome following COS with a GnRH antagonist protocol. Infertile patients were allocated to receive either OCP containing 0.03?mg of ethinylestradiol and 3?mg of drospirenone, or OCP containing 0.02?mg of ethinylestradiol and 3?mg of drospirenone prior to initiation of controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) with recombinant gonadotropins on a variable multi-dose antagonist protocol (Ganirelix), while the control group underwent COS without OCP pretreatment. Lower dose OCP was associated with recovery of FSH on day 3 instead of day 5, but the synchronization of the follicular cohort, the number of retrieved oocytes and the clinical pregnancy rate were similar to higher dose OCP. PMID:24954511

  17. Safety and immunogenicity in North Americans of a single dose of live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR: results of a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Kotloff, K L; Wasserman, S S; O'Donnell, S; Losonsky, G A; Cryz, S J; Levine, M M

    1992-10-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a single 5 x 10(8)-CFU dose of live oral recombinant cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR in 94 North American adults. The vaccine was well tolerated without associated adverse reactions. Despite minimal fecal excretion of vaccine, 97% of subjects exhibited serum vibriocidal antibody and 72% had antitoxin responses. PMID:1398956

  18. “Sequential” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT): A Novel Approach to BNCT for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ana J. Molinari; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Marcela A. Garabalino; Silvia I. Thorp; Marcelo Miller; Maria E. Itoiz; Romina F. Aromando; David W. Nigg; Jorge Quintana; Gustavo A. Santa Cruz; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2011-04-01

    In the present study we evaluated the therapeutic effect and/or potential radiotoxicity of the novel “Tandem” Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (T-BNCT) for the treatment of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch model at RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Two groups of animals were treated with “Tandem BNCT”, i.e. BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) followed by BNCT mediated by sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) either 24 h (T-24h-BNCT) or 48 h (T-48h-BNCT) later. A total tumor dose-matched single application of BNCT mediated by BPA and GB-10 administered jointly [(BPA + GB-10)-BNCT] was administered to an additional group of animals. At 28 days post-treatment, T-24h-BNCT and T-48h-BNCT induced, respectively, overall tumor control (OTC) of 95% and 91%, with no statistically significant differences between protocols. Tumor response for the single application of (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT was 75%, significantly lower than for T-BNCT. The T-BNCT protocols and (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT induced reversible mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue around treated tumors, reaching Grade 3/4 mucositis in 47% and 60% of the animals respectively. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was associated to tumor control for any of the protocols. “Tandem” BNCT enhances tumor control in oral cancer and reduces or, at worst, does not increase, mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue.

  19. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most common symptom of oral cancer ... the oral cavity. • HPV infection The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has ...

  20. [Tolerance and immunogenicity of an oral dose of CVD 103-HgR, a live attenuated Vibrio cholerae 01 strain: a double-blind study of Chilean adults].

    PubMed

    Lagos, R; Avendaño, A; Horwitz, I; Prado, V; Ferreccio, C; Sotomayor, V; Losonsky, G; Wasserman, S S; Cryz, S; Kaper, J B

    1993-08-01

    CVD 103-HgR is an attenuated, AB+, live, recombinant vaccine strain, developed by deletion of the toxA gen in a virulent Vibrio cholerae 01, Inada classical strain (569B). In phase II studies conducted to date, CVD 103-HgR has been well tolerated and immunogenic in volunteers from both industrialized countries and cholera-endemic areas. In this study of safety, immunogenicity and excretion, 81 Chilean adults were randomly allocated to receive, in a double blind fashion, a single oral dose of 5 x 10(9) FU of CVD 103-HgR or placebo, (5 x 10(9) heat-killed E. Coli K12 organisms), in 100 ml of buffered water. Side effects were assessed by daily visits to the participants. Immunogenicity, (vibriocidal seroconversion), was investigated in blood drawn before and on days 8 and 28 after immunization, while stool cultures to assess excretion of the vaccine strain were performed on specimens obtained on days 1 and 7. None of the participants, (40 vaccinees and 41 placebo recipients), experienced untoward effects during 30 minutes of close surveillance after ingestion of the preparation; upon follow up, neither adverse events were more frequently reported by the vaccinees. 34/40 vaccinees, and 2/41 participants receiving placebo had a significant raise, (> = fourfold), in their vibriocidal titers; (85 vs 2%, p < 0.001). The peak postimmunization geometric mean titer, (222), was ten fold higher than the baseline vibriocidal titer. The vaccine strain was recovered in stool cultures from 8 participants, one of them excreted the strain in both specimens. We conclude that CVD-103-HgR is safe and immunogenic in Chilean adults. PMID:8296092

  1. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Single, Escalating Oral Doses of JDTic.

    PubMed

    Buda, Jeffrey J; Carroll, F I; Kosten, Thomas R; Swearingen, Dennis; Walters, Bradford B

    2015-08-01

    Animal studies suggest that kappa opioid receptor antagonists (KORAn) potentially could treat a wide variety of addictive and depressive disorders. We assessed the KORAn JDTic for safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial evaluating single oral doses in healthy adult males. Predose and postdose safety assessments included orthostatic vital signs; 6-lead continuous telemetry monitoring (approximately 16 h predose to 24 h postdose); 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs); clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, and urinalysis; psychomotor functioning (using the Wayne Saccadic Fixator (WSF)); and adverse events. As a potential indicator of JDTic effects on affect, the POMS Standard instrument was administered predose and daily postdose Days 1-6. At 1 mg, 2 of the 6 JDTic (and 0/6 placebo) subjects experienced a single, asymptomatic event of multiple beats of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT). Their events were temporally similar with respect to time postdose (and the postdose timing of an NSVT event in a monkey). These events triggered a study stopping rule. No differences were observed between the placebo and JDTic subjects with respect to clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, urinalysis, orthostatic vital signs, WSF, or 12-lead ECG parameters. Plasma JDTic levels were below the lower limit of quantitation (0.1 nM) in all subjects. There were no significant differences in POMS scores between the placebo and JDTic groups. Although the evidence is circumstantial, it suggests that NSVT is a potential JDTic toxicity in humans. Given the therapeutic potential of KORAn, further investigation is needed to determine whether a significant JDTic human cardiac effect indeed exists, and if so, whether it is specific to JDTic or represents a KORAn class effect. PMID:25628006

  2. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Single, Escalating Oral Doses of JDTic

    PubMed Central

    Buda, Jeffrey J; Carroll, F I; Kosten, Thomas R; Swearingen, Dennis; Walters, Bradford B

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that kappa opioid receptor antagonists (KORAn) potentially could treat a wide variety of addictive and depressive disorders. We assessed the KORAn JDTic for safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial evaluating single oral doses in healthy adult males. Predose and postdose safety assessments included orthostatic vital signs; 6-lead continuous telemetry monitoring (approximately 16?h predose to 24?h postdose); 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs); clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, and urinalysis; psychomotor functioning (using the Wayne Saccadic Fixator (WSF)); and adverse events. As a potential indicator of JDTic effects on affect, the POMS Standard instrument was administered predose and daily postdose Days 1–6. At 1?mg, 2 of the 6 JDTic (and 0/6 placebo) subjects experienced a single, asymptomatic event of multiple beats of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT). Their events were temporally similar with respect to time postdose (and the postdose timing of an NSVT event in a monkey). These events triggered a study stopping rule. No differences were observed between the placebo and JDTic subjects with respect to clinical chemistry, hematology, coagulation, urinalysis, orthostatic vital signs, WSF, or 12-lead ECG parameters. Plasma JDTic levels were below the lower limit of quantitation (0.1?nM) in all subjects. There were no significant differences in POMS scores between the placebo and JDTic groups. Although the evidence is circumstantial, it suggests that NSVT is a potential JDTic toxicity in humans. Given the therapeutic potential of KORAn, further investigation is needed to determine whether a significant JDTic human cardiac effect indeed exists, and if so, whether it is specific to JDTic or represents a KORAn class effect. PMID:25628006

  3. Comparison of total and salivary cortisol in a low-dose ACTH (Synacthen) test: influence of three-month oral contraceptives administration to healthy women.

    PubMed

    Sim?nková, K; Stárka, L; Hill, M; Kríz, L; Hampl, R; Vondra, K

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of low-dose combined oral contraception (COC) on basal and stimulated (1 microg ACTH test) levels of serum and salivary cortisol (F), cortisone and on basal serum cortisol binding globulin (CBG), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), dehydroepiadrosterone (DHEA) and calculated free cortisol in healthy young women. Three-month administration of COC resulted in 1) significant increase of basal (454.0+/-125.0 to 860.9+/-179.7 nmol/l) and ACTH-stimulated serum cortisol in 30th min (652.3+/-60.5 to 1374.1+/-240.6 nmol/l); 2) no significant change of basal (15.4+/-7.3 to 18.9+/-8.5 nmol/l) and ACTH-stimulated salivary cortisol at the 30th min (32.4+/-8.8 to 32.9+/-9.0 nmol/l); 3) no significant change of basal serum cortisone (38,8+/-7.68 to 45.2+/-24.2 nmol/l) and ACTH-stimulated cortisone at the 30th (34.8+/-10.9 to 47.0+/-35.7 nmol/l); 4) significant increase of basal ACTH (17.2+/-9.0 to 38.2+/-29.4 ng/l), CBG (991.0+/-161.0 to 2332.0+/-428.0 nmol/l), and 5) no significant change of basal DHEA (24.6+/-15.7 to 22.6+/-11.7 micromol/l) and calculated basal value for free cortisol (22.8+/-14.9 to 19.2+/-6.9 nmol/l). In conclusions, higher basal and ACTH-stimulated serum cortisol were found after three-month administration of COC, while basal and stimulated salivary cortisol were not significantly affected. Therefore, salivary cortisol can be used for assessment of adrenal function in women regularly using COC. PMID:18271677

  4. The absorption, distribution, excretion, and metabolism of a single oral dose of O-ethyl O-4-nitrophenyl phenylphosphonothioate in hens

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Donia, M.B.; Reichert, B.L.; Ashry, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    The disposition and metabolism of a single oral 10 mg/kg (LD50) of uniformly phenyl-labeled (/sup 14/C)EPN (O-ethyl O-4-nitrophenyl (/sup 14/C)phenylphosphonothioate) were studied in adult hens. The birds were protected from acute toxicity with atropine sulfate. Three treated hens were killed at each time interval (days): 0.5, 2, 4, 8, 12. Radioactivity was adsorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed in all tissues. Most of the dose was excreted in the combined urinary-fecal excreta (74%). Only traces of the radioactivity (0.2%) were detected in expired CO/sub 2/. Most of the excreted radioactive materials were identified as phenylphosphonic acid (PPA), O-ethyl phenylphosphonic acid (EPPA), and O-ethyl phenylphosphonothioc acid (EPPTA). Radioactivity in tissues reached a peak of 11.8% in 12 days. The highest concentration of radioactivity was present in the liver followed by bile, kidney, adipose tissue, and muscle. EPN was the major compound identified in brain, spinal cord, sciatic nerve, kidney, and plasma. Most of the radioactivity in the liver was identified as EPPA followed by EPPTA and PPA. Kinetic studies showed that EPN disappeared exponentially from tissues. The half-life of the elimination of EPN from plasma was 16.5 days corresponding to a constant rate value of 0.04 day-1. Relative residence (RR) of EPN relative to plasma was shortest in liver and longest in adipose tissue followed by sciatic nerve and spinal cord.

  5. Tissue distribution of tungsten in mice following oral exposure to sodium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Guandalini, Gustavo S; Zhang, Lingsu; Fornero, Elisa; Centeno, Jose A; Mokashi, Vishwesh P; Ortiz, Pedro A; Stockelman, Michael D; Osterburg, Andrew R; Chapman, Gail G

    2011-04-18

    Heavy metal tungsten alloys have replaced lead and depleted uranium in many munitions applications, due to public perception of these elements as environmentally unsafe. Tungsten materials left in the environment may become bioaccessible as tungstate, which might lead to population exposure through water and soil contamination. Although tungsten had been considered a relatively inert and toxicologically safe material, recent research findings have raised concerns about possible deleterious health effects after acute and chronic exposure to this metal. This investigation describes tissue distribution of tungsten in mice following oral exposure to sodium tungstate. Twenty-four 6-9 weeks-old C57BL/6 laboratory mice were exposed to different oral doses of sodium tungstate (0, 62.5, 125, and 200 mg/kg/d) for 28 days, and after one day, six organs were harvested for trace element analysis with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Kidney, liver, colon, bone, brain, and spleen were analyzed by sector-field high-resolution ICP-MS. The results showed increasing tungsten levels in all organs with increased dose of exposure, with the highest concentration found in the bones and the lowest concentration found in brain tissue. Gender differences were noticed only in the spleen (higher concentration of tungsten in female animals), and increasing tungsten levels in this organ were correlated with increased iron levels, something that was not observed for any other organ or either of the two other metals analyzed (nickel and cobalt). These findings confirmed most of what has been published on tungsten tissue distribution; they also showed that the brain is relatively protected from oral exposure. Further studies are necessary to clarify the findings in splenic tissue, focusing on possible immunological effects of tungsten exposure. PMID:21375269

  6. Identification and quantification of nicotine biomarkers in human oral fluid from individuals receiving low-dose transdermal nicotine: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eleanor I; Norris, Hye-Ryun K; Rollins, Douglas E; Tiffany, Stephen T; Moore, Christine M; Vincent, Michael J; Agrawal, Alpana; Wilkins, Diana G

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to identify and quantify potential nicotine (NIC) biomarkers in post-exposure oral fluid samples collected from 10 NIC-abstinent human participants administered 7 mg transdermal NIC using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Oral fluid samples were collected prior to NIC patch application and at 0.5 and 0.75 h after patch removal using the Quantisal() oral fluid collection device. The validated LC-MS-MS analyte panel included nicotine-Nbeta-D-glucuronide, cotinine-N-oxide, trans-3-hydroxycotinine, norcotinine, trans-nicotine-1'-N-oxide, cotinine (COT), nornicotine, NIC, anatabine, anabasine, and cotinine-N-beta-D-glucuronide. Analytes and corresponding deuterated internal standards were extracted by solid-phase extraction. NIC and COT concentrations were quantifiable in oral fluid samples collected from 6 of the 10 participants 0.5 h after patch removal and in oral fluid samples collected from 7 of the 10 participants 0.75 h after patch removal. Based on the mean NIC and COT concentrations in oral fluid and plasma for the participants with both quantifiable NIC and COT at the 0.5 and 0.75 h collection times, the oral fluid-plasma ratio was 6.4 for NIC and 3.3 for COT. An ELISA procedure was also validated and successfully applied as a screening tool for these oral fluid samples in conjunction with LC-MS-MS confirmation. An ELISA cut-off concentration of 5.0 ng/mL provided excellent sensitivity for discrimination of COT-positive post-exposure oral fluid samples collected after low-level transdermal NIC exposure and oral fluid samples collected prior to patch application. PMID:20822672

  7. Efficiency and effectiveness of the use of an acenocoumarol pharmacogenetic dosing algorithm versus usual care in patients with venous thromboembolic disease initiating oral anticoagulation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic events are frequent in patients on treatment with antivitamin-K oral anticoagulants due to their narrow therapeutic margin. Studies performed with acenocoumarol have shown the relationship between demographic, clinical and genotypic variants and the response to these drugs. Once the influence of these genetic and clinical factors on the dose of acenocoumarol needed to maintain a stable international normalized ratio (INR) has been demonstrated, new strategies need to be developed to predict the appropriate doses of this drug. Several pharmacogenetic algorithms have been developed for warfarin, but only three have been developed for acenocoumarol. After the development of a pharmacogenetic algorithm, the obvious next step is to demonstrate its effectiveness and utility by means of a randomized controlled trial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of an acenocoumarol dosing algorithm developed by our group which includes demographic, clinical and pharmacogenetic variables (VKORC1, CYP2C9, CYP4F2 and ApoE) in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). Methods and design This is a multicenter, single blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. The protocol has been approved by La Paz University Hospital Research Ethics Committee and by the Spanish Drug Agency. Two hundred and forty patients with VTE in which oral anticoagulant therapy is indicated will be included. Randomization (case/control 1:1) will be stratified by center. Acenocoumarol dose in the control group will be scheduled and adjusted following common clinical practice; in the experimental arm dosing will be following an individualized algorithm developed and validated by our group. Patients will be followed for three months. The main endpoints are: 1) Percentage of patients with INR within the therapeutic range on day seven after initiation of oral anticoagulant therapy; 2) Time from the start of oral anticoagulant treatment to achievement of a stable INR within the therapeutic range; 3) Number of INR determinations within the therapeutic range in the first six weeks of treatment. Discussion To date, there are no clinical trials comparing pharmacogenetic acenocoumarol dosing algorithm versus routine clinical practice in VTE. Implementation of this pharmacogenetic algorithm in the clinical practice routine could reduce side effects and improve patient safety. Trial registration Eudra CT. Identifier: 2009-016643-18. PMID:23237631

  8. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products in critically ill patients and its associations with other clinical markers and 28-day mortality

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yanzi; Zhong, Jiwen; Xiang, Yang; Zeng, Fan; Cai, Dehong; Zhao, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the possible associations between serum levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) and specific clinical markers and prognosis in critically ill patients diagnosed with stress hyperglycemia. Patients and methods A total of 70 critically ill patients and 25 normal controls were recruited for this study. Serum levels of sRAGE and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additional data on other clinical markers were obtained from patient records in the intensive care unit. Comparisons of sRAGE and AGEs levels between groups were assessed by t-test. The relationships between sRAGE and other clinical markers were assessed by Pearson’s correlation analyses and multiple linear regression analyses. Risk factors for prognosis, such as 28-day mortality were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Results Serum sRAGE and AGEs levels were significantly higher in critically ill patients, compared to normal controls (P<0.05). The increase in serum sRAGE levels was significantly correlated with AGEs levels, interleukin-6 levels, and the sequential organ failure assessment score (P<0.01). Using multiple linear regression analysis, the association between AGEs and sRAGE remained significant after adjustment of other clinical factors. However, there were no significant correlations between sRAGE levels and patient outcome in these critically ill patients. Conclusion Serum sRAGE levels were significantly elevated in critically ill patients and positively correlated with higher AGEs levels, but sRAGE levels were not associated with increased mortality, suggesting sRAGE levels are not a predictor of prognosis in critically ill patients. PMID:25429209

  9. Nitrogen removal and mass balance in newly-formed Myriophyllum aquaticum mesocosm during a single 28-day incubation with swine wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Zhang, Shunan; Wang, Yi; Li, Yong; Xiao, Runlin; Li, Hongfang; He, Yang; Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Di; Li, Xi; Wu, Jinshui

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this research was to assess the applicability of Myriophyllum (M.) aquaticum for swine wastewater treatment. Nitrogen (N) removal processes were investigated in M. aquaticum mesocosms with swine wastewater (SW), 50% diluted swine wastewater (50% SW), and two strengths of synthetic wastewater, 200 mg [Formula: see text] L(-1) (200 [Formula: see text] ) and 400 mg [Formula: see text] L(-1) (400 [Formula: see text] ). During a 28-day incubation period, the average [Formula: see text] and TN removal rates were 99.8% and 94.2% for 50% SW and 99.8% and 93.8% for SW, which were greater than 86.5% and 83.7% for 200 [Formula: see text] , and 73.7% and 74.1% for 400 [Formula: see text] , respectively. A maximum areal total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of 157.8 mg N m(-2) d(-1) was found in M. aquaticum mesocosms with SW. During the incubation period, the observed dynamics of [Formula: see text] concentrations in water and gene copy numbers of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nirK and nirS in soil unraveled strong nitrification and denitrification processes occurring in M. aquaticum mesocosms with swine wastewater. The N mass balance analysis indicated that plant uptake and soil N accumulation accounted for 17.9-42.2% and 18.0-43.8% of the initial TN load, respectively. The coupled nitrification and denitrification process was calculated to account for, on average, 36.8% and 62.8% of TN removal for 50% SW and SW, respectively. These findings demonstrated that the N uptake by M. aquaticum contributed to a considerable proportion of N removal. In particular, the activities of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrification microbes responsible for nitrification and denitrification processes in M. aquaticum mesocosm accelerated [Formula: see text] and TN removal from swine wastewater. PMID:26607567

  10. Acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats with nanoscale and pigment grade titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B; Brown, S C; Donner, E M

    2015-10-01

    Data generated using standardized testing protocols for toxicity studies generally provide reproducible and reliable results for establishing safe levels and formulating risk assessments. The findings of three OECD guideline-type oral toxicity studies of different duration in rats are summarized in this publication; each study evaluated different titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles of varying sizes and surface coatings. Moreover, each study finding demonstrated an absence of any TiO2 -related hazards. To briefly summarize the findings: 1) In a subchronic 90-day study (OECD TG 408), groups of young adult male and female rats were dosed with rutile-type, surface-coated pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 145 nm - 21% nanoparticles by particle number criteria) by oral gavage for 90 days. The no-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both male and female rats in this study was 1000 mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. The NOAEL was determined based on a lack of TiO2 particle-related adverse effects on any in-life, clinical pathology, or anatomic/microscopic pathology parameters; 2) In a 28-day repeated-dose oral toxicity study (OECD TG 407), groups of young adult male rats were administered daily doses of two rutile-type, uncoated, pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 173 nm by number) by daily oral gavage at a dose of 24,000 mg/kg bw/day. There were no adverse effects measured during or following the end of the exposure period; and the NOAEL was determined to be 24,000 mg/kg bw/day; 3) In an acute oral toxicity study (OECD TG 425), female rats were administered a single oral exposure of surface-treated rutile/anatase nanoscale TiO2 particles (d50 = 73 nm by number) with doses up to 5000 mg/kg and evaluated over a 14-day post-exposure period. Under the conditions of this study, the oral LD50 for the test substance was >5000 mg/kg bw. In summary, the results from these three toxicity studies - each with different TiO2 particulate-types, demonstrated an absence of adverse toxicological effects. Apart from reporting the findings of these three studies, this publication also focuses on additional critical issues associated with particle and nanotoxicology studies. First, describing the detailed methodology requirements and rigor upon which the standardized OECD 408 guideline subchronic oral toxicity studies are conducted. Moreover, an attempt is made to reconcile the complex issue of particle size distribution as it relates to measurements of nanoscale and pigment-grade TiO2 particles. Clearly this has been a confusing issue and often misrepresented in the media and the scientific literature. It is clear that the particle-size distribution for pigment-grade TiO2, contains a small ("tail") component of nanoscale particles (i.e., 21% by particle number and <1% by weight in the test material used in the 90-day study). However, this robust particle characterization finding should not be confused with mislabeling the test materials as exclusively in the nanoscale range. Moreover, based upon the findings presented herein, there appears to be no significant oral toxicity impact contributed by the nanoscale component of the TiO2 Test Material sample in the 90-day study. Finally, it seems reasonable to conclude that the study findings should be considered for read-across purposes to food-grade TiO2 particles (e.g., E171), as the physicochemical characteristics are quite similar. PMID:26341192

  11. Phase I trial of split-dose induction docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy followed by curative surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (TISOC-1)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction chemotherapy (ICT) with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) followed by radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for unresectable locally advanced head and neck cancer. This phase I study was designed to investigate the safety and tolerability of a split-dose TPF ICT regimen prior to surgery for locally advanced resectable oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods Patients received TPF split on two dosages on day 1 and 8 per cycle for one or three 3-week cycles prior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Docetaxel was escalated in two dose levels, 40 mg/m2 (DL 0) and 30 mg/m2 (DL ?1), plus 40 mg/m2 cisplatin and 2000 mg/m2 fluorouracil per week using a 3 +3 dose escalation algorithm. Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and were eligible for toxicity and response. A maximum tolerated dose of 30 mg/m2 docetaxel per week was reached. The most common grade 3+ adverse event was neutropenia during ICT in 10 patients. Surgery reached R0 resection in all cases. Nine patients (50%) showed complete pathologic regression. Conclusions A split-dose regime of TPF prior to surgery is feasible, tolerated and merits additional investigation in a phase II study with a dose of 30 mg/m docetaxel per week. Trial registration number NCT01108042 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier) PMID:23083061

  12. Sub-chronic toxicity study in rats orally exposed to nanostructured silica

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic Amorphous Silica (SAS) is commonly used in food and drugs. Recently, a consumer intake of silica from food was estimated at 9.4 mg/kg bw/day, of which 1.8 mg/kg bw/day was estimated to be in the nano-size range. Food products containing SAS have been shown to contain silica in the nanometer size range (i.e. 5 – 200 nm) up to 43% of the total silica content. Concerns have been raised about the possible adverse effects of chronic exposure to nanostructured silica. Methods Rats were orally exposed to 100, 1000 or 2500 mg/kg bw/day of SAS, or to 100, 500 or 1000 mg/kg bw/day of NM-202 (a representative nanostructured silica for OECD testing) for 28 days, or to the highest dose of SAS or NM-202 for 84 days. Results SAS and NM-202 were extensively characterized as pristine materials, but also in the feed matrix and gut content of the animals, and after in vitro digestion. The latter indicated that the intestinal content of the mid/high-dose groups had stronger gel-like properties than the low-dose groups, implying low gelation and high bioaccessibility of silica in the human intestine at realistic consumer exposure levels. Exposure to SAS or NM-202 did not result in clearly elevated tissue silica levels after 28-days of exposure. However, after 84-days of exposure to SAS, but not to NM-202, silica accumulated in the spleen. Biochemical and immunological markers in blood and isolated cells did not indicate toxicity, but histopathological analysis, showed an increased incidence of liver fibrosis after 84-days of exposure, which only reached significance in the NM-202 treated animals. This observation was accompanied by a moderate, but significant increase in the expression of fibrosis-related genes in liver samples. Conclusions Although only few adverse effects were observed, additional studies are warranted to further evaluate the biological relevance of observed fibrosis in liver and possible accumulation of silica in the spleen in the NM-202 and SAS exposed animals respectively. In these studies, dose-effect relations should be studied at lower dosages, more representative of the current exposure of consumers, since only the highest dosages were used for the present 84-day exposure study. PMID:24507464

  13. Improvement of hyperglycaemia and metabolic syndromes in type 2 diabetic KKAy mice by oral treatment with [meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato]oxovanadium(IV)(4-) complex.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tapan Kumar; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Sakurai, Hiromu

    2007-03-01

    Recently, we reported that [meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato]oxovanadium(IV)(4-), VO(tpps), shows in-vitro insulin-mimetic and in-vivo anti-diabetic activity in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice. This result prompted us to examine its ability in type 2 diabetic model KKA(y) mice with insulin resistance. We studied the in-vivo anti-diabetic activity of VO(tpps), compared with that of vanadium(IV) oxide sulfate, VS, as control. Both compounds were orally administered at doses of 5-10 mg (0.1-0.2 mmol) V/kg body weight to the KKA(y) mice for 28 days. VO(tpps) normalized the hyperglycaemia within 15 days, while VS lowered the blood glucose concentration only by a small degree. In addition, metabolic syndromes characterized by insulin and leptin resistance were significantly improved in VO(tpps)-treated KKA(y) mice compared with those treated with VS. The improvement in diabetes was validated by oral glucose tolerance test and decrease in HbA(1c) concentration. Based on these observations, VO(tpps) is proposed to be an orally active oxovanadium(IV)-porphyrin complex for treating not only type 2 diabetes but also metabolic syndromes in animals. PMID:17331348

  14. Toxicity study of a rubber antioxidant, 2-mercaptobenzimidazole, by repeated oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Y; Umemura, T; Saito, M; Momma, J; Matsushima, Y; Sekiguchi, H; Matsumoto, M; Sakemi, K; Isama, K; Inoue, T; Kurokawa, Y; Tsuda, M

    1998-02-01

    The chemical structure of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (2-MBI), which is widely used as a rubber antioxidant, is partially similar to those of thiourea (TU) and ethylenethiourea (ETU), both potent thyrotoxic compounds. In order to determine the oral toxicity of 2-MBI, a 28-day repeated dose toxicity study in Wistar rats followed by observation over a 14-day recovery period was conducted at dose levels of 2, 10 and 50 mg/kg 2-MBI administered by gavage. No toxic deaths occurred due to 2-MBI treatment. Decreases of body weight gain and food consumption in the 50 mg/kg dose group were observed during the second half of the treatment period. In addition, hematological examination and serum biochemical tests revealed decreased white blood cells and hemoglobin and increased serum urea nitrogen, cholesterol, phospholipid, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and the Na+/K+ ratio in the 50 mg/kg dose group. Marked thyroid enlargement (to 10 fold the control weight), histopathologically associated with diffuse hyperplasia of follicles with decreased colloid and thickening of the fibrous capsule, was found. Reduction in thymus weight was also observed in a dose-dependent manner, without significant histopathological alteration. The non-observed effect level (NOEL) of 2-MBI in this gavage study was found to be less than 2 mg/kg/day based on the significant decrease in thymus weight in the 2 mg/kg 2-MBI treatment group. In an ancillary study, measurement of serum levels of T3, T4 and TSH, and thyroid weight after gavage treatment with 0.15 and 0.3 mmol/kg of three antithyroid compounds for 14 days revealed a more potent antithyroid effect for 2-MBI than for TU or ETU. PMID:9513921

  15. Oral Herpes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A– ... Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral ...

  16. Pre-Altitude Serum Ferritin Levels and Daily Oral Iron Supplement Dose Mediate Iron Parameter and Hemoglobin Mass Responses to Altitude Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Govus, Andrew D.; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A.; Abbiss, Chris R.; Peeling, Peter; Gore, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of daily oral iron supplementation on changes in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass) and iron parameters after 2–4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure. Methods Hematological data collected from 178 athletes (98 males, 80 females) exposed to moderate altitude (1,350–3,000 m) were analysed using linear regression to determine how altitude exposure combined with oral iron supplementation influenced Hbmass, total iron incorporation (TII) and blood iron parameters [ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT)]. Results Altitude exposure (mean ± s: 21 ± 3 days) increased Hbmass by 1.1% [-0.4, 2.6], 3.3% [1.7, 4.8], and 4.0% [2.0, 6.1] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who ingested nil, 105 mg and 210 mg respectively, of oral iron supplement daily. Serum ferritin levels decreased by -33.2% [-46.9, -15.9] and 13.8% [-32.2, 9.7] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who supplemented with nil and 105 mg of oral iron supplement daily, but increased by 36.8% [1.3, 84.8] in athletes supplemented with 210 mg of oral iron daily. Finally, athletes who ingested either 105 mg or 210 mg of oral iron supplement daily had a greater TII compared with non-supplemented athletes (0 versus 105 mg: effect size (d) = -1.88 [-2.56, -1.17]; 0 versus 210 mg: effect size (d) = -2.87 [-3.88, -1.66]). Conclusion Oral iron supplementation during 2–4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure may enhance Hbmass production and assist the maintenance of iron balance in some athletes with low pre-altitude iron stores. PMID:26263553

  17. Further observation on histopathological alterations of adult Schistosoma japonicum harbored in mice following treatment with mefloquine at a smaller single dose.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu-Hua; Zhang, Chao-Wei

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study is to assess the histopathological alterations of adult schistosomes caused by a smaller dose of mefloquine. Mice were infected with Schistosoma japonicum cercariae for 35 days and then treated with a single 200 mg/kg oral dose of mefloquine. Groups of mice were killed between 12 h and 28 days posttreatment, and the livers were removed, fixed, and processed routinely and examined by light microscopy. Twelve hours to 48 h or 3 days posttreatment, 10.3% to 53.3% of male worms and 10% to 25% of female worms shifted to the liver revealed normal appearance. However, 46.7% to 69.2% of male worms and 45.5% to 75% of female worms showed signs of degeneration, including moderate or high swelling of tegument and/or muscles with roughing surface or formation of small vesicles beneath the tegument or collapse of damaged tegument, light swelling of parenchymal tissues, and light dilatation of gut. These histopathological changes aggravated either in extent or in severity along with time, especially the speed of emergence of dead worm granuloma that was faster in female worms than in male ones. In female worms, severe damage to the vitelline glands was universal, which was characterized by necrosis and karyopyknosis of vitelline cells and emergence of small vacuoles among the vitelline gland lobules. Seven days to 28 days posttreatment, almost all of the female worms shifted to the liver were classified as dead or dead worm granuloma, while the percentage of dead male worm and its granuloma examined in the liver was 52.1% to 53.3%. The results indicate that smaller dose of mefloquine (200 mg/kg) still shows strong histopathological response to kill female schistosomes, but its lethal effect against male worms is weakened. PMID:20532914

  18. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  19. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Taro; Denda, Tadamichi; Tawada, Katsunobu; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  20. The enhancement of the oral bioavailability of ?-tocotrienol in mice by ?-cyclodextrin inclusion.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Wakao, Yohei; Tomono, Susumu; Tatemichi, Masayuki; Yano, Tomohiro; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Cyclodextrin (CD) is widely used in the pharmaceutical and nutritional fields to form an inclusion complex with lipophilic compounds for the improvement of their aqueous solubility, stability and diffusibility under physiological conditions. In this study, we investigated the effect of the ?-tocotrienol (?T3) inclusion complex with CD on its oral bioavailability. Five-week-old C57BL6 mice were fed a vitamin E-free diet for 28 days, followed by the oral administration of 2.79 mg of ?T3-rich fraction (TRF) extracted from rice bran or the equivalent dose (14.5 mg) of a CD inclusion complex with TRF (TRF/CD). The levels of ?T3 in sequentially collected plasma were determined by LC-MS/MS. The pharmacokinetic study revealed that the plasma concentrations of ?T3 were increased and peaked at 6 or 3 h after the oral administration of TRF or TRF/CD, respectively (C(max) values of 7.9±3.3 or 11.4±4.5 ?M, respectively). The area under the curve of plasma ?T3 concentration also showed a 1.4-fold increase in the group administered with TRF/CD compared with the TRF-only group. Furthermore, the mice that had received the TRF/CD tended to reduce the endotoxin shock induced by injection with lethal amounts of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, compared with the mice that had received TRF alone. Taken together, our results suggest that the CD inclusion improved ?T3 bioavailability, resulting in the enhancement of ?T3 physiological activity, which would be a useful approach for the nutrition delivery system. PMID:21292469

  1. In vivo flow cytometric Pig-a and micronucleus assays: highly sensitive discrimination of the carcinogen/noncarcinogen pair benzo(a)pyrene and pyrene using acute and repeated-dose designs.

    PubMed

    Torous, Dorothea K; Phonethepswath, Souk; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Mereness, Jared; Bryce, Steven M; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Weller, Pamela; Bell, Sara; Gleason, Carol; Custer, Laura L; MacGregor, James T; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Combining multiple genetic toxicology endpoints into a single in vivo study, and/or integrating one or more genotoxicity assays into general toxicology studies, is attractive because it reduces animal use and enables comprehensive comparative analysis using toxicity, metabolism, and pharmacokinetic information from the same animal. This laboratory has developed flow cytometric scoring techniques for monitoring two blood-based genotoxicity endpoints-micronucleated reticulocyte frequency and gene mutation at the Pig-a locus-thereby making combination and integration studies practical. The ability to effectively monitor these endpoints in short-term and repeated dosing schedules was investigated with the carcinogen/noncarcinogen pair benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and pyrene (Pyr). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated via oral gavage for 3 or 28 consecutive days with several dose levels of Pyr, including maximum tolerated doses. BP exposure was administered by the same route but at one dose level, 250 or 125 mg/kg/day for 3-day and 28-day studies, respectively. Serial blood samples were collected up to Day 45, and were analyzed for Pig-a mutation with a dual labeling method (SYTO 13 in combination with anti-CD59-PE) that facilitated mutant cell frequency measurements in both total erythrocytes and the reticulocyte subpopulation. A mutant cell enrichment step based on immunomagnetic column separation was used to increase the statistical power of the assay. BP induced robust mutant reticulocyte responses by Day 15, and elevated frequencies persisted until study termination. Mutant erythrocyte responses lagged mutant reticulocyte responses, with peak incidences observed on Day 30 of the 3-day study (43-fold increase) and on Day 42 of the 28-day study (171-fold increase). No mutagenic effects were apparent for Pyr. Blood samples collected on Day 4, and Day 29 for the 28-day study, were evaluated for micronucleated reticulocyte frequency. Significant increases in micronucleus frequencies were observed with BP, whereas Pyr had no effect. These results demonstrate that Pig-a and micronucleus endpoints discriminate between these structurally related carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic agents. Furthermore, the high sensitivity demonstrated with the enrichment protocol indicates that the Pig-a endpoint is suitable for both repeated-dose and acute studies, allowing integration of mutagenic and clastogenic endpoints into on-going toxicology studies, and use as a short-term assay that provides efficient screening and mechanistic information in vivo. PMID:22730284

  2. Estrogen and Progestin (Oral Contraceptives)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... many different brands. Different brands of oral contraceptives contain slightly different medications or doses, are taken in ... 28-tablet packets have certain color tablets that contain different amounts of estrogen and progestin, but also ...

  3. Dose-response effect of black maca (Lepidium meyenii) in mice with memory impairment induced by ethanol.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Julio; Yucra, Sandra; Gasco, Manuel; Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that black variety of maca has beneficial effects on learning and memory in experimental animal models. The present study aimed to determine whether the hydroalcoholic extract of black maca (BM) showed a dose-response effect in mice treated with ethanol 20% (EtOH) as a model of memory impairment. Mice were divided in the following groups: control, EtOH, ascorbic acid (AA) and 0.125, 0.25, 0.50 and 1.00?g/kg of BM plus EtOH. All treatments were orally administered for 28 days. Open field test was performed to determine locomotor activity and water Morris maze was done to determine spatial memory. Also, total polyphenol content in the hydroalcoholic extract of BM was determined (0.65?g pyrogallol/100?g). Mice treated with EtOH took more time to find the hidden platform than control during escape acquisition trials; meanwhile, AA and BM reversed the effect of EtOH. In addition, AA and BM ameliorated the deleterious effect of EtOH during the probe trial. Correlation analyses showed that the effect of BM a dose-dependent behavior. Finally, BM improved experimental memory impairment induced by ethanol in a dose-response manner due, in part, to its content of polyphenolic compounds. PMID:21780878

  4. Gender Differences in the Toxicokinetics of Triptolide after Single- and Multiple-dose Administration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Zhang, J; Wang, Z; Xu, D; Jiang, Z; Wang, T; Ju, W; Zhang, L

    2015-11-01

    Triptolide is a natural compound extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F with distinguishing pharmacological activities and evident toxicities. We reported previously that 28 continuous days of oral administration of triptolide in rats resulted in gender dimorphic profiles in toxicities. To better understand this issue, the toxicokinetics of triptolide was observed in this study. Rats of both sexes were administered 400??g/kg triptolide either as a single dose or multiple doses for 28 days. Triptolide concentrations in rat plasma were determined using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The plasma concentration-time curve and toxicokinetic parameters revealed gender differences after single and repeated triptolide administration, including significantly higher area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-?) and peak plasma concentration (Cmax), lower clearance rate (CL) and longer terminal elimination half-life (t1/2) of triptolide in females, and lower drug exposure levels and greater CL in males. The gender differential disposition of triptolide may be the cause of increased toxicity in females. Moreover, auto-inhibition of metabolism and the resulting increase in drug exposure were observed after repeated dosing. The AUC0-? of triptolide was increased 6-fold in females and 2-fold in males, while the CL of triptolide was significantly decreased by 84% in females and 55% in males. These results indicated that gender-related differences existed in the toxicokinetics of triptolide and long-term oral administration of triptolide resulted in drug accumulation, which might account for the gender differences in the toxicities of triptolide. PMID:25647231

  5. Dose selection using a semi-mechanistic integrated glucose-insulin-glucagon model: designing phase 2 trials for a novel oral glucokinase activator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Schneck, Karen; Bue-Valleskey, Juliana; Yeo, Kwee Poo; Heathman, Michael; Sinha, Vikram

    2013-02-01

    Selecting dosing regimens for phase 2 studies for a novel glucokinase activator LY2599506 is challenging due to the difficulty in modeling and assessing hypoglycemia risk. A semi-mechanistic integrated glucose-insulin-glucagon (GIG) model was developed in NONMEM based on pharmacokinetic, glucose, insulin, glucagon, and meal data obtained from a multiple ascending dose study in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with LY2599506 for up to 26 days. The series of differential equations from the NONMEM model was translated into an R script to prospectively predict 24-h glucose profiles following LY2599506 treatment for 3 months for a variety of doses and dosing regimens. The reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) at the end of the 3-month treatment was estimated using a transit compartment model based on the simulated fasting glucose values. Two randomized phase 2 studies, one with fixed dosing and the other employing conditional dose titration were conducted. The simulation suggested that (1) Comparable HbA1c lowering with lower hypoglycemia risk occurs with titration compared to fixed-dosing; and (2) A dose range of 50-400 mg BID provides either greater efficacy or lower hypoglycemia incidence or both than glyburide. The predictions were in reasonable agreement with the observed clinical data. The model predicted HbA1c reduction and hypoglycemia risk provided the basis for the decision to focus on the dose-titration trial and for the selection of doses for the demonstration of superiority of LY2599506 to glyburide. The integrated GIG model represented a valuable tool for the evaluation of hypoglycemia incidence. PMID:23263772

  6. Safety Evaluation of Multiple Strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus in Wistar Rats Based on the Ames Test and a 28-Day Feeding Study

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Sew-Fen; Huang, Quan-Rong; Chou, Lan-Chun; Huang, Chun-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Three lactic acid bacterial strains, Lactobacillus plantarum, HK006, and HK109, and Pediococcus pentosaceus PP31 exhibit probiotic potential as antiallergy agents, both in vitro and in vivo. However, the safety of these new strains requires evaluation when isolated from infant faeces or pickled cabbage. Multiple strains (HK006, HK109, and PP31) were subject to a bacterial reverse mutation assay and a short-term oral toxicity study. The powder product exhibited mutagenic potential in Salmonella Typhimurium strains TA98 and TA1535 (with or without metabolic activation). In the short-term oral toxicity study, rats received a normal dosage of 390?mg/kg/d (approximately 9 × 109?CFU/kg/d) or a high dosage of 1950?mg/kg/d (approximately 4.5 × 1010?CFU/kg/d) for 28?d. No adverse effects were observed regarding the general condition, behaviour, growth, feed and water consumption, haematology, clinical chemistry indices, organ weights, or histopathologic analysis of the rats. These studies have demonstrated that the consumption of multiple bacterial strains is not associated with any signs of mutagenicity of S. Typhimurium or toxicity in Wistar rats, even after consuming large quantities of bacteria. PMID:25379552

  7. Safety evaluation of multiple strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus in Wistar rats based on the Ames test and a 28-day feeding study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Leu, Sew-Fen; Huang, Quan-Rong; Chou, Lan-Chun; Huang, Chun-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Three lactic acid bacterial strains, Lactobacillus plantarum, HK006, and HK109, and Pediococcus pentosaceus PP31 exhibit probiotic potential as antiallergy agents, both in vitro and in vivo. However, the safety of these new strains requires evaluation when isolated from infant faeces or pickled cabbage. Multiple strains (HK006, HK109, and PP31) were subject to a bacterial reverse mutation assay and a short-term oral toxicity study. The powder product exhibited mutagenic potential in Salmonella Typhimurium strains TA98 and TA1535 (with or without metabolic activation). In the short-term oral toxicity study, rats received a normal dosage of 390 mg/kg/d (approximately 9 × 10(9) CFU/kg/d) or a high dosage of 1950 mg/kg/d (approximately 4.5 × 10(10) CFU/kg/d) for 28 d. No adverse effects were observed regarding the general condition, behaviour, growth, feed and water consumption, haematology, clinical chemistry indices, organ weights, or histopathologic analysis of the rats. These studies have demonstrated that the consumption of multiple bacterial strains is not associated with any signs of mutagenicity of S. Typhimurium or toxicity in Wistar rats, even after consuming large quantities of bacteria. PMID:25379552

  8. Evaluation of repeated dose micronucleus assays of the liver and gastrointestinal tract using potassium bromate: a report of the collaborative study by CSGMT/JEMS.MMS.

    PubMed

    Okada, Emiko; Fujiishi, Yohei; Narumi, Kazunori; Kado, Shoichi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Ohyama, Wakako

    2015-03-01

    The food additive potassium bromate (KBrO3) is known as a renal carcinogen and causes chromosomal aberrations in vitro without metabolic activation and in vivo in hematopoietic and renal cells. As a part of a collaborative study by the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study group, which is a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, we administered KBrO3 to rats orally for 4, 14, and 28 days and examined the micronucleated (MNed) cell frequency in the liver, glandular stomach, colon, and bone marrow to confirm whether the genotoxic carcinogen targeting other than liver and gastrointestinal (GI) tract was detected by the repeated dose liver and GI tract micronucleus (MN) assays. In our study, animals treated with KBrO3 showed some signs of toxicity in the kidney and/or stomach. KBrO3 did not increase the frequency of MNed cells in the liver and colon in any of the repeated dose studies. However, KBrO3 increased the frequency of MNed cells in the glandular stomach and bone marrow. Additionally, the MNed cell frequency in the glandular stomach was not significantly affected by the difference in the length of the administration period. These results suggest that performing the MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first tissue to contact agents after oral ingestion, is useful for evaluating the genotoxic potential of chemicals and that the glandular stomach MN assay could be integrated into general toxicity studies. PMID:24637080

  9. Pharmacology of DB844, an Orally Active aza Analogue of Pafuramidine, in a Monkey Model of Second Stage Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Thuita, John K.; Wang, Michael Z.; Kagira, John M.; Denton, Cathrine L.; Paine, Mary F.; Mdachi, Raymond E.; Murilla, Grace A.; Ching, Shelley; Boykin, David W.; Tidwell, Richard R.; Hall, James E.; Brun, Reto

    2012-01-01

    Novel drugs to treat human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are still urgently needed despite the recent addition of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT) to WHO Model Lists of Essential Medicines against second stage HAT, where parasites have invaded the central nervous system (CNS). The pharmacology of a potential orally available lead compound, N-methoxy-6-{5-[4-(N-methoxyamidino) phenyl]-furan-2-yl}-nicotinamidine (DB844), was evaluated in a vervet monkey model of second stage HAT, following promising results in mice. DB844 was administered orally to vervet monkeys, beginning 28 days post infection (DPI) with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense KETRI 2537. DB844 was absorbed and converted to the active metabolite 6-[5-(4-phenylamidinophenyl)-furanyl-2-yl]-nicotinamide (DB820), exhibiting plasma Cmax values of 430 and 190 nM for DB844 and DB820, respectively, after the 14th dose at 6 mg/kg qd. A 100-fold reduction in blood trypanosome counts was observed within 24 h of the third dose and, at the end of treatment evaluation performed four days post the last drug dose, trypanosomes were not detected in the blood or cerebrospinal fluid of any monkey. However, some animals relapsed during the 300 days of post treatment monitoring, resulting in a cure rate of 3/8 (37.5%) and 3/7 (42.9%) for the 5 mg/kg×10 days and the 6 mg/kg×14 days dose regimens respectively. These DB844 efficacy data were an improvement compared with pentamidine and pafuramidine both of which were previously shown to be non-curative in this model of CNS stage HAT. These data show that synthesis of novel diamidines with improved activity against CNS-stage HAT was possible. PMID:22848769

  10. Short-term effects of high-dose oral vitamin D3 in critically ill vitamin D deficient patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D deficiency is encountered frequently in critically ill patients and might be harmful. Current nutrition guidelines recommend very low vitamin D doses. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single oral high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in an intensive care setting over a one-week observation period. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study in a medical ICU at a tertiary care university center in Graz, Austria. Twenty-five patients (mean age 62 ± 16yrs) with vitamin D deficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) ?20 ng/ml] and an expected stay in the ICU >48 hours were included and randomly received either 540,000 IU (corresponding to 13.5 mg) of cholecalciferol (VITD) dissolved in 45 ml herbal oil or matched placebo (PBO) orally or via feeding tube. Results The mean serum 25(OH)D increase in the intervention group was 25 ng/ml (range 1-47 ng/ml). The highest 25(OH)D level reached was 64 ng/ml, while two patients showed a small (7 ng/ml) or no response (1 ng/ml). Hypercalcemia or hypercalciuria did not occur in any patient. From day 0 to day 7, total serum calcium levels increased by 0.10 (PBO) and 0.15 mmol/L (VITD; P < 0.05 for both), while ionized calcium levels increased by 0.11 (PBO) and 0.05 mmol/L (VITD; P < 0.05 for both). Parathyroid hormone levels decreased by 19 and 28 pg/ml (PBO and VITD, ns) over the seven days, while 1,25(OH)D showed a transient significant increase in the VITD group only. Conclusions This pilot study shows that a single oral ultra-high dose of cholecalciferol corrects vitamin D deficiency within 2 days in most patients without causing adverse effects like hypercalcemia or hypercalciuria. Further research is needed to confirm our results and establish whether vitamin D supplementation can affect the clinical outcome of vitamin D deficient critically ill patients. EudraCT Number 2009-012080-34 German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS) DRKS00000750 PMID:21443793

  11. Dose-response relationship after single oral dose administrations of morphine and oxycodone using laser-evoked potentials on UVB- and capsaicin-irritated skin in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Hoeben, Eef; Smit, Johan W; Upmalis, David; Rusch, Sarah; Schaffler, Klaus; Reitmeir, Peter; Mangold, Bernhard

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the analgesic/antihyperalgesic efficacy and to establish the dose-response relationship of morphine immediate release (IR) and oxycodone IR in a human experimental algesimetric model. Calculated effect ratios for peak-to-peak (PtP) amplitudes of laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) and visual analog scales (VAS) postlaser pain on UVB-irradiated skin (main target variables) were 1.68 and 1.18 respectively for oxycodone 10mg/morphine 20mg, 3.00 and 1.63 respectively for oxycodone 15 mg/morphine 30 mg, and 1.12 and 1.25 respectively for oxycodone 20mg/morphine 40 mg. The effect on the laser-PtP amplitude of morphine at the highest dose (40 mg) and of oxycodone at all doses (10, 15, 20mg) was considered to be clinically relevant based on a difference from placebo of ? 2.5 ?V. For both compounds, a statistically significant linear trend was observed between dose groups in at least 1 of the 2 main target variables (adjusted P value for both end points <.001 at all doses). Hyperalgesia developed over time vs baseline due to acute exposure to UVB irradiation and to topical/occlusive 1% capsaicin solution. For both compounds, the principal onset of analgesic/antihyperalgesic drug effects was around 0.5 hours with an average peak at about 1 to 2 hours and the effect lasting for more than 3 hours (morphine 20 and 30 mg) or 6 hours (morphine 40 mg and oxycodone all doses). In conclusion, the study demonstrated a solid outcome of a mixed objective/subjective human experimental algesimetric model to approach dose-response relationships and analgesic/antihyperalgesic effects of 2 opioids. PMID:22703892

  12. Immunogenicity of a low-dose diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis combination vaccine with either inactivated or oral polio vaccine compared to standard-dose diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis when used as a pre-school booster in UK children: A 5-year follow-up of a randomised controlled study.

    PubMed

    John, T; Voysey, M; Yu, L M; McCarthy, N; Baudin, M; Richard, P; Fiquet, A; Kitchin, N; Pollard, A J

    2015-08-26

    This serological follow up study assessed the kinetics of antibody response in children who previously participated in a single centre, open-label, randomised controlled trial of low-dose compared to standard-dose diphtheria booster preschool vaccinations in the United Kingdom (UK). Children had previously been randomised to receive one of three combination vaccines: either a combined adsorbed tetanus, low-dose diphtheria, 5-component acellular pertussis and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) (Tdap-IPV, Repevax(®); Sanofi Pasteur MSD); a combined adsorbed tetanus, low-dose diphtheria and 5-component acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap, Covaxis(®); Sanofi Pasteur MSD) given concomitantly with oral polio vaccine (OPV); or a combined adsorbed standard-dose diphtheria, tetanus, 2-component acellular pertussis and IPV (DTap-IPV, Tetravac(®); Sanofi Pasteur MSD). Blood samples for the follow-up study were taken at 1, 3 and 5 years after participation in the original trial (median, 5.07 years of age at year 1), and antibody persistence to each vaccine antigen measured against defined serological thresholds of protection. All participants had evidence of immunity to diphtheria with antitoxin concentrations greater than 0.01IU/mL five years after booster vaccination and 75%, 67% and 79% of children who received Tdap-IPV, Tdap+OPV and DTap-IPV, respectively, had protective antitoxin levels greater than 0.1IU/mL. Long lasting protective immune responses to tetanus and polio antigens were also observed in all groups, though polio responses were lower in the sera of those who received OPV. Low-dose diphtheria vaccines provided comparable protection to the standard-dose vaccine and are suitable for use for pre-school booster vaccination. PMID:26165918

  13. Oral Ulcerations

    E-print Network

    Fetterolf, Brandon; Zabella, Alexandra; Strote, Jared

    2015-01-01

    of Emergency Medicine Fetterolf et al. Oral UlcerationsOral Ulcerations Brandon Fetterolf, DO* Alexandra Zaballa, BS † Jared Strote, MD, MS ‡ * Madigan Army Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine,

  14. Effects of Oral Administration of Chitin Nanofiber on Plasma Metabolites and Gut Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kazuo; Izumi, Ryotaro; Kawata, Mari; Nagae, Tomone; Osaki, Tomohiro; Murahata, Yusuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Ito, Norihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Morimoto, Minoru; Izawa, Hironori; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of oral administration of chitin nanofibers (CNFs) and surface-deacetylated (SDA) CNFs on plasma metabolites using metabolome analysis. Furthermore, we determined the changes in gut microbiota and fecal organic acid concentrations following oral administrations of CNFs and SDACNFs. Healthy female mice (six-week-old) were fed a normal diet and administered tap water with 0.1% (v/v) CNFs or SDACNFs for 28 days. Oral administration of CNFs increased plasma levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). Oral administration of SDACNFs affected the metabolisms of acyl-carnitines and fatty acids. The fecal organic level analysis indicated that oral administration of CNFs stimulated and activated the functions of microbiota. These results indicate that oral administration of CNFs increases plasma levels of ATP and 5-HT via activation of gut microbiota. PMID:26378523

  15. Effects of Oral Administration of Chitin Nanofiber on Plasma Metabolites and Gut Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kazuo; Izumi, Ryotaro; Kawata, Mari; Nagae, Tomone; Osaki, Tomohiro; Murahata, Yusuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Ito, Norihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Morimoto, Minoru; Izawa, Hironori; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of oral administration of chitin nanofibers (CNFs) and surface-deacetylated (SDA) CNFs on plasma metabolites using metabolome analysis. Furthermore, we determined the changes in gut microbiota and fecal organic acid concentrations following oral administrations of CNFs and SDACNFs. Healthy female mice (six-week-old) were fed a normal diet and administered tap water with 0.1% (v/v) CNFs or SDACNFs for 28 days. Oral administration of CNFs increased plasma levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). Oral administration of SDACNFs affected the metabolisms of acyl-carnitines and fatty acids. The fecal organic level analysis indicated that oral administration of CNFs stimulated and activated the functions of microbiota. These results indicate that oral administration of CNFs increases plasma levels of ATP and 5-HT via activation of gut microbiota. PMID:26378523

  16. Hematological effects of repeated graded doses of the methanol extract of Paullinia pinnata (Linn.) leaves in Wistar albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo-Salami, Oluwatoyin A.; Ewuola, Emmanuel O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paullinia pinnata is a medicinal plant used for the treatment of various diseases, including anemia in West Africa. Aim: This study was carried out to investigate the effect of increasing doses of the methanolic leaves extract of P. pinnata on hematological parameters in rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six male Wistar albino rats were grouped into six groups of six animals each. Five doses; 50,100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight of the P. pinnata extract were administered separately to five groups. The sixth group served as a control and received only the vehicle (70% physiological saline: 30% Tween 80 [v/v]). Administration was done orally daily for 28 days at 24 h interval. On day 29, the animals were made inactive, blood was then collected from the heart and various hematological parameters were evaluated. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of variance was employed. Results: The packed cell volume and red blood cell count increased significantly (P < 0.05) in the treatment groups except at 200 mg/kg dose. The hemoglobin concentration increased in all the treatment groups. The values for the neutrophils at 50, 100, 200 and 800 mg/kg doses were higher than that of the control. The white blood cell count increased significantly (P < 0.05) at 50 and 400 mg/kg doses compared to the control and exceeded the normal physiological range. Conclusion: The maximum tolerable dose is 200 mg/kg body weight of the methanolic leaves extract of P. pinnata and the extract has anti-anemic property with the ability to increase neutrophils count. PMID:26109785

  17. Phase 1b dose-finding study of motesanib with docetaxel or paclitaxel in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    De Boer, Richard H; Kotasek, Dusan; White, Shane; Koczwara, Bogda; Mainwaring, Paul; Chan, Arlene; Melara, Rebeca; Ye, Yining; Adewoye, Adeboye H; Sikorski, Robert; Kaufman, Peter A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of motesanib when combined with docetaxel or paclitaxel in patients with metastatic breast cancer. In this open-label, dose-finding, phase 1b study, patients received motesanib 50 or 125-mg orally once daily (QD), beginning day 3 of cycle 1 of chemotherapy, continuously in combination with either paclitaxel 90 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28-day cycle (Arm A) or docetaxel 100 mg/m(2) on day 1 every 21-day cycle (Arm B). Dose escalation to motesanib 125 mg QD occurred if the incidence of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs, primary endpoint) was ? 33 %. If the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of motesanib was established in Arm B, additional patients could receive motesanib at the MTD plus docetaxel 75 mg/m(2). Forty-six patients were enrolled and 45 received ? 1 dose of motesanib. The incidence of DLTs was <33 % in all cohorts; thus, motesanib 125 mg QD was established as the MTD. Seven patients (16 %) had grade 3 motesanib-related adverse events including cholecystitis (2 patients) and hypertension (2 patients). Pharmacokinetic parameters of motesanib were similar to those reported in previous studies. The objective response rate was 56 % among patients with measurable disease at baseline who received motesanib in combination with taxane-based chemotherapy. The addition of motesanib to either paclitaxel or docetaxel was generally tolerable up to the 125-mg QD dose of motesanib. The objective response rate of 56 % suggests a potential benefit of motesanib in combination with taxane-based chemotherapy. PMID:22872523

  18. Hepatic cytochrome P4501A induction in dab (Limanda limanda) after oral dosing with the polychlorinated biphenyl mixture Clophen A40

    SciTech Connect

    Sleiderink, H.M.; Everaarts, J.M.; Boon, J.P.; Goksoeyr, A.

    1995-04-01

    The flatfish dab (Limanda limanda) serves as an indicator species in pollution monitoring programs in the North Sea. The present study investigated the induction response of the monooxygenase system and haematological changes in female dab after multiple administrations of a technical mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Mature female dab were dosed with 1 mg of the PCB mixture Clophen A40 (Clo A40) in sunflower oil every 6 weeks, with a maximum of three doses per fish. In all PCB-administered groups, levels of cytochrome P4501A (CYPIA) protein, measured with a semi-quantitative ELISA method, and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity showed a three- to ninefold induction 14 d after dosing compared with control groups, smaller but also significant increases were observed in total cytochrome P450 ({Sigma} P450) levels. Although the PCB concentrations and the corresponding toxic equivalent (TEQ) value in muscle tissue still increased after administration of the second and third dose of Clo A40, maximum responses of the EROD activity were already reached after the first dose at a TEQ value for chlorinated biphenyls (CB-TEQ) of 2 ng/g lipid. The PCB patterns of liver and muscle tissue of female dab from the central North Sea were found to be virtually identical. Hence, the use of PCB concentrations in muscle as a qualitative model for changes in the liver appears legitimate. Haemoglobin concentrations were elevated after the third dose of Clo A40, whereas haematocrit values and the mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) between treated and control groups did not differ.

  19. Activity of Oral ALS-008176 in a Respiratory Syncytial Virus Challenge Study.

    PubMed

    DeVincenzo, John P; McClure, Matthew W; Symons, Julian A; Fathi, Hosnieh; Westland, Christopher; Chanda, Sushmita; Lambkin-Williams, Rob; Smith, Patrick; Zhang, Qingling; Beigelman, Leo; Blatt, Lawrence M; Fry, John

    2015-11-19

    BACKGROUND Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a cause of substantial morbidity and mortality. There is no known effective therapy. METHODS We conducted a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial in healthy adults inoculated with RSV. Participants received the oral nucleoside analogue ALS-008176 or placebo 12 hours after confirmation of RSV infection or 6 days after inoculation. Treatment was administered every 12 hours for 5 days. Viral load, disease severity, resistance, and safety were measured throughout the 28-day study period, with measurement beginning before inoculation. The primary end point was the area under the curve (AUC) for viral load, which was assessed immediately before administration of the first dose through the 12th day after inoculation in participants infected with RSV. RESULTS A total of 62 participants received placebo or one of three ALS-008176 dosing regimens: 1 loading dose of 750 mg followed by 9 maintenance doses of 500 mg (group 1), 1 loading dose of 750 mg followed by 9 maintenance doses of 150 mg (group 2), or 10 doses of 375 mg (group 3). In the 35 infected participants (23 of whom were treated with ALS-008176), the AUCs for viral load for groups 1, 2, and 3 and the placebo group were 59.9, 73.7, 133.4, and 500.9 log10 plaque-forming-unit equivalents × hours per milliliter, respectively (P?0.001). The time to nondetectability on polymerase-chain-reaction assay (P<0.001), the peak viral load (P?0.001), the AUC for symptom score (P<0.05), and the AUC for mucus weight were lower in all groups receiving ALS-008176 than in the placebo group. Antiviral activity was greatest in the two groups that received a loading dose--viral clearance was accelerated (P?0.05), and the AUC for viral load decreased by 85 to 88% as compared with the placebo group. Within this small trial, no viral rebound or resistance was identified. There were no serious adverse events, and there was no need for premature discontinuation of the study drug. CONCLUSIONS In this RSV challenge study, more rapid RSV clearance and a greater reduction of viral load, with accompanying improvements in the severity of clinical disease, were observed in the groups treated with ALS-008176 than in the placebo group. (Funded by Alios BioPharma; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02094365.). PMID:26580997

  20. Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of a novel tetramethylpyrazine reservoir-type transdermal patch versus tetramethylpyrazine phosphate oral tablets in healthy normal volunteers, and in vitro/in vivo correlation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Teng; Xu, Huinan; Weng, Weiyu; Zhang, Jianfang

    2013-01-01

    A novel reservoir-type transdermal system of 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) was developed containing eucalyptus oil as a penetration enhancer. The single and multiple-dose pharmacokinetic profiles of TMP administrated by TMP transdermal patch were characterized in healthy volunteers using an in vivo, randomized, open-label, two-way crossover design. 2,3,5,6-Tetramethylpyrazine phosphate (TMPP) oral tablets were chosen as reference. Following single/multiple oral administration of 200/100 mg TMPP tablets, a TMP C(max) of 1284/613.5 ng/mL was observed within 0.75 h. Single/multiple applications of the TMP patch yielded mean C(max) of 309/325 ng/mL at a median T(max) of 5/4 h, with steady state achieved at second application. The mean C(min) of the patch was 131±30.38 ng/mL, contrasting to nearly zero for the tablet. Multiple applications of patch produced an accumulative effect over single application. At steady state 250 mg/20 cm(2) TMP patch given daily provided comparable exposure to 100 mg TMPP tablets three times daily (3753.91 versus 3563.67 ng·h/mL). TMP tablets and patch yielded similar steady-state plasma concentrations: C(av) (148.48±51.27, 156.41±40.31 ng/mL). The results demonstrated that TMP patch can achieve a therapeutic effect that is comparable to oral administration, exhibited prolonged and sustained plasma levels, fewer drug fluctuations, lower adverse effects, more convenience, and improved patient compliance. In-vitro permeation through human skin demonstrated zero-order kinetics with the flux of 364 µg/cm(2)/h. The predicted C(av) (163.9 ng/mL) was in agreement with the observed C(av) (156.4 ng/mL). PMID:23514701

  1. Comparison of peripheral and central effects of single and repeated oral dose administrations of bilastine, a new H1 antihistamine: a dose-range study in healthy volunteers with hydroxyzine and placebo as control treatments.

    PubMed

    García-Gea, Consuelo; Martínez-Colomer, Joan; Antonijoan, Rosa M; Valiente, Román; Barbanoj, Manuel-José

    2008-12-01

    Peripheral anti-H1 and central nervous system (CNS) activities after single (day 1) and repeated (day 7) administrations of increasing doses of bilastine (BIL) were assessed in 20 healthy volunteers throughout a crossover, randomized, double-blind, placebo (PLA)-controlled study. Repeated doses of BIL 20, 40, or 80 mg and hydroxyzine 25 mg (HYD) as positive standard were administered on 7 consecutive days. Before and at several time points after drug intake, skin reactivity to the intradermal injection of histamine, objective tests of psychomotor performance, and subjective mood scales were evaluated. All active treatments led to a significant and similar reduction in the wheal reaction in relation to PLA after both the single (P < 0.001) and repeated administrations (P < 0.001). No delay was observed in the onset of its peripheral activity after the first dose of BIL as compared with HYD. No tolerance or sensitization was seen when comparing acute and repetitive assessments. Central nervous system effects showed that HYD induced the greatest psychomotor impairment (P < 0.05). Repeated HYD intake showed a lower number of significant alterations in comparison to acute administration. Bilastine 80 mg also showed some impairment (P < 0.05). Subjectively, the only active treatment that could not be differentiated from PLA was BIL 20 mg. Hydroxyzine 25 mg showed the greatest differentiation (P < 0.01). A clear dissociation between peripheral anti-H1 and CNS activity was found after BIL treatment. Significant and sustained peripheral H1-blocking effects were observed after both single and repeated administrations of the therapeutic dose of 20 mg BIL. The 40-mg dose of BIL produced subjective report of sedation, whereas unwanted objective CNS side effects were observed only with the 80-mg dose. PMID:19011437

  2. Differences in reporting Pearl Indices in the United States and Europe: Focus on a 91-day extended-regimen combined oral contraceptive with low-dose ethinyl estradiol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lobo Abascal, Paloma; Luzar-Stiffler, Vesna; Giljanovic, Silvana; Howard, Brandon; Weiss, Herman; Trussell, James

    2016-02-01

    Background Regulatory agencies in the United States (US) and Europe differ in requirements for defining pregnancies after the last dose of oral contraceptive, sometimes resulting in discrepant Pearl Indices (PIs) for the same product despite identical clinical data. This brief report highlights one such example, a 91-day extended-regimen combined oral contraceptive (COC). Methods The US- and European-based PI methodologies were compared for a 91-day extended-regimen COC consisting of 84 days of active levonorgestrel/EE 150 ?g/30 ?g tablets, followed by seven days of EE 10 ?g tablets in place of placebo. Conclusions At the times of approval of the 91-day extended-regimen COC in the US and Europe, the requirements for defining 'on-treatment' pregnancies differed (14-day vs. 2-day rule, respectively). This difference resulted in a higher PI in the US- vs. European-based calculation (1.34 and 0.76, respectively). The differences in the PI should not be interpreted as the extended-regimen COC being less effective in preventing pregnancy in the US compared with Europe. PMID:26115381

  3. Di-n-butyl Phthalate (DNBP) and Diisobutyl Phthalate (DiBP) Metabolism in a Human Volunteer after Single Oral Doses [Journal Article

    EPA Science Inventory

    An individual (male, 36 years, 87 kg) ingested two separate doses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) and diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP) at a rate of ~60 µg/kg. Key monoester and oxidized metabolites were identified and quantified in urine continuously collected until 48 hours post dos...

  4. A DESCRIPTIVE FEASIBILITY STUDY TO EVALUATE SCHEDULED ORAL ANALGESIC DOSING AT HOME FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE PAIN IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN FOLLOWING TONSILLECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Sutters, Kimberly A.; Holdridge-Zeuner, Danielle; Waite, Steven; Paul, Steven M.; Savedra, Marilyn C.; Lanier, Brent; Mahoney, Karla; Miaskowski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study, in a sample of preschool children (ages 3 to 5 years; N=47), was to evaluate the feasibility of scheduled analgesic dosing following outpatient tonsillectomy in order to optimize pain management. Methods Parents were instructed to give their child acetaminophen with hydrocodone (167mg/5ml) every 4 hours around-the-clock for the first 3 days following surgery. Parents recorded ratings of their child’s pain with/without swallowing using the Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) behavioral pain scale, pain relief ratings, and severity of analgesic side effects in a home diary. Audiotaped interviews were conducted with parents to document descriptions of their experiences in managing their child’s pain at home. Results Mean FLACC scores with/without swallowing were less than 2 at each measurement time and pain relief scores increased over time. Total analgesic dose decreased and the number of missed doses increased over the first 3 days after surgery. Moderate-to-severe daytime sedation, nausea, vomiting, and constipation were reported by parents. Discussion Study results suggest that acetaminophen with hydrocodone is effective in relieving preschool children’s pain following tonsillectomy, and that parental adherence to a scheduled analgesic regimen decreases over time. Time-contingent dosing was associated with moderate to severe side effects, and should be addressed in discharge teaching with parents. Findings provide insight into parents’ perspective of pain management at home following tonsillectomy and methods for relieving their child’s pain. PMID:22313591

  5. EDTA Chelation Therapy Alone and in Combination with Oral High-Dose Multivitamins and Minerals for Coronary Disease: The Factorial Group Results of the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lamas, Gervasio A.; Boineau, Robin; Goertz, Christine; Mark, Daniel B.; Rosenberg, Yves; Stylianou, Mario; Rozema, Theodore; Nahin, Richard L.; Chappell, L. Terry; Lindblad, Lauren; Lewis, Eldrin F.; Drisko, Jeanne; Lee, Kerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) reduced adverse cardiac outcomes in a factorial trial also testing oral vitamins. Objective This report describes the intent-to-treat comparison of the 4 factorial groups overall and in patients with diabetes. Methods Double-blind placebo-controlled 2 × 2 factorial multicenter randomized trial of 1708 post-MI patients ? 50 years and creatinine ?2.0 mg/dL randomized to receive 40 EDTA chelation or placebo infusions plus 6 caplets daily of a 28-component multivitaminmultimineral mixture or placebo. Primary endpoint was a composite of total mortality, MI, stroke, coronary revascularization, or hospitalization for angina. Results Median age was 65 years, 18% female, 94% Caucasian, 37% diabetic, 83% prior coronary revascularization, and 73% on statins. Five-year Kaplan-Meier estimates for the primary endpoint in the chelation + high-dose vitamin group was 31.9%, in the chelation + placebo vitamin group 33.7%, in the placebo infusion + active vitamin group 36.6%, and in the placebo infusions + placebo vitamin group 40.2 %. The reduction in primary endpoint by double active treatment compared with double placebo was significant (HR 0.74, 95% CI (0.57,0.95); p=0.016). In patients with diabetes, the primary endpoint reduction of double active compared with double placebo was more pronounced (HR 0.49, 95% CI (0.33,0.75), p<0.001). Conclusions In stable post- MI patients on evidence-based medical therapy, the combination of oral high-dose vitamins and chelation therapy compared with double placebo reduced clinically important cardiovascular events to an extent that was both statistically significant and of potential clinical relevance. PMID:24952858

  6. Quantification of absorption, retention and elimination of two different oral doses of vitamin A in Zambian boys using accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Aklamati, E K; Mulenga, M; Dueker, S R; Buchholz, B A; Peerson, J M; Kafwembe, E; Brown, K H; Haskell, M J

    2009-10-12

    A recent survey indicated that high-dose vitamin A supplements (HD-VAS) had no apparent effect on vitamin A (VA) status of Zambian children <5 y of age. To explore possible reasons for the lack of response to HD-VAS among Zambian children, we quantified the absorption, retention, and urinary elimination of either a single HDVAS (60 mg) or a smaller dose of stable isotope (SI)-labeled VA (5 mg), which was used to estimate VA pool size, in 3-4 y old Zambian boys (n = 4 for each VA dose). A 25 nCi tracer dose of [{sup 14}C{sub 2}]-labeled VA was co-administered with the HD-VAS or SI-labeled VA, and 24-hr stool and urine samples were collected for 3 and 7 consecutive days, respectively, and 24-hr urine samples at 4 later time points. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) was used to measure the cumulative excretion of {sup 14}C in stool and urine 3d after dosing to estimate, respectively, absorption and retention of the VAS and SI-labeled VA. The urinary elimination rate (UER) was estimated by plotting {sup 14}C in urine vs. time, and fitting an exponential equation to the data. Estimates of mean absorption, retention and the UER were 83.8 {+-} 7.1%, 76.3 {+-} 6.7%, and 1.9 {+-} 0.6%/d, respectively, for the HD-VAS and 76.5 {+-} 9.5%, 71.1 {+-} 9.4%, and 1.8 {+-} 1.2%/d, respectively for the smaller dose of SI-labeled VA. Estimates of absorption, retention and the UER did not differ by size of the VA dose administered (P=0.26, 0.40, 0.88, respectively). Estimated absorption and retention were negatively associated with reported fever (P=0.011) and malaria (P =0.010). HD-VAS and SI-labeled VA were adequately absorbed, retained and utilized in apparently healthy Zambian preschool-age boys, although absorption and retention may be affected by recent infections.

  7. Subchronic Oral Exposure to Benzo(a)pyrene Leads to Distinct Transcriptomic Changes in the Lungs That Are Related to Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Halappanavar, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that acute oral exposure to the environmental carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) elicits comparable levels of DNA adducts, but distinct transcriptomic changes, in mouse lungs and livers, the two main BaP bioactivating organs. Oral BaP exposure is predominantly associated with lung cancer and not hepatic cancer in some animal models, suggesting that gene expression differences may provide insight into the drivers of tissue-specific carcinogenesis. In the present study, we examine pulmonary DNA adduct formation, lacZ mutant frequency, and mRNA profiles in adult male MutaMouse following subchronic (28 day) oral exposure to BaP (0, 25, 50, and 75mg/kg/day) and sacrificed 3 days postexposure. The results are compared with those obtained from livers of the same mice (previously published). Although there was a 1.8- to 3.3-fold increase in the levels of DNA adducts in lung compared with liver, the lacZ transgene mutant frequency was similar in both tissues. At the transcriptomic level, a transition from activation of the DNA damage response p53 pathway at the low dose to the induction of genes involved in angiogenesis, evasion of apoptosis and growth signals at the high doses was evident only in the lungs. These results suggest that tissue DNA adducts and mutant frequency are sensitive markers of target tissue exposure and mode of action, whereas early changes in gene expression may provide a better indication of the likelihood of carcinogenic transformation in selected tissues. Moreover, the study provides new information on the underlying mecha- nisms that contribute to tissue-specific responses to BaP. PMID:22610609

  8. Placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial on the immunomodulating activities of low- and high-dose bromelain after oral administration - new evidence on the antiinflammatory mode of action of bromelain.

    PubMed

    Müller, Silke; März, Reinhard; Schmolz, Manfred; Drewelow, Bernd; Eschmann, Klaus; Meiser, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Bromelain has been used for treatment of inflammatory diseases for decades. However, the exact mechanism of action remains poorly understood. While in vitro investigations have shown conflicting effects on the release of various cytokines, no in vivo data were available. In this study, the effects on inflammation-related cytokines of two doses of bromelain were tested in a single dose placebo-controlled 3?×?crossover randomized clinical trial. Cytokine circadian profiles were used to investigate the effects of bromelain on the human immune system by using stimulated whole-blood leukocytes. The effects seen in these cultures demonstrated a significant shift in the circadian profiles of the Th1 cell mediator interferon gamma (IFN?; p?oral use. It is postulated that the immunomodulating effect of bromelain observed in this trial is part of its known antiinflammatory activities. Further investigations will be necessary to verify the relevance of these findings to a diseased immune system. PMID:22517542

  9. Distribution of vitamin C is tissue specific with early saturation of the brain and adrenal glands following differential oral dose regimens in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hasselholt, Stine; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2015-05-28

    Vitamin C (VitC) deficiency is surprisingly common in humans even in developed parts of the world. The micronutrient has several established functions in the brain; however, the consequences of its deficiency are not well characterised. To elucidate the effects of VitC deficiency on the brain, increased knowledge about the distribution of VitC to the brain and within different brain regions after varying dietary concentrations is needed. In the present study, guinea pigs (like humans lacking the ability to synthesise VitC) were randomly divided into six groups (n 10) that received different concentrations of VitC ranging from 100 to 1500 mg/kg feed for 8 weeks, after which VitC concentrations in biological fluids and tissues were measured using HPLC. The distribution of VitC was found to be dynamic and dependent on dietary availability. Brain saturation was region specific, occurred at low dietary doses, and the dose-concentration relationship could be approximated with a three-parameter Hill equation. The correlation between plasma and brain concentrations of VitC was moderate compared with other organs, and during non-scorbutic VitC deficiency, the brain was able to maintain concentrations from about one-quarter to half of sufficient levels depending on the region, whereas concentrations in other tissues decreased to one-sixth or less. The adrenal glands have similar characteristics to the brain. The observed distribution kinetics with a low dietary dose needed for saturation and exceptional retention ability suggest that the brain and adrenal glands are high priority tissues with regard to the distribution of VitC. PMID:25865869

  10. Investigation of the Effects of Subchronic Low Dose Oral Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) and Ethinyl Estradiol (EE) on Estrogen Receptor Expression in the Juvenile and Adult Female Rat Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Rebuli, Meghan E.; Cao, Jinyan; Sluzas, Emily; Delclos, K. Barry; Camacho, Luísa; Lewis, Sherry M.; Vanlandingham, Michelle M.; Patisaul, Heather B.

    2014-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the long-term impacts of early life exposure to the ubiquitous environmental contaminant bisphenol A (BPA) on brain organization. Because BPA has been reported to affect estrogen signaling, and steroid hormones play a critical role in brain sexual differentiation, there is also concern that BPA exposure could alter neural sex differences. Here, we examine the impact of subchronic exposure from gestation to adulthood to oral doses of BPA below the current no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of 5 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day on estrogen receptor (ESR) expression in sexually dimorphic brain regions of prepubertal and adult female rats. The dams were gavaged daily with vehicle (0.3% carboxymethylcellulose), 2.5, 25, 260, or 2700 ?g BPA/kg bw/day, or 0.5 or 5.0 ?g ethinyl estradiol (EE)/kg bw/day from gestational day 6 until labor began. Offspring were then gavaged directly from the day after birth until the day before scheduled sacrifice on postnatal days 21 or 90. Using in situ hybridization, one or more BPA doses produced significant decreases in Esr1 expression in the juvenile female rat anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) of the hypothalamus and significant decreases in Esr2 expression in the adult female rat AVPV and medial preoptic area (MPOA), relative to vehicle controls. BPA did not simply reproduce EE effects, indicating that BPA is not acting solely as an estrogen mimic. The possible consequences of long-term changes in hypothalamic ESR expression resulting from subchronic low dose BPA exposure on neuroendocrine effects are discussed and being addressed in ongoing, related work. PMID:24752507

  11. Effects of graded oral doses of a new 5-hydroxytryptamine/noradrenaline uptake inhibitor (Ro 15-8081) in comparison with 60 mg codeine and placebo on experimentally induced pain and side effect profile in healthy men.

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, G; Steinringer, H; Schneider, S; Mittelbach, G; Gaupmann, G; Abatzi, T A; Stacher-Janotta, G

    1987-01-01

    1. Ro 15-8081 (Hoffmann-La Roche, Basle, Switzerland) is a novel mixed 5-HT/noradrenaline uptake inhibitor producing potent antinociceptive effects in animal pain models. 2. In healthy man, two models with electrically and thermally induced pain, respectively, have been shown to reliably discriminate between the effects of opioid as well as of antipyretic analgesics and placebo. 3. This study investigated the effects of single oral doses of 10, 25, and 50 mg Ro 15-8081 in comparison with 60 mg codeine and placebo on threshold and tolerance to electrically induced pain and on threshold to thermally induced pain. Furthermore, the effects on psychomotor function, self-rated subjective feelings, and side effect profile were studied. 4. Twenty healthy males participated each in five experiments in which they received, in random double-blind fashion, each of the treatments. Every experiment comprised two series of measurements before and twelve after drug administration, carried out at 30 min intervals. 5. Ro 15-8081 produced marked elevations of threshold and tolerance to electrically and of threshold to thermally induced pain. The effects of all doses of Ro 15-8081 were significantly superior to those of placebo. Threshold and tolerance to electrically induced pain were not affected differently by the three doses of Ro 15-8081, whereas the threshold to thermally induced pain was elevated significantly more by 50 mg than by 10 and 25 mg Ro 15-8081. 6. Codeine 60 mg had a more rapid onset of action and greater maximal effects than Ro 15-8081.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3501728

  12. Effect of small bowel bacterial overgrowth on the immunogenicity of single-dose live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR.

    PubMed

    Lagos, R; Fasano, A; Wasserman, S S; Prado, V; San Martin, O; Abrego, P; Losonsky, G A; Alegria, S; Levine, M M

    1999-11-01

    Several live oral vaccines (polio, bovine rotavirus, CVD 103-HgR cholera) are less immunogenic in developing than in industrialized countries. It was hypothesized that proximal small bowel bacterial overgrowth (common in children in less developed countries but rare in industrialized settings) diminishes the vibriocidal antibody response to CVD 103-HgR. In total, 202 fasting Santiago schoolchildren aged 5-9 years had lactulose breath H2 tests to detect proximal small bowel bacteria 1 day before ingesting CVD 103-HgR. Florid small bowel overgrowth was observed in 10 (5.6%) of 178 analyzable children. In children with florid overgrowth, vibriocidal seroconversion differed little from other children (60% vs. 67%), but the geometric mean titer was lower (160 vs. 368; P=.25). By logistic regression, increased peak breath H2 at small bowel time points was associated with diminished seroconversion (P=.04), as was the interaction of H2 value and weight (children >25 kg had lower seroconversion rates among subjects with heaviest overgrowth). PMID:10515838

  13. Treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in a rat model by using multiple daily doses of oral administration of G-CSF-containing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Su, Fang-Yi; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Lin, Po-Yen; Chou, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Mi, Fwu-Long; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Lin, Kun-Ju; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2014-04-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia often increases the likelihood of life-threatening infections. In this study, a nanoparticle (NP) system composed of chitosan and poly(?-glutamic acid) conjugated with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (?PGA-DTPA) was prepared for oral delivery of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor. The therapeutic potential of this NP system for daily administration of G-CSF to treat neutropenia associated with chemotherapy was evaluated in a rat model. In vitro results indicate that the procedures of NP loading and release preserved the structural integrity and bioactivity of the G-CSF molecules adequately. Those results further demonstrated the enzymatic inhibition activity of ?PGA-DTPA towards G-CSF against intestinal proteases. Additionally, the in vivo biodistribution study clearly identified accumulations of G-CSF in the heart, liver, bone marrow, and urinary bladder, an indication of systemic absorption of G-CSF; its relative bioavailability was approximately 13.6%. Moreover, significant glucose uptake was observed in bone marrow during G-CSF treatment, suggesting increased bone marrow metabolism and neutrophil production. Consequently, neutrophil count in the blood increased in a sustained manner; this fact may help a patient's immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. PMID:24477192

  14. Evaluation of 90-day Repeated Dose Oral Toxicity, Glycometabolism, Learning and Memory Ability, and Related Enzyme of Chromium Malate Supplementation in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weiwei; Wu, Huiyu; Li, Qian; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Chen, Yao; Zhao, Ting; Feng, Yun; Mao, Guanghua; Li, Fang; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-11-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the 90-day oral toxicity of chromium malate in Sprague-Dawley rats. The present study inspected the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes, lipid metabolism, and learning and memory ability in metabolically healthy Sprague-Dawley rats. The results showed that all rats survived and pathological, toxic, feces, and urine changes were not observed. Chromium malate did not cause measurable damage on liver, brain, and kidney. The fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance index, C-peptide, hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels of normal rats in chromium malate groups had no significant change when compared with control group and chromium picolinate group under physiologically relevant conditions. The serum and organ content of Cr in chromium malate groups had no significant change compared with control group. No significant changes were found in morris water maze test and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and true choline esterase (TChE) activity. The results indicated that supplementation with chromium malate did not cause measurable toxicity and has no obvious effect on glycometabolism and related enzymes, learning and memory ability, and related enzymes and lipid metabolism of female and male rats. The results of this study suggest that chromium malate is safe for human consumption. PMID:25900579

  15. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully. PMID:25892619

  16. Effect of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of levomilnacipran following a single oral dose of levomilnacipran extended-release capsule in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Laishun; Greenberg, William M; Brand-Schieber, Elimor; Wangsa, Julie; Periclou, Antonia; Ghahramani, Parviz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Levomilnacipran extended-release (ER) is indicated for treatment of major depressive disorder in adults. We evaluated the pharmacokinetic and safety profile of levomilnacipran ER in individuals with impaired renal function. Methods A total of 32 individuals participated in four groups (eight in each group) with normal, mild, moderately, or severely impaired renal function. Each participant received one dose of levomilnacipran ER 40 mg. Blood and urine were assayed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Results between normal and renally impaired groups were compared using analysis of variance. Safety measures included adverse events, laboratory evaluations, vital signs, suicidality, and electrocardiograms. Results Following administration of levomilnacipran, mean (standard deviation) maximum plasma concentration in participants with normal renal function, and mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment was 83.9 (21.0), 81.8 (23.4), 98.7 (18.1), and 122.1 (35.1) (ng/mL), respectively; area under the curve from time zero to infinity was 2,101.0 (516.9), 2,587.8 (649.9), 4,016.4 (995.4), and 5,900.8 (1,799.3) (h·ng/mL), respectively; terminal elimination half-life was 13.5 (2.8), 17.3 (3.5), 19.1 (4.6), and 27.7 (7.4) (hours), respectively; and renal clearance was 175.9 mL/min, 114.7 mL/min, 69.9 mL/min, and 28.6 mL/min, respectively. Levomilnacipran ER was generally well tolerated with no safety issues of concern identified. Conclusion Renal impairment was associated with increased plasma levels of levomilnacipran and prolonged half-life. No dose adjustment is required for individuals with mild renal impairment; the recommended maximum daily maintenance dose of levomilnacipran ER should not exceed 80 mg for individuals with moderate renal impairment and 40 mg for individuals with severe renal impairment. PMID:26150701

  17. Determination of designer doping agent--2-ethylamino-1-phenylbutane--in dietary supplements and excretion study following single oral supplement dose.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Marzena; Jarek, Anna; Chajewska, Katarzyna; Turek-Lepa, Ewa; Kwiatkowska, Dorota

    2015-11-10

    The quantitative analysis of a new designer doping agent, 2-ethylamino-1-phenylbutane (EAPB) and its metabolite, 2-amino-1-phenylbutane (APB) in urine samples, and the determination of EAPB in dietary supplement samples, have been presented. The main purpose of the present study was to develop simple and reliable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method (GC-MS) for excretion study following a single oral administration of dietary supplements containing EAPB. Three analytical methods for the determination of EAPB in urine and supplement samples, and APB in urine samples using the GC-MS system, have been validated. The method of the determination of EAPB in supplement samples was applied to analyze seventeen dietary supplements, CRAZE and DETONATE. Two other methods were used to determine the urinary excretion profile of EAPB and APB in the case of three healthy volunteers and, on further investigation, it was applied to the anti-doping control in sport. Quantification was obtained on the basis of the ions at m/z 86, 58 and 169, monitored for EAPB, APB and diphenylamine (used as an internal standard), respectively. The limits of detection and quantification were 2.4 and 7.3?g/g for EAPB in the case of supplement analysis, 2.9 and 8.8ng/mL for EAPB in the case of urine analysis, and 3.2 and 9.7ng/mL for APB. The other validation parameters as linearity, precision and trueness have been also investigated with the acceptable results. The extraction yield of all presented methods was above 69%. EAPB was detected in fourteen analyzed supplements (not included EAPB in their labels) and its content varied between 1.8 and 16.1mg/g. Following oral administration of three supplements with EAPB to one male and two female volunteers, the parent compound of EAPB and its metabolite were monitored and the excretion parameters as the maximum concentration of the analyte in urine (2.2-4.2?g/mL for EAPB; 1.1-5.1?g/mL for APB) and the time for the maximum height of the excretion peak (2-8h and 22h in one case for EAPB; 20-22h and 4h in one case for APB) have been indicated. EAPB and APB were detected at the level above 50ng/mL (50% of the minimum required performance level for stimulants in the anti-doping control in-competition in sport) in the urine up to 46-106h and 58-120h, respectively. Additionally, the result of the anti-doping control during swimming competition of one athlete, whose urine sample was analyzed for stimulants and narcotics, has been presented. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of new designer agents in urine samples and the excretion studies of these substances are of a great importance in the anti-doping control in sport. Moreover, the presentation of detection examples of these agents in supplements that haven't got included an information about them in the labeling, make athletes (and other supplement customers) more and more aware of the risk of the supplement use and possible health and doping consequences. PMID:26311473

  18. A randomised, placebo-controlled, dose-finding study of AZD9668, an oral inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease treated with tiotropium.

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, Claus; Aquino, Teresita O; O'Brien, Christopher D; Perrett, John; Gunawardena, Kulasiri A

    2012-04-01

    AZD9668 is a fully reversible, selective, oral inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, a protease implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Efficacy, safety and tolerability of AZD9668 (5, 20 and 60 mg bid) were compared with placebo in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week, Phase IIb trial (NCT00949975: approved by an Investigational Review Board), in patients with symptomatic COPD receiving maintenance tiotropium. The primary endpoint was pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV?). Secondary endpoints included forced vital capacity and inspiratory capacity, peak expiratory flow, Breathlessness, Cough and Sputum Scale score, exercise capacity, quality of life (QoL), exacerbation assessments, safety and pharmacokinetics. Exploratory endpoints included inflammatory and tissue degradation biomarkers. A total of 838 patients were randomised to AZD9668 5 mg bid (212 patients), 20 mg bid (206 patients), 60 mg bid (202 patients) or placebo (218 patients). AZD9668 showed no effect on lung function, respiratory signs and symptoms, QoL or biomarkers. At end of treatment, the change in mean pre-bronchodilator FEV? for AZD9668 60 mg bid compared with placebo was 0.00L (95% confidence interval: -0.05, 0.04; p = 0.873). Overall, AZD9668 was well tolerated; the numbers of patients with adverse events (AEs), serious AEs and AEs leading to discontinuation were similar in each of the four study groups. AZD9668 60 mg bid showed no clinical benefit and no effect on biomarkers of inflammation or tissue degradation when added to tiotropium in patients with COPD. These results raise important questions for future investigation of anti-inflammatory and disease-modifying agents in patients with COPD. PMID:22458939

  19. Low-dose oral imatinib in the treatment of systemic sclerosis interstitial lung disease unresponsive to cyclophosphamide: a phase II pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary involvement represents a major cause of death of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients. Recent data suggest that tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib, may be a therapeutic option for SSc patients. However, preliminary published clinical trials were inconclusive about imatinib efficacy and showed side effects. The purpose of this study was to verify efficacy and tolerability of low-dose imatinib on interstitial lung disease in a cohort of SSc patients unresponsive to cyclophosphamide therapy. Methods Thirty consecutive SSc patients with active pulmonary involvement, unresponsive to cyclophosphamide, were treated with imatinib 200 mg/day for 6 months followed by a 6-month follow-up. A “good response” was defined as an increase of forced vital capacity (FVC) by more of 15% and/or increase of diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) >15% and PaO2?>?90% of initial value and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT)-scan pattern unchanged or improved. Results Twenty-six patients completed the study. Three patients died and one patient was lost to follow-up. Four patients (15.32%) had a good response, 7 worsened and 15 had a stabilized lung disease. Overall, 19 (73.07%) patients had an improved or stabilized lung disease. After a 6-month follow-up, 12 (54.5%) of the 22 patients showed an improved or stabilized lung disease. Conclusions Lung function was stabilized in a large proportion of patients unresponsive to cyclophosphamide therapy and a beneficial outcome emerged from the analysis of HRCT lung scans. There was no significant improvement of skin involvement, and the low dose was well tolerated. These data provide useful suggestions to design future randomized clinical trials for SSc therapeutics. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00573326. Registered 13 December 2007. PMID:25007944

  20. Effects of oral fixed-dose combinations of telmisartan plus ramipril and losartan plus ramipril in hypertension: A multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind, phase iii trial in adult indian patients

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S.D.; Biradar, Sangram; Periyandavar, I.; Singh Sodhi, Sanjeet; Anwaruddin, K.; Gawde, Ashish; Baliga, Vidyagauri; Gandewar, Kailas; Desai, Anish

    2005-01-01

    Background: A new oral fixed-dose combination (FDC) of telmisartan plus ramipril is being introduced in India for the treatment of patients with stage 2 hypertension. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of an oral FDC of telmisartan plus ramipril with those of an oral FDC of losartan plus ramipril in adult Indian patients with stage 2 hypertension. Methods: This multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind, Phase III study was conducted at 5 centers in India. Indian patients aged 18 to 65 years with uncomplicated stage 2 essential hypertension (systolic/diastolic blood pressure [SBP/DBP], >160/>100 mm Hg) were enrolled. After a 2-week placebo run-in period, patients were randomly assigned to receive telmisartan 40 mg plus ramipril 5 mg (T + R) or losartan 50 mg plus ramipril 5 mg (L + R), PO (tablet) QD (before the morning meal) for 8 weeks. Supine blood pressure (BP) was measured at 0 (baseline) and 8 weeks of treatment. The primary end point was the mean reduction from baseline in BP. Responders were classified as patients who had a DBP <90 mm Hg at the end of 8 weeks of therapy. Tolerability was assessed using spontaneous reports of adverse events (AEs) during the follow-up visits and laboratory analyses performed at week 8. Results: A total of 289 patients were enrolled (155 men, 134 women; mean age, 50.74 years). Of these, 8 patients in the T + R group and 7 in the L + R group were lost to follow-up and considered withdrawals. At the end of week 8, the mean percentage reduction in SBP was significantly greater in the T + R group compared with that in the L + R group (24.1% vs 19.4%; P < 0.05). The mean percentage reduction in DBP was also significantly greater in the T + R group compared with that in the L + R group (17.3% vs 12.5%; P < 0.05). The response rates in the T + R and L + R groups were statistically similar (79.1% vs 68.7%). The most common AEs in the T + R and L + R groups were cough (9 [6.1%] and 11 [7.8%] patients, respectively) and headache (7 [4.7%] and 8 [5.7%] patients, respectively). Conclusions: The results in this study in Indian patients with stage 2 essential hypertension suggest that the FDC of T + R controlled BP more effectively compared with the FDC of L + R over 8 weeks. The response rates were similar between the 2 groups. Both treatments were well tolerated. PMID:24678079

  1. Vitamin D supplementation in older people (VDOP): Study protocol for a randomised controlled intervention trial with monthly oral dosing with 12,000 IU, 24,000 IU or 48,000 IU of vitamin D3

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The randomised, double blind intervention trial ‘Optimising Vitamin D Status in Older People’ (VDOP) will test the effect of three oral dosages of vitamin D given for one year on bone mineral density (BMD) and biochemical markers of vitamin D metabolism, bone turnover and safety in older people. VDOP is funded by Arthritis Research UK, supported through Newcastle University and MRC Human Nutrition Research and sponsored by the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.a Background Vitamin D insufficiency is common in older people and may lead to secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone loss, impairment of muscle function and increased risk of falls and fractures. Vitamin D supplementation trials have yielded conflicting results with regard to decreasing rates of bone loss, falls and fractures and the optimal plasma concentration of 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) for skeletal health remains unclear. Method/design Older (?70 years) community dwelling men and women are recruited through General Practices in Northern England and 375 participants are randomised to take 12,000 international units (IU), 24,000 IU or 48,000 IU of vitamin D3 orally each month for one year starting in the winter or early spring. Hip BMD and anthropometry are measured at baseline and 12 months. Fasting blood samples are collected at baseline and three-month intervals for the measurement of plasma 25OHD, parathyroid hormone (PTH), biochemical markers of bone turnover and biochemistry to assess the dose–response and safety of supplementation. Questionnaire data include falls, fractures, quality of life, adverse events and outcomes, compliance, dietary calcium intake and sunshine exposure. Discussion This is the first integrated vitamin D supplementation trial in older men and women using a range of doses given at monthly intervals to assess BMD, plasma 25OHD, PTH and biochemical markers of bone turnover and safety, quality of life and physical performance. We aim to investigate the vitamin D supplementation and plasma 25OHD concentration required to maintain bone health and to develop a set of biochemical markers that reflects the effect of vitamin D on bone. This will aid future studies investigating the effect of vitamin D supplementation on fracture risk. #ISRCTN 35648481 (assigned 16 August 2012), EudraCT 2011-004890-10. PMID:24041337

  2. An open-label, single-dose, crossover study of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of two oral formulations of 1-octanol in patients with essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Nahab, Fatta B; Wittevrongel, Loretta; Ippolito, Dominic; Toro, Camilo; Grimes, George J; Starling, Judith; Potti, Gopal; Haubenberger, Dietrich; Bowen, Daniel; Buchwald, Peter; Dong, Chuanhui; Kalowitz, Daniel; Hallett, Mark

    2011-10-01

    Existing therapeutic options for management of essential tremor are frequently limited by poor efficacy and adverse effects. Likely the most potent tremor suppressant used is ethanol, although its use is prohibitive due to a brief therapeutic window, and the obvious implications of excessive alcohol use. Longer-chain alcohols have been shown to suppress tremor in harmaline animal models, and appear to be safe and well tolerated in 2 prior studies in humans. Here we report on the findings of a phase I/II study of 1-octanol designed to explore pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. The most significant finding was the identification of octanoic acid as the product of rapid 1-octanol metabolism. Furthermore, the temporal profile of efficacy closely matches the plasma concentration of octanoic acid. Therefore, these findings identify a novel class of compound (e.g., carboxylic acids) with tremor suppressive properties in ET. Administration of 1-octanol also appears to be safe based on various measures collected. Essential tremor (ET) is the most common tremor disorder, with tremors occurring during static posturing or movement. These tremors are known to briefly improve in many cases after alcohol (ethanol) consumption. Two previous studies of a longer chain alcohol, 1-octanol, have demonstrated longer duration tremor-suppressive effects without the occurrence of intoxication. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of 1-octanol and its primary metabolite octanoic acid using two formulations, along with additional safety and efficacy measures. Participants with proven ethanol-responsive ET were recruited into 1 of 2 parts: (part A) a dose escalation study (1-64 mg/kg; n?=?4), and (part B) a fixed dose (64 mg/kg; n?=?10) balanced, open-label crossover design. Two participants in part B then completed an exploratory part C evaluating 128 mg/kg.Plasma samples were collected at 10 intervals during a 6-hour period postingestion. Efficacy was assessed using spirography, whereas safety was assessed with electrocardiograms, vital signs, adverse effects surveys, and an intoxication assessment. Plasma concentrations of 1-octanol were detectable at low levels whereas octanoic acid (OA) concentrations were approximately 100-fold higher. The half-life of OA was 87.6 minutes. This was matched by a clinical reduction in tremor severity of 32% at 90 minutes, assessed using spirography. The safety profile was favorable, with the most commonly reported adverse effect being dysgeusia (38%). Early detection and higher plasma concentrations of OA are a product of rapid metabolism of 1-octanol.OA pharmacokinetics mirrored the timing of clinical improvement. These findings provide preliminary evidence for a new class of compound that may be effective in the treatment of ET. PMID:21594724

  3. Risk factors for hospital admission in the 28?days following a community-acquired pneumonia diagnosis in older adults, and their contribution to increasing hospitalisation rates over time: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Elizabeth R C; De Stavola, Bianca L; Smeeth, Liam; Thomas, Sara L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine factors associated with hospitalisation after community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among older adults in England, and to investigate how these factors have contributed to increasing hospitalisations over time. Design Cohort study. Setting Primary and secondary care in England. Population 39?211 individuals from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, who were eligible for linkage to Hospital Episode Statistics and mortality data, were aged ?65 and had at least 1 CAP episode between April 1998 and March 2011. Main outcome measures The association between hospitalisation within 28?days of CAP diagnosis (a ‘post-CAP’ hospitalisation) and a wide range of comorbidities, frailty factors, medications and vaccinations. We examined the role of these factors in post-CAP hospitalisation trends. We also looked at trends in post-CAP mortality and length of hospitalisation over the study period. Results 14 comorbidities, 5 frailty factors and 4 medications/vaccinations were associated with hospitalisation (of 18, 12 and 7 considered, respectively). Factors such as chronic lung disease, severe renal disease and diabetes were associated with increased likelihood of hospitalisation, whereas factors such as recent influenza vaccination and a recent antibiotic prescription decreased the odds of hospitalisation. Despite adjusting for these and other factors, the average predicted probability of hospitalisation after CAP rose markedly from 57% (1998–2000) to 86% (2009–2010). Duration of hospitalisation and 28-day mortality decreased over the study period. Conclusions The risk factors we describe enable identification of patients at increased likelihood of post-CAP hospitalisation and thus in need of proactive case management. Our analyses also provide evidence that while comorbidities and frailty factors contributed to increasing post-CAP hospitalisations in recent years, the trend appears to be largely driven by changes in service provision and patient behaviour. PMID:26631055

  4. Phase II study of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, low-dose dexamethasone, and lenalidomide in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Baz, Rachid C; Shain, Kenneth H; Hussein, Mohamad A; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Sullivan, Daniel M; Oliver, Elizabeth Finley; Nardelli, Lisa A; Nodzon, Lisa A; Zhao, Xiuhua; Ochoa-Bayona, Jose Leonel; Nishihori, Taiga; Dalton, William S; Alsina, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Our previous phase I/II trial of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), low-dose dexamethasone, and lenalidomide in patients with relapsed and refractory myeloma showed an overall response rate of 75%, with 29% achieving ? VGPR. Here, we investigated this combination (PLD 30 or 40 mg/m(2) intravenously, day 1; dexamethasone 40 mg orally, days 1-4; lenalidomide 25 mg orally, days 1-21; administered every 28 days) in a phase II study in patients with newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma to determine its efficacy and tolerability (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00617591). At best response, patients could proceed with high-dose melphalan or with maintenance lenalidomide and dexamethasone. In 57 patients, we found that the overall response rate and rate of very good partial response and better on intent-to-treat, our primary endpoints, were 77.2% and 42.1%, respectively, with responses per the International Myeloma Working Group. Median progression-free survival was 28 months (95% CI 18.1-34.8), with 1- and 2-year overall survival rates of 98.1 and 79.6%. During induction, grade 3/4 toxicities were neutropenia (49.1%), anemia (15.8%), thrombocytopenia (7%), fatigue (14%), febrile neutropenia (8.8%), and venous thromboembolic events (8.8%). During maintenance, grade 3/4 toxicities were mainly hematologic. We found this combination to be active in patients with newly diagnosed myeloma, with results comparable to other lenalidomide-based induction strategies without proteasome inhibition. In addition, maintenance therapy with lenalidomide was well tolerated. PMID:24030918

  5. Phase II study of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, low-dose dexamethasone, and lenalidomide in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Baz, Rachid C.; Shain, Kenneth H.; Hussein, Mohamad A.; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Sullivan, Daniel M.; FinleyOliver, Elizabeth; Nardelli, Lisa A.; Nodzon, Lisa A.; Zhao, Xiuhua; Ochoa-Bayona, Jose Leonel; Nishihori, Taiga; Dalton, William S.; Alsina, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Our previous phase I/II trial of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), low-dose dexamethasone, and lenalidomide in patients with relapsed and refractory myeloma showed an overall response rate of 75%, with 29% achieving ?VGPR. Here, we investigated this combination (PLD 30 or 40 mg/m2 intravenously, day 1; dexamethasone 40 mg orally, days 1-4; lenalidomide 25 mg orally, days 1-21; administered every 28 days) in a phase II study in patients with newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma to determine its efficacy and tolerability (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00617591). At best response, patients could proceed with high-dose melphalan or with maintenance lenalidomide and dexamethasone. In 57 patients, we found that the overall response rate and rate of very good partial response and better on intent-to-treat, our primary endpoints, were 77.2% and 42.1%, respectively, with responses per the International Myeloma Working Group. Median progression-free survival was 28 months (95% CI 18.1-34.8), with 1- and 2-year overall survival rates of 98.1 and 79.6%. During induction, grade 3/4 toxicities were neutropenia (49.1%), anemia (15.8%), thrombocytopenia (7%), fatigue (14%), febrile neutropenia (8.8%), and venous thromboembolic events (8.8%). During maintenance, grade 3/4 toxicities were mainly hematologic. We found this combination to be active in patients with newly diagnosed myeloma, with results comparable to other lenalidomide-based induction strategies without proteasome inhibition. In addition, maintenance therapy with lenalidomide was well tolerated. PMID:24030918

  6. Phase 2, Randomized, Double-Blind, Dose-Ranging Study Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, Population Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Oral Torezolid Phosphate in Patients with Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections? † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Prokocimer, P.; Bien, P.; Surber, J.; Mehra, P.; DeAnda, C.; Bulitta, J. B.; Corey, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    Torezolid (TR-700) is the active moiety of the prodrug torezolid phosphate ([TP] TR-701), a second-generation oxazolidinone with 4- to 16-fold greater potency than linezolid against Gram-positive species including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A double-blind phase 2 study evaluated three levels (200, 300, or 400 mg) of oral, once-daily TP over 5 to 7 days for complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI). Patients 18 to 75 years old with cSSSI caused by suspected or confirmed Gram-positive pathogens were randomized 1:1:1. Of 188 treated patients, 76.6% had abscesses, 17.6% had extensive cellulitis, and 5.9% had wound infections. S. aureus, the most common pathogen, was isolated in 90.3% of patients (139/154) with a baseline pathogen; 80.6% were MRSA. Cure rates in clinically evaluable patients were 98.2% at 200 mg, 94.4% at 300 mg, and 94.4% at 400 mg. Cure rates were consistent across diagnoses, regardless of lesion size or the presence of systemic signs of infection. Clinical cure rates in patients with S. aureus isolated at baseline were 96.6% overall and 96.8% for MRSA. TP was safe and well tolerated at all dose levels. No patients discontinued treatment due to an adverse event. Three-stage hierarchical population pharmacokinetic modeling yielded a geometric mean clearance of 8.28 liters/h (between-patient variability, 32.3%), a volume of the central compartment of 71.4 liters (24.0%), and a volume of the peripheral compartment of 27.9 liters (35.7%). Results of this study show a high degree of efficacy at all three dose levels without significant differences in the safety profile and support the continued evaluation of TP for the treatment of cSSSI in phase 3 trials. PMID:21115795

  7. Impact of Low-Dose Oral Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) on Juvenile and Adult Rat Exploratory and Anxiety Behavior: A CLARITY-BPA Consortium Study.

    PubMed

    Rebuli, Meghan E; Camacho, Luísa; Adonay, Maria E; Reif, David M; Aylor, David L; Patisaul, Heather B

    2015-12-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high volume production chemical and has been identified as an endocrine disruptor, prompting concern that developmental exposure could impact brain development and behavior. Rodent and human studies suggest that early life BPA exposure may result in an anxious, hyperactive phenotype but results are conflicting and data from studies using multiple doses below the no-observed-adverse-effect level are limited. To address this, the present studies were conducted as part of the CLARITY-BPA (Consortium Linking Academic and Regulatory Insights on BPA Toxicity) program. The impact of perinatal BPA exposure (2.5, 25, or 2500?µg/kg body weight (bw)/day) on behaviors related to anxiety and exploratory activity was assessed in juvenile (prepubertal) and adult NCTR Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes. Ethinyl estradiol (0.5?µg/kg bw/day) was used as a reference estrogen. Exposure spanned gestation and lactation with dams gavaged from gestational day 6 until birth and then the offspring gavaged directly through weaning (n = 12/sex/group). Behavioral assessments included open field, elevated plus maze, and zero maze. Anticipated sex differences in behavior were statistically identified or suggested in most cases. No consistent effects of BPA were observed for any endpoint, in either sex, at either age compared to vehicle controls; however, significant differences between BPA-exposed and ethinyl estradiol-exposed groups were identified for some endpoints. Limitations of this study are discussed and include suboptimal statistical power and low concordance across behavioral tasks. These data do not indicate BPA-related effects on anxiety or exploratory activity in these developmentally exposed rats. PMID:26209558

  8. A phase II, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multi-dose study of SRT2104, a SIRT1 activator, in subjects with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baksi, Arun; Kraydashenko, Oleg; Zalevkaya, Alsu; Stets, Roman; Elliott, Peter; Haddad, Jonathan; Hoffmann, Ethan; Vlasuk, George P; Jacobson, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    Aim SRT2104 is a selective activator of SIRT1. In animal models, SRT2104 improves glucose homeostasis and increases insulin sensitivity. We evaluated the tolerability and pharmacokinetics of SRT2104, and its effects on glycaemic control, in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Method Type 2 diabetics with glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ? 7.5% and ?10.5%, fasting glucose ?160 and ?240 mg dl?1, and on stable doses of metformin were evenly randomized to placebo or SRT2104 0.25 g, 0.5 g, 1.0 g or 2.0 g, administered orally once daily for 28 days. Changes in fasting and post-prandial glucose and insulin were analyzed. Results Safety evaluation found no major differences between groups in the frequency of adverse events. SRT2104 concentrations did not increase in a dose-proportional fashion. Significant variability in exposure was observed. Treatment with SRT2104 did not lead to any consistent, dose-related changes in glucose or insulin. Day 28 change from baseline (mean (SD)): fasting glucose (mmol l?1) = ?1.17 (2.42), ?1.11 (3.45), ?0.52 (2.60), ?0.97 (2.83) and ?0.15 (2.38) for placebo, 0.25 g, 0.5 g, 1.0 g and 2.0 g, respectively. Day 28 change from baseline (mean (SD)): fasting insulin (mmol l?1) = 1.0 (51.66), 8.9 (95.04), ?6.9 (41.45), 4.1 (57.16) and 15.2 (138.79) for placebo, 0.25 g, 0.5 g, 1.0 g and 2.0 g, respectively) Treatment with SRT2104 was associated with improvement in lipid profiles. Conclusion Treatment with SRT2104 for 28 days did not result in improved glucose or insulin control which is likely due to the observed pharmacokinetics which were not dose proportional and had large between subject variability. PMID:24446723

  9. Ampicillin Oral

    MedlinePLUS

    ... capsule, liquid, and pediatric drops to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 6 hours (four ... blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), atenolol (Tenormin), oral contraceptives, probenecid (Benemid), rifampin, sulfasalazine, and vitamins.tell ...

  10. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  11. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral cancer during regular checkups. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) also make note of unusual or abnormal growths ... examinations and provide referrals to appropriate medical professionals. SLPs are important members of the cancer team. They ...

  12. Effects of SiC nanoparticles orally administered in a rat model: Biodistribution, toxicity and elemental composition changes in feces and organs

    SciTech Connect

    Lozano, Omar; Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation , University of Namur , Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur ; Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye; Department of Pharmacy, NAMEDIC, Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center , University of Namur , Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur ; Mejia, Jorge; Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation , University of Namur , Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur ; Rolin, Stéphanie; Department of Pharmacy, NAMEDIC, Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center , University of Namur , Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur ; Toussaint, Olivier; Laboratory of Biochemistry and Cellular Biology , University of Namur , Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur ; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Department of Pharmacy, NAMEDIC, Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center , University of Namur , Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur ; and others

    2012-10-15

    Background: Silicon carbide (SiC) presents noteworthy properties as a material such as high hardness, thermal stability, and photoluminescent properties as a nanocrystal. However, there are very few studies in regard to the toxicological potential of SiC NPs. Objectives: To study the toxicity and biodistribution of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles in an in vivo rat model after acute (24 h) and subacute (28 days) oral administrations. The acute doses were 0.5, 5, 50, 300 and 600 mg·kg{sup ?1}, while the subacute doses were 0.5 and 50 mg·kg{sup ?1}. Results: SiC biodistribution and elemental composition of feces and organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) have been studied by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). SiC and other elements in feces excretion increased by the end of the subacute assessment. SiC did not accumulate in organs but some elemental composition modifications were observed after the acute assessment. Histopathological sections from organs (stomach, intestines, liver, and kidneys) indicate the absence of damage at all applied doses, in both assessments. A decrease in the concentration of urea in blood was found in the 50 mg·kg{sup ?1} group from the subacute assessment. No alterations in the urine parameters (sodium, potassium, osmolarity) were found. Conclusion: This is the first study that assesses the toxicity, biodistribution, and composition changes in feces and organs of SiC nanoparticles in an in vivo rat model. SiC was excreted mostly in feces and low traces were retrieved in urine, indicating that SiC can cross the intestinal barrier. No sign of toxicity was however found after oral administration. -- Highlights: ? SiC nanoparticles were orally administered to rats in acute and subacute doses. ? SiC was found in low traces in urine. It is mostly excreted in feces within 5 days. ? SiC excretion rate, feces and organ elemental composition change with time. ? No morphological alteration were found on GI tract, liver, kidneys, or spleen. ? Urea increased in blood in the subacute assessment. No change in urine properties.

  13. Development, validation and transfer of a near infrared method to determine in-line the end point of a fluidised drying process for commercial production batches of an approved oral solid dose pharmaceutical product.

    PubMed

    Peinado, Antonio; Hammond, Jonathan; Scott, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies are progressively adopting and introducing the principles of Quality by Design with the main purpose of assurance and built-in quality throughout the whole manufacturing process. Within this framework, a Partial Least Square (PLS) model, based on Near Infrared (NIR) spectra and humidity determinations, was built in order to determine in-line the drying end point of a fluidized bed process. The in-process method was successfully validated following the principles described within The International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use - ICH Q2 (r1) - Validation of Analytical Procedures: Text and Methodology. However, in some aspects, the cited guidelines were not appropriate to in-process methods developed and validated exclusively with in-line samples and implemented in dynamic systems, such as drying processes. In this work, a customized interpretation of guidelines has been adopted which provided the framework of evidence to support a validated application. The application has been submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and The European Medicines Agency (EMA) during applications for grant of licences. Representatives from these Regulatory Authorities have specifically reviewed this novel application during on-site inspections, and have subsequently approved both the product and this application. Currently, the NIR method is implemented as a primary in-line method to control the drying end point in real-time (to below a control limit of not greater than 1.2% w/w) for commercial production batches of an approved, solid, oral-dose medicine. The implementation of this in-process method allows real-time control with benefits including a reduction in operation time and labour; sample handling and waste generation; and a reduced risk to product quality in further unit operations due to improved consistency of intermediate output at this stage. To date, this has achieved approximately 10% savings in energy efficiency and operational time for this part of the manufacturing process. PMID:20801599

  14. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening (PDQ®) What is screening? ... are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cancer is ...

  15. Oral Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®) What is prevention? ... and How to Quit General Information About Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Key Points Oral cavity cancer ...

  16. Oral Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... mouth A lump, rough spot, or other change Pain, tenderness, or numbness anywhere in the mouth or on the lips Problems chewing, swallowing, speaking, or moving the jaw or tongue A change in the way the teeth fit together Thrush. Thrush is also called oral ...

  17. Oral Drug Absorption

    E-print Network

    Yamashita, Shinji

    2006-10-26

    amount of various drugs in the D/P system 0 20 40 60 80 100 0.01 0.1 1.0 10.0 100.0 Permeated amount (% of dose/2 h) Human Abs. ( % of dose) Correlation between in vivo human absorption and in vitro permeated amount in the D/P system Fasted State Fed... (Fasted/Fed) 4.0 0.9 1.6 0.25 1.11 3.09 2.05 28.0 81.2 Cmax (?g/mL) Tmax 2.3 3.8 1.9 2.3 3.0 2.0 (h) 14 0 20 40 60 80 100 0.01 0.1 1.0 10.0 100.0 Estimation of food-effect on oral absorption of albendazole, quazepam and nateglinide from in vitro study in D/P...

  18. Live attenuated oral cholera vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Edward T; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi

    2006-08-01

    Live, orally administered, attenuated vaccine strains of Vibrio cholerae have many theoretical advantages over killed vaccines. A single oral inoculation could result in intestinal colonization and rapid immune responses, obviating the need for repetitive dosing. Live V. cholerae organisms can also respond to the intestinal environment and immunological exposure to in vivo expressed bacterial products, which could result in improved immunological protection against wild-type V. cholerae infection. The concern remains that live oral cholera vaccines may be less effective among partially immune individuals in cholera endemic areas as pre-existing antibodies can inhibit live organisms and decrease colonization of the gut. A number of live oral cholera vaccines have been developed to protect against cholera caused by the classical and El Tor serotypes of V. cholerae O1, including CVD 103-HgR, Peru-15 and V. cholerae 638. A number of live oral cholera vaccines have also been similarly developed to protect against cholera caused by V. cholerae O139, including CVD 112 and Bengal-15. Live, orally administered, attenuated cholera vaccines are in various stages of development and evaluation. PMID:16989629

  19. Apixaban and oral implications

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thrombotic disorders remain a leading cause of death in the Western world, and in this regard a number of anticoagulation treatment have been used, including heparins, fondaparinux, vitamin K antagonists (warfarin, acenocoumarol), and new oral anticoagulants such as apixaban. For years there has been great controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants in planning dental treatments that imply bleeding. The main concerns about using new oral anticoagulants in invasive dental procedures are bleeding due to the lack of an antidote, and the thrombotic risk of the disease for which anticoagulation was indicated in the first place. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through May 2014 using the keyword “apixaban” for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge. The search was extended to other databases (PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Library). Results Based on the results of the different studies, apixaban seems to be a good alternative to conventional anticoagulation and a reasonable treatment option, though its main and most common adverse effect is bleeding. Dose adjustment is needed in some patients, though regular laboratory monitoring is not required. The use of the drug in different patient populations will define its final indications and doses. Conclusions Regarding the use of apixaban in the dental setting, there is a compelling need for further clinical studies in order to establish more evidence-based guidelines for patients requiring antithrombotic treatment. Key words:Apixaban, dental treatment, dental implications. PMID:26535102

  20. Single and Multiple Dose Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Safety of the Novel Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Enzyme Inhibitor Darapladib in Healthy Chinese Subjects: An Open Label Phase-1 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chaoying; Tompson, Debra; Magee, Mindy; Chen, Qian; Liu, Yan Mei; Zhu, Wenjing; Zhao, Hongxin; Gross, Annette S.; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Darapladib is a lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) inhibitor. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety of darapladib in healthy Chinese subjects. Methods Twenty-four subjects received darapladib 160 mg orally, approximately 1 hour after a standard breakfast, as a single dose and once daily for 28 days. Non-compartmental methods were used to determine the single and multiple dose pharmacokinetics of darapladib and its metabolite SB-553253. Repeat dose Lp-PLA2 activity and safety were evaluated. Results Systemic exposure (AUC(0-T), Cmax geometric mean (CVb%)) of darapladib was higher after multiple-dosing (519 ng.h/mL (33.3%), 34.4 ng/mL (49.9%)) compared to single-dose administration (153 ng.h/mL (69.0%), 17.9 ng/mL (55.2%). The steady-state accumulation ratio was less than unity (Rs = 0.80), indicating time-dependent pharmacokinetics of darapladib. Darapladib steady-state was reached by Day 14 of once daily dosing. Systemic exposure to SB-553253 was lower than darapladib with median (SB-553253: darapladib) ratios for AUC(0-?) of 0.0786 for single dose and 0.0532 for multiple dose administration. On Day 28, pre-dose and maximum inhibition of Lp-PLA2 activity was approximately 70% and 75% relative to the baseline value, respectively and was dependent of darapladib concentration. The most common adverse events (? 21% subjects) were abnormal faeces, abnormal urine odour, diarrhoea and nasopharyngitis. Conclusion Darapladib 160 mg single and repeat doses were profiled in healthy Chinese subjects. Single dose systemic exposure to darapladib in healthy Chinese subjects was consistent with that observed previously in Western subjects whereas steady-state systemic exposure was approximately 65% higher in Chinese than Western subjects. The Lp-PLA2 activity and adverse event profile were similar in healthy Chinese and previous reports in Western subjects. Ethnic-specific dose adjustment of darapladib is not considered necessary for the Chinese population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02000804 PMID:26465780

  1. Oral dirofilariasis.

    PubMed

    Desai, R S; Pai, N; Nehete, A P; Singh, J S

    2015-01-01

    Dirofilaria is parasitic nematodes of domestic and wild animals that can infect humans accidentally via vectors. Its occurrence in the oral cavity is extremely rare. The most frequent presentation of human dirofilariasis is a single submucosal nodule without signs of inflammation. We hereby, report a case of human dirofilariasis affecting the buccal mucosa in a 32-year-old farmer caused by D. repens. PMID:26470974

  2. Oncologic doses of zoledronic acid induce osteonecrosis of the jaw-like lesions in rice rats (Oryzomys palustris) with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, J Ignacio; Akhter, Mohammed P; Kimmel, Donald B; Pingel, Jennifer E; Williams, Alyssa; Jorgensen, Marda; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Wronski, Thomas J

    2012-10-01

    Though osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is temporally-associated with the use of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs), a cause-and-effect relationship has not yet been established. We hypothesize that ONJ is a two-stage process in which: (1) risk factors initiate pathologic processes in the oral cavity that lead to a supranormal rate of hard tissue necrosis; and (2) powerful antiresorptives reduce the rate of removal of necrotic bone sufficiently to allow its net accumulation in the jaw. To test this hypothesis, we used the rice rat model of periodontitis. At age 28 days, rats (n?=?15/group) were placed on a high-sucrose and casein diet to exacerbate the development of periodontitis. Animals were injected subcutaneously (SC) biweekly with vehicle or alendronate (ALN, 15?µg/kg), or IV once monthly with vehicle, a low dose (LD) of zoledronic acid (ZOL), or a high dose (HD) of ZOL and sacrificed after 6, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Mandibles and maxillae were analyzed to determine the effects on the: (1) progression of periodontitis; (2) integrity of alveolar bone; (3) status of bone resorption and formation; (4) vascularity; and (5) osteocyte viability. We found that only HD-ZOL induced ONJ-like lesions in mandibles of rice rats after 18 and 24 weeks of treatment. These lesions were characterized by areas of exposed necrotic alveolar bone, osteolysis, a honeycomb-like appearance of the alveolar bone, presence of bacterial colonies, and periodontal tissue destruction. In addition, inhibition of bone formation, a paradoxical abolition of the antiresorptive effect of only HD-ZOL, increased osteocyte necrosis/apoptosis, and decreased blood vessel number were found after 18 and/or 24 weeks. Our study suggests that only HD-ZOL exacerbates the inflammatory response and periodontal tissue damage in rice rats, inducing bone lesions that resemble ONJ. PMID:22623376

  3. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using clofibrate in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Tomomi; Takashima, Rie; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Hori, Hisako; Fujii, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (MN) assay is a newly established in vivo genotoxicity test for evaluation of liver carcinogens. It may be integrated into general toxicity studies, thereby reducing the numbers of animals required for assessment of chemical safety. A collaborative study by the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study (MMS) Group further evaluated this assay using a wide range of chemicals, including carcinogens and non-carcinogens in young adult rats. In this study, we administered clofibrate (125, 250, or 500mg/kg/day) for 14 or 28 days, and examined the micronucleated (MNed) cell frequencies in the liver and bone marrow. Clofibrate is a known liver carcinogen specific to rodents and has been shown to yield negative results in many in vitro genotoxicity and carcinogenicity tests in monkeys. Clofibrate is categorized as a Group 3 chemical by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and is considered a non-genotoxic carcinogen. After treatment with clofibrate for 14 or 28 days, frequencies of hepatic MNed cells were significantly increased, but there were no differences in the ratios of hepatic M-phase cells. Clofibrate did not increase the frequency of MNed cells in the bone marrow in the 14-day study, whereas a slight increase was observed at the highest dose in the 28-day study. These results suggested that the repeated-dose liver MN assay is more sensitive to clofibrate, an indirect liver carcinogen in rodents, than the conventional bone marrow MN assay. PMID:25892631

  4. A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Lenalidomide in Combination with Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ullenhag, Gustav J.; Rossmann, Eva; Liljefors, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Lenalidomide have both immunomodulatory and anti-angiogenic properties which could confer anti-cancer effects. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of combining lenalidomide with the standard treatment gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer patients with advanced disease. Patients and Methods Eligible patients had locally advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Patients received lenalidomide days 1–21 orally and gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 intravenously (days 1, 8 and 15), each 28 day cycle. Three cohorts of lenalidomide were examined (Cohort I = 15 mg, Cohort II = 20 mg and Cohort III = 25 mg daily). The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of lenalidomide given in combination with gemcitabine was defined as the highest dose level at which no more than one out of four (25%) subjects experiences a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Patients should also be able to receive daily low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (e.g. dalteparin 5000 IU s.c. daily) as a prophylactic anticoagulant for venous thromboembolic events (VTEs). Twelve patients (n = 4, n = 3 and n = 5 in cohort I, II and III, respectively) were enrolled in this study. Results Median duration of treatment was 11 weeks (range 1–66), and median number of treatment cycles were three (range 1–14). The only DLT was a cardiac failure grade 3 in cohort III. Frequent treatment-related adverse events (AEs) (all grades) included neutropenia, leucopenia and fatigue (83% each, but there was no febrile neutropenia); thrombocytopenia (75%); dermatological toxicity (75%); diarrhea and nausea (42% each); and neuropathy (42%). Discussion This phase I study demonstrates the feasibility of the combination of lenalidomide and gemcitabine as first-line treatment in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The tolerability profile demonstrated in the dose escalation schedule of lenalidomide suggests the dosing of lenalidomide to be 25 mg daily on days 1–21 with standard dosing of gemcitabine and merits further evaluation in a phase II trial. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01547260 PMID:25837499

  5. Live oral vaccines against cholera: an update.

    PubMed

    Levine, M M; Kaper, J B

    1993-01-01

    One hundred years elapsed between the first (live, parenteral) cholera vaccine that entered clinical trials in 1885 and the field trials of two oral inactivated cholera vaccines undertaken in Bangladesh in the mid-1980s. The oral inactivated vaccines advanced the art by establishing, convincingly, that oral vaccines could protect (although multiple doses were required) and that (at least in adults) protection could last 3 years. Attenuated Vibrio cholerae O1 strain CVD 103-HgR (deleted of the cholera toxin A subunit gene and harbouring a gene encoding resistance to Hg++) constitutes another significant advance. This live oral vaccine is well tolerated and highly immunogenic in adults and children and highly protective (in adult volunteer challenge studies) following ingestion of of a single dose. PMID:8438619

  6. Study of serum ctx in 50 oral surgical patients treated with oral bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Flichy-Fernández, Antonio J.; Alegre-Domingo, Teresa; González-Lemonnier, Sandra; Balaguer-Martínez, José; Jiménez-Soriano, Yolanda; Peñarrocha-Diago, David; Bagán-Sebastián, José V.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether there is a relationship between the total BP dose administered and the variations in serum CTX concentration. Study design: The study included 50 patients requiring dental implant surgery and treated with oral BPs, seen in an Oral Surgery and Implantology Unit between January 2007 and June 2009. The patients were divided into two groups: those in which the medication was not suspended before obtaining the laboratory test sample, and those patients referred from other dental clinics in which BPs was suspended before reporting to our Unit. The total drug dosage administered and the total dose per kilogram body weight were evaluated for comparison with serum CTX. The data obtained were correlated to the osteonecrosis risk table developed by Marx et al. in 2007. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in relation to the total administered dose and the dose in mg/kg b.w. Likewise, in both groups no relationship was observed between the serum CTX value and the total administered dose or the dose in mg/kg b.w. No differences were found between the two patient groups regarding chemical osteonecrosis risk based on the criteria of Marx et al. Conclusions: No relationship was observed between the oral BP dose administered (total dose or expressed in mg/kg b.w.) and serum CTX concentration, and suspension of the medication did not influence the serum CTX levels. Key words:Serum CTX, osteonecrosis, oral bisphosphonates. PMID:22143730

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose to neonates in a special care baby unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.; Yousif, A.; Babikir, E.; Salih, I.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient entrance surface dose (ESD), organ dose and effective dose for neonates in the special care baby unit (SCBU) up to 28 days after birth. A total of 135 patients were examined during 4 months. ESDs were calculated from patient exposure parameters using DosCal software. Effective doses were calculated using software from the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). The mean patient ESD per procedure was 80±0.02 ?Gy. The mean and range of the effective dose per procedure were 0.02 (0.01-0.3) mSv. The radiation dose in this study was higher compared to previous studies. A dedicated X-ray machine with additional filtration is recommended for patient dose reductions.

  8. Oral Sex, Oral Health and Orogenital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Rajiv; Saini, Santosh; Sharma, Sugandha

    2010-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:20300419

  9. Zomepirac sodium -- a new oral analgesic.

    PubMed

    1981-01-01

    Zomepirac sodium is a new oral analgesic that is more effective than aspirin, with no apparent tolerance or potential for addiction. It causes gastrointestinal bleeding similar to that caused by large doses of aspirin. For occasional moderate pain not responsive to aspirin, zomepirac may prove to be preferable to oral narcotics such as codeine, oxycodone, propoxyphene, pentazocine and meperidine. For chronic use, the safety and continued effectiveness of the new drug remain to be determined; it probably cannot replace oral narcotics in narcotic-dependent patients. For severe pain, as in myocardial infarction, renal colic and after some operations, zomepirac is no substitute for parenteral morphine. PMID:7005639

  10. TTCs for oral exposure: Identification of outliers in Cramer class I, II and III using the combined database of RepDose (FhG), Toxbase (TNO), Munro and ToxRefDB (USEPA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Thresholds of Toxicological Concern (TTC) are generic human exposure threshold for structural groups of chemicals below which no risk to human health is assumed and therefore no further testing is needed. Different thresholds have been developed for oral exposure e.g. for gen...

  11. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePLUS

    ... endometrial cancer risk? How do oral contraceptives affect cervical cancer risk? How do oral contraceptives affect liver cancer ... oral contraceptives ( 11 ). How do oral contraceptives affect cervical cancer risk? Long-term use of oral contraceptives (5 ...

  12. Oral diacetylmorphine (heroin) yields greater morphine bioavailability than oral morphine: bioavailability related to dosage and prior opioid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Halbsguth, Ulrike; Rentsch, Katharina M; Eich-Höchli, Dominique; Diterich, Isabel; Fattinger, Karin

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECTVenosclerosis prevents many opioid addicts in heroin substitution programmes from injecting intravenously, which makes consideration of other routes of administration necessary.Even high doses of oral diacetylmorphine are completely converted to morphine presystemically.Morphine bioavailability in heroin addicts after high-dose oral diacetylmorphine administration is considerably higher than expected based on prior data obtained with relatively low oral diacetylmorphine or morphine doses in healthy subjects or patients receiving treatment for pain (64–72% vs. 20–25%). WHAT THIS STUDY ADDSMorphine influx into systemic circulation is more rapid after oral diacetylmorphine than after oral morphine, resulting in earlier and more than double maximal concentrations.In opioid-dependent people, bioavailability of morphine from oral doses of diacetylmorphine is also 37% higher than that of oral morphine.Morphine bioavailability is two and 1.5 times higher in chronic users than in opioid-naive subjects after low oral doses of diacetylmorphine or morphine, respectively.Oral absorption of morphine from diacetylmorphine is dose dependent, i.e. bioavailability increases with diacetylmorphine dose. AIMS In the Swiss heroin substitution trials, patients are treated with self-administered diacetylmorphine (heroin). Intravenous administration is not possible in patients that have venosclerosis. Earlier studies have demonstrated that oral diacetylmorphine may be used, although it is completely converted to morphine presystemically. Morphine bioavailability after high-dose oral diacetylmorphine is considerably higher than would be predicted from low-dose trials. The aim was to investigate whether the unexpectedly high bioavailability is due to a difference in the drug examined, and whether it depends on previous exposure or on dose. METHODS Opioid-naive healthy volunteers and dependent patients from the Swiss heroin trials (n = 8 per group) received low doses of intravenous and oral deuterium-labelled morphine and diacetylmorphine, respectively. Patients also received a high oral diacetylmorphine dose. RESULTS The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of morphine was twofold higher after oral diacetylmorphine than after morphine administration in both groups. However, morphine bioavailability was considerably higher in chronic users [diacetylmorphine 45.6% (95% confidence interval 40.0, 51.3), morphine 37.2% (30.1, 44.3)] than in naive subjects [diacetylmorphine 22.9% (16.4, 29.4), morphine 23.9% (16.5, 31.2)] after low oral doses (48.5 µmol) of either diacetylmorphine or morphine. Morphine clearance was similar in both groups. Moreover, oral absorption of morphine from diacetylmorphine was found to be dose dependent, with bioavailability reaching 64.2% (55.3, 73.1) for high diacetylmorphine doses (1601 µmol). CONCLUSIONS Oral absorption of opioids is substance-, dose- and patient collective-dependent, suggesting that there may be a saturation of first-pass processes, the exact mechanism of which is not yet understood. PMID:18945270

  13. 21 CFR 520.88c - Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Swine (1) Amount. 40 milligrams orally, twice a day using a dosing pump. (2) Indications for use. Treatment of baby pigs under 10 pounds for porcine colibacillosis caused by Escherichia coli susceptible to amoxicillin. (3)...

  14. 21 CFR 520.88c - Amoxicillin trihydrate oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Swine —(1) Amount . 40 milligrams orally, twice a day using a dosing pump. (2) Indications for use. Treatment of baby pigs under 10 pounds for porcine colibacillosis caused by Escherichia coli susceptible to amoxicillin. (3)...

  15. Biomimetic Actinide Chelators: An Update on the Preclinical Development of the Orally Active Hydroxypyridonate Decorporation Agents 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO)

    PubMed Central

    Abergel, Rebecca J.; Durbin, Patricia W.; Kullgren, Birgitta; Ebbe, Shirley N.; Xu, Jide; Chang, Polly Y.; Bunin, Deborah I.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Rosen, Chris J.; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2010-01-01

    The threat of a dirty bomb or other major radiological contamination presents a danger of large-scale radiation exposure of the population. Because major components of such contamination are likely to be actinides, actinide decorporation treatments that will reduce radiation exposure must be a priority. Current therapies for the treatment of radionuclide contamination are limited and extensive efforts must be dedicated to the development of therapeutic, orally bioavailable, actinide chelators for emergency medical use. Using a biomimetic approach based on the similar biochemical properties of plutonium(IV) and iron(III), siderophore-inspired multidentate hydroxypyridonate ligands have been designed and are unrivaled in terms of actinide-affinity, selectivity and efficiency. A perspective on the preclinical development of two hydroxypyridonate actinide decorporation agents, 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO) and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO), is presented. The chemical syntheses of both candidate compounds have been optimized for scale-up. Baseline preparation and analytical methods suitable for manufacturing large amounts have been established. Both ligands show much higher actinide-removal efficacy than the currently approved agent, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), with different selectivity for the tested isotopes of plutonium, americium, uranium and neptunium. No toxicity is observed in cells derived from three different human tissue sources treated in vitro up to ligand concentrations of 1 mM, and both ligands were well tolerated in rats when orally administered daily at high doses (> 100 ?mol kg?1 day?1) over 28 days under good laboratory practice (GLP) guidelines. Both compounds are on an accelerated development pathway towards clinical use. PMID:20699704

  16. Transfer of methylmercury to hens' eggs after oral administration

    SciTech Connect

    Kambamanoli-Dimou, A. ); Kamarianos, A.; Kilikidis, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The present investigation was performed to elucidate the possibility of transport of methylmercury into eggs after its oral administration. Also, to determine the quantity of mercury excreted via eggs after oral administration of a certain quantity of this element once or in doses.

  17. Oral fluid cannabinoids in chronic cannabis smokers during oral ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol therapy and smoked cannabis challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Vandrey, Ryan; Mendu, Damodara R.; Anizan, Sebastien; Milman, Garry; Murray, Jeannie A.; Barnes, Allan J.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Oral ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is effective for attenuating cannabis withdrawal and may benefit treatment of cannabis use disorders. Oral fluid (OF) cannabinoid testing, increasing in forensic and workplace settings, could be valuable for monitoring during cannabis treatment. METHODS Eleven cannabis smokers resided on a closed research unit for 51 days, and received daily 0, 30, 60, and 120 mg oral THC in divided doses for 5 days. There was a 5-puff smoked cannabis challenge on the 5th day. Each medication session was separated by 9 days of ad libitum cannabis smoking. OF was collected the evening prior to and throughout oral THC sessions and analyzed by 2-dimensional GC-MS for THC, cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). RESULTS During all oral THC administrations, THC OF concentrations decreased to ?78.2, 33.2, and 1.4 ?g/L by 24, 48, and 72h, respectively. CBN also decreased over time with concentrations 10-fold lower than THC, with none detected beyond 69h. CBD and 11-OH-THC were rarely detected, only within 19 and 1.6h post smoking, respectively. THCCOOH OF concentrations were dose-dependent and increased over time during 120 mg THC dosing. After cannabis smoking, THC, CBN, and THCCOOH concentrations showed a significant dose-effect and decreased significantly over time. CONCLUSIONS Oral THC dosing significantly affected OF THCCOOH but minimally contributed to THC OF concentrations; prior ad libitum smoking was the primary source of THC, CBD and CBN. Higher cannabinoid concentrations following active oral THC administrations versus placebo suggest a compensatory effect of THC tolerance on smoking topography. PMID:23938457

  18. [New option in the management of cancer pain in Hungary: short acting oral opioid therapy].

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Tamás; Sip?cz, István; Csikós, Ágnes; Pintér, Tamás

    2015-06-21

    Short acting oral morphine has recently been registered again in Hungary. Short acting oral morphine has two essential indications: dose titration at initiation of major analgesic therapy and treatment of breakthrough pain appearing beside round the clock major analgesic therapy. The clinical management of short acting oral morphine is summarised in this article. PMID:26170088

  19. Effect of treatment with oral calcitriol on calcium metabolism and fasting serum 25(OH)- or 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D level in Japanese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Tatsuhiko; Nakagami, Tetsuo; Morishita, Kaoru

    2003-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of daily oral administration of calcitriol on calcium metabolism in Japanese postmenopausal women. For this purpose, we administered 0.5 microg of daily calcitriol to 18 Japanese postmenopausal women for up to 24 weeks. During the first 28 days, daily administration of 0.5 microg of oral calcitriol increased fasting serum 1,25(OH) 2D levels significantly in 9 women (Group B) (p<0.005), while no significant change was seen in another 9 women without calcitriol administration (Group A). The first 28-day calcitriol supplement increased fasting urinary calcium excretion (urinary Ca/Cr) from 0.133 +/- 0.072 to 0.171 +/- 0.089 (p<0.05) and fractional excretion of calcium (FECa) without changing serum Ca2+. Urinary NTx/Cr excretion, an index of bone resorption, decreased significantly from 64.8 +/- 24.5 to 50.3 +/- 27.2 nMBCE/mMCr in Group B. Following the 28-day control period, 0.5 microg of oral calcitriol was also administered to women in Group A for another 20 weeks. At the end of the 24-week investigation period, the effects of oral calcitriol on urinary calcium excretion and bone resorption were still significant in both Group A and B. A positive correlation was found between urinary Ca/Cr and NTx/Cr excretion at the start (r = 0.657, p<0.05), but this correlation was lost by calcitriol treatment (r = 0.135). These results indicated that calcitriol supplement was effective in suppressing bone resorption in postmenopausal women, and that an increased fasting urinary calcium excretion due to calcitriol supplement was predominantly caused by increased intestinal calcium absorption in these women. PMID:14709838

  20. Safety data on 19 vehicles for use in 1?month oral rodent pre-clinical studies: administration of hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin causes renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Healing, Guy; Sulemann, Tabassum; Cotton, Peter; Harris, Jayne; Hargreaves, Adam; Finney, Rowena; Kirk, Sarah; Schramm, Carolin; Garner, Clare; Pivette, Perrine; Burdett, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Potential new drugs are assessed in pre-clinical in vivo studies to determine their safety profiles. The drugs are formulated in vehicles suitable for the route of administration and the physicochemical properties of the drug, aiming to achieve optimal exposure in the test species. The availability of safety data on vehicles is often limited (incomplete data, access restricted/private databases). Nineteen potentially useful vehicles that contained new and/or increased concentrations of excipients and for which little safety data have been published were tested. Vehicles were dosed orally once daily to HanWistar rats for a minimum of 28?days and a wide range of toxicological parameters were assessed. Only 30% (w/v) hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin was found unsuitable owing to effects on liver enzymes (AST, ALT and GLDH), urinary volume and the kidneys (tubular vacuolation and tubular pigment). 20% (v/v) oleic acid caused increased salivation and hence this vehicle should be used with caution. As 40% (v/v) tetraethylene glycol affected urinary parameters, its use should be carefully considered, particularly for compounds suspected to impact the renal system and studies longer than 1?month. There were no toxicologically significant findings with 10% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide, 20% (v/v) propylene glycol, 33% (v/v) Miglyol®812, 20% (w/v) Kolliphor®RH40, 10% (w/v) Poloxamer 407, 5% (w/v) polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 or 10% (v/v) Labrafil®M1944. All other vehicles tested caused isolated or low magnitude effects which would not prevent their use. The aim of sharing these data, including adverse findings, is to provide meaningful information for vehicle selection, thereby avoiding repetition of animal experimentation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25959454

  1. Oral glycopyrrolate for refractory pediatric and adolescent hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Monique G; Foreman, Rebecca S; Berk, David R; Bayliss, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis is a common disorder affecting children and adolescents, and it can have a significant negative psychosocial effect. Treatment for pediatric hyperhidrosis tends to be limited by low efficacy, low adherence, and poor tolerance. Oral glycopyrrolate is emerging as a potential second-line treatment option, but experience with safety, efficacy, and dosing is especially limited in children. We present an institutional review of 12 children with severe, refractory hyperhidrosis treated with oral glycopyrrolate; 11 (92%) noted improvement and 9 (75%) would recommend oral glycopyrrolate to their friends. No significant side effects were noted. Our retrospective analysis suggests that oral glycopyrrolate is safe and effective in children with hyperhidrosis. PMID:24266878

  2. Three-way, three-period, crossover bioequivalence study of single oral dose of three brands of 300 mg phenytoin sodium tablets marketed in India, on healthy Indian human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Maulik S.; Naik, Anuja A.; Mehta, Mohit R.; Gogtay, Nithya J.; Thatte, Urmila M.; Menon, Mala D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the bioavailability of two brands of phenytoin sodium tablets available in the Indian market using Eptoin™ as the reference. Materials and Methods: A randomized, assessor-blind, three-way crossover design study was carried out over a period of 6 months after approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Twenty-two healthy male participants received a single oral 300 mg oral tablet of either of the formulations with a 2-week washout. Blood samples were collected predose and at regular intervals postdose. Plasma phenytoin levels were estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Calculation of Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-? was done by the linear trapezoidal rule and 90-110% margin (90% confidence interval (CI)) was used to assess bioequivalence. Results: Twenty volunteers completed the study. It was seen that the log-transformed values of Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-? of the test formulations were not within the specified limits. Conclusion: Bioinequivalence of available phenytoin brands indicates that switching brands could lead to variations in blood concentrations and thus impact safety and efficacy. If a brand switch is done for any reason, stringent drug-level monitoring is advised. PMID:24250200

  3. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Nicotine oral inhalation is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine oral inhalation should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine inhalation is in a class of medications called ...

  4. Dose-Dependent Adverse Effects of Salinomycin on Male Reproductive Organs and Fertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Olajumoke Omolara; Bhadauria, Smrati; Rath, Srikanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Salinomycin is used as an antibiotic in animal husbandry. Its implication in cancer therapy has recently been proposed. Present study evaluated the toxic effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice. Doses of 1, 3 or 5 mg/kg of Salinomycin were administered daily for 28 days. Half of the mice were sacrificed after 24 h of the last treatment and other half were sacrificed 28 days after withdrawal of treatment. Effects of SAL on body and reproductive organ weights were studied. Histoarchitecture of testis and epididymis was evaluated along with ultrastructural changes in Leydig cells. Serum and testicular testosterone and luteinizing hormones were estimated. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured. Spermatozoa count, morphology, motility and fertility were evaluated. Expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage proteins (CYP11A1) were assessed by Western blotting. Salinomycin treatment was lethal to few mice and retarded body growth in others with decreased weight of testes and seminal vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Seminiferous tubules in testes were disrupted and the epithelium of epididymis showed frequent occurrence of vacuolization and necrosis. Leydig cells showed hypertrophied cytoplasm with shrunken nuclei, condensed mitochondria, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum and increased number of lipid droplets. Salinomycin decreased motility and spermatozoa count with increased number of abnormal spermatozoa leading to infertility. The testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were decreased in testis but increased in serum at higher doses. Depletion of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione with increased lipid peroxidation in both testis and epididymis indicated generation of oxidative stress. Suppressed expression of StAR and CYP11A1 proteins indicates inhibition of steroidogenesis. Spermatogenesis was however observed in testis 28 days after Salinomycin withdrawal. The results indicate reversible dose-dependent adverse effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice. PMID:23840907

  5. An open-label, randomized positron emission tomography (PET) study in healthy male volunteers consisiting of Part A and Part B. Part A: Clinical validation of norepinephrine transporter (NET) PET ligand, (S,S)-[11C]O-methylreboxetine ([11C]MRB) using different doses of oral atomoxetine as NET reuptake inhibitor. Part B: Evaluation of NET occupancy, as measured by [11C]MRB, with multiple dosing regimens of orally administered GSK372475.

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Joanna

    2007-08-31

    Results from human studies with the PET radiotracer (S,S)-[(11)C]O-methyl reboxetine ([(11)C](S,S)-MRB), a ligand targeting the norepinephrine transporter (NET), are reported. Quantification methods were determined from test/retest studies, and sensitivity to pharmacological blockade was tested with different doses of atomoxetine (ATX), a drug that binds to the NET with high affinity (K(i)=2-5 nM). METHODS: Twenty-four male subjects were divided into different groups for serial 90-min PET studies with [(11)C](S,S)-MRB to assess reproducibility and the effect of blocking with different doses of ATX (25, 50 and 100 mg, po). Region-of-interest uptake data and arterial plasma input were analyzed for the distribution volume (DV). Images were normalized to a template, and average parametric images for each group were formed. RESULTS: [(11)C](S,S)-MRB uptake was highest in the thalamus (THL) and the midbrain (MBR) [containing the locus coeruleus (LC)] and lowest for the caudate nucleus (CDT). The CDT, a region with low NET, showed the smallest change on ATX treatment and was used as a reference region for the DV ratio (DVR). The baseline average DVR was 1.48 for both the THL and MBR with lower values for other regions [cerebellum (CB), 1.09; cingulate gyrus (CNG) 1.07]. However, more accurate information about relative densities came from the blocking studies. MBR exhibited greater blocking than THL, indicating a transporter density approximately 40% greater than THL. No relationship was found between DVR change and plasma ATX level. Although the higher dose tended to induce a greater decrease than the lower dose for MBR (average decrease for 25 mg=24+/-7%; 100 mg=31+/-11%), these differences were not significant. The different blocking between MBR (average decrease=28+/- 10%) and THL (average decrease=17+/-10%) given the same baseline DVR indicates that the CDT is not a good measure for non-NET binding in both regions. Threshold analysis of the difference between the average baseline DV image and the average blocked image showed the expected NET distribution with the MBR (LC) and hypothalamus>THL>CNG and CB, as well as a significant change in the supplementary motor area. DVR reproducibility for the different brain regions was approximately 10%, but intersubject variability was large. CONCLUSIONS: The highest density of NETs was found in the MBR where the LC is located, followed by THL, whereas the lowest density was found in basal ganglia (lowest in CDT), consistent with the regional localization of NETs in the nonhuman primate brain. While all three doses of ATX were found to block most regions, no significant differences between doses were found for any region, although the average percent change across subjects of the MBR did correlate with ATX dose. The lack of a dose effect could reflect a low signal-to-noise ratio coupled with the possibility that a sufficient number of transporters were blocked at the lowest dose and further differences could not be detected. However, since the lowest (25 mg) dose is less than the therapeutic doses used in children for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ( approximately 1.0 mg/kg/day), this would suggest that there may be additional targets for ATX's therapeutic actions.

  6. A prospective study of incidence, clinical and quality of life consequences of oral mucositis post palifermin prophylaxis in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sakellari, Ioanna; Angelopoulou, Maria; Tsopra, Olga; Dervenoulas, Ioannis; Tsirigotis, Panagiotis; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Liga, Maria; Tsionos, Konstantinos; Anargyrou, Konstantinos; Pouli, Anastasia; Anagnostopoulos, Achilles

    2015-10-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) has presented a revolutionary advance in the management of hematologic malignancies with low toxicity. However, oral mucositis (OM) remains a distressing toxic effect of AHCT and one of the major side effects of the conditioning. This prospective, observational study aimed to evaluate the severity of oral cavity pain and quality of life (QOL) and explore incidence, duration, and potential risk factors of moderate/severe OM. Thirty-nine patients receiving prophylactic palifermin post-AHCT were enrolled. QOL and severity of pain were assessed using validated questionnaires (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) and mouth and throat soreness (MTS), respectively). The incidence of moderate/severe OM was 28.2 % with a median duration of 5 days and was associated with younger age and female gender. Severity of pain related to OM was generally low or moderate with only 25 % of patients reporting a score >6 on the MTS scale of 0-10 on day +7. Health-related QOL was worse on day +7 in the transplant unit compared to day 1, while on discharge day, all scores recovered and the total FACT-G score was not different from that on day 1. In our population, the incidence and duration of OM and the severity of pain related to OM appeared to be lower compared to that reported in previous studies. The impact of OM on QOL assessments seemed to be reversible with optimal supportive care despite the major transient disabilities mainly attributable to OM. PMID:26141369

  7. Oral iodine supplementation does not reduce neutralizing antibody responses to oral poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Taffs, R. E.; Enterline, J. C.; Rusmil, K.; Muhilal; Suwardi, S. S.; Rustama, D.; Djatnika; Cobra, C.; Semba, R. D.; Cohen, N.; Asher, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a major cause of impaired mental development, goitre, and cretinism in many parts of the world. Because existing immunization programmes can be used to deliver oral iodized oil (OIO) to infants at risk, it was important to know whether OIO could adversely affect the antibody response to vaccines, such as trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in Subang, West Java, Indonesia, in which 617 eight-week-old infants received either OIO or a placebo (poppy-seed oil) during a routine visit for their first dose of OPV as part of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). The infants received two boosters of OPV at 4-week intervals after the first dose, and were followed up when 6 months old. Neutralizing antibody titres to poliovirus serotypes 1, 2, and 3 were compared in serum samples that were taken from 478 of these infants just before the first dose of OPV and at 6 months. It was found that oral iodized oil did not reduce the antibody responses to any of the three serotypes of OPV. These results indicate that oral iodine may safely be delivered to infants at the same time as oral poliovirus vaccine according to current EPI immunization schedules. PMID:10427933

  8. [Oral formulation of choice for children].

    PubMed

    Lajoinie, A; Henin, E; Kassai, B

    2015-08-01

    Selecting the most appropriate oral formulation is very challenging when developing medicines for children and in routine practice. Research in pediatric pharmacology has focused on oral drug formulation, determining whether the active pharmaceutical ingredient can be successfully delivered to children. Pediatric expert committees (EMA, EuFPI) recommend that children's medicines be safe, well tolerated, easy to use (palatable and requiring minimal handling), transportable, easily produced, cost effective, commercially viable, with a minimal impact on children's life-style. Oral liquid drug formulations (OLFs: solutions, syrups, suspensions) are historically considered as the most appropriate oral formulation for children, since they are easy to swallow for younger infants and palatable for children. However, OLFs present numerous disadvantages, such as low stability, potentially toxic excipients for children, and low transportability. In the long-term, dose volume and frequency of administration might lead to non-compliance. Multiple preparation steps and volume calculations are also among risk factors for medicine errors in children. An alternative to OLFs is the conventional solid oral dosage form (OSF), such as tablets and capsules. These offer the advantages of greater stability, easy dose selection, improved transportability, and ease of storage. They also allow the modification of drug pharmacokinetic parameters, minimizing administration frequency. Finally, OSFs are less costly than OLFs, since they are easier to develop, manufacture, transport, store, and deliver. Controlled study results suggest that the use of OSFs in children would be associated with greater acceptability by children, greater preference on the part of caregivers, and higher drug compliance than OLFs. Recent controlled studies, confirming that OSFs with an acceptable size for children (mini-tablets), should shift the current paradigm of OLFs as the reference for children's oral medicine. We lack evidence on OSF acceptability in children and its influence on drug compliance, particularly with appropriate-size OSFs for children. Further investigation on oral formulation should investigate the utilisation of OSFs in young children. Few OSFs are licensed for children under 6 years of age. PMID:26141805

  9. Transcriptional Changes in nAChRs, Interactive Proteins and P450s in Locusta migratoria manilensis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) CNS in Response to High and Low Oral Doses of Imidacloprid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Huahua; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Chuanjun; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    The insect central nervous system (CNS) is the target for many insecticides, and changes in transcript levels could be expected after insecticide applications. In this study, differentially expressed genes in the locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis) CNS in response to imidacloprid treatments at low dose (LD, 10% mortality) and high dose (HD, 80% mortality) were identified. Two nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits genes and 18 interacting protein genes were regulated at LD, and only one nAChR subunit gene and 11 interacting proteins were regulated at HD. Among the 110 annotated P450 unigenes, 43 unigenes were regulated at LD and 34 unigenes were regulated at HD. Most of the differentially expressed P450 unigenes were mapped to CYP4, in which most unigenes were upregulated at LD, but downregulated at HD. Totally, the numbers and regulation levels of the regulated genes were more at LD than that at HD. Seventeen unigenes were selected to test their expression changes following insecticide treatments by qRT-PCR, in which the changes in more than half of the selected genes were verified. The results revealed the variation in the response of locusts to different insecticide pressure, such as different doses. PMID:26180048

  10. Transcriptional Changes in nAChRs, Interactive Proteins and P450s in Locusta migratoria manilensis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) CNS in Response to High and Low Oral Doses of Imidacloprid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Huahua; Zhang, Yixi; Liu, Chuanjun; Liu, Zewen

    2015-01-01

    The insect central nervous system (CNS) is the target for many insecticides, and changes in transcript levels could be expected after insecticide applications. In this study, differentially expressed genes in the locust (Locusta migratoria manilensis) CNS in response to imidacloprid treatments at low dose (LD, 10% mortality) and high dose (HD, 80% mortality) were identified. Two nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits genes and 18 interacting protein genes were regulated at LD, and only one nAChR subunit gene and 11 interacting proteins were regulated at HD. Among the 110 annotated P450 unigenes, 43 unigenes were regulated at LD and 34 unigenes were regulated at HD. Most of the differentially expressed P450 unigenes were mapped to CYP4, in which most unigenes were upregulated at LD, but downregulated at HD. Totally, the numbers and regulation levels of the regulated genes were more at LD than that at HD. Seventeen unigenes were selected to test their expression changes following insecticide treatments by qRT-PCR, in which the changes in more than half of the selected genes were verified. The results revealed the variation in the response of locusts to different insecticide pressure, such as different doses. PMID:26180048

  11. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  12. Oral cleft prevention program (OCPP)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral clefts are one of the most common birth defects with significant medical, psychosocial, and economic ramifications. Oral clefts have a complex etiology with genetic and environmental risk factors. There are suggestive results for decreased risks of cleft occurrence and recurrence with folic acid supplements taken at preconception and during pregnancy with a stronger evidence for higher than lower doses in preventing recurrence. Yet previous studies have suffered from considerable design limitations particularly non-randomization into treatment. There is also well-documented effectiveness for folic acid in preventing neural tube defect occurrence at 0.4 mg and recurrence with 4 mg. Given the substantial burden of clefting on the individual and the family and the supportive data for the effectiveness of folic acid supplementation as well as its low cost, a randomized clinical trial of the effectiveness of high versus low dose folic acid for prevention of cleft recurrence is warranted. Methods/design This study will assess the effect of 4 mg and 0.4 mg doses of folic acid, taken on a daily basis during preconception and up to 3 months of pregnancy by women who are at risk of having a child with nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without palate (NSCL/P), on the recurrence of NSCL/P. The total sample will include about 6,000 women (that either have NSCL/P or that have at least one child with NSCL/P) randomly assigned to the 4 mg and the 0.4 mg folic acid study groups. The study will also compare the recurrence rates of NSCL/P in the total sample of subjects, as well as the two study groups (4mg, 0.4 mg) to that of a historical control group. The study has been approved by IRBs (ethics committees) of all involved sites. Results will be disseminated through publications and presentations at scientific meetings. Discussion The costs related to oral clefts are high, including long term psychological and socio-economic effects. This study provides an opportunity for huge savings in not only money but the overall quality of life. This may help establish more specific clinical guidelines for oral cleft prevention so that the intervention can be better tailored for at-risk women. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00397917 PMID:23181832

  13. Oral Fluid and Plasma Cannabinoid Ratios after Around-the-Clock Controlled Oral ?9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Garry; Schwope, David M.; Schwilke, Eugene W.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Oral fluid (OF) testing is increasingly important for drug treatment, workplace, and drugged-driving programs. There is interest in predicting plasma or whole-blood concentrations from OF concentrations; however, the relationship between these matrices is incompletely characterized because of few controlled drug-administration studies. METHODS Ten male daily cannabis smokers received around-the-clock escalating 20-mg oral ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, dronabinol) doses (40–120 mg/day) for 8 days. Plasma and OF samples were simultaneously collected before, during, and after dosing. OF THC, 11-hydroxy-THC and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) were quantified by GC-MS at 0.5-?g/L, 0.5-?g/L, and 7.5-ng/L limits of quantification (LOQs), respectively. In plasma, the LOQs were 0.25 ?g/L for THC and THCCOOH, and 0.5 ?g/L for 11-hydroxy-THC. RESULTS Despite multiple oral THC administrations each day and increasing plasma THC concentrations, OF THC concentrations generally decreased over time, reflecting primarily previously self-administered smoked cannabis. The logarithms of the THC concentrations in oral fluid and plasma were not significantly correlated (r = ?0.10; P = 0.065). The OF and plasma THCCOOH concentrations, albeit with 1000-fold higher concentrations in plasma, increased throughout dosing. The logarithms of OF and plasma THCCOOH concentrations were significantly correlated (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), although there was high interindividual variation. A high OF/plasma THC ratio and a high OF THC/THCCOOH ratio indicated recent cannabis smoking. CONCLUSIONS OF monitoring does not reliably detect oral dronabinol intake. The time courses of THC and THCCOOH concentrations in plasma and OF were different after repeated oral THC doses, and high inter-individual variation was observed. For these reasons, OF cannabinoid concentrations cannot predict concurrent plasma concentrations. PMID:21875944

  14. Pharmacokinetics and cell trafficking dynamics of 2-amino-2-[2-(4-octylphenyl)ethyl]propane-1,3-diol hydrochloride (FTY720) in cynomolgus monkeys after single oral and intravenous doses.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongshan; Meno-Tetang, Guy M L; Chiba, Kenji; Arima, Noriyuki; Heining, Peter; Jusko, William J

    2002-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics and cell trafficking dynamics of 2-amino-2-[2-(4-octylphenyl)ethyl]propane-1,3-diol hydrochloride (FTY720), a novel immunosuppressive agent, were examined in cynomolgus monkeys (three males and three females). After single doses of 0.1 mg/kg p.o. or i.v. bolus and 1 mg/kg p.o. were administered to the animals, the concentrations of FTY720, and the numbers of lymphocytes, CD20+CD2-B cells, and CD2+CD20-T cells in blood were measured over 23 days. A linear three-compartment model characterized the time course of FTY720 concentrations with a terminal half-life of about 31 h, clearance of about 0.53 l/h/kg, and bioavailability of about 38%. The dynamic responses were not area under the curve (or dose) proportional for either males or females. An indirect response model with a distribution pool captured the cell trafficking data for all doses for each cell type, where initial blood counts (R(0)) were about 7650, 2100, and 5250 cells/microl; maximum fractional inhibition (I(max)) about 0.88, 0.85, and 0.91; influx (k(in)) about 6014, 1312, and 5662 cells/microl/h; efflux (k(out)) about 0.798, 0.555, and 1.08 h(-1); intercompartmental k(cp) about 0.134, 0.192, and 0.082 h(-1); and intercompartmental k(pc) rate constants about 3.9 x 10(-4), and 0.016 and 8.9 x 10(-6) h(-1) for lymphocytes, B cells, and T cells, respectively. The inhibition concentration IC(50) was about 0.48 microg/l for all cells, which was remarkably low. The apparent distribution volumes of peripheral pool (V(p)) were markedly larger than blood volume (V(b)) for all cells. The I(max) for cell trafficking was achieved at doses smaller than that producing graft protection, indicating stronger central than peripheral effects of this drug. The profound cell trafficking effects of FTY720 can be readily captured and interpreted with an extended indirect response model. PMID:11961052

  15. Oral Calcidiol Is More Effective Than Cholecalciferol Supplementation to Reach Adequate 25(OH)D Levels in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases Chronically Treated with Low Doses of Glucocorticoids: A “Real-Life” Study

    PubMed Central

    Ortego-Jurado, Miguel; Callejas-Rubio, José-Luis; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; González-Moreno, Juan; González Ramírez, Amanda Rocío; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the cornerstone of the therapy in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, it is well known that their use is a double edged sword, as their beneficial effects are associated almost universally with unwanted effects, as, for example glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO). Over the last years, several clinical practice guidelines emphasize the need of preventing bone mass loss and reduce the incidence of fractures associated with GC use. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation, as adjunctive therapy, are included in all the practice guidelines. However, no standard vitamin D dose has been established. Several studies with postmenopausal women show that maintaining the levels above 30–33?ng/mL help improve the response to bisphosphonates. It is unknown if the response is the same in GIO, but in the clinical practice the levels are maintained at around the same values. In this study we demonstrate that patients with autoimmune diseases, undergoing glucocorticoid therapy, often present suboptimal 25(OH)D levels. Patients with higher body mass index and those receiving higher doses of glucocorticoids are at increased risk of having lower levels of 25(OH)D. In these patients, calcidiol supplementations are more effective than cholecalciferol to reach adequate 25(OH)D levels. PMID:26124976

  16. Allison Oral History

    E-print Network

    Albin, Tami; Allison

    2014-03-13

    Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer People in Kansas Allison Oral History Interviewed by Tami Albin August 23, 2009 http://hdl.handle.net/1808.../13171 This interview was made possible by the generous support of the University of Kansas Libraries and the University of Kansas grants 2302114, 2301283, 2301334. © Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Queer...

  17. Mechanisms of Oral Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P

    2015-12-01

    Oral tolerance is an active process of local and systemic immune unresponsiveness to orally ingested antigens such as food. The gut immune system must balance responses to commensal bacteria (microbiome), innocuous antigens, and pathogens. Although it is clear that specialized populations of immune cells and lymph nodes create a unique environment in the gut, there remains evidence to suggest that systemic effector sites also are critical to establishing and maintaining oral tolerance. PMID:26456448

  18. George Paris Oral History

    E-print Network

    Paris, George; Albin, Tami

    2010-01-11

    Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas George Paris Oral History Part 1 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 2 video platform video management video solutionsvideo player Part 3 video platform video management video... platform video management video solutionsvideo player Return to George Paris's Oral History in KU ScholarWorks Tami Albin, Director for Under the Rainbow: Oral Histories of GLBTQ People in Kansas Anschutz Library University of Kansas 1301 Hoch...

  19. Novel oral anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    How, Choon How

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is effective in preventing primary and secondary thromboembolic events due to atrial fibrillation. Warfarin, which was approved by the United States in 1954, was the only long-term oral anticoagulation therapy till the approval of dabigatran in 2010, and of rivaroxaban and other direct factor Xa inhibitors from 2011, forming a group known as novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC). NOAC have fewer food and drug interactions compared to warfarin; hence, the patient will require fewer clinic visits. However, the short half-life of NOAC means that twice-a-day dosing is needed and there is higher risk of a prothrombotic state when doses are missed. Other disadvantages are the lack of long-term data on NOAC, their high cost and the current lack of locally available antidotes. PMID:26702159

  20. [Oral precancer and cancer].

    PubMed

    López-López, José; Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed the concept of oral precancerous lesions, oral cancer, and the possibility of early diagnosis. With the keywords: premalignant oral lesions prevention, a search was performed over the past 10 years. Also clinical trials are searched from January 2011 until today with the keywords: oral cancer prevention AND dentistry. It is emphasized that there can be no significant changes related to the concept of precancerous lesions and cancer, and those relating to the early diagnosis. Despite the numerous described methods of screening, biopsy remains the most useful test, and therefore it is essential, mainly if we consider the new possibilities of molecular studies. PMID:25638423

  1. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentered trial of the efficacy of a single dose of live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR in preventing cholera following challenge with Vibrio cholerae O1 El tor inaba three months after vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tacket, C O; Cohen, M B; Wasserman, S S; Losonsky, G; Livio, S; Kotloff, K; Edelman, R; Kaper, J B; Cryz, S J; Giannella, R A; Schiff, G; Levine, M M

    1999-12-01

    CVD 103-HgR is a live oral cholera vaccine strain constructed by deleting 94% of the gene for the enzymatically active A subunit of cholera toxin from classical Inaba Vibrio cholerae O1 569B; the strain also contains a mercury resistance gene as an identifying marker. This vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic in double-blind, controlled studies and was protective in open-label studies of volunteers challenged with V. cholerae O1. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study of vaccine efficacy was designed to test longer-term protection of CVD 103-HgR against moderate and severe El Tor cholera in U.S. volunteers. A total of 85 volunteers (50 at the University of Maryland and 35 at Children's Hospital Medical Center/University of Cincinnati) were recruited for vaccination and challenge with wild-type V. cholerae El Tor Inaba. Volunteers were randomized in a double-blind manner to receive, with buffer, a single oral dose of either CVD 103-HgR (2 x 10(8) to 8 x 10(8) CFU) or placebo (killed E. coli K-12). About 3 months after immunization, 51 of these volunteers were orally challenged with 10(5) CFU of virulent V. cholerae O1 El Tor Inaba strain N16961, prepared from a standardized frozen inoculum. Ninety-one percent of the vaccinees had a >/=4-fold rise in serum vibriocidal antibodies after vaccination. After challenge, 9 (39%) of the 23 placebo recipients and 1 (4%) of the 28 vaccinees had moderate or severe diarrhea (>/=3-liter diarrheal stool) (P < 0.01; protective efficacy, 91%). A total of 21 (91%) of 23 placebo recipients and 5 (18%) of 28 vaccinees had any diarrhea (P < 0.001; protective efficacy, 80%). Peak stool V. cholerae excretion among placebo recipients was 1.1 x 10(7) CFU/g and among vaccinees was 4.9 x 10(2) CFU/g (P < 0.001). This vaccine could therefore be a safe and effective tool to prevent cholera in travelers. PMID:10569747

  2. A 6-Week Oral Toxicity Study of Oral Cholera Vaccine in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Yeong-Ok; Choi, Seuk-Keun; Shin, Seo-Ho; Koo, Kyo-Hwan; Choi, Ho-Young; Cha, Seung-Bum; Li, Yong-Chun; Yoo, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Joo-Young; Kil, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Hak-Soo; Kang, Min-Soo; Kang, Boo-Hyun; Kim, Kap-Ho

    2012-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the toxicity and target organs of oral cholera vaccine (OCV) after repeated oral administration in Sprague-Dawley rats for 6 weeks (3 administrations, once every 2 weeks). OCV is an inactivated oral cholera vaccine that contains Vibrio cholerae and confers protection against cholera caused by V. cholera serogroups O1 (Inaba and Ogawa serotypes) and O139 (strain 4260B). The animals were orally administered either OCV placebo (negative control) or OCV at a dose equivalent to 240 times the anticipated human dose. Throughout the administration period, no significant change was detected in clinical signs, body weight, food or water consumption, urinalysis results, hematological and clinical biochemistry test results, organ weights, necropsy, or histopathological examination results. Minor changes were found in hematological and clinical biochemistry tests; however, these changes were within normal ranges. The above results suggest that oral administration of OCV in rats did not induce any toxicologically meaningful changes, and the target organs could not be determined. This study was conducted in accordance with the guidelines established by Good Laboratory Practice (2009-183, KFDA, December 22, 2009) and the OECD Principles of Good Laboratory Practice (1997). PMID:24278614

  3. [Single and 13-week oral toxicity study of fucoxanthin oil from microalgae in rats].

    PubMed

    Iio, Kumiko; Okada, Yumika; Ishikura, Masaharu

    2011-01-01

    Single oral dose and 13-week oral subchronic toxicity studies of fucoxanthin-containing oil extracted from microalga, Chaetoseros sp., were conducted in rats. In the single oral dose study, no mortality and no change related to the test material were observed. Thus, the 50% lethal dose of microalgal fucoxanthin oil is more than 2,000 mg/kg body weight. In the 13-week oral dose study, 0, 20 or 200 mg/kg body weight of microalgal fucoxanthin oil was administered. The fucoxanthin-administered groups, showed no mortality and no abnormalities. This result suggested that the no-observed-adverse-effect level of fucoxanthin-containing oil extracted from microalga Chaetoseros sp. was 200 mg/kg body weight under the tested subchronic dose condition. PMID:21720124

  4. Distribution of oral ketoconazole to vaginal tissue.

    PubMed

    Heykants, J J; Woestenborghs, R J; Bisschop, M P; Merkus, J M

    1982-10-01

    Plasma samples and biopsies of vaginal tissue were obtained from 23 healthy women undergoing operative sterilization, 1 to 6 h after a single oral dose of ketoconazole 200 mg. Drug concentrations in plasma and tissue, were measured by a specific gas chromatographic method. The vaginal tissue concentration averaged 2.4 times less than the corresponding plasma levels. Equilibrium between tissue, and plasma was established within 1 h after dosing, when vaginal tissue levels exceeded 1 microgram/g. Ketoconazole concentrations decayed monoexponentially over the time interval studied (1-6h), with the similar half-lives of 1.2 and 1.4 H in plasma and tissue, respectively. Following an oral 200 mg dose, a tissue concentration not less than 0.01 microgram/ml was maintained over a 12 h period. This concentration has been shown to prevent outgrowth of the invasive (pseudo) mycelial form of Candida albicans. Hence, a b.i.d. or t.i.d. dosage schedule of ketoconazole in vaginal candidosis would give continuously effective levels at the site of infection. Ketoconazole concentrations in vaginal fluid are thought to be much higher than in the tissue because of ion-trapping. The present data may explain the efficacy of oral ketoconazole in the treatment of vaginal candidosis. PMID:6293835

  5. Oral oocyst-induced mouse model of toxoplasmosis: Effect of infection with Toxoplasma gondii strains of different genotypes, dose, and mouse strains (transgenic, out-bred, in-bred) on pathogenesis and mortality

    PubMed Central

    DUBEY, J.P.; FERREIRA, L. R.; MARTINS, J.; MCLEOD, RIMA

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Humans and other hosts acquire Toxoplasma gondii infection by ingesting tissue cysts in undercooked meat, or by food or drink contaminated with oocysts. Currently, there is no vaccine to prevent clinical disease due this parasite in humans, although, various T. gondii vaccine candidates are being developed. Mice are generally used to test the protective efficacy of vaccines because they are susceptible, reagents are available to measure immune parameters, in mice, and they are easily managed in the laboratory. In the present study, pathogenesis of toxoplasmosis was studied in mice of different strains, including Human leukocyte antigen(HLA) transgenic mice infected with different doses of T. gondii strains of different genotypes derived from several countries. Based on many experiments, the decreasing order of infectivity and pathogenicity of oocysts was: interferon gamma gene knock out (KO), HLA 3.11, HLA 2.1, HLA B7, Swiss Webster, C57/black, and BALB/c. Mice fed as few as 1 oocyst of Type I and several atypical strains died of acute toxoplasmosis within 21 days p.i. Type II, and III strains were less virulent. The model developed herein should prove to be extremely useful for testing vaccines because it is possible to accurately quantitate a challenge inoculum, test response to different strains of T. gondii using the same preparations of oocysts which are stable for up to a year, and to have highly reproducible responses to the infection. PMID:22078010

  6. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Kumar, Vivek; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate) and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  7. Tongue piercing (oral body art).

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Chen, M

    1994-02-01

    Oral body art is a relatively recent fashion in the West where jewelry is inserted in the oral soft tissues. A patient who had tongue-piercing is presented, and the subject of oral piercing reviewed. PMID:8136338

  8. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 5, 2016 AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands We ...

  9. Thrush (Oral Candidiasis) in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A A A In oral candidiasis, normal mouth yeast overgrows, causing white, slightly elevated lesions. Overview Thrush ( ... candidiasis), also known as oral moniliasis, is a yeast infection of the mouth or throat (the oral ...

  10. Oral Melanotic Macule

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral melanotic macule appears as a solitary, flat, tan-to-dark-brown spot usually less than 7 mm in diameter. It has a well-defined border and a uniform color. People can have more than one oral melanotic macule. Self-Care Guidelines There are no self-care measures ...

  11. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17 "chistes" (jokes), 1…

  12. Preclinical toxicity profile of oral bilastine.

    PubMed

    Lucero, María Luisa; Arteche, Joseba K; Sommer, E W; Casadesus, Agustín

    2012-06-01

    As part of the bilastine development program, and as mandated by regulatory authorities, several studies were performed with oral bilastine in different animal species to evaluate its toxicity profile. Toxicokinetic analyses conducted in tandem to evaluate systemic exposure, gender differences, and dose proportionality in the different animal species indicated that animals were systemically exposed to bilastine during treatment. Repeated-dose toxicity studies in beagle dogs (52 weeks) and in rats and mice (13 weeks) showed that bilastine at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg/day was not associated with any mortality, ocular effects, or nodules/masses. Likewise, no bilastine-associated neoplastic lesions were observed in rats and mice after 104 weeks of treatment with bilastine at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg/day. In general, bilastine-related clinical signs, body-weight changes, food consumption, clinical chemistry, haematology, and macro- and microscopic findings were of low order and reversible, with effects present only at the highest doses administered. Bilastine (up to 1,000 mg/kg/day) was well tolerated in pregnant/lactating rats and in their offspring and subsequent generations. With respect to effects on embryofoetal development in rabbits, bilastine at 400 mg/kg/day (the highest dose evaluated) was assessed to be the no observed adverse effects level. Overall, bilastine demonstrated a favorable toxicity profile in all animal models investigated and at higher doses than the corresponding recommended daily human dosage. PMID:22616813

  13. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Oral cavity cancer, or just ... parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  14. Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePLUS

    Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know Oral chemo is any drug you take by mouth to treat cancer. ... be ready for oral chemo. What is oral chemotherapy? There are many types of chemotherapy (chemo). Oral ...

  15. Assessment of the mutagenic potential of Cr(VI) in the oral mucosa of Big Blue® transgenic F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Young, Robert R; Suh, Mina; Dinesdurage, Harshini R; Elbekai, Reem H; Harris, Mark A; Rohr, Annette C; Proctor, Deborah M

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water was associated with an increased incidence of oral tumors in F344 rats in a 2-year cancer bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. These tumors primarily occurred at 180 ppm Cr(VI) and appeared to originate from the gingival mucosa surrounding the upper molar teeth. To investigate whether these tumors could have resulted from a mutagenic mode of action (MOA), a transgenic mutation assay based on OECD Test Guideline 488 was conducted in Big Blue(®) TgF344 rats. The mutagenic oral carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) served as a positive control. Mutant frequency was measured in the inner gingiva with adjacent palate, and outer gingiva with adjacent buccal tissue. Exposure to 10 ppm 4-NQO in drinking water for 28 days increased mutant frequency in the cII transgene significantly, from 39.1?±?7.5 × 10(-6) to 688?±?250 × 10(-6) in the gingival/buccal region, and from 49.8?±?17.8 × 10(-6) to 1818?±?362 × 10(-6) in the gingival/palate region. Exposure to 180 ppm Cr(VI) in drinking water for 28 days did not significantly increase the mutant frequency in the gingival/buccal (44.4?±?25.4 × 10(-6)) or the gingival/palate (57.8?±?9.1 × 10(-6)) regions relative to controls. These data indicate that high (?180,000 times expected human exposure), tumorigenic concentrations of Cr(VI) did not significantly increase mutations in the gingival epithelium, and suggest that Cr(VI) does not act by a mutagenic MOA in the rat oral cavity. PMID:26010270

  16. Stuttering and oral stereognosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, R R; Lawrence, B A; Haroldson, S K; Gunderson, D

    1981-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate oral stereognostic performance of stutterers. In Exp. I, stutterers and controls responded "same"--"different" to two oral forms placed successively on their tongues. In Exp. II, stutterers and controls underwent two procedures. For half the items, the task was the same as in Exp. I; for the other half, subjects were presented a single form and visually identified that form from among others on a placard. In both experiments, stutterers made significantly more oral stereognostic errors than did their matched controls. PMID:7290864

  17. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant rabies vaccine strain (ERAG3G) induces complete protection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose New rabies vaccine bait for both pets and raccoon dogs residing in Korea is needed to eradicate rabies infection among animals. In this study, we constructed a recombinant rabies virus (RABV), the ERAG3G strain, using a reverse genetics system. Then we investigated the efficacy of this strain in mice after oral administration and the safety of this strain in cats after intramuscular administration. Materials and Methods The ERAG3G strain was rescued in BHK/T7-9 cells using the full-length genome mutated at the amino acid position 333 of the glycoprotein gene of RABV and helper plasmids. Four-week-old mice underwent one or two oral administrations of the ERAG3G strain and were challenged with the highly virulent RABV strain CVSN2c 14 days after the second administration. Clinical symptoms were observed and body weights were measured every day after the challenge. Results All mice showed complete protection against virulent RABV. In addition, cats intramuscularly inoculated with the ERAG3G strain showed high antibody titers ranging from 2.62 to 23.9 IU/mL at 28-day postinoculation. Conclusion The oral immunization of the ERAG3G strain plays an important role in conferring complete protection in mice, and intramuscular inoculation of the ERAG3G strain induces the formation of anti-rabies neutralizing antibody in cats. PMID:25648184

  18. Oral sex and oral health: An enigma in itself

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Tarun; Puri, Gagan; Aravinda, Konidena; Arora, Neha; Patil, Deepa; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active couples of various age groups, including male-female and same-gender adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus, and analingus. Oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital infections from one site in body to the other. Oral health has a direct correlation on the transmission of infection; a cut in the mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of life-threatening infections. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues, and oral hygiene and dental issues. The ulcerations or unhealthy periodontium in mouth accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus, consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex. PMID:26692602

  19. A less stressful alternative to oral gavage for pharmacological and toxicological studies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mary K.; Boberg, Jason R.; Walsh, Mary T.; Wolf, Valerie; Trujillo, Alisha; Duke, Melissa Skelton; Palme, Rupert

    2012-04-01

    Oral gavage dosing can induce stress and potentially confound experimental measurements, particularly when blood pressure and heart rate are endpoints of interest. Thus, we developed a pill formulation that mice would voluntarily consume and tested the hypothesis that pill dosing would be significantly less stressful than oral gavage. C57Bl/6 male mice were singly housed and on four consecutive days were exposed to an individual walking into the room (week 1, control), a pill being placed into the cage (week 2), and a dose of water via oral gavage (week 3). Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded by radiotelemetry continuously for 5 h after treatment, and feces collected 6–10 h after treatment for analysis of corticosterone metabolites. Both pill and gavage dosing significantly increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) during the first hour, compared to control. However, the increase in MAP was significantly greater after gavage and remained elevated up to 5 h, while MAP returned to normal within 2 h after a pill. Neither pill nor gavage dosing significantly increased heart rate during the first hour, compared to control; however, pill dosing significantly reduced heart rate while gavage significantly increased heart rate 2–5 h post dosing. MAP and heart rate did not differ 24 h after dosing. Lastly, only gavage dosing significantly increased fecal corticosterone metabolites, indicating a systemic stress response via activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. These data demonstrated that this pill dosing method of mice is significantly less stressful than oral gavage. -- Highlights: ? Developed a novel oral dosing method using a pill that mice will readily consume. ? Assessed stress by blood pressure, heart rate, and fecal corticosterone metabolites. ? Demonstrated that pill dosing is significantly less stressful than oral gavage.

  20. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development (autonomy, self-esteem, locus of control), life expectations (marriage, college, career), dating behavior, age at 1st intercourse, perceived risk for becoming pregnant, personal attributes (sex, birth control, acquisition of birth control, pregnancy, parents' and peers' feelings toward sex and birth control), and previous experiences with birth control. PMID:1679420

  1. Oral Communications: Survey and Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyllie, James

    1980-01-01

    Argues that oral communication is important in business but is rarely taught in business communication courses. Provides five suggestions to teachers of oral communication: teach organization, teach different types of oral communication, offer training in the use of visual aids, use cassettes or videotape, and stress functional oral communication.…

  2. David Nelson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Nelson, David; Gadd-Nelson, Rachel

    2009-10-31

    Oral history interview with David Nelson conducted by Rachel Gadd-Nelson in Kansas City, Kansas, on October 31, 2009. In this interview, David Nelson discusses his journey from his childhood experiences in the Swedish Lutheran church in Burdick...

  3. Glenn Lindell Oral History

    E-print Network

    Lindell, Glenn; Caton, Jeffrey

    2009-10-24

    Oral history interview with Glenn Lindell conducted by Jeffrey Caton in Johnson County, Kansas, on October 24, 2009. In this interview, Glen Lindell, pastor emeritus of the Hillcrest Covenant Church in Prairie Village, Kansas, discusses his training...

  4. Brandon Brillhart Oral History

    E-print Network

    Brillhart, Brandon; Stratton, Emily

    2013-07-18

    Oral history interview with Brandon Brillhart conducted by Emily Stratton in Lawrence, Kansas, on July 18, 2013. This interview features Brandon Brillhart, the founder and lead pastor of Relevate Church. Relevate Church was planted in Lawrence...

  5. Jan Helmer Oral History

    E-print Network

    Helmer, Jan; Helmer, Lauren

    2010-12-29

    Oral history interview with Jan Helmer conducted by Lauren Helmer in Marion, Kansas, on December 29, 2010. In this interview, Jan Helmer discusses her recollections of attending Valley Methodist Church in Marion, Kansas, including youth group...

  6. Molly Marshall Oral History

    E-print Network

    Marshall, Molly; Hobson, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Oral history interview with Molly Marshall conducted by Katie Hobson on July 02, 2015. This interview features the president at Central Baptist Theological Seminary in Shawnee, Kansas. Questions address President Marshall's experiences...

  7. Kansas Lawsonians Oral History

    E-print Network

    Mook, John; Mook, Paula; Hunergaaurd, George; Reeve, Jamie

    2009-12-08

    Oral history interview with John and Paula Mook and George Hunergaaurd conducted by Jamie Reeve in Wichita, Kansas, on December 8, 2009. In this interview, John and Paul Mook and George Hunergaaurd discuss the biography of Alfred Lawson, the history...

  8. Flunisolide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Flunisolide oral inhalation is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma in adults ... Flunisolide comes as an aerosol to inhale by mouth. It usually is inhaled twice daily. Try to ...

  9. Beclomethasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Beclomethasone comes as an aerosol to inhale by mouth using an inhaler. It usually is inhaled twice ... doctor about how you should use your other oral and inhaled medications for asthma during your treatment ...

  10. Pentobarbital Oral and Rectal

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as a capsule and liquid to take by mouth and as a suppository to be used rectally. ... Grisactin), medications for depression or seizures, metronidazole (Flagyl), oral contraceptives, propranolol (Inderal), quinidine, rifampin, sedatives, sleeping pills, ...

  11. Ciclesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePLUS

    Ciclesonide oral inhalation is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma in adults ... Ciclesonide comes as an aerosol to inhale by mouth using an inhaler. Ciclesonide is usually inhaled twice ...

  12. Leona Anderson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Leona; Gadd-Nelson, Rachel

    2009-09-18

    Oral history interview with Leona Anderson conducted by Rachel Gadd-Nelson in Burdick, Kansas, on September 18, 2009. In this interview, Leona Anderson discusses her experiences as a member of the Missouri Synod Lutheran ...

  13. Joseph Luben Oral History

    E-print Network

    Luben, Joseph; Manning, Sean

    2009-11-05

    Oral history interview with Joseph Luben conducted by Sean Manning in Overland Park, Kansas, on November 5, 2009. In this interview, Joseph Luben discusses being raised with both Pentecostal and Jewish influences in Galena, Kansas. He also describes...

  14. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in the rate of occurrence of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. There are two distinct pathways by which most ... If you add the sub category of laryngeal throat cancers, the rates of occurrence (about 12,000 additional ...

  15. Gene Carlson Oral History

    E-print Network

    Carlson, Gene; Shriner, Clint

    2009-12-10

    Oral history interview with Gene Carlson conducted by Clint Shriner on December 10, 2009. In this interview, Gene Carlson, lead pastor at Westlink Christian Church, discusses the formative experiences that resulted in his decision to join...

  16. Intra-oral cone radiation therapy for selected carcinomas of the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.C.; Doppke, K.P.; Biggs, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    A study of 101 patients with early carcinomas of the oral cavity, T1 and T2, treated by external cobalt 60 beam and/or intra-oral cone (IOC) radiation therapy between 1964 through 1980 was made. The two year disease-free survival rate, including surgical salvage, was 88% and the local control rate was 85%. The incidence of radiation complications, i.e., soft tissue ulceration and/or osteoradionecrosis, was 14% and varied with various tumor sites and radiation doses delivered. The present review shows that local control and radiation complications are closely related to radiation doses and varies with different tumor sites of the oral cavity. Radiation therapy dosages expressed in terms of TDF values for these lesions are herein recommended. With proper selections of lesions arising from the oral cavity, combined external beam and IOC radiation therapy has been found extremely efficacious in achieving good local tumor control and high survival rates with excellent cosmetic and functional results and minimum radiation sequalae.

  17. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  18. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  19. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  20. Citraturic response to oral citric acid load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Alpern, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    It is possible that some orally administered citrate may appear in urine by escaping oxidation in vivo. To determine whether this mechanism contributes to the citraturic response to potassium citrate, we measured serum and urinary citrate for 4 hours after a single oral load of citric acid (40 mEq.) in 6 normal subjects. Since citric acid does not alter acid-base balance, the effect of absorbed citrate could be isolated from that of alkali load. Serum citrate concentration increased significantly (p less than 0.05) 30 minutes after a single oral dose of citric acid and remained significantly elevated for 3 hours after citric acid load. Commensurate with this change, urinary citrate excretion peaked at 2 hours and gradually decreased during the next 2 hours after citric acid load. In contrast, serum and urinary citrate remained unaltered following the control load (no drug). Differences of the citratemic and citraturic effects between phases were significant (p less than 0.05) at 2 and 3 hours. Urinary pH, carbon dioxide pressure, bicarbonate, total carbon dioxide and ammonium did not change at any time after citric acid load, and did not differ between the 2 phases. No significant difference was noted in serum electrolytes, arterialized venous pH and carbon dioxide pressure at any time after citric acid load and between the 2 phases. Thus, the citraturic and citratemic effects of oral citric acid are largely accountable by provision of absorbed citrate, which has escaped in vivo degradation.

  1. Benzydamine Oral Spray Inhibiting Parasympathetic Function of Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Benzydamine is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents agent with anti-inflammatory and local anesthesia properties that is available in the entire world as an oral spray for oral mucositis patients who are suffering from radiation effects. The effect of benzydamine on oral mucositis in vivo is well known; however, the effect of the drug on tracheal smooth muscle has rarely been explored. During administration of the benzydamine for oral symptoms, it might affect the trachea via oral intake or inhalation. Methods We examined the effectiveness of benzydamine on isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle. The following assessments of benzydamine were performed: effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; effect on contraction caused by 10-6M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; and effect of the drug on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. Results Addition of methacholine to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of benzydamine at doses of 10-5M or above elicited a significant relaxation response to 10-6M methacholine-induced contraction. Benzydamine could inhibit electrical field stimulation-induced spike contraction. It alone had a minimal effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. Conclusion This study indicated that high concentrations of benzydamine might actually inhibit parasympathetic function of the trachea. Benzydamine might reduce asthma attacks in oral mucositis patients because it could inhibit parasympathetic function and reduce methacholine-induced contraction of tracheal smooth muscle. PMID:25729498

  2. Treatment of oral soft tissues benign tumors using laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, Bogdan; Baciut, Mihaela; Crisan, Liana; Bran, Simion; Rotar, Horatiu; Dinu, Cristian; Moldovan, Iuliu; Baciut, Grigore

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the efficacy and indications of surgical laser therapy in the treatment of oral soft tissues benign tumors compared to classic surgery. A controlled clinical study was conducted in a group of 93 patients presenting various forms of oral soft tissues benign tumors. These patients were examined pre-and postoperatively and the oral benign tumors were measured linearly and photographed. The surgery of laser-assisted biopsy excision of oral benign tumors was carried out using a diode laser device of 980 nm. In patients who received surgical laser treatment, therapeutic doses of laser to biostimulate the operated area were administered on the first day after the surgery. The interventions of conventional excision of oral soft tissues benign tumors consisted in removing them using scalpel. In patients who have received therapeutic doses of laser for biostimulation of the operated area, a faster healing of wound surfaces and tumor bed was observed during the first days after surgery. Two weeks after the surgical treatment, good healing without scarring or discomfort in the area of excision was documented. Surgical treatment of oral soft tissues benign tumors with laser assisted postoperative therapy confirms the benefits of this surgical procedure. A faster healing process of the excision area due to laser biostimulation of low intensity has been observed in patients with surgical laser assisted treatment in the postoperative period.

  3. DISTRIBUTION OF ORALLY ADMINISTERED CHRYSOTILE ASBESTOS IN NEWBORN BABOON BODY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of transmission electron microscopic analyses for asbestos in ten organs of the newborn baboon which was orally administered chrysotile asbestos. The feeding period consisted of nine days with a cumulative dose of 3 x10 to the 13th power chrysotil...

  4. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity...

  5. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity...

  6. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity...

  7. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity...

  8. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... radioactivity following oral or dermal administration and total excretion following intravenous administration... repeated dosing study, shall be terminated at 7 days or after at least 90 percent of the radioactivity...

  9. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

  10. Therapeutic time window and dose response of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Strong, Roger; Sharma, Sushil; Brenneman, Miranda; Mallikarjunarao, Kasam; Xi, Xiaopei; Grotta, James C; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Savitz, Sean I

    2011-06-01

    Although mononuclear cells (MNCs) from bone marrow are being investigated in phase I clinical trials in stroke patients, dose response, therapeutic time window, and biodistribiton have not been well-characterized in animal stroke models. Long Evans rats underwent common carotid artery/middle cerebral artery occlusion (CCA/MCAo) and 24 hr later were randomized to receive saline IV or a bone marrow aspiration followed by an IV infusion of autologous separated MNCs (1 million, 10 million, or 30 million cells/kg). In another experiment, rats underwent CCAo/MCAo and were randomized at 24 hr, 72 hr, or 7 days after stroke to receive a saline injection or 10 million/kg MNCs. All animals were evaluated on the cylinder and corner tests up to 28 days. MNCs were tracked using Q-dot nanocrystals to monitor biodistribution. Animals treated with MNCs at 10 million and 30 million cells/kg at 24 hr after stroke had significant reductions in neurological deficits and lesion size compared with saline controls or animals treated with 1 million cells/kg. There was no difference in neurological deficits in the 10 and 30 million cell/kg groups at 28 days. Animals treated with MNCs at 72 hr but not at 7 days showed a significant reduction in neurological deficits by 28 days. Labeled MNCs were found in the brain, spleen, lung, liver, and kidney at 1 hr and exponentially decreased over the ensuing week. In conclusion, we found a maximum reduction in neurological deficits at 10 and 30 million cells/kg and a therapeutic time window up to 72 hr after stroke. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21412816

  11. Development and validation of an assay to detect porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus-specific neutralizing antibody titers in pig oral fluid samples.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Kang; Binjawadagi, Basavaraj; Kittawornrat, Apisit; Olsen, Chris; Hiremath, Jagadish; Elkalifa, Nadia; Schleappi, Rose; Wu, Jianmin; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J

    2013-08-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA) are important for clearing the virus. Pen-based pig oral fluid samples for disease surveillance are gaining in importance due to the ease of collection and low cost. The aim of this study was to develop a PRRSV-specific NA assay to determine NA titers in pig oral fluid samples. At first, we standardized the PRRSV NA assay using pen-based pig oral fluid samples collected over a period of 3 months from a herd of swine that received a PRRSV modified live vaccine (PRRS-MLV), and we also used oral fluid and serum samples collected from individual boars that were vaccinated with PRRS-MLV or infected with a virulent PRRSV strain. Our results suggest that a PRRSV NA titer of >8 in oral fluid samples is virus specific and can be detected beginning at 28 days after vaccination or infection. To validate the assay, we used 104 pen-based pig oral fluid and five representative serum samples from each pen of unknown history, as well as 100 serum samples from repeatedly vaccinated sows and oral fluid samples of their respective litters belonging to four different swine-breeding farms. Our results demonstrated that PRRSV NA titers in oral fluid samples are correlated with serum sample titers, and maternally derived PRRSV-specific NA titers could be detected in litters at the time of weaning. In conclusion, we have standardized and validated the pig oral fluid-based PRRSV NA assay, which has 94.3% specificity and 90.5% repeatability. The assay can be used to monitor herd immunity against PRRSV in vaccinated and infected herds of swine. PMID:23784856

  12. Effects of tetrahydrouridine on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral decitabine

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Donald; Vaitkus, Kestis; Ling, Yonghua; Ruiz, Maria A.; Mahfouz, Reda; Ng, Kwok Peng; Negrotto, Soledad; Smith, Nicola; Terse, Pramod; Engelke, Kory J.; Covey, Joseph; Chan, Kenneth K.; DeSimone, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The deoxycytidine analog decitabine (DAC) can deplete DNA methyl-transferase 1 (DNMT1) and thereby modify cellular epigenetics, gene expression, and differentiation. However, a barrier to efficacious and accessible DNMT1-targeted therapy is cytidine deaminase, an enzyme highly expressed in the intestine and liver that rapidly metabolizes DAC into inactive uridine counterparts, severely limiting exposure time and oral bioavailability. In the present study, the effects of tetrahydrouridine (THU), a competitive inhibitor of cytidine deaminase, on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral DAC were evaluated in mice and nonhuman primates. Oral administration of THU before oral DAC extended DAC absorption time and widened the concentration-time profile, increasing the exposure time for S-phase–specific depletion of DNMT1 without the high peak DAC levels that can cause DNA damage and cytotoxicity. THU also decreased interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics seen with DAC alone. One potential clinical application of DNMT1-targeted therapy is to increase fetal hemoglobin and treat hemoglobinopathy. Oral THU-DAC at a dose that would produce peak DAC concentrations of less than 0.2?M administered 2×/wk for 8 weeks to nonhuman primates was not myelotoxic, hypomethylated DNA in the ?-globin gene promoter, and produced large cumulative increases in fetal hemoglobin. Combining oral THU with oral DAC changes DAC pharmacology in a manner that may facilitate accessible noncytotoxic DNMT1-targeted therapy. PMID:22160381

  13. Mefloquine Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Models: Implications for Dosing and Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Julie A.; Watkins, Emmeline R.; Price, Ric N.; Aarons, Leon; Kyle, Dennis E.; White, Nicholas J.

    2000-01-01

    Antimalarial resistance develops and spreads when spontaneously occurring mutant malaria parasites are selected by concentrations of antimalarial drug which are sufficient to eradicate the more sensitive parasites but not those with the resistance mutation(s). Mefloquine, a slowly eliminated quinoline-methanol compound, is the most widely used drug for the treatment of multidrug-resistant falciparum malaria. It has been used at doses ranging between 15 and 25 mg of base/kg of body weight. Resistance to mefloquine has developed rapidly on the borders of Thailand, where the drug has been deployed since 1984. Mathematical modeling with population pharmacokinetic and in vivo and in vitro pharmacodynamic data from this region confirms that, early in the evolution of resistance, conventional assessments of the therapeutic response ?28 days after treatment underestimate considerably the level of resistance. Longer follow-up is required. The model indicates that initial deployment of a lower (15-mg/kg) dose of mefloquine provides a greater opportunity for the selection of resistant mutants and would be expected to lead more rapidly to resistance than de novo use of the higher (25-mg/kg) dose. PMID:11083649

  14. The effect of long-term