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Sample records for dose number systemic

  1. Relative trends in hospitalizations and mortality among infants by the number of vaccine doses and age, based on the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), 1990–2010

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, GS; Miller, NZ

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) database, 1990–2010, was investigated; cases that specified either hospitalization or death were identified among 38,801 reports of infants. Based on the types of vaccines reported, the actual number of vaccine doses administered, from 1 to 8, was summed for each case. Linear regression analysis of hospitalization rates as a function of (a) the number of reported vaccine doses and (b) patient age yielded a linear relationship with r 2 = 0.91 and r 2 = 0.95, respectively. The hospitalization rate increased linearly from 11.0% (107 of 969) for 2 doses to 23.5% (661 of 2817) for 8 doses and decreased linearly from 20.1% (154 of 765) for children aged <0.1 year to 10.7% (86 of 801) for children aged 0.9 year. The rate ratio (RR) of the mortality rate for 5–8 vaccine doses to 1–4 vaccine doses is 1.5 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4–1.7), indicating a statistically significant increase from 3.6% (95% CI, 3.2–3.9%) deaths associated with 1–4 vaccine doses to 5.5% (95% CI, 5.2–5.7%) associated with 5–8 vaccine doses. The male-to-female mortality RR was 1.4 (95% CI, 1.3–1.5). Our findings show a positive correlation between the number of vaccine doses administered and the percentage of hospitalizations and deaths. Since vaccines are given to millions of infants annually, it is imperative that health authorities have scientific data from synergistic toxicity studies on all combinations of vaccines that infants might receive. Finding ways to increase vaccine safety should be the highest priority. PMID:22531966

  2. Hypoxia Dose Painting by Numbers: A Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thorwarth, Daniela . E-mail: daniela.thorwarth@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Eschmann, Susanne-Martina; Paulsen, Frank; Alber, Markus

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of different hypoxia dose painting strategies in head-and-neck radiotherapy; the potential benefit was limited by the stipulation of isotoxicity with respect to the conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment. Methods and Materials: Thirteen head-and-neck cancer patients were included into the planning study. For each patient, three different treatment plans were created: a conventional IMRT plan, an additional uniform dose escalation (uniDE) of 10% to the fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positive volume, and a plan in which dose painting by numbers (DPBN) was implemented. Dose painting by numbers was realized according to a map of dose-escalation factors calculated from dynamic [{sup 18}F]-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) positron emission tomography data. Results: Both dose-escalation approaches were shown to be feasible under the constraint of limiting normal tissue doses to the level of conventional IMRT. For DPBN, the prescriptions could be fulfilled in larger regions of the target than for uniDE. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positive volumes had sizes up to 94 cm{sup 3}. In contrast, regions receiving comparable dose levels with DPBN presented volumes in the range of 0-2.7 cm{sup 3}. Overtreatment of the target was observed with uniDE in most of the cases, whereas some regions did not receive the required dose to overcome hypoxia-induced radiation insensitivity. Tumor control probability increased from 55.9% with conventional IMRT to 57.7% for the uniDE method in the patient group. For DPBN, a potential increase in tumor control probability from 55.9% to 70.2% was determined. Therefore, DPBN seems to result in higher benefits for the patients. Conclusion: Dose painting by numbers delivers the dose more effectively than an additional uniform boost to the FDG-positive area. If hypoxia could be adequately quantified with a simple imaging technique like FMISO positron emission tomography, DPBN in head-and-neck cancer could

  3. Dose comparisons for mammographic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Speiser, R.C.; Zanrosso, E.M.; Jeromin, L.S.; Carlson, R.A.

    1986-09-01

    Dose estimates were made for Kodak Min-R screens combined with Kodak Min-R film and Kodak Ortho M film, both with and without a 5:1 Bucky grid; for standard xeroradiographic techniques in negative development mode; and for the new, higher sensitivity xeroradiographic process of the Xerox 175 System. The estimates were derived from exposure versus depth measurements in phantoms made of BR12 breast simulation material using thermoluminescent detectors. A molybdenum target source with molybdenum filtration, at a half-value layer of 0.37-mm Al, was used for the screen-film measurements. All xeroradiographic measurements were made with a tungsten target source with aluminum filtration at half-value layers of 1.5 to 1.56 mm Al. Mean glandular dose estimates for the Min-R screen/Ortho M film combination with Bucky grid and for the new xeroradiographic process were found to be similar. Dose reduction with the new xeroradiographic system was achieved through a more sensitive photoreceptor and more sensitive development, which also improved the unique imaging characteristics of xeroradiography.

  4. Children's mappings between number words and the approximate number system.

    PubMed

    Odic, Darko; Le Corre, Mathieu; Halberda, Justin

    2015-05-01

    Humans can represent number either exactly--using their knowledge of exact numbers as supported by language, or approximately--using their approximate number system (ANS). Adults can map between these two systems--they can both translate from an approximate sense of the number of items in a brief visual display to a discrete number word estimate (i.e., ANS-to-Word), and can generate an approximation, for example by rapidly tapping, when provided with an exact verbal number (i.e., Word-to-ANS). Here we ask how these mappings are initially formed and whether one mapping direction may become functional before the other during development. In two experiments, we gave 2-5 year old children both an ANS-to-Word task, where they had to give a verbal number response to an approximate presentation (i.e., after seeing rapidly flashed dots, or watching rapid hand taps), and a Word-to-ANS task, where they had to generate an approximate response to a verbal number request (i.e., rapidly tapping after hearing a number word). Replicating previous results, children did not successfully generate numerically appropriate verbal responses in the ANS-to-Word task until after 4 years of age--well after they had acquired the Cardinality Principle of verbal counting. In contrast, children successfully generated numerically appropriate tapping sequences in the Word-to-ANS task before 4 years of age--well before many understood the Cardinality Principle. We further found that the accuracy of the mapping between the ANS and number words, as captured by error rates, continues to develop after this initial formation of the interface. These results suggest that the mapping between the ANS and verbal number representations is not functionally bidirectional in early development, and that the mapping direction from number representations to the ANS is established before the reverse. PMID:25721021

  5. Solar System Number-Crunching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Bob; Firedrake, George

    1997-01-01

    Defines terrestrial and Jovian planets and provides directions to obtain planetary data from the National Space Science Data Center Web sites. Provides "number-crunching" activities for the terrestrial planets using Texas Instruments TI-83 graphing calculators: computing volumetric mean radius and volume, density, ellipticity, speed, surface…

  6. 75 FR 25279 - Device Improvements to Reduce the Number of Under-Doses, Over-Doses, and Misaligned Exposures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Device Improvements to Reduce the Number of Under-Doses, Over- Doses, and Misaligned Exposures From Therapeutic Radiation; Public Meeting; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS....

  7. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chena; Kim, Jo-Eun; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Lee, Woo-Jin; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Choi, Soon-Chul; Yeom, Heon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. Materials and Methods An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. Results The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. Conclusion A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose. PMID:27358817

  8. Gantries and dose delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meer, David; Psoroulas, Serena

    2015-04-01

    Particle therapy is a field in remarkable development, with the goal of increasing the number of indications which could benefit from such treatments and the access to the therapy. The therapeutic usage of a particle beam defines the technical requirements of all the elements of the therapy chain: we summarize the main characteristics of accelerators, the beam line, the treatment room, the integrated therapy and imaging systems used in particle therapy. Aiming at a higher flexibility in the choice of treatments, an increasing number of centers around the world have chosen to equip their treatment rooms with gantries, rotating beam line structures that allow a complete flexibility in the choice of the treatment angle. We review the current designs. A particle therapy gantry though is a quite expensive structure, and future development will increasingly consider reducing the cost and the footprint. Increasing the number of indications also means development in the delivery techniques and solving some of the issues which traditionally affected particle therapy, for example the precision of the delivery in presence of motion and the large penumbras for low depths. We show the current strategies in these fields, focusing on pencil beam scanning (PBS), and give some hints about future developments.

  9. The Decimal Number System and Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, John

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author believes that a visual image of the number system is helpful to everyone, especially children, in understanding what is, after all, an abstract idea. The simplest model is the number line, a row of equally spaced numbers, starting at zero. This illustrates the continuous progression of the natural numbers, moving to the…

  10. Adaptive Dose Painting by Numbers for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic; De Neve, Wilfried; De Gersem, Werner; Coghe, Marc; Madani, Indira

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of adaptive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using dose painting by numbers (DPBN) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Each patient's treatment used three separate treatment plans: fractions 1-10 used a DPBN ([{sup 18}-F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F-FDG-PET]) voxel intensity-based IMRT plan based on a pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) scan; fractions 11-20 used a DPBN plan based on a {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT scan acquired after the eighth fraction; and fractions 21-32 used a conventional (uniform dose) IMRT plan. In a Phase I trial, two dose prescription levels were tested: a median dose of 80.9 Gy to the high-dose clinical target volume (CTV{sub highdose}) (dose level I) and a median dose of 85.9 Gy to the gross tumor volume (GTV) (dose level II). Between February 2007 and August 2009, 7 patients at dose level I and 14 patients at dose level II were enrolled. Results: All patients finished treatment without a break, and no Grade 4 acute toxicity was observed. Treatment adaptation (i.e., plans based on the second {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT scan) reduced the volumes for the GTV (41%, p = 0.01), CTV{sub highdose} (18%, p = 0.01), high-dose planning target volume (14%, p = 0.02), and parotids (9-12%, p < 0.05). Because the GTV was much smaller than the CTV{sub highdose} and target adaptation, further dose escalation at dose level II resulted in less severe toxicity than that observed at dose level I. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this represents the first clinical study that combines adaptive treatments with dose painting by numbers. Treatment as described above is feasible.

  11. Probability Estimates of Solar Proton Doses During Periods of Low Sunspot Number for Short Duration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William F.; Rojdev, Kristina; Matzkind, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    In an earlier paper presented at ICES in 2015, we investigated solar particle event (SPE) radiation exposures (absorbed dose) to small, thinly-shielded spacecraft during a period when the monthly smoothed sunspot number (SSN) was less than 30. Although such months are generally considered "solar-quiet", SPEs observed during these months even include Ground Level Events, the most energetic type of SPE. In this paper, we add to previous study those SPEs that occurred in 1973-2015 when the SSN was greater than 30 but less than 50. Based on the observable energy range of the solar protons, we classify the event as GLEs, sub-GLEs, and sub-sub-GLEs, all of which are potential contributors to the radiation hazard. We use the spectra of these events to construct a probabilistic model of the absorbed dose due to solar protons when SSN < 50 at various confidence levels for various depths of shielding and for various mission durations. We provide plots and tables of solar proton-induced absorbed dose as functions of confidence level, shielding thickness, and mission-duration that will be useful to system designers.

  12. A study of the drawing number system

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, S.

    1987-05-01

    This document defines the procedures used for the drawing number system at Sandia National Laboratories. A detailed description of the methods used for identifying drawings includes the value ranges, meanings, and historical use of such items are drawing prefix, suffix, part numbers, and nomenclature. Rules used for making changes to drawings are defined since certain types of changes may result in generating new drawing numbers. Exceptions to established procedures are also identified. The information in this document is being used to develop the logical data model for the ADDS-II engineering information management application.

  13. Feasibility and robustness of dose painting by numbers in proton therapy with contour-driven plan optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Barragán, A. M. Differding, S.; Lee, J. A.; Sterpin, E.; Janssens, G.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To prove the ability of protons to reproduce a dose gradient that matches a dose painting by numbers (DPBN) prescription in the presence of setup and range errors, by using contours and structure-based optimization in a commercial treatment planning system. Methods: For two patients with head and neck cancer, voxel-by-voxel prescription to the target volume (GTV{sub PET}) was calculated from {sup 18}FDG-PET images and approximated with several discrete prescription subcontours. Treatments were planned with proton pencil beam scanning. In order to determine the optimal plan parameters to approach the DPBN prescription, the effects of the scanning pattern, number of fields, number of subcontours, and use of range shifter were separately tested on each patient. Different constant scanning grids (i.e., spot spacing = Δx = Δy = 3.5, 4, and 5 mm) and uniform energy layer separation [4 and 5 mm WED (water equivalent distance)] were analyzed versus a dynamic and automatic selection of the spots grid. The number of subcontours was increased from 3 to 11 while the number of beams was set to 3, 5, or 7. Conventional PTV-based and robust clinical target volumes (CTV)-based optimization strategies were considered and their robustness against range and setup errors assessed. Because of the nonuniform prescription, ensuring robustness for coverage of GTV{sub PET} inevitably leads to overdosing, which was compared for both optimization schemes. Results: The optimal number of subcontours ranged from 5 to 7 for both patients. All considered scanning grids achieved accurate dose painting (1% average difference between the prescribed and planned doses). PTV-based plans led to nonrobust target coverage while robust-optimized plans improved it considerably (differences between worst-case CTV dose and the clinical constraint was up to 3 Gy for PTV-based plans and did not exceed 1 Gy for robust CTV-based plans). Also, only 15% of the points in the GTV{sub PET} (worst case) were

  14. The use of small fraction numbers in high dose-rate gynaecological afterloading: some radiobiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Dale, R G

    1990-04-01

    Using commonly assumed alpha/beta ratios for tumours and late-reacting tissues, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used to compare low dose-rate (LDR) gynaecological treatment with high dose-rate (HDR) techniques given in small fraction numbers. Even in the absence of relatively favourable tissue recovery constants (mu values) it is shown that, provided a modest extra amount of geometrical sparing of critical tissues is available (by means of spacing or shielding), HDR treatment in a small number of fractions may be used in place of an LDR regime without loss of therapeutic ratio. This general result, although not universally true, does indicate that HDR treatment delivered in a small number of fractions may be more feasible than is sometimes thought. These findings do not contradict currently accepted radiobiological philosophy, which cautions against the use of small numbers of high-dose fractions. Primarily they serve to emphasize the importance of the recommendations of the ICRU (1985), which stress the need to consider the complete time-dose pattern of radiation delivery to all the critical tissues in an intracavitary treatment. PMID:2346867

  15. Energy Dependence of Measured CT Numbers on Substituted Materials Used for CT Number Calibration of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Reza; Jabbari, Nasrollah; aghdasi, Mehdi; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For accurate dose calculations, it is necessary to provide a correct relationship between the CT numbers and electron density in radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy dependence of measured CT numbers on substituted materials used for CT number calibration of radiotherapy TPSs and the resulting errors in the treatment planning calculation doses. Materials and Methods In this study, we designed a cylindrical water phantom with different materials used as tissue equivalent materials for the simulation of tissues and obtaining the related CT numbers. For evaluating the effect of CT number variations of substituted materials due to energy changing of scanner (kVp) on the dose calculation of TPS, the slices of the scanned phantom at three kVp's were imported into the desired TPSs (MIRS and CorePLAN). Dose calculations were performed on two TPSs. Results The mean absolute percentage differences between the CT numbers of CT scanner and two treatment planning systems for all the samples were 3.22%±2.57% for CorePLAN and 2.88%±2.11% for MIRS. It was also found that the maximum absolute percentage difference between all of the calculated doses from each photon beam of linac (6 and 15 MV) at three kVp's was less than 1.2%. Discussion The present study revealed that, for the materials with effective low atomic number, the mean CT number increased with increasing energy, which was opposite for the materials with an effective high atomic number. We concluded that the tissue substitute materials had a different behavior in the energy ranges from 80 to 130 kVp. So, it is necessary to consider the energy dependence of the substitute materials used for the measurement or calibration of CT number for radiotherapy treatment planning systems. PMID:27391672

  16. WE-G-BRE-03: Dose Painting by Numbers Using Targeted Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Altundal, Y; Sajo, E; Korideck, H; Ngwa, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Homogeneous dose enhancement in tumor cells of lung cancer patients treated with conventional dose of 60–66 Gy in five fractions is limited due to increased risk of toxicity to normal structures. Dose painting by numbers (DPBN) is the prescription of a non-uniform radiation dose distribution in the tumor for each voxel based on the intensity level of that voxel obtained from the tumor image. The purpose of this study is to show that DPBN using targeted gold nanoparticles (GNPs) could enhance conventional doses in the more resistant tumor areas. Methods: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of GNPs after intratumoral injection into human tumor were taken at 0, 48, 144 and 160 hours. The dose enhancement in the tumor voxels by secondary electrons from the GNPs was calculated based on analytical microdosimetry methods. The dose enhancement factor (DEF) is the ratio of the doses to the tumor with and without the presence of GNPs. The DEF was calculated for each voxel of the images based on the GNP concentration in the tumor sub-volumes using 6-MV photon spectra obtained using Monte Carlo simulations at 5 cm depth (10×10 cm2 field). Results: The results revealed DEF values of 1.05–2.38 for GNPs concentrations of 1–30 mg/g which corresponds to 12.60 – 28.56 Gy per fraction for delivering 12 Gy per fraction homogenously to lung tumor region. Conclusion: Our preliminary results verify that DPBN could be achieved using GNPs to enhance conventional doses to high risk tumor sub-volumes. In practice, DPBN using GNPs could be achieved due to diffusion of targeted GNPs sustainably released in-situ from radiotherapy biomaterials (e.g. fiducials) coated with polymer film containing the GNPs.

  17. CT number variations in micro CT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Hsieh, Hui-Ling; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2008-03-01

    CT numbers can be directly computed from the linear attenuation coefficients in the reconstructed CT images and are correlated to the electron densities of the chemical elements with specific atomic numbers. However, the computed CT numbers can be varied when different imaging parameters are used. Phantoms composed of clinically relevant and tissue-equivalent materials (lung, bone, muscle, and adipose) were scanned with a commercial circular-scanning micro CT imager. This imaging system is composed with a micro-focused x-ray tube and charged-coupled device (CCD) camera as the detector. The mean CT numbers and the corresponding standard deviations in terms of Hounsfield units were then computed from a pre-defined region of interest located within the reconstructed volumetric images. The variations of CT number were then identified from a series of imaging parameters. Those parameters include imaging acquisition modes (e.g., the metal filter used in the x-ray tube), reconstruction methods (e.g., Feldkamp and iterative algorithm), and post-image processing techniques (e.g., ring artifact, beam-hardening artifact, and smoothing processing). These variations of CT numbers are useful and important in tissue characterization, quantitative bone structure analysis, bone marrow density evaluation, and Monte Carlo dose calculations for the pilot small animal study when micro CT imaging systems are employed. Also these variations can be used as the quantification for the performance of the micro CT imaging systems.

  18. The dependence of computed tomography number to relative electron density conversion on phantom geometry and its impact on planned dose.

    PubMed

    Inness, Emma K; Moutrie, Vaughan; Charles, Paul H

    2014-06-01

    A computed tomography number to relative electron density (CT-RED) calibration is performed when commissioning a radiotherapy CT scanner by imaging a calibration phantom with inserts of specified RED and recording the CT number displayed. In this work, CT-RED calibrations were generated using several commercially available phantoms to observe the effect of phantom geometry on conversion to electron density and, ultimately, the dose calculation in a treatment planning system. Using an anthropomorphic phantom as a gold standard, the CT number of a material was found to depend strongly on the amount and type of scattering material surrounding the volume of interest, with the largest variation observed for the highest density material tested, cortical bone. Cortical bone gave a maximum CT number difference of 1,110 when a cylindrical insert of diameter 28 mm scanned free in air was compared to that in the form of a 30 × 30 cm(2) slab. The effect of using each CT-RED calibration on planned dose to a patient was quantified using a commercially available treatment planning system. When all calibrations were compared to the anthropomorphic calibration, the largest percentage dose difference was 4.2 % which occurred when the CT-RED calibration curve was acquired with heterogeneity inserts removed from the phantom and scanned free in air. The maximum dose difference observed between two dedicated CT-RED phantoms was ±2.1 %. A phantom that is to be used for CT-RED calibrations must have sufficient water equivalent scattering material surrounding the heterogeneous objects that are to be used for calibration. PMID:24760737

  19. A comprehensive study on decreasing the kilovoltage cone-beam CT dose by reducing the projection number.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Lu, Haibin; Palta, Jatinder

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on registration accuracy and image qualities with a reduced number of planar projections used in volumetric imaging reconstruction. The ultimate goal is to evaluate the possibility of reducing the patient dose while maintaining registration accuracy under different projection-number schemes for various clinical sites. An Elekta Synergy Linear accelerator with an onboard CBCT system was used in this study. The quality of the Elekta XVI cone-beam three-dimensional volumetric images reconstructed with a decreasing number of projections was quantitatively evaluated by a Catphan phantom. Subsequently, we tested the registration accuracy of imaging data sets on three rigid anthropomorphic phantoms and three real patient sites under the reduced projection-number (as low as 1/6th) reconstruction of CBCT data with different rectilinear shifts and rota-tions. CBCT scan results of the Catphan phantom indicated the CBCT images got noisier when the number of projections was reduced, but their spatial resolution and uniformity were hardly affected. The maximum registration errors under the small amount transformation of the reference CT images were found to be within 0.7 mm translation and 0.3 masculine rotation. However, when the projection number was lower than one-fourth of the full set with a large amount of transformation of reference CT images, the registration could easily be trapped into local minima solutions for a nonrigid anatomy. We concluded, by using projection-number reduction strategy under conscientious care, imaging-guided localization procedure could achieve a lower patient dose without losing the registration accuracy for various clinical sites and situations. A faster scanning time is the main advantage compared to the mA decrease-based, dose-reduction method. PMID:20717096

  20. Visual nesting impacts approximate number system estimation.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Dana L; Gelman, Rochel

    2012-08-01

    The approximate number system (ANS) allows people to quickly but inaccurately enumerate large sets without counting. One popular account of the ANS is known as the accumulator model. This model posits that the ANS acts analogously to a graduated cylinder to which one "cup" is added for each item in the set, with set numerosity read from the "height" of the cylinder. Under this model, one would predict that if all the to-be-enumerated items were not collected into the accumulator, either the sets would be underestimated, or the misses would need to be corrected by a subsequent process, leading to longer reaction times. In this experiment, we tested whether such miss effects occur. Fifty participants judged numerosities of briefly presented sets of circles. In some conditions, circles were arranged such that some were inside others. This circle nesting was expected to increase the miss rate, since previous research had indicated that items in nested configurations cannot be preattentively individuated in parallel. Logically, items in a set that cannot be simultaneously individuated cannot be simultaneously added to an accumulator. Participants' response times were longer and their estimations were lower for sets whose configurations yielded greater levels of nesting. The level of nesting in a display influenced estimation independently of the total number of items present. This indicates that miss effects, predicted by the accumulator model, are indeed seen in ANS estimation. We speculate that ANS biases might, in turn, influence cognition and behavior, perhaps by influencing which kinds of sets are spontaneously counted. PMID:22810562

  1. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES FOR DIFFERENT DOSE METRICS: COMPARISON OF NUMBER, SURFACE AREA AND MASS DOSE OF TYPICAL AMBIENT BI-MODAL AEROSOLS.
    Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu*, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, ...

  2. SU-E-T-182: Feasibility of Dose Painting by Numbers in Proton Therapy with Contour-Driven Plan Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Montero, A Barragan; Differding, S; Lee, J; Sterpin, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The work aims to 1) prove the feasibility of dose painting by numbers (DPBN) in proton therapy with usual contour-driven plan optimization and 2) compare the achieved plan quality to that of rotational IMRT. Methods: For two patients with head and neck cancers, voxel-by-voxel prescription to the target volume (PTV-PET) was calculated from {sup 18} FDG-PET images and converted to contour-based prescription by defining several sub-contours. Treatments were planned with RayStation (RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) and proton pencil beam scanning modality. In order to determine the optimal plan parameters to approach the DPBN prescription, the effect of the number of fields, number of sub-contours and use of range shifter were tested separately on each patient. The number of sub-contours were increased from 3 to 11 while the number of fields were set to 3, 5, 7 and 9. Treatment plans were also optimized on two rotational IMRT systems (TomoTherapy and Varian RapidArc) using previously published guidelines. Results: For both patients, more than 99% of the PTV-PET received at least 95% of the prescribed dose while less than 1% of the PTV-PET received more than 105%, which demonstrates the feasibility of the treatment. Neither the use of a range shifter nor the increase of the number of fields had a significant influence on PTV coverage. Plan quality increased when increasing number of fields up to 7 or 9 and slightly decreased for a bigger number of sub-contours. Good OAR sparing is achieved while keeping high plan quality. Finally, proton therapy achieved significantly better plan quality than rotational IMRT. Conclusion: Voxel-by-voxel prescriptions can be approximated accurately in proton therapy using a contour-driven optimization. Target coverage is nearly insensitive to the number of fields and the use of a range shifter. Finally, plan quality assessment confirmed the superiority of proton therapy compared to rotational IMRT.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS STUDIES, REPORT NUMBER 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ANDERSON, RONALD R.; AND OTHERS

    CONTENTS--(1) AN ASSOCIATIVITY TECHNIQUE FOR AUTOMATICALLY OPTIMIZING RETRIEVAL RESULTS BY RONALD R. ANDERSON. AN ASSOCIATIVE TECHNIQUE BY WHICH IT IS POSSIBLE TO AUTOMATICALLY EXPAND AND NARROW THE NUMBER OF DOCUMENTS RETRIEVED AND TO RETRIEVE DOCUMENTS RELATED TO A REQUEST EVEN THOUGH THEY MAY NOT BE INDEXED BY THE EXACT TERMS OF THE REQUEST IS…

  4. Application of in vitro transmucosal permeability, dose number, and maximum absorbable dose for biopharmaceutics assessment during early drug development for intraoral delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Sotthivirat, Sutthilug; Wu, Yunhui; Lalloo, Anita; Nissley, Becky; Manser, Kimberly; Li, Hankun

    2016-04-30

    Intraoral (IO) administration is a unique route that takes advantage of transmucosal absorption in the oral cavity to deliver a drug substance locally or systemically. IO delivery can also enhance or enable oral administration, providing a better therapeutic benefit/safety risk profile for patient compliance. However, there are relatively few systematic biopharmaceutics assessments for IO delivery to date. Therefore, the goals of this study were to i) identify the most relevant in vitro permeability models as alternatives to porcine oral tissues (gold standard) for predicting human IO absorption and ii) establish guidelines for biopharmaceutics assessment during early drug development for IO delivery. Porcine kidney LLC-PK1 cells provided the strongest correlation of transmucosal permeability with porcine oral tissues followed by human Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, cultured human buccal tissues predicted high/low permeability classification and correlated well with porcine oral tissues, which are used for predicting clinical IO absorption. In the meantime, we introduced maximum absorbable dose and dose number in the oral cavity for IO delivery assessment as well as a decision tree to provide guidance for biopharmaceutics assessment during early drug development for IO delivery. PMID:26906458

  5. Code System for Emergency Response Dose Assessment.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-01-16

    Version: 00 A dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Dose pathways represented in the model are those that are most likely to be important during and immediately following a release (hours) rather than over an extended time frame (days or weeks). The doses computed include: external dose resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides in the air and deposited on the ground, internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation, and total whole-body dose. Threemore » preprocessors are included. RSFPREP generates the MESORAD run specification (input) file, METWR creates the meteorological data file, and RELPREP prepares the release definition file. PRNT is a postprocessor for generating printer or screen-compatible output. All four programs run interactively. MESORAD was developed from version 2.0 of the MESOI atmospheric dispersion model (NESC 9862) retaining its modular nature.« less

  6. Affine root systems and dual numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyakov, I. V.; Gromov, N. A.; Kuratov, V. V.

    The root systems in Carroll spaces with degenerate metric are defined. It is shown that their Cartan matrices and reflection groups are affine. Due to the geometric consideration the root system structure of affine algebras is determined by a sufficiently simple algorithm.

  7. The Learning System. Volume 4, Number 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring quality teaching in every classroom across an entire system of schools--that's what a district leader's job is all about. A district leader's challenges are unique so "The Learning System" was created with that in mind. This issue contains: (1) Competing Values Form Obstacles to Change: Deep Conversations Uncover Invisible Goals (Valerie…

  8. The Learning System. Volume 4, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring quality teaching in every classroom across an entire system of schools--that's what a district leader's job is all about. A district leader's challenges are unique so "The Learning System" was created with that in mind. This issue contains: (1) What Works Around the World: Landmark Study Examines Professional Learning Abroad to Pinpoint…

  9. The Learning System. Volume 5, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring quality teaching in every classroom across an entire system of schools--that's what a district leader's job is all about. A district leader's challenges are unique so "The Learning System" was created with that in mind. This issue contains: (1) Imagine the Possibilities: 2020 Forecast Explores 6 Change Forces that Will Shape the Future of…

  10. Dose and risk in diagnostic radiology: How big How little Lecture Number 16

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, E.W.

    1992-01-01

    This lecture is divided into two parts: dose and risk. The dose segment is technical and noncontroversial since it deals with straightforward measurements or calculations which do not depend on unproven hypotheses. Some conflicting contributions of low dose epidemiological studies to the appraisal of risk are briefly presented. Attention is focused on the following: dose reduction in radiography; dose reduction in fluoroscopy; limitations of dose reduction; estimated radiation risks for diagnostic radiology examinations; excess breast cancer following X-ray examinations for scoliosis; dose-response relation for human mammary cancer; lung cancer from protracted X-irradiation; leukemia and diagnostic X-ray exposure; and thyroid cancer after diagnostic dose of I-131.

  11. Preclinical dose number and its application in understanding drug absorption risk and formulation design for preclinical species.

    PubMed

    Wuelfing, W Peter; Daublain, Pierre; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Templeton, Allen; McGregor, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    In the drug discovery setting, the ability to rapidly identify drug absorption risk in preclinical species at high doses from easily measured physical properties is desired. This is due to the large number of molecules being evaluated and their high attrition rate, which make resource-intensive in vitro and in silico evaluation unattractive. High-dose in vivo data from rat, dog, and monkey are analyzed here, using a preclinical dose number (PDo) concept based on the dose number described by Amidon and other authors (Pharm. Res., 1993, 10, 264-270). PDo, as described in this article, is simply calculated as dose (mg/kg) divided by compound solubility in FaSSIF (mg/mL) and approximates the volume of biorelevant media per kilogram of animal that would be needed to fully dissolve the dose. High PDo values were found to be predictive of difficulty in achieving drug exposure (AUC)-dose proportionality in in vivo studies, as could be expected; however, this work analyzes a large data set (>900 data points) and provides quantitative guidance to identify drug absorption risk in preclinical species based on a single solubility measurement commonly carried out in drug discovery. Above the PDo values defined, >50% of all in vivo studies exhibited poor AUC-dose proportionality in rat, dog, and monkey, and these values can be utilized as general guidelines in discovery and early development to rapidly assess risk of solubility-limited absorption for a given compound. A preclinical dose number generated by biorelevant dilutions of formulated compounds (formulated PDo) was also evaluated and defines solubility targets predictive of suitable AUC-dose proportionality in formulation development efforts. Application of these guidelines can serve to efficiently identify compounds in discovery that are likely to present extreme challenges with respect to solubility-limited absorption in preclinical species as well as reduce the testing of poor formulations in vivo, which is a key

  12. A Numbering System for MFS Transporter Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joanna; Sands, Zara A.; Biggin, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    The Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest classes of secondary active transporters and is widely expressed in many domains of life. It is characterized by a common 12-transmembrane helix motif that allows the selective transport of a vast range of diverse substrates across the membrane. MFS transporters play a central role in many physiological processes and are increasingly recognized as potential drug targets. Despite intensive efforts, there are still only a handful of crystal structures and therefore homology modeling is likely to be a necessary process for providing models to interpret experiments for many years to come. However, the diversity of sequences and the multiple conformational states these proteins can exist in makes the process significantly more complicated, especially for sequences for which there is very little sequence identity to known templates. Inspired by the approach adopted many years ago for GPCRs, we have analyzed the large number of MFS sequences now available alongside the current structural information to propose a series of conserved contact points that can provide additional guidance for the homology modeling process. To enable cross-comparison across MFS models we also present a numbering scheme that can be used to provide a point of reference within each of the 12 transmembrane regions. PMID:27314000

  13. Comparison of dose distributions for Hounsfield number conversion methods in GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Dong; Kim, Byung Yong; Kim, Eng Chan; Yun, Sang Mo; Kang, Jeong Ku; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2014-06-01

    The conversion of patient computed tomography (CT) data to voxel phantoms is essential for CT-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations, and incorrect assignments of materials and mass densities can lead to large errors in dose distributions. We investigated the effects of mass density and material assignments on GEANT4-based photon dose calculations. Three material conversion methods and four density conversion methods were compared for a lung tumor case. The dose calculations for 6-MV photon beams with a field size of 10 × 10 cm2 were performed using a 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 cm3 voxel with 1.2 × 109 histories. The material conversion methods led to different material assignment percentages in converted voxel regions. The GEANT4 example and the modified Schneider material conversion methods showed large local dose differences relative to the BEAMnrc default method for lung and other tissues. For mass density conversion methods when only water was used, our results showed only slight dose differences. Gaussian-like distributions, with mean values close to zero, were obtained when the reference method was compared with the other methods. The maximum dose difference of ˜2% indicated that the dose distributions agreed relatively well. Material assignment methods probably have more significant impacts on dose distributions than mass density assignment methods. The study confirms that material assignment methods cause significant dose differences in GEANT4-based photon dose calculations.

  14. 18 CFR 367.4 - Numbering system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... expenses. (8) 800-894, Gas operating expenses. (9) 900-949, Customer accounts, customer service and... NATURAL GAS ACT UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR CENTRALIZED SERVICE COMPANIES SUBJECT TO THE PROVISIONS OF... be considered as parts of the titles. Each service company, however, may adopt for its own purposes...

  15. The Learning System. Volume 4, Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning System" is a newsletter designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) District Pulls Together in Pursuit of Excellence: Creating Collaboration Systemwide Requires Commitment (Valerie von Frank); (2) Scheduling Time for Teacher Learning Is Key for Both…

  16. Systemic Education Reform. ERIC Digest, Number 90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, James

    Economic forces and educational equity issues have combined to heighten calls for improved education for all students. Systemic reform calls for education to be reconceptualized from the ground up, beginning with the nature of teaching and learning, educational relationships, and school-community relationships. One of the assumptions made by…

  17. The Learning System. Volume 5, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning System" is an eight-page newsletter published eight times a year. Designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) Superintendent Stays on Course with Personal Learning Plan (Valerie von Frank); (2) District Leadership: Permit, Don't Proscribe, to Build…

  18. The Learning System. Volume 4, Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    "The Learning System" is a newsletter designed for superintendents and central office staff with professional learning responsibilities. This issue includes: (1) Principal-Coaches Transform Teachers and Schools (Valerie von Frank); (2) District Leadership: Delve into NSDC's [National Staff Development Council's] New Definition of Professional…

  19. Number systems, α-splines and refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zube, Severinas

    2004-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the smooth refinable function on a plane relative with complex scaling factor . Characteristic functions of certain self-affine tiles related to a given scaling factor are the simplest examples of such refinable function. We study the smooth refinable functions obtained by a convolution power of such charactericstic functions. Dahlke, Dahmen, and Latour obtained some explicit estimates for the smoothness of the resulting convolution products. In the case α=1+i, we prove better results. We introduce α-splines in two variables which are the linear combination of shifted basic functions. We derive basic properties of α-splines and proceed with a detailed presentation of refinement methods. We illustrate the application of α-splines to subdivision with several examples. It turns out that α-splines produce well-known subdivision algorithms which are based on box splines: Doo-Sabin, Catmull-Clark, Loop, Midedge and some -subdivision schemes with good continuity. The main geometric ingredient in the definition of α-splines is the fundamental domain (a fractal set or a self-affine tile). The properties of the fractal obtained in number theory are important and necessary in order to determine two basic properties of α-splines: partition of unity and the refinement equation.

  20. 48 CFR 404.870 - Document numbering system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Document numbering system. 404.870 Section 404.870 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Government Contract Files 404.870 Document numbering system. The SPE shall issue...

  1. 48 CFR 404.870 - Document numbering system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Document numbering system. 404.870 Section 404.870 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Government Contract Files 404.870 Document numbering system. The SPE shall issue...

  2. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  3. 33 CFR 174.11 - Applicability of State numbering system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... applies. (b) A State numbering system may require the numbering of any vessel subject to the jurisdiction of the State unless prohibited by the regulations in Part 173 of this chapter. (c) A State...

  4. 33 CFR 174.11 - Applicability of State numbering system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... applies. (b) A State numbering system may require the numbering of any vessel subject to the jurisdiction of the State unless prohibited by the regulations in Part 173 of this chapter. (c) A State...

  5. 33 CFR 174.11 - Applicability of State numbering system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... applies. (b) A State numbering system may require the numbering of any vessel subject to the jurisdiction of the State unless prohibited by the regulations in Part 173 of this chapter. (c) A State...

  6. 33 CFR 174.11 - Applicability of State numbering system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... applies. (b) A State numbering system may require the numbering of any vessel subject to the jurisdiction of the State unless prohibited by the regulations in Part 173 of this chapter. (c) A State...

  7. [Evaluations of a specified number of inhalations and how to assess the contents in metered-dose inhalers].

    PubMed

    Obata, T; Fujikawa, M; Obata, Y; Obata, J

    1996-10-01

    Many kinds of Metered-Dose Inhalers (MDI) have been clinically available for bronchial asthma. Although manufacturers demonstrate the specified number of inhalations per canister on an attached document or on a plastic bag, the information provided are usually inadequate and inconsistent. They provide no information on the problems of the Metered-Dose Inhalers beyond the maximum specified number of actuations and the time when to exchange for a new one. We examined the technique how to evaluate the contents of MDI and their accuracy. Patients and their parents depended on inaccurate methods, such as shaking the inhalers to listen to the sound of contents, estimating the weight of the canisters and the size of emissions, and only a half of them were able to distinguish between 1/3 and 2/ 3 of remaining doses. Three Metered-Dose Inhalers with anti-inflammatory drugs and one MDI with beta-stimulant supplied consistent doses until they reached the maximum specified number. The 4 MDIs floated in the water in different ways and provided information when to replace for new ones in some MDIs. PMID:8958655

  8. [X-ray exposure dose control for x-ray CT system].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Shortening scan time of CT scanner system has been evolved and increase in number of CT examinations has also been remarkable. This has been resulted from global recognition of usefulness of the CT examination, contrary to this merit, however, it is important to recognize the risk of x-ray exposure dose. Japan Industry Association of Radiological Systems (JIRA) in which CT manufacturers join has issued the concrete countermeasure and guidance for reduction in x-ray exposure dose in response to the ICRP90 Recommendation. Current CT scanner systems provide the data related to x-ray exposure dose such as CTDI(w) for setting CT scan parameters. To reduce x-ray exposure dose against infant patient, the scan parameters specified to infant patient (CT infant protocol) can be provided. Exposure dose by x-ray CT can be measured by the measurement method corresponding to IEC-60601-2-44 and by using phantom. CTDI measurement is made by CTDI(100) that measures in a range of 100mm for all slice thicknesses, and absorbed radiation dose is converted to that of air. Dose profile is measured by using multiple thermoluminescence dosimeter (TDL) chips. CT exposure dose data including CTDI(100) and Dose profile are well-defined, and Dose Information Guide conforming to IEC-60601-2-44 is provided to user for the purpose of reducing x-ray exposure dose. Studies by low dose (2.5 approximately 3mA) simulation for the purpose of reducing x-ray exposure dose in screening CT examination of lung cancer and development of ROI scan to reduce x-ray exposure dose in puncture under CT fluoroscopy have also been conducted. PMID:12766284

  9. Cultural Influences on Number Preferences: Christmas and Grading Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieger, Stefan; Krizan, Zlatan

    2013-01-01

    People consistently prefer numbers associated with themselves (e.g., birth dates) over other numbers. We argue that such number preferences are also shaped by cultural influences, such as customs regarding the day on which Christmas is celebrated and customs regarding ranking of numerals used in national school's grading system. Across 6 different…

  10. Studies in Mathematics, Volume XIV. Introduction to Number Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Burton W., Ed.

    This text was written for junior high school teachers who wish to have more mathematical background on number systems. It is particularly useful for teachers who teach SMSG materials at grades 7 and 8. Chapters included are: (1) Introduction; (2) Numeration; (3) The Whole Numbers; (4) Divisibility and Properties of Whole Numbers; (5) The…

  11. The Real Number System vs. a System Called 10-adic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslan, Farhad; Duck, Howard

    1992-01-01

    P-adic or g-adic sets are sets of elements formed by linear combinations of powers of p, a prime number, or g, a counting number, where the coefficients are whole numbers less than p or g. Discusses exercises illustrating basic numerical operations for p-adic and g-adic sets. Provides BASIC computer programs to verify the solutions. (MDH)

  12. Dose error analysis for a scanned proton beam delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Wang, N.; Miller, D. W.; Yang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    All particle beam scanning systems are subject to dose delivery errors due to errors in position, energy and intensity of the delivered beam. In addition, finite scan speeds, beam spill non-uniformities, and delays in detector, detector electronics and magnet responses will all contribute errors in delivery. In this paper, we present dose errors for an 8 × 10 × 8 cm3 target of uniform water equivalent density with 8 cm spread out Bragg peak and a prescribed dose of 2 Gy. Lower doses are also analyzed and presented later in the paper. Beam energy errors and errors due to limitations of scanning system hardware have been included in the analysis. By using Gaussian shaped pencil beams derived from measurements in the research room of the James M Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda, CA and executing treatment simulations multiple times, statistical dose errors have been calculated in each 2.5 mm cubic voxel in the target. These errors were calculated by delivering multiple treatments to the same volume and calculating the rms variation in delivered dose at each voxel in the target. The variations in dose were the result of random beam delivery errors such as proton energy, spot position and intensity fluctuations. The results show that with reasonable assumptions of random beam delivery errors, the spot scanning technique yielded an rms dose error in each voxel less than 2% or 3% of the 2 Gy prescribed dose. These calculated errors are within acceptable clinical limits for radiation therapy.

  13. The linking number in systems with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotou, E.

    2015-11-01

    Periodic Boundary Conditions (PBC) are often used for the simulation of complex physical systems. Using the Gauss linking number, we define the periodic linking number as a measure of entanglement for two oriented curves in a system employing PBC. In the case of closed chains in PBC, the periodic linking number is an integer topological invariant that depends on a finite number of components in the periodic system. For open chains, the periodic linking number is an infinite series that accounts for all the topological interactions in the periodic system. In this paper we give a rigorous proof that the periodic linking number is defined for the infinite system, i.e., that it converges for one, two, and three PBC models. It gives a real number that varies continuously with the configuration and gives a global measure of the geometric complexity of the system of chains. Similarly, for a single oriented chain, we define the periodic self-linking number and prove that it also is defined for open chains. In addition, we define the cell periodic linking and self-linking numbers giving localizations of the periodic linking numbers. These can be used to give good estimates of the periodic linking numbers in infinite systems. We also define the local periodic linking number associated to chains in the immediate cell neighborhood of a chain in order to study local linking measures in contrast to the global linking measured by the periodic linking numbers. Finally, we study and compare these measures when applied to a PBC model of polyethylene melts.

  14. Quantum number theoretic transforms on multipartite finite systems.

    PubMed

    Vourdas, A; Zhang, S

    2009-06-01

    A quantum system composed of p-1 subsystems, each of which is described with a p-dimensional Hilbert space (where p is a prime number), is considered. A quantum number theoretic transform on this system, which has properties similar to those of a Fourier transform, is studied. A representation of the Heisenberg-Weyl group in this context is also discussed. PMID:19488175

  15. Evaluation of Deformable Image Coregistration in Adaptive Dose Painting by Numbers for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Olteanu, Luiza A.M.; Madani, Indira; De Neve, Wilfried; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of contour deformation and feasibility of dose summation applying deformable image coregistration in adaptive dose painting by numbers (DPBN) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Data of 12 head-and-neck-cancer patients treated within a Phase I trial on adaptive {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)-guided DPBN were used. Each patient had two DPBN treatment plans: the initial plan was based on a pretreatment PET/CT scan; the second adapted plan was based on a PET/CT scan acquired after 8 fractions. The median prescription dose to the dose-painted volume was 30 Gy for both DPBN plans. To obtain deformed contours and dose distributions, pretreatment CT was deformed to per-treatment CT using deformable image coregistration. Deformed contours of regions of interest (ROI{sub def}) were visually inspected and, if necessary, adjusted (ROI{sub def{sub ad}}) and both compared with manually redrawn ROIs (ROI{sub m}) using Jaccard (JI) and overlap indices (OI). Dose summation was done on the ROI{sub m}, ROI{sub def{sub ad}}, or their unions with the ROI{sub def}. Results: Almost all deformed ROIs were adjusted. The largest adjustment was made in patients with substantially regressing tumors: ROI{sub def} = 11.8 {+-} 10.9 cm{sup 3} vs. ROI{sub def{sub ad}} = 5.9 {+-} 7.8 cm{sup 3} vs. ROI{sub m} = 7.7 {+-} 7.2 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.57). The swallowing structures were the most frequently adjusted ROIs with the lowest indices for the upper esophageal sphincter: JI = 0.3 (ROI{sub def}) and 0.4 (ROI{sub def{sub ad}}); OI = 0.5 (both ROIs). The mandible needed the least adjustment with the highest indices: JI = 0.8 (both ROIs), OI = 0.9 (ROI{sub def}), and 1.0 (ROI{sub def{sub ad}}). Summed doses differed non-significantly. There was a trend of higher doses in the targets and lower doses in the spinal cord when doses were summed on unions. Conclusion: Visual inspection and adjustment were necessary for most ROIs. Fast automatic ROI

  16. Development and validation of a fast voxel-based dose evaluation system in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Chang; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Dong, Shang-Lung; Wu, Jay; Ni, Yu-Ching; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2014-11-01

    PET imaging has been widely used in the detection and staging of malignancies and the evaluation of patient-specific dosimetry for PET scans is important in nuclear medicine. However, patient-specific dosimetry can be estimated only by Monte Carlo methods which are usually time-consuming. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast dose evaluation system namely SimDOSE. SimDOSE is a Monte Carlo code embedded in SimSET with a dose scoring routine to record the deposited energy of the photons and electrons. Fluorine-18 is one of the most commonly used radionuclides that decay predominantly by positron emission. Only a 635 keV (Emax) positron and two annihilation photons should be concerned in F-18 radiation dosimetry, hence simulation is relatively simple. To evaluate the effects of resolution, an F-18 point source placed in a 20 cm diameter sphere filled with water was simulated by SimDOSE and GATE v6.1. Grid sizes of 1 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm were tested and each was simulated with a total of 107 decays. The resultant dose distribution functions were compared. Dose evaluation on ORNL phantom was also performed to validate the accuracy of SimDOSE. The grid size of phantom was set as 3 mm and the number of decays was 107. The S-values of liver computed by SimDOSE were compared with GATE and OLINDA (Organ Level INternal Dose Assessment) for 11C, 15O, and 18F.Finally, the CPU time of simulations was compared between SimDOSE and GATE. The dose profiles show the absorption doses located 3 mm outside the center are similar between SimDOSE and GATE. However, 71% (19%) difference of the center dose between SimDOSE and GATE are observed for 1 mm (3 mm) grid. The differences of the profile lie in the assumption in SimDOSE that all kinetic energies of electrons are locally absorbed. The ratios of S values of (SimDOSE/OLINDA) range from 0.95 to 1.11 with a mean value of 1.02±0.043. To compare simulation time from SimDOSE to GATE for calculation of 1 mm, 3 mm, 5 mm gird point

  17. 32 CFR 21.565 - Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers? 21.565 Section 21.565 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-GENERAL MATTERS Information Reporting...

  18. 32 CFR 21.565 - Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers? 21.565 Section 21.565 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-GENERAL MATTERS Information Reporting...

  19. 32 CFR 21.565 - Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers? 21.565 Section 21.565 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-GENERAL MATTERS Information Reporting...

  20. 32 CFR 21.565 - Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers? 21.565 Section 21.565 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-GENERAL MATTERS Information Reporting...

  1. 32 CFR 21.565 - Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Must DoD Components' electronic systems accept Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) numbers? 21.565 Section 21.565 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-GENERAL MATTERS Information Reporting...

  2. Avertable dose intervention applied in emergency response dose evaluation system for nuclear emergency preparedness in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chung-hsin; Teng, Jen-hsin; Yang, Yung-muh; Chang, Bor-jing

    2010-06-01

    In Taiwan the new guides for the nuclear emergency public protective action were laid down by the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) of Executive Yuan, Taiwan, ROC on July 15th, 2005. The main modifications of the guides are that the avertable dose is applied as the intervention levels and suggests the public protective actions. The emergency response dose evaluation system named RPDOSE, which was developed in 2005, was employed in this work to enhance the capability of the avertable dose evaluation for the villages in the emergency planning zone (EPZ). The period of the long-term weather forecasting data was extended from 4 to 8 days to satisfy the requirement of avertable dose computing. According to the intervention levels, the RPDOSE system is used to calculate the avertable dose and suggest appropriate public protective actions such as sheltering, evacuation or iodine prophylaxis as well as the proposed acting times for each village in the EPZ. This system was employed and examined in the annual nuclear emergency exercise of 2008 in the Maanshan nuclear power plant.

  3. Evaluation of in vivo low-dose mouse irradiation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H.; Kye, Y.-U.; Kim, J. K.; Son, T. G.; Lee, M. W.; Jeong, D. H.; Yang, K. M.; Nam, S.-H.; Kang, Y.-R.

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to develop a facility that can irradiate subjects with a desired low dose, which can be used to assess the biological effects of low-dose radiation. We develop a single-occupancy mouse-cage and shelf system with adjustable geometric parameters, such as the distances and angles of the cages relative to the collimator. We assess the irradiation-level accuracy using two measurement methods. First, we calculate the angle and distance of each mouse cage relative to the irradiator. We employ a Monte Carlo n-particle simulation for all of the cages at a given distance from the radiation source to calculate the air kerma and the relative absorbed dose in the in-house designed shelving system; these are found to be approximately 0.108 and 0.109 Gy, respectively. Second, we measure the relative absorbed dose using glass dosimeters inserted directly into the heads and bodies of the mice. For a conventional irradiation system, the irradiation measurements show a maximum discrepancy of 42% between the absorbed and desired doses, whereas a discrepancy of only 6% from the desired dose is found for the designed mouse apartment system. In addition, multi-mouse cages are shown to yield to significantly greater differences in the mouse head and body relative absorbed doses, compared to the discrepancies found for single-occupancy cages in the conventional irradiation system. Our findings suggest that the in-house shelving system has greater reliability for the biological analysis of the effects of low-dose radiation.

  4. Limits and the System of Near-Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenton, Frank J.

    2006-01-01

    The paper details a comprehensive system for the treatment of the topic of limits--conceptually, computationally, and formally. The system addresses fundamental linguistic flaws in the standard presentation of limits, which attempts to force limit discussion into the language of individual real numbers and equality. The system of near-numbers…

  5. 41 CFR 101-1.109 - Numbering in FPMR System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Numbering in FPMR System. 101-1.109 Section 101-1.109 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System §...

  6. 41 CFR 101-1.109 - Numbering in FPMR System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Numbering in FPMR System. 101-1.109 Section 101-1.109 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System §...

  7. 41 CFR 101-1.109 - Numbering in FPMR System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Numbering in FPMR System. 101-1.109 Section 101-1.109 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System §...

  8. 41 CFR 101-1.109 - Numbering in FPMR System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Numbering in FPMR System. 101-1.109 Section 101-1.109 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System §...

  9. Sampling from the mental number line: how are approximate number system representations formed?

    PubMed

    Inglis, Matthew; Gilmore, Camilla

    2013-10-01

    Nonsymbolic comparison tasks are commonly used to index the acuity of an individual's Approximate Number System (ANS), a cognitive mechanism believed to be involved in the development of number skills. Here we asked whether the time that an individual spends observing numerical stimuli influences the precision of the resultant ANS representations. Contrary to standard computational models of the ANS, we found that the longer the stimulus was displayed, the more precise was the resultant representation. We propose an adaptation of the standard model, and suggest that this finding has significant methodological implications for numerical cognition research. PMID:23831565

  10. A real time spectrum to dose conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, B. J.; Johnson, J. H.; Bagwell, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    A system has been developed which permits the determination of dose in real time or near real time directly from the pulse-height output of a radiation spectrometer. The technique involves the use of the resolution matrix of a spectrometer, the radiation energy-to-dose conversion function, and the geometrical factors, although the order of matrix operations is reversed. The new technique yields a result which is mathematically identical to the standard method while requiring no matrix manipulations or resolution matrix storage in the remote computer. It utilizes only a single function for each type dose required and each geometric factor involved.

  11. Comparison of 3-dimensional dose reconstruction system between fluence-based system and dose measurement-guided system.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yuji; Ono, Takeshi; Onitsuka, Ryota; Maruyama, Masato; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Kai, Yudai

    2016-01-01

    COMPASS system (IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany) and ArcCHECK with 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL) are commercial quasi-3-dimensional (3D) dosimetry arrays. Cross-validation to compare them under the same conditions, such as a treatment plan, allows for clear evaluation of such measurement devices. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of reconstructed dose distributions from the COMPASS system and ArcCHECK with 3DVH software using Monte Carlo simulation (MC) for multi-leaf collimator (MLC) test patterns and clinical VMAT plans. In a phantom study, ArcCHECK 3DVH showed clear differences from COMPASS, measurement and MC due to the detector resolution and the dose reconstruction method. Especially, ArcCHECK 3DVH showed 7% difference from MC for the heterogeneous phantom. ArcCHECK 3DVH only corrects the 3D dose distribution of treatment planning system (TPS) using ArcCHECK measurement, and therefore the accuracy of ArcCHECK 3DVH depends on TPS. In contrast, COMPASS showed good agreement with MC for all cases. However, the COMPASS system requires many complicated installation procedures such as beam modeling, and appropriate commissioning is needed. In terms of clinical cases, there were no large differences for each QA device. The accuracy of the compass and ArcCHECK 3DVH systems for phantoms and clinical cases was compared. Both systems have advantages and disadvantages for clinical use, and consideration of the operating environment is important. The QA system selection is depending on the purpose and workflow in each hospital. PMID:27179708

  12. Dose error analysis for a scanned proton beam delivery system.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Wang, N; Miller, D W; Yang, Y

    2010-12-01

    All particle beam scanning systems are subject to dose delivery errors due to errors in position, energy and intensity of the delivered beam. In addition, finite scan speeds, beam spill non-uniformities, and delays in detector, detector electronics and magnet responses will all contribute errors in delivery. In this paper, we present dose errors for an 8 × 10 × 8 cm(3) target of uniform water equivalent density with 8 cm spread out Bragg peak and a prescribed dose of 2 Gy. Lower doses are also analyzed and presented later in the paper. Beam energy errors and errors due to limitations of scanning system hardware have been included in the analysis. By using Gaussian shaped pencil beams derived from measurements in the research room of the James M Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda, CA and executing treatment simulations multiple times, statistical dose errors have been calculated in each 2.5 mm cubic voxel in the target. These errors were calculated by delivering multiple treatments to the same volume and calculating the rms variation in delivered dose at each voxel in the target. The variations in dose were the result of random beam delivery errors such as proton energy, spot position and intensity fluctuations. The results show that with reasonable assumptions of random beam delivery errors, the spot scanning technique yielded an rms dose error in each voxel less than 2% or 3% of the 2 Gy prescribed dose. These calculated errors are within acceptable clinical limits for radiation therapy. PMID:21076200

  13. Minimum number of spermatozoa per dose in Mediterranean Italian buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) using sexed frozen semen and conventional artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Gaviraghi, A; Puglisi, R; Balduzzi, D; Severgnini, A; Bornaghi, V; Bongioni, G; Frana, A; Gandini, L M; Lukaj, A; Bonacina, C; Galli, A

    2013-05-01

    In buffaloes, AI with sexed semen is not fully optimized, and the procedure has only been performed using the approach currently in use for cattle. The objective of the present work was to compare the pregnancy rates in Mediterranean Italian buffalo cows inseminated with sexed frozen-thawed semen at 2, 4, 6, and 8 million sperm per dose, using the Ovsynch protocol and conventional AI at a fixed time. Fresh ejaculates from three buffalo bulls were processed according to Beltsville sperm sorting technology, and packaged in 0.25-mL straws with two total concentrations of 2 and 4 million live sorted sperm per straw. After thawing, semen was evaluated for total motility, forward motility, average path velocity, membrane and DNA integrity, and membrane fluidity. Sorting efficiency was estimated using a real time polymerase chain reaction method developed and validated in our laboratory. The artificial inseminations were conducted during the breeding season on 849 Italian Mediterranean buffalo heifers and cows distributed in 13 farms in northern and central Italy. No significant difference in quality parameters was reported between nonsexed and sexed straws produced with 2 and 4 million sperm. Lower pregnancy rate (P < 0.001) was reported when inseminating doses of sexed semen at 2 million were used (53/170; 31.2%), with respect to conventional nonsexed (78/142; 54.9%), and sexed doses at 4, 6, and 8 million spermatozoa (102/205, 49.8%; 84/175, 48.0%; and 74/157, 47.1%, respectively). No differences were evident using conventional doses and sexed semen with sperm numbers equal or higher than 4 million per dose. Pregnancies were not affected by the sire; 39/82 (47.6%), 120/270 (44.4%), and 151/355 (42.5%), respectively, for the three bulls. Variability in pregnancy rates observed in different herds was not significant. Furthermore, no significant difference was reported between pregnancies obtained with sexed semen in heifers and multiparous, respectively, 179/407 (44

  14. Fused number representation systems and their barcode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaian, Sarkis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we focus on: a) enhancing the performance of existing barcode systems and b) building a barcode system for mobile applications. First we introduce a new concept of generating a parametric number representation system by fusing a number of representation systems that use multiplication, addition, and other operations. Second we show how one can generate a secure, reliable, and high capacity color barcode by using the fused system. The representation, symbols, and colors may be used as encryption keys that can be encoded into barcodes, thus eliminating the direct dependence on cryptographic techniques. To supply an extra layer of security, the fused system also allows one to encrypt given data using different types of encryption methods. In addition, this fused system can be used to improve image processing applications and cryptography.

  15. Examining Provincial HPV Vaccination Schemes in Canada: Should We Standardise the Grade of Vaccination or the Number of Doses?

    PubMed Central

    Smith?, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection, which is linked to several cancers and genital warts. Depending on the Canadian province, the quadrivalent vaccine is given to girls in grades 4 through 10 with either a two- or three-dose schedule. We use a mathematical model to address the following research questions: (1) Does the grade at which the girls are vaccinated significantly affect the outcome of the program? (2) What coverage rate must the provinces reach in order to reduce the impact of HPV on the Canadian population? (3) What are the implications of vaccinating with two versus three doses? The model suggests the grade of vaccination and the number of doses do not make a significant difference to the outcome of the public vaccination program. The most significant factor is the coverage rate of children and adults. We recommend that provinces vaccinate as early as possible to avoid vaccine failure due to previous infection. We also recommend that the main focus of the program should be on obtaining a large enough coverage rate for children and/or adults in order to achieve the desired outcome with either two or three doses of the vaccine.

  16. New Strategies for Teaching Properties of Number Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creswell, John L.; Wiscamb, Margaret

    1970-01-01

    Presents techniques and materials for instruction at secondary school and upper elementary grades in mathematical concepts of number systems structure. Grouping is used as a simple algebraic system to illustrate structure. Closure, inverse, identity, commutative and associative properties are examines relative to manipulation of geometric figureS.…

  17. NOTE: Cone beam computerized tomography: the effect of calibration of the Hounsfield unit number to electron density on dose calculation accuracy for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Joan; McCurdy, Boyd; Greer, Peter B.

    2009-08-01

    The availability of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) images at the time of treatment has opened possibilities for dose calculations representing the delivered dose for adaptive radiation therapy. A significant component in the accuracy of dose calculation is the calibration of the Hounsfield unit (HU) number to electron density (ED). The aim of this work is to assess the impact of HU to ED calibration phantom insert composition and phantom volume on dose calculation accuracy for CBCT. CBCT HU to ED calibration curves for different commercial phantoms were measured and compared. The effect of the scattering volume of the phantom on the HU to ED calibration was examined as a function of phantom length and radial diameter. The resulting calibration curves were used at the treatment planning system to calculate doses for geometrically simple phantoms and a pelvic anatomical phantom to compare against measured doses. Three-dimensional dose distributions for the pelvis phantom were calculated using the HU to ED curves and compared using Chi comparisons. The HU to ED calibration curves for the commercial phantoms diverge at densities greater than that of water, depending on the elemental composition of the phantom insert. The effect of adding scatter material longitudinally, increasing the phantom length from 5 cm to 26 cm, was found to be up to 260 HU numbers for the high-density insert. The change in the HU value, by increasing the diameter of the phantom from 18 to 40 cm, was found to be up to 1200 HU for the high-density insert. The effect of phantom diameter on the HU to ED curve can lead to dose differences for 6 MV and 18 MV x-rays under bone inhomogeneities of up to 20% in extreme cases. These results show significant dosimetric differences when using a calibration phantom with materials which are not tissue equivalent. More importantly, the amount of scattering material used with the HU to ED calibration phantom has a significant effect on the dosimetric

  18. Exchange and correlation in open systems of fluctuating electron number

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, John P.; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Csonka, Gabor I.; Vydrov, Oleg A.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Staroverov, Viktor N.; Tao, Jianmin

    2007-10-15

    While the exact total energy of a separated open system varies linearly as a function of average electron number between adjacent integers, the energy predicted by semilocal density-functional approximations is concave up and the exact-exchange-only or Hartree-Fock energy is concave down. As a result, semilocal density functionals fail for separated open systems of fluctuating electron number, as in stretched molecular ions A{sub 2}{sup +} and in solid transition-metal oxides. We develop an exact-exchange theory and an exchange-hole sum rule that explain these failures and we propose a way to correct them via a local hybrid functional.

  19. 78 FR 6732 - Changes to Standard Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ..., Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Rule... Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database rule became...

  20. Safety in numbers 1: Essential numerical and scientific principles underpinning medication dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Young, Simon; Weeks, Keith W; Hutton, B Meriel

    2013-03-01

    Registered nurses spend up to 40% of their professional clinical practice engaged in the art and science of medication dosage calculation problem-solving (MDC-PS). In advancing this patient safety critical discipline it is our position that as a profession we must first situate MDC-PS within the context of the wider features of the nursing numeracy, medicines management and clinical pharmacokinetic domains that inform its practice. This paper focuses on the essential relationship between numeracy, healthcare numeracy, medicines management, pharmacokinetics and MDC-PS. We present a taxonomy of generic numerical competencies for the pre-registration curriculum, with examples of essential medication dosage calculation requirements mapped to each skills domain. This is followed by a review of the symbols and measurement units that represent essential components of calculation competence in healthcare and medicines management practice. Finally we outline the fundamental pharmacokinetic knowledge that explains how the body deals with medication and we illustrate through clinical correlations why numeric and scientific knowledge and skills must be mastered to ensure safe dosage calculation and medicines management practice. The findings inform nurse education practice via advancing our understanding of a number of issues, including a unified taxonomy of generic numerical competencies mapped to the 42 revised UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) Essential Skills Clusters (NMC, 2010a; NMC, 2010b). PMID:23273945

  1. Implementation of dose management system at radiation protection board of Ghana Atomic Energy Commission.

    PubMed

    Hasford, F; Amoako, J K; Darko, E O; Emi-Reynolds, G; Sosu, E K; Otoo, F; Asiedu, G O

    2012-01-01

    The dose management system (DMS) is a computer software developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency for managing data on occupational exposure to radiation sources and intake of radionuclides. It is an integrated system for the user-friendly storage, processing and control of all existing internal and external dosimetry data. The Radiation Protection Board (RPB) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission has installed, customised, tested and using the DMS as a comprehensive DMS to improve personnel and area monitoring in the country. Personnel dose records from the RPBs database from 2000 to 2009 are grouped into medical, industrial and education/research sectors. The medical sector dominated the list of monitored institutions in the country over the 10-y period representing ∼87 %, while the industrial and education/research sectors represent ∼9 and ∼4 %, respectively. The number of monitored personnel in the same period follows a similar trend with medical, industrial and education/research sectors representing ∼74, ∼17 and ∼9 %, respectively. Analysis of dose data for 2009 showed that there was no instance of a dose above the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, however, 2.7 % of the exposed workers received individual annual doses >1 mSv. The highest recorded individual annual dose and total collective dose in all sectors were 4.73 mSv and 159.84 man Sv, respectively. Workers in the medical sector received higher individual doses than in the other two sectors, and average dose per exposed worker in all sectors is 0.25 mSv. PMID:21335631

  2. Mental Numerosity Line in the Human's Approximate Number System.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinlin; Shen, Chaoran; Li, Leinian; Li, Dawei; Cui, Jiaxin

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated existence of a mental line for symbolic numbers (e.g., Arabic digits). For nonsymbolic number systems, however, it remains unresolved whether a spontaneous spatial layout of numerosity exists. The current experiment investigated whether SNARC-like (Spatial-Numerical Association of Response Codes) effects exist in approximate processing of numerosity, as well as of size and density. Participants were asked to judge whether two serially presented stimuli (i.e., dot arrays, pentagons) were the same regarding numbers of dots, sizes of the pentagon, or densities of dots. Importantly, two confounds that were overlooked by most previous studies were controlled in this study: no ordered numerosity was presented, and only numerosity in the approximate number system (beyond the subitizing range) was used. The results demonstrated that there was a SNARC-like effect only in the numerosity-matching task. The results suggest that numerosity could be spontaneously aligned to a left-to-right oriented mental line according to magnitude information in human's approximate number system. PMID:27404985

  3. Young Children "Solve for X" Using the Approximate Number System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibbe, Melissa M.; Feigenson, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The Approximate Number System (ANS) supports basic arithmetic computation in early childhood, but it is unclear whether the ANS also supports the more complex computations introduced later in formal education. "Solving for x" in addend-unknown problems is notoriously difficult for children, who often struggle with these types of problems…

  4. A comparison of surface doses for two immobilizing systems.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M W; Griggs, M A; Sharma, S C

    1995-01-01

    To achieve accurate and reproducible treatments, many types of immobilizing systems have been used. Two of these systems: Alpha Cradle and VacFix, conform around the patient to improve day-to-day treatment repositioning. The Alpha Cradle system has been in clinical use for several years. The system involves two polyurethane chemicals which upon mixing in a latex bag will expand and harden around the patient. The second system (VacFix) uses a 0.15 mm thick plastic bag loosely filled with 1 mm polysterol spheres. The patient lays on the bag in the treatment position and the air is evacuated from the bag. This system retains its shape for the entire treatment and can be re-used. In some patient set-ups, it is possible that the beam is modified as it passes through these devices, causing a potential change in the target dose and an increase in the patient surface dose. CT scans of the Alpha Cradle and VacFix systems were performed and relative densities were calculated and compared to air. Material densities and surface dose data for a Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit and a dual photon linear accelerator are presented. PMID:7576093

  5. Preliminary assessment of radiological doses in alternative waste management systems without an MRS facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.J.; Pelto, P.J.; Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.; Fecht, B.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report presents generic analyses of radiological dose impacts of nine hypothetical changes in the operation of a waste management system without a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The waste management activities examined in this study include those for handling commercial spent fuel at nuclear power reactors and at the surface facilities of a deep geologic repository, and the transportation of spent fuel by rail and truck between the reactors and the repository. In the reference study system, the radiological doses to the public and to the occupational workers are low, about 170 person-rem/1000 metric ton of uranium (MTU) handled with 70% of the fuel transported by rail and 30% by truck. The radiological doses to the public are almost entirely from transportation, whereas the doses to the occupational workers are highest at the reactors and the repository. Operating alternatives examined included using larger transportation casks, marshaling rail cars into multicar dedicated trains, consolidating spent fuel at the reactors, and wet or dry transfer options of spent fuel from dry storage casks. The largest contribution to radiological doses per unit of spent fuel for both the public and occupational workers would result from use of truck transportation casks, which are smaller than rail casks. Thus, reducing the number of shipments by increasing cask sizes and capacities (which also would reduce the number of casks to be handled at the terminals) would reduce the radiological doses in all cases. Consolidating spent fuel at the reactors would reduce the radiological doses to the public but would increase the doses to the occupational workers at the reactors.

  6. Preliminary dose comparisons for the MRS Systems Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pelto, P.J.; Lavender, J.C.

    1989-04-01

    This report provides preliminary information on the radiological doses to the public and the workers for alternative system configurations proposed in the MRS Systems Study. Information published in the MRS Environmental Assessment (DOE 1986) was used as a basis for this analysis. The risk differences between alternative configurations were found to be small and should not be viewed as a major factor in selecting alternative configurations. 1 ref.

  7. Dose measurements in space by the Hungarian Pille TLD system.

    PubMed

    Apathy, I; Deme, S; Feher, I; Akatov, Y A; Reitz, G; Arkhanguelski, V V

    2002-10-01

    Exposure of crew, equipment, and experiments to the ambient space radiation environment in low Earth orbit poses one of the most significant problems to long-term space habitation. Accurate dose measurement has become increasingly important during the assembly (extravehicular activity (EVA)) and operation of space stations such as on Space Station Mir. Passive integrating detector systems such as thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) are commonly used for dosimetry mapping and personal dosimetry on space vehicles. The well-known advantages of passive detector systems are their independence of power supply, small dimensions, high sensitivity, good stability, wide measuring range, resistance to environmental effects, and relatively low cost. Nevertheless, they have the general disadvantage that for evaluation purposes they need a laboratory or large--in mass and power consumption--terrestrial equipment, and consequently they cannot provide time-resolved dose data during long-term space flights. KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (KFKI AEKI) has developed and manufactured a series of thermoluminescent dosemeter systems for measuring cosmic radiation doses in the 10 microGy to 10 Gy range, consisting of a set of bulb dosemeters and a compact, self-contained, TLD reader suitable for on-board evaluation of the dosemeters. By means of such a system, highly accurate measurements were carried out on board the Salyut-6, -7 and Mir Space Stations as well as on the Space Shuttle. A detailed description of the system is given and the comprehensive results of these measurements are summarised. PMID:12440428

  8. NES++: number system for encryption based privacy preserving speaker verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Feng, Tao; Zhao, Xi; Shi, Weidong

    2014-05-01

    As speech based operation becomes a main hand-free interaction solution between human and mobile devices (i.e., smartphones, Google Glass), privacy preserving speaker verification receives much attention nowadays. Privacy preserving speaker verification can be achieved through many different ways, such as fuzzy vault and encryption. Encryption based solutions are promising as cryptography is based on solid mathematic foundations and the security properties can be easily analyzed in a well established framework. Most current asymmetric encryption schemes work on finite algebraic structures, such as finite group and finite fields. However, the encryption scheme for privacy preserving speaker verification must handle floating point numbers. This gap must be filled to make the overall scheme practical. In this paper, we propose a number system that meets the requirements of both speaker verification and the encryption scheme used in the process. It also supports addition homomorphic property of Pailliers encryption, which is crucial for privacy preserving speaker verification. As asymmetric encryption is expensive, we propose a method of packing several numbers into one plain-text and the computation overhead is greatly reduced. To evaluate the performance of this method, we implement Pailliers encryption scheme over proposed number system and the packing technique. Our findings show that the proposed solution can fulfill the gap between speaker verification and encryption scheme very well, and the packing technique improves the overall performance. Furthermore, our solution is a building block of encryption based privacy preserving speaker verification, the privacy protection and accuracy rate are not affected.

  9. SHC2 gene copy number in multiple system atrophy (MSA)

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Marcus C.; Garland, Emily M.; Hedges, Lora; Womack-Nunley, Bethany; Hamid, Rizwan; Phillips, John A.; Shibao, Cyndya A.; Raj, Satish R.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic, late onset, rapidly-progressing neurodegenerative disorder, which is characterized by autonomic failure, together with parkinsonian, cerebellar, and pyramidal motor symptoms. The pathologic hallmark is the glial cytoplasmic inclusion with alpha-synuclein aggregates. MSA is thus an alpha synucleinopathy. Recently, Sasaki et al. reported that heterozygosity for copy number loss of Src homology 2 domain containing-transforming protein 2 (SHC2) genes (heterozygous SHC2 gene deletions) occurred in DNAs from many Japanese individuals with MSA. Because background copy number variation (CNV) can be distinct in different human populations, we assessed SHC2 allele copy number in DNAs from a US cohort of individuals with MSA, to determine the contribution of SHC2 gene copy number variation in an American cohort followed at a US referral center for MSA. Our cohort included 105 carefully phenotyped individuals with MSA. Methods We studied 105 well characterized patients with MSA and 5 control subjects with reduced SHC2 gene copy number. We used two TaqMan Gene Copy Number Assays, to determine the copy number of two segments of the SHC2 gene that are separated by 27 Kb. Results Assay results of DNAs from all of our 105 subjects with MSA showed two copies of both segments of their SHC2 genes. Conclusion Our results indicate that SHC2 gene deletions underlie few, if any, cases of well characterized MSA in the US population. This is in contrast to the Japanese experience reported by Sasaki et al., likely reflecting heterogeneity of the disease in different genetic backgrounds. PMID:24170347

  10. K-System Generator of Pseudorandom Numbers on Galois Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasiu, G. G.; Floratos, E. G.; Savvidy, G. K.

    We analyze the structure of the periodic trajectories of the K-system generator of pseudorandom numbers on a rational sublattice which coincides with the Galois field GF[p]. The period of the trajectories increases as a function of the lattice size p and the dimension of the K-matrix d. We emphasize the connection of this approach with the one which is based on primitive matrices over Galois fields.

  11. K-system generator of pseudorandom numbers of Galois field

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiu, G.G.; Floratos, E.G.; Savvidy, G.K.

    1997-06-01

    We analyze the structure of the periodic trajectories of the K-system generator of pseudorandom numbers on a rational sublattice which coincides with the Galois field GF[p]. The period of the trajectories increases as a function of the lattice size p and the dimension of the K-matrix d. We emphasize the connection of this approach with the one which is based on primitive matrices over Galois fields.

  12. Total Dose Effects on Error Rates in Linear Bipolar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchner, Stephen; McMorrow, Dale; Bernard, Muriel; Roche, Nicholas; Dusseau, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    The shapes of single event transients in linear bipolar circuits are distorted by exposure to total ionizing dose radiation. Some transients become broader and others become narrower. Such distortions may affect SET system error rates in a radiation environment. If the transients are broadened by TID, the error rate could increase during the course of a mission, a possibility that has implications for hardness assurance.

  13. Omitted doses as an unintended consequence of a hospital restricted antibacterial system: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Neil; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Jacklin, Ann; Wilcock, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of omitted doses of antibacterial agents and explore a number of risk factors, including the effect of a restricted antibacterial system. Methods Antibacterial data were extracted from a hospital electronic prescribing and medication administration system for the period 1 January to 30 April 2014. Percentage dose omission rates were calculated. Omission rates for the first dose of antibacterial courses were analysed using logistic regression to identify any correlation between first dose omission rates and potential risk factors, including the antibacterials' restriction status and whether or not they were ward stock. Results The study included 90 761 antibacterial doses. Of these, 6535 (7.2%) were documented as having been omitted; omission of 847 (0.9% of 90 761) was due to medication being unavailable. Non-restricted, ward stock antibacterials had the lowest frequency of omission, with 6.2% (271 of 4391) first doses omitted. The prevalence was 10.4% (27 of 260) for restricted, ward-stock antibacterials (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0–2.4, P = 0.027) and 15.5% (53 of 341) for non-restricted, non-ward stock antibacterials (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 2.0–3.7, P < 0.001). Restricted, non-ward stock antibacterials had the highest frequency (30.7%, 71 of 231; OR = 6.2, 95% CI = 4.5–8.4, P < 0.001). Conclusions Antibacterials not stocked in clinical areas were significantly more likely to be omitted. The prevalence of omitted doses increased further if the antibiotic was also restricted. To achieve safe, effective antimicrobial use, a balance is needed between promoting antimicrobial stewardship and preventing unintended omitted doses. PMID:26316382

  14. Young children 'solve for x' using the Approximate Number System.

    PubMed

    Kibbe, Melissa M; Feigenson, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The Approximate Number System (ANS) supports basic arithmetic computation in early childhood, but it is unclear whether the ANS also supports the more complex computations introduced later in formal education. 'Solving for x' in addend-unknown problems is notoriously difficult for children, who often struggle with these types of problems well into high school. Here we asked whether 4-6-year-old children could solve for an unknown addend using the ANS. We presented problems either symbolically, using Arabic numerals or verbal number words, or non-symbolically, using collections of objects while preventing verbal counting. Across five experiments, children failed to identify the value of the unknown addend when problems were presented symbolically, but succeeded when problems were presented non-symbolically. Our results suggest that, well before formal exposure to unknown-addend problems, children appear to 'solve for x' in an intuitive way, using the ANS. PMID:24589420

  15. Number-theoretic nature of communication in quantum spin systems.

    PubMed

    Godsil, Chris; Kirkland, Stephen; Severini, Simone; Smith, Jamie

    2012-08-01

    The last decade has witnessed substantial interest in protocols for transferring information on networks of quantum mechanical objects. A variety of control methods and network topologies have been proposed, on the basis that transfer with perfect fidelity-i.e., deterministic and without information loss-is impossible through unmodulated spin chains with more than a few particles. Solving the original problem formulated by Bose [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 207901 (2003)], we determine the exact number of qubits in unmodulated chains (with an XY Hamiltonian) that permit transfer with a fidelity arbitrarily close to 1, a phenomenon called pretty good state transfer. We prove that this happens if and only if the number of nodes is n = p - 1, 2p - 1, where p is a prime, or n = 2(m) - 1. The result highlights the potential of quantum spin system dynamics for reinterpreting questions about the arithmetic structure of integers and, in this case, primality. PMID:23006153

  16. Analysis of entropy extraction efficiencies in random number generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-05-01

    Random numbers (RNs) have applications in many areas: lottery games, gambling, computer simulation, and, most importantly, cryptography [N. Gisin et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 74 (2002) 145]. In cryptography theory, the theoretical security of the system calls for high quality RNs. Therefore, developing methods for producing unpredictable RNs with adequate speed is an attractive topic. Early on, despite the lack of theoretical support, pseudo RNs generated by algorithmic methods performed well and satisfied reasonable statistical requirements. However, as implemented, those pseudorandom sequences were completely determined by mathematical formulas and initial seeds, which cannot introduce extra entropy or information. In these cases, “random” bits are generated that are not at all random. Physical random number generators (RNGs), which, in contrast to algorithmic methods, are based on unpredictable physical random phenomena, have attracted considerable research interest. However, the way that we extract random bits from those physical entropy sources has a large influence on the efficiency and performance of the system. In this manuscript, we will review and discuss several randomness extraction schemes that are based on radiation or photon arrival times. We analyze the robustness, post-processing requirements and, in particular, the extraction efficiency of those methods to aid in the construction of efficient, compact and robust physical RNG systems.

  17. A comparison of the dose distributions from three proton treatment planning systems in the planning of meningioma patients with single-field uniform dose pencil beam scanning.

    PubMed

    Doolan, Paul J; Alshaikhi, Jailan; Rosenberg, Ivan; Ainsley, Chris G; Gibson, Adam; D'Souza, Derek; Bentefour, El Hassane; Royle, Gary

    2015-01-01

    With the number of new proton centers increasing rapidly, there is a need for an assessment of the available proton treatment planning systems (TPSs). This study compares the dose distributions of complex meningioma plans produced by three proton TPSs: Eclipse, Pinnacle3, and XiO. All three systems were commissioned with the same beam data and, as best as possible, matched configuration settings. Proton treatment plans for ten patients were produced on each system with a pencil beam scanning, single-field uniform dose approach, using a fixed horizontal beamline. All 30 plans were subjected to identical dose constraints, both for the target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing, with a consistent order of priority. Beam geometry, lateral field margins, and lateral spot resolutions were made consistent across all systems. Few statistically significant differences were found between the target coverage and OAR sparing of each system, with all optimizers managing to produce plans within clinical tolerances (D2 < 107% of prescribed dose, D5 < 105%, D95 > 95%, D99 > 90%, and OAR maximum doses) despite strict constraints and overlapping structures. PMID:25679158

  18. A time- and dose-dependent STAT1 expression system

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Nicole R; Strobl, Birgit; Bokor, Marion; Painz, Ronald; Kolbe, Thomas; Rülicke, Thomas; Müller, Mathias; Karaghiosoff, Marina

    2006-01-01

    Background The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family of transcription factors mediates a variety of cytokine dependent gene regulations. STAT1 has been mainly characterized by its role in interferon (IFN) type I and II signaling and STAT1 deficiency leads to high susceptibility to several pathogens. For fine-tuned analysis of STAT1 function we established a dimerizer-inducible system for STAT1 expression in vitro and in vivo. Results The functionality of the dimerizer-induced STAT1 system is demonstrated in vitro in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and embryonic stem cells. We show that this two-vector based system is highly inducible and does not show any STAT1 expression in the absence of the inducer. Reconstitution of STAT1 deficient cells with inducible STAT1 restores IFNγ-mediated gene induction, antiviral responses and STAT1 activation remains dependent on cytokine stimulation. STAT1 expression is induced rapidly upon addition of dimerizer and expression levels can be regulated in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore we show that in transgenic mice STAT1 can be induced upon stimulation with the dimerizer, although only at low levels. Conclusion These results prove that the dimerizer-induced system is a powerful tool for STAT1 analysis in vitro and provide evidence that the system is suitable for the use in transgenic mice. To our knowledge this is the first report for inducible STAT1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. PMID:17184522

  19. Absorbed dose and dose rate using the Varian OBI 1.3 and 1.4 CBCT system.

    PubMed

    Palm, Asa; Nilsson, Elisabeth; Herrnsdorf, Lars

    2010-01-01

    According to published data, the absorbed dose used for a CBCT image acquisition with Varian OBI v1.3 can be as high as 100 mGy. In 2008 Varian released a new OBI version (v1.4), which promised to reduce the imaging dose. In this study, absorbed doses used for CBCT image acquisitions with the default irradiation techniques of Varian OBI v1.3 and v1.4 are measured. TLDs are used to derive dose distributions at three planes inside an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition, point doses and dose profiles inside a 'stack' of three CTDI body phantoms are measured using a new solid state detector, the CT Dose Profiler. With the CT Dose Profiler, the individual pulses from the X-ray tube are also studied. To verify the absorbed dose measured with the CT Dose Profiler, it is compared to TLD. The image quality is evaluated using a Catphan phantom. For OBI v1.3, doses measured in transverse planes of the Alderson phantom range between 64 mGy and 144 mGy. The average dose is around 100 mGy. For OBI v1.4, doses measured in transverse planes of the Alderson phantom range between 1 mGy and 51 mGy. Mean doses range between 3-35 mGy depending on CBCT mode. CT Dose Profiler data agree with TLD measurements in a CTDI phantom within the uncertainty of the TLD measurements (estimated SD +/- 10%). Instantaneous dose rate at the periphery of the phantom can be higher than 20 mGy/s, which is 10 times the dose rate at the center. The spatial resolution in v1.4 is not as high as in v1.3. In conclusion, measurements show that the imaging doses for default modes in Varian OBI v1.4 CBCT system are significantly lower than in v1.3. The CT Dose Profiler is proven fast and accurate for CBCT applications. PMID:20160695

  20. The Approximate Number System Acuity Redefined: A Diffusion Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joonkoo; Starns, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    While all humans are capable of non-verbally representing numerical quantity using so-called the approximate number system (ANS), there exist considerable individual differences in its acuity. For example, in a non-symbolic number comparison task, some people find it easy to discriminate brief presentations of 14 dots from 16 dots while others do not. Quantifying individual ANS acuity from such a task has become an essential practice in the field, as individual differences in such a primitive number sense is thought to provide insights into individual differences in learned symbolic math abilities. However, the dominant method of characterizing ANS acuity—computing the Weber fraction (w)—only utilizes the accuracy data while ignoring response times (RT). Here, we offer a novel approach of quantifying ANS acuity by using the diffusion model, which accounts both accuracy and RT distributions. Specifically, the drift rate in the diffusion model, which indexes the quality of the stimulus information, is used to capture the precision of the internal quantity representation. Analysis of behavioral data shows that w is contaminated by speed-accuracy tradeoff, making it problematic as a measure of ANS acuity, while drift rate provides a measure more independent from speed-accuracy criterion settings. Furthermore, drift rate is a better predictor of symbolic math ability than w, suggesting a practical utility of the measure. These findings demonstrate critical limitations of the use of w and suggest clear advantages of using drift rate as a measure of primitive numerical competence. PMID:26733929

  1. A Global Existence Result for a Zero Mach Number System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xian

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we study the global-in-time existence of weak solutions to a zero Mach number system that derives from the Navier-Stokes-Fourier system, under a special relationship between the viscosity coefficient and the heat conductivity coefficient. Roughly speaking, this relation implies that the source term in the equation for the newly introduced divergence-free velocity vector field vanishes. In dimension two, thanks to a local-in-time existence result of a unique strong solution in critical Besov spaces given by Danchin and Liao (Commun Contemp Math 14:1250022, 2012), for arbitrary large initial data, we show that this unique strong solution exists globally in time, as a consequence of a weak-strong uniqueness argument.

  2. Food allergy population thresholds: an evaluation of the number of oral food challenges and dosing schemes on the accuracy of threshold dose distribution modeling.

    PubMed

    Klein Entink, Rinke H; Remington, Benjamin C; Blom, W Marty; Rubingh, Carina M; Kruizinga, Astrid G; Baumert, Joseph L; Taylor, Steve L; Houben, Geert F

    2014-08-01

    For most allergenic foods, limited availability of threshold dose information within the population restricts the advice on action levels of unintended allergenic foods which should trigger advisory labeling on packaged foods. The objective of this paper is to provide guidance for selecting an optimal sample size for threshold dosing studies for major allergenic foods and to identify factors influencing the accuracy of estimation. A simulation study was performed to evaluate the effects of sample size and dosing schemes on the accuracy of the threshold distribution curve. The relationships between sample size, dosing scheme and the employed statistical distribution on the one hand and accuracy of estimation on the other hand were obtained. It showed that the largest relative gains in accuracy are obtained when sample size increases from N=20 to N=60. Moreover, it showed that the EuroPrevall dosing scheme is a useful start, but that it may need revision for a specific allergen as more data become available, because a proper allocation of the dosing steps is important. The results may guide risk assessors in minimum sample sizes for new studies and in the allocation of proper dosing schemes for allergens in provocation studies. PMID:24815821

  3. A unique dosing system for the production of OH under high vacuum for the study of environmental heterogeneous reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Matthew A.; Johanek, Viktor; Hemminger, John C.

    2008-02-15

    A unique dosing system for the production of hydroxyl radicals under high vacuum for the study of environmental heterogeneous reactions is described. Hydroxyl radicals are produced by the photodissociation of a hydrogen peroxide aqueous gas mixture with 254 nm radiation according to the reaction H{sub 2}O{sub 2}+h{nu} (254 nm){yields}OH+OH. Under the conditions of the current design, 0.6% conversion of hydrogen peroxide is expected yielding a hydroxyl number density on the order of 10{sup 10} molecules/cm{sup 3}. The flux distribution of the dosing system is calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation method and compared with the experimentally determined results. The performance of this unique hydroxyl dosing system is demonstrated for the heterogeneous reaction with a solid surface of potassium iodide. Coupling of the hydroxyl radical dosing system to a quantitative surface analysis system should help provide molecular level insight into detailed reaction mechanisms.

  4. SU-D-204-06: Dose and Image Quality Evaluation of a Low-Dose Slot-Scanning X-Ray System for Pediatric Orthopedic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z; Hoerner, M; Lamoureux, R; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Children in early teens with scoliosis require repeated radiographic exams over a number of years. The EOS (EOS imaging S.A., Paris, France) is a novel low-dose slot-scanning digital radiographic system designed to produce full-spine images of a free-standing patient. The radiation dose and image quality characteristics of the EOS were evaluated relative to those of a Computed Radiography (CR) system for scoliosis imaging. Methods: For dose evaluation, a full-torso anthropomorphic phantom was scanned five times using the default standard clinical protocols for both the EOS and a CR system, which include both posteroanterior and lateral full-spine views. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs), also known as nanoDots™ (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), were placed on the phantom’s surface to measure entrance skin dose. To assess image quality, MTF curves were generated from sampling the noise levels within the high-contrast regions of a line-pair phantom. Vertical and horizontal distortions were measured for the square line-pair phantom with the EOS system to evaluate the effects of geometric magnification and misalignment with the indicated imaging plane. Results: The entrance skin dose was measured to be 0.4 to 1.1 mGy for the EOS, and 0.7 to 3.6 mGy for the CR study. MTF comparison shows that CR greatly outperforms the EOS, despite both systems having a limiting resolution at 1.8 line-pairs per mm. Vertical distortion was unaffected by phantom positioning, because of the EOS slot-scanning geometry. Horizontal distortion increased linearly with miscentering distance. Conclusion: The EOS system resulted in approximately 70% lower radiation dose than CR for full-spine images. Image quality was found to be inferior to CR. Further investigation is required to see if EOS system is an acceptable modality for performing clinically diagnostic scoliosis examinations.

  5. A retrospective analysis of rectal and bladder dose for gynecological brachytherapy treatments with GZP6 HDR afterloading system

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Makhdoumi, Yasha; Taheri, Mojtaba; Homaee Shandiz, Fatemeh; Zahed Anaraki, Siavash; Soleimani Meigooni, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of this work is to evaluate rectal and bladder dose for the patients treated for gynecological cancers. Background The GZP6 high dose rate brachytherapy system has been recently introduced to a number of radiation therapy departments in Iran, for treatment of various tumor sites such as cervix and vagina. Materials and methods Our analysis was based on dose measurements for 40 insertions in 28 patients, treated by a GZP6 unit between June 2009 and November 2010. Treatments consisted of combined teletherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. In vivo dosimetry was performed with TLD-400 chips and TLD-100 microcubes in the rectum and bladder. Results The average of maximum rectal and bladder dose values were found to be 7.62 Gy (range 1.72–18.55 Gy) and 5.17 Gy (range 0.72–15.85 Gy), respectively. It has been recommended by the ICRU that the maximum dose to the rectum and bladder in intracavitary treatment of vaginal or cervical cancer should be lower than 80% of the prescribed dose to point A in the Manchester system. In this study, of the total number of 40 insertions, maximum rectal dose in 29 insertions (72.5% of treatment sessions) and maximum bladder dose in 18 insertions (45% of treatments sessions) were higher than 80% of the prescribed dose to the point of dose prescription. Conclusion In vivo dosimetry for patients undergoing treatment by GZP6 brachytherapy system can be used for evaluation of the quality of brachytherapy treatments by this system. This information could be used as a base for developing the strategy for treatment of patients treated with GZP6 system. PMID:24377037

  6. Practical dose point-based methods to characterize dose distribution in a stationary elliptical body phantom for a cone-beam C-arm CT system

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Constantin, Dragos; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Girard, Erin; Morin, Richard L.; Dixon, Robert L.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To propose new dose point measurement-based metrics to characterize the dose distributions and the mean dose from a single partial rotation of an automatic exposure control-enabled, C-arm-based, wide cone angle computed tomography system over a stationary, large, body-shaped phantom. Methods: A small 0.6 cm3 ion chamber (IC) was used to measure the radiation dose in an elliptical body-shaped phantom made of tissue-equivalent material. The IC was placed at 23 well-distributed holes in the central and peripheral regions of the phantom and dose was recorded for six acquisition protocols with different combinations of minimum kVp (109 and 125 kVp) and z-collimator aperture (full: 22.2 cm; medium: 14.0 cm; small: 8.4 cm). Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were carried out to generate complete 2D dose distributions in the central plane (z = 0). The MC model was validated at the 23 dose points against IC experimental data. The planar dose distributions were then estimated using subsets of the point dose measurements using two proposed methods: (1) the proximity-based weighting method (method 1) and (2) the dose point surface fitting method (method 2). Twenty-eight different dose point distributions with six different point number cases (4, 5, 6, 7, 14, and 23 dose points) were evaluated to determine the optimal number of dose points and their placement in the phantom. The performances of the methods were determined by comparing their results with those of the validated MC simulations. The performances of the methods in the presence of measurement uncertainties were evaluated. Results: The 5-, 6-, and 7-point cases had differences below 2%, ranging from 1.0% to 1.7% for both methods, which is a performance comparable to that of the methods with a relatively large number of points, i.e., the 14- and 23-point cases. However, with the 4-point case, the performances of the two methods decreased sharply. Among the 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-point cases, the 7-point case (1.0% [±0

  7. The CNAO dose delivery system for modulated scanning ion beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F.; Garella, M. A.; Donetti, M.; Bourhaleb, F.; Monaco, V.; Hosseini, M. A.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Cirio, R.; Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the system for the dose delivery currently used at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) for ion beam modulated scanning radiotherapy. Methods: CNAO Foundation, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Torino have designed, built, and commissioned a dose delivery system (DDS) to monitor and guide ion beams accelerated by a dedicated synchrotron and to distribute the dose with a full 3D scanning technique. Protons and carbon ions are provided for a wide range of energies in order to cover a sizable span of treatment depths. The target volume, segmented in several layers orthogonally to the beam direction, is irradiated by thousands of pencil beams which must be steered and held to the prescribed positions until the prescribed number of particles has been delivered. For the CNAO beam lines, these operations are performed by the DDS. The main components of this system are two independent beam monitoring detectors, called BOX1 and BOX2, interfaced with two control systems performing the tasks of real-time fast and slow control, and connected to the scanning magnets and the beam chopper. As a reaction to any condition leading to a potential hazard, a DDS interlock signal is sent to the patient interlock system which immediately stops the irradiation. The essential tasks and operations performed by the DDS are described following the data flow from the treatment planning system through the end of the treatment delivery. Results: The ability of the DDS to guarantee a safe and accurate treatment was validated during the commissioning phase by means of checks of the charge collection efficiency, gain uniformity of the chambers, and 2D dose distribution homogeneity and stability. A high level of reliability and robustness has been proven by three years of system activity needing rarely more than regular maintenance and working with 100% uptime. Four identical and independent DDS devices have been tested showing

  8. How to describe genes: enlightenment from the quaternary number system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin-Guang

    2007-01-01

    As an open problem, computational gene identification has been widely studied, and many gene finders (software) become available today. However, little attention has been given to the problem of describing the common features of known genes in databanks to transform raw data into human understandable knowledge. In this paper, we draw attention to the task of describing genes and propose a trial implementation by treating DNA sequences as quaternary numbers. Under such a treatment, the common features of genes can be represented by a "position weight function", the core concept for a number system. In principle, the "position weight function" can be any real-valued function. In this paper, by approximating the function using trigonometric functions, some characteristic parameters indicating single nucleotide periodicities were obtained for the bacteria Escherichia coli K12's genome and the eukaryote yeast's genome. As a byproduct of this approach, a single-nucleotide-level measure is derived that complements codon-based indexes in describing the coding quality and expression level of an open reading frame (ORF). The ideas presented here have the potential to become a general methodology for biological sequence analysis. PMID:16945479

  9. Children's expectations about training the approximate number system.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Moira R; Pires, Ana C; Hyde, Daniel C; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2015-11-01

    Humans possess a developmentally precocious and evolutionarily ancient approximate number system (ANS) whose sensitivity correlates with uniquely human symbolic arithmetic skills. Recent studies suggest that ANS training improves symbolic arithmetic, but such studies may engender performance expectations in their participants that in turn produce the improvement. Here, we assessed 6- to 8-year-old children's expectations about the effects of numerical and non-numerical magnitude training, as well as states of satiety and restfulness, in the context of a study linking children's ANS practice to their improved symbolic arithmetic. We found that children did not expect gains in symbolic arithmetic after exercising the ANS, although they did expect gains in ANS acuity after training on any magnitude task. Moreover, children expected gains in symbolic arithmetic after a good night's sleep and their favourite breakfast. Thus, children's improved symbolic arithmetic after ANS training cannot be explained by their expectations about that training. PMID:26399713

  10. Verification of the performance accuracy of a real-time skin-dose tracking system for interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, Daniel R.; Barbarits, Jeffery; Rana, Vijay K.; Nagaraja, Srikanta P.; Josan, Madhur S.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    A tracking system has been developed to provide real-time feedback of skin dose and dose rate during interventional fluoroscopic procedures. The dose tracking system (DTS) calculates the radiation dose rate to the patient's skin using the exposure technique parameters and exposure geometry obtained from the x-ray imaging system digital network (Toshiba Infinix) and presents the cumulative results in a color mapping on a 3D graphic of the patient. We performed a number of tests to verify the accuracy of the dose representation of this system. These tests included comparison of system-calculated dose-rate values with ionization-chamber (6 cc PTW) measured values with change in kVp, beam filter, field size, source-to-skin distance and beam angulation. To simulate a cardiac catheterization procedure, the ionization chamber was also placed at various positions on an Alderson Rando torso phantom and the dose agreement compared for a range of projection angles with the heart at isocenter. To assess the accuracy of the dose distribution representation, Gafchromic film (XR-RV3, ISP) was exposed with the beam at different locations. The DTS and film distributions were compared and excellent visual agreement was obtained within the cm-sized surface elements used for the patient graphic. The dose (rate) values agreed within about 10% for the range of variables tested. Correction factors could be applied to obtain even closer agreement since the variable values are known in real-time. The DTS provides skin-dose values and dose mapping with sufficient accuracy for use in monitoring diagnostic and interventional x-ray procedures.

  11. Verification of the performance accuracy of a real-time skin-dose tracking system for interventional fluoroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Daniel R; Barbarits, Jeffery; Rana, Vijay K; Nagaraja, Srikanta P; Josan, Madhur S; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-02-13

    A tracking system has been developed to provide real-time feedback of skin dose and dose rate during interventional fluoroscopic procedures. The dose tracking system (DTS) calculates the radiation dose rate to the patient's skin using the exposure technique parameters and exposure geometry obtained from the x-ray imaging system digital network (Toshiba Infinix) and presents the cumulative results in a color mapping on a 3D graphic of the patient. We performed a number of tests to verify the accuracy of the dose representation of this system. These tests included comparison of system-calculated dose-rate values with ionization-chamber (6 cc PTW) measured values with change in kVp, beam filter, field size, source-to-skin distance and beam angulation. To simulate a cardiac catheterization procedure, the ionization chamber was also placed at various positions on an Alderson Rando torso phantom and the dose agreement compared for a range of projection angles with the heart at isocenter. To assess the accuracy of the dose distribution representation, Gafchromic film (XR-RV3, ISP) was exposed with the beam at different locations. The DTS and film distributions were compared and excellent visual agreement was obtained within the cm-sized surface elements used for the patient graphic. The dose (rate) values agreed within about 10% for the range of variables tested. Correction factors could be applied to obtain even closer agreement since the variable values are known in real-time. The DTS provides skin-dose values and dose mapping with sufficient accuracy for use in monitoring diagnostic and interventional x-ray procedures. PMID:21731400

  12. Significant Inter-Test Reliability across Approximate Number System Assessments

    PubMed Central

    DeWind, Nicholas K.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    The approximate number system (ANS) is the hypothesized cognitive mechanism that allows adults, infants, and animals to enumerate large sets of items approximately. Researchers usually assess the ANS by having subjects compare two sets and indicate which is larger. Accuracy or Weber fraction is taken as an index of the acuity of the system. However, as Clayton et al. (2015) have highlighted, the stimulus parameters used when assessing the ANS vary widely. In particular, the numerical ratio between the pairs, and the way in which non-numerical features are varied often differ radically between studies. Recently, Clayton et al. (2015) found that accuracy measures derived from two commonly used stimulus sets are not significantly correlated. They argue that a lack of inter-test reliability threatens the validity of the ANS construct. Here we apply a recently developed modeling technique to the same data set. The model, by explicitly accounting for the effect of numerical ratio and non-numerical features, produces dependent measures that are less perturbed by stimulus protocol. Contrary to their conclusion we find a significant correlation in Weber fraction across the two stimulus sets. Nevertheless, in agreement with Clayton et al. (2015) we find that different protocols do indeed induce differences in numerical acuity and the degree of influence of non-numerical stimulus features. These findings highlight the need for a systematic investigation of how protocol idiosyncrasies affect ANS assessments. PMID:27014126

  13. Evaluation of the Emergency Response Dose Assessment System(ERDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.; Lambert, Winifred C.; Manobianco, John T.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Wheeler, Mark M.; Yersavich, Ann M.

    1996-01-01

    The emergency response dose assessment system (ERDAS) is a protype software and hardware system configured to produce routine mesoscale meteorological forecasts and enhanced dispersion estimates on an operational basis for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) region. ERDAS provides emergency response guidance to operations at KSC/CCAS in the case of an accidental hazardous material release or an aborted vehicle launch. This report describes the evaluation of ERDAS including: evaluation of sea breeze predictions, comparison of launch plume location and concentration predictions, case study of a toxic release, evaluation of model sensitivity to varying input parameters, evaluation of the user interface, assessment of ERDA's operational capabilities, and a comparison of ERDAS models to the ocean breeze dry gultch diffusion model.

  14. Verification of the performance accuracy of a real-time skin-dose tracking system for interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Bednarek, Daniel R.; Barbarits, Jeffery; Rana, Vijay K.; Nagaraja, Srikanta P.; Josan, Madhur S.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    A tracking system has been developed to provide real-time feedback of skin dose and dose rate during interventional fluoroscopic procedures. The dose tracking system (DTS) calculates the radiation dose rate to the patient’s skin using the exposure technique parameters and exposure geometry obtained from the x-ray imaging system digital network (Toshiba Infinix) and presents the cumulative results in a color mapping on a 3D graphic of the patient. We performed a number of tests to verify the accuracy of the dose representation of this system. These tests included comparison of system–calculated dose-rate values with ionization-chamber (6 cc PTW) measured values with change in kVp, beam filter, field size, source-to-skin distance and beam angulation. To simulate a cardiac catheterization procedure, the ionization chamber was also placed at various positions on an Alderson Rando torso phantom and the dose agreement compared for a range of projection angles with the heart at isocenter. To assess the accuracy of the dose distribution representation, Gafchromic film (XR-RV3, ISP) was exposed with the beam at different locations. The DTS and film distributions were compared and excellent visual agreement was obtained within the cm-sized surface elements used for the patient graphic. The dose (rate) values agreed within about 10% for the range of variables tested. Correction factors could be applied to obtain even closer agreement since the variable values are known in real-time. The DTS provides skin-dose values and dose mapping with sufficient accuracy for use in monitoring diagnostic and interventional x-ray procedures. PMID:21731400

  15. Upgrading NASA/DOSE laser ranging system control computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricklefs, Randall L.; Cheek, Jack; Seery, Paul J.; Emenheiser, Kenneth S.; Hanrahan, William P., III; Mcgarry, Jan F.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ranging systems now managed by the NASA Dynamics of the Solid Earth (DOSE) and operated by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation, the University of Hawaii, and the University of Texas have produced a wealth on interdisciplinary scientific data over the last three decades. Despite upgrades to the most of the ranging station subsystems, the control computers remain a mix of 1970's vintage minicomputers. These encompass a wide range of vendors, operating systems, and languages, making hardware and software support increasingly difficult. Current technology allows replacement of controller computers at a relatively low cost while maintaining excellent processing power and a friendly operating environment. The new controller systems are now being designed using IBM-PC-compatible 80486-based microcomputers, a real-time Unix operating system (LynxOS), and X-windows/Motif IB, and serial interfaces have been chosen. This design supports minimizing short and long term costs by relying on proven standards for both hardware and software components. Currently, the project is in the design and prototyping stage with the first systems targeted for production in mid-1993.

  16. An Absorbed-Dose/Dose-Rate Dependence for the Alanine-EPR Dosimetry System and Its Implications in High-Dose Ionizing Radiation Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, M. F.; Puhl, J. M.; Cooper, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    NIST developed the alanine dosimetry system in the early 1990s to replace radiochromic dye film dosimeters. Later in the decade the alanine system was firmly established as a transfer service for high-dose radiation dosimetry and an integral part of the internal calibration scheme supporting these services. Over the course of the last decade, routine monitoring of the system revealed a small but significant observation that, after examination, led to the characterization of a previously unknown absorbed-dose-dependent, dose-rate effect for the alanine system. Though the potential impact of this effect is anticipated to be extremely limited for NIST’s customer-based transfer dosimetry service, much greater implications may be realized for international measurement comparisons between National Measurement Institutes. PMID:27096113

  17. A low, adaptive dose of gamma-rays reduced the number and altered the spectrum of S1- mutants in human-hamster hybrid AL cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, A. M.; Vannais, D. B.; Gustafson, D. L.; Wong, J. C.; Waldren, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We examined the effects of a low, adaptive dose of 137Cs-gamma-irradiation (0.04 Gy) on the number and kinds of mutants induced in AL human-hamster hybrid cells by a later challenge dose of 4 Gy. The yield of S1- mutants was significantly less (by 53%) after exposure to both the adaptive and challenge doses compared to the challenge dose alone. The yield of hprt- mutants was similarly decreased. Incubation with cycloheximide (CX) or 3-aminobenzamide largely negated the decrease in mutant yield. The adaptive dose did not perturb the cell cycle, was not cytotoxic, and did not of itself increase the mutant yield above background. The adaptive dose did, however, alter the spectrum of S1- mutants from populations exposed only to the adaptive dose, as well as affecting the spectrum of S1- mutants generated by the challenge dose. The major change in both cases was a significant increase in the proportion of complex mutations compared to small mutations and simple deletions.

  18. ARAC: A flexible real-time dose consequence assessment system

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.S.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1993-10-07

    Since its beginning, the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), an emergency radiological dose assessment service of the US Government, has been called on to do consequence assessments for releases into the atmosphere of radionuclides and a variety of other substances. Some of the more noteworthy emergency responses have been for the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power reactor accidents, and more recently, for a cloud of gases from a rail-car spill into the Sacramento river of the herbicide metam sodium, smoke from hundreds of burning oil wells in Kuwait, and ash clouds from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The spatial scales of these responses range from local, to regional, to global, and the response periods from hours, to weeks, to months. Because of the variety of requirements of each unique assessment, ARAC has developed and maintains a flexible system of people, computer software and hardware.

  19. Quality control of dose volume histogram computation characteristics of 3D treatment planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitsa, E.; Rosenwald, J. C.; Kappas, C.

    1998-10-01

    Detailed quality control (QC) protocols are a necessity for modern radiotherapy departments. The established QC protocols for treatment planning systems (TPS) do not include recommendations on the advanced features of three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning, like the dose volume histograms (DVH). In this study, a test protocol for DVH characteristics was developed. The protocol assesses the consistency of the DVH computation to the dose distribution calculated by the same TPS by comparing DVH parameters with values obtained by the isodose distributions. The computation parameters (such as the dimension of the computation grid) that are applied to the TPS during the tests are not fixed but set by the user as if the test represents a typical clinical case. Six commercial TPS were examined with this protocol within the frame of the EC project Dynarad (Biomed I). The results of the intercomparison prove the consistency of the DVH results to the isodose values for most of the examined TPS. However, special attention should be paid when working with cases of adverse conditions such as high dose gradient regions. In these cases, higher errors are derived, especially when an insufficient number of dose calculation points are used for the DVH computation.

  20. The precision of mapping between number words and the approximate number system predicts children's formal math abilities.

    PubMed

    Libertus, Melissa E; Odic, Darko; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2016-10-01

    Children can represent number in at least two ways: by using their non-verbal, intuitive approximate number system (ANS) and by using words and symbols to count and represent numbers exactly. Furthermore, by the time they are 5years old, children can map between the ANS and number words, as evidenced by their ability to verbally estimate numbers of items without counting. How does the quality of the mapping between approximate and exact numbers relate to children's math abilities? The role of the ANS-number word mapping in math competence remains controversial for at least two reasons. First, previous work has not examined the relation between verbal estimation and distinct subtypes of math abilities. Second, previous work has not addressed how distinct components of verbal estimation-mapping accuracy and variability-might each relate to math performance. Here, we addressed these gaps by measuring individual differences in ANS precision, verbal number estimation, and formal and informal math abilities in 5- to 7-year-old children. We found that verbal estimation variability, but not estimation accuracy, predicted formal math abilities, even when controlling for age, expressive vocabulary, and ANS precision, and that it mediated the link between ANS precision and overall math ability. These findings suggest that variability in the ANS-number word mapping may be especially important for formal math abilities. PMID:27348475

  1. Fast evolution of urban ultrafine particles: Implications for deposition doses in the human respiratory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigrasso, Maurizio; Avino, Pasquale

    2012-05-01

    The impact of ultrafine particles (diameters <100 nm) on human health has been addressed in many toxicological studies. It is therefore important to assess relevant respiratory exposure of the population. In this paper, aerosol number-size distribution was measured with 1 s time resolution, in a street canyon, in proximity to traffic, with the purpose of studying the fast evolution of UFP doses deposited in the respiratory system. Close to the traffic, nucleation particle concentrations increase within few seconds and decrease in tens of seconds. As a consequence, the exposure pattern, near to traffic, may be represented as a sequence of short-term peak exposures. The number of UFPs deposited for each tidal volume of air inhaled (instant UFP doses) rapidly reaches level of 107 particles, with maximum values for the alveolar interstitial region. For the correct estimate of short-term exposures, in scenarios involving proximity to traffic, it is therefore crucial to rely on aerosol measurements with a time resolution able to trace the fast evolution of aerosol from vehicle exhausts. When traffic levels drop, spike values of instant UFP doses are comparatively less frequent and the maxima of their size distributions shift from 10 to 20 nm (nucleation particles) to greater diameter (up to about 60 nm).

  2. Dynamic flow control strategies of vehicle SCR Urea Dosing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei; Zhang, Youtong; Asif, Malik

    2015-03-01

    Selective Catalyst Reduction(SCR) Urea Dosing System(UDS) directly affects the system accuracy and the dynamic response performance of a vehicle. However, the UDS dynamic response is hard to keep up with the changes of the engine's operating conditions. That will lead to low NO X conversion efficiency or NH3 slip. In order to optimize the injection accuracy and the response speed of the UDS in dynamic conditions, an advanced control strategy based on an air-assisted volumetric UDS is presented. It covers the methods of flow compensation and switching working conditions. The strategy is authenticated on an UDS and tested in different dynamic conditions. The result shows that the control strategy discussed results in higher dynamic accuracy and faster dynamic response speed of UDS. The inject deviation range is improved from being between -8% and 10% to -4% and 2% and became more stable than before, and the dynamic response time was shortened from 200 ms to 150 ms. The ETC cycle result shows that after using the new strategy the NH3 emission is reduced by 60%, and the NO X emission remains almost unchanged. The trade-off between NO X conversion efficiency and NH3 slip is mitigated. The studied flow compensation and switching working conditions can improve the dynamic performance of the UDS significantly and make the UDS dynamic response keep up with the changes of the engine's operating conditions quickly.

  3. Efficiency of Matricaria chamomilla CH12 and number of doses of rabies vaccine on the humoral immune response in cattle.

    PubMed

    de Souza Reis, Luis Souza; Frazatti-Gallina, Neuza Maria; de Lima Paoli, Rosana; Giuffrida, Rogerio; Albas, Avelino; Oba, Eunice; Pardo, Paulo Eduardo

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Matricaria chamomilla and vaccination frequency on cattle immunization against rabies. Four groups (n = 15 /group) were treated with or without Matricaria chamomilla CH12 and vaccinated with one or two doses of rabies vaccine (30 day interval). No effect of chamomile was found on cattle immunization against rabies; however, antibody titers were protective in cattle vaccinated twice, while 93.3% of cattle vaccinated only once had titers under 0.5 UI/ml after 60 days. In conclusion, the use of chamomile did not alter the humoral immune response in cattle, and two vaccine doses are suggested for achieving protective antibody titers. PMID:19043320

  4. Efficiency of Matricaria chamomilla CH12 and number of doses of rabies vaccine on the humoral immune response in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Frazatti-Gallina, Neuza Maria; de Lima Paoli, Rosana; Giuffrida, Rogerio; Albas, Avelino; Oba, Eunice; Pardo, Paulo Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Matricaria chamomilla and vaccination frequency on cattle immunization against rabies. Four groups (n = 15 /group) were treated with or without Matricaria chamomilla CH12 and vaccinated with one or two doses of rabies vaccine (30 day interval). No effect of chamomile was found on cattle immunization against rabies; however, antibody titers were protective in cattle vaccinated twice, while 93.3% of cattle vaccinated only once had titers under 0.5 UI/ml after 60 days. In conclusion, the use of chamomile did not alter the humoral immune response in cattle, and two vaccine doses are suggested for achieving protective antibody titers. PMID:19043320

  5. SU-E-T-107: Development of a GPU-Based Dose Delivery System for Adaptive Pencil Beam Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Giordanengo, S; Russo, G; Marchetto, F; Attili, A; Monaco, V; Varasteh, M; Pella, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A description of a GPU-based dose delivery system (G-DDS) to integrate a fast forward planning implementing in real-time the prescribed sequence of pencil beams. The system, which is under development, is designed to evaluate the dose distribution deviations due to range variations and interplay effects affecting mobile tumors treatments. Methods: The Dose Delivery System (DDS) in use at the Italian Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), is the starting point for the presented system. A fast and partial forward planning (FP) tool has been developed to evaluate in few seconds the delivered dose distributions using the DDS data (on-line measurements of spot properties, i.e. number of particles and positions). The computation is performed during the intervals between synchrotron spills and, made available at the end of each spill. In the interval between two spills, the G-DDS will evaluate the delivered dose distributions taking into account the real-time target positions measured by a tracking system. The sequence of prescribed pencil beams for the following spill will be adapted taking into account the variations with respect to the original plan due to the target motion. In order to speed up the computation required to modify pencil beams distribution (up to 400 times has been reached), the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and advanced Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are used. Results: An existing offline forward planning is going to be optimized for the CUDA architecture: the gain in time will be presented. The preliminary performances of the developed GPU-based FP algorithms will be shown. Conclusion: A prototype of a GPU-based dose delivery system is under development and will be presented. The system workflow will be illustrated together with the approach adopted to integrate the three main systems, i.e. CNAO dose delivery system, fast forward planning, and tumor tracking system.

  6. A System of Individually Guided Motivation. Practical Paper Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausmeier, Herbert J.; And Others

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a system of individually guided motivation which is directly tied to a total system of individually guided education. In the system of motivation, the child's entering characteristics are assessed, motivational objectives in the form of desired behaviors are set for each child, a program designed to…

  7. [Construction of System for Support of Multifacility IVR Dose Analysis and Research].

    PubMed

    Sun, Lue; Hitomi, Go; Futatsuya, Koichiro; Kato, Mamoru; Kawauchi, Satoru; Morota, Koichi; Tsukamoto, Atsuko; Hayakawa, Mikito; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumaru, Yuji; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Although measurement and management of angiographic entrance skin dose (ESD) are deemed extremely important, accurate determination of maximum ESD and its location is generally difficult because of the dependence on therapeutic technique and position. Following our development of body-mounted gear bearing radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLD) arrays for direct measurement of ESD in cranial and cardiovascular angiography and interventional radiology (IVR), our focus next turned to the limited number of facilities equipped to read RPLD outputs and the need for methods to effectively provide feedback to clinical facilities. As described here, we first constructed an RPLD reading facility capable of sending and receiving RPLDs by post, offering the potential to enable utilization of the developed gear at all hospitals in Japan that perform angiography and IVR. We next developed specialized web-based system to generate dose maps from RPLD dose data, thereby enabling any facility to perform trial system analysis, evaluation, and implementation; and investigated the results and related problems. PMID:26685837

  8. Reflective, Systemic and Analytic Thinking in Real Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachariades, Theodossios; Christou, Constantinos; Pitta-Pantazi, Demetra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a theoretical model to analyze prospective teachers' reasoning and knowledge of real numbers, and to provide an empirical verification of it. The model is based on Sierpinska's theory of theoretical thinking. Data were collected from 59 prospective teachers through a written test and interviews. The data…

  9. A rational analysis of the approximate number system.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T

    2016-06-01

    It is well-known in numerical cognition that higher numbers are represented with less absolute fidelity than lower numbers, often formalized as a logarithmic mapping. Previous derivations of this psychological law have worked by assuming that relative change in physical magnitude is the key psychologically-relevant measure (Fechner, 1860; Sun et al., 2012; Portugal & Svaiter, Minds and Machines, 21(1), 73-81, 2011). Ideally, however, this property of psychological scales would be derived from more general, independent principles. This paper shows that a logarithmic number line is the one which minimizes the error between input and representation relative to the probability that subjects would need to represent each number. This need probability is measured here through natural language and matches the form of need probabilities found in other literatures. The derivation does not presuppose anything like Weber's law and makes minimal assumptions about both the nature of internal representations and the form of the mapping. More generally, the results prove in a general setting that the optimal psychological scale will change with the square root of the probability of each input. For stimuli that follow a power-law need distribution this approach recovers either a logarithmic or power-law psychophysical mapping (Stevens, 1957, 1961, 1975). PMID:26755188

  10. Disposition of 2-(2-quinolyl)-1,3-indandione (D. C. yellow number11) in rats dosed orally or intravenously

    SciTech Connect

    el Dareer, S.M.; Kalin, J.R.; Tillery, K.F.; Hill, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The disposition of 2-(2-quinolyl)-1,3-indandione (D. C. yellow number11, DCY) in male Fischer rats dosed intravenously or by feeding was determined. For rats given (/sup 14/C)DCY in the feed (0.00044-0.41% of the diet), recovery of radioactivity during the 24-h dosing period and the 72-h period thereafter ranged from 89.1 to 93.9% for feces and from 4.98 to 6.25 for urine. Tissues contained only trace amounts. Following intravenous dosing with (/sup 14/C)DCY (0.93 mg/kg), radioactivity distributed readily into most tissues; maximum amounts were present at 5 min, the earliest time of assay. Maximum amounts of radioactivity in fat, skin, and gut tissue, however, were present at 30 min after dosing. These three tissues also had relatively long alpha phases for the elimination of radioactivity. In 24 h after intravenous dosing, rats excreted 81.1% of the dose in the feces and 16.0% of the dose in the urine. For rats fitted with biliary cannulas, 54.5% of the dose, all of which was metabolites of (/sup 14/C)DCY, was recovered in the bile in 4 h. Associated with the rapid and extensive biliary excretion of metabolites of intravenously administered (/sup 14/C)DCY was the appearance of large amounts of radioactivity in the feces and also, at intermediate time points, in the liver, gut contents, and gut tissue. In conclusion, rats rapidly distribute, metabolize, and excrete (/sup 14/C)DCY.

  11. Optimization of Dose Distribution for the System of Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Tae-Suk

    The work suggested in this paper addresses a method for obtaining an optimal dose distribution for stereotactic radiosurgery. Since stereotactic radiosurgery utilizes multiple noncoplanar arcs and a three-dimensional dose evaluation technique, many beam parameters and complex optimization criteria are included in the dose optimization. Consequently, a lengthy computation time is required to optimize even the simplest case by a trial and error method. The basic approach presented here is to use both an analytical and an experimental optimization to minimize the dose to critical organs while maintaining a dose shaped to the target. The experimental approach is based on shaping the target volumes using multiple isocenters from dose experience, or on field shaping using a beam's eye view technique. The analytical approach is to adapt computer -aided design optimization to find optimum parameters automatically. Three-dimensional approximate dose models are developed to simulate the exact dose model using a spherical or cylindrical coordinate system. Optimum parameters are found much faster with the use of computer-aided design optimization techniques. The implementation of computer-aided design algorithms with the approximate dose model and the application of the algorithms to several cases are discussed. It is shown that the approximate dose model gives dose distributions similar to those of the exact dose model, which makes the approximate dose model an attractive alternative to the exact dose model, and much more efficient in terms of computer -aided design and visual optimization.

  12. Analysis of radiation doses from operation of postulated commercial spent fuel transportation systems: Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.J.; Hostick, C.J.; Ross, W.A.; Peterson, R.W.; Smith, R.I.; Stiles, D.L.; Daling, P.M.; Weakley, S.A.; Grinde, R.B.; Young, J.R.

    1987-11-01

    This report contains a system study of estimated radiation doses to the public and workers resulting from the transport of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power reactors to a geologic repository. The report contains a detailed breakdown of activities and a description of time/distance/dose-rate estimates for each activity within the system. Collective doses are estimated for each of the major activities at the reactor site, in transit, and at the repository receiving facility. Annual individual doses to the maximally exposed individuals or groups of individuals are also estimated. A total of 17 alternatives and subalternatives to the postulated reference transportation system are identified, conceptualized, and their dose-reduction potentials and costs estimated. Resulting ratios of ..delta..cost/..delta..collective system dose for each alternative relative to the postulated reference transportation system are given. Most of the alternatives evaluated are estimated to provide both cost and dose reductions. Major reductions in transportation system dose and cost are estimated to result from using higher-capacity rail and truck casks, and particularly when replacing legalweight truck casks with ''advanced design'' overweight truck casks. The greatest annual dose reduction to the highest exposed individual workers (i.e., at the repository) is estimated to be achieved by using remote handling equipment for the cask handling operations at the repository. Additional shielding is also effective in reducing doses to both radiation workers at the reactor and repository and to transport workers. 69 refs., 36 figs., 156 tabs.

  13. Dose perturbation in the presence of metallic implants: treatment planning system versus Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieslander, Elinore; Knöös, Tommy

    2003-10-01

    An increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy have metallic implants such as hip prostheses. Therefore, beams are normally set up to avoid irradiation through the implant; however, this cannot always be accomplished. In such situations, knowledge of the accuracy of the used treatment planning system (TPS) is required. Two algorithms, the pencil beam (PB) and the collapsed cone (CC), are implemented in the studied TPS. Comparisons are made with Monte Carlo simulations for 6 and 18 MV. The studied materials are steel, CoCrMo, Orthinox® (a stainless steel alloy and registered trademark of Stryker Corporation), TiAlV and Ti. Monte Carlo simulated depth dose curves and dose profiles are compared to CC and PB calculated data. The CC algorithm shows overall a better agreement with Monte Carlo than the PB algorithm. Thus, it is recommended to use the CC algorithm to get the most accurate dose calculation both for the planning target volume and for tissues adjacent to the implants when beams are set up to pass through implants.

  14. Generalized phi number system and its applications for image decomposition and enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaian, Sarkis; Zhou, Yicong

    2011-02-01

    Technologies and applications of the field-programmable gate array (FPGAs) and digital signal processing (DSP) require both new customizable number systems and new data formats. This paper introduces a new class of parameterized number systems, namely the generalized Phi number system (GPNS). By selecting appropriate parameters, the new system derives the traditional Phi number system, binary number system, beta encoder, and other commonly used number systems. GPNS also creates new opportunities for developing customized number systems, multimedia security systems, and image decomposition and enhancement systems. A new image enhancement algorithm is also developed by integrating the GPNS-based bit-plane decomposition with Parameterized Logarithmic Image Processing (PLIP) models. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the GPNS's performance.

  15. Strength in Numbers: State Spending on K-12 Assessment Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chingos, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    In the coming years, states will need to make the most significant changes to their assessment systems in a decade as they implement the Common Core State Standards, a common framework for what students are expected to know that will replace existing standards in 45 states and the District of Columbia. The Common Core effort has prompted concerns…

  16. Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS), Volume 1 Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    The Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS) is a comprehensive biweekly listing of citations of recent drug abuse literature, derived from scanning the major publications media in the area. This includes scientific and technical journals, popular magazines, underground newspapers, books, legal journals, and government project reports.…

  17. Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS), Volume 1 Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    The Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS) is a comprehensive biweekly listing of citations of the recent drug abuse literature, derived from scanning the major publications media in the area, including scientific and technical journals, popular magazines, underground newspapers, books, legal journals, and government project reports. The…

  18. Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS), Volume 1 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    The Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS) is a comprehensive biweekly listing of citations of the recent drug abuse literature derived from scanning the major publications media in the area, including scientific and technical journals, popular magazines, underground newspapers, books, legal journals, and government project reports. The…

  19. Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS), Volume 1 Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    The Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS) is a comprehensive biweekly listing of citations of recent drug abuse literature, derived from scanning the major publications media in the area. This includes scientific and technical journals, popular magazines, underground newspapers, books, legal journals, and government project reports.…

  20. Drug Abuse Awareness System (DACAS), Volume 1 Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    The Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS) is a comprehensive biweekly listing of citations of the recent drug abuse literature, derived from scanning the major publications media in the area, including scientific and technical journals, popular magazines, underground newspapers, books, legal journals, and government project reports. The…

  1. Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS), Volume 1 Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    The Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS) is a comprehensive biweekly listing of citations of the recent drug abuse literature, derived from scanning the major publications media in the area, including scientific and technical journals, popular magazines, underground newspapers, books, legal journals, and government project reports. The…

  2. Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS), Volume 1 Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    The Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS) is a comprehensive biweekly listing of citations of the recent drug abuse literature, derived from scanning the major publications media in the area, including scientific and technical journals, popular magazines, underground newspapers, books, legal journals, and government project reports. The…

  3. Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS), Volume 1 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    The Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS) is a comprehensive biweekly listing of citations of the recent drug abuse literature, derived from scanning the major publications media in the area, including scientific and technical journals, popular magazines, underground newspapers, books, legal journals, and government project reports. The…

  4. Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS), Volume 1 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    The Drug Abuse Current Awareness System (DACAS) is a comprehensive biweekly listing of citations of the recent drug abuse literature, derived from scanning the major publications media in the area, including scientific and technical journals, popular magazines, underground newspapers, books, legal journals, and government project reports. The…

  5. Systems Newsletter. Volume 18, Number 1, Summer 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Dawn, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This issue of the Center's "Systems Newsletter" will be the last one published under the aegis of Dr. JoyceVanTassel-Baska, the Center's founder and current Executive Director. As of this August Dr. VanTassel-Baska will officially retire from the College of William and Mary and the Center. She will still be an integral part of the Center through…

  6. Code System for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting from an Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1982-06-15

    WRAITH calculates the atmospheric transport of radioactive material to each of a number of downwind receptor points and the external and internal doses to a reference man at each of the receptor points.

  7. Average radiation doses in a standard head examination for 250 CT systems

    SciTech Connect

    McCrohan, J.L.; Patterson, J.F.; Gagne, R.M.; Goldstein, H.A.

    1987-04-01

    Approximately 250 computed tomography (CT) systems were surveyed in a nationwide study to determine the average radiation dose resulting from a typical adult head procedure. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD) was selected as the dose descriptor. For the typical adult CT head procedure, the MSAD was generally within 2.2-6.8 rads (22-68 mGy). Variations in dose by a factor of two or more were often seen for a given manufacturer and model. These dose ranges indicate a potential to reduce dose by carefully selecting imaging techniques. Overall, variations in dose can result from differences in the user's choice of technique (desired image quality) or from actual differences in scanner performance (caused by differences in collimation, filtration, or geometry). To use CT appropriately, a facility should consider dose as well as image quality in selecting optimal techniques for typical modes of operation.

  8. Incidence of malignant thyroid tumors in humans after exposure to diagnostic doses of /sup 131/I. II. Estimation of thyroid gland size, thyroid radiation dose, and predicted versus observed number of malignant thyroid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, L.E.; Eklund, G.; Lundell, G.

    1980-12-01

    The size of the thyroid glands was analyzed for 10% of the patients in a selected group that had been exposed to diagnostic doses of /sup 131/I. The mean thyroid gland weight +- SD was 50 +- 33 g for patients 20 or more years of age and 10 +- 5 g for patients less than 20 years of age. With the present follow-up, diagnostic doses of /sup 131/I appeared not to be associated with an increased risk for later development of malignant thyroid tumors. Possible reasons for the difference between the observed number of such tumors and the number expected (47 to 124) on the basis of risk estimates of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation are discussed.

  9. Activity, regulation, copy number and function in the glyoxalase system.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Xue, Mingzhan; Thornalley, Paul J

    2014-04-01

    Molecular, catalytic and structural properties of glyoxalase pathway enzymes of many species are now known. Current research has focused on the regulation of activity and expression of Glo1 (glyoxalase I) and Glo2 (glyoxalase II) and their role in health and disease. Human GLO1 has MRE (metal-response element), IRE (insulin-response element), E2F4 (early gene 2 factor isoform 4), AP-2α (activating enhancer-binding protein 2α) and ARE (antioxidant response-element) regulatory elements and is a hotspot for copy number variation. The human Glo2 gene, HAGH (hydroxyacylglutathione hydrolase), has a regulatory p53-response element. Glo1 is linked to healthy aging, obesity, diabetes and diabetic complications, chronic renal disease, cardiovascular disease, other disorders and multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy. Mathematical modelling of the glyoxalase pathway predicts that pharmacological levels of increased Glo1 activity markedly decrease cellular methylglyoxal and related glycation, and pharmacological Glo1 inhibition markedly increases cellular methylglyoxal and related glycation. Glo1 inducers are in development to sustain healthy aging and for treatment of vascular complications of diabetes and other disorders, and cell-permeant Glo1 inhibitors are in development for treatment of multidrug-resistant tumours, malaria and potentially pathogenic bacteria and fungi. PMID:24646254

  10. NIRS external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents after the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Fukumura, Akifumi; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The great east Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) developed the external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents. The system is being used in the Fukushima health management survey. The doses can be obtained by superimposing the behavior data of the residents on the dose rate maps. For grasping the doses, 18 evacuation patterns of the residents were assumed by considering the actual evacuation information before using the survey data. The doses of the residents from the deliberate evacuation area were relatively higher than those from the area within 20 km radius. The estimated doses varied from around 1 to 6 mSv for the residents evacuated from the representative places in the deliberate evacuation area. The maximum dose in 18 evacuation patterns was estimated to be 19 mSv. PMID:23591638

  11. Calculating integral dose using data exported from a commercial record and verify system.

    PubMed

    Fox, C; Hardcastle, N; Lim, A; Khor, R

    2015-06-01

    Integral dose has been useful in investigations into the incidence of second primary malignancies in radiotherapy patients. This note outlines an approach to calculation of integral dose for a group of prostate patients using only data exported from a commercial record and verify system. Even though it was necessary to make some assumptions about patient anatomy, comparison with integral dose calculated from data exported from the planning system showed good agreement. PMID:25869674

  12. A number of upgrades on RHIC power supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, C.; Bruno, D.; Drozd, J.; Nolan, T.; Orsatti, F.; Heppener, G.; Di Lieto, A.; Schultheiss, C.; Samms, T.; Zapasek, R.; Sandberg, J.

    2015-05-03

    This year marks the 15th run for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Operation of a reliable superconducting magnet power supply system is a key factor of an accelerator’s performance. Over the past 15 years, the RHIC power supply group has made many improvements to increase the machine availability and reduce failures. During these past 15 years of operating RHIC a lot of problems have been solved or addressed. In this paper some of the essential upgrades/improvements are discussed.

  13. Effects of the Number of Genome Segments on Primary and Systemic Infections with a Multipartite Plant RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2013-01-01

    Multipartite plant viruses were discovered because of discrepancies between the observed dose response and predictions of the independent-action hypothesis (IAH) model. Theory suggests that the number of genome segments predicts the shape of the dose-response curve, but a rigorous test of this hypothesis has not been reported. Here, Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), a tripartite Alfamovirus, and transgenic Nicotianatabacum plants expressing no (wild type), one (P2), or two (P12) viral genome segments were used to test whether the number of genome segments necessary for infection predicts the dose response. The dose-response curve of wild-type plants was steep and congruent with the predicted kinetics of a multipartite virus, confirming previous results. Moreover, for P12 plants, the data support the IAH model, showing that the expression of virus genome segments by the host plant can modulate the infection kinetics of a tripartite virus to those of a monopartite virus. However, the different types of virus particles occurred at different frequencies, with a ratio of 116:45:1 (RNA1 to RNA2 to RNA3), which will affect infection kinetics and required analysis with a more comprehensive infection model. This analysis showed that each type of virus particle has a different probability of invading the host plant, at both the primary- and systemic-infection levels. While the number of genome segments affects the dose response, taking into consideration differences in the infection kinetics of the three types of AMV particles results in a better understanding of the infection process. PMID:23903837

  14. Effects of the number of genome segments on primary and systemic infections with a multipartite plant RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A; Zwart, Mark P; Elena, Santiago F

    2013-10-01

    Multipartite plant viruses were discovered because of discrepancies between the observed dose response and predictions of the independent-action hypothesis (IAH) model. Theory suggests that the number of genome segments predicts the shape of the dose-response curve, but a rigorous test of this hypothesis has not been reported. Here, Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), a tripartite Alfamovirus, and transgenic Nicotianatabacum plants expressing no (wild type), one (P2), or two (P12) viral genome segments were used to test whether the number of genome segments necessary for infection predicts the dose response. The dose-response curve of wild-type plants was steep and congruent with the predicted kinetics of a multipartite virus, confirming previous results. Moreover, for P12 plants, the data support the IAH model, showing that the expression of virus genome segments by the host plant can modulate the infection kinetics of a tripartite virus to those of a monopartite virus. However, the different types of virus particles occurred at different frequencies, with a ratio of 116:45:1 (RNA1 to RNA2 to RNA3), which will affect infection kinetics and required analysis with a more comprehensive infection model. This analysis showed that each type of virus particle has a different probability of invading the host plant, at both the primary- and systemic-infection levels. While the number of genome segments affects the dose response, taking into consideration differences in the infection kinetics of the three types of AMV particles results in a better understanding of the infection process. PMID:23903837

  15. Monte Carlo verification of IMRT dose distributions from a commercial treatment planning optimization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Pawlicki, T.; Jiang, S. B.; Li, J. S.; Deng, J.; Mok, E.; Kapur, A.; Xing, L.; Ma, L.; Boyer, A. L.

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to use Monte Carlo simulations to verify the accuracy of the dose distributions from a commercial treatment planning optimization system (Corvus, Nomos Corp., Sewickley, PA) for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). A Monte Carlo treatment planning system has been implemented clinically to improve and verify the accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculations. Further modifications to the system were made to compute the dose in a patient for multiple fixed-gantry IMRT fields. The dose distributions in the experimental phantoms and in the patients were calculated and used to verify the optimized treatment plans generated by the Corvus system. The Monte Carlo calculated IMRT dose distributions agreed with the measurements to within 2% of the maximum dose for all the beam energies and field sizes for both the homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. The dose distributions predicted by the Corvus system, which employs a finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm, agreed with the Monte Carlo simulations and measurements to within 4% in a cylindrical water phantom with various hypothetical target shapes. Discrepancies of more than 5% (relative to the prescribed target dose) in the target region and over 20% in the critical structures were found in some IMRT patient calculations. The FSPB algorithm as implemented in the Corvus system is adequate for homogeneous phantoms (such as prostate) but may result in significant under- or over-estimation of the dose in some cases involving heterogeneities such as the air-tissue, lung-tissue and tissue-bone interfaces.

  16. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  17. Evaluation of effective dose with chest digital tomosynthesis system using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohyeon; Jo, Byungdu; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) system has recently been introduced and studied. This system offers the potential to be a substantial improvement over conventional chest radiography for the lung nodule detection and reduces the radiation dose with limited angles. PC-based Monte Carlo program (PCXMC) simulation toolkit (STUK, Helsinki, Finland) is widely used to evaluate radiation dose in CDT system. However, this toolkit has two significant limits. Although PCXMC is not possible to describe a model for every individual patient and does not describe the accurate X-ray beam spectrum, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation describes the various size of phantom for individual patient and proper X-ray spectrum. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate effective dose in CDT system with the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit using GATE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effective dose in virtual infant chest phantom of posterior-anterior (PA) view in CDT system using GATE simulation. We obtained the effective dose at different tube angles by applying dose actor function in GATE simulation which was commonly used to obtain the medical radiation dosimetry. The results indicated that GATE simulation was useful to estimate distribution of absorbed dose. Consequently, we obtained the acceptable distribution of effective dose at each projection. These results indicated that GATE simulation can be alternative method of calculating effective dose in CDT applications.

  18. Comparison of different dose reduction system in computed tomography for orthodontic applications

    PubMed Central

    FANUCCI, E.; FIASCHETTI, V.; OTTRIA, L.; MATALONI, M; ACAMPORA, V.; LIONE, R.; BARLATTANI, A.; SIMONETTI, G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY To correlate different CT system: MSCT (multislice computed tomography) with different acquisition parameters (100KV, 80KV), different reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) and CBCT (cone beam computed tomography) examination in terms of absorbed X-ray dose and diagnostic accuracy. 80 KV protocols compared with 100 KV protocols resulted in reduced total radiation dose without relevant loss of diagnostic image information and quality. CBCT protocols compared with 80 KV MSCT protocols resulted in reduced total radiation dose but loss of diagnostic image information and quality although no so relevant. In addition the new system applies to equipment ASIR applicable on MSCT allows 50% of the dose without compromising image quality. PMID:23285397

  19. An automatic dose verification system for adaptive radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Xiaohu; Chen, Mingli; Parnell, Donald; Olivera, Gustavo; Galmarini, Daniel; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: During a typical 5-7 week treatment of external beam radiotherapy, there are potential differences between planned patient's anatomy and positioning, such as patient weight loss, or treatment setup. The discrepancies between planned and delivered doses resulting from these differences could be significant, especially in IMRT where dose distributions tightly conforms to target volumes while avoiding organs-at-risk. We developed an automatic system to monitor delivered dose using daily imaging. Methods: For each treatment, a merged image is generated by registering the daily pre-treatment setup image and planning CT using treatment position information extracted from the Tomotherapy archive. The treatment dose is then computed on this merged image using our in-house convolution-superposition based dose calculator implemented on GPU. The deformation field between merged and planning CT is computed using the Morphon algorithm. The planning structures and treatment doses are subsequently warped for analysis and dose accumulation. All results are saved in DICOM format with private tags and organized in a database. Due to the overwhelming amount of information generated, a customizable tolerance system is used to flag potential treatment errors or significant anatomical changes. A web-based system and a DICOM-RT viewer were developed for reporting and reviewing the results. Results: More than 30 patients were analysed retrospectively. Our in-house dose calculator passed 97% gamma test evaluated with 2% dose difference and 2mm distance-to-agreement compared with Tomotherapy calculated dose, which is considered sufficient for adaptive radiotherapy purposes. Evaluation of the deformable registration through visual inspection showed acceptable and consistent results, except for cases with large or unrealistic deformation. Our automatic flagging system was able to catch significant patient setup errors or anatomical changes. Conclusions: We developed an automatic dose

  20. Clinical Trials of a Urethral Dose Measurement System in Brachytherapy Using Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Suchowerska, Natalka; Jackson, Michael; Lambert, Jamil; Yin, Yong Bai; Hruby, George; McKenzie, David R.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To report on the clinical feasibility of a novel scintillation detector system with fiberoptic readout that measures the urethral dose during high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of the prostate. Methods and Materials: The clinical trial enrolled 24 patients receiving high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment to the prostate. After the first 14 patients, three improvements were made to the dosimeter system design to improve clinical reliability: a dosimeter self-checking facility; a radiopaque marker to determine the position of the dosimeter, and a more robust optical extension fiber. Results: Improvements to the system design allowed for accurate dose measurements to be made in vivo. A maximum measured dose departure of 9% from the calculated dose was observed after dosimeter design improvements. Conclusions: Departures of the measured from the calculated dose, after improvements to the dosimetry system, arise primarily from small changes in patient anatomy. Therefore, we recommend that patient response be correlated with the measured in vivo dose rather than with the calculated dose.

  1. Monte Carlo Code System for Electron (Positron) Dose Kernel Calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    CHIBANI, OMAR

    1999-05-12

    Version 00 KERNEL performs dose kernel calculations for an electron (positron) isotropic point source in an infinite homogeneous medium. First, the auxiliary code PRELIM is used to prepare cross section data for the considered medium. Then the KERNEL code simulates the transport of electrons and bremsstrahlung photons through the medium until all particles reach their cutoff energies. The deposited energy is scored in concentric spherical shells at a radial distance ranging from zero to twice the source particle range.

  2. The Approximate Number System and Its Relation to Early Math Achievement: Evidence from the Preschool Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonny, Justin W.; Lourenco, Stella F.

    2013-01-01

    Humans rely on two main systems of quantification; one is nonsymbolic and involves approximate number representations (known as the approximate number system or ANS), and the other is symbolic and allows for exact calculations of number. Despite the pervasiveness of the ANS across development, recent studies with adolescents and school-aged…

  3. Use of convolution/superposition-based treatment planning system for dose calculations in the kilovoltage energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaei, Parham

    2000-11-01

    A number of procedures in diagnostic radiology and cardiology make use of long exposures to x rays from fluoroscopy units. Adverse effects of these long exposure times on the patients' skin have been documented in recent years. These include epilation, erythema, and, in severe cases, moist desquamation and tissue necrosis. Potential biological effects from these exposures to other organs include radiation-induced cataracts and pneumonitis. Although there have been numerous studies to measure or calculate the dose to skin from these procedures, there have only been a handful of studies to determine the dose to other organs. Therefore, there is a need for accurate methods to measure the dose in tissues and organs other than the skin. This research was concentrated in devising a method to determine accurately the radiation dose to these tissues and organs. The work was performed in several stages: First, a three dimensional (3D) treatment planning system used in radiation oncology was modified and complemented to make it usable with the low energies of x rays used in diagnostic radiology. Using the system for low energies required generation of energy deposition kernels using Monte Carlo methods. These kernels were generated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo system of codes and added to the treatment planning system. Following modification, the treatment planning system was evaluated for its accuracy of calculations in low energies within homogeneous and heterogeneous media. A study of the effects of lungs and bones on the dose distribution was also performed. The next step was the calculation of dose distributions in humanoid phantoms using this modified system. The system was used to calculate organ doses in these phantoms and the results were compared to those obtained from other methods. These dose distributions can subsequently be used to create dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for internal organs irradiated by these beams. Using this data and the concept of normal tissue

  4. Estimation of organ and effective dose to the patient during spinal surgery with a cone-beam O-arm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Marcus; Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Ohlin, Acke; Gunnarsson, Mikael

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate organ and effective dose to the patient during spinal surgery with a cone-beam O-arm system. The absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs and effective dose were calculated on mathematically simulated phantom corresponding to a 15-year-old patient using PCXMC 2.0. Radiation doses were calculated at every 15° of the x-ray tube projection angle at two regions: thoracic spine and lumbar spine. Two different scan settings were investigated: 120 kV/128 mAs (standard) and 80 kV/80 mAs (low-dose). The effect on effective dose by changing the number of simulated projection angles (24, 12 and 4) was investigated. Estimated effective dose with PCXMC was compared with calculated effective dose using conversion factors between dose length product (DLP) and effective dose. The highest absorbed doses were received by the breast, lungs (thoracic spine) and stomach (lumbar spine). The effective doses using standard settings were 5 times higher than those delivered with low-dose settings (2-3 scans: 7.9-12 mSv versus 1.5-2.4 mSv). There was no difference in estimated effective dose using 24 or 12 projection angles. Using 4 projection angles at every 90° was not enough to accurate simulate the x-ray tube rotating around the patient. Conversion factors between DLP and effective dose were determined. Our conclusion is that the O-arm has the potential to deliver high radiation doses and consequently there is a strong need to optimize the clinical scan protocols.

  5. Numerical characterization of a tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, D. M.; Valda, A. A.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.

    2007-02-12

    A tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) based on the measurement of a specific 478 keV {gamma}-ray emitted after the neutron capture in boron is being developed. In the present work we study by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations the effects of the finite spatial resolution and the limited number of counts, i. e. the statistical noise, on the reconstructed image contrast of numerical phantoms. These phantoms, of simple geometry, mimic the tumor (specific) and the normal tissue (non specific) boron concentrations. The simulated projection data were reconstructed using the expectation-maximization maximum-likelihood algorithm. These studies will help in the improvement of BNCT dosimetry.

  6. Developmental Change in the Acuity of the "Number Sense": The Approximate Number System in 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-Year-Olds and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halberda, Justin; Feigenson, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral, neuropsychological, and brain imaging research points to a dedicated system for processing number that is shared across development and across species. This foundational Approximate Number System (ANS) operates over multiple modalities, forming representations of the number of objects, sounds, or events in a scene. This system is…

  7. Development of wireless communication system in real-time internal radiation dose measurement system using magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Fumihiro; Shinohe, Kohta; Takura, Tetsuya; Matsuki, Hidetoshi; Yamada, Syogo; Sato, Tadakuni

    2009-04-01

    In radiation therapy, excessive radiation occurs because the actual delivered dose to the tumor is unknown. To overcome this problem, we need a system in which the delivered dose is measured inside the body, and the dose data are transmitted from the inside to the outside of the body. In this study, a wireless communication system, using magnetic fields was studied, and an internal circuit for obtaining radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was examined. As a result, a communication distance of 200 mm was obtained. An internal circuit was developed, and a signal transmission experiment was performed using the wireless communication system. As a result, the radiation dose data from an x-ray detector was transmitted over a communication distance of 200 mm, and the delivered dose was determined from the received signal.

  8. Application of the inverse Monte Carlo treatment planning system IKO for an inhomogeneous dose prescription in the sense of dose painting.

    PubMed

    Rickhey, Mark; Bogner, Ludwig

    2006-01-01

    Biological imaging (PET SPECTJfMRI, MRS, etc.) is able to provide tri-dimensional biological information, i.e. proliferation, cell density, hypoxia or choline/citrate ratio. The implementation of this information in a treatment plan can be utilised to escalate the dose in target subvolumes. For this purpose, a treatment planning system has to be able to realise an inhomogeneous dose prescription with sufficient spatial resolution. The present study investigated to which extent the inverse Monte Carlo treatment planning system IKO (inverse kernel optimization), developed at our department, can modulate an inhomogeneous dose prescription. As a qualifier to describe this ability, we defined in analogy to imaging a modulation transfer function for treatment planning systems. In addition two clinical cases, a prostate case and a head-and-neck case, were set up with different dose prescriptions in different subtargets. The modulation transfer function revealed that IKO is able to modulate structures larger than 1.3 cm with sharp dose gradients. Also, IKO is able to modulate several subtargets inside a prostate with different escalated doses. The dose-volume histograms of the head-and-neck case showed a good dose coverage of the target volumes, as well as a good protection of the organs at risk according to the dose constraints. As a result, IKO is able to realise a heterogeneous dose prescription in the sense of "dose painting". PMID:17216756

  9. Mixed species radioiodine air sampling readout and dose assessment system

    DOEpatents

    Distenfeld, Carl H.; Klemish, Jr., Joseph R.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a simple, reliable, inexpensive and portable means and method for determining the thyroid dose rate of mixed airborne species of solid and gaseous radioiodine without requiring highly skilled personnel, such as health physicists or electronics technicians. To this end, this invention provides a means and method for sampling a gas from a source of a mixed species of solid and gaseous radioiodine for collection of the mixed species and readout and assessment of the emissions therefrom by cylindrically, concentrically and annularly molding the respective species around a cylindrical passage for receiving a conventional probe-type Geiger-Mueller radiation detector.

  10. Monte Carlo Code System for Electron (Positron) Dose Kernel Calculations.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-05-12

    Version 00 KERNEL performs dose kernel calculations for an electron (positron) isotropic point source in an infinite homogeneous medium. First, the auxiliary code PRELIM is used to prepare cross section data for the considered medium. Then the KERNEL code simulates the transport of electrons and bremsstrahlung photons through the medium until all particles reach their cutoff energies. The deposited energy is scored in concentric spherical shells at a radial distance ranging from zero to twicemore » the source particle range.« less

  11. Dashboard systems: Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic mediated dose optimization for monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Dubinsky, Marla C

    2015-03-01

    Many marketed drugs exhibit high variability in exposure and response. While these drugs are efficacious in their approved indications, finding appropriate dose regimens for individual patients is not straightforward. Similar dose adjustment problems are also seen with drugs that have a complex relationship between exposure and response and/or a narrow therapeutic window. This is particularly true for monoclonal antibodies, where prolonged dosing at a sub-therapeutic dose can also elicit anti-drug antibodies which will further compromise safety and efficacy. Thus, finding appropriate doses quickly would represent a substantial improvement in healthcare. Dashboard systems, which are decision-support tools, offer an improved, convenient means of tailoring treatment for individual patients. This article reviews the clinical need for this approach, particularly with monoclonal antibodies, the design, development, and testing of such systems, and the likely benefits of dashboard systems in clinical practice. We focus on infliximab for reference. PMID:25707964

  12. Calibration setting numbers for dose calibrators for the PET isotopes (52)Mn, (64)Cu, (76)Br, (86)Y, (89)Zr, (124)I.

    PubMed

    Wooten, A Lake; Lewis, Benjamin C; Szatkowski, Daniel J; Sultan, Deborah H; Abdin, Kinda I; Voller, Thomas F; Liu, Yongjian; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2016-07-01

    For PET radionuclides, the radioactivity of a sample can be conveniently measured by a dose calibrator. These devices depend on a "calibration setting number", but many recommended settings from manuals were interpolated based on standard sources of other radionuclide(s). We conducted HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy, resulting in a reference for determining settings in two types of vessels containing one of several PET radionuclides. Our results reiterate the notion that in-house, experimental calibrations are recommended for different radionuclides and vessels. PMID:27152914

  13. 10 CFR 434.99 - Explanation of numbering system for codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... designating a section, the system employed in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) will be employed. The... Code of Federal Regulations' numbering system allows the researcher using the CFR easy access to the... MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS § 434.99 Explanation of numbering system for codes. (a)...

  14. 10 CFR 434.99 - Explanation of numbering system for codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... designating a section, the system employed in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) will be employed. The... Code of Federal Regulations' numbering system allows the researcher using the CFR easy access to the... MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS § 434.99 Explanation of numbering system for codes. (a)...

  15. 10 CFR 434.99 - Explanation of numbering system for codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... designating a section, the system employed in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) will be employed. The... Code of Federal Regulations' numbering system allows the researcher using the CFR easy access to the... MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS § 434.99 Explanation of numbering system for codes. (a)...

  16. 10 CFR 434.99 - Explanation of numbering system for codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... designating a section, the system employed in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) will be employed. The... Code of Federal Regulations' numbering system allows the researcher using the CFR easy access to the... MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS § 434.99 Explanation of numbering system for codes. (a)...

  17. One Language, Two Number-Word Systems and Many Problems: Numerical Cognition in the Czech Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pixner, S.; Zuber, J.; Hermanova, V.; Kaufmann, L.; Nuerk, H.-C.; Moeller, K.

    2011-01-01

    Comparing numerical performance between different languages does not only mean comparing different number-word systems, but also implies a comparison of differences regarding culture or educational systems. The Czech language provides the remarkable opportunity to disentangle this confound as there exist two different number-word systems within…

  18. Patient dose, gray level and exposure index with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. R.; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is gradually replacing conventional screen-film system in Brazil. To assess image quality, manufactures provide the calculation of an exposure index through the acquisition software of the CR system. The objective of this study is to verify if the CR image can be used as an evaluator of patient absorbed dose too, through a relationship between the entrance skin dose and the exposure index or the gray level values obtained in the image. The CR system used for this study (Agfa model 30-X with NX acquisition software) calculates an exposure index called Log of the Median (lgM), related to the absorbed dose to the IP. The lgM value depends on the average gray level (called Scan Average Level (SAL)) of the segmented pixel value histogram of the whole image. A Rando male phantom was used to simulate a human body (chest and head), and was irradiated with an X-ray equipment, using usual radiologic techniques for chest exams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF, TLD100) were used to evaluate entrance skin dose and exit dose. The results showed a logarithm relation between entrance dose and SAL in the image center, regardless of the beam filtration. The exposure index varies linearly with the entrance dose, but the angular coefficient is beam quality dependent. We conclude that, with an adequate calibration, the CR system can be used to evaluate the patient absorbed dose.

  19. Implementation of an analytical model for leakage neutron equivalent dose in a proton radiotherapy planning system.

    PubMed

    Eley, John; Newhauser, Wayne; Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca; Schneider, Christopher; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects. PMID:25768061

  20. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    PubMed Central

    Eley, John; Newhauser, Wayne; Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca; Schneider, Christopher; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects. PMID:25768061

  1. Evaluation of a Quartz Bourdon Pressure Gage of Wind Tunnel Mach Number Control System Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, W. G.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of using the National Transonic Facility's high accuracy Mach number measurement system as part of a closed loop Mach number control system. The theoretical and experimental procedures described are applicable to the engineering design of pressure control systems. The results show that the dynamic response characteristics of the NTF Mach number gage (a Ruska DDR-6000 quartz absolute pressure gage) coupled to a typical length of pressure tubing were only marginally acceptable within a limited range of the facility's total pressure envelope and could not be used in the Mach number control system.

  2. One language, two number-word systems and many problems: numerical cognition in the Czech language.

    PubMed

    Pixner, S; Zuber, J; Heřmanová, V; Kaufmann, L; Nuerk, H-C; Moeller, K

    2011-01-01

    Comparing numerical performance between different languages does not only mean comparing different number-word systems, but also implies a comparison of differences regarding culture or educational systems. The Czech language provides the remarkable opportunity to disentangle this confound as there exist two different number-word systems within the same language: for instance, "25" can be either coded in non-inverted order "dvadsetpät" [twenty-five] or in inverted order "pätadvadset" [five-and-twenty]. To investigate the influence of the number-word system on basic numerical processing within one culture, 7-year-old Czech-speaking children had to perform a transcoding task (i.e., writing Arabic numbers to dictation) in both number-word systems. The observed error pattern clearly indicated that the structure of the number-word system determined transcoding performance reliably: In the inverted number-word system about half of all errors were inversion-related. In contrast, hardly any inversion-related errors occurred in the non-inverted number-word system. We conclude that the development of numerical cognition does not only depend on cultural or educational differences, but is indeed related to the structure and transparency of a given number-word system. PMID:21763104

  3. Effective dose to patients and staff when using a mobile PET/SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Studenski, Matthew T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the number of weekly acquisitions permissible using a mobile PET/SPECT scanner for myocardial perfusion/viability imaging in an intensive care unit (ICU) based on the effective dose to patients and staff. The effective dose to other patients and staff in an ICU was calculated following recommendations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 108 report (AAPM TG-108). The number of weekly acquisitions using 555 MBq (15 mCi) Tc-99m for myocardial perfusion or F-18 for myocardial viability was determined using the regulatory limits described in the Code of Federal Regulations 10 CFR 20. To increase the number of weekly acquisitions allowed, a reduction in administered dose and portable shielding was considered. A single myocardial perfusion image can be acquired with Tc-99m each week with a dose reduction to 455 MBq (12.3 mCi) without additional shielding. To acquire a myocardial viability image with F-18, an activity reduction to 220 MBq (5.9 mCi) is required to meet the regulatory effective dose limit without additional shielding. More than one weekly acquisition can be performed if additional shielding or activity reduction is utilized. A method for calculating dose to patients and staff in an ICU has been developed using conservative assumptions and following AAPM TG-108. This calculation must be repeated for each individual clinic before any acquisition is performed. PMID:23652256

  4. Contrast-detail evaluation and dose assessment of eight digital chest radiography systems in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Veldkamp, Wouter J H; Kroft, Lucia J M; Boot, Mireille V; Mertens, Bart J A; Geleijns, Jacob

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess contrast-detail performance and effective dose of eight different digital chest radiography systems. Digital chest radiography systems from different manufacturers were included: one storage phosphor system, one selenium-coated drum system, and six direct readout systems including four thin-film transistor (TFT) systems and two charge-coupled device (CCD) systems. For measuring image quality, a contrast-detail test object was used in combination with a phantom that simulates the primary and scatter transmission through lung fields (LucAl). Six observers judged phantom images of each modality by soft-copy reading in a four-alternative-forced-choice experiment. The entrance dose was also measured, and the effective dose was calculated for an average patient. Contrast-detail curves were constructed from the observer data. The blocked two-way ANOVA test was used for statistical analysis. Significant difference in contrast-detail performance was found between the systems. Best contrast-detail performance was shown by a CCD system with slot-scan technology, and the selenium-coated drum system was compared to the other six systems (p values dose varied between 0.010 mSv and 0.032 mSv. Significant differences in contrast-detail performance and effective dose levels were found between different digital chest radiography systems in clinical practice. PMID:16132918

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of two treatment planning systems for high dose rate brachytherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shwetha, Bondel; Ravikumar, Manickam; Supe, Sanjay S.; Sathiyan, Saminathan; Lokesh, Vishwanath; Keshava, Subbarao L.

    2012-04-01

    Various treatment planning systems are used to design plans for the treatment of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The purpose of this study was to make a dosimetric comparison of the 2 treatment planning systems from Varian medical systems, namely ABACUS and BrachyVision. The dose distribution of Ir-192 source generated with a single dwell position was compared using ABACUS (version 3.1) and BrachyVision (version 6.5) planning systems. Ten patients with intracavitary applications were planned on both systems using orthogonal radiographs. Doses were calculated at the prescription points (point A, right and left) and reference points RU, LU, RM, LM, bladder, and rectum. For single dwell position, little difference was observed in the doses to points along the perpendicular bisector. The mean difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision for these points was 1.88%. The mean difference in the dose calculated toward the distal end of the cable by ABACUS and BrachyVision was 3.78%, whereas along the proximal end the difference was 19.82%. For the patient case there was approximately 2% difference between ABACUS and BrachyVision planning for dose to the prescription points. The dose difference for the reference points ranged from 0.4-1.5%. For bladder and rectum, the differences were 5.2% and 13.5%, respectively. The dose difference between the rectum points was statistically significant. There is considerable difference between the dose calculations performed by the 2 treatment planning systems. It is seen that these discrepancies are caused by the differences in the calculation methodology adopted by the 2 systems.

  6. Automatic system testing of a decision support system for insulin dosing using Google Android.

    PubMed

    Spat, Stephan; Höll, Bernhard; Petritsch, Georg; Schaupp, Lukas; Beck, Peter; Pieber, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia in hospitalized patients is a common and costly health care problem. The GlucoTab system is a mobile workflow and decision support system, aiming to facilitate efficient and safe glycemic control of non-critically ill patients. Being a medical device, the GlucoTab requires extensive and reproducible testing. A framework for high-volume, reproducible and automated system testing of the GlucoTab system was set up applying several Open Source tools for test automation and system time handling. The REACTION insulin titration protocol was investigated in a paper-based clinical trial (PBCT). In order to validate the GlucoTab system, data from this trial was used for simulation and system tests. In total, 1190 decision support action points were identified and simulated. Four data points (0.3%) resulted in a GlucoTab system error caused by a defective implementation. In 144 data points (12.1%), calculation errors of physicians and nurses in the PBCT were detected. The test framework was able to verify manual calculation of insulin doses and detect relatively many user errors and workflow anomalies in the PBCT data. This shows the high potential of the electronic decision support application to improve safety of implementation of an insulin titration protocol and workflow management system in clinical wards. PMID:23542995

  7. Dose calculation accuracy of lung planning with a commercial IMRT treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Patrick N; He, Tongming; DeYoung, A

    2003-01-01

    The dose calculation accuracy of a commercial pencil beam IMRT planning system is evaluated by comparison with Monte Carlo calculations and measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom. The target volume is in the right lung and mediastinum and thus significant tissue inhomogeneities are present. The Monte Carlo code is an adaptation of the MCNP code and the measurements were made with TLD and film. Both the Monte Carlo code and the measurements show very good agreement with the treatment planning system except in regions where the dose is high and the electron density is low. In these regions the commercial system shows doses up to 10% higher than Monte Carlo and film. The average calculated dose for the CTV is 5% higher with the commercial system as compared to Monte Carlo. PMID:14604424

  8. Clinical characterization of a proton beam continuous uniform scanning system with dose layer stacking

    PubMed Central

    Farr, J. B.; Mascia, A. E.; Hsi, W.-C.; Allgower, C. E.; Jesseph, F.; Schreuder, A. N.; Wolanski, M.; Nichiporov, D. F.; Anferov, V.

    2008-01-01

    A proton beam delivery system on a gantry with continuous uniform scanning and dose layer stacking at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute has been commissioned and accepted for clinical use. This paper was motivated by a lack of guidance on the testing and characterization for clinical uniform scanning systems. As such, it describes how these tasks were performed with a uniform scanning beam delivery system. This paper reports the methods used and important dosimetric characteristics of radiation fields produced by the system. The commissioning data include the transverse and longitudinal dose distributions, penumbra, and absolute dose values. Using a 208 MeV cyclotron’s proton beam, the system provides field sizes up to 20 and 30 cm in diameter for proton ranges in water up to 27 and 20 cm, respectively. The dose layer stacking method allows for the flexible construction of spread-out Bragg peaks with uniform modulation of up to 15 cm in water, at typical dose rates of 1–3 Gy∕min. For measuring relative dose distributions, multielement ion chamber arrays, small-volume ion chambers, and radiographic films were employed. Measurements during the clinical commissioning of the system have shown that the lateral and longitudinal dose uniformity of 2.5% or better can be achieved for all clinically important field sizes and ranges. The measured transverse penumbra widths offer a slight improvement in comparison to those achieved with a double scattering beam spreading technique at the facility. Absolute dose measurements were done using calibrated ion chambers, thermoluminescent and alanine detectors. Dose intercomparisons conducted using various types of detectors traceable to a national standards laboratory indicate that the measured dosimetry data agree with each other within 5%. PMID:19070228

  9. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of Eclipse treatment planning system for effects on dose distribution of the hip prostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Çatlı, Serap; Tanır, Güneş

    2013-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of titanium, titanium alloy, and stainless steel hip prostheses on dose distribution based on the Monte Carlo simulation method, as well as the accuracy of the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 and 18 MV photon energies. In the present study the pencil beam convolution (PBC) method implemented in the Eclipse TPS was compared to the Monte Carlo method and ionization chamber measurements. The present findings show that if high-Z material is used in prosthesis, large dose changes can occur due to scattering. The variance in dose observed in the present study was dependent on material type, density, and atomic number, as well as photon energy; as photon energy increased back scattering decreased. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses was significant and could not be predicted accurately by the PBC method for hip prostheses. The findings show that for accurate dose calculation the Monte Carlo-based TPS should be used in patients with hip prostheses.

  10. Acquisition of the Cardinal Principle Coincides with Improvement in Approximate Number System Acuity in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Shusterman, Anna; Slusser, Emily; Halberda, Justin; Odic, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Human mathematical abilities comprise both learned, symbolic representations of number and unlearned, non-symbolic evolutionarily primitive cognitive systems for representing quantities. However, the mechanisms by which our symbolic (verbal) number system becomes integrated with the non-symbolic (non-verbal) representations of approximate magnitude (supported by the Approximate Number System, or ANS) are not well understood. To explore this connection, forty-six children participated in a 6-month longitudinal study assessing verbal number knowledge and non-verbal numerical acuity. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a strong relationship between verbal number knowledge and ANS acuity. Longitudinal analyses suggested that increases in ANS acuity were most strongly related to the acquisition of the cardinal principle, but not to other milestones of verbal number acquisition. These findings suggest that experience with culture and language is intimately linked to changes in the properties of a core cognitive system. PMID:27078257

  11. Acquisition of the Cardinal Principle Coincides with Improvement in Approximate Number System Acuity in Preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Anna; Slusser, Emily; Halberda, Justin; Odic, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Human mathematical abilities comprise both learned, symbolic representations of number and unlearned, non-symbolic evolutionarily primitive cognitive systems for representing quantities. However, the mechanisms by which our symbolic (verbal) number system becomes integrated with the non-symbolic (non-verbal) representations of approximate magnitude (supported by the Approximate Number System, or ANS) are not well understood. To explore this connection, forty-six children participated in a 6-month longitudinal study assessing verbal number knowledge and non-verbal numerical acuity. Cross-sectional analyses revealed a strong relationship between verbal number knowledge and ANS acuity. Longitudinal analyses suggested that increases in ANS acuity were most strongly related to the acquisition of the cardinal principle, but not to other milestones of verbal number acquisition. These findings suggest that experience with culture and language is intimately linked to changes in the properties of a core cognitive system. PMID:27078257

  12. Computed Tomography Angiography of Carotid Arteries and Vertebrobasilar System: A Simulation Study for Radiation Dose Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Manuel; Ellmann, Stephan; Allmendinger, Thomas; Eller, Achim; Kammerer, Ferdinand; May, Matthias S; Baigger, João F; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system is a standardized procedure with excellent image quality, but radiation exposure remains a matter of concern. The aim of this study is to examine to what extent radiation dose can be lowered in relation to a standard protocol by simulating examinations with lower tube currents applying a dedicated software.Lower tube current was simulated by a dedicated noise insertion and reconstruction software (ReconCT). In a phantom study, true scans were performed with different dose protocols and compared to the results of simulated dose reductions of the same degree, respectively. In a patient study, 30 CTAs of supra-aortic vessels were reconstructed at a level of 100%, 75%, 50%, and 25% of the initial dose. Objective and subjective image analyses were performed.No significant noise differences between true scans and simulated scans of mimicked contrasted vessels were found. In the patient study, the quality scores of the 4 dose groups differed statistically significant; this difference vanished for the comparison of the 100% and 75% datasets after dichotomization into the categories of diagnostic and nondiagnostic image quality (P = .50).This study suggests an easy-to-implement method of simulating CTAs of carotid arteries and vertebrobasilar system with lower tube current for dose reduction by artificially adding noise to the original raw data. Lowering the radiation dose in a moderate extent to 75% of the original dose levels does not significantly alter the diagnostic image quality. PMID:26131822

  13. Experimental validation of a commercial 3D dose verification system for intensity-modulated arc therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggula, Ramesh; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Mueller, Lutz; Birkner, Mattias; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Stieler, Florian; Steil, Volker; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-10-01

    We validate the dosimetric performance of COMPASS®, a novel 3D quality assurance system for verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans that can correlate the delivered dose to the patient's anatomy, taking into account the tissue inhomogeneity. The accuracy of treatment delivery was assessed by the COMPASS® for 12 VMAT plans, and the resulting assessments were evaluated using an ionization chamber and film measurements. Dose-volume relationships were evaluated by the COMPASS® for three additional treatment plans and these were used to verify the accuracy of treatment planning dose calculations. The results matched well between COMPASS® and measurements for the ionization chamber (<=3%) and film (73-99% for gamma(3%/3 mm) < 1 and 98-100% for gamma(5%/5 mm) < 1) for the phantom plans. Differences in dose-volume statistics for the average dose to the PTV were within 2.5% for three treatment plans. For the structures located in the low-dose region, a maximum difference of <9% was observed. In its current implementation, the system could measure the delivered dose with sufficient accuracy and could project the 3D dose distribution directly on the patient's anatomy. Slight deviations were found for large open fields. These could be minimized by improving the COMPASS® in-built beam model.

  14. 22 CFR 308.7 - Use of social security account number in records systems. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Use of social security account number in records systems. 308.7 Section 308.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 308.7 Use of social security account number in records systems....

  15. 22 CFR 308.7 - Use of social security account number in records systems. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Use of social security account number in records systems. 308.7 Section 308.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 308.7 Use of social security account number in records systems....

  16. 22 CFR 308.7 - Use of social security account number in records systems. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of social security account number in records systems. 308.7 Section 308.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 308.7 Use of social security account number in records systems....

  17. 10 CFR 434.99 - Explanation of numbering system for codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... designating a section, the system employed in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) will be employed. The... Code of Federal Regulations' numbering system allows the researcher using the CFR easy access to the... a prefix for all section headings. The suffix is a two or three digit section number. For...

  18. 22 CFR 308.7 - Use of social security account number in records systems. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Use of social security account number in records systems. 308.7 Section 308.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 308.7 Use of social security account number in records systems....

  19. 22 CFR 308.7 - Use of social security account number in records systems. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Use of social security account number in records systems. 308.7 Section 308.7 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 308.7 Use of social security account number in records systems....

  20. Introduction to Number Systems, Boolean Algebra, Logic Circuits. Navy Electricity and Electronics Training Series. Module 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Program Development Center, Pensacola, FL.

    This textbook is one of a series of publications designed to provide information needed by Navy personnel whose duties require an elementary and general knowledge of the fundamental concepts of number systems, logic circuits, and Boolean algebra. Topic 1, Number Systems, describes the radix; the positional notation; the decimal, binary, octal, and…

  1. Reverse Conversion Schemes for Signed-Digit Number Systems: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Madhu Sudan

    2016-06-01

    Although signed-digit number systems have received a considerable attention, the transformation of signed-digit numbers back into the conventional forms, known as reverse conversion, is still a performance bottleneck of signed-digit arithmetic. In this paper, a literature survey of reverse conversion schemes for signed-digit number systems is performed on the basis of the articles published from recognized platforms for the past few decades. The survey reveals some specific problems of this field, which need further investigations.

  2. [Evaluation of an Experimental Production Wireless Dose Monitoring System for Radiation Exposure Management of Medical Staff].

    PubMed

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Murazaki, Hiroo; Kuramoto, Taku; Umedzu, Yoshiyuki; Ishigaki, Yung

    2015-08-01

    Because of the more advanced and more complex procedures in interventional radiology, longer treatment times have become necessary. Therefore, it is important to determine the exposure doses received by operators and patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate an experimental production wireless dose monitoring system for pulse radiation in diagnostic X-ray. The energy, dose rate, and pulse fluoroscopy dependence were evaluated as the basic characteristics of this system for diagnostic X-ray using a fully digital fluoroscopy system. The error of 1 cm dose equivalent rate was less than 15% from 35.1 keV to 43.2 keV with energy correction using metal filter. It was possible to accurately measure the dose rate dependence of this system, which was highly linear until 100 μSv/h. This system showed a constant response to the pulse fluoroscopy. This system will become useful wireless dosimeter for the individual exposure management by improving the high dose rate and the energy characteristics. PMID:26289982

  3. Three-dimensional dose evaluation system using real-time wind field information for nuclear accidents in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Lu, Chung-Hsin; Chang, Shu-Jun; Yang, Yung-Muh; Chang, Bor-Jing; Teng, Jen-Hsin

    2006-09-01

    In Taiwan, the three operating nuclear power plants are all built along the coast over complex terrain. Dose estimates after a nuclear accident with releases of radioactive materials, therefore, cannot be accurately calculated using simple dispersion models. We developed a three-dimensional dose evaluation system, which incorporates real-time prognostic wind field information with three-dimensional numerical models to predict dose results. The proposed system consists of three models: a three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model (HOTMAC), a three-dimensional transport and diffusion model (RAPTAD), and a dose calculation model (DOSE). The whole-body dose and thyroid dose as well as dose rates can be rapidly estimated and displayed on the three-dimensional terrain model constructed by satellite images. The developed three-dimensional dose evaluation system could accurately forecast the dose results and has been used in the annual nuclear emergency response exercise to provide suggestions for protective measures.

  4. Lung cancer susceptibility among atomic bomb survivors in relation to CA repeat number polymorphism of epidermal growth factor receptor gene and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakachi, Kei; Imai, Kazue; Cologne, John B; Niwa, Yasuharu; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Prevention could be improved by identifying susceptible individuals as well as improving understanding of interactions between genes and etiological environmental agents, including radiation exposure. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-signaling pathway, regulating cellular radiation sensitivity, is an oncogenic cascade involved in lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma. The cytosine adenine (CA) repeat number polymorphism in the first intron of EGFR has been shown to be inversely correlated with EGFR production. It is hypothesized that CA repeat number may modulate individual susceptibility to lung cancer. Thus, we carried out a case-cohort study within the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivor cohort to evaluate a possible association of CA repeat polymorphism with lung cancer risk in radiation-exposed or negligibly exposed (<5 mGy) A-bomb survivors. First, by dividing study subjects into Short and Long genotypes, defined as the summed CA repeat number of two alleles < or = 37 and > or = 38, respectively, we found that the Short genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, specifically adenocarcinoma, among negligibly exposed subjects. Next, we found that prior radiation exposure significantly enhanced lung cancer risk of survivors with the Long genotype, whereas the risk for the Short genotype did not show any significant increase with radiation dose, resulting in indistinguishable risks between these genotypes at a high radiation dose. Our findings imply that the EGFR pathway plays a crucial role in assessing individual susceptibility to lung adenocarcinoma in relation to radiation exposure. PMID:19843645

  5. Validation of a quick three-dimensional dose verification system for pre-treatment IMRT QA.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yuji; Araki, Fujio; Ono, Takeshi; Tomiyama, Yuki; Maruyama, Masato; Nagasue, Nozomu; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Kai, Yudai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the dosimetric performance of the three-dimensional (3D) dose verification system, COMPASS version 3 (IBA Dosimetry, GmbH, Germany). The COMPASS has the function of a dedicated beam modeling and dose calculation. It is able to reconstruct 3D dose distributions on patient CT images, using the incident fluence from a linear accelerator measured with the MatriXX 2D array (IBA Dosimetry). The dose profiles measured with various multi-leaf collimator (MLC) test patterns for the COMPASS were checked by comparison with those of EDR2 (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY) films and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The COMPASS was also used for dose verification in clinical intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for head and neck cases. The dose distributions were compared with those measured by 3DVH (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) and MC. In addition, the quality assurance (QA) times among the COMPASS, 3DVH, and EDR2 were compared. For MLC test patterns, the COMPASS dose profiles agreed within 3 % with those of EDR2 films and MC simulations. The physical resolution of the COMPASS detectors was lower than that of film, but the dose resolution for MLC patterns was comparable to that of film. In clinical plans, the dose-volume-histograms were equal for all systems. The average QA times of the COMPASS, 3DVH, and EDR2 film were 40.1, 59.4, and 121.4 min, respectively. The COMPASS system provides fast and reliable 3D dose verification for clinical IMRT QA. The COMPASS QA process does not require phantom plans. Therefore, it allows a simple QA workflow. PMID:25261343

  6. How the FSH/LH ratio and dose numbers in the p-FSH administration treatment regimen, and insemination schedule affect superovulatory response in ewes.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, A G; Martemucci, G; Taibi, L

    2005-04-01

    We wished to evaluate the effects of FSH/LH ratio and number of doses of p-FSH during a superovulatory treatment on ovulation rate and embryo production (Experiment I). In Experiment II, we studied the efficacy of fertilization after various insemination schedules in superovulated donors. In Experiment I estrus was synchronized in 40 ewes (FGA, for 9 days plus PGF2alpha on Day 7) and the ewes were randomly assigned to four treatment groups as follows (n = 10 ewes each): Group A: four p-FSH doses with the FSH/LH ratio held constant (1.6); Group B: four p-FSH doses with the FSH/LH ratio decreasing (FSH/LH 1.6-1.0-0.6-0.3); Group C: eight p-FSH doses with the FSH/LH ratio held constant (1.6); Group D: eight p-FSH doses and FSH/LH ratio decreasing (1.6-1.6, 1.0-1.0, 0.6-0.6, 0.3-0.3). p-FSH administrations were performed twice daily 12 h apart. The ewes were mated at the onset of estrus and again after 12 and 24 h; then, one ram per four ewes was maintained with the ewes for two additional days. Ovarian response and embryo production were assessed on Day 7 after estrus. Experiment II. Three groups (n = 10 each) of superovulated ewes were inseminated as follows: Group M: mated at onset of estrus; Group AI: artificial insemination 30 h after onset of estrus; M + AI) mating at onset of estrus and intrauterine AI performed 30 h from estrus with fresh semen. Results of Experiment I showed that treatment (D) improved (P < 0.05) ovulatory response in comparison to Groups (C) and (A). The fertilization rate was lower (P < 0.01) in Group D) than Group (A). Also the proportion of transferable embryos was lower in Group (D) in comparison to all the other treatments (P < 0.01). Group A gave the best production of embryos (7.3/ewe; 89.0% transferable). In Experiment II, combined mating plus AI improved fertilization rate (80.3%) compared to both mating (P < 0.01) and AI (P < 0.02) alone. PMID:15763116

  7. Dose algorithm determination for the Los Alamos National Laboratory personnel dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    One of the most important aspects of a TLD dosimetry system is the dose algorithm used to convert the signals from the badge reader to an estimate of a worker`s dose. It is now more important then ever to have an accurate algorithm to estimate dose well below regulatory limits. Dosimetry systems for DOE laboratories must meet minimum performance standards based on DOELAP criteria. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a dose algorithm for a new TLD dosimeter that has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratories. It is expected that DOELAP testing will start in 1995. Initial results indicate that the system will be able to exceed the minimum performance criteria by a large margin. The enhanced ability of the dosimeter to determine beta, gamma, and neutron energies makes it very useful in the various radiation fields encountered at the laboratory.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF UNCERTAINTY IN THE RADIATION DOSES FOR THE TECHA RIVER DOSIMETRY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Shagina, N. B.

    2009-10-23

    In order to provide more accurate and precise estimates of individual dose (and thus more precise estimates of radiation risk) for the members of the ETRC, a new dosimetric calculation system, the Techa River Dosimetry System-2009 (TRDS-2009) has been prepared. The deterministic version of the improved dosimetry system TRDS-2009D was basically completed in April 2009. Recent developments in evaluation of dose-response models in light of uncertain dose have highlighted the importance of different types of uncertainties in the development of individual dose estimates. These include uncertain parameters that may be either shared or unshared within the dosimetric cohort, and also the nature of the type of uncertainty as aleatory or epistemic and either classical or Berkson. This report identifies the nature of the various input parameters and calculational methods incorporated in the Techa River Dosimetry System (based on the TRDS-2009D implementation), with the intention of preparing a stochastic version to estimate the uncertainties in the dose estimates. This report reviews the equations, databases, and input parameters, and then identifies the author’s interpretations of their general nature. It presents the approach selected so that the stochastic, Monte-Carlo, implementation of the dosimetry System - TRDS-2009MC - will provide useful information regarding the uncertainties of the doses.

  9. A system to track skin dose for neuro-interventional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Xiong, Zhenyu; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The skin-dose tracking system (DTS) provides a color-coded illustration of the cumulative skin-dose distribution on a closely-matching 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic interventions in real-time for immediate feedback to the interventionist. The skin-dose tracking utility of DTS has been extended to include cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) of neurointerventions. While the DTS was developed to track the entrance skin dose including backscatter, a significant part of the dose in CBCT is contributed by exit primary radiation and scatter due to the many overlapping projections during the rotational scan. The variation of backscatter inside and outside the collimated beam was measured with radiochromic film and a curve was fit to obtain a scatter spread function that could be applied in the DTS. Likewise, the exit dose distribution was measured with radiochromic film for a single projection and a correction factor was determined as a function of path length through the head. Both of these sources of skin dose are added for every projection in the CBCT scan to obtain a total dose mapping over the patient graphic. Results show the backscatter to follow a sigmoidal falloff near the edge of the beam, extending outside the beam as far as 8 cm. The exit dose measured for a cylindrical CTDI phantom was nearly 10 % of the entrance peak skin dose for the central ray. The dose mapping performed by the DTS for a CBCT scan was compared to that measured with radiochromic film and a CTDI-head phantom with good agreement.

  10. Dose and image quality for a cone-beam C-arm CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrig, Rebecca; Dixon, Robert; Payne, Thomas; Morin, Richard L.; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Strobel, Norbert

    2006-12-15

    We assess dose and image quality of a state-of-the-art angiographic C-arm system (Axiom Artis dTA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) for three-dimensional neuro-imaging at various dose levels and tube voltages and an associated measurement method. Unlike conventional CT, the beam length covers the entire phantom, hence, the concept of computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is not the metric of choice, and one can revert to conventional dosimetry methods by directly measuring the dose at various points using a small ion chamber. This method allows us to define and compute a new dose metric that is appropriate for a direct comparison with the familiar CTDI{sub W} of conventional CT. A perception study involving the CATPHAN 600 indicates that one can expect to see at least the 9 mm inset with 0.5% nominal contrast at the recommended head-scan dose (60 mGy) when using tube voltages ranging from 70 kVp to 125 kVp. When analyzing the impact of tube voltage on image quality at a fixed dose, we found that lower tube voltages gave improved low contrast detectability for small-diameter objects. The relationships between kVp, image noise, dose, and contrast perception are discussed.

  11. Probability Estimates of Solar Particle Event Doses During a Period of Low Sunspot Number for Thinly-Shielded Spacecraft and Short Duration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William; Rojdev, Kristina; Matzkind, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    In an earlier paper (Atwell, et al., 2015), we investigated solar particle event (SPE) radiation exposures (absorbed dose) to small, thinly-shielded spacecraft during a period when the sunspot number (SSN) was less than 30. These SPEs contain Ground Level Events (GLE), sub-GLEs, and sub-sub-GLEs (Tylka and Dietrich, 2009, Tylka and Dietrich, 2008, and Atwell, et al., 2008). GLEs are extremely energetic solar particle events having proton energies extending into the several GeV range and producing secondary particles in the atmosphere, mostly neutrons, observed with ground station neutron monitors. Sub-GLE events are less energetic, extending into the several hundred MeV range, but do not produce secondary atmospheric particles. Sub-sub GLEs are even less energetic with an observable increase in protons at energies greater than 30 MeV, but no observable proton flux above 300 MeV. In this paper, we consider those SPEs that occurred during 1973-2010 when the SSN was greater than 30 but less than 50. In addition, we provide probability estimates of absorbed dose based on mission duration with a 95% confidence level (CL). We also discuss the implications of these data and provide some recommendations that may be useful to spacecraft designers of these smaller spacecraft.

  12. Evaluation of Radiation Dose and Image Quality for the Varian Cone Beam Computed Tomography System

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Harry C.Y.; Wu, Vincent W.C.; Liu, Eva S.F.; Kwong, Dora L.W.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the image quality and dosimetry on the Varian cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system between software Version 1.4.13 and Version 1.4.11 (referred to as 'new' and 'old' protocols, respectively, in the following text). This study investigated organ absorbed dose, total effective dose, and image quality of the CBCT system for the head-and-neck and pelvic regions. Methods and Materials: A calibrated Farmer chamber and two standard cylindrical Perspex CT dosimetry phantoms with diameter of 16 cm (head phantom) and 32 cm (body phantom) were used to measure the weighted cone-beam computed tomography dose index (CBCTDIw) of the Varian CBCT system. The absorbed dose of different organs was measured in a female anthropomorphic phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and the total effective dose was estimated according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103. The dose measurement and image quality were studied for head-and-neck and pelvic regions, and comparison was made between the new and old protocols. Results: The values of the new CBCTDIw head-and-neck and pelvic protocols were 36.6 and 29.4 mGy, respectively. The total effective doses from the new head-and-neck and pelvic protocols were 1.7 and 8.2 mSv, respectively. The absorbed doses of lens for the new 200{sup o} and old 360{sup o} head-and-neck protocols were 3.8 and 59.4 mGy, respectively. The additional secondary cancer risk from daily CBCT might be up to 2.8%. Conclusions: The new Varian CBCT provided volumetric information for image guidance with acceptable image quality and lower radiation dose. This imaging tool gave a better standard for patient daily setup verification.

  13. A real-time skin dose tracking system for biplane neuro-interventional procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vijay K.; Rudin, Stephen R.; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2015-03-01

    A biplane dose-tracking system (Biplane-DTS) that provides a real-time display of the skin-dose distribution on a 3D-patient graphic during neuro-interventional fluoroscopic procedures was developed. Biplane-DTS calculates patient skin dose using geometry and exposure information for the two gantries of the imaging system acquired from the digital system bus. The dose is calculated for individual points on the patient graphic surface for each exposure pulse and cumulative dose for both x-ray tubes is displayed as color maps on a split screen showing frontal and lateral projections of a 3D-humanoid graphic. Overall peak skin dose (PSD), FOV-PSD and current dose rates for the two gantries are also displayed. Biplane- TS uses calibration files of mR/mAs for the frontal and lateral tubes measured with and without the table in the beam at the entrance surface of a 20 cm thick PMMA phantom placed 15 cm tube-side of the isocenter. For neuro-imaging, conversion factors are applied as a function of entrance field area to scale the calculated dose to that measured with a Phantom Laboratory head phantom which contains a human skull to account for differences in backscatter between PMMA and the human head. The software incorporates inverse-square correction to each point on the skin and corrects for angulation of the beam through the table. Dose calculated by Biplane DTS and values measured by a 6-cc ionization chamber placed on the head phantom at multiple points agree within a range of -3% to +7% with a standard deviation for all points of less than 3%.

  14. Automated systems for measuring dose and radiation quality as a function of time

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, L.A.; Conroy, T.J.; Elegy, D.C.; Brackenbush, L.W. ); Badhwar, G.D. )

    1992-09-01

    A compact, modular, tissue equivalent proportional counter system has been developed for use in space. The data acquisition system consists of a microcomputer, multi channel analyzer, memory, and power converter on individual circuit cards which can be used in various combinations for specific measurement requirements. The system uses separate, interchangeable detectors, each with its preamplifier and shaping amplifier connected directly to the detector. The microprocessor provides the computing power of a personal computer, and utilizes an operating system which is compatible with a subset of MSDOS. Experiment procedures can be programmed in high level languages and down loaded to the microprocessor. A typical application, used to characterize the dose rates due to trapped radiations in space, monitors the dose rate and records energy deposition spectra frequently when the dose rate is high. The microprocessor also measures and records system operation characteristics such as MCA linearity, proportional counter gain, and power supply voltages on a periodic basis.

  15. A low dose simulation tool for CT systems with energy integrating detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zabic, Stanislav; Morton, Thomas; Brown, Kevin M.; Wang Qiu

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new strategy for simulating low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans using real scans of a higher dose as an input. The tool is verified against simulations and real scans and compared to other approaches found in the literature. Methods: The conditional variance identity is used to properly account for the variance of the input high-dose data, and a formula is derived for generating a new Poisson noise realization which has the same mean and variance as the true low-dose data. The authors also derive a formula for the inclusion of real samples of detector noise, properly scaled according to the level of the simulated x-ray signals. Results: The proposed method is shown to match real scans in number of experiments. Noise standard deviation measurements in simulated low-dose reconstructions of a 35 cm water phantom match real scans in a range from 500 to 10 mA with less than 5% error. Mean and variance of individual detector channels are shown to match closely across the detector array. Finally, the visual appearance of noise and streak artifacts is shown to match in real scans even under conditions of photon-starvation (with tube currents as low as 10 and 80 mA). Additionally, the proposed method is shown to be more accurate than previous approaches (1) in achieving the correct mean and variance in reconstructed images from pure-Poisson noise simulations (with no detector noise) under photon-starvation conditions, and (2) in simulating the correct noise level and detector noise artifacts in real low-dose scans. Conclusions: The proposed method can accurately simulate low-dose CT data starting from high-dose data, including effects from photon starvation and detector noise. This is potentially a very useful tool in helping to determine minimum dose requirements for a wide range of clinical protocols and advanced reconstruction algorithms.

  16. Prenatal Exposure to Low Doses of Bisphenol A Increases Pituitary Proliferation and Gonadotroph Number in Female Mice Offspring at Birth1

    PubMed Central

    Brannick, Katherine E.; Craig, Zelieann R.; Himes, Ashley D.; Peretz, Jackye R.; Wang, Wei; Flaws, Jodi A.; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pituitary gland is composed of hormone-producing cells essential for homeostasis and reproduction. Pituitary cells are sensitive to endocrine feedback in the adult and can have altered hormonal secretion from exposure to the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA). BPA is a prevalent plasticizer used in food and beverage containers, leading to widespread human exposure. Although prenatal exposure to BPA can impact reproductive function in the adult, the effects of BPA on the developing pituitary are unknown. We hypothesized that prenatal exposure to low doses of BPA impacts gonadotroph cell number or parameters of hormone synthesis. To test this, pregnant mice were administered 0.5 μg/kg/day of BPA, 50 μg/kg/day of BPA, or vehicle beginning on Embryonic Day 10.5. At parturition, pituitaries from female offspring exposed in utero to either dose of BPA had increased proliferation, as assessed by mKi67 mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry. Coincidently, gonadotroph number also increased in treated females. However, we observed a dichotomy between mRNA levels of Lhb and Fshb. Female mice exposed to 0.5 μg/kg/day BPA had increased mRNA levels of gonadotropins and the gonadotropin-receptor hormone (GNRH) receptor (Gnrhr), which mediates GNRH regulation of gonadotropin production and release. In contrast, mice treated with 50 μg/kg/day of BPA had decreased gonadotropin mRNA levels, Gnrhr and Nr5a1, a transcription factor required for gonadotroph differentiation. No other pituitary hormones were altered on the day of birth in response to in utero BPA exposure, and male pituitaries showed no change in the parameters tested. Collectively, these results show that prenatal exposure to BPA affects pituitary gonadotroph development in females. PMID:22875908

  17. Backscattering measuring system for optimization of intravenous laser irradiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, Tatyana V.; Popov, V. D.; Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1996-11-01

    Intravenous laser blood irradiation as an effective method of biostimulation and physiotherapy becomes a more popular procedure. Optimal irradiation conditions for each patient are needed to be established individually. A fiber optics feedback system combined with conventional intravenous laser irradiation system was developed to control of irradiation process. The system consists of He-Ne laser, fiber optics probe and signal analyzer. Intravenous blood irradiation was performed in 7 healthy volunteers and 19 patients with different diseases. Measurements in vivo were related to in vitro blood irradiation which was performed in the same conditions with force-circulated venous blood. Comparison of temporal variations of backscattered light during all irradiation procedures has shown a strong discrepancy on optical properties of blood in patients with various health disorders since second procedure. The best cure effect was achieved when intensity of backscattered light was constant during at least five minutes. As a result, the optical irradiation does was considered to be equal 20 minutes' exposure of 3 mW He-Ne laser light at the end of fourth procedure.

  18. SU-E-J-60: Efficient Monte Carlo Dose Calculation On CPU-GPU Heterogeneous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, K; Chen, D. Z; Hu, X. S; Zhou, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well-known that the performance of GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation implementations is bounded by memory bandwidth. One major cause of this bottleneck is the random memory writing patterns in dose deposition, which leads to several memory efficiency issues on GPU such as un-coalesced writing and atomic operations. We propose a new method to alleviate such issues on CPU-GPU heterogeneous systems, which achieves overall performance improvement for Monte Carlo dose calculation. Methods: Dose deposition is to accumulate dose into the voxels of a dose volume along the trajectories of radiation rays. Our idea is to partition this procedure into the following three steps, which are fine-tuned for CPU or GPU: (1) each GPU thread writes dose results with location information to a buffer on GPU memory, which achieves fully-coalesced and atomic-free memory transactions; (2) the dose results in the buffer are transferred to CPU memory; (3) the dose volume is constructed from the dose buffer on CPU. We organize the processing of all radiation rays into streams. Since the steps within a stream use different hardware resources (i.e., GPU, DMA, CPU), we can overlap the execution of these steps for different streams by pipelining. Results: We evaluated our method using a Monte Carlo Convolution Superposition (MCCS) program and tested our implementation for various clinical cases on a heterogeneous system containing an Intel i7 quad-core CPU and an NVIDIA TITAN GPU. Comparing with a straightforward MCCS implementation on the same system (using both CPU and GPU for radiation ray tracing), our method gained 2-5X speedup without losing dose calculation accuracy. Conclusion: The results show that our new method improves the effective memory bandwidth and overall performance for MCCS on the CPU-GPU systems. Our proposed method can also be applied to accelerate other Monte Carlo dose calculation approaches. This research was supported in part by NSF under Grants CCF

  19. Code system to compute radiation dose in human phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ryman, J.C.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.; Davis, J.L.; Tang, J.S.; Kerr, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    Monte Carlo photon transport code and a code using Monte Carlo integration of a point kernel have been revised to incorporate human phantom models for an adult female, juveniles of various ages, and a pregnant female at the end of the first trimester of pregnancy, in addition to the adult male used earlier. An analysis code has been developed for deriving recommended values of specific absorbed fractions of photon energy. The computer code system and calculational method are described, emphasizing recent improvements in methods. (LEW)

  20. Individual Dose Calculations with Use of the Revised Techa River Dosimetry System TRDS-2009D

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M. O.; Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2009-10-23

    An updated deterministic version of the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS-2009D) has been developed to estimate individual doses from external exposure and intake of radionuclides for residents living on the Techa River contaminated as a result of radioactive releases from the Mayak plutonium facility in 1949–1956. The TRDS-2009D is designed as a flexible system that uses, depending on the input data for an individual, various elements of system databases to provide the dosimetric variables requested by the user. Several phases are included in the computation schedule. The first phase includes calculations with use of a common protocol for all cohort members based on village-average-intake functions and external dose rates; individual data on age, gender and history of residence are included in the first phase. This phase results in dose estimates similar to those obtained with system TRDS-2000 used previously to derive risks of health effects in the Techa River Cohort. The second phase includes refinement of individual internal doses for those persons who have had body-burden measurements or exposure parameters specific to the household where he/she lived on the Techa River. The third phase includes summation of individual doses from environmental exposure and from radiological examinations. The results of TRDS-2009D dose calculations have demonstrated for the ETRC members on average a moderate increase in RBM dose estimates (34%) and a minor increase (5%) in estimates of stomach dose. The calculations for the members of the ETROC indicated similar small changes for stomach, but significant increase in RBM doses (400%). Individual-dose assessments performed with use of TRDS-2009D have been provided to epidemiologists for exploratory risk analysis in the ETRC and ETROC. These data provide an opportunity to evaluate the possible impact on radiogenic risk of such factors as confounding exposure (environmental and medical), changes in the Techa River source

  1. Construction of an Online Learning System for Decimal Numbers through the Use of Cognitive Conflict Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Tzu-Hua; Liu, Yuan-Chen; Shiu, Chia-Ya

    2008-01-01

    The study focused on the effects of the CAL system constructed via cognitive conflict of decimal numbers for the sixth graders. The purpose of the system is to gauge decimal concepts of students. When students entertain misconceptions or misleading ideas, the system will in accordance with the types of the wrong answer generate appropriate…

  2. Automatic management system for dose parameters in interventional radiology and cardiology.

    PubMed

    Ten, J I; Fernandez, J M; Vaño, E

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an automatic management system to archive and analyse the major study parameters and patient doses for fluoroscopy guided procedures performed in cardiology and interventional radiology systems. The X-ray systems used for this trial have the capability to export at the end of the procedure and via e-mail the technical parameters of the study and the patient dose values. An application was developed to query and retrieve from a mail server, all study reports sent by the imaging modality and store them on a Microsoft SQL Server data base. The results from 3538 interventional study reports generated by 7 interventional systems were processed. In the case of some technical parameters and patient doses, alarms were added to receive malfunction alerts so as to immediately take appropriate corrective actions. PMID:21831869

  3. Experimental measurement of radiation dose in a dedicated breast CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shan-Wei; Wang, Yan-Fang; Shu, Hang; Tang, Xiao; Wei, Cun-Feng; Song, Yu-Shou; Shi, Rong-Jian; Wei, Long

    2014-03-01

    Radiation dose is an important performance indicator of a dedicated breast CT (DBCT). In this paper, the method of putting thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) into a breast shaped PMMA phantom to study the dose distribution in breasts was improved by using smaller TLDs and a new half-ellipsoid PMMA phantom. Then the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was introduced to average glandular assessment in DBCT for the first time and two measurement modes were proposed for different sizes of breasts. The dose deviations caused by using cylindrical phantoms were simulated using the Monte Carlo method and a set of correction factors were calculated. The results of the confirmatory measurement with a cylindrical phantom (11 cm/8 cm) show that CTDIw gives a relatively conservative overestimate of the average glandular dose comparing to the results of Monte Carlo simulation and TLDs measurement. But with better practicability and stability, the CTDIw is suitable for dose evaluations in daily clinical practice. Both of the TLDs and CTDIw measurements demonstrate that the radiation dose of our DBCT system is lower than conventional two-view mammography.

  4. [Evaluation of absorbed dose from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography by radiotherapy planning system: influence on the radiation therapy for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Tetsuro; Murakami, Naoki; Okamura, Yoshiaki; Nishimura, Hideki; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Kimura, Kunihiko; Hase, Mamoru; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2013-05-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is increasingly being used in modern radiation therapy, and it is now possible to verify a patient's position using kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). However, if kV-CBCT is used frequently, the dose absorbed by the body cannot be disregarded. A number of studies have been made on the absorbed dose of kV-CBCT, in which absorbed dose measurements were made using a computed tomography dose index (CTDI) or a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). Other methods include comparison of the absorbed dose between a kV-CBCT and other modalities. These techniques are now in common use. However, dose distribution within the patient varies with the patient's size, posture and the part of the body to which radiation therapy is applied. The chief purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose distribution of kV-CBCT by employing a radiotherapy planning system (RTPS); a secondary aim was to examine the influence of a dose of kV-CBCT radiation when used to treat prostate cancer. The beam data of an on-board imager (OBI) was registered in the RTPS, after which modeling was performed. The radiation dosimetry was arranged by the dosimeter in an elliptical phantom. Rotational radiation treatment was used to obtain the dose distribution of the kV-CBCT within the patient, and the patient dose was evaluated based on the simulation of the dose distribution. In radiation therapy for prostate cancer, if kV-CBCT was applied daily, the dose increment within the planning target volume (PTV) and the organ in question was about 1 Gy. PMID:23964528

  5. Accuracy of out-of-field dose calculations by a commercial treatment planning system

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Rebecca M; Scarboro, Sarah B; Kry, S F; Yaldo, Derek Z

    2011-01-01

    The dosimetric accuracy of treatment planning systems (TPSs) decreases for locations outside the treatment field borders. However, the true accuracy of specific TPSs for locations beyond the treatment field borders is not well documented. Our objective was to quantify the accuracy of out-of-field dose predicted by the commercially available Eclipse version 8.6 TPS (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for a clinical treatment delivered on a Varian Clinac 2100. We calculated (in the TPS) and determined (with thermoluminescent dosimeters) doses at a total of 238 points of measurement (with distance from the field edge ranging from 3.75 to 11.25 cm). Our comparisons determined that the Eclipse TPS underestimated out-of-field doses by an average of 40% over the range of distances examined. As the distance from the treatment field increased, the TPS underestimated the dose with increasing magnitude—up to 55% at 11.25 cm from the treatment field border. These data confirm that accuracy beyond the treatment border is inadequate, and out-of-field data from TPSs should be used only with a clear understanding of this limitation. Studies that require accurate out-of-field dose should use other dose reconstruction methods, such as direct measurements or Monte Carlo calculations. PMID:21076191

  6. Systemic Delivery of Atropine Sulfate by the MicroDose Dry-Powder Inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Venkataramanan, R.; Hoffman, R.M.; George, M.P.; Petrov, A.; Richards, T.; Zhang, S.; Choi, J.; Gao, Y.Y.; Oakum, C.D.; Cook, R.O.; Donahoe, M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inhaled atropine is being developed as a systemic and pulmonary treatment for the extended recovery period after chemical weapons exposure. We performed a pharmacokinetics study comparing inhaled atropine delivery using the MicroDose Therapeutx Dry Powder Inhaler (DPIA) with intramuscular (IM) atropine delivery via auto-injector (AUTO). Methods The MicroDose DPIA utilizes a novel piezoelectric system to aerosolize drug and excipient from a foil dosing blister. Subjects inhaled a 1.95-mg atropine sulfate dose from the dry powder inhaler on one study day [5 doses×0.4 mg per dose (nominal) delivered over 12 min] and received a 2-mg IM injection via the AtroPen® auto-injector on another. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic response, and safety were studied for 12 hr. Results A total of 17 subjects were enrolled. All subjects completed IM dosing. One subject did not perform inhaled delivery due to a skin reaction from the IM dose. Pharmacokinetic results were as follows: area under the curve concentration, DPIA=20.1±5.8, AUTO=23.7±4.9 ng hr/mL (means±SD); maximum concentration reached, DPIA=7.7±3.5, AUTO=11.0±3.8 ng/mL; time to reach maximum concentration, DPIA=0.25±0.47, AUTO=0.19±0.23 hr. Pharmacodynamic results were as follows: maximum increase in heart rate, DPIA=18±12, AUTO=23±13 beats/min; average change in 1-sec forced expiratory volume at 30 min, DPIA=0.16±0.22 L, AUTO=0.11±0.29 L. The relative bioavailability for DPIA was 87% (based on output dose). Two subjects demonstrated allergic responses: one to the first dose (AUTO), which was mild and transient, and one to the second dose (DPIA), which was moderate in severity, required treatment with oral and intravenous (IV) diphenhydramine and IV steroids, and lasted more than 7 days. Conclusions Dry powder inhalation is a highly bioavailable route for attaining rapid and consistent systemic concentrations of atropine. PMID:22691110

  7. Independent calculation of dose distributions for helical tomotherapy using a conventional treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Klüter, Sebastian Schubert, Kai; Lissner, Steffen; Sterzing, Florian; Oetzel, Dieter; Debus, Jürgen; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Oelfke, Uwe; Nill, Simeon

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric verification of treatment plans in helical tomotherapy usually is carried out via verification measurements. In this study, a method for independent dose calculation of tomotherapy treatment plans is presented, that uses a conventional treatment planning system with a pencil kernel dose calculation algorithm for generation of verification dose distributions based on patient CT data. Methods: A pencil beam algorithm that directly uses measured beam data was configured for dose calculation for a tomotherapy machine. Tomotherapy treatment plans were converted into a format readable by an in-house treatment planning system by assigning each projection to one static treatment field and shifting the calculation isocenter for each field in order to account for the couch movement. The modulation of the fluence for each projection is read out of the delivery sinogram, and with the kernel-based dose calculation, this information can directly be used for dose calculation without the need for decomposition of the sinogram. The sinogram values are only corrected for leaf output and leaf latency. Using the converted treatment plans, dose was recalculated with the independent treatment planning system. Multiple treatment plans ranging from simple static fields to real patient treatment plans were calculated using the new approach and either compared to actual measurements or the 3D dose distribution calculated by the tomotherapy treatment planning system. In addition, dose–volume histograms were calculated for the patient plans. Results: Except for minor deviations at the maximum field size, the pencil beam dose calculation for static beams agreed with measurements in a water tank within 2%/2 mm. A mean deviation to point dose measurements in the cheese phantom of 0.89% ± 0.81% was found for unmodulated helical plans. A mean voxel-based deviation of −0.67% ± 1.11% for all voxels in the respective high dose region (dose values >80%), and a mean local

  8. Accuracy of micro powder dosing via a vibratory sieve-chute system.

    PubMed

    Besenhard, M O; Faulhammer, E; Fathollahi, S; Reif, G; Calzolari, V; Biserni, S; Ferrari, A; Lawrence, S M; Llusa, M; Khinast, J G

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a powder dosing system with a vibratory sieve mounted on a chute that doses particles into a capsule. Vertical vibration occurred with a broad range of frequencies and amplitudes. During dosing events, the fill weight was accurately recorded via a capacitance sensor, covering the capsules and making it possible to analyze filling characteristics, that is, the fill rates and their robustness. The range of frequencies and amplitudes was screened for settings that facilitated reasonable (no blocking, no spilling) fill rates for three lactose powders. The filling characteristics were studied within this operating space. The results reveal similar operating spaces for all investigated powders. The fill rate robustness varied distinctly in the operating space, which is of prime importance for selecting the settings for continuous feeding applications. In addition, we present accurate dosing studies utilizing the knowledge about the filling characteristics of each powder. PMID:26044188

  9. Determination of effective doses in image-guided radiation therapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyone, Y. Y.; Suriyapee, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, S.; Tawonwong, T.

    2016-03-01

    The organ and effective doses in image-guided radiotherapy system are determined in this study. For 2D imaging, incident air kerma (Ki) was measured by 6cc ionization chamber with Accu-Pro dosimeter. The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was calculated by multiplying Ki with backscatter factor. The effective dose was calculated by multiplying ESAK with conversion coefficient. For 3D imaging, computed tomography/cone-beam dose index (CTDI/CBDI) measurements were performed by using 100mm pencil ionization chamber with Accu-Pro dosimeter. The dose index in air and in CTDI phantom from planning CT and cone- beam CT were measured. Then, effective dose was calculated by ImPACT software. The effective doses from 2D conventional simulator for anteroposterior and lateral projections were 01 and 0.02mSv for head, 0.15 and 0.16mSv for thorax, 0.22 and 0.21mSv for pelvis, respectively. The effective doses from 3D, planning CT and CBCT, were 3.3 and 0.1mSv for head, 13 and 2.4mSv for thorax and 7.2 and 4.9mSv for pelvis, respectively. Based on 30 fractions of treatment course, total effective dose (3D CT, 2D setup verification and 6 times CBCT) of head, thorax and pelvis were 3.93, 27.71 and 37.03mSv, respectively. Therefore, IGRT should be administered with significant parameters to reduce the dose.

  10. Dose Control System in the Optima XE Single Wafer High Energy Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Shu; Yoon, Jongyoon; David, Jonathan

    2011-01-07

    Photoresist outgassing can significantly compromise accurate dosimetry of high energy implants. High energy implant even at a modest beam current produces high beam powers which create significantly worse outgassing than low and medium energy implants and the outgassing continues throughout the implant due to the low dose in typical high energy implant recipes. In the previous generation of high energy implanters, dose correction by monitoring of process chamber pressure during photoresist outgassing has been used. However, as applications diversify and requirements change, the need arises for a more versatile photoresist correction system to match the versatility of a single wafer high energy ion implanter. We have successfully developed a new dosimetry system for the Optima XE single wafer high energy ion implanter which does not require any form of compensation due to the implant conditions. This paper describes the principles and performance of this new dose system.

  11. Dose Control System in the Optima XE Single Wafer High Energy Ion Implanter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Shu; Yoon, Jongyoon; David, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Photoresist outgassing can significantly compromise accurate dosimetry of high energy implants. High energy implant even at a modest beam current produces high beam powers which create significantly worse outgassing than low and medium energy implants and the outgassing continues throughout the implant due to the low dose in typical high energy implant recipes. In the previous generation of high energy implanters, dose correction by monitoring of process chamber pressure during photoresist outgassing has been used. However, as applications diversify and requirements change, the need arises for a more versatile photoresist correction system to match the versatility of a single wafer high energy ion implanter. We have successfully developed a new dosimetry system for the Optima XE single wafer high energy ion implanter which does not require any form of compensation due to the implant conditions. This paper describes the principles and performance of this new dose system.

  12. A universal number for wave reflection optimization of the mammalian cardiovascular system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Quantifying the optimum arterial wave reflection and systemic arterial function is essential to the evaluation of optimal cardiovascular system (CVS) operation. The CVS function depends on both the dynamics of the heart and wave dynamics of the arterial network. Here, we are introducing a universal dimensionless number, called wave condition number (α) that quantifies the arterial wave reflection. An in-vitro experimental approach, utilizing a unique hydraulic model was used to quantify α in human aortas with a wide range of aortic rigidities. Our results indicate that the optimum value of the wave condition number is 0.1 at each level of aortic rigidity. Looking into mammals of various size (from mice to elephant), our results show that the optimum wave condition number remains 0.1 and is universal among all mammals. Clinical applications and the relevancy of the wave condition number will also be discussed.

  13. MO-F-16A-06: Implementation of a Radiation Exposure Monitoring System for Surveillance of Multi-Modality Radiation Dose Data

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, B; Kanal, K; Dickinson, R; Zamora, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have implemented a commercially available Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) to enhance the processes of radiation dose data collection, analysis and alerting developed over the past decade at our sites of practice. REMS allows for consolidation of multiple radiation dose information sources and quicker alerting than previously developed processes. Methods: Thirty-nine x-ray producing imaging modalities were interfaced with the REMS: thirteen computed tomography scanners, sixteen angiography/interventional systems, nine digital radiography systems and one mammography system. A number of methodologies were used to provide dose data to the REMS: Modality Performed Procedure Step (MPPS) messages, DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Reports (RDSR), and DICOM header information. Once interfaced, the dosimetry information from each device underwent validation (first 15–20 exams) before release for viewing by end-users: physicians, medical physicists, technologists and administrators. Results: Before REMS, our diagnostic physics group pulled dosimetry data from seven disparate databases throughout the radiology, radiation oncology, cardiology, electrophysiology, anesthesiology/pain management and vascular surgery departments at two major medical centers and four associated outpatient clinics. With the REMS implementation, we now have one authoritative source of dose information for alerting, longitudinal analysis, dashboard/graphics generation and benchmarking. REMS provides immediate automatic dose alerts utilizing thresholds calculated through daily statistical analysis. This has streamlined our Closing the Loop process for estimated skin exposures in excess of our institutional specific substantial radiation dose level which relied on technologist notification of the diagnostic physics group and daily report from the radiology information system (RIS). REMS also automatically calculates the CT size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) as well as provides

  14. A simplified method for determining the number of independent slip systems in crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, J. D.; Kaufman, M. J.; Noebe, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    A novel method for determining the number of independent slip systems for any family or a combination of families of slip systems is proposed, which is more direct than previous approaches. This technique makes it possible to easily determine, from the known operative slip systems, if the material is slip-system-deficient. The method also makes it possible to determine if twinning may contribute additional deformation modes.

  15. Biological effect of dose distortion by fiducial markers in spot-scanning proton therapy with a limited number of fields: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Taeko; Maeda, Kenichiro; Sutherland, Kenneth; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Shimizu, Shinichi; Takao, Seishin; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: In accurate proton spot-scanning therapy, continuous target tracking by fluoroscopic x ray during irradiation is beneficial not only for respiratory moving tumors of lung and liver but also for relatively stationary tumors of prostate. Implanted gold markers have been used with great effect for positioning the target volume by a fluoroscopy, especially for the cases of liver and prostate with the targets surrounded by water-equivalent tissues. However, recent studies have revealed that gold markers can cause a significant underdose in proton therapy. This paper focuses on prostate cancer and explores the possibility that multiple-field irradiation improves the underdose effect by markers on tumor-control probability (TCP). Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the dose distortion effect. A spherical gold marker was placed at several characteristic points in a water phantom. The markers were with two different diameters of 2 and 1.5 mm, both visible on fluoroscopy. Three beam arrangements of single-field uniform dose (SFUD) were examined: one lateral field, two opposite lateral fields, and three fields (two opposite lateral fields + anterior field). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was set to 1.1 and a dose of 74 Gy (RBE) was delivered to the target of a typical prostate size in 37 fractions. The ratios of TCP to that without the marker (TCP{sub r}) were compared with the parameters of the marker sizes, number of fields, and marker positions. To take into account the dependence of biological parameters in TCP model, {alpha}/{beta} values of 1.5, 3, and 10 Gy (RBE) were considered. Results: It was found that the marker of 1.5 mm diameter does not affect the TCPs with all {alpha}/{beta} values when two or more fields are used. On the other hand, if the marker diameter is 2 mm, more than two irradiation fields are required to suppress the decrease in TCP from TCP{sub r} by less than 3%. This is especially true when multiple

  16. SU-E-T-586: Optimal Determination of Tolerance Level for Radiation Dose Delivery Verification in An in Vivo Dosimetry System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Souri, S; Gill, G; Rea, A; Kuruvilla, A; Riegel, A; Cao, Y; Jamshidi, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To statistically determine the optimal tolerance level in the verification of delivery dose compared to the planned dose in an in vivo dosimetry system in radiotherapy. Methods: The LANDAUER MicroSTARii dosimetry system with screened nanoDots (optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters) was used for in vivo dose measurements. Ideally, the measured dose should match with the planned dose and falls within a normal distribution. Any deviation from the normal distribution may be redeemed as a mismatch, therefore a potential sign of the dose misadministration. Randomly mis-positioned nanoDots can yield a continuum background distribution. A percentage difference of the measured dose to its corresponding planned dose (ΔD) can be used to analyze combined data sets for different patients. A model of a Gaussian plus a flat function was used to fit the ΔD distribution. Results: Total 434 nanoDot measurements for breast cancer patients were collected across a period of three months. The fit yields a Gaussian mean of 2.9% and a standard deviation (SD) of 5.3%. The observed shift of the mean from zero is attributed to the machine output bias and calibration of the dosimetry system. A pass interval of −2SD to +2SD was applied and a mismatch background was estimated to be 4.8%. With such a tolerance level, one can expect that 99.99% of patients should pass the verification and at most 0.011% might have a potential dose misadministration that may not be detected after 3 times of repeated measurements. After implementation, a number of new start breast cancer patients were monitored and the measured pass rate is consistent with the model prediction. Conclusion: It is feasible to implement an optimal tolerance level in order to maintain a low limit of potential dose misadministration while still to keep a relatively high pass rate in radiotherapy delivery verification.

  17. Linearization of dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Chan, Maria F.; Lewis, Dave

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Despite numerous advantages of radiochromic film dosimeter (high spatial resolution, near tissue equivalence, low energy dependence) to measure a relative dose distribution with film, one needs to first measure an absolute dose (following previously established reference dosimetry protocol) and then convert measured absolute dose values into relative doses. In this work, we present result of our efforts to obtain a functional form that would linearize the inherently nonlinear dose-response curve of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. Methods: Functional form [{zeta}= (-1){center_dot}netOD{sup (2/3)}/ln(netOD)] was derived from calibration curves of various previously established radiochromic film dosimetry systems. In order to test the invariance of the proposed functional form with respect to the film model used we tested it with three different GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign film models (EBT, EBT2, and EBT3) irradiated to various doses and scanned on a same scanner. For one of the film models (EBT2), we tested the invariance of the functional form to the scanner model used by scanning irradiated film pieces with three different flatbed scanner models (Epson V700, 1680, and 10000XL). To test our hypothesis that the proposed functional argument linearizes the response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system, verification tests have been performed in clinical applications: percent depth dose measurements, IMRT quality assurance (QA), and brachytherapy QA. Results: Obtained R{sup 2} values indicate that the choice of the functional form of the new argument appropriately linearizes the dose response of the radiochromic film dosimetry system we used. The linear behavior was insensitive to both film model and flatbed scanner model used. Measured PDD values using the green channel response of the GAFCHROMIC Trade-Mark-Sign EBT3 film model are well within {+-}2% window of the local relative dose value when compared to the tabulated Cobalt-60 data. It was also

  18. Medication Incidents Related to Automated Dose Dispensing in Community Pharmacies and Hospitals - A Reporting System Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A. G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. Methods The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR) reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. Main Outcome Measures Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. Results From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4%) incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6%) incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8%) were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2%) were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%). The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. Conclusion A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an incident

  19. Radiation dose to patients from X-ray radiographic examinations using computed radiography imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reena; Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Pawar, Shramika; Chaubey, Ajay; Kantharia, S; Babu, D A R

    2015-01-01

    The screen-film system is replaced by computed radiography system for recording the images of the patients during X-ray radiography examinations. The change in imaging system requires the re-establishment of the institutional diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of X-ray examinations conducted at the hospital. For this purpose, patient specific parameters [age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), object to image distance (OID)] and machine specific parameters (kVp, mAs, distance and field sizes) of 1875 patients during 21 different types of X-ray examinations were recorded for estimating the entrance skin dose (ESD). The ESD for each of these patients were estimated using measured X-ray beam output and the standard value of the back scatter factor. Five number summary was calculated for all the data for their presentation in the Box-Whisker plot, which provides the statistical distribution of the data. The data collected indicates that majorly performed examinations are cervical spine AP, Chest PA and Knee Lat with percentage contributions of 16.05, 16 and 8.27% respectively. The lowest contribution comes from Hip Lat which is about 1.01%. The ratio of measured ESD (maximum to minimum) for these examinations is found to be highest for the cervical spine AP with a value of 50 followed by Thoracic spine AP of 32.36. The ESD ratio for Chest PA, Knee Lat and Lumbar Spine AP are 30.75, 30.4 and 30.2 respectively. The lowest ESD ratio is for Hip Lat which is 2.68. The third quartile values of ESDs are established as the institutional DRLs. The ESD values obtained for 21 different X-ray projections are either comparable or lesser than the reported national/international values. PMID:26150685

  20. Dose Verification of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia with Presage 3D Dosimetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Thomas, A.; Newton, J.; Ibbott, G.; Deasy, J.; Oldham, M.

    2010-11-01

    Achieving adequate verification and quality-assurance (QA) for radiosurgery treatment of trigeminal-neuralgia (TGN) is particularly challenging because of the combination of very small fields, very high doses, and complex irradiation geometries (multiple gantry and couch combinations). TGN treatments have extreme requirements for dosimetry tools and QA techniques, to ensure adequate verification. In this work we evaluate the potential of Presage/Optical-CT dosimetry system as a tool for the verification of TGN distributions in high-resolution and in 3D. A TGN treatment was planned and delivered to a Presage 3D dosimeter positioned inside the Radiological-Physics-Center (RPC) head and neck IMRT credentialing phantom. A 6-arc treatment plan was created using the iPlan system, and a maximum dose of 80Gy was delivered with a Varian Trilogy machine. The delivered dose to Presage was determined by optical-CT scanning using the Duke Large field-of-view Optical-CT Scanner (DLOS) in 3D, with isotropic resolution of 0.7mm3. DLOS scanning and reconstruction took about 20minutes. 3D dose comparisons were made with the planning system. Good agreement was observed between the planned and measured 3D dose distributions, and this work provides strong support for the viability of Presage/Optical-CT as a highly useful new approach for verification of this complex technique.

  1. Size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) for a prototype orthopedic cone-beam CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Samuel; Packard, Nathan; Yorkston, John

    2014-03-01

    Patient specific dose evaluation and reporting is becoming increasingly important for x-ray imaging systems. Even imaging systems with lower patient dose such as CBCT scanners for extremities can benefit from accurate and size-specific dose assessment and reporting. This paper presents CTDI dose measurements performed on a prototype CBCT extremity imaging system across a range of body part sizes (5, 10, 16, and 20 cm effective diameter) and kVp (70, 80, and 90 kVp - with 0.1 mm Cu added filtration). The ratio of the CTDI measurements for the 5, 10, and 20 cm phantoms to the CTDI measurements for the 16 cm phantom were calculated and results were compared to size-specific dose estimates conversion factors (AAPM Report 204), which were evaluated on a conventional CT scanner. Due to the short scan nature of the system (220 degree acquisition angle), the dependence of CTDI values on the initial angular orientation of the phantom with respect to the imager was also evaluated. The study demonstrated that for a 220 degree acquisition sequence, the initial angular position of the conventional CTDI phantom with respect to the scanner does not significantly affect CTDI measurements (varying by less than 2% overall across the range of possible initial angular positions). The size-specific conversion factor was found to be comparable to the Report 204 factors for the large phantom size (20 cm) but lower, by up to 12%, for the 5 cm phantom (i.e., 1.35 for CBCT vs 1.54 for CT). The factors dependence on kVp was minimal, but dependence on kVp was most significant for smaller diameters. These results indicate that specific conversion factors need to be used for CBCT systems with short scans in order to provide more accurate dose reporting across the range of body sizes found in extremity scanners.

  2. Very Large Data Volumes Analysis of Collaborative Systems with Finite Number of States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivan, Ion; Ciurea, Cristian; Pavel, Sorin

    2010-01-01

    The collaborative system with finite number of states is defined. A very large database is structured. Operations on large databases are identified. Repetitive procedures for collaborative systems operations are derived. The efficiency of such procedures is analyzed. (Contains 6 tables, 5 footnotes and 3 figures.)

  3. On the Maximum Number of Periodical Solutions of a Class of Autonomous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raeva, M.

    2008-10-30

    The autonomous systems are investigated on a certain condition, assuming the existence of inner resonances. Nonlinear parts are polynomials of a certain class. The present article is a continuation of the last one, which was published by American Institute of Physics, New York in 2007. We are interested both in the existence and the number of periodical trajectories of the system with initial conditions.

  4. Development of mammography system using CdTe photon counting detector for the exposure dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Sho; Niwa, Naoko; Yamazaki, Misaki; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Nagano, Tatsuya; Kodera, Yoshie

    2014-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) photon-counting detector for exposure dose reduction. In contrast to conventional mammography, this system uses high-energy X-rays. This study evaluates the usefulness of this system in terms of the absorbed dose distribution and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at acrylic step using a Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, we created a prototype system that uses a CdTe detector and automatic movement stage. For various conditions, we measured the properties and evaluated the quality of images produced by the system. The simulation result for a tube voltage of 40 kV and tungsten/barium (W/Ba) as a target/filter shows that the surface dose was reduced more than 60% compared to that under conventional conditions. The CNR of our proposal system also became higher than that under conventional conditions. The point at which the CNRs coincide for 4 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the 2-mm-thick step corresponds to a dose reduction of 30%, and these differences increased with increasing phantom thickness. To improve the image quality, we determined the problematic aspects of the scanning system. The results of this study indicate that, by using a higher X-ray energy than in conventional mammography, it is possible to obtain a significant exposure dose reduction without loss of image quality. Further, the image quality of the prototype system can be improved by optimizing the balance between the shift-and-add operation and the output of the X-ray tube. In future work, we will further examine these improvement points.

  5. [A novel serial port auto trigger system for MOSFET dose acquisition].

    PubMed

    Luo, Guangwen; Qi, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    To synchronize the radiation of microSelectron-HDR (Nucletron afterloading machine) and measurement of MOSFET dose system, a trigger system based on interface circuit was designed and corresponding monitor and trigger program were developed on Qt platform. This interface and control system was tested and showed stable operate and reliable work. This adopted serial port detect technique may expand to trigger application of other medical devices. PMID:23668038

  6. Power Assigning Method for Increasing the Number of Users in Time-spreading Optical CDMA Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Mohammad Reza; Abiri, Ebrahim; Kazemi, Keyvan; Dezfouli, Mehran

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a method for increasing the number of supportable users in a time-spreading Optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) system is proposed. In the presented technique, a unique codeword is assigned to a couple of users instead of just one. Different optical powers are employed for such users in order to distinguish them from each other. Other methods use the frequency or the polarization of the optical signals as an additional coding dimension to increase the number of codewords and hence the number of users in the network. It is proposed to employ nonlinear optical regenerators for separating optical pulses with different powers. A comprehensive design algorithm for such regenerators is presented. In order to evaluate the performance of the designed regenerators a TS-OCDMA system is simulated using OptiSystem software. Results indicate an error free transmission in the system employing the proposed technique.

  7. Responses of the Rat Basal Ganglia Neurotensin Systems to Low Doses of Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Alburges, Mario E.; Hoonakker, Amanda J.; Cordova, Nathaniel M.; Robson, Christina M.; McFadden, Lisa M.; Martin, Amber L.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) in a manner mimicking the bingeing patterns associated with abuse, reduces NT release and causes its accumulation and elevated NT levels in extrapyramidal structures by a D1 mechanism. The relevance of these findings to the therapeutic use of METH needs to be studied. Objectives The effect of low doses (comparable to that used for therapy) of METH on basal ganglia NT systems was examined and compared to high-dose and self-administration effects previously reported. Methods Rats were injected four times (2-h intervals) with either saline or low doses of METH (0.25, 0.50 or 1.00 mg/kg/s.c.). For the DA antagonist studies, animals were pretreated with a D1 (SCH23390) or D2 (eticlopride) antagonist 15 min prior to METH or saline treatments. Rats were sacrificed 5–48 h after last injection. Results METH at doses of 0.25 and 0.50, but not 1.00 mg/kg rapidly and briefly decreased NTLI concentration in all basal ganglia structures studied. In the posterior dorsal striatum, the reduction in NT level after low-dose METH appeared to be caused principally by D2 stimulation, but both D2 and D1 stimulation were required for the NT responses in the other basal ganglia regions. Conclusions A novel finding from the present study was that opposite to abuse-mimicking high doses of METH, the therapeutically relevant low-dose METH treatment reduced NT tissue levels likely reflecting an increase in NT release and a short-term depletion of the levels of this neuropeptide in basal ganglia structures. The possible significance is discussed. PMID:24522333

  8. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit Number 427: Area 3 septic waste system numbers 2 and 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-19

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 3 Compound, specifically Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Number 427, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The Corrective Action Unit Work Plan, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada divides investigative activities at TTR into Source Groups. The Septic Tanks and Lagoons Group consists of seven CAUs. Corrective Action Unit Number 427 is one of three septic waste system CAUs in TTR Area 3. Corrective Action Unit Numbers 405 and 428 will be investigated at a future data. Corrective Action Unit Number 427 is comprised of Septic Waste Systems Number 2 and 6 with respective CAS Numbers 03-05-002-SW02 and 03-05-002-SW06.

  9. Imaging doses from the Elekta Synergy X-ray cone beam CT system.

    PubMed

    Amer, A; Marchant, T; Sykes, J; Czajka, J; Moore, C

    2007-06-01

    The Elekta Synergy is a radiotherapy treatment machine with integrated kilovoltage (kV) X-ray imaging system capable of producing cone beam CT (CBCT) images of the patient in the treatment position. The aim of this study is to assess the additional imaging dose. Cone beam CT dose index (CBDI) is introduced and measured inside standard CTDI phantoms for several sites (head: 100 kV, 38 mAs, lung: 120 kV, 152 mAs and pelvis: 130 kV, 456 mAs). The measured weighted doses were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements at various locations in a Rando phantom and at patients' surfaces. The measured CBDIs in-air at the isocentre were 9.2 mGy 100 mAs(-1), 7.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) and 5.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) for 130 kV, 120 kV and 100 kV, respectively. The body phantom weighted CBDI were 5.5 mGy 100 mAs(-1) and 3.8 mGy 100 mAs(-1 )for 130 kV and 120 kV. The head phantom weighted CBDI was 4.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) for 100 kV. The weighted doses for the Christie Hospital CBCT imaging techniques were 1.6 mGy, 6 mGy and 22 mGy for the head, lung and pelvis. The measured CBDIs were used to estimate the total effective dose for the Synergy system using the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator. Measured CBCT doses using the Christie Hospital protocols are low for head and lung scans whether compared with electronic portal imaging (EPI), commonly used for treatment verification, or single and multiple slice CT. For the pelvis, doses are similar to EPI but higher than CT. Repeated use of CBCT for treatment verification is likely and hence the total patient dose needs to be carefully considered. It is important to consider further development of low dose CBCT techniques to keep additional doses as low as reasonably practicable. PMID:17684077

  10. Dose and scatter characteristics of a novel cone beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Muhit, A.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-03-01

    A novel cone-beam CT (CBCT) system has been developed with promising capabilities for musculoskeletal imaging (e.g., weight-bearing extremities and combined radiographic / volumetric imaging). The prototype system demonstrates diagnostic-quality imaging performance, while the compact geometry and short scan orbit raise new considerations for scatter management and dose characterization that challenge conventional methods. The compact geometry leads to elevated, heterogeneous x-ray scatter distributions - even for small anatomical sites (e.g., knee or wrist), and the short scan orbit results in a non-uniform dose distribution. These complex dose and scatter distributions were investigated via experimental measurements and GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The combination provided a powerful basis for characterizing dose distributions in patient-specific anatomy, investigating the benefits of an antiscatter grid, and examining distinct contributions of coherent and incoherent scatter in artifact correction. Measurements with a 16 cm CTDI phantom show that the dose from the short-scan orbit (0.09 mGy/mAs at isocenter) varies from 0.16 to 0.05 mGy/mAs at various locations on the periphery (all obtained at 80 kVp). MC estimation agreed with dose measurements within 10-15%. Dose distribution in patient-specific anatomy was computed with MC, confirming such heterogeneity and highlighting the elevated energy deposition in bone (factor of ~5-10) compared to soft-tissue. Scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) up to ~1.5-2 was evident in some regions of the knee. A 10:1 antiscatter grid was found earlier to result in significant improvement in soft-tissue imaging performance without increase in dose. The results of MC simulations elucidated the mechanism behind scatter reduction in the presence of a grid. A ~3-fold reduction in average SPR was found in the MC simulations; however, a linear grid was found to impart additional heterogeneity in the scatter distribution

  11. Comparison of winding-number sequences for symmetric and asymmetric oscillatory systems.

    PubMed

    Englisch, Volker; Parlitz, Ulrich; Lauterborn, Werner

    2015-08-01

    The bifurcation sets of symmetric and asymmetric periodically driven oscillators are investigated and classified by means of winding numbers. It is shown that periodic windows within chaotic regions are forming winding-number sequences on different levels. These sequences can be described by a simple formula that makes it possible to predict winding numbers at bifurcation points. Symmetric and asymmetric systems follow similar rules for the development of winding numbers within different sequences and these sequences can be combined into a single general rule. The role of the two distinct period-doubling cascades is investigated in the light of the winding-number sequences discovered. Examples are taken from the double-well Duffing oscillator, a special two-parameter Duffing oscillator, and a bubble oscillator. PMID:26382476

  12. Predicted and observed therapeutic dose exceedances of ionizable pharmaceuticals in fish plasma from urban coastal systems.

    PubMed

    Scott, W Casan; Du, Bowen; Haddad, Samuel P; Breed, Christopher S; Saari, Gavin N; Kelly, Martin; Broach, Linda; Chambliss, C Kevin; Brooks, Bryan W

    2016-04-01

    Instream flows of the rapidly urbanizing watersheds and estuaries of the Gulf of Mexico in Texas (USA) are increasingly dominated by reclaimed waters. Though ionizable pharmaceuticals have received increasing attention in freshwaters, many research questions remain unanswered, particularly in tidally influenced urban coastal systems, which experience significant spatiotemporal variability in pH that influences bioavailability and bioaccumulation. The authors coupled fish plasma modeling of therapeutic hazard values with field monitoring of water chemistry variability and pharmaceutical occurrence to examine whether therapeutic hazards to fish existed within these urban coastal ecosystems and whether therapeutic hazards differed within and among coastal locations and seasons. Spatial and temporal fluctuations in pH within study sites altered the probability of encountering pharmaceutical hazards to fish. Significant water quality differences were consistently observed among traditional parameters and pharmaceuticals collected from surface and bottom waters, which are rarely sampled during routine surface water quality assessments. The authors then compared modeling predictions of fish plasma concentrations of pharmaceuticals to measured plasma levels from various field-collected fish species. Diphenhydramine and diltiazem were observed in plasma of multiple species, and diltiazem exceeded human therapeutic doses in largemouth bass, catfish, and mullet inhabiting these urban estuaries. Though the present study only examined a small number of target analytes, which represent a microcosm of the exposome of these fish, coastal systems are anticipated to be more strongly influenced by continued urbanization, altered instream flows, and population growth in the future. Unfortunately, aquatic toxicology information for diltiazem and many other pharmaceuticals is not available for marine and estuarine organisms, but such field observations suggest that potential adverse

  13. The 2002 dosimetry system (DS02) and available fluences for organ dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D

    2012-03-01

    The A bomb dosimetry system (DS) calculates each survivor's organ doses. It does this by calculating the angular fluences incident on each survivor. These are used with humanoid phantom shielding calculations to estimate organ doses in 15 organs, 3-sized phantoms, 2 sexes and 2 postures at any orientation or distance to the bomb. The DS has been re-used and updated several times. Currently, efforts are being considered to include shielding for additional organs by adding additional phantoms. The DS has gone through a series of upgrades referred to as: DS84, DS86, DS86R, DS93, DS02. DS86 and DS02 were approved and installed at Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The system uses free-field energy-angular fluence from a discrete ordinate calculation coupled with Monte Carlo adjoint-shielding histories. This paper briefly discusses the adjoint Monte Carlo; combinatorial shield geometry for the phantom, house, factory, and terrain; modifications to use fictitious scattering in voxel phantoms; the adjoint source energy, angle and location distribution; 'leakage histories' and their optimisation for dose or fluence; doubly differential (energy-angle) coupling for single-, double-, or triple-shielding coupling; output of various components of dose and energy-angular fluences; survivor-specific inputs; organ dose uncertainty; and testing, benchmarking and extended applications. Also, approaches to add additional organ-shielding calculations to DS02 are discussed. PMID:21778157

  14. Automatic image registration performance for two different CBCT systems; variation with imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, J.; Sykes, J. R.; Holloway, L.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-03-01

    The performance of an automatic image registration algorithm was compared on image sets collected with two commercial CBCT systems, and the relationship with imaging dose was explored. CBCT images of a CIRS Virtually Human Male Pelvis phantom (VHMP) were collected on Varian TrueBeam/OBI and Elekta Synergy/XVI linear accelerators, across a range of mAs settings. Each CBCT image was registered 100 times, with random initial offsets introduced. Image registration was performed using the grey value correlation ratio algorithm in the Elekta XVI software, to a mask of the prostate volume with 5 mm expansion. Residual registration errors were calculated after correcting for the initial introduced phantom set-up error. Registration performance with the OBI images was similar to that of XVI. There was a clear dependence on imaging dose for the XVI images with residual errors increasing below 4mGy. It was not possible to acquire images with doses lower than ~5mGy with the OBI system and no evidence of reduced performance was observed at this dose. Registration failures (maximum target registration error > 3.6 mm on the surface of a 30mm sphere) occurred in 5% to 9% of registrations except for the lowest dose XVI scan (31%). The uncertainty in automatic image registration with both OBI and XVI images was found to be adequate for clinical use within a normal range of acquisition settings.

  15. Evaluation of a low-dose/slow-rotating SPECT-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, M.; Aldridge, M.; Dickson, J.; Endozo, R.; Lozhkin, K.; Hutton, B. F.

    2008-05-01

    The 4-slice CT that forms part of the GE Infinia Hawkeye-4 SPECT-CT scanner (Hawkeye) is evaluated against the diagnostic 16-slice CT that is incorporated in the GE Discovery ST PET-CT system (DST). The x-ray tube of the slow-rotating Hawkeye system (23 s/rotation) operates at approximately a third of the dose of diagnostic systems as used for conventional diagnostic imaging. Image reconstruction is optimized for low noise. High-contrast spatial resolution significantly falls behind diagnostic figures: the average of MTF50 and MTF10 (resolution where the MTF has fallen to 50% and 10%) is 2.8 ± 0.1 cm-1 for Hawkeye and 5.3 ± 0.1 cm-1 for the DST (standard reconstruction filters). Resolution in the direction of the couch movement (z coordinate) is governed by the fixed Hawkeye slice width of 5 mm. Reconstruction accuracy is found to be increased by reducing the default z increment from 4.4 mm to 2.2 mm. Low-contrast object detectability is superior compared with diagnostic systems operating in the Hawkeye dose range. In the diagnostic dose regime, however, small low-contrast details remain visible in DST that are not detectable with Hawkeye. Although not of diagnostic quality, the low-dose Hawkeye provides appropriate data for SPECT attenuation correction and anatomical localization capability. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  16. [Dose requirement and definition of the image with new types of mammographic systems (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Frost, D; Krause, R A

    1980-11-01

    Several film-screen-systems have been tested under clinical conditions in order to check their utility for mammography (Dupont, Kodak, 3M, Agfa, Auer). The aim was to find the balance between the resolution of the details and the minimal radiation dose. PMID:7434387

  17. Addendum to brachytherapy dose-volume histogram commissioning with multiple planning systems.

    PubMed

    Gossman, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The process for validating dose-volume histogram data in brachytherapy software is presented as a supplement to a previously published article. Included is the DVH accuracy evaluation of the Best NOMOS treatment planning system called "Best TPS VolumePlan." As done previously in other software, a rectangular cuboid was contoured in the treatment planning system. A single radioactive 125I source was positioned coplanar and concentric with one end. Calculations were performed to estimate dose deposition in partial volumes of the cuboid structure, using the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism defined in AAPM Task Group 43. Hand-calculated, dose-volume results were compared to TPS-generated, point-source-approximated dose-volume histogram data to establish acceptance. The required QA for commissioning was satisfied for the DVH as conducted previously for other software, using the criterion that the DVH %VolTPS "actual variance" calculations should differ by no more than 5% at any specific radial distance with respect to %VolTG-43, and the "average variance" DVH %VolTPS calculations should differ by no more than 2% over all radial distances with respect to %VolTG-43. The average disagreement observed between hand calculations and treatment planning system DVH was less than 0.5% on average for this treatment planning system and less than 1.1% maximally for 1 ≤ r ≤ 5 cm. PMID:27167288

  18. Development of an alanine dosimetry system for radiation dose measurements in the radiotherapy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago-Arias, A.; González-Castaño, D. M.; Gómez, F.; Peteiro, E.; Lodeiro, C.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2015-08-01

    Alanine/ESR systems provide an interesting alternative to standard dosimetry systems like solid state or gas ionization chambers for dosimetry in radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the negligible energy dependence, high stability, and the possibility of using small pellets that are especially suitable for the dosimetry of small fields. In order to obtain acceptable dose uncertainties in the radiotherapy dose range, the setup, operational parameters and quantification methods need to be carefully investigated and optimized. In this work we present the development of an alanine/ESR dosimetry system, traced to the secondary standard laboratory of absorbed dose to water at the Radiation Physics Laboratory of the Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain). We focus on the setup, the optimization of the operational parameters of the ESR spectrometer, the quantification of the readout signal and the construction of a calibration curve. The evaluation of the uncertainty budget is also a key component of an alanine/ESR system for radiotherapy dosimetry, and is presented in detail.After the optimization of the procedures, we have achieved a relative uncertainty of 1.7% (k=2) for an absorbed dose of 10 Gy, decreasing to 0.9% for 50 Gy.

  19. Teaching of real numbers by using the Archimedes-Cantor approach and computer algebra systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorob'ev, Evgenii M.

    2015-11-01

    Computer technologies and especially computer algebra systems (CAS) allow students to overcome some of the difficulties they encounter in the study of real numbers. The teaching of calculus can be considerably more effective with the use of CAS provided the didactics of the discipline makes it possible to reveal the full computational potential of CAS. In the case of real numbers, the Archimedes-Cantor approach satisfies this requirement. The name of Archimedes brings back the exhaustion method. Cantor's name reminds us of the use of Cauchy rational sequences to represent real numbers. The usage of CAS with the Archimedes-Cantor approach enables the discussion of various representations of real numbers such as graphical, decimal, approximate decimal with precision estimates, and representation as points on a straight line. Exercises with numbers such as e, π, the golden ratio ϕ, and algebraic irrational numbers can help students better understand the real numbers. The Archimedes-Cantor approach also reveals a deep and close relationship between real numbers and continuity, in particular the continuity of functions.

  20. Cumulative high doses of inhaled formoterol have less systemic effects in asthmatic children 6–11 years-old than cumulative high doses of inhaled terbutaline

    PubMed Central

    Kaae, Rikke; Agertoft, Lone; Pedersen, Sören; Nordvall, S Lennart; Pedroletti, Christophe; Bengtsson, Thomas; Johannes-Hellberg, Ingegerd; Rosenborg, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate high dose tolerability and relative systemic dose potency between inhaled clinically equipotent dose increments of formoterol and terbutaline in children. Methods Twenty boys and girls (6–11 years-old) with asthma and normal ECGs were studied. Ten doses of formoterol (Oxis®) 4.5 µg (F4.5) or terbutaline (Bricanyl®) 500 µg (T500) were inhaled cumulatively via a dry powder inhaler (Turbuhaler®) over 1 h (three patients) or 2.5 h (17 patients) and compared to a day of no treatment, in a randomised, double-blind (active treatments only), crossover trial. Blood pressure (BP), ECG, plasma potassium, glucose, lactate, and adverse events were monitored up to 10 h to assess tolerability and relative systemic dose potency. Results Formoterol and terbutaline had significant β2-adrenergic effects on most outcomes. Apart from the effect on systolic BP, QRS duration and PR interval, the systemic effects were significantly more pronounced with terbutaline than with formoterol. Thus, mean minimum plasma potassium, was suppressed from 3.56 (95% confidence interval, CI: 3.48–3.65) mmol l−1 on the day of no treatment to 2.98 (CI: 2.90–3.08) after 10 × F4.5 and 2.70 (CI: 2.61–2.78) mmol l−1 after 10 × T500, and maximum Q-Tc (heart rate corrected Q-T interval [Bazett's formula]) was prolonged from 429 (CI: 422–435) ms on the day of no treatment, to 455 (CI: 448–462) ms after 10 × F4.5 and 470 (CI: 463–476) ms after 10 × T500. Estimates of relative dose potency indicated that F4.5 µg had the same systemic activity as the clinically less effective dose of 250 µg terbutaline. The duration of systemic effects differed marginally between treatments. Spontaneously reported adverse events (most frequently tremor) were fewer with formoterol (78% of the children) than with terbutaline (95%). A serious adverse event occurred after inhalation of 45 µg formoterol over the 1 h dosing time, that prompted the extension of dosing time to 2.5 h

  1. Two mode mechanical non-Gaussian squeezed number state in a two-membrane optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, S.; Mahmoudi, Z.; Zandi, M. H.; Bahrampour, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    We consider an optomechanical system with two membranes when a bichromatic laser field with red-sideband and blue-sideband frequencies is applied in the single photon strong coupling regime. It is shown that using the mode selecting method and under the Lamb-Dicke approximation, motion of membranes can evolve to single or two mode squeezed number states. By considering the environmental effect, a Wigner function is plotted for understanding the conditions that lead to the generation of non-Gaussian states. The results show that, in this system, initial states of membranes are important to generation of non-Gaussian mechanical squeezed number states.

  2. Design and Implementation of a Compact Low-Dose Diffraction Enhanced Medical Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Parham, C.; Zhong, Z; Connor, D; Chapman, D; Pisano, E

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and performance of a new DEI system using a commercially available tungsten anode x-ray tube and includes the first high-quality low-dose diffraction-enhanced images of full-thickness human tissue specimens. Diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray imaging modality that differs from conventional radiography in its use of three physical mechanisms to generate contrast. DEI is able to generate contrast from x-ray absorption, refraction, and ultra-small-angle scatter rejection (extinction) to produce high-contrast images with a much lower radiation dose compared to conventional radiography.

  3. Validation of OSLD and a treatment planning system for surface dose determination in IMRT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Audrey H.; Olch, Arthur J.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of skin dose determination for composite multibeam 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments using optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) and Eclipse treatment planning system. Methods: Surface doses measured by OSLDs in the buildup region for open field 6 MV beams, either perpendicular or oblique to the surface, were evaluated by comparing against dose measured by Markus Parallel Plate (PP) chamber, surface diodes, and calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. The accuracy of percent depth dose (PDD) calculation in the buildup region from the authors’ Eclipse system (Version 10), which was precisely commissioned in the buildup region and was used with 1 mm calculation grid, was also evaluated by comparing to PP chamber measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was CT scanned with OSLDs in place at three locations. A planning target volume (PTV) was defined that extended close to the surface. Both an 8 beam 3DCRT and IMRT plan were generated in Eclipse. OSLDs were placed at the CT scanned reference locations to measure the skin doses and were compared to diode measurements and Eclipse calculations. Efforts were made to ensure that the dose comparison was done at the effective measurement points of each detector and corresponding locations in CT images. Results: The depth of the effective measurement point is 0.8 mm for OSLD when used in the buildup region in a 6 MV beam and is 0.7 mm for the authors’ surface diode. OSLDs and Eclipse system both agree well with Monte Carlo and/or Markus PP ion chamber and/or diode in buildup regions in 6 MV beams with normal or oblique incidence and across different field sizes. For the multiple beam 3DCRT plan and IMRT plans, the differences between OSLDs and Eclipse calculations on the surface of the anthropomorphic phantom were within 3% and distance-to-agreement less than 0.3 mm

  4. Comparison of doses to the rectum derived from treatment planning system with in-vivo dose values in vaginal vault brachytherapy using cylinder applicators

    PubMed Central

    Obed, Rachel Ibhade; Akinlade, Bidemi Idayat; Ntekim, Atara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In-vivo measurements to determine doses to organs-at-risk can be an essential part of brachytherapy quality assurance (QA). This study compares calculated doses to the rectum with measured dose values as a means of QA in vaginal vault brachytherapy using cylinder applicators. Material and methods At the Department of Radiotherapy, University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria, intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) was delivered by a GyneSource high-dose-rate (HDR) unit with 60Co. Standard 2D treatment plans were created with HDR basic 2.6 software for prescription doses 5-7 Gy at points 5 mm away from the posterior surface of vaginal cylinder applicators (20, 25, and 30 mm diameters). The LiF:Mg, Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter rods (1 x 6 mm) were irradiated to a dose of 7 Gy on Theratron 60Co machine for calibration purpose prior to clinical use. Measurements in each of 34 insertions involving fourteen patients were performed with 5 TLD-100 rods placed along a re-usable rectal marker positioned in the rectum. The dosimeters were read in Harshaw 3500 TLD reader and compared with doses derived from the treatment planning system (TPS) at 1 cm away from the dose prescription points. Results The mean calculated and measured doses ranged from 2.1-3.8 Gy and 1.2-5.6 Gy with averages of 3.0 ± 0.5 Gy and 3.1 ± 1.1 Gy, respectively, for treatment lengths 2-8 cm along the cylinder-applicators. The mean values correspond to 48.9% and 50.8% of the prescribed doses, respectively. The deviations of the mean in-vivo doses from the TPS values ranged from –1.9 to 2.1 Gy with a p-value of 0.427. Conclusions This study was part of efforts to verify rectal dose obtained from the TPS during vaginal vault brachytherapy. There was no significant difference in the dose to the rectum from the two methods of measurements. PMID:26816506

  5. Influence of increment of gantry angle and number of arcs on esophageal volumetric modulated arc therapy planning in Monaco planning system: A planning study.

    PubMed

    Nithya, L; Raj, N Arunai Nambi; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar; Sharma, Kanika; Pandey, Manish Bhushan

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the increment of gantry angle and the number of arcs on esophageal volumetric modulated arc therapy plan. All plans were done in Monaco planning system for Elekta Synergy linear accelerator with 80 multileaf collimator (MLC). Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were done with different increment of gantry angle like 15°, 20°, 30° and 40°. The remaining parameters were similar for all the plans. The results were compared. To compare the plan quality with number of arcs, VMAT plans were done with single and dual arc with increment of gantry angle of 20°. The dose to gross tumor volume (GTV) for 60 Gy and planning target volume (PTV) for 48 Gy was compared. The dosimetric parameters D98%, D95%, D50% and Dmax of GTV were analyzed. The homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) of GTV were studied and the dose to 98% and 95% of PTV was analyzed. Maximum dose to spinal cord and planning risk volume of cord (PRV cord) was compared. The Volume of lung receiving 10 Gy, 20 Gy and mean dose was analyzed. The volume of heart receiving 30 Gy and 45 Gy was compared. The volume of normal tissue receiving greater than 2 Gy and 5 Gy was compared. The number of monitor units (MU) required to deliver the plans were compared. The plan with larger increment of gantry angle proved to be superior to smaller increment of gantry angle plans in terms of dose coverage, HI, CI and normal tissue sparing. The number of arcs did not make any difference in the quality of the plan. PMID:25525311

  6. Whole-body dose evaluation with an adaptive treatment planning system for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kenta; Kumada, Hiroaki; Isobe, Tomonori; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Kamizawa, Satoshi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Dose evaluation for out-of-field organs during radiotherapy has gained interest in recent years. A team led by University of Tsukuba is currently implementing a project for advancing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), along with a radiation treatment planning system (RTPS). In this study, the authors used the RTPS (the 'Tsukuba-Plan') to evaluate the dose to out-of-field organs during BNCT. Computed tomography images of a whole-body phantom were imported into the RTPS, and a voxel model was constructed for the Monte Carlo calculations, which used the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System. The results indicate that the thoracoabdominal organ dose during BNCT for a brain tumour and maxillary sinus tumour was 50-360 and 120-1160 mGy-Eq, respectively. These calculations required ∼29.6 h of computational time. This system can evaluate the out-of-field organ dose for BNCT irradiation during treatment planning with patient-specific irradiation conditions. PMID:25520378

  7. Number-of-particle fluctuations and stability of Bose-Einstein-condensed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.-H.

    2006-02-01

    In this paper we show that a normal total number-of-particle fluctuation can be obtained consistently from the static thermodynamic relation and dynamic compressibility sum rule. In models using the broken U(1) gauge symmetry, in order to keep the consistency between statics and dynamics, it is important to identify the equilibrium state of the system with which the density response function is calculated, so that the condensate particle number N0 , the number of thermal depletion particles Ñ , and the number of noncondensate particles NNC can be unambiguously defined. We also show that the chemical potential determined from the Hugenholtz-Pines theorem should be consistent with that determined from the equilibrium equation of state. The N4/3 anomalous fluctuation of the number of noncondensate particles is an intrinsic feature of the broken U(1) gauge symmetry. However, this anomalous fluctuation does not imply the instability of the system. Using the random phase approximation, which preserves the U(1) gauge symmetry, such an anomalous fluctuation of the number of noncondensate particles is completely absent.

  8. Internal dose assessment data management system for a large population of Pu workers.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, L; Miller, G; Little, T; Guilmette, R A; Glasser, S M

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) dose assessment (DA) data system. Dose calculations for the most important radionuclides at LANL, namely plutonium, americium, uranium and tritium, are performed through the Microsoft Access DA database. DA includes specially developed forms and macros that perform a variety of tasks, such as retrieving bioassay data, launching the FORTRAN internal dosimetry applications and displaying dose results in the form of text summaries and plots. The DA software involves the following major processes: (1) downloading of bioassay data from a remote data source, (2) editing local and remote databases, (3) setting up and carrying out internal dose calculations using the UF code or the ID code, (3) importing results of the dose calculations into local results databases, (4) producing a secondary database of 'official results' and (5) automatically creating and e-mailing reports. The software also provides summary status and reports of the pending DAs, which are useful for managing the cases in process. PMID:17925307

  9. COMPARISON OF WIRELESS DETECTORS FOR DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY SYSTEMS: IMAGE QUALITY AND DOSE.

    PubMed

    Mourik, J E M; van der Tol, P; Veldkamp, W J H; Geleijns, J

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare dose and image quality of wireless detectors for digital chest radiography. Entrance dose at both the detector (EDD) and phantom (EPD) and image quality were measured for wireless detectors of seven different vendors. Both the local clinical protocols and a reference protocol were evaluated. In addition, effective dose was calculated. Main differences in clinical protocols involved tube voltage, tube current, the use of a small or large focus and the use of additional filtration. For the clinical protocols, large differences in EDD (1.4-11.8 µGy), EPD (13.9-80.2 µGy) and image quality (IQFinv: 1.4-4.1) were observed. Effective dose was <0.04 mSv for all protocols. Large differences in performance were observed between the seven different systems. Although effective dose is low, further improvement of imaging technology and acquisition protocols is warranted for optimisation of digital chest radiography. PMID:26535003

  10. Route towards Localization for Quantum Anomalous Hall Systems with Chern Number 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Yan-Yang; Song, Jun-Tao; Li, Shu-Shen

    2016-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall system with Chern number 2 can be destroyed by sufficiently strong disorder. During its process towards localization, it was found that the electronic states will be directly localized to an Anderson insulator (with Chern number 0), without an intermediate Hall plateau with Chern number 1. Here we investigate the topological origin of this phenomenon, by calculating the band structures and Chern numbers for disordered supercells. We find that on the route towards localization, there exists a hidden state with Chern number 1, but it is too short and too fluctuating to be practically observable. This intermediate state cannot be stabilized even after some “smart design” of the model and this should be a universal phenomena for insulators with high Chern numbers. By performing numerical scaling of conductances, we also plot the renormalization group flows for this transition, with Chern number 1 state as an unstable fixed point. This is distinct from known results, and can be tested by experiments and further theoretical analysis.

  11. Route towards Localization for Quantum Anomalous Hall Systems with Chern Number 2.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Yan-Yang; Song, Jun-Tao; Li, Shu-Shen

    2016-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall system with Chern number 2 can be destroyed by sufficiently strong disorder. During its process towards localization, it was found that the electronic states will be directly localized to an Anderson insulator (with Chern number 0), without an intermediate Hall plateau with Chern number 1. Here we investigate the topological origin of this phenomenon, by calculating the band structures and Chern numbers for disordered supercells. We find that on the route towards localization, there exists a hidden state with Chern number 1, but it is too short and too fluctuating to be practically observable. This intermediate state cannot be stabilized even after some "smart design" of the model and this should be a universal phenomena for insulators with high Chern numbers. By performing numerical scaling of conductances, we also plot the renormalization group flows for this transition, with Chern number 1 state as an unstable fixed point. This is distinct from known results, and can be tested by experiments and further theoretical analysis. PMID:26743996

  12. Photonic analog-to-digital converter based on the robust symmetrical number system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Chi, Hao; Zheng, Shilie; Jin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2012-11-01

    A novel approach to realizing photonic analog-to-digital conversion with Gray-code-like property is proposed and demonstrated. Instead of using Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) with different half-wave voltages, an array of MZMs with identical half-wave voltages are applied to realize quantization and encoding, which greatly simplifies the implementation. Multiple comparators with preset thresholds are applied at the output of each MZM to improve the number of bits. Through properly setting the bias voltages of the MZMs, a photonic analog to digital converter (ADC) based on the robust symmetrical number system (RSNS) coding method is realized. As an example, a 3-channel structure with maximum quantization level of 17 (corresponding to 4.09 bits) is investigated in detail. We show that the differential encoding technique can be applied in the proposed structure, which increases the equivalent number of bits of the ADC system.

  13. Leftist Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The leftist number system consists of numbers with decimal digits arranged in strings to the left, instead of to the right. This system fails to be a field only because it contains zerodivisors. The same construction with prime base yields the p-adic numbers.

  14. Teaching of Real Numbers by Using the Archimedes-Cantor Approach and Computer Algebra Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorob'ev, Evgenii M.

    2015-01-01

    Computer technologies and especially computer algebra systems (CAS) allow students to overcome some of the difficulties they encounter in the study of real numbers. The teaching of calculus can be considerably more effective with the use of CAS provided the didactics of the discipline makes it possible to reveal the full computational potential of…

  15. How to Teach Residue Number System to Computer Scientists and Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navi, K.; Molahosseini, A. S.; Esmaeildoust, M.

    2011-01-01

    The residue number system (RNS) has been an important research field in computer arithmetic for many decades, mainly because of its carry-free nature, which can provide high-performance computing architectures with superior delay specifications. Recently, research on RNS has found new directions that have resulted in the introduction of efficient…

  16. Impaired Acuity of the Approximate Number System Underlies Mathematical Learning Disability (Dyscalculia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many children have significant mathematical learning disabilities (MLD, or dyscalculia) despite adequate schooling. The current study hypothesizes that MLD partly results from a deficiency in the Approximate Number System (ANS) that supports nonverbal numerical representations across species and throughout development. In this study of 71 ninth…

  17. Acuity of the Approximate Number System and Preschoolers' Quantitative Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Marle, Kristy; Chu, Felicia W.; Li, Yaoran; Geary, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the relations among acuity of the inherent approximate number system (ANS), performance on measures of symbolic quantitative knowledge, and mathematics achievement for a sample of 138 (64 boys) preschoolers. The Weber fraction (a measure of ANS acuity) and associated task accuracy were significantly correlated with mathematics…

  18. Application of Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems to Ultra-High Reynolds Number Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system development is briefly reviewed. Technical work currently underway at NASA Langley Research Center is detailed, where it relates to the ultra-high Reynolds number application. The application itself is addressed, concluded to be quite feasible, and broad design recommendations given.

  19. Operability test report for rotary mode core sampling system number 3

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the successful completion of operability testing for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) system {number_sign}3. The Report includes the test procedure (WHC-SD-WM-OTP-174), exception resolutions, data sheets, and a test report summary.

  20. 78 FR 18346 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Use of Data Universal Numbering System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... establishment. A notice was published in the Federal Register at 77 FR 56212, on September 12, 2012. Three... burden has been adjusted since published in the Federal Register at 74 FR 37991, on July 30, 2009. The... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Use of Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) as Primary...

  1. Preschool Acuity of the Approximate Number System Correlates with School Math Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libertus, Melissa E.; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Previous research shows a correlation between individual differences in people's school math abilities and the accuracy with which they rapidly and nonverbally approximate how many items are in a scene. This finding is surprising because the Approximate Number System (ANS) underlying numerical estimation is shared with infants and with non-human…

  2. The Nonlinear Relations of the Approximate Number System and Mathematical Language to Early Mathematics Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purpura, David J.; Logan, Jessica A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Both mathematical language and the approximate number system (ANS) have been identified as strong predictors of early mathematics performance. Yet, these relations may be different depending on a child's developmental level. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between these domains across different levels of ability.…

  3. An automated system for lung nodule detection in low-dose computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, I.; Fantacci, M. E.; Preite Martinez, A.; Retico, A.

    2007-03-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The results obtained on the collected database of low-dose thin-slice CT scans are shown in terms of free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves and discussed.

  4. MECHANIZED CIRCULATION SYSTEM, LEHIGH UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. LIBRARY SYSTEMS ANALYSIS, REPORT NUMBER 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FLANNERY, ANNE; MACK, JAMES D.

    A MECHANIZED CIRCULATION SYSTEM CURRENTLY IN OPERATION AT LEHIGH UNIVERSITY HAS PROVEN TO GIVE RELIABLE CONTROL OF CIRCULATION ALTHOUGH IT HAS NOT SAVED ON OPERATING COSTS. WHEN THE STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF CHANGING FROM THE PREVIOUS MANUAL SYSTEM TO THE CURRENT ONE, THE LIBRARY WAS SERVING A STUDENT BODY OF 4500…

  5. Developmental change in the acuity of the "Number Sense": The Approximate Number System in 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds and adults.

    PubMed

    Halberda, Justin; Feigenson, Lisa

    2008-09-01

    Behavioral, neuropsychological, and brain imaging research points to a dedicated system for processing number that is shared across development and across species. This foundational Approximate Number System (ANS) operates over multiple modalities, forming representations of the number of objects, sounds, or events in a scene. This system is imprecise and hence differs from exact counting. Evidence suggests that the resolution of the ANS, as specified by a Weber fraction, increases with age such that adults can discriminate numerosities that infants cannot. However, the Weber fraction has yet to be determined for participants of any age between 9 months and adulthood, leaving its developmental trajectory unclear. Here we identify the Weber fraction of the ANS in 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old children and in adults. We show that the resolution of this system continues to increase throughout childhood, with adultlike levels of acuity attained surprisingly late in development. PMID:18793076

  6. An image-guidance system for dynamic dose calculation in prostate brachytherapy using ultrasound and fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Mian, Omar Y.; Le, Yi; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Prince, Jerry L.; Song, Danny Y.; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is a standard option of care for prostate cancer patients but may be improved by dynamic dose calculation based on localized seed positions. The American Brachytherapy Society states that the major current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. An image-guidance system was therefore developed to localize seeds for dynamic dose calculation. Methods: The proposed system is based on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and mobile C-arm fluoroscopy, while using a simple fiducial with seed-like markers to compute pose from the nonencoded C-arm. Three or more fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume are acquired and processed by a pipeline of algorithms: (1) seed segmentation, (2) fiducial detection with pose estimation, (3) seed matching with reconstruction, and (4) fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration. Results: The system was evaluated on ten phantom cases, resulting in an overall mean error of 1.3 mm. The system was also tested on 37 patients and each algorithm was evaluated. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative rate and 2% false positive rate. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a 98% detection rate. Seed matching with reconstruction had a mean error of 0.4 mm. Fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration had a mean error of 1.3 mm. Moreover, a comparison of dose calculations between the authors’ intraoperative method and an independent postoperative method shows a small difference of 7% and 2% forD90 and V100, respectively. Finally, the system demonstrated the ability to detect cold spots and required a total processing time of approximately 1 min. Conclusions: The proposed image-guidance system is the first practical approach to dynamic dose calculation, outperforming earlier solutions in terms of robustness, ease of use, and functional completeness. PMID:25186387

  7. An image-guidance system for dynamic dose calculation in prostate brachytherapy using ultrasound and fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Nathanael Prince, Jerry L.; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Mian, Omar Y.; Le, Yi; Song, Danny Y.; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is a standard option of care for prostate cancer patients but may be improved by dynamic dose calculation based on localized seed positions. The American Brachytherapy Society states that the major current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. An image-guidance system was therefore developed to localize seeds for dynamic dose calculation. Methods: The proposed system is based on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and mobile C-arm fluoroscopy, while using a simple fiducial with seed-like markers to compute pose from the nonencoded C-arm. Three or more fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume are acquired and processed by a pipeline of algorithms: (1) seed segmentation, (2) fiducial detection with pose estimation, (3) seed matching with reconstruction, and (4) fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration. Results: The system was evaluated on ten phantom cases, resulting in an overall mean error of 1.3 mm. The system was also tested on 37 patients and each algorithm was evaluated. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative rate and 2% false positive rate. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a 98% detection rate. Seed matching with reconstruction had a mean error of 0.4 mm. Fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration had a mean error of 1.3 mm. Moreover, a comparison of dose calculations between the authors’ intraoperative method and an independent postoperative method shows a small difference of 7% and 2% forD{sub 90} and V{sub 100}, respectively. Finally, the system demonstrated the ability to detect cold spots and required a total processing time of approximately 1 min. Conclusions: The proposed image-guidance system is the first practical approach to dynamic dose calculation, outperforming earlier solutions in terms of robustness, ease of use, and functional completeness.

  8. Feedback control of digital chaotic systems with application to pseudorandom number generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yashuang; Hu, Hanping; Liu, Lingfeng

    2015-07-01

    The dynamical properties will degrade when chaotic systems are implemented in digital computers with finite precisions, and such degradation often has serious negative influence on some digital chaos-based systems. Degradation reduction for a class of digital chaotic systems is investigated in this paper. A varying parameter control method is proposed based on the state feedback control technology at first. Then two chaotic maps are applied to verify its validity. Finally, a novel pseudorandom number generator is constructed, which can pass all the tests of NIST SP800-22 at both level-one and level-two approaches and also most of the tests of TestU01. Moreover, it performs better than some existing pseudorandom number generators. Thus, it has acceptable quality of randomness and can be used for cryptography and other applications.

  9. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Konishi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-09-01

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis.

  10. Qualification of a Method to Calculate the Irrecoverable Pressure Loss in High Reynolds Number Piping Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, K. C.; Coffield, R. D.

    2002-09-01

    High Reynolds number test data has recently been reported for both single and multiple piping elbow design configurations at earlier ASME Fluid Engineering Division conferences. The data of these studies ranged up to a Reynolds number of 42 x 10[sup]6 which is significantly greater than that used to establish design correlations before the data was available. Many of the accepted design correlations, based on the lower Reynolds number data, date back as much as fifty years. The new data shows that these earlier correlations are extremely conservative for high Reynolds number applications. Based on the recent high Reynolds number information a new recommended method has been developed for calculating irrecoverable pressure loses in piping systems for design considerations such as establishing pump sizing requirements. This paper describes the recommended design approach and additional testing that has been performed as part of the qualification of the method. This qualification testing determined the irrecoverable pressure loss of a piping configuration that would typify a limiting piping section in a complicated piping network, i.e., multiple, tightly coupled, out-of-plane elbows in series under high Reynolds number flow conditions. The overall pressure loss measurements were then compared to predictions, which used the new methodology to assure that conservative estimates for the pressure loss (of the type used for pump sizing) were obtained. The recommended design methodology, the qualification testing and the comparison between the predictions and the test data are presented. A major conclusion of this study is that the recommended method for calculating irrecoverable pressure loss in piping systems is conservative yet significantly lower than predicted by early design correlations that were based on the extrapolation of low Reynolds number test data.

  11. System and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information from numerous identity tags

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    A system and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information reports from numerous colliding coded-radio-frequency identity tags. Each tag has a unique multi-digit serial number that is stored in non-volatile RAM. A reader transmits an ASCII coded "D" character on a carrier of about 900 MHz and a power illumination field having a frequency of about 1.6 Ghz. A one MHz tone is modulated on the 1.6 Ghz carrier as a timing clock for a microprocessor in each of the identity tags. Over a thousand such tags may be in the vicinity and each is powered-up and clocked by the 1.6 Ghz power illumination field. Each identity tag looks for the "D" interrogator modulated on the 900 MHz carrier, and each uses a digit of its serial number to time a response. Clear responses received by the reader are repeated for verification. If no verification or a wrong number is received by any identity tag, it uses a second digital together with the first to time out a more extended period for response. Ultimately, the entire serial number will be used in the worst case collision environments; and since the serial numbers are defined as being unique, the final possibility will be successful because a clear time-slot channel will be available.

  12. System and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information from numerous identity tags

    DOEpatents

    Doty, M.A.

    1997-01-07

    A system and method are disclosed for simultaneously collecting serial number information reports from numerous colliding coded-radio-frequency identity tags. Each tag has a unique multi-digit serial number that is stored in non-volatile RAM. A reader transmits an ASCII coded ``D`` character on a carrier of about 900 MHz and a power illumination field having a frequency of about 1.6 Ghz. A one MHz tone is modulated on the 1.6 Ghz carrier as a timing clock for a microprocessor in each of the identity tags. Over a thousand such tags may be in the vicinity and each is powered-up and clocked by the 1.6 Ghz power illumination field. Each identity tag looks for the ``D`` interrogator modulated on the 900 MHz carrier, and each uses a digit of its serial number to time a response. Clear responses received by the reader are repeated for verification. If no verification or a wrong number is received by any identity tag, it uses a second digital together with the first to time out a more extended period for response. Ultimately, the entire serial number will be used in the worst case collision environments; and since the serial numbers are defined as being unique, the final possibility will be successful because a clear time-slot channel will be available. 5 figs.

  13. Dose reconstruction system for the exposed population living along the Techa River

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M O.; Vorobiova, M I.; Kozheurov, V P.; Tolstykh, E I.; Anspaugh, L R.; Napier, Bruce A. )

    1999-12-01

    The Mayak Production Association (MPA) was the first facility in the former Soviet Union for the production of plutonium, beginning operation in 1948. Significant worker and population exposure occurred as a result of failures in the technological processes in the late 1940?s and early 1950?s. Members of the public were exposed via discharge of about 10{sup 17} Bq of liquid wastes into the Techa River (1949-1956), an explosion in the radioactive waste-storage facility in 1957, and gaseous aerosol releases within the first decades of the facility's operation. Residents of many villages downstream on the Techa River were exposed via a variety of pathways; the more significant included drinking of water from the river and external gamma exposure due to proximity to sediments and shoreline. The specific aim of this project is to enhance the reconstruction of external and internal radiation doses for individuals in the Extended Techa River Cohort. The purpose of this paper is to present the details of the methods that are being used in this enhanced dose-reconstruction effort and to provide example and representative results of the calculations. The methods of dose assessment currently being used for the exposed population (termed the Techa River Dosimetry System -2000[TRDS-2000]), which are a significant improvement on past methods (TRDS-1996), are presented. The new TRDS-2000 doses from the ingestion of radionuclides are substantially higher for the gastrointestinal tract, due to consideration of short-lived radionuclides. The TRDS-2000 doses from external exposure are substantially lower, due to improvements in several factors. Assessment of uncertainty and validation of the?new? doses are significant issues currently under investigation.

  14. Dose reconstruction system for the exposed population living along the Techa River.

    PubMed

    Degteva, M O; Vorobiova, M I; Kozheurov, V P; Tolstykh, E I; Anspaugh, L R; Napier, B A

    2000-05-01

    The Mayak Production Association, which began operation in 1948, was the first facility in the former Soviet Union for the production of plutonium. Significant worker and population exposure occurred as a result of failures in the technological processes in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Members of the public were exposed via discharge of about 1017 Bq of liquid wastes into the Techa River during 1949-1956, an explosion in the radioactive waste-storage facility in 1957, and gaseous aerosol releases within the first decades of the facility's operation. Residents of many villages downstream on the Techa River were exposed via a variety of pathways; the more significant included drinking of water from the river and external gamma exposure due to proximity to sediments and shoreline. The specific aim of this project is to enhance the reconstruction of external and internal radiation doses for individuals in the Extended Techa River Cohort. The purpose of this paper is to present the details of the methods that are being used in this enhanced dose-reconstruction effort and to provide example and representative results of the calculations. The methods of dose assessment currently being developed for the exposed population [termed the Techa River Dosimetry System-2000 (TRDS-2000)], which are a significant improvement on past methods (TRDS-1996), are presented. The new TRDS-2000 doses from the ingestion of radionuclides are substantially higher for the gastrointestinal tract, due to consideration of short-lived radionuclides. The TRDS-2000 doses from external exposure are substantially lower due to improvements in several factors. Assessment of uncertainty and validation of the "new" doses are significant issues currently under investigation. PMID:10772028

  15. Dose reconstruction system for the exposed population living along the Techa River

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M.O.; Vorobiova, M.I.; Kozheurov, V.P.; Tolstykh, E.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Napier, B.A.

    2000-05-01

    The Mayak Production Association, which began operation in 1948, was the first facility in the former Soviet Union for the production of plutonium. Significant worker and population exposure occurred as a result of failures in the technological processes in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Members of the public were exposed via discharge of about 10{sup 17}Bq of liquid wastes into the Techa River during 1949--1956, an explosion in the radioactive waste-storage facility in 1957, and gaseous aerosol releases within the first decades of the facility's operation. Residents of many villages downstream on the Techa River were exposed via a variety of pathways; the more significant included drinking of water from the river and external gamma exposure due to proximity to sediments and shoreline. The specific aim of this project is to enhance the reconstruction of external and internal radiation doses for individuals in the Extended Techa River Cohort. The purpose of this paper is to present the details of the methods that are being used in this enhanced dose-reconstruction effort and to provide example and representative results of the calculations. The methods of dose assessment currently being developed for the exposed population [termed the Techa River Dosimetry System-2000 (TRDS-2000)], which are a significant improvement on past methods (TRDS-1996), are presented. The new TRDS-2000 doses from the ingestion of radionuclides are substantially higher for the gastrointestinal tract, due to consideration of short-lived radionuclides. The TRDS-2000 doses from external exposure are substantially lower due to improvements in several factors. Assessment of uncertainty and validation of the new doses are significant issues currently under investigation.

  16. A self-adaptive case-based reasoning system for dose planning in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Nishikant; Petrovic, Sanja; Sundar, Santhanam

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in the male population. Radiotherapy is often used in the treatment for prostate cancer. In radiotherapy treatment, the oncologist makes a trade-off between the risk and benefit of the radiation, i.e., the task is to deliver a high dose to the prostate cancer cells and minimize side effects of the treatment. The aim of our research is to develop a software system that will assist the oncologist in planning new treatments. Methods: A nonlinear case-based reasoning system is developed to capture the expertise and experience of oncologists in treating previous patients. Importance (weights) of different clinical parameters in the dose planning is determined by the oncologist based on their past experience, and is highly subjective. The weights are usually fixed in the system. In this research, the weights are updated automatically each time after generating a treatment plan for a new patient using a group based simulated annealing approach. Results: The developed approach is analyzed on the real data set collected from the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. Extensive experiments show that the dose plan suggested by the proposed method is coherent with the dose plan prescribed by an experienced oncologist or even better. Conclusions: The developed case-based reasoning system enables the use of knowledge and experience gained by the oncologist in treating new patients. This system may play a vital role to assist the oncologist in making a better decision in less computational time; it utilizes the success rate of the previously treated patients and it can also be used in teaching and training processes.

  17. Validation of a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining the absorbed and effective radiation doses in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Manninen, A-L; Kotiaho, A; Nikkinen, J; Nieminen, M T

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to validate a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining absorbed and effective doses (EDs) in the dose and energy range used in diagnostic radiology. Energy dependence, dose linearity and repeatability of the dosemeter were examined. The absorbed doses (ADs) were compared at anterior-posterior projection and the EDs were determined at posterior-anterior, anterior-posterior and lateral projections of thoracic imaging using an anthropomorphic phantom. The radiation exposures were made using digital radiography systems. This study revealed that the MOSFET system with high sensitivity bias supply set-up is sufficiently accurate for AD and ED determination. The dosemeter is recommended to be calibrated for energies <60 and >80 kVp. The entrance skin dose level should be at least 5 mGy to minimise the deviation of the individual dosemeter dose. For ED determination, dosemeters should be implanted perpendicular to the surface of the phantom to prevent the angular dependence error. PMID:25213263

  18. Characterizing a proton beam scanning system for Monte Carlo dose calculation in patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, C.; Lomax, Anthony; Paganetti, H.

    2015-01-01

    The presented work has two goals. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of accurately characterizing a proton radiation field at treatment head exit for Monte Carlo dose calculation of active scanning patient treatments. Second, to show that this characterization can be done based on measured depth dose curves and spot size alone, without consideration of the exact treatment head delivery system. This is demonstrated through calibration of a Monte Carlo code to the specific beam lines of two institutions, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Comparison of simulations modeling the full treatment head at MGH to ones employing a parameterized phase space of protons at treatment head exit reveals the adequacy of the method for patient simulations. The secondary particle production in the treatment head is typically below 0.2% of primary fluence, except for low-energy electrons (<0.6 MeV for 230 MeV protons), whose contribution to skin dose is negligible. However, there is significant difference between the two methods in the low-dose penumbra, making full treatment head simulations necessary to study out-of-field effects such as secondary cancer induction. To calibrate the Monte Carlo code to measurements in a water phantom, we use an analytical Bragg peak model to extract the range-dependent energy spread at the two institutions, as this quantity is usually not available through measurements. Comparison of the measured with the simulated depth dose curves demonstrates agreement within 0.5 mm over the entire energy range. Subsequently, we simulate three patient treatments with varying anatomical complexity (liver, head and neck and lung) to give an example how this approach can be employed to investigate site-specific discrepancies between treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Characterizing a proton beam scanning system for Monte Carlo dose calculation in patients.

    PubMed

    Grassberger, C; Lomax, Anthony; Paganetti, H

    2015-01-21

    The presented work has two goals. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of accurately characterizing a proton radiation field at treatment head exit for Monte Carlo dose calculation of active scanning patient treatments. Second, to show that this characterization can be done based on measured depth dose curves and spot size alone, without consideration of the exact treatment head delivery system. This is demonstrated through calibration of a Monte Carlo code to the specific beam lines of two institutions, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Comparison of simulations modeling the full treatment head at MGH to ones employing a parameterized phase space of protons at treatment head exit reveals the adequacy of the method for patient simulations. The secondary particle production in the treatment head is typically below 0.2% of primary fluence, except for low-energy electrons (<0.6 MeV for 230 MeV protons), whose contribution to skin dose is negligible. However, there is significant difference between the two methods in the low-dose penumbra, making full treatment head simulations necessary to study out-of-field effects such as secondary cancer induction. To calibrate the Monte Carlo code to measurements in a water phantom, we use an analytical Bragg peak model to extract the range-dependent energy spread at the two institutions, as this quantity is usually not available through measurements. Comparison of the measured with the simulated depth dose curves demonstrates agreement within 0.5 mm over the entire energy range. Subsequently, we simulate three patient treatments with varying anatomical complexity (liver, head and neck and lung) to give an example how this approach can be employed to investigate site-specific discrepancies between treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:25549079

  20. SU-E-J-205: Dose Distribution Differences Caused by System Related Geometric Distortion in MRI-Guided Radiation Treatment System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Yang, J; Wen, Z; Marshall, S; Court, L; Ibbott, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI has superb soft tissue contrast but is also known for geometric distortions. The concerns and uncertainty about MRI’s geometric distortion have contributed to the hesitation of using only MRI for simulation in radiation therapy. There are two major categories of geometric distortion in MRI; system related and patient related. In this presentation, we studied the impact of system-related geometric distortion on dose distribution in a digital body phantom under an MR-Linac environment. Methods: Residual geometric distortion (after built-in geometric correction) was modeled based on phantom measurements of the system-related geometric distortions of a MRI scanner of a combined MR guided Radiation Therapy (MRgRT) system. A digital oval shaped phantom (40×25 cm) as well as one ellipsoid shaped tumor volume was created to simulate a simplified human body. The simulated tumor volume was positioned at several locations between the isocenter and the body surface. CT numbers in HUs that approximate soft tissue and tumor were assigned to the respective regions in the digital phantom. To study the effect of geometric distortion caused by system imperfections, an IMRT plan was optimized with the distorted image set with the B field. Dose distributions were re-calculated on the undistorted image set with the B field (as in MR-Linac). Results: The maximum discrepancies in both body contour and tumor boundary was less than 2 mm, which leads to small dose distribution change. For the target in the center, coverage was reduced from 98.8% (with distortion) to 98.2%; for the other peripheral target coverage was reduced from 98.4% to 95.9%. Conclusion: System related geometric distortions over the 40×25 area were within 2mm and the resulted dosimetric effects were minor for the two tumor locations in the phantom. Patient study will be needed for further investigation. The authors received a corporate research grant from Elekta.

  1. 75 FR 49869 - Changes to Standard Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Reopening of Comment Period On May 7, 2010, we published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register (75 FR 25137..., Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS....

  2. 75 FR 25137 - Changes to Standard Numbering System, Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Boating Accident Report Database CFR Code of Federal Regulations DHS Department of Homeland Security FR... notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). D..., Vessel Identification System, and Boating Accident Report Database AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS....

  3. Development of Portable Automatic Number Plate Recognition System on Android Mobile Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutholib, Abdul; Gunawan, Teddy S.; Chebil, Jalel; Kartiwi, Mira

    2013-12-01

    The Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) System has performed as the main role in various access control and security, such as: tracking of stolen vehicles, traffic violations (speed trap) and parking management system. In this paper, the portable ANPR implemented on android mobile phone is presented. The main challenges in mobile application are including higher coding efficiency, reduced computational complexity, and improved flexibility. Significance efforts are being explored to find suitable and adaptive algorithm for implementation of ANPR on mobile phone. ANPR system for mobile phone need to be optimize due to its limited CPU and memory resources, its ability for geo-tagging image captured using GPS coordinates and its ability to access online database to store the vehicle's information. In this paper, the design of portable ANPR on android mobile phone will be described as follows. First, the graphical user interface (GUI) for capturing image using built-in camera was developed to acquire vehicle plate number in Malaysia. Second, the preprocessing of raw image was done using contrast enhancement. Next, character segmentation using fixed pitch and an optical character recognition (OCR) using neural network were utilized to extract texts and numbers. Both character segmentation and OCR were using Tesseract library from Google Inc. The proposed portable ANPR algorithm was implemented and simulated using Android SDK on a computer. Based on the experimental results, the proposed system can effectively recognize the license plate number at 90.86%. The required processing time to recognize a license plate is only 2 seconds on average. The result is consider good in comparison with the results obtained from previous system that was processed in a desktop PC with the range of result from 91.59% to 98% recognition rate and 0.284 second to 1.5 seconds recognition time.

  4. Generalized Gibbs ensemble in a nonintegrable system with an extensive number of local symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamazaki, Ryusuke; Ikeda, Tatsuhiko N.; Ueda, Masahito

    2016-03-01

    We numerically study the unitary time evolution of a nonintegrable model of hard-core bosons with an extensive number of local Z2 symmetries. We find that the expectation values of local observables in the stationary state are described better by the generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE) than by the canonical ensemble. We also find that the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis fails for the entire spectrum but holds true within each symmetry sector, which justifies the GGE. In contrast, if the model has only one global Z2 symmetry or a size-independent number of local Z2 symmetries, we find that the stationary state is described by the canonical ensemble. Thus, the GGE is necessary to describe the stationary state even in a nonintegrable system if it has an extensive number of local symmetries.

  5. A new generic column switching system for quantitation in cassette dosing using LC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, T; Ishida, Y; Kanaoka, E; Takahashi, K; Okabe, H; Matsumoto, T; Nakamoto, S; Tamada, J; Koike, M; Yoshikawa, T

    2003-04-10

    Cassette dosing is a method in which multiple drugs are administered to a single animal at the same time, and the plasma concentrations of the individual compounds are simultaneously determined. This method enables high-throughput rapid screening for pharmacokinetic assessment of new drug candidates. An available gradient method was modified for cassette dosing analysis to attain the advantages of high sensitivity and applicability to a wide range of compounds. However, two problems arose; (1). the time-consuming optimization of mobile phases for each compound group, which limited applicability and (2). the remarkable suppression of ionization by polyethyleneglycol, which is commonly used in intravenous administration. To resolve these problems, a new column switching method was established to attain wider applicability and avoid the ionization suppression. This column switching system is very simple because the trap column and the analytical column are specified and the mobile phase is selected from only two species. Method optimization requires only the selection of the mobile phase and takes only a few hours. About 200 compounds, which were administered as about 50 cassettes, were analyzed using this column switching system. Assay validation of one cassette was carried out, and good accuracy and precision were obtained. About 90% of the compounds could be determined within 20% bias. These results showed that this new column switching system for cassette dosing is accurate enough for the screening of drug candidates and offers wide applicability for various compounds. This system was shown to be very useful for the determination of cassette dosing samples, containing multiple compounds. PMID:12667925

  6. A comparative study of folate receptor-targeted doxorubicin delivery systems: dosing regimens and therapeutic index.

    PubMed

    Scomparin, Anna; Salmaso, Stefano; Eldar-Boock, Anat; Ben-Shushan, Dikla; Ferber, Shiran; Tiram, Galia; Shmeeda, Hilary; Landa-Rouben, Natalie; Leor, Jonathan; Caliceti, Paolo; Gabizon, Alberto; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2015-06-28

    Ligand-receptor mediated targeting may affect differently the performance of supramolecular drug carriers depending on the nature of the nanocarrier. In this study, we compare the selectivity, safety and activity of doxorubicin (Dox) entrapped in liposomes versus Dox conjugated to polymeric nanocarriers in the presence or absence of a folic acid (FA)-targeting ligand to cancer cells that overexpress the folate receptor (FR). Two pullulan (Pull)-based conjugates of Dox were synthesized, (FA-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox) and (NH2-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox). The other delivery systems are Dox loaded PEGylated liposomes (PLD, Doxil®) and the FR-targeted version (PLD-FA) obtained by ligand post-insertion into the commercial formulation. Both receptor-targeted drug delivery systems (DDS) were shown to interact in vitro specifically with cells via the folate ligand. Treatment of FR-overexpressing human cervical carcinoma KB tumor-bearing mice with three-weekly injections resulted in slightly enhanced anticancer activity of PLD-FA compared to PLD and no activity for both pullulan-based conjugates. When the DDS were administered intravenously every other day, the folated-Pull conjugate and the non-folated-Pull conjugate displayed similar and low antitumor activity as free Dox. At this dosing regimen, the liposome-based formulations displayed enhanced antitumor activity with an advantage to the non-folated liposome. However, both liposomal formulations suffered from toxicity that was reversible following treatment discontinuation. Using a daily dosing schedule, with higher cumulative dose, the folated-Pull conjugate strongly inhibited tumor growth while free Dox was toxic at this regimen. For polymeric constructs, increasing dose intensity and cumulative dose strongly affects the therapeutic index and reveals a major therapeutic advantage for the FR-targeted formulation. All DDS were able to abrogate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. This study constitutes the first side

  7. Image Quality and Radiation Dose Assessment of a Digital Mammography System

    SciTech Connect

    Isa, N. M.; Hassan, W. M. S. W.; Abdullah, W. A. K. W.; Othman, F.; Ramli, A. A. M.

    2010-07-07

    Image quality and radiation dose of a direct amorphous selenium digital mammography system were considered in terms of contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and average glandular dose (AGD). They were measured for various qualities and breast phantom thicknesses with different types of breast tissue composition to determine optimal radiation quality and dose. Three sets of breast tissue equivalent slabs (30%:70%, 50%:50% and 70%:30% glandular-adipose) with thickness of 2 cm to 7 cm and 0.2 mm aluminum foil were used to provide certain CNR. Two different combinations of anode/ilter material and a wide range of tube voltages were employed for each phantom thickness. Phantom images with grid were acquired using automatic exposure control (AEC) mode for each thickness. Phantom images without grid were also obtained in manual exposure mode by selecting the same anode/filter combination and kVp as the image obtained with grid at the same thickness, but varying mAs of 10 to 200 mAs. Optimization indicated that relatively high energy beam qualities should be used with a greater dose to compensate for lower energy x-rays. The results also indicate that current AEC setting for a fixed detector is not optimal.

  8. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S.; Sharma, A.; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K. C.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2008-10-15

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm{sup 2} current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance {approx}1/x{sup n}, where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns.

  9. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S; Sharma, A; Mondal, J; Mittal, K C; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2008-10-01

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm(2) current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO(4):Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance approximately 1/x(n), where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns. PMID:19044706

  10. Dose distribution transfer from CyberKnife to Varian treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osewski, W.; Ślosarek, K.; Karaszewska, B.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to introduce one of the options of the locally developed DDcon.exe which gives the possibility to transfer the dose distribution from CyberKnife (Accuray) treatment planning system (CK TPS) to Varian treatment planning system (Eclipse TPS, Varian). DICOM format is known as a universal format for medical data. The dose distribution is stored as RTdose file in DICOM format, so there should be a possibility to transfer it between different treatment planning systems. Trying to transfer RTdose file from CK TPS to Eclipse TPS the error message occurs. That's because the RTdose file in CK TPS is connected with Structure_Set_Sequence against Eclipse TPS where it's connected with RT_Plan_Sequence. To make it transferable RTdose file from CK TPS have to be 'disconnected' from Structure_Set_Sequence and 'connected' with RT_Plan_Sequence. This is possible thanks DDcon software which creates new RTdose file by changing proper DICOM tags in original RTdose file. New homemade software gives us an opportunity to transfer dose distribution from CyberKnife TPS to TPS Eclipse. This method opens new possibilities to combine or compare different treatment techniques in Varian TPS.

  11. Low and high dose measurement by Agfa personal monitoring film and FD-III-B badge dosimeter system.

    PubMed

    Mihai, F; Bercea, S; Stochioiu, A; Celarel, A; Udup, E; Tudor, I

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the measurement of the dose equivalent Hp(10) to low (0.005-1) mSv and high (20-1000) mSv doses by exposure at (241)Am and (173)Cs radiation sources of the halide film with FB-III-D dosimeter system. Accuracy of measurements, standard error of the dose mean value (SEM) and some comments about ability to reread of dosimetric films were determined. A good accuracy was obtained over the important dose ranges. In the low dose range, under 0.1 mSv, the SEM values of the (241)Am doses, recorded on the film under plastic filter, are between -21.36% and +47.51%. For 0.1-500 mSv (137)Cs dose range the SEM values are from -9.55% to +7.24%. PMID:19815420

  12. Robust symmetrical number system preprocessing for minimizing encoding errors in photonic analog-to-digital converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvizo, Mylene R.; Calusdian, James; Hollinger, Kenneth B.; Pace, Phillip E.

    2011-08-01

    A photonic analog-to-digital converter (ADC) preprocessing architecture based on the robust symmetrical number system (RSNS) is presented. The RSNS preprocessing architecture is a modular scheme in which a modulus number of comparators are used at the output of each Mach-Zehnder modulator channel. The number of comparators with a logic 1 in each channel represents the integer values within each RSNS modulus sequence. When considered together, the integers within each sequence change one at a time at the next code position, resulting in an integer Gray code property. The RSNS ADC has the feature that the maximum nonlinearity is less than a least significant bit (LSB). Although the observed dynamic range (greatest length of combined sequences that contain no ambiguities) of the RSNS ADC is less than the optimum symmetrical number system ADC, the integer Gray code properties make it attractive for error control. A prototype is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept and to show the important RSNS property that the largest nonlinearity is always less than a LSB. Also discussed are practical considerations related to multi-gigahertz implementations.

  13. Local versus systemic control of numbers of endometrial T cells during pregnancy in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, A C; Tekin, S; Hansen, P J

    2001-01-01

    Pregnancy in sheep is associated with changes in numbers of specific T-lymphocyte populations in the uterine endometrium. These changes probably contribute to evasion by the conceptus of maternal immunological rejection and indicate a possible role for T cells in placental growth, parturition and post-parturient uterine defence against infection. The purpose of the present experiment was to evaluate the relative importance of systemic signals (i.e. those present throughout the uterus or from the circulation, including conceptus hormones secreted into the maternal blood) versus locally acting conceptus signals for regulating changes in numbers of endometrial lymphocytes during pregnancy. The approach taken was to surgically confine pregnancy to one uterine horn and compare differences in lymphocyte numbers between the two uterine horns as well as between both horns of pregnant ewes with those of ovariectomized ewes. As compared with ovariectomized ewes, there was a decline in numbers of CD45R+ lymphocytes within glandular epithelium and an increase in γδ T-cell number within the luminal epithelium. These changes occurred in both the pregnant and non-pregnant uterine horns of unilaterally pregnant ewes. Moreover, there were no significant differences in lymphocyte numbers between the two uterine horns of unilaterally pregnant ewes. Expression of CD25 was absent in tissues from both uterine horns. In conclusion, changes in numbers of endometrial lymphocytes during pregnancy, rather than due to locally acting signals of conceptus origin, are the result of hormonal signals of maternal or conceptus origin that either act directly on endometrial lymphocytes or stimulate the uterine endometrium to induce synthesis of regulatory molecules that affect lymphocyte dynamics. PMID:11298830

  14. The role of the + or - 1 number system in multibit hardware correlators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, Shalhav

    1989-01-01

    The use of commercially available 1-bit LSI correlator chips whose main function is the correlation of sequences of plus ones and minus ones (rather than zeros and ones) as building blocks in the design of multibit correlators is investigated. A radix-2 number system in which the bit values are + or - 1 (no zero) is discussed. The development of a simple conversion algorithm to find the + or - 1 representation of a number given in 2's complement is presented. Some of the issues raised by this conversion algorithm are discussed. It is shown that, if the analog signal is available, there is a simple step to take before the analog-to-digital conversion in order to improve the overall precision. The construction of multibit correlators based on the + or - 1 system is compared to alternative approaches.

  15. Integration and automation of DoseMapper in a logic fab APC system: application for 45/40/28nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gratiet, Bertrand; Salagnon, Christophe; de Caunes, Jean; Mikolajczak, Marc; Morin, Vincent; Chojnowski, Nicolas; Sundermann, Frank; Massin, Jean; Pelletier, Alice; Metz, Joel; Blancquaert, Yoann; Bouyssou, Regis; Pelissier, Arthur; Belmont, Olivier; Strapazzon, Anne; Phillips, Anna; Devoivre, Thierry; Bernard, Emilie; Batail, Estelle; Thevenon, Lionel; Bry, Benedicte; Bernard-Granger, Fabrice; Oumina, Ahmed; Baron, Marie-Pierre; Gueze, Didier

    2012-03-01

    The main difficulty related to DoseMapper correction is to generate an appropriate CD datacollection to feed DoseMapper and to generate DoseRecipe in a user friendly way, especially with a complex process mix. We could heavily measure the silicon and create, in feedback mode, the corresponding DoseRecipe. However, such approach in a logic fab becomes a heavy duty due to the number of different masks / product / processes. We have observed that process CD variability is significantly depending on systematic intrawafer and intrafield CD footprints that can be measured and applied has generic pre-correction for any new product/mask process in-line. The applied CD correction is based on a CD (intrafield: Mask + Straylight & intrawafer: Etch Bias) variability "model" handled by the FAB APC (Advanced Process Control). - Individual CD profile correction component are generated "off-line" (1) for Intrafield Mask via automatic CD extraction from a Reticle CD database (2) for Intrafield Straylight via a CD "model" (3) for Intrawafer Etch Bias via engineering input based on process monitoring. - These CD files are handled via the FAB APC/automation system which is remotely taking control of DoseMapper server via WEB services, so that CD profiles are generated "off-line" (before the lot is being processed) and stored in a profile database while DoseRecipes are created "real-time" on demand via the automation when the lot comes to the scanner to be processed. DoseRecipe and CD correction profiles management is done via the APC system. The automated DoseRecipe creation is now running since the beginning of 2011 contributing to bring both intrafield and intrawafer GATE CDu below 1nm 3sigma, for 45/40 & 28nm nodes.

  16. Scope of Various Random Number Generators in Ant System Approach for TSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S. K.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    Experimented on heuristic, based on an ant system approach for traveling Salesman problem, are several quasi and pseudo-random number generators. This experiment is to explore if any particular generator is most desirable. Such an experiment on large samples has the potential to rank the performance of the generators for the foregoing heuristic. This is just to seek an answer to the controversial performance ranking of the generators in probabilistic/statically sense.

  17. Low-latency digital frequency synthesizer using the residue number system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chren, William A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A low-latency frequency synthesizer using the Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) technique has been designed. Called the Residue Assisted Frequency Synthesizer (RAFS), it exhibits frequency switching times which are reduced by more than 50 percent below previously published designs. The switching speed advantage is made possible by the use of the Residue Number System, which allows the pipeline lengths in the Phase Accumulator and other circuitry to be reduced significantly.

  18. The double-base number system and its application to elliptic curve cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Vassil; Imbert, Laurent; Mishra, Pradeep K.

    2008-06-01

    We describe an algorithm for point multiplication on generic elliptic curves, based on a representation of the scalar as a sum of mixed powers of 2 and 3 . The sparseness of this so-called double-base number system, combined with some efficient point tripling formulae, lead to efficient point multiplication algorithms for curves defined over both prime and binary fields. Side-channel resistance is provided thanks to side-channel atomicity.

  19. Dose audit failures and dose augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, C.

    1999-01-01

    Standards EN 552 and ISO 11137, covering radiation sterilization, are technically equivalent in their requirements for the selection of the sterilization dose. Dose Setting Methods 1 and 2 described in Annex B of ISO 11137 can be used to meet these requirements for the selection of the sterilization dose. Both dose setting methods require a dose audit every 3 months to determine the continued validity of the sterilization dose. This paper addresses the subject of dose audit failures and investigations into their cause. It also presents a method to augment the sterilization dose when the number of audit positives exceeds the limits imposed by ISO 11137.

  20. Minimum-action paths for wave-number selection in nonequilibrium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Liyan; Zheng, Zhigang; Cross, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of wave-number selections in nonequilibrium pattern-forming systems in the presence of noise is investigated. The minimum-action method is proposed to study the noise-induced transitions between the different spatiotemporal states by generalizing the traditional theory previously applied in low-dimensional dynamical systems. The scheme is shown as an example in the stabilized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. The present method allows us to conveniently find the unique noise selected state, in contrast to previous work using direct simulations of the stochastic partial differential equation, where the constraints of the simulation only allow a narrow band to be determined.

  1. Forging a morphological system out of two dimensions: Agentivity and number

    PubMed Central

    Horton, L.; Goldin-Meadow, S.; Coppola, M.; Senghas, A.; Brentari, D.

    2015-01-01

    Languages have diverse strategies for marking agentivity and number. These strategies are negotiated to create combinatorial systems. We consider the emergence of these strategies by studying features of movement in a young sign language in Nicaragua (NSL). We compare two age cohorts of Nicaraguan signers (NSL1 and NSL2), adult homesigners in Nicaragua (deaf individuals creating a gestural system without linguistic input), signers of American and Italian Sign Languages (ASL and LIS), and hearing individuals asked to gesture silently. We find that all groups use movement axis and repetition to encode agentivity and number, suggesting that these properties are grounded in action experiences common to all participants. We find another feature – unpunctuated repetition – in the sign systems (ASL, LIS, NSL, Homesign) but not in silent gesture. Homesigners and NSL1 signers use the unpunctuated form, but limit its use to No-Agent contexts; NSL2 signers use the form across No-Agent and Agent contexts. A single individual can thus construct a marker for number without benefit of a linguistic community (homesign), but generalizing this form across agentive conditions requires an additional step. This step does not appear to be achieved when a linguistic community is first formed (NSL1), but requires transmission across generations of learners (NSL2). PMID:26740937

  2. ARCHITECTURE OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS BASED ON KEPLER DATA: NUMBER OF PLANETS AND COPLANARITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Julia; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the underlying architecture of planetary systems by deriving the distribution of planet multiplicity (number of planets) and the distribution of orbital inclinations based on the sample of planet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission. The scope of our study included solar-like stars and planets with orbital periods less than 200 days and with radii between 1.5 and 30 Earth radii, and was based on Kepler planet candidates detected during Quarters 1-6. We created models of planetary systems with different distributions of planet multiplicity and inclinations, simulated observations of these systems by Kepler, and compared the properties of the transits of detectable objects to actual Kepler planet detections. Specifically, we compared with both the Kepler sample's transit numbers and normalized transit duration ratios in order to determine each model's goodness of fit. We did not include any constraints from radial velocity surveys. Based on our best-fit models, 75%-80% of planetary systems have one or two planets with orbital periods less than 200 days. In addition, over 85% of planets have orbital inclinations less than 3 Degree-Sign (relative to a common reference plane). This high degree of coplanarity is comparable to that seen in our solar system. These results have implications for planet formation and evolution theories. Low inclinations are consistent with planets forming in a protoplanetary disk, followed by evolution without significant and lasting perturbations from other bodies capable of increasing inclinations.

  3. Optimal system and exact solutions for the generalized system of 2-dimensional Burgers equations with infinite Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulwahhab, Muhammad Alim

    2015-01-01

    One of the equations used for studying fluid turbulence is the 2D Burgers equations. Researchers have used various numerical methods to compute the values of the velocity components at different Reynolds number and other parameters of choice. Reynolds number is important in analyzing any type of flow when there is substantial velocity gradient. It indicates the relative significance of the viscous effect compared to the inertia effect. Results available in the literature for the 2D Burgers equations are either for laminar flow which occurs at low Reynolds numbers or for turbulent flow which occurs at high Reynolds numbers. These results cannot be used for superfluidity, the hallmark property of quantum fluids, where Reynolds number is infinite. Although Reynolds number may not be infinite in some superfluid turbulence (Barenghi, 2008; Vinen, 2005) [1,2], it is definitely the case at zero-temperature limit (Sasa and Machida, 2011) [3]. Based on this assumption, we analyse the 2D Burgers equation at infinite Reynolds number using Lie group method. Optimal system of one-dimensional subalgebras is derived and used to obtain generalized distinct exact solutions of the velocity components.

  4. Measurement of neutron ambient dose equivalent in carbon-ion radiotherapy with an active scanned delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yonai, S; Furukawa, T; Inaniwa, T

    2014-10-01

    In ion beam radiotherapy, secondary neutrons contribute to an undesired dose outside the target volume, and consequently the increase of secondary cancer risk is a growing concern. In this study, neutron ambient dose equivalents in carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) with an active beam delivery system were measured with a rem meter, WENDI-II, at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. When the same irradiation target was assumed, the measured neutron dose with an active beam was at most ∼15 % of that with a passive beam. This percentage became smaller as larger distances from the iso-centre. Also, when using an active beam delivery system, the neutron dose per treatment dose in CIRT was comparable with that in proton radiotherapy. Finally, it was experimentally demonstrated that the use of an active scanned beam in CIRT can greatly reduce the secondary neutron dose. PMID:24126486

  5. Characteristics and verification of a car-borne survey system for dose rates in air: KURAMA-II.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Yoshida, T; Tsutsumi, M; Saito, K

    2015-01-01

    The car-borne survey system KURAMA-II, developed by the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, has been used for air dose rate mapping after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. KURAMA-II consists of a CsI(Tl) scintillation detector, a GPS device, and a control device for data processing. The dose rates monitored by KURAMA-II are based on the G(E) function (spectrum-dose conversion operator), which can precisely calculate dose rates from measured pulse-height distribution even if the energy spectrum changes significantly. The characteristics of KURAMA-II have been investigated with particular consideration to the reliability of the calculated G(E) function, dose rate dependence, statistical fluctuation, angular dependence, and energy dependence. The results indicate that 100 units of KURAMA-II systems have acceptable quality for mass monitoring of dose rates in the environment. PMID:24698118

  6. Radiation dose reduction and new image modalities development for interventional C-arm imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Kai

    Cardiovascular disease and stroke are the leading health problems and causes of death in the US. Due to the minimally invasive nature of the evolution of image guided techniques, interventional radiological procedures are becoming more common and are preferred in treating many cardiovascular diseases and strokes. In addition, with the recent advances in hardware and device technology, the speed and efficacy of interventional treatment has significantly improved. This implies that more image modalities can be developed based on the current C-arm system and patients treated in interventional suites can potentially experience better health outcomes. However, during the treatment patients are irradiated with substantial amounts of ionizing radiation with a high dose rate (digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with 3muGy/frame and 3D cone beam CT image with 0.36muGy/frame for a Siemens Artis Zee biplane system) and/or a long irradiation time (a roadmapping image sequence can be as long as one hour during aneurysm embolization). As a result, the patient entrance dose is extremely high. Despite the fact that the radiation dose is already substantial, image quality is not always satisfactory. By default a temporal average is used in roadmapping images to overcome poor image quality, but this technique can result in motion blurred images. Therefore, reducing radiation dose while maintaining or even improving the image quality is an important area for continued research. This thesis is focused on improving the clinical applications of C-arm cone beam CT systems in two ways: (1) Improve the performance of current image modalities on the C-arm system. (2) Develop new image modalities based on the current system. To be more specific, the objectives are to reduce radiation dose for current modalities (e.g., DSA, fluoroscopy, roadmapping, and cone beam CT) and enable cone beam CT perfusion and time resolved cone beam CT angiography that can be used to diagnose and triage acute

  7. HASCAL -- A system for estimating contamination and doses from incidents at worldwide nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoreen, A.L.; Sykes, R.I.

    1995-04-01

    The Hazard Assessment System for Consequence Analysis (HASCAL) is being developed to support the analysis of radiological incidents anywhere in the world for the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA). HASCAL is a component of the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC), which is a comprehensive nuclear, biological, and chemical hazard effects planning and forecasting modeling system that is being developed by DNA. HASCAL computes best-guess estimates of the consequences of radiological incidents. HASCAL estimates the amount of radioactivity released, its atmospheric transport and deposition, and the resulting radiological doses.

  8. The electron dose monitoring and control system in EB radiation processing for wires and cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinzhi; Zhou, Yong; Zhou, Youyi; Tang, Qiang

    2002-03-01

    This paper introduces a close-loop microcomputer control system used for EB radiation processing of wires and cables, which is based on the measurements and calculations of the absorbed dose distribution of 0.6-2.0 MeV electrons in circular compound materials. The calculation of electron energy deposition in 4-layer media is carried out by the bipartition model of electron transport. The design ideas, system configuration and implementation of this control system governed by a 586 personal computer under windows 98 OS are described in this paper. The field operation results such as control precision and step response curves of this system are also given. The control system has been used for EB radiation processing of wires.

  9. Clinical implementation of the Peregrine Monte Carlo dose calculations system for photon beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, N; Bergstrom, P M; Daly, T P; Descalle, M; Garrett, D; House, R K; Knapp, D K; May, S; Patterson, R W; Siantar, C L; Verhey, L; Walling, R S; Welczorek, D

    1999-07-01

    PEREGRINE is a 3D Monte Carlo dose calculation system designed to serve as a dose calculation engine for clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems. Taking advantage of recent advances in low-cost computer hardware, modern multiprocessor architectures and optimized Monte Carlo transport algorithms, PEREGRINE performs mm-resolution Monte Carlo calculations in times that are reasonable for clinical use. PEREGRINE has been developed to simulate radiation therapy for several source types, including photons, electrons, neutrons and protons, for both teletherapy and brachytherapy. However the work described in this paper is limited to linear accelerator-based megavoltage photon therapy. Here we assess the accuracy, reliability, and added value of 3D Monte Carlo transport for photon therapy treatment planning. Comparisons with clinical measurements in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms demonstrate PEREGRINE's accuracy. Studies with variable tissue composition demonstrate the importance of material assignment on the overall dose distribution. Detailed analysis of Monte Carlo results provides new information for radiation research by expanding the set of observables.

  10. Numerical system utilising a Monte Carlo calculation method for accurate dose assessment in radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, F; Endo, A

    2007-01-01

    A system utilising radiation transport codes has been developed to derive accurate dose distributions in a human body for radiological accidents. A suitable model is quite essential for a numerical analysis. Therefore, two tools were developed to setup a 'problem-dependent' input file, defining a radiation source and an exposed person to simulate the radiation transport in an accident with the Monte Carlo calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. Necessary resources are defined by a dialogue method with a generally used personal computer for both the tools. The tools prepare human body and source models described in the input file format of the employed Monte Carlo codes. The tools were validated for dose assessment in comparison with a past criticality accident and a hypothesized exposure. PMID:17510203

  11. Dose-dependent on reversible effects of lead on rat dopaminergic system

    SciTech Connect

    Memo, M.; Lucchi, L.; Spano, P.F.; Trabucchi, M.

    1981-02-16

    It has been suggested that hyperactivity and mental retardation, the most serious clinical aspects observed in children during lead intoxication, may occur as consequence of specific alterations of neurotransmitter functions. In our experiments we indicate that the behavioural patterns observed in chronically lead exposed rats may be correlated with an impairment of the dopaminergic system. Performing our study at two different levels of lead exposure, we found a dose-dependent change in dopamine turnover. Moreover, 30 days after the last assumption of lead we observed a complete disappearance of these neurochemical variations. Our findings suggest that lead affects dopamine function in different brain areas in reversible manner, inducing effects which are dose-dependent.

  12. Clinical evaluation of the DIABETES expert system for decision support by multiple regimen insulin dose adjustment.

    PubMed

    Ambrosiadou, B V; Goulis, D G; Pappas, C

    1996-01-01

    A performance evaluation of the DIABETES rule-based expert system prototype for clinical decision making is presented. The system facilitates multiple insulin regimen and dose adjustment of insulin dependent Type I or II diabetic patients. The study was performed on 600 subjects from two diabetological centres and three diabetological offices of Greek hospitals. The responses of the attendant medical doctors were compared with those of the DIABETES system, with the aid of a specifically devised valuation range (0-5 degrees, 0 indicating full agreement and 5 full disagreement). The capabilities and the weakness of the system in terms of its practicality for decision support in assisting therapy of diabetes mellitus by blood glucose monitoring and subsequent insulin dose adjustment are discussed. The potential benefits of decision support systems for diabetic patient management are seen to be the cost saving they provide in terms of man-hours of verbal instruction by medical experts, the support in terms of objective and consistent decision making, as well as the recording of medical knowledge in the ill-defined field of insulin administration, thus aiding the education and training of medical personnel. PMID:8646833

  13. Comparison of different approaches of estimating effective dose from reported exposure data in 3D imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Hansson, Jonny; Bâth, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems is today a common examination. The examination includes acquisition of two-dimensional projection images, used to reconstruct section images of the patient. The aim of the present study was to investigate the difference in resulting effective dose obtained using different levels of complexity in calculations of effective doses from these examinations. In the study the Siemens Artis Zeego interventional fluoroscopy system (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Images of anthropomorphic chest and pelvis phantoms were acquired. The exposure values obtained were used to calculate the resulting effective doses from the examinations, using the computer software PCXMC (STUK, Helsinki, Finland). The dose calculations were performed using three different methods: 1. using individual exposure values for each projection image, 2. using the mean tube voltage and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over the projection images, and 3. using the mean kV and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over smaller selection of projection images. The results revealed that the difference in resulting effective dose between the first two methods was smaller than 5%. When only a selection of projection images were used in the dose calculations the difference increased to over 10%. Given the uncertainties associated with the effective dose concept, the results indicate that dose calculations based on average exposure values distributed over a smaller selection of projection angles can provide reasonably accurate estimations of the radiation doses from 3D imaging using interventional fluoroscopy systems.

  14. Number of first-passage times as a measurement of information for weakly chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Nazé, Pierre; Venegeroles, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    We consider a general class of maps of the interval having Lyapunov subexponential instability |δxt|∼|δx0|exp[Λt(x0)ζ(t)], where ζ(t) grows sublinearly as t→∞. We outline here a scheme [J. Stat. Phys. 154, 988 (2014)] whereby the choice of a characteristic function automatically defines the map equation and corresponding growth rate ζ(t). This matching approach is based on the infinite measure property of such systems. We show that the average information that is necessary to record without ambiguity a trajectory of the system tends to 〈Λ〉ζ(t), suitably extending the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy and Pesin's identity. For such systems, information behaves like a random variable for random initial conditions, its statistics obeying a universal Mittag-Leffler law. We show that, for individual trajectories, information can be accurately inferred by the number of first-passage times through a given turbulent phase-space cell. This enables us to calculate far more efficiently Lyapunov exponents for such systems. Lastly, we also show that the usual renewal description of jumps to the turbulent cell, usually employed in the literature, does not provide the real number of entrances there. Our results are supported by exhaustive numerical simulations. PMID:25375577

  15. Application of remote sensing and geographical information system for generation of runoff curve number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshram, S. Gajbhiye; Sharma, S. K.; Tignath, S.

    2015-10-01

    Watershed is an ideal unit for planning and management of land and water resources (Gajbhiye et al., IEEE international conference on advances in technology and engineering (ICATE), Bombay, vol 1, issue 9, pp 23-25, 2013a; Gajbhiye et al., Appl Water Sci 4(1):51-61, 2014a; Gajbhiye et al., J Geol Soc India (SCI-IF 0.596) 84(2):192-196, 2014b). This study aims to generate the curve number, using remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) and the effect of slope on curve number values. The study was carried out in Kanhaiya Nala watershed located in Satna district of Madhya Pradesh. Soil map, Land Use/Land cover and slope map were generated in GIS Environment. The CN parameter values corresponding to various soil, land cover, and land management conditions were selected from Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) standard table. Curve number (CN) is an index developed by the NRCS, to represent the potential for storm water runoff within a drainage area. The CN for a drainage basin is estimated using a combination of land use, soil, and antecedent soil moisture condition (AMC). In present study effect of slope on CN values were determined. The result showed that the CN unadjusted value are higher in comparison to CN adjusted with slope. Remote sensing and GIS is very reliable technique for the preparation of most of the input data required by the SCS curve number model.

  16. Studying the concentration dependence of the aggregation number of a micellar model system by SANS.

    PubMed

    Amann, Matthias; Willner, Lutz; Stellbrink, Jörg; Radulescu, Aurel; Richter, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    We present a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) structural characterization of n-alkyl-PEO polymer micelles in aqueous solution with special focus on the dependence of the micellar aggregation number on increasing concentration. The single micellar properties in the dilute region up to the overlap concentration ϕ* are determined by exploiting the well characterized unimer exchange kinetics of the model system in a freezing and diluting experiment. The micellar solutions are brought to thermodynamic equilibrium at high temperatures, where unimer exchange is fast, and are then cooled to low temperatures and diluted to concentrations in the limit of infinite dilution. At low temperatures the kinetics, and therefore the key mechanism for micellar rearrangement, is frozen on the experimental time scale, thus preserving the micellar structure in the dilution process. Information about the single micellar structure in the semidilute and concentrated region are extracted from structure factor analysis at high concentrations where the micelles order into fcc and bcc close packed lattices and the aggregation number can be calculated by geometrical arguments. This approach enables us to investigate the aggregation behavior in a wide concentration regime from dilute to 6·ϕ*, showing a constant aggregation number with concentration over a large concentration regime up to a critical concentration about three times ϕ*. When exceeding this critical concentration, the aggregation number was found to increase with increasing concentration. This behavior is compared to scaling theories for star-like polymer micelles. PMID:25892401

  17. Probing the nature of deficits in the 'Approximate Number System' in children with persistent Developmental Dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Bugden, Stephanie; Ansari, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    In the present study we examined whether children with Developmental Dyscalculia (DD) exhibit a deficit in the so-called 'Approximate Number System' (ANS). To do so, we examined a group of elementary school children who demonstrated persistent low math achievement over 4 years and compared them to typically developing (TD), aged-matched controls. The integrity of the ANS was measured using the Panamath (www.panamath.org) non-symbolic numerical discrimination test. Children with DD demonstrated imprecise ANS acuity indexed by larger Weber fraction (w) compared to TD controls. Given recent findings showing that non-symbolic numerical discrimination is affected by visual parameters, we went further and investigated whether children performed differently on trials on which number of dots and their overall area were either congruent or incongruent with each other. This analysis revealed that differences in w were only found between DD and TD children on the incongruent trials. In addition, visuo-spatial working memory strongly predicts individual differences in ANS acuity (w) during the incongruent trials. Thus the purported ANS deficit in DD can be explained by a difficulty in extracting number from an array of dots when area is anti-correlated with number. These data highlight the role of visuo-spatial working memory during the extraction process, and demonstrate that close attention needs to be paid to perceptual processes invoked by tasks thought to represent measures of the ANS. PMID:26227387

  18. An evidential approach to problem solving when a large number of knowledge systems is available

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekorvin, Andre

    1989-01-01

    Some recent problems are no longer formulated in terms of imprecise facts, missing data or inadequate measuring devices. Instead, questions pertaining to knowledge and information itself arise and can be phrased independently of any particular area of knowledge. The problem considered in the present work is how to model a problem solver that is trying to find the answer to some query. The problem solver has access to a large number of knowledge systems that specialize in diverse features. In this context, feature means an indicator of what the possibilities for the answer are. The knowledge systems should not be accessed more than once, in order to have truly independent sources of information. Moreover, these systems are allowed to run in parallel. Since access might be expensive, it is necessary to construct a management policy for accessing these knowledge systems. To help in the access policy, some control knowledge systems are available. Control knowledge systems have knowledge about the performance parameters status of the knowledge systems. In order to carry out the double goal of estimating what units to access and to answer the given query, diverse pieces of evidence must be fused. The Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence is used to pool the knowledge bases.

  19. Extending Birthday Paradox Theory to Estimate the Number of Tags in RFID Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shakiba, Masoud; Singh, Mandeep Jit; Sundararajan, Elankovan; Zavvari, Azam; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of Radio Frequency Identification systems is to provide fast identification for tagged objects. However, there is always a chance of collision, when tags transmit their data to the reader simultaneously. Collision is a time-consuming event that reduces the performance of RFID systems. Consequently, several anti-collision algorithms have been proposed in the literature. Dynamic Framed Slotted ALOHA (DFSA) is one of the most popular of these algorithms. DFSA dynamically modifies the frame size based on the number of tags. Since the real number of tags is unknown, it needs to be estimated. Therefore, an accurate tag estimation method has an important role in increasing the efficiency and overall performance of the tag identification process. In this paper, we propose a novel estimation technique for DFSA anti-collision algorithms that applies birthday paradox theory to estimate the number of tags accurately. The analytical discussion and simulation results prove that the proposed method increases the accuracy of tag estimation and, consequently, outperforms previous schemes. PMID:24752285

  20. Extending birthday paradox theory to estimate the number of tags in RFID systems.

    PubMed

    Shakiba, Masoud; Singh, Mandeep Jit; Sundararajan, Elankovan; Zavvari, Azam; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of Radio Frequency Identification systems is to provide fast identification for tagged objects. However, there is always a chance of collision, when tags transmit their data to the reader simultaneously. Collision is a time-consuming event that reduces the performance of RFID systems. Consequently, several anti-collision algorithms have been proposed in the literature. Dynamic Framed Slotted ALOHA (DFSA) is one of the most popular of these algorithms. DFSA dynamically modifies the frame size based on the number of tags. Since the real number of tags is unknown, it needs to be estimated. Therefore, an accurate tag estimation method has an important role in increasing the efficiency and overall performance of the tag identification process. In this paper, we propose a novel estimation technique for DFSA anti-collision algorithms that applies birthday paradox theory to estimate the number of tags accurately. The analytical discussion and simulation results prove that the proposed method increases the accuracy of tag estimation and, consequently, outperforms previous schemes. PMID:24752285

  1. Copy number ratios determined by two digital polymerase chain reaction systems in genetically modified grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Urquiza, M.; Acatzi Silva, A. I.

    2014-02-01

    Three certified reference materials produced from powdered seeds to measure the copy number ratio sequences of p35S/hmgA in maize containing MON 810 event, p35S/Le1 in soybeans containing GTS 40-3-2 event and DREB1A/acc1 in wheat were produced according to the ISO Guides 34 and 35. In this paper, we report digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) protocols, performance parameters and results of copy number ratio content of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in these materials using two new dPCR systems to detect and quantify molecular deoxyribonucleic acid: the BioMark® (Fluidigm) and the OpenArray® (Life Technologies) systems. These technologies were implemented at the National Institute of Metrology in Mexico (CENAM) and in the Reference Center for GMO Detection from the Ministry of Agriculture (CNRDOGM), respectively. The main advantage of this technique against the more-used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is that it generates an absolute number of target molecules in the sample, without reference to standards or an endogenous control, which is very useful when not much information is available for new developments or there are no standard reference materials in the market as in the wheat case presented, or when it was not possible to test the purity of seeds as in the maize case presented here. Both systems reported enhanced productivity, increased reliability and reduced instrument footprint. In this paper, the performance parameters and uncertainty of measurement obtained with both systems are presented and compared.

  2. A BrachyPhantom for verification of dose calculation of HDR brachytherapy planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Austerlitz, C.; Campos, C. A. T.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a calibration phantom for {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy units that renders possible the direct measurement of absorbed dose to water and verification of treatment planning system.Methods: A phantom, herein designated BrachyPhantom, consists of a Solid Water™ 8-cm high cylinder with a diameter of 14 cm cavity in its axis that allows the positioning of an A1SL ionization chamber with its reference measuring point at the midheight of the cylinder's axis. Inside the BrachyPhantom, at a 3-cm radial distance from the chamber's reference measuring point, there is a circular channel connected to a cylindrical-guide cavity that allows the insertion of a 6-French flexible plastic catheter from the BrachyPhantom surface. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to calculate a factor, P{sub sw}{sup lw}, to correct the reading of the ionization chamber to a full scatter condition in liquid water. The verification of dose calculation of a HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system was performed by inserting a catheter with a dummy source in the phantom channel and scanning it with a CT. The CT scan was then transferred to the HDR computer program in which a multiple treatment plan was programmed to deliver a total dose of 150 cGy to the ionization chamber. The instrument reading was then converted to absorbed dose to water using the N{sub gas} formalism and the P{sub sw}{sup lw} factor. Likewise, the absorbed dose to water was calculated using the source strength, S{sub k}, values provided by 15 institutions visited in this work.Results: A value of 1.020 (0.09%, k= 2) was found for P{sub sw}{sup lw}. The expanded uncertainty in the absorbed dose assessed with the BrachyPhantom was found to be 2.12% (k= 1). To an associated S{sub k} of 27.8 cGy m{sup 2} h{sup −1}, the total irradiation time to deliver 150 cGy to the ionization chamber point of reference was 161.0 s. The deviation between the absorbed doses to water assessed with the Brachy

  3. Impaired acuity of the approximate number system underlies mathematical learning disability (dyscalculia).

    PubMed

    Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many children have significant mathematical learning disabilities (MLD, or dyscalculia) despite adequate schooling. The current study hypothesizes that MLD partly results from a deficiency in the Approximate Number System (ANS) that supports nonverbal numerical representations across species and throughout development. In this study of 71 ninth graders, it is shown that students with MLD have significantly poorer ANS precision than students in all other mathematics achievement groups (low, typically, and high achieving), as measured by psychophysical assessments of ANS acuity (w) and of the mappings between ANS representations and number words (cv). This relation persists even when controlling for domain-general abilities. Furthermore, this ANS precision does not differentiate low-achieving from typically achieving students, suggesting an ANS deficit that is specific to MLD. PMID:21679173

  4. Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

    2003-07-31

    This report summarizes a literature review to assess the acidity characteristics of the older mineral oil and newer polyolester (POE) refrigeration systems as well as to evaluate acid measuring techniques used in other non-aqueous systems which may be applicable for refrigeration systems. Failure in the older chlorofluorocarbon/hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CFC/HCFC) / mineral oil systems was primarily due to thermal degradation of the refrigerant which resulted in the formation of hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids. These are strong mineral acids, which can, over time, severely corrode the system metals and lead to the formation of copper plating on iron surfaces. The oil lubricants used in the older systems were relatively stable and were not prone to hydrolytic degradation due to the low solubility of water in oil. The refrigerants in the newer hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)/POE systems are much more thermally stable than the older CFC/HCFC refrigerants and mineral acid formation is negligible. However, acidity is produced in the new systems by hydrolytic decomposition of the POE lubricants with water to produce the parent organic acids and alcohols used to prepare the POE. The individual acids can therefore vary but they are generally C5 to C9 carboxylic acids. Organic acids are much weaker and far less corrosive to metals than the mineral acids from the older systems but they can, over long time periods, react with metals to form carboxylic metal salts. The salts tend to accumulate in narrow areas such as capillary tubes, particularly if residual hydrocarbon processing chemicals are present in the system, which can lead to plugging. The rate of acid production from POEs varies on a number of factors including chemical structure, moisture levels, temperature, acid concentration and metals. The hydrolysis rate of reaction can be reduced by using driers to reduce the free water concentration and by using scavenging chemicals which react with the system acids. Total acid

  5. A microfluidic reciprocating intracochlear drug delivery system with reservoir and active dose control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ernest S.; Gustenhoven, Erich; Mescher, Mark J.; Pararas, Erin E. Leary; Smith, Kim A.; Spencer, Abigail J.; Tandon, Vishal; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Fiering, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Reciprocating microfluidic drug delivery, as compared to steady or pulsed infusion, has unique features which may be advantageous in many therapeutic applications. We have previously described a device, designed for wearable use in small animal models, which periodically infuses then withdraws a sub-microliter volume of drug solution to and from the endogenous fluid of the inner ear. This delivery approach results in zero net volume of liquid transfer while enabling mass transport of compounds to the cochlea by means of diffusion and mixing. We report here on an advanced wearable delivery system aimed at further miniaturization and complex dose protocols. Enhancements to the system include the incorporation of a planar micropump to generate reciprocating flow and a novel drug reservoir which maintains zero net volume delivery and permits programmable modulation of the drug concentration in the infused bolus. The reciprocating pump is fabricated from laminated polymer films and employs a miniature electromagnetic actuator to meet the size and weight requirements of a head-mounted in vivo guinea pig testing system. The reservoir comprises a long microchannel in series with a micropump, connected in parallel with the reciprocating flow network. We characterized in vitro the response and repeatability of the planar pump and compared the results with a lumped element simulation. We also characterized the performance of the reservoir, including repeatability of dosing and range of dose modulation. Acute in vivo experiments were performed in which the reciprocating pump was used to deliver a test compound to the cochlea of anesthetized guinea pigs to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of the system. These advances are key steps toward realization of an implantable device for long-term therapeutic applications in humans. PMID:24302432

  6. An on-board TLD system for dose monitoring on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Apathy, I; Deme, S; Bodnar, L; Csoke, A; Hejja, I

    1999-01-01

    This institute has developed and manufactured a series of thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) systems for spacecraft, consisting of a set of bulb dosemeters and a small, compact, TLD reader suitable for on-board evaluation of the dosemeters. By means of such a system highly accurate measurements were carried out on board the Salyut-6, -7 and Mir Space Stations as well as on the Space Shuttle. A new implementation of the system will be placed on several segments of the ISS as the contribution of Hungary to this intemational enterprise. The well proven CaSO4:Dy dosemeters will be used for routine dosimetry of the astronauts and in biological experiments. The mean LET value will be measured by LiF dosemeters while doses caused by neutrons are planned to be determined by 6LiF/7LiF dosemeter pairs and moderators. A detailed description of the system is given. PMID:11542233

  7. Changes in the organ procurement system in South Korea: effects on brain-dead donor numbers.

    PubMed

    Lee, S D; Kim, J H

    2009-11-01

    In Korea, the Organ Transplantation Act came into effect in 2000, establishing the Korean Network for Organ Sharing (KONOS) with centralized authority for organ procurement as well as for approval of donors and recipients to ensure fair organ allocation. However, the number of brain-dead donors decreased sharply, and the organ allocation system proved inefficient. The government revised the Organ Transplantation Act in August 2002, introducing an incentive system. If a transplantation hospital formed a Committee for Brain Death Evaluation and a Hospital Organ Procurement Organization, it could receive a kidney from a brain dead-donor as an incentive to foster organ procurement regardless of the KONOS wait list. The government also launched a pilot brain-dead donor registry program to strengthen Hospital Organ Procurement Organization activity. If local hospitals collaborated with specialized hospitals in organ procurement, local hospitals obtained financial incentives. But because the organ shortage problem has not been resolved, the government has proposed four initiatives: first, broadening the incentive system, which makes it possible to give each specialized hospital a choice of one of eight organs from each donor as an incentive; second, development of an Independent Organ Procurement Organization; third introduction of an opt-out system; and last, improvement of the Committee for Brain Death Evaluation system. It is uncertain which initiatives will be adopted, but changes in organ procurement systems are nonetheless considered a key to solve the organ shortage problem in Korea. PMID:19917342

  8. Entropy Production in Collisionless Systems. II. Arbitrary Phase-space Occupation Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Eric I.; Williams, Liliya L. R.

    2012-04-01

    We present an analysis of two thermodynamic techniques for determining equilibria of self-gravitating systems. One is the Lynden-Bell (LB) entropy maximization analysis that introduced violent relaxation. Since we do not use the Stirling approximation, which is invalid at small occupation numbers, our systems have finite mass, unlike LB's isothermal spheres. (Instead of Stirling, we utilize a very accurate smooth approximation for ln x!.) The second analysis extends entropy production extremization to self-gravitating systems, also without the use of the Stirling approximation. In addition to the LB statistical family characterized by the exclusion principle in phase space, and designed to treat collisionless systems, we also apply the two approaches to the Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) families, which have no exclusion principle and hence represent collisional systems. We implicitly assume that all of the phase space is equally accessible. We derive entropy production expressions for both families and give the extremum conditions for entropy production. Surprisingly, our analysis indicates that extremizing entropy production rate results in systems that have maximum entropy, in both LB and MB statistics. In other words, both thermodynamic approaches lead to the same equilibrium structures.

  9. ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN COLLISIONLESS SYSTEMS. II. ARBITRARY PHASE-SPACE OCCUPATION NUMBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Eric I.; Williams, Liliya L. R. E-mail: llrw@astro.umn.edu

    2012-04-01

    We present an analysis of two thermodynamic techniques for determining equilibria of self-gravitating systems. One is the Lynden-Bell (LB) entropy maximization analysis that introduced violent relaxation. Since we do not use the Stirling approximation, which is invalid at small occupation numbers, our systems have finite mass, unlike LB's isothermal spheres. (Instead of Stirling, we utilize a very accurate smooth approximation for ln x{exclamation_point}.) The second analysis extends entropy production extremization to self-gravitating systems, also without the use of the Stirling approximation. In addition to the LB statistical family characterized by the exclusion principle in phase space, and designed to treat collisionless systems, we also apply the two approaches to the Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) families, which have no exclusion principle and hence represent collisional systems. We implicitly assume that all of the phase space is equally accessible. We derive entropy production expressions for both families and give the extremum conditions for entropy production. Surprisingly, our analysis indicates that extremizing entropy production rate results in systems that have maximum entropy, in both LB and MB statistics. In other words, both thermodynamic approaches lead to the same equilibrium structures.

  10. Effects of small particle numbers on long-term behaviour in discrete biochemical systems

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Bashar; Dittrich, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The functioning of many biological processes depends on the appearance of only a small number of a single molecular species. Additionally, the observation of molecular crowding leads to the insight that even a high number of copies of species do not guarantee their interaction. How single particles contribute to stabilizing biological systems is not well understood yet. Hence, we aim at determining the influence of single molecules on the long-term behaviour of biological systems, i.e. whether they can reach a steady state. Results: We provide theoretical considerations and a tool to analyse Systems Biology Markup Language models for the possibility to stabilize because of the described effects. The theory is an extension of chemical organization theory, which we called discrete chemical organization theory. Furthermore we scanned the BioModels Database for the occurrence of discrete chemical organizations. To exemplify our method, we describe an application to the Template model of the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint mechanism. Availability and implementation: http://www.biosys.uni-jena.de/Services.html. Contact: bashar.ibrahim@uni-jena.de or dittrich@minet.uni-jena.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161236

  11. Treatment of Severe Alopecia Areata: Combination Therapy Using Systemic Cyclosporine A with Low Dose Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Deborah; Oh, Doo Jin; Kim, Jung Wook; Park, Sung Wook; Oh, Min Kyung; Sung, Ho Suk

    2008-01-01

    Background Combination therapy using cyclosporine A (CsA) together with low-dose corticosteroids has adequate efficacy with little toxicity for the treatment of severe alopecia areata (AA). Objective We wanted to evaluate the clinical efficacy of combination therapy using CsA with low-dose corticosteroid for the treatment of severe AA and we also wanted to determine the safe therapeutic concentration of CsA in the peripheral blood. Methods We treated 34 cases of severe AA with combination therapy for 24 weeks and we evaluated the efficacy at 12 and 24 weeks. We monitored the peripheral blood concentration of CsA to determine the therapeutic range of CsA that has the fewest side effects. Results Of the patients, 77.4% (n=24) and 22.6% (n=10) were classified in the responder and poor-responder groups, respectively. The mean trough concentration of CsA was 95.1 and 101.2 ng/ml in the responder and poor-responder groups, respectively. For the patients with side effects associated with CsA, the mean CsA concentration was 195.8 ng/ml. Conclusion We found that combination therapy with systemic CsA and low-dose corticosteroids effectively treats severe AA and this therapy results in a safe, therapeutic concentration of CsA in the peripheral blood. PMID:27303186

  12. Design and implementation of wireless dose logger network for radiological emergency decision support system.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, V; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2016-08-01

    A decision support system (DSS) is implemented in Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research for providing guidance for emergency decision making in case of an inadvertent nuclear accident. Real time gamma dose rate measurement around the stack is used for estimating the radioactive release rate (source term) by using inverse calculation. Wireless gamma dose logging network is designed, implemented, and installed around the Madras Atomic Power Station reactor stack to continuously acquire the environmental gamma dose rate and the details are presented in the paper. The network uses XBee-Pro wireless modules and PSoC controller for wireless interfacing, and the data are logged at the base station. A LabView based program is developed to receive the data, display it on the Google Map, plot the data over the time scale, and register the data in a file to share with DSS software. The DSS at the base station evaluates the real time source term to assess radiation impact. PMID:27587160

  13. Design and implementation of wireless dose logger network for radiological emergency decision support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-08-01

    A decision support system (DSS) is implemented in Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research for providing guidance for emergency decision making in case of an inadvertent nuclear accident. Real time gamma dose rate measurement around the stack is used for estimating the radioactive release rate (source term) by using inverse calculation. Wireless gamma dose logging network is designed, implemented, and installed around the Madras Atomic Power Station reactor stack to continuously acquire the environmental gamma dose rate and the details are presented in the paper. The network uses XBee-Pro wireless modules and PSoC controller for wireless interfacing, and the data are logged at the base station. A LabView based program is developed to receive the data, display it on the Google Map, plot the data over the time scale, and register the data in a file to share with DSS software. The DSS at the base station evaluates the real time source term to assess radiation impact.

  14. Scope of Various Random Number Generators in ant System Approach for TSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S. K.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    Experimented on heuristic, based on an ant system approach for traveling salesman problem, are several quasi- and pseudo-random number generators. This experiment is to explore if any particular generator is most desirable. Such an experiment on large samples has the potential to rank the performance of the generators for the foregoing heuristic. This is mainly to seek an answer to the controversial issue "which generator is the best in terms of quality of the result (accuracy) as well as cost of producing the result (time/computational complexity) in a probabilistic/statistical sense."

  15. Cryptographic random number generators for low-power distributed measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Pawel; Olszyna, Jakub

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we present the State of The Art in Cryptographic Random Number Generators (RNG). We provide analysis of every of the most popular types of RNGs such as linear generators (i.e. congruential, multiple recursive), non-linear generators (i.e. Quadratic, Blum-Blum-Shub) and cryptographic algorithms based (i.e. RSA generator, SHA-1 generator). Finally we choose solutions which are suitable to Distributed Measurement Systems (DMS) specific requirements according to cryptographic security, computational efficiency (throughput) and complexity of implementation (VHDL targeted at FPGA and ASIC devices). Strong asymmetry of computing power and memory capacity is taken into account in both software and hardware solutions.

  16. HPC-Colony: Services and Interfaces to Aupport Systems With Very Large Numbers of Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T; Kale, L; Moreira, J; Mendes, C; Chakravorty, S; Tauferner, A; Inglett, T

    2007-01-31

    The HPC-Colony Project, a collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and IBM, is focused on services and interfaces for very large numbers of processors. Advances in parallel systems in the last decade have delivered phenomenal progress in the overall capability available to a single parallel application. Several systems with peak capability of over 100TF are already available and systems are expected to exceed 1PF within a few years. Despite these impressive advances in peak performance capability, the sustained performance of these systems continues to fall as a percentage of the peak capability. Initial analysis suggests that key architectural bottlenecks (in hardware and software) are responsible for the lower sustained performance and some architectural change of direction may be necessary to address the declining sustained performance. In this proposal we focus on addressing software architectural bottlenecks, in the areas of operating system and runtime systems. While the trend towards larger processor counts benefits application developers through more processing power, it also challenges application developers to harness ever-increasing numbers of processors for productive work. Much of the burden falls to operating systems and runtime systems that were originally designed for much smaller processor counts. Under the Colony project, we are researching and developing system software to enable general purpose operating and runtime systems for tens of thousands of processors. Difficulties in achieving a balanced partitioning and dynamically scheduling workloads can limit scaling for complex problems on large machines. Scientific simulations that span components of large machines require common operating system services, such as process scheduling, event notification, and job management to scale to large machines. Today, application programmers must explicitly manage these resources. We address

  17. Commissioning dose computation models for spot scanning proton beams in water for a commercially available treatment planning system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X. R.; Poenisch, F.; Lii, M.; Sawakuchi, G. O.; Titt, U.; Bues, M.; Song, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Ciangaru, G.; Li, H.; Taylor, M. B.; Suzuki, K.; Mohan, R.; Gillin, M. T.; Sahoo, N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present our method and experience in commissioning dose models in water for spot scanning proton therapy in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The input data required by the TPS included in-air transverse profiles and integral depth doses (IDDs). All input data were obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that had been validated by measurements. MC-generated IDDs were converted to units of Gy mm2/MU using the measured IDDs at a depth of 2 cm employing the largest commercially available parallel-plate ionization chamber. The sensitive area of the chamber was insufficient to fully encompass the entire lateral dose deposited at depth by a pencil beam (spot). To correct for the detector size, correction factors as a function of proton energy were defined and determined using MC. The fluence of individual spots was initially modeled as a single Gaussian (SG) function and later as a double Gaussian (DG) function. The DG fluence model was introduced to account for the spot fluence due to contributions of large angle scattering from the devices within the scanning nozzle, especially from the spot profile monitor. To validate the DG fluence model, we compared calculations and measurements, including doses at the center of spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles, and depth doses for different widths of SOBP. Dose models were validated extensively with patient treatment field-specific measurements. Results: We demonstrated that the DG fluence model is necessary for predicting the field size dependence of dose distributions. With this model, the calculated doses at the center of SOBPs as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles and depth doses for rectangular target volumes agreed well with respective measured values. With the DG fluence model for our scanning proton beam line, we successfully treated more than 500 patients from

  18. Commissioning dose computation models for spot scanning proton beams in water for a commercially available treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. R.; Poenisch, F.; Lii, M.; Sawakuchi, G. O.; Titt, U.; Bues, M.; Song, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Ciangaru, G.; Li, H.; Taylor, M. B.; Suzuki, K.; Mohan, R.; Gillin, M. T.; Sahoo, N.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To present our method and experience in commissioning dose models in water for spot scanning proton therapy in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The input data required by the TPS included in-air transverse profiles and integral depth doses (IDDs). All input data were obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that had been validated by measurements. MC-generated IDDs were converted to units of Gy mm{sup 2}/MU using the measured IDDs at a depth of 2 cm employing the largest commercially available parallel-plate ionization chamber. The sensitive area of the chamber was insufficient to fully encompass the entire lateral dose deposited at depth by a pencil beam (spot). To correct for the detector size, correction factors as a function of proton energy were defined and determined using MC. The fluence of individual spots was initially modeled as a single Gaussian (SG) function and later as a double Gaussian (DG) function. The DG fluence model was introduced to account for the spot fluence due to contributions of large angle scattering from the devices within the scanning nozzle, especially from the spot profile monitor. To validate the DG fluence model, we compared calculations and measurements, including doses at the center of spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles, and depth doses for different widths of SOBP. Dose models were validated extensively with patient treatment field-specific measurements. Results: We demonstrated that the DG fluence model is necessary for predicting the field size dependence of dose distributions. With this model, the calculated doses at the center of SOBPs as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles and depth doses for rectangular target volumes agreed well with respective measured values. With the DG fluence model for our scanning proton beam line, we successfully treated more than 500 patients

  19. Configuration of automatic exposure control on mammography units for computed radiography to match patient dose of screen film systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chang-Ying Joseph; Huang, Weidong

    2009-02-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is considered a drop-in addition or replacement for traditional screen-film (SF) systems in digital mammography. Unlike other technologies, CR has the advantage of being compatible with existing mammography units. One of the challenges, however, is to properly configure the automatic exposure control (AEC) on existing mammography units for CR use. Unlike analogue systems, the capture and display of digital CR images is decoupled. The function of AEC is changed from ensuring proper and consistent optical density of the captured image on film to balancing image quality with patient dose needed for CR. One of the preferences when acquiring CR images under AEC is to use the same patient dose as SF systems. The challenge is whether the existing AEC design and calibration process-most of them proprietary from the X-ray systems manufacturers and tailored specifically for SF response properties-can be adapted for CR cassettes, in order to compensate for their response and attenuation differences. This paper describes the methods for configuring the AEC of three different mammography units models to match the patient dose used for CR with those that are used for a KODAK MIN-R 2000 SF System. Based on phantom test results, these methods provide the dose level under AEC for the CR systems to match with the dose of SF systems. These methods can be used in clinical environments that require the acquisition of CR images under AEC at the same dose levels as those used for SF systems.

  20. Interstitial pregnancy treated with a single-dose of systemic methotrexate: A successful management

    PubMed Central

    Corioni, Serena; Perelli, Federica; Bianchi, Claudia; Cozzolino, Mauro; Maggio, Luana; Masini, Giulia; Coccia, Maria Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial pregnancy is an ectopic pregnancy at high hemorrhagic risk. It often poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the clinician, with a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. It presents a difficult management problem with no absolute standard of care; the most appropriate treatment technique for these pregnancies remains controversial. We describe a case of unruptured interstitial pregnancy successfully treated with a single-dose of systemic methotrexate with subsequent ultrasound and serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin monitoring. Medical management can be a safe and successful option in selected cases that satisfy specific criteria and in women who are able to be monitored after treatment. PMID:26109980

  1. Analysis of Godunov type schemes applied to the compressible Euler system at low Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellacherie, Stéphane

    2010-02-01

    We propose a theoretical framework to clearly explain the inaccuracy of Godunov type schemes applied to the compressible Euler system at low Mach number on a Cartesian mesh. In particular, we clearly explain why this inaccuracy problem concerns the 2D or 3D geometry and does not concern the 1D geometry. The theoretical arguments are based on the Hodge decomposition, on the fact that an appropriate well-prepared subspace is invariant for the linear wave equation and on the notion of first-order modified equation. This theoretical approach allows to propose a simple modification that can be applied to any colocated scheme of Godunov type or not in order to define a large class of colocated schemes accurate at low Mach number on any mesh. It also allows to justify colocated schemes that are accurate at low Mach number as, for example, the Roe-Turkel and the AUSM +-up schemes, and to find a link with a colocated incompressible scheme stabilized with a Brezzi-Pitkäranta type stabilization. Numerical results justify the theoretical arguments proposed in this paper.

  2. On indeterminism, chaos, and small number particle systems in the brain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Edwin R; MacGregor, Ronald J

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents rational, theoretical, and empirical grounds for doubting the principle of determinism in nature and in the brain, and discusses implications of this for free will and the chaos model of the brain. Small number particle systems are practically indeterministic and may be intrinsically indeterministic. Determinism in nature has often been taken to preclude free will. Strict determinism is a concept frequently applied to systems theory, establishing, e.g., the uniqueness of state-space trajectories. In order to consider determinism as a law of nature, however, one must be able to subject it to empirical tests. Presently, one is not able to and whether this can be shown to enable free will or not is not clear. It does remove, at least for the present, determinism itself as a rationale for precluding free will. The work partially supports the chaos model, but weakens the computational computer metaphor of brain function. PMID:16783870

  3. Self-Organized Criticality in Glassy Spin Systems Requires a Diverging Number of Neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Juan Carlos; Zhu, Zheng; Andrist, Ruben S.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Dobrosavljević, V.; Zimanyi, Gergely T.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the conditions required for general spin systems with frustration and disorder to display self-organized criticality, a property which so far has been established only for the fully connected infinite-range Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin-glass model [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1034 (1999)]. Here, we study both avalanche and magnetization jump distributions triggered by an external magnetic field, as well as internal field distributions in the short-range Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass for various space dimensions between 2 and 8, as well as the fixed-connectivity mean-field Viana-Bray model. Our numerical results, obtained on systems of unprecedented size, demonstrate that self-organized criticality is recovered only in the strict limit of a diverging number of neighbors and is not a generic property of spin-glass models in finite space dimensions.

  4. Proposal for a new radiation dose control system for future manned space flights.

    PubMed

    Semkova, J V; Dachev TsP; Matviichuk YuN; Koleva, R T; Baynov, P T; Tomov, B T; Botolier-Depois, J F; Nguen, V D; Lebaron-Jacobs, L; Siegrist, M; Duvivier, E; Almarcha, B; Petrov, V M; Shurshakov, V A; Makhmutov, V S

    1995-01-01

    Radiation risk on a future long-duration manned space mission appears to be one of the basic factors in planning and designing the mission. Since 1988 different active dosimetric investigations has been performed on board the MIR space station by the Bulgarian-Russian dosimeter-radiometer LIULIN and French tissue-equivalent proportional counters CIRCE and NAUSICAA. A joint French-Bulgarian-Russian dosimetry experiment and the dosimetry-radiometry system RADIUS-MD have been developed for the future MARS-96 mission. On the base of the results and experience of these investigations a conception for a new radiation dose control system for the future orbital stations, lunar bases and interplanetary space ships is proposed. The proposed system which consists of different instruments will allow personal radiation control for crew members, radiation monitoring inside and outside each habitat, analysis and forecasting of the situation and will suggest procedures to minimize the radiation risk. PMID:11540998

  5. Proposal for a new radiation dose control system for future manned space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkova, J. V.; Dachev, Ts. P.; N. Matviichuk, Yu.; Koleva, R. T.; Baynov, P. T.; Tomov, B. T.; Botolier-Depois, J. F.; Nguen, V. D.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Siegrist, M.; Duvivier, E.; Almarcha, B.; Petrov, V. M.; Shurshakov, V. A.; Makhmutov, V. S.

    Radiation risk on a future long-duration manned space mission appears to be one of the basic factors in planning and designing the mission. Since 1988 different active dosimetric investigations has been performed on board the MIR space station by the Bulgarian-Russian dosimeter-radiometer LIULIN and French tissue-equivalent proportional counters CIRCE and NAUSICAA. A joint French-Bulgarian-Russian dosimetry experiment and the dosimetry-radiometry system RADIUS-MD have been developed for the future MARS-96 mission. On the base of the results and experience of these investigations a conception for a new radiation dose control system for the future orbital stations, lunar bases and interplanetary space ships is proposed. The proposed system which consists of different instruments will allow personal radiation control for crew members, radiation monitoring inside and outside each habitat, analysis and forecasting of the situation and will suggest procedures to minimize the radiation risk.

  6. Development of Diagnostic Reference Levels Using a Real-Time Radiation Dose Monitoring System at a Cardiovascular Center in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsu; Seo, Deoknam; Choi, Inseok; Nam, Sora; Yoon, Yongsu; Kim, Hyunji; Her, Jae; Han, Seonggyu; Kwon, Soonmu; Park, Hunsik; Yang, Dongheon; Kim, Jungmin

    2015-12-01

    Digital cardiovascular angiography accounts for a major portion of the radiation dose among the examinations performed at cardiovascular centres. However, dose-related information is neither monitored nor recorded systemically. This report concerns the construction of a radiation dose monitoring system based on digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data and its use at the cardiovascular centre of the University Hospitals in Korea. The dose information was analysed according to DICOM standards for a series of procedures, and the formulation of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) at our cardiovascular centre represents the first of its kind in Korea. We determined a dose area product (DAP) DRL for coronary angiography of 75.6 Gy cm(2) and a fluoroscopic time DRL of 318.0 s. The DAP DRL for percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention was 213.3 Gy cm(2), and the DRL for fluoroscopic time was 1207.5 s. PMID:25700616

  7. Association between Number of Teeth and Chronic Systemic Diseases: A Cohort Study Followed for 13 Years

    PubMed Central

    Oluwagbemigun, Kolade; Dietrich, Thomas; Pischon, Nicole; Bergmann, Manuela; Boeing, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence of an association between oral health, specifically dental status, and chronic systemic diseases. However, varying measures of dental status across different populations and low study sample has made comparison of studies and conclusion of findings unclear. Our aim is to examine whether the number of teeth as a measure of dental status is associated with incident chronic diseases in a cohort setting. Methods We conducted a cohort study among 24,313 middle-aged Germans followed up for 13 years. Data on number of teeth as a measure of dental status were obtained through self-reports. Outcomes were clinically–verified incident non–fatal myocardial infarction, stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained from Cox regression models. Results Increasing number of teeth is inversely related to risk of myocardial infarction (HR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.96, 0.99). The full multivariate model of teeth groups showed a strong linear trend for myocardial infarction, a less strong trend for stroke, and no relation with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cancer in a competing risk model. Participants with 18–23 teeth and those without teeth were at 76% (95%CI: 1.04, 3) and 2.93 times (95%CI: 1.61, 5.18) higher risk of myocardial infarction compared to those with nearly all teeth (28–32 teeth). Conclusions Number of teeth is specifically associated with myocardial infarction and not with other chronic disease indicating that dental status further strengthens the link between oral health and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25945503

  8. Overall x-ray system simulation model developed for system design and image quality versus patient dose optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Han

    2003-06-01

    We have developed a full-scale image quality (IQ) simulation model as a tool for X-ray system design, image quality optimization and patient dose reduction. The IQ model supports the (de-)composition of system level requirements and simulates several types of automatic X-ray control technique. The model is implemented in LabVIEW. The X-ray system is modeled in distinguishable components and processes, which allows isolation of sub-systems and exclusion of devices. All relevant patient dose and IQ items such as contrast, sharpness, lag and noise are calculated and additionally combined in IQ "figures of merit" (FOM). Some characteristic application examples will be presented: In a general image magnification study we compare magnification techniques, such as geometric enlargement, image intensifier zooming and digital processing. In an optimization study we apply a new IQ FOM that contains not only imaging properties of the system, but also detail information in terms of material, size and thickness. Combining the IQ simulation model with a Pareto trade-off algorithm appears to be a promising optimization approach. In addition to the mentioned employment, the IQ simulation model is also suitable for comparison studies on the performance of flat detectors versus image intensifier television detectors, application related studies and fine tuning of specific settings and adjustments, design of test objects and development of measuring methods.

  9. Adolescents’ Functional Numeracy Is Predicted by Their School Entry Number System Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Geary, David C.; Hoard, Mary K.; Nugent, Lara; Bailey, Drew H.

    2013-01-01

    One in five adults in the United States is functionally innumerate; they do not possess the mathematical competencies needed for many modern jobs. We administered functional numeracy measures used in studies of young adults’ employability and wages to 180 thirteen-year-olds. The adolescents began the study in kindergarten and participated in multiple assessments of intelligence, working memory, mathematical cognition, achievement, and in-class attentive behavior. Their number system knowledge at the beginning of first grade was defined by measures that assessed knowledge of the systematic relations among Arabic numerals and skill at using this knowledge to solve arithmetic problems. Early number system knowledge predicted functional numeracy more than six years later (ß = 0.195, p = .0014) controlling for intelligence, working memory, in-class attentive behavior, mathematical achievement, demographic and other factors, but skill at using counting procedures to solve arithmetic problems did not. In all, we identified specific beginning of schooling numerical knowledge that contributes to individual differences in adolescents’ functional numeracy and demonstrated that performance on mathematical achievement tests underestimates the importance of this early knowledge. PMID:23382934

  10. Adolescents' functional numeracy is predicted by their school entry number system knowledge.

    PubMed

    Geary, David C; Hoard, Mary K; Nugent, Lara; Bailey, Drew H

    2013-01-01

    One in five adults in the United States is functionally innumerate; they do not possess the mathematical competencies needed for many modern jobs. We administered functional numeracy measures used in studies of young adults' employability and wages to 180 thirteen-year-olds. The adolescents began the study in kindergarten and participated in multiple assessments of intelligence, working memory, mathematical cognition, achievement, and in-class attentive behavior. Their number system knowledge at the beginning of first grade was defined by measures that assessed knowledge of the systematic relations among Arabic numerals and skill at using this knowledge to solve arithmetic problems. Early number system knowledge predicted functional numeracy more than six years later (ß = 0.195, p = .0014) controlling for intelligence, working memory, in-class attentive behavior, mathematical achievement, demographic and other factors, but skill at using counting procedures to solve arithmetic problems did not. In all, we identified specific beginning of schooling numerical knowledge that contributes to individual differences in adolescents' functional numeracy and demonstrated that performance on mathematical achievement tests underestimates the importance of this early knowledge. PMID:23382934

  11. Individual differences in algebraic cognition: Relation to the approximate number and semantic memory systems.

    PubMed

    Geary, David C; Hoard, Mary K; Nugent, Lara; Rouder, Jeffrey N

    2015-12-01

    The relation between performance on measures of algebraic cognition and acuity of the approximate number system (ANS) and memory for addition facts was assessed for 171 ninth graders (92 girls) while controlling for parental education, sex, reading achievement, speed of numeral processing, fluency of symbolic number processing, intelligence, and the central executive component of working memory. The algebraic tasks assessed accuracy in placing x,y pairs in the coordinate plane, speed and accuracy of expression evaluation, and schema memory for algebra equations. ANS acuity was related to accuracy of placements in the coordinate plane and expression evaluation but not to schema memory. Frequency of fact retrieval errors was related to schema memory but not to coordinate plane or expression evaluation accuracy. The results suggest that the ANS may contribute to or be influenced by spatial-numerical and numerical-only quantity judgments in algebraic contexts, whereas difficulties in committing addition facts to long-term memory may presage slow formation of memories for the basic structure of algebra equations. More generally, the results suggest that different brain and cognitive systems are engaged during the learning of different components of algebraic competence while controlling for demographic and domain general abilities. PMID:26255604

  12. A Systems-Level Interrogation Identifies Regulators of Drosophila Blood Cell Number and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Makhijani, Kalpana; Alexander, Brandy; Perrimon, Norbert; Brückner, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, cell number is typically determined by a balance of intracellular signals that positively and negatively regulate cell survival and proliferation. Dissecting these signaling networks facilitates the understanding of normal development and tumorigenesis. Here, we study signaling by the Drosophila PDGF/VEGF Receptor (Pvr) in embryonic blood cells (hemocytes) and in the related cell line Kc as a model for the requirement of PDGF/VEGF receptors in vertebrate cell survival and proliferation. The system allows the investigation of downstream and parallel signaling networks, based on the ability of Pvr to activate Ras/Erk, Akt/TOR, and yet-uncharacterized signaling pathway/s, which redundantly mediate cell survival and contribute to proliferation. Using Kc cells, we performed a genome wide RNAi screen for regulators of cell number in a sensitized, Pvr deficient background. We identified the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) Insulin-like receptor (InR) as a major Pvr Enhancer, and the nuclear hormone receptors Ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (usp), corresponding to mammalian Retinoid X Receptor (RXR), as Pvr Suppressors. In vivo analysis in the Drosophila embryo revealed a previously unrecognized role for EcR to promote apoptotic death of embryonic blood cells, which is balanced with pro-survival signaling by Pvr and InR. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrates distinct modes of cell number regulation by EcR and RTK signaling. We define common phosphorylation targets of Pvr and InR that include regulators of cell survival, and unique targets responsible for specialized receptor functions. Interestingly, our analysis reveals that the selection of phosphorylation targets by signaling receptors shows qualitative changes depending on the signaling status of the cell, which may have wide-reaching implications for other cell regulatory systems. PMID:25749252

  13. Hardware random number generator base on monostable multivibrators dedicated for distributed measurement and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Pawel

    2013-10-01

    The hardware random number generator based on the 74121 monostable multivibrators for applications in cryptographically secure distributed measurement and control systems with asymmetric resources was presented. This device was implemented on the basis of the physical electronic vibration generator in which the circuit is composed of two "loop" 74121 monostable multivibrators, D flip-flop and external clock signal source. The clock signal, witch control D flip-flop was generated by a computer on one of the parallel port pins. There was presented programmed the author's acquisition process of random data from the measuring system to a computer. The presented system was designed, builded and thoroughly tested in the term of cryptographic security in our laboratory, what there is the most important part of this publication. Real cryptographic security was tested based on the author's software and the software environment called RDieHarder. The obtained results was here presented and analyzed in detail with particular reference to the specificity of distributed measurement and control systems with asymmetric resources.

  14. Nonlinear dose-response relationship in the immune system following exposure to ionizing radiation: mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Zheng

    2003-01-01

    The health effects of low-dose radiation (LDR) have been the concern of the academic spheres, regulatory bodies, governments, and the public. Among these effects, the most important is carcinogenesis. In view of the importance of immune surveillance in cancer control, the dose-response relationship of the changes in different cell types of the immune system after whole-body irradiation is analyzed on the basis of systemic data from the author's laboratory in combination with recent reports in the literature. For T lymphocytes J- or inverted J-shaped curves are usually demonstrated after irradiation, while for macrophages dose-response curves of chiefly stimulation with irregular patterns are often observed. The intercellular reactions between the antigen presenting cell (APC) and T lymphocyte (TLC) in the immunologic synapse via expression of surface molecules and secretion of cytokines by the two cell types after different doses of radiation are illustrated. The different pathways of signal transduction thus facilitated in the T lymphocyte by different doses of radiation are analyzed to explain the mechanism of the phenomenon of low-dose stimulation and high-dose suppression of immunity. Experimental and clinical data are cited to show that LDR retards tumor growth, reduces metastasis, increases the efficacy of conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy as well as alleviates the suppression of immunity due to tumor burden. The incidence of thymic lymphoma after high-dose radiation is lowered by preexposure to low-dose radiation, and its mechanism is supposed to be related to the stimulation of anticancer immunity induced by low-dose radiation. Recent reports on lowering of standardized cancer mortality rate and all cause death rate of cohorts occupationally exposed to low-dose radiation from the US, UK, and Canada are cited. PMID:19330113

  15. Integral T-Shaped Phantom-Dosimeter System to Measure Transverse and Longitudinal Dose Distributions Simultaneously for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Moon, Jinsoo; Jang, Kyoung Won; Han, Ki-Tek; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Park, Jang-Yeon; Park, Byung Gi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-01-01

    A T-shaped fiber-optic phantom-dosimeter system was developed using square scintillating optical fibers, a lens system, and a CMOS image camera. Images of scintillating light were used to simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal distributions of absorbed dose of a 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm2. Each optical fiber has a very small sensitive volume and the sensitive material is water equivalent. This allows the measurements of cross-beam profile as well as the percentage depth dose of small field sizes. In the case of transverse dose distribution, the measured beam profiles were gradually become uneven and the beam edge had a gentle slope with increasing depth of the PMMA phantom. In addition, the maximum dose values of longitudinal dose distribution for 6 MV photon beam with field sizes of 1 × 1 and 3 × 3 cm2 were found to be at a depth of approximately 15 mm and the percentage depth dose of both field sizes were nearly in agreement at the skin dose level. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that an all-in-one phantom-dosimeter can be developed to accurately measure beam profiles and dose distribution in a small irradiation fields prior to carrying out stereotactic radiosurgery. PMID:22778649

  16. [Evaluation of Radiation Dose during Stent-graft Treatment Using a Hybrid Operating Room System].

    PubMed

    Haga, Yoshihiro; Chida, Kouichi; Kaga, Yuji; Saitou, Kazuhisa; Arai, Takeshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Iwaya, Yoshimi; Kumasaka, Eriko; Kataoka, Nozomi; Satou, Naoto; Abe, Mitsuya

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, aortic aneurysm treatment with stent graft grafting in the X-ray fluoroscopy is increasing. This is an endovascular therapy, because it is a treatment which includes the risk of radiation damage, having to deal with radiation damage, to know in advance is important. In this study, in order to grasp the trend of exposure stent graft implantation in a hybrid operating room (OR) system, focusing on clinical data (entrance skin dose and fluoroscopy time), was to count the total. In TEVAR and EVAR, fluoroscopy time became 13.40 ± 7.27 minutes, 23.67 ± 11.76 minutes, ESD became 0.87 ± 0.41 mGy, 1.11 ± 0.57 mGy. (fluoroscopy time of EVAR was 2.0 times than TEVAR. DAP of EVAR was 1.2 times than TEVAR.) When using the device, adapted lesions and usage are different. This means that care changes in exposure-related factors. In this study, exposure trends of the stent graft implantation was able to grasp. It can be a helpful way to reduce/optimize the radiation dose in a hybrid OR system. PMID:26685833

  17. Characterization of a two-dimensional, thermoluminescent, dose-mapping system: Uniformity, reproducibility, and calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehl, D. L.; Muron, D. J.; Sujka, B. R.; Vehar, D. W.; Lorence, L. J., Jr.; Westfall, R. L.; Jones, S. C.; Sweet, J. A.; Braunlich, P.

    1994-10-01

    Initial testing of a new, commercially available, thermoluminescent dosimetry system is reported. The radiation detectors consist of two-dimensional arrays of 104 CaF2:Mn dosimeters, deposited on flexible polyimide sheets. The spatial resolution is 3 mm, and the combined thickness of the dosimeters and the substrate is 185 μm. Exposed sheets are processed by laser heating. This system is compatible with intense, pulsed Bremsstrahlung fields and electronics hardness testing. A two-step calibration procedure is described. In spatial uniformity tests at 66 Gy the detectors exhibited random fluctuations of 1%-3% superposed on broad spatial drifts of ˜±5%. Reproducibility for strips of 288 elements, cut from sheets and given absorbed doses of 100 Gy, was ˜2%. For absorbed doses in the 10 Gy-1.5 kGy range, response vs exposure curves show reasonable features of linearity, supralinearity, and saturation for CaF2:Mn phosphor. Small systematic effects (<7%) can be observed for sheets and strips stacked during exposure; these effects are explained by radiation transport calculations and impact the dosimetric technique.

  18. NATIONAL DOSE REGISTER IN FRANCE WITHIN THE NATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEM SISERI.

    PubMed

    Scanff, P; Crescini, D; Roy, H; Billarand, Y; Rannou, A

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, France has developed an electronic dose register at national level called SISERI. Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety is in charge of the management of this information system. Besides the main purpose of being a central register of any doses measured for the individual dosimetric monitoring of all exposed workers, SISERI has been developed so as to constitute a tool for occupational physicians and radiation protection officers allowing access in real-time to the results of the individual monitoring. The SISERI information system centralises, verifies and keeps the records of all personal dosimetric results of the 370 000 workers annually monitored in France. Moreover, since the publication of a new order in 2013, employers shall declare any new workers in SISERI before the beginning of their occupation and they shall upload data concerning in particular the activity field/sector and the occupation of each worker. The enforcement of this new order is going to enrich the individual dosimetric information stored in SISERI. Thus, it is expected that more precise and accurate statistics on occupational exposure to ionising radiation in France will be established in the next few years. PMID:26424137

  19. Systemic effects of local treatment with high doses of potent corticosteroids in psoriatics.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, J E; Gip, L J

    1979-01-01

    The risk of systemic effects of high doses of potent topical corticosteroids was evaluated in 6 psoriatics with lesions on more than 50% of the body surface. Before the examinations the patients had been treated for 3-4 months with 35-65 g fluorinated corticosteroids daily. General clinical examination, plasma cortisol determinations, and tetracosactrin tests were carried out. One patient showed clinical signs of Cushing's syndrome including diabetes mellitus, another had a slight Cushingoid appearance. The plasma cortisol levels were depressed in 5 of the 6 patients on the first post-treatment day. A subnormal plasmacortisol response to tetracosactrin stimulation was noted in 3 of the patients. In these cases the potent corticosteroid therapy was discontinued. One month later a follow-up was performed, which showed a clinical and laboratory normalization except for the tetracosactrin test in one case. The study emphasizes the risk of serious systemic effects of the absorbed corticosteroids, if high doses are used for long periods. PMID:87083

  20. New Perspectives for Didactical Engineering: An Example for the Development of a Resource for Teaching Decimal Number System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempier, Frédérick

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown the difficulties of learning and teaching the decimal number system for whole numbers. In the case of numbers bigger than one hundred, complexity is partly due to the multitude of possible relationships between units. This study was aimed to develop conditions of a resource which can help teachers to enhance their teaching…

  1. Reduction of radiation dose during facet joint injection using the new image guidance system SabreSource™: a prospective study in 60 patients

    PubMed Central

    Proschek, Dirk; Kafchitsas, K.; Rauschmann, M. A.; Kurth, A. A.; Vogl, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    Interventional procedures are associated with high radiation doses for both patients and surgeons. To reduce the risk from ionizing radiation, it is essential to minimize radiation dose. This prospective study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness in reducing radiation dose during facet joint injection in the lumbar spine and to evaluate the feasibility and possibilities of the new real time image guidance system SabreSource™. A total of 60 patients, treated with a standardized injection therapy of the facet joints L4–L5 or L5–S1, were included in this study. A total of 30 patients were treated by fluoroscopy guidance alone, the following 30 patients were treated using the new SabreSource™ system. Thus a total of 120 injections to the facet joints were performed. Pain, according to the visual analogue scale (VAS), was documented before and 6 h after the intervention. Radiation dose, time of radiation and the number of exposures needed to place the needle were recorded. No significant differences concerning age (mean age 60.5 years, range 51–69), body mass index (mean BMI 26.2, range 22.2–29.9) and preoperative pain (VAS 7.9, range 6–10) were found between the two groups. There was no difference in pain reduction between the two groups (60 vs. 61.5%; P = 0.001) but the radiation dose was significantly smaller with the new SabreSource™ system (reduction of radiation dose 32.7%, P = 0.01; reduction of mean entrance surface dose 32.3%, P = 0.01). The SabreSource™ System significantly reduced the radiation dose received during the injection therapy of the lumbar facet joints. With minimal effort for the setup at the beginning of a session, the system is easy to handle and can be helpful for other injection therapies (e.g. nerve root block therapies). PMID:19082641

  2. Kootenai River Nutrient Dosing System and N-P Consumption: Year 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-02-19

    In early 2006 we designed and built low energy consumption, pump-operated system, for dosing of the liquid nutrient in the summer 2006 season. This operated successfully, and the system was used again during the 2007 and 2008 seasons for dosing. During the early winter period, 2008, laboratory tests were made of the liquid nutrient pump system, and it was noted that small amounts of air were being entrained on the suction side of the pump, during conditions when the inlet pressure was low. It was believed that this was the cause of diurnal fluctuations in the flow supplied, characteristic of the 2007 year flow data. Replacement of '0' rings on the inlet side of the pumps was the solution to this problem, and when tested in the field during the summer season, the flow supplied was found to be stable. A decision was made by the IKERT committee at the meeting of 20th to 21st May 2008 (held in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho) to use an injection flow rate of liquid fertilizer (polyammonium phosphate 10-34-0) to achieve a target phosphorus concentration of 3.0 {micro}g/L, after complete mixing in the river. This target concentration was the same as that used in 2006 and 2007. The proposed starting date was as early as possible in June 2008. Plans were made to measure the dosing flow in three ways. Two of the three methods of flow measurement (1 and 2 below) are inter-dependent. These were: (1) Direct measurement of flow rate by diverting dosing flow into a 1000 mL volume standard flask. The flow rate was computed by dividing the flask volume by the time required to fill the flask. This was done a few times only during the summer period. (2) Adjusting the flow rate reading of the Gamma dosing pump using the 'calibration' function to achieve agreement with the flow rate computed by method 1 above. (3) Direct measurement by electrical signal from conductive fluid passing through a magnetic field (Seametrics meter, as used in previous years). Values were recorded every 4 minutes by a

  3. [Evaluation tests of computer systems concerning tri-dimensional dose calculations].

    PubMed

    Simonian-Sauve, M; Smart, C

    1998-01-01

    The development of irradiation techniques in radiotherapy shows a clear tendency towards the systematic use of three-dimensional (3D) information. Great efforts are being made to set up 3D conformal radiotherapy. Consequently, in the aim of greater coherence and accuracy, "the dosimetric tool" must also meet the requirements of 3D radiotherapy, as it plays a role in the treatment chain. To know if the treatment planning system is a "3D", "2D" or even "1D" system, one should not be satisfied with reading the technical documentation and the program algorithm description nor entirely trust the constructor's assertions. It is essential to clearly and precisely evaluate the possibilities of the treatment planning system. Even if it is proved not to satisfy perfectly all the tests which would qualify it as a real 3D calculation system, the study of the test results helps to give clear explanations of the dosimetric results. Two series of test cases are proposed. The first series allows us to understand in which conditions the treatment planning system takes into account the scatter influence in a volume. The second series is designed to inform us about the capability of the dose calculation algorithm when the medium encloses non-homogeneities. These test cases do not constitute an exhaustive "check-list" able to tackle completely the question of 3D calculation. They are submitted as examples and should be considered as an evaluation methodology for the software implanted in the treatment planning system. PMID:9749097

  4. Combined local and systemic bleomycin administration in electrochemotherapy to reduce the number of treatment sessions

    PubMed Central

    Tellado, Matias; Olaiz, Nahuel; Michinski, Sebastian; Marshall, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy (ECT), a medical treatment widely used in human patients for tumor treatment, increases bleomycin toxicity by 1000 fold in the treated area with an objective response rate of around 80%. Despite its high response rate, there are still 20% of cases in which the patients are not responding. This could be ascribed to the fact that bleomycin, when administered systemically, is not reaching the whole tumor mass properly because of the characteristics of tumor vascularization, in which case local administration could cover areas that are unreachable by systemic administration. Patients and methods We propose combined bleomycin administration, both systemic and local, using companion animals as models. We selected 22 canine patients which failed to achieve a complete response after an ECT treatment session. Eleven underwent another standard ECT session (control group), while 11 received a combined local and systemic administration of bleomycin in the second treatment session. Results According to the WHO criteria, the response rates in the combined administration group were: complete response (CR) 54% (6), partial response (PR) 36% (4), stable disease (SD) 10% (1). In the control group, these were: CR 0% (0), PR 19% (2), SD 63% (7), progressive disease (PD) 18% (2). In the combined group 91% objective responses (CR+PR) were obtained. In the control group 19% objective responses were obtained. The difference in the response rate between the treatment groups was significant (p < 0.01). Conclusions Combined local and systemic bleomycin administration was effective in previously to ECT non responding canine patients. The results indicate that this approach could be useful and effective in specific population of patients and reduce the number of treatment sessions needed to obtain an objective response. PMID:27069450

  5. High-Throughput Droplet Digital PCR System for Absolute Quantitation of DNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Digital PCR enables the absolute quantitation of nucleic acids in a sample. The lack of scalable and practical technologies for digital PCR implementation has hampered the widespread adoption of this inherently powerful technique. Here we describe a high-throughput droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) system that enables processing of ∼2 million PCR reactions using conventional TaqMan assays with a 96-well plate workflow. Three applications demonstrate that the massive partitioning afforded by our ddPCR system provides orders of magnitude more precision and sensitivity than real-time PCR. First, we show the accurate measurement of germline copy number variation. Second, for rare alleles, we show sensitive detection of mutant DNA in a 100 000-fold excess of wildtype background. Third, we demonstrate absolute quantitation of circulating fetal and maternal DNA from cell-free plasma. We anticipate this ddPCR system will allow researchers to explore complex genetic landscapes, discover and validate new disease associations, and define a new era of molecular diagnostics. PMID:22035192

  6. Revised tables of airspeed, altitude, and Mach number presented in the International system of units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, M. S.; Sawyer, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Because inception of a national program to implement the International System of Units (SI) appears to be inevitable and imminent, the tables of airspeed, altitude, and Mach number prepared by Livingston and Gracey to serve for airspeed meter and altimeter calibrations and for the conversion of flight measurements of these quantities to related parameters - Mach number, true airspeed, equivalent airspeed, etc. - have been revised to the SI. Tables of airspeed in knots are also included because of the significance of this quantity in navigation. In addition, the data in the altitude tables have been revised to the U.S. Standard Atmosphere of 1962. The latter data reflect increased knowledge of the higher atmosphere and more precise determination of basic quantities, including the redefinition of the absolute thermodynamic temperature scale by the Tenth General Conference on Weights and Measures in 1954. The U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1962, corresponds to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Standard Atmosphere up to 20 kilometers (geopotential altitude). A table of conversion factors for various pressure units is presented in SI Units.

  7. A perspective for biowaivers of human bioequivalence studies on the basis of the combination of the ratio of AUC to the dose and the biopharmaceutics classification system.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Shinji; Tachiki, Hidehisa; Uchiyama, Hitoshi; Fukui, Yasunobu; Takeuchi, Naohiro; Kumamoto, Kazuo; Satoh, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Yoshinobu; Ishii, Emi; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Takeuchi, Susumu; Sugita, Masaru; Yamashita, Shinji

    2011-08-01

    The ratio of AUC to the dose (AUC/dose) was previously found as a parameter that predicts a risk of bioinequivalence of oral drug products. On the basis of the combination of this parameter and the biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS), a perspective for biowaivers of human bioequivalence studies is discussed. Databases of bioequivalence studies using immediate-release solid oral dosage forms were disclosed by 6 Japanese generic pharmaceutical companies, and the number of subjects required for demonstrating bioequivalence between generic and reference products was plotted as a function of AUC/dose for each BCS category. A small variation in the number of subjects was constantly observed in bioequivalence studies using dosage forms containing an identical BCS class 1 or class 3 drug, even though formulations of the generic product differ between companies. The variation was extremely enlarged when the drugs were substituted with BCS class 2 drugs. Rate-determining steps in oral absorption of highly water-soluble BCS class 1 and class 3 drugs are independent of formulations when there is no significant difference in the in vitro dissolution profiles between formulations. The small variation observed for both BCS categories indicates that the number of subjects converges into one value for each drug. Our analysis indicates the appropriateness of biowaiver of bioequivalence studies for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms containing not only BCS class 1 drugs but also class 3 drugs. PMID:21630662

  8. Dose-response relationship of autonomic nervous system responses to individualized training impulse in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Vincenzo; Castagna, Carlo; Padua, Elvira; Lombardo, Mauro; D'Ottavio, Stefano; Massaro, Michele; Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2009-06-01

    In athletes, exercise training induces autonomic nervous system (ANS) adaptations that could be used to monitor training status. However, the relationship between training and ANS in athletes has been investigated without regard for individual training loads. We tested the hypothesis that in long-distance athletes, changes in ANS parameters are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load and could predict athletic performance. A spectral analysis of heart rate (HR), systolic arterial pressure variability, and baroreflex sensitivity by the sequences technique was investigated in eight recreational athletes during a 6-mo training period culminating with a marathon. Individualized training load responses were monitored by a modified training impulse (TRIMP(i)) method, which was determined in each athlete using the individual HR and lactate profiling determined during a treadmill test. Monthly TRIMP(i) steadily increased during the training period. All the ANS parameters were significantly and very highly correlated to the dose of exercise with a second-order regression model (r(2) ranged from 0.90 to 0.99; P < 0.001). Variance, high-frequency oscillations of HR variability (HRV), and baroreflex sensitivity resembled a bell-shaped curve with a minimum at the highest TRIMP(i), whereas low-frequency oscillations of HR and systolic arterial pressure variability and the low frequency (LF)-to-high frequency ratio resembled an U-shaped curve with a maximum at the highest TRIMP(i). The LF component of HRV assessed at the last recording session was significantly and inversely correlated to the time needed to complete the nearing marathon. These results suggest that in recreational athletes, ANS adaptations to exercise training are dose related on an individual basis, showing a progressive shift toward a sympathetic predominance, and that LF oscillations in HRV at peak training load could predict athletic achievement in this athlete population. PMID

  9. Doses due to the South Atlantic Anomaly during the Euromir'95 mission measured by an on-board TLD system.

    PubMed

    Deme, S; Reitz, G; Apathy, I; Hejja, I; Lang, E; Feher, I

    1999-01-01

    During the Euromir'95 mission, a specially designed microprocessor-controlled thermoluminescent detector (TLD) system, called the 'Pille'95', was used by ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter to measure the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir space station. One of the experiment's objectives was to determine the dose fraction on Mir due to the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) on an orbit inclined at 51.6 degrees and at an altitude of about 400 km. Using an hourly measuring period for 170 h in automatic mode, dose components both of galactic (independent of SAA) and SAA origin were determined. It was found that the maximum dose due to crossing the SAA was equal to 55 microGy. Averaging all the measurements it was calculated that the mean dose rate inside the Mir was 12-14 microGy h-1 and that half of this value was caused by the SAA. PMID:11542232

  10. Minimal skin dose increase in longitudinal rotating biplanar linac-MR systems: examination of radiation energy and flattening filter design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvanloo, A.; Burke, B.; St. Aubin, J.; Baillie, D.; Wachowicz, K.; Warkentin, B.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic fields of linac-MR systems modify the path of contaminant electrons in photon beams, which alters patient entrance skin dose. Also, the increased SSD of linac-MR systems reduces the maximum achievable dose rate. To accurately quantify the changes in entrance skin dose, the authors use EGSnrc Monte Carlo calculations that incorporate 3D magnetic field of the Alberta 0.5 T longitudinal linac-MR system. The Varian 600C linac head geometry assembled on the MRI components is used in the BEAMnrc simulations for 6 MV and 10 MV beam models and skin doses are calculated at an average depth of 70 μm using DOSXYZnrc. 3D modeling shows that magnetic fringe fields decay rapidly and are small at the linac head. SSDs between 100 and 120 cm result in skin-dose increases of between ~6%–19% and ~1%–9% for the 6 and 10 MV beams, respectively. For 6 MV, skin dose increases from ~10.5% to ~1.5% for field-size increases of 5  ×  5 cm2 to 20  ×  20 cm2. For 10 MV, skin dose increases by ~6% for a 5  ×  5 cm2 field, and decreases by ~1.5% for a 20  ×  20 cm2 field. Furthermore, the proposed reshaped flattening filter increases the dose rate from the current 355 MU min‑1 to 529 MU min‑1 (6 MV) or 604 MU min‑1 (10 MV), while the skin-dose increases by only an additional ~2.6% (all percent increases in skin dose are relative to D max). This study suggests that there is minimal increase in the entrance skin dose and minimal/no decrease in the dose rate of the Alberta longitudinal linac-MR system. The even lower skin dose increase at 10 MV offers further advantages in future designs of linac-MR prototypes.

  11. Minimal skin dose increase in longitudinal rotating biplanar linac-MR systems: examination of radiation energy and flattening filter design.

    PubMed

    Keyvanloo, A; Burke, B; St Aubin, J; Baillie, D; Wachowicz, K; Warkentin, B; Steciw, S; Fallone, B G

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic fields of linac-MR systems modify the path of contaminant electrons in photon beams, which alters patient entrance skin dose. Also, the increased SSD of linac-MR systems reduces the maximum achievable dose rate. To accurately quantify the changes in entrance skin dose, the authors use EGSnrc Monte Carlo calculations that incorporate 3D magnetic field of the Alberta 0.5 T longitudinal linac-MR system. The Varian 600C linac head geometry assembled on the MRI components is used in the BEAMnrc simulations for 6 MV and 10 MV beam models and skin doses are calculated at an average depth of 70 μm using DOSXYZnrc. 3D modeling shows that magnetic fringe fields decay rapidly and are small at the linac head. SSDs between 100 and 120 cm result in skin-dose increases of between ~6%-19% and ~1%-9% for the 6 and 10 MV beams, respectively. For 6 MV, skin dose increases from ~10.5% to ~1.5% for field-size increases of 5  ×  5 cm(2) to 20  ×  20 cm(2). For 10 MV, skin dose increases by ~6% for a 5  ×  5 cm(2) field, and decreases by ~1.5% for a 20  ×  20 cm(2) field. Furthermore, the proposed reshaped flattening filter increases the dose rate from the current 355 MU min(-1) to 529 MU min(-1) (6 MV) or 604 MU min(-1) (10 MV), while the skin-dose increases by only an additional ~2.6% (all percent increases in skin dose are relative to D max). This study suggests that there is minimal increase in the entrance skin dose and minimal/no decrease in the dose rate of the Alberta longitudinal linac-MR system. The even lower skin dose increase at 10 MV offers further advantages in future designs of linac-MR prototypes. PMID:27050044

  12. Characterization of the neutron irradiation system for use in the Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Manuel,

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the neutron irradiation system consisting of americium-241 beryllium (241AmBe) neutron sources placed in a polyethylene shielding for use at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF). With a total activity of 0.3 TBq (9 Ci), the source consisted of three recycled 241AmBe sources of different activities that had been combined into a single source. The source in its polyethylene shielding will be used in neutron irradiation testing of components. The characterization of the source-shielding system was necessary to evaluate the radiation environment for future experiments. Characterization of the source was also necessary because the documentation for the three component sources and their relative alignment within the Special Form Capsule (SFC) was inadequate. The system consisting of the source and shielding was modeled using Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP). The model was validated by benchmarking it against measurements using multiple techniques. To characterize the radiation fields over the full spatial geometry of the irradiation system, it was necessary to use a number of instruments of varying sensitivities. First, the computed photon radiography assisted in determining orientation of the component sources. With the capsule properly oriented inside the shielding, the neutron spectra were measured using a variety of techniques. A N-probe Microspec and a neutron Bubble Dosimeter Spectrometer (BDS) set were used to characterize the neutron spectra/field in several locations. In the third technique, neutron foil activation was used to ascertain the neutron spectra. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to characterize the photon spectrum. The experimentally measured spectra and the MCNP results compared well. Once the MCNP model was validated to an adequate level of confidence, parametric analyses was performed on the model to optimize for potential

  13. The estimating of Curve Number from River Level for real-time flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M.; Yoon, Kanghoon

    2009-04-01

    In the South Korea, the NRCS runoff curve number method is used to estimate the effective rainfall and the CN has much effect on the peak discharge and time for the real-time forecasting system. According to the experience and existing research about flooding forecasting system, the new method to estimate CN would be necessary, since it is very difficult to operate the flood forecasting system using the method which uses the AMC from 5-day antecedent rainfall developed by NRCS. It could be assumed that the maximum potential retention(S) will be related to the groundwater or groundwater levels; therefore, the relationship between water stage in river and maximum potential retention(S) would be investigated. In order to derive the relationship, the flooding data of 1980 through 2007 in Sulmachun and Pyungchang River is used, since this data is delicately constructed. Here, the CN is calculated using the total rainfall discharge and the total depth of runoff discharge at the flooding period and then water stage in river and maximum potential retention(S) would be determined. The relationship between water level in river and maximum potential retention(S) or CN has a higher correlation under the specific water stage of about 0.1m^3/sec/km^2; however, it shows relatively lower correlation above the specific water level. This result shows that NRCS method represents the relationship very well in the lower water stage as infiltration is actively occurred with relatively higher maximum potential retention(S). Keyword : CN, rela-time forecasting system, water stage

  14. A comparative evaluation of rare-earth screen-film systems. System speed, contrast, sensitometry, RMS noise, square-wave response function, and contrast-dose-detail analysis.

    PubMed

    Fearon, T; Vucich, J; Hoe, J; McSweeney, W J; Potter, B M

    1986-08-01

    We evaluated the physical characteristics and contrast-dose-detail performance of 11 rare-earth and three calcium tungstate screen-film systems. Measurements included system speed, contrast, sensitometry, RMS noise, square-wave response function, and contrast-dose-detail analysis. The major differences in physical characteristics among systems were system speed and RMS noise. Square-wave response differences were more subtle. For contrast-dose-detail analysis, the rare-earth screen-film systems and the calcium tungstate system responses were significant over a limited subject contrast range as a function of detail diameter. Relative dose efficiency in the noise-limited region is a function of the properties of the screen only and is independent of the film. PMID:3744739

  15. Total Dose Effects on Single Event Transients in Linear Bipolar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchner, Stephen; McMorrow, Dale; Bernard, Muriel; Roche, Nicholas; Dusseau, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Single Event Transients (SETs) originating in linear bipolar integrated circuits are known to undermine the reliability of electronic systems operating in the radiation environment of space. Ionizing particle radiation produces a variety of SETs in linear bipolar circuits. The extent to which these SETs threaten system reliability depends on both their shapes (amplitude and width) and their threshold energies. In general, SETs with large amplitudes and widths are the most likely to propagate from a bipolar circuit's output through a subsystem. The danger these SET pose is that, if they become latched in a follow-on circuit, they could cause an erroneous system response. Long-term exposure of linear bipolar circuits to particle radiation produces total ionizing dose (TID) and/or displacement damage dose (DDD) effects that are characterized by a gradual degradation in some of the circuit's electrical parameters. For example, an operational amplifier's gain-bandwidth product is reduced by exposure to ionizing radiation, and it is this reduction that contributes to the distortion of the SET shapes. In this paper, we compare SETs produced in a pristine LM124 operational amplifier with those produced in one exposed to ionizing radiation for three different operating configurations - voltage follower (VF), inverter with gain (IWG), and non-inverter with gain (NIWG). Each configuration produces a unique set of transient shapes that change following exposure to ionizing radiation. An important finding is that the changes depend on operating configuration; some SETs decrease in amplitude, some remain relatively unchanged, some become narrower and some become broader.

  16. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data

    SciTech Connect

    Fellman, A.

    1989-01-01

    A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations, were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrifice at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man.

  17. The Techa River dosimetry system: methods for the reconstruction of internal dose.

    PubMed

    Degteva, M O; Kozheurov, V P; Tolstykh, E I; Vorobiova, M I; Anspaugh, L R; Napier, B A; Kovtun, A N

    2000-07-01

    The Mayak Production Association (MPA) was the first facility in the former Soviet Union for the production of plutonium. Significant worker and population exposures occurred as a result of failures in the technological processes in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Residents of many villages downstream on the Techa River were exposed via a variety of pathways; the more significant included drinking of water from the river and external gamma exposure due to proximity to contaminated bottom sediment and shoreline. After the extent of the major contamination of the Techa River became known, several villages on the upper part of the Techa River were evacuated. Organ doses are being reconstructed on the basis of derivation of an historical source term and a simple river model used to simulate the transport of radionuclides downstream and their retention on sediments; measurements of 90Sr content in teeth and the whole body of half of the members of the cohort; and development of the "Techa River Dosimetry System" for computation of the doses. PMID:10855775

  18. The Techa River dosimetry system: Methods for the reconstruction of internal dose

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M.O.; Kozheurov, V.P.; Tolstykh, E.I.; Vorobiova, M.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Napier, B.A.; Kovtun, A.N.

    2000-07-01

    The Mayak Production Association (MPA) was the first facility in the former Soviet Union for the production of plutonium. Significant worker and population exposures occurred as a result of failures in the technological processes in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Residents of many villages downstream on the Techa River were exposed via a variety of pathways; the more significant included drinking of water from the river and external gamma exposure due to proximity to contaminated bottom sediment and shoreline. After the extent of the major contamination of the Techa River became known, several villages on the upper part of the Techa River were evacuated. Organ doses are being reconstructed on the basis of derivation of an historical source term and a simple river model used to simulate the transport of radionuclides downstream and their retention on sediments; measurements of {sup 90}Sr content in teeth and the whole body of half of the members of the cohort; and development of the Techa River Dosimetry System for computation of the doses.

  19. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Hardev; Herman, Tania De La Fuente; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2012-10-01

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem & ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  1. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  2. Hollow Fiber Membrane Bioreactor Systems for Wastewater Processing: Effects of Environmental Stresses Including Dormancy Cycling and Antibiotic Dosing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Hummerick, Mary E.; Lunn, Griffin M.; Larson, Brian D.; Spencer, LaShelle E.; Kosiba, Michael L.; Khodadad, Christina L.; Catechis, John A.; Birmele, Michele N.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-aerated biofilm reactors (MABRs) have been studied for a number of years as an alternate approach for treating wastewater streams during space exploration. While the technology provides a promising pre-treatment for lowering organic carbon and nitrogen content without the need for harsh stabilization chemicals, several challenges must be addressed before adoption of the technology in future missions. One challenge is the transportation of bioreactors containing intact, active biofilms as a means for rapid start-up on the International Space Station or beyond. Similarly, there could be a need for placing these biological systems into a dormant state for extended periods when the system is not in use, along with the ability for rapid restart. Previous studies indicated that there was little influence of storage condition (4 or 25 C, with or without bulk fluid) on recovery of bioreactors with immature biofilms (48 days old), but that an extensive recovery time was required (20+ days). Bioreactors with fully established biofilms (13 months) were able to recover from a 7-month dormancy within 4 days (approximately 1 residence). Further dormancy and recovery testing is presented here that examines the role of biofilm age on recovery requirements, repeated dormancy cycle capabilities, and effects of long-duration dormancy cycles (8-9 months) on HFMB systems. Another challenge that must be addressed is the possibility of antibiotics entering the wastewater stream. Currently, for most laboratory tests of biological water processors, donors providing urine may not contribute to the study when taking antibiotics because the effects on the system are yet uncharacterized. A simulated urinary tract infection event, where an opportunistic, pathogenic organism, E. coli, was introduced to the HFMBs followed by dosing with an antibiotic, ciprofloxacin, was completed to study the effect of the antibiotic on reactor performance and to also examine the development of

  3. Genetic Patterns in European Geometrid Moths Revealed by the Barcode Index Number (BIN) System

    PubMed Central

    Hausmann, Axel; Godfray, H. Charles J.; Huemer, Peter; Mutanen, Marko; Rougerie, Rodolphe; van Nieukerken, Erik J.; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2013-01-01

    Background The geometrid moths of Europe are one of the best investigated insect groups in traditional taxonomy making them an ideal model group to test the accuracy of the Barcode Index Number (BIN) system of BOLD (Barcode of Life Datasystems), a method that supports automated, rapid species delineation and identification. Methodology/Principal Findings This study provides a DNA barcode library for 219 of the 249 European geometrid moth species (88%) in five selected subfamilies. The data set includes COI sequences for 2130 specimens. Most species (93%) were found to possess diagnostic barcode sequences at the European level while only three species pairs (3%) were genetically indistinguishable in areas of sympatry. As a consequence, 97% of the European species we examined were unequivocally discriminated by barcodes within their natural areas of distribution. We found a 1:1 correspondence between BINs and traditionally recognized species for 67% of these species. Another 17% of the species (15 pairs, three triads) shared BINs, while specimens from the remaining species (18%) were divided among two or more BINs. Five of these species are mixtures, both sharing and splitting BINs. For 82% of the species with two or more BINs, the genetic splits involved allopatric populations, many of which have previously been hypothesized to represent distinct species or subspecies. Conclusions/Significance This study confirms the effectiveness of DNA barcoding as a tool for species identification and illustrates the potential of the BIN system to characterize formal genetic units independently of an existing classification. This suggests the system can be used to efficiently assess the biodiversity of large, poorly known assemblages of organisms. For the moths examined in this study, cases of discordance between traditionally recognized species and BINs arose from several causes including overlooked species, synonymy, and cases where DNA barcodes revealed regional variation of

  4. Primary central nervous system lymphoma: implication of high-dose chemotherapy followed by auto-SCT

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, N; Savani, BN

    2016-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma is a rare and distinct subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Decisions regarding the initial therapeutic approach are influenced by age and risk of therapy-related neurotoxicity. Despite several albeit small phase II studies, and the acknowledged need for larger prospective trials, there is supporting evidence to consider auto-SCT following induction chemotherapy in patients with good performance status. The international extranodal lymphoma study group is conducting a randomized phase II study comparing consolidative radiation therapy to high-dose therapy. Novel therapeutic options including early aggressive approach with upfront auto-SCT and strategies to prevent relapse following transplantation is an area of focus. PMID:22002486

  5. Code System to Calculate Radiation Dose Rates Relative to Spent Fuel Shipping Casks.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-05-20

    Version 00 QBF calculates and plots in a short running time, three dimensional radiation dose rate distributions in the form of contour maps on specified planes resulting from cylindrical sources loaded into vehicles or ships. Shielding effects by steel walls and shielding material layers are taken into account in addition to the shadow effect among casks. This code system identifies the critical points on which to focus when designing the radiation shielding structure and wheremore » each of the spent fuel shipping casks should be stored. The code GRAPH reads the output data file of QBF and plots it using the HGX graphics library. QBF unifies the functions of the SMART and MANYCASK codes included in CCC-482.« less

  6. Effects of low-dose prenatal irradiation on the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Scientists are in general agreement about the effects of prenatal irradiation, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Differing concepts and research approaches have resulted in some uncertainties about some quantitative relationships, underlying interpretations, and conclusions. Examples of uncertainties include the existence of a threshold, the quantitative relationships between prenatal radiation doses and resulting physical and functional lesions, and processes by which lesions originate and develop. A workshop was convened in which scientists with varying backgrounds and viewpoints discussed these relationships and explored ways in which various disciplines could coordinate concepts and methodologies to suggest research directions for resolving uncertainties. This Workshop Report summarizes, in an extended fashion, salient features of the presentations on the current status of our knowledge about the radiobiology and neuroscience of prenatal irradiation and the relationships between them.

  7. Application of a Planar Doppler Velocimetry System to a High Reynolds Number Compressible Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    A Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) system has been constructed and used to investigate the instantaneous turbulent velocity structure of a round high-speed compressible air jet with a low-speed co-flow. The exit condition was Mach=0.85 at ambient pressure, yielding a Reynolds number of about 650,000 on diameter. The PDV system was installed at NASA Langley Research Center in the Small Anechoic Jet Facility (SAJF), a chamber in which both the acoustic and aerodynamic properties of jets can be studied. For this test, the goal was to gather data which can be used to relate the turbulence structure of the jet to the levels and character of the acoustic noise produced by the jet. The current PDV system can acquire single-velocity-component, single-shot, planar images (15ns exposures) at 30 Hz. For this paper, the primary data set consists of 240 frames of velocity data acquired with both the jet and the low-speed co-flow seeded with light-scattering articles. Thus, velocities could be measured everywhere in the jet shear layer, both in the jet fluid and in the entrained co-flow. Some data were also taken with only the jet flow seeded. These provided mixing concentration images along with the reduced velocity fields. Other images were taken with only the co-flow seeded. These produced unique quantitative images of high speed entrainment. Optical "laser speckle" noise is the largest source of random noise in pulsed PDV systems. Components for the PDV imaging system were specifically selected to minimize speckle noise. To reduce systematic velocity errors due to laser drift, a frequency monitoring reference leg with a temperature-tuned reference iodine cell, was employed. In the course of this study, a novel flow seeder was developed. It enabled continuously variable seeding of the flow with particles of Sheared Pyrogenic Amorphous Hydrophobic Silica (SPAHS). The seeder comprised a dry fluidized bed hopper and a supersonic nozzle "pickup." Shearing action in the pickup

  8. Evaluation of possible toxic effects of spearmint (Mentha spicata) on the reproductive system, fertility and number of offspring in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Nozhat, Fatemeh; Alaee, Sanaz; Behzadi, Khodabakhsh; Azadi Chegini, Najmeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In this study we investigated the effects of spearmint (Mentha spicata Labiatae) on the reproductive system, fertility and number of offspring in adult male rats. Materials and Methods: Adult Wistar male rats in one control (C) and three experimental groups (I, II and III) received 0, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg spearmint extract orally for 45 days, respectively. Following this treatment, the animals’ weights, and the standard weight of reproductive tissues, sperm count, sperm motility and serum testosterone concentration were measured, and reproductive tissues were examined histopathologically. To evaluate the effects of spearmint on fertility of male rats and growth of their offspring, male rats of the control and experimental groups mated with untreated female rats. Results: Results showed that spearmint did not affect the rats’ body and reproductive tissue weights. The sperm count, fast and slow progressive motility of sperm and serum testosterone concentration decreased while number of non-progressive sperm and immotile sperm increased in the experimental groups compared to the control group, but none of these changes were statistically significant. Histopathological studies showed no severe changes in reproductive tissues between control and experimental groups. Number and growth of offspring born from mating of male rats with untreated female rats showed no difference. Conclusion: We concluded that spearmint has no significant toxic effect on the reproductive system, fertility and number of offspring in adult male rats at the above mentioned dose levels. However high levels of this extract may have adverse effects on male fertility. PMID:25386406

  9. A practical method to standardise and optimise the Philips DoseRight 2.0 CT automatic exposure control system.

    PubMed

    Wood, T J; Moore, C S; Stephens, A; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-09-01

    Given the increasing use of computed tomography (CT) in the UK over the last 30 years, it is essential to ensure that all imaging protocols are optimised to keep radiation doses as low as reasonably practicable, consistent with the intended clinical task. However, the complexity of modern CT equipment can make this task difficult to achieve in practice. Recent results of local patient dose audits have shown discrepancies between two Philips CT scanners that use the DoseRight 2.0 automatic exposure control (AEC) system in the 'automatic' mode of operation. The use of this system can result in drifting dose and image quality performance over time as it is designed to evolve based on operator technique. The purpose of this study was to develop a practical technique for configuring examination protocols on four CT scanners that use the DoseRight 2.0 AEC system in the 'manual' mode of operation. This method used a uniform phantom to generate reference images which form the basis for how the AEC system calculates exposure factors for any given patient. The results of this study have demonstrated excellent agreement in the configuration of the CT scanners in terms of average patient dose and image quality when using this technique. This work highlights the importance of CT protocol harmonisation in a modern Radiology department to ensure both consistent image quality and radiation dose. Following this study, the average radiation dose for a range of CT examinations has been reduced without any negative impact on clinical image quality. PMID:26083878

  10. Number Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezin, Fatin

    2009-01-01

    It is instructive and interesting to find hidden numbers by using different positional numeration systems. Most of the present guessing techniques use the binary system expressed as less-than, greater-than or present-absent type information. This article describes how, by employing four cards having integers 1-64 written in different colours, one…

  11. Methods of space radiation dose analysis with applications to manned space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langley, R. W.; Billings, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    The full potential of state-of-the-art space radiation dose analysis for manned missions has not been exploited. Point doses have been overemphasized, and the critical dose to the bone marrow has been only crudely approximated, despite the existence of detailed man models and computer codes for dose integration in complex geometries. The method presented makes it practical to account for the geometrical detail of the astronaut as well as the vehicle. Discussed are the major assumptions involved and the concept of applying the results of detailed proton dose analysis to the real-time interpretation of on-board dosimetric measurements.

  12. Development of a dose verification system for Vero4DRT using Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yoshitomo; Sawada, Akira; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Tanabe, Hiroaki; Kaneko, Shuji; Takayama, Kenji; Mizowaki, Takashi; Kokubo, Masaki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Vero4DRT is an innovative image-guided radiotherapy system employing a C-band X-ray head with gimbal mechanics. The purposes of this study were to propose specific MC models of the linac head and multileaf collimator (MLC) for the Vero4DRT and to verify their accuracy. For a 6 MV photon beam delivered by the Vero4DRT, a simulation code was implemented using EGSnrc. The linac head model and the MLC model were simulated based on its specification. Next, the percent depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles at depths of 15, 100, and 200 mm were simulated under source-to-surface distance of 900 and 1000 mm. Field size was set to 150 × 150 mm2 at a depth of 100 mm. Each of the simulated dosimetric metrics was then compared with the corresponding measurements by a 0.125 cc ionization chamber. After that, intra- and interleaf leakage, tongue-and-groove, and rounded-leaf profiles were simulated for the static MLC model. Meanwhile, film measurements were performed using EDR2 films under similar conditions to simulation. The measurement for the rounded-leaf profile was performed using the water phantom and the ionization chamber. The leaf physical density and abutting leaf gap were adjusted to obtain good agreement between the simulated intra- and interleaf leakage profiles and measurements. For the MLC model in step-and-shoot cases, a pyramid and a prostate IMRT field were simulated, while film measurements were performed using EDR2. For the linac head, exclusive of MLC, the difference in PDD was < 1.0% after the buildup region. The simulated beam profiles agreed to within 1.3% at each depth. The MLC model has been shown to reproduce dose measurements within 2.5% for static tests. The MLC is made of tungsten alloy with a purity of 95%. The leaf gap of 0.015 cm and the MLC physical density of 18.0 g/ cm3, which provided the best agreement between the simulated and measured leaf leakage, were assigned to our MC model. As a result, the simulated step-and-shoot IMRT dose

  13. Evaluation of Dose Uncertainty to the Target Associated With Real-Time Tracking Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Using the CyberKnife Synchrony System.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Shiomi, Hiroya; Murai, Taro; Tatewaki, Koshi; Ohta, Seiji; Okawa, Kohei; Yokota, Naoki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the dose uncertainty caused by errors in real-time tracking intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the CyberKnife Synchrony Respiratory Tracking System (SRTS). Twenty lung tumors that had been treated with non-IMRT real-time tracking using CyberKnife SRTS were used for this study. After validating the tracking error in each case, we did 40 IMRT planning using 8 different collimator sizes for the 20 patients. The collimator size was determined for each planning target volume (PTV); smaller ones were one-half, and larger ones three-quarters, of the PTV diameter. The planned dose was 45 Gy in 4 fractions prescribed at 95% volume border of the PTV. Thereafter, the tracking error in each case was substituted into calculation software developed in house and randomly added in the setting of each beam. The IMRT planning incorporating tracking errors was simulated 1000 times, and various dose data on the clinical target volume (CTV) were compared with the original data. The same simulation was carried out by changing the fraction number from 1 to 6 in each IMRT plan. Finally, a total of 240 000 plans were analyzed. With 4 fractions, the change in the CTV maximum and minimum doses was within 3.0% (median) for each collimator. The change in D99 and D95 was within 2.0%. With decreases in the fraction number, the CTV coverage rate and the minimum dose decreased and varied greatly. The accuracy of real-time tracking IMRT delivered in 4 fractions using CyberKnife SRTS was considered to be clinically acceptable. PMID:25520272

  14. Development of a high precision dosimetry system for the measurement of surface dose rate distribution for eye applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Eichmann, Marion; Fluehs, Dirk; Spaan, Bernhard

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The therapeutic outcome of the therapy with ophthalmic applicators is highly dependent on the application of a sufficient dose to the tumor, whereas the dose applied to the surrounding tissue needs to be minimized. The goal for the newly developed apparatus described in this work is the determination of the individual applicator surface dose rate distribution with a high spatial resolution and a high precision in dose rate with respect to time and budget constraints especially important for clinical procedures. Inhomogeneities of the dose rate distribution can be detected and taken into consideration for the treatment planning. Methods: In order to achieve this, a dose rate profile as well as a surface profile of the applicator are measured and correlated with each other. An instrumental setup has been developed consisting of a plastic scintillator detector system and a newly designed apparatus for guiding the detector across the applicator surface at a constant small distance. It performs an angular movement of detector and applicator with high precision. Results: The measurements of surface dose rate distributions discussed in this work demonstrate the successful operation of the measuring setup. Measuring the surface dose rate distribution with a small distance between applicator and detector and with a high density of measuring points results in a complete and gapless coverage of the applicator surface, being capable of distinguishing small sized spots with high activities. The dosimetrical accuracy of the measurements and its analysis is sufficient (uncertainty in the dose rate in terms of absorbed dose to water is <7%), especially when taking the surgical techniques in positioning of the applicator on the eyeball into account. Conclusions: The method developed so far allows a fully automated quality assurance of eye applicators even under clinical conditions. These measurements provide the basis for future calculation of a full 3D dose rate

  15. Uncertainty analysis of practical structural health monitoring systems currently employed for tall buildings consisting of small number of sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Kenta; Mita, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Because of social background, such as repeated large earthquakes and cheating in design and construction, structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are getting strong attention. The SHM systems are in a practical phase. An SHM system consisting of small number of sensors has been introduced to 6 tall buildings in Shinjuku area. Including them, there are 2 major issues in the SHM systems consisting of small number of sensors. First, optimal system number of sensors and the location are not well-defined. In the practice, system placement is determined based on rough prediction and experience. Second, there are some uncertainties in estimation results by the SHM systems. Thus, the purpose of this research is to provide useful information for increasing reliability of SHM system and to improve estimation results based on uncertainty analysis of the SHM systems. The important damage index used here is the inter-story drift angle. The uncertainty considered here are number of sensors, earthquake motion characteristics, noise in data, error between numerical model and real building, nonlinearity of parameter. Then I have analyzed influence of each factor to estimation accuracy. The analysis conducted here will help to decide sensor system design considering valance of cost and accuracy. Because of constraint on the number of sensors, estimation results by the SHM system has tendency to provide smaller values. To overcome this problem, a compensation algorithm was discussed and presented. The usefulness of this compensation method was demonstrated for 40 story S and RC building models with nonlinear response.

  16. Evaluation of automatic exposure control system chamber for the dose optimization when examining pelvic in digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Chul; Lee, Hae-Kag; Lee, Yang-Sub; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    We found a way to optimize the image quality and reduce the exposure dose of patients through the proper activity combination of the automatic exposure control system chamber for the dose optimization when examining the pelvic anteroposterior side using the phantom of the human body standard model. We set 7 combinations of the chamber of automatic exposure control system. The effective dose was yielded by measuring five times for each according to the activity combination of the chamber for the dose measurement. Five radiologists with more than five years of experience evaluated the image through picture archiving and communication system using double blind test while classifying the 6 anatomical sites into 3-point level (improper, proper, perfect). When only one central chamber was activated, the effective dose was found to be the highest level, 0.287 mSv; and lowest when only the top left chamber was used, 0.165 mSv. After the subjective evaluation by five panel members on the pelvic image was completed, there was no statistically meaningful difference between the 7 chamber combinations, and all had good image quality. When testing the pelvic anteroposterior side with digital radiography, we were able to reduce the exposure dose of patients using the combination of the top right side of or the top two of the chamber. PMID:26410466

  17. Accurate dose assessment system for an exposed person utilising radiation transport calculation codes in emergency response to a radiological accident.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, F; Shigemori, Y; Seki, A

    2009-01-01

    A system has been developed to assess radiation dose distribution inside the body of exposed persons in a radiological accident by utilising radiation transport calculation codes-MCNP and MCNPX. The system consists mainly of two parts, pre-processor and post-processor of the radiation transport calculation. Programs for the pre-processor are used to set up a 'problem-dependent' input file, which defines the accident condition and dosimetric quantities to be estimated. The program developed for the post-processor part can effectively indicate dose information based upon the output file of the code. All of the programs in the dosimetry system can be executed with a generally used personal computer and accurately give the dose profile to an exposed person in a radiological accident without complicated procedures. An experiment using a physical phantom was carried out to verify the availability of the dosimetry system with the developed programs in a gamma ray irradiation field. PMID:19181661

  18. The role of the temporal lobe semantic system in number knowledge: evidence from late-stage semantic dementia.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Elizabeth; Bateman, David; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2005-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that many aspects of number knowledge remain unimpaired in semantic dementia, despite severe comprehension problems in other domains. It is argued that this advantage for numbers arises because the disease spares the parietal lobe magnitude system thought to be critical for number processing. Models of numerical cognition that favour a separation between verbal and magnitude representations of number might, however, predict a restricted impairment of the verbal number code in this condition. We obtained support for this hypothesis in a patient with late-stage semantic dementia. She was impaired at a variety of tasks tapping the verbal number code; for example, reading and writing Arabic numerals, naming and word-picture matching with dot pictures, reading aloud number words, digit span and magnitude comparison/serial ordering tasks with number words. In contrast, she demonstrated good understanding of the magnitude and serial order of numbers when tested with Arabic numerals and non-symbolic representations. These findings suggest that although the magnitude meaning of numbers is isolated from the temporal lobe semantic system, the anterior infero-temporal lobe may play a critical role in binding English number words to their non-symbolic magnitude meaning. PMID:15716160

  19. Incorporating system latency associated with real-time target tracking radiotherapy in the dose prediction step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Teboh; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Shi, Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-05-01

    System latency introduces geometric errors in the course of real-time target tracking radiotherapy. This effect can be minimized, for example by the use of predictive filters, but cannot be completely avoided. In this work, we present a convolution technique that can incorporate the effect as part of the treatment planning process. The method can be applied independently or in conjunction with the predictive filters to compensate for residual latency effects. The implementation was performed on TrackBeam (Initia Ltd, Israel), a prototype real-time target tracking system assembled and evaluated at our Cancer Institute. For the experimental system settings examined, a Gaussian distribution attributable to the TrackBeam latency was derived with σ = 3.7 mm. The TrackBeam latency, expressed as an average response time, was deduced to be 172 ms. Phantom investigations were further performed to verify the convolution technique. In addition, patient studies involving 4DCT volumes of previously treated lung cancer patients were performed to incorporate the latency effect in the dose prediction step. This also enabled us to effectively quantify the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of the TrackBeam and other higher latency effects on the clinical outcome of a real-time target tracking delivery.

  20. A DNA-Based Registry for All Animal Species: The Barcode Index Number (BIN) System

    PubMed Central

    Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2013-01-01

    Because many animal species are undescribed, and because the identification of known species is often difficult, interim taxonomic nomenclature has often been used in biodiversity analysis. By assigning individuals to presumptive species, called operational taxonomic units (OTUs), these systems speed investigations into the patterning of biodiversity and enable studies that would otherwise be impossible. Although OTUs have conventionally been separated through their morphological divergence, DNA-based delineations are not only feasible, but have important advantages. OTU designation can be automated, data can be readily archived, and results can be easily compared among investigations. This study exploits these attributes to develop a persistent, species-level taxonomic registry for the animal kingdom based on the analysis of patterns of nucleotide variation in the barcode region of the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene. It begins by examining the correspondence between groups of specimens identified to a species through prior taxonomic work and those inferred from the analysis of COI sequence variation using one new (RESL) and four established (ABGD, CROP, GMYC, jMOTU) algorithms. It subsequently describes the implementation, and structural attributes of the Barcode Index Number (BIN) system. Aside from a pragmatic role in biodiversity assessments, BINs will aid revisionary taxonomy by flagging possible cases of synonymy, and by collating geographical information, descriptive metadata, and images for specimens that are likely to belong to the same species, even if it is undescribed. More than 274,000 BIN web pages are now available, creating a biodiversity resource that is positioned for rapid growth. PMID:23861743

  1. On-road particle number measurements using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallus, Jens; Kirchner, Ulf; Vogt, Rainer; Börensen, Christoph; Benter, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    In this study the on-road particle number (PN) performance of a Euro-5 direct-injection (DI) gasoline passenger car was investigated. PN emissions were measured using the prototype of a portable emission measurement system (PEMS). PN PEMS correlations with chassis dynamometer tests show a good agreement with a chassis dynamometer set-up down to emissions in the range of 1·1010 #/km. Parallel on-line soot measurements by a photo acoustic soot sensor (PASS) were applied as independent measurement technique and indicate a good on-road performance for the PN-PEMS. PN-to-soot ratios were 1.3·1012 #/mg, which was comparable for both test cell and on-road measurements. During on-road trips different driving styles as well as different road types were investigated. Comparisons to the world harmonized light-duty test cycle (WLTC) 5.3 and to European field operational test (euroFOT) data indicate the PEMS trips to be representative for normal driving. Driving situations in varying traffic seem to be a major contributor to a high test-to-test variability of PN emissions. However, there is a trend to increasing PN emissions with more severe driving styles. A cold start effect is clearly visible for PN, especially at low ambient temperatures down to 8 °C.

  2. A generalized Damköhler number for classifying material processing in hydrological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, C. E.; Farrow, D. E.; Peiffer, S.

    2013-03-01

    Assessing the potential for transfer of pollutants and nutrients across catchments is of primary importance under changing land use and climate. Over the past decade the connectivity/disconnectivity dynamic of a catchment has been related to its potential to export material; however, we continue to use multiple definitions of connectivity, and most have focused strongly on physical (hydrological or hydraulic) connectivity. In contrast, this paper constantly focuses on the dynamic balance between transport and material transformation, and defines material connectivity as the effective transfer of material between elements of the hydrological cycle. The concept of exposure timescales is developed and used to define three distinct regimes: (i) which is hydrologically connected and transport is dominated by advection; (ii) which is hydrologically connected and transport is dominated by diffusion; and (iii) which is materially isolated. The ratio of exposure timescales to material processing timescales is presented as the non-dimensional number, NE, where NE is reaction-specific and allows estimation of relevant spatial scales over which the reactions of interest take place. Case studies within each regime provide examples of how NE can be used to characterise systems according to their sensitivity to shifts in hydrology and gain insight into the biogeochemical processes that are signficant under the specified conditions. Finally, we explore the implications of the NE framework for improved water management, and for our understanding of biodiversity, resilience and chemical competitiveness under specified conditions.

  3. Mobile lidar system for measurement of water vapor mixing ratio and ozone number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Vapor Lidar was modified and extended to make differential absorption measurements of ozone. Water vapor measurements make use of a weak molecular scattering process known as Raman scattering. It is characterized by a shift in wavelength of the scattered beam of light relative to the incident one. Some of the energy of the incident photon is converted to vibrational or rotational energy within the molecule leaving the scattered photon shifted to a slightly longer wavelength. When performing water vapor measurements, profiles are acquired of water vapor mixing ratio from near the ground to beyond 7 km every 2 minutes. By forming a color composite image of the individual profiles, the spatial and temporal evolution of water vapor is visible with vertical resolution of 75 to 150m and temporal resolution of 2 minutes. The ozone lidar is intended for use as a cross calibration facility for other stationary ozone lidar systems. The ozone measurement employs the technique known as differential absorption. The backscattered laser radiation from two different wavelengths is measured. Successful measurements of 308 nm returns were made from 80 km with an averaging period of 6 hours. Using these data and a standard atmosphere density curve, an ozone number density profile was made which agrees very well with the standard ozone curve between 20 and 40 km.

  4. Dot Display Affects Approximate Number System Acuity and Relationships with Mathematical Achievement and Inhibitory Control

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Jade Eloise; Castronovo, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Much research has investigated the relationship between the Approximate Number System (ANS) and mathematical achievement, with continued debate surrounding the existence of such a link. The use of different stimulus displays may account for discrepancies in the findings. Indeed, closer scrutiny of the literature suggests that studies supporting a link between ANS acuity and mathematical achievement in adults have mostly measured the ANS using spatially intermixed displays (e.g. of blue and yellow dots), whereas those failing to replicate a link have primarily used spatially separated dot displays. The current study directly compared ANS acuity when using intermixed or separate dots, investigating how such methodological variation mediated the relationship between ANS acuity and mathematical achievement. ANS acuity was poorer and less reliable when measured with intermixed displays, with performance during both conditions related to inhibitory control. Crucially, mathematical achievement was significantly related to ANS accuracy difference (accuracy on congruent trials minus accuracy on incongruent trials) when measured with intermixed displays, but not with separate displays. The findings indicate that methodological variation affects ANS acuity outcomes, as well as the apparent relationship between the ANS and mathematical achievement. Moreover, the current study highlights the problem of low reliabilities of ANS measures. Further research is required to construct ANS measures with improved reliability, and to understand which processes may be responsible for the increased likelihood of finding a correlation between the ANS and mathematical achievement when using intermixed displays. PMID:27195749

  5. Changing the precision of preschoolers' approximate number system representations changes their symbolic math performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinjing Jenny; Odic, Darko; Halberda, Justin; Feigenson, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    From early in life, humans have access to an approximate number system (ANS) that supports an intuitive sense of numerical quantity. Previous work in both children and adults suggests that individual differences in the precision of ANS representations correlate with symbolic math performance. However, this work has been almost entirely correlational in nature. Here we tested for a causal link between ANS precision and symbolic math performance by asking whether a temporary modulation of ANS precision changes symbolic math performance. First, we replicated a recent finding that 5-year-old children make more precise ANS discriminations when starting with easier trials and gradually progressing to harder ones, compared with the reverse. Next, we show that this brief modulation of ANS precision influenced children's performance on a subsequent symbolic math task but not a vocabulary task. In a supplemental experiment, we present evidence that children who performed ANS discriminations in a random trial order showed intermediate performance on both the ANS task and the symbolic math task, compared with children who made ordered discriminations. Thus, our results point to a specific causal link from the ANS to symbolic math performance. PMID:27061668

  6. In How Many Ways is the Approximate Number System Associated with Exact Calculation?

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro-Chagas, Pedro; Wood, Guilherme; Knops, André; Krinzinger, Helga; Lonnemann, Jan; Starling-Alves, Isabella; Willmes, Klaus; Haase, Vitor Geraldi

    2014-01-01

    The approximate number system (ANS) has been consistently found to be associated with math achievement. However, little is known about the interactions between the different instantiations of the ANS and in how many ways they are related to exact calculation. In a cross-sectional design, we investigated the relationship between three measures of ANS acuity (non-symbolic comparison, non-symbolic estimation and non-symbolic addition), their cross-sectional trajectories and specific contributions to exact calculation. Children with mathematical difficulties (MD) and typically achieving (TA) controls attending the first six years of formal schooling participated in the study. The MD group exhibited impairments in multiple instantiations of the ANS compared to their TA peers. The ANS acuity measured by all three tasks positively correlated with age in TA children, while no correlation was found between non-symbolic comparison and age in the MD group. The measures of ANS acuity significantly correlated with each other, reflecting at least in part a common numerosity code. Crucially, we found that non-symbolic estimation partially and non-symbolic addition fully mediated the effects of non-symbolic comparison in exact calculation. PMID:25409446

  7. The nonlinear relations of the approximate number system and mathematical language to early mathematics development.

    PubMed

    Purpura, David J; Logan, Jessica A R

    2015-12-01

    Both mathematical language and the approximate number system (ANS) have been identified as strong predictors of early mathematics performance. Yet, these relations may be different depending on a child's developmental level. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between these domains across different levels of ability. Participants included 114 children who were assessed in the fall and spring of preschool on a battery of academic and cognitive tasks. Children were 3.12 to 5.26 years old (M = 4.18, SD = .58) and 53.6% were girls. Both mixed-effect and quantile regressions were conducted. The mixed-effect regressions indicated that mathematical language, but not the ANS, nor other cognitive domains, predicted mathematics performance. However, the quantile regression analyses revealed a more nuanced relation among domains. Specifically, it was found that mathematical language and the ANS predicted mathematical performance at different points on the ability continuum. These dual nonlinear relations indicate that different mechanisms may enhance mathematical acquisition dependent on children's developmental abilities. PMID:26436871

  8. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deme, S.; Apathy, I.; Hejja, I.; Lang, E.; Feher, I.

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET.

  9. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system.

    PubMed

    Deme, S; Apathy, I; Hejja, I; Lang, E; Feher, I

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET. PMID:11542227

  10. Regulatory T Cell Responses to High-Dose Methylprednisolone in Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Chader, Driss; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Haroche, Julien; Fadlallah, Jehane; Claër, Laetitia; Musset, Lucile; Gorochov, Guy; Amoura, Zahir; Miyara, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Background/Purpose A slight increase in the proportion of circulating regulatory T (Treg) cells has been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients taking oral prednisone. The effects of intravenous (IV) high dose methylprednisolone (MP) on Tregs have not yet been described, especially in active SLE. Methods We prospectively analyzed the proportion of circulating CD4+ Treg cell subsets defined as follows: (1) naïve Treg (nTreg) FoxP3lowCD45RA+ cells; (2) effector Treg (eTreg) FoxP3highCD45RA− cells; and (3) non-suppressive FoxP3lowCD45RA− cells (non-regulatory Foxp3low T cells). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with active SLE were analyzed before the first infusion of IV high dose MP (day 0) and the following days (day 1, day 2, ±day 3 and ±day 8). The activity of SLE was assessed by the SLEDAI score. Results Seventeen patients were included. Following MP infusions, the median (range) percentage of eTregs significantly increased from 1.62% (0.53–8.43) at day 0 to 2.80% (0.83–14.60) at day 1 (p = 0.003 versus day 0), 4.64% (0.50–12.40) at day 2 (p = 0.06 versus day 1) and 7.50% (1.02–20.70) at day 3 (p = 0.008 versus day 2), and declined to baseline values at day 8. Expanding eTreg cells were actively proliferating, as they expressed Ki-67. The frequency of non-regulatory FoxP3low T cells decreased from 6.39% (3.20–17.70) at day 0 to 4.74% (1.03–9.72) at day 2 (p = 0.005); nTreg frequency did not change. All patients clinically improved immediately after MP pulses. The absence of flare after one year of follow up was associated with a higher frequency of eTregs at day 2. Conclusion IV high dose MP induces a rapid, dramatic and transient increase in circulating regulatory T cells. This increase may participate in the preventive effect of MP on subsequent flares in SLE. PMID:26629828

  11. Evaluation of the MIM Symphony treatment planning system for low-dose-rate- prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhanesar, Sandeep K; Lim, Tze Y; Du, Weiliang; Bruno, Teresa L; Frank, Steven J; Kudchadker, Rajat J

    2015-01-01

    MIM Symphony is a recently introduced low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS). We evaluated the dosimetric and planning accuracy of this new TPS compared to the universally used VariSeed TPS. For dosimetric evaluation of the MIM Symphony version 5.4 TPS, we compared dose calculations from the MIM Symphony TPS with the formalism recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 report (TG-43) and those generated by the VariSeed version 8.0 TPS for iodine-125 (I-125; Models 6711 and IAI-125A), palladium-103 (Pd-103; Model 200), and cesium-131 (Cs-131; Model Cs-1). Validation was performed for both line source and point source approximations. As part of the treatment planning validation, first a QA phantom (CIRS Brachytherapy QA Phantom Model 045 SN#D7210-3) containing three ellipsoid objects with certified volumes was scanned in order to check the volume accuracy of the contoured structures in MIM Symphony. Then the DICOM data containing 100 patient plans from the VariSeed TPS were imported into the MIM Symphony TPS. The 100 plans included 25 each of I-125 pre-implant plans, Pd-103 pre-implant plans, I-125 Day 30 plans (i.e., from 1 month after implantation), and Pd-103 Day 30 plans. The dosimetric parameters (including prostate volume, prostate D90 values, and rectum V100 values) of the 100 plans were calculated independently on the two TPSs. Other TPS tests that were done included verification of source input and geometrical accuracy, data transfer between different planning systems, text printout, 2D dose plots, DVH printout, and template grid accuracy. According to the line source formalism, the dosimetric results between the MIM Symphony TPS and TG-43 were within 0.5% (0.02 Gy) for r > 1 cm. In the line source approximation validation, MIM Symphony TPS values agreed with VariSeed TPS values to within 0.5% (0.09 Gy) for r > 1 cm. Similarly, in point source approximation validation, the MIM Symphony values

  12. Numerical study of a quasi-hydrodynamic system of equations for flow computation at small mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashov, V. A.; Savenkov, E. B.

    2015-10-01

    The applicability of numerical algorithms based on a quasi-hydrodynamic system of equations for computing viscous heat-conducting compressible gas flows at Mach numbers M = 10-2-10-1 is studied numerically. The numerical algorithm is briefly described, and the results obtained for a number of two- and three-dimensional test problems are presented and compared with earlier numerical data.

  13. Evaluation of a lithium formate EPR dosimetry system for dose measurements around {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Antonovic, Laura; Gustafsson, Haakan; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2009-06-15

    A dosimetry system using lithium formate monohydrate (HCO{sub 2}Li{center_dot}H{sub 2}O) as detector material and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for readout has been used to measure absorbed dose distributions around clinical {sup 192}Ir sources. Cylindrical tablets with diameter of 4.5 mm, height of 4.8 mm, and density of 1.26 g/cm{sup 3} were manufactured. Homogeneity test and calibration of the dosimeters were performed in a 6 MV photon beam. {sup 192}Ir irradiations were performed in a PMMA phantom using two different source models, the GammaMed Plus HDR and the microSelectron PDR-v1 model. Measured absorbed doses to water in the PMMA phantom were converted to the corresponding absorbed doses to water in water phantoms of dimensions used by the treatment planning systems (TPSs) using correction factors explicitly derived for this experiment. Experimentally determined absorbed doses agreed with the absorbed doses to water calculated by the TPS to within {+-}2.9%. Relative standard uncertainties in the experimentally determined absorbed doses were estimated to be within the range of 1.7%-1.3% depending on the radial distance from the source, the type of source (HDR or PDR), and the particular absorbed doses used. This work shows that a lithium formate dosimetry system is well suited for measurements of absorbed dose to water around clinical HDR and PDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Being less energy dependent than the commonly used thermoluminescent lithium fluoride (LiF) dosimeters, lithium formate monohydrate dosimeters are well suited to measure absorbed doses in situations where the energy dependence cannot easily be accounted for such as in multiple-source irradiations to verify treatment plans. Their wide dynamic range and linear dose response over the dose interval of 0.2-1000 Gy make them suitable for measurements on sources of the strengths used in clinical applications. The dosimeter size needs, however, to be reduced for application to

  14. Feasibility study of patient-specific quality assurance system for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Boram; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyeyoung; Han, Youngyih; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Dong Wook; Sim, Jina; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of establishing a quality-assurance (QA) system for brachytherapy that can ensure patient-specific QA by enhancing dosimetric accuracy for the patient's therapy plan. To measure the point-absorbed dose and the 2D dose distribution for the patient's therapy plan, we fabricated a solid phantom that allowed for the insertion of an applicator for patient-specific QA and used an ion chamber and a film as measuring devices. The patient treatment plan was exported to the QA dose-calculation software, which calculated the time weight of dwell position stored in the plan DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) file to obtain an overall beam quality correction factor, and that correction was applied to the dose calculations. Experiments were conducted after importing the patient's treatment planning source data for the fabricated phantom and inserting the applicator, ion chamber, and film into the phantom. On completion of dose delivery, the doses to the ion chamber and film were checked against the corresponding treatment plan to evaluate the dosimetric accuracy. For experimental purposes, five treatment plans were randomly selected. The beam quality correction factors for ovoid and tandem brachytherapy applicators were found to be 1.15 and 1.10 - 1.12, respectively. The beam quality correction factor in tandem fluctuated by approximately 2%, depending on the changes in the dwell position. The doses measured by using the ion chamber showed differences ranging from -2.4% to 0.6%, compared to the planned doses. As for the film, the passing rate was 90% or higher when assessed using a gamma value of the local dose difference of 3% and a distance to agreement of 3 mm. The results show that the self-fabricated phantom was suitable for QA in clinical settings. The proposed patient-specific QA for the treatment planning is expected to contribute to reduce dosimetric errors in brachytherapy and, thus, to enhancing treatment

  15. Analysis of Dose at the Site of Second Tumor Formation After Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Thomas J.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Swanson, Erika L.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Second tumors are an uncommon complication of multimodality treatment of childhood cancer. The present analysis attempted to correlate the dose received as a component of primary treatment and the site of the eventual development of a second tumor. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 16 patients who had received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a second tumor. We compared the historical fields and port films of the primary treatment with the modern imaging of the second tumor locations. We classified the location of the second tumors as follows: in the boost field; marginal to the boost field, but in a whole-brain field; in a whole-brain field; marginal to the whole brain/primary treatment field; and distant to the field. We divided the dose received into 3 broad categories: high dose (>45 Gy), moderate dose (20-36 Gy), and low dose (<20 Gy). Results: The most common location of the second tumor was in the whole brain field (57%) and in the moderate-dose range (81%). Conclusions: Our data contradict previous publications that suggested that most second tumors develop in tissues that receive a low radiation dose. Almost all the second tumors in our series occurred in tissue within a target volume in the cranium that had received a moderate dose (20-36 Gy). These findings suggest that a major decrease in the brain volume that receives a moderate radiation dose is the only way to substantially decrease the second tumor rate after central nervous system radiotherapy.

  16. Equivalent Lung Dose and Systemic Exposure of Budesonide/Formoterol Combination via Easyhaler and Turbuhaler

    PubMed Central

    Sairanen, Ulla; Haikarainen, Jussi; Korhonen, Jani; Vahteristo, Mikko; Fuhr, Rainard; Kirjavainen, Merja

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Easyhaler® device-metered dry powder inhaler containing budesonide and formoterol fumarate dihydrate (hereafter formoterol) for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been developed. The current approvals of the product in Europe were based on several pharmacokinetic (PK) bioequivalence (BE) studies, and in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) modeling. Methods: Four PK studies were performed to compare the lung deposition and total systemic exposure of budesonide and formoterol after administration of budesonide/formoterol Easyhaler and the reference product, Symbicort Turbuhaler. The products were administered concomitantly with oral charcoal (lung deposition) and in two of the studies also without charcoal (total systemic exposure). Demonstration of BE for lung deposition (surrogate marker for efficacy) and non-inferiority for systemic exposure (surrogate marker for safety) were considered a proof of therapeutic equivalence. In addition, IVIVC models were constructed to predict study outcomes with different reference product fine particle doses (FPDs). Results: In the first pivotal study, the exposure and lung dose via Easyhaler were higher compared to the reference product (mean comparison estimates between 1.07 and 1.28) as the FPDs of the reference product batch were low. In the following studies, reference product batches with higher FPDs were utilized. In the second pivotal study, non-inferiority of Easyhaler compared to Turbuhaler was shown in safety and BE in efficacy for all other parameters except the formoterol AUCt. In the fourth study where two reference batches were compared to each other and Easyhaler, budesonide/formoterol Easyhaler was bioequivalent with one reference batch but not with the other having the highest FPDs amongst the 28 reference batches studied. In the IVIVC based study outcome predictions, the test product was bioequivalent with great proportion of the reference batches. For the

  17. Dose-volume delivery guided proton therapy using beam on-line PET system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2006-11-15

    Proton therapy is one form of radiotherapy in which the irradiation can be concentrated on a tumor using a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair annihilation gamma rays from positron emitter nuclei generated by the target nuclear fragment reaction of irradiated proton nuclei and nuclei in the irradiation target using a positron emission tomography (PET) apparatus, and dose-volume delivery guided proton therapy (DGPT) can thereby be achieved using PET images. In the proton treatment room, a beam ON-LINE PET system (BOLPs) was constructed so that a PET apparatus of the planar-type with a high spatial resolution of about 2 mm was mounted with the field of view covering the isocenter of the beam irradiation system. The position and intensity of activity were measured using the BOLPs immediately after the proton irradiation of a gelatinous water target containing {sup 16}O nuclei at different proton irradiation energy levels. The change of the activity-distribution range against the change of the physical range was observed within 2 mm. The experiments of proton irradiation to a rabbit and the imaging of the activity were performed. In addition, the proton beam energy used to irradiate the rabbit was changed. When the beam condition was changed, the difference between the two images acquired from the measurement of the BOLPs was confirmed to clearly identify the proton-irradiated volume.

  18. Investigation of a MOSFET dosimetry system for midpoint dose verification in prostate 3D CRT/IMRT.

    PubMed

    Wiese, T; Bezak, E; Nelligan, R

    2008-09-01

    The suitability of MOSFETs (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors) for use in in-vivo dosimetry for IMRT prostate treatment and patient setup errors has been investigated in this work. MOSFETs were placed on entrance and exit surfaces of a number of different phantoms (with varying complexities from homogeneous to anthropomorphic). Dose measurements were then used to calculate a midpoint dose, which was compared with an IC placed at the isocentre. The agreements found between the calculated (MOSFETs) and the measured midpoint dose (IC) was: 0.7% for a prostate treatment verification and 3.5% for an IMRT treatment. MOSFETs placed on entry and exit surfaces can detect patient setup offsets of 2 cm, but do not have the sensitivity to confidently detect offsets of 1 cm or smaller. PMID:18946975

  19. 77 FR 65898 - Agency Information Collection Activities: InfoPass System, No Form Number; Extension, Without...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... Number 1615-0113 in the subject box. Comments may also be submitted via the Federal eRulemaking Portal Web site at http://www.Regulations.gov under e-Docket ID number USCIS-2009-0024. All submissions... or material, all submissions will be posted, without change, to the Federal eRulemaking Portal...

  20. Mass versus molar doses, similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, A; Lamparczyk, H

    2008-11-01

    Generally, they are two systems expressing the amounts of active substance in a given drug product, i.e. mass and molar dose. Currently, the dose system based on the mass is widely used in which doses are expressed in grams or milligrams. On the other hand, the molar dose system is in direct relation to the number of molecules. Hence, the objective of this work was to compare both systems in order to find their advantages and disadvantages. Active substances belonging to the groups of antibiotics, nootropic agents, beta-blockers, vitamins, GABA-analog, COX-2 inhibitors, calcium channel antagonists, benzodiazepine receptor agonists, lipid-modifying agents (fibrates), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (profens), estrogens, neuroleptics, analgesics and benzodiazepines were considered. Moreover, products containing two active substances were also taken into account. These are mixtures of hydrochlorothiazide with active substances influencing the renin-angiotensin system and combined oral contraceptives. For each active substance, belonging to the groups mentioned above molar doses were calculated from mass doses and molar mass. Hence, groups of drugs with a single active substance, drugs with similar pharmacological activities, pharmaceutical alternatives, and drugs with a single active ingredient manufactured in different doses were compared in order to find which dose system describes more adequately differences between and within the groups mentioned above. Comparisons were supported by a number of equations, which theoretically justify the data, and relationships derived from calculations. PMID:19069248

  1. Active Control of Flow Separation on a High-Lift System with Slotted Flap at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khodadoust, Abdollah; Washburn, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) airfoil was tested at NASA Langley's Low- Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) to assess the effectiveness of distributed Active Flow Control (AFC) concepts on a high-lift system at flight scale Reynolds numbers for a medium-sized transport. The test results indicate presence of strong Reynolds number effects on the high-lift system with the AFC operational, implying the importance of flight-scale testing for implementation of such systems during design of future flight vehicles with AFC. This paper describes the wind tunnel test results obtained at the LTPT for the EET high-lift system for various AFC concepts examined on this airfoil.

  2. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-04-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with αr = 0.764 Gy-1 and β = 0.0615 Gy-2 as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  3. A Multilayer Secure Biomedical Data Management System for Remotely Managing a Very Large Number of Diverse Personal Healthcare Devices

    PubMed Central

    Park, KeeHyun; Lim, SeungHyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a multilayer secure biomedical data management system for managing a very large number of diverse personal health devices is proposed. The system has the following characteristics: the system supports international standard communication protocols to achieve interoperability. The system is integrated in the sense that both a PHD communication system and a remote PHD management system work together as a single system. Finally, the system proposed in this paper provides user/message authentication processes to securely transmit biomedical data measured by PHDs based on the concept of a biomedical signature. Some experiments, including the stress test, have been conducted to show that the system proposed/constructed in this study performs very well even when a very large number of PHDs are used. For a stress test, up to 1,200 threads are made to represent the same number of PHD agents. The loss ratio of the ISO/IEEE 11073 messages in the normal system is as high as 14% when 1,200 PHD agents are connected. On the other hand, no message loss occurs in the multilayered system proposed in this study, which demonstrates the superiority of the multilayered system to the normal system with regard to heavy traffic. PMID:26247034

  4. Dosimetry in radiotherapy using a-Si EPIDs: Systems, methods, and applications focusing on 3D patient dose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2013-06-01

    An overview is provided of the use of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for dosimetric purposes in radiation therapy, focusing on 3D patient dose estimation. EPIDs were originally developed to provide on-treatment radiological imaging to assist with patient setup, but there has also been a natural interest in using them as dosimeters since they use the megavoltage therapy beam to form images. The current generation of clinically available EPID technology, amorphous-silicon (a-Si) flat panel imagers, possess many characteristics that make them much better suited to dosimetric applications than earlier EPID technologies. Features such as linearity with dose/dose rate, high spatial resolution, realtime capability, minimal optical glare, and digital operation combine with the convenience of a compact, retractable detector system directly mounted on the linear accelerator to provide a system that is well-suited to dosimetric applications. This review will discuss clinically available a-Si EPID systems, highlighting dosimetric characteristics and remaining limitations. Methods for using EPIDs in dosimetry applications will be discussed. Dosimetric applications using a-Si EPIDs to estimate three-dimensional dose in the patient during treatment will be overviewed. Clinics throughout the world are implementing increasingly complex treatments such as dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy, as well as specialized treatment techniques using large doses per fraction and short treatment courses (ie. hypofractionation and stereotactic radiosurgery). These factors drive the continued strong interest in using EPIDs as dosimeters for patient treatment verification.

  5. Florfenicol residues in rainbow trout after oral dosing in recirculating and flow-through culture systems.

    PubMed

    Meinertz, J R; Hess, K R; Bernardy, J A; Gaikowski, M P; Whitsel, M; Endris, R G

    2014-12-01

    Aquaflor is a feed premix for fish containing the broad spectrum antibacterial agent florfenicol (FFC) incorporated at a ratio of 50% (w/w). To enhance the effectiveness of FFC for salmonids infected with certain isolates of Flavobacterium psychrophilum causing cold water disease, the FFC dose must be increased from the standard 10 mg·kg⁻¹ body weight (BW)·d⁻¹ for 10 consecutive days. A residue depletion study was conducted to determine whether FFC residues remaining in the fillet tissue after treating fish at an increased dose would be safe for human consumption. Groups of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (total n = 144; weight range, 126-617 g) were treated with FFC at 20 mg·kg⁻¹ BW·d⁻¹ for 10 d in a flow-through system (FTS) and a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) each with a water temperature of ∼13°C. The two-tank RAS included a nontreated tank containing 77 fish. Fish were taken from each tank (treated tank, n = 16; nontreated tank, n = 8) at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 120, 240, 360, and 480 h posttreatment. Florfenicol amine (FFA) concentrations (the FFC marker residue) in skin-on fillets from treated fish were greatest at 12 h posttreatment (11.58 μg/g) in the RAS and were greatest at 6 h posttreatment (11.09 μg/g) in the FTS. The half-lives for FFA in skin-on fillets from the RAS and FTS were 20.3 and 19.7 h, respectively. Assimilation of FFC residues in the fillets of nontreated fish sharing the RAS with FFC-treated fish was minimal. Florfenicol water concentrations peaked in the RAS-treated tank and nontreated tanks at 10 h (453 μg/L) and 11 h (442 μg/L) posttreatment, respectively. Monitoring of nitrite concentrations throughout the study indicated the nitrogen oxidation efficiency of the RAS biofilter was minimally impacted by the FFC treatment. PMID:25321636

  6. Florfenicol residues in Rainbow Trout after oral dosing in recirculating and flow-through culture systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Hess, Karina R.; Bernady, Jeffry A.; Gaikowski, M. P.; Whitsel, Melissa; Endris, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaflor is a feed premix for fish containing the broad spectrum antibacterial agent florfenicol (FFC) incorporated at a ratio of 50% (w/w). To enhance the effectiveness of FFC for salmonids infected with certain isolates of Flavobacterium psychrophilum causing coldwater disease, the FFC dose must be increased from the standard 10 mg·kg−1 body weight (BW)·d−1 for 10 consecutive days. A residue depletion study was conducted to determine whether FFC residues remaining in the fillet tissue after treating fish at an increased dose would be safe for human consumption. Groups of Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (total n = 144; weight range, 126–617 g) were treated with FFC at 20 mg·kg−1 BW·d−1 for 10 d in a flow-through system (FTS) and a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) each with a water temperature of ∼13°C. The two-tank RAS included a nontreated tank containing 77 fish. Fish were taken from each tank (treated tank, n = 16; nontreated tank, n = 8) at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 120, 240, 360, and 480 h posttreatment. Florfenicol amine (FFA) concentrations (the FFC marker residue) in skin-on fillets from treated fish were greatest at 12 h posttreatment (11.58 μg/g) in the RAS and were greatest at 6 h posttreatment (11.09 μg/g) in the FTS. The half-lives for FFA in skin-on fillets from the RAS and FTS were 20.3 and 19.7 h, respectively. Assimilation of FFC residues in the fillets of nontreated fish sharing the RAS with FFC-treated fish was minimal. Florfenicol water concentrations peaked in the RAS-treated tank and nontreated tanks at 10 h (453 μg/L) and 11 h (442 μg/L) posttreatment, respectively. Monitoring of nitrite concentrations throughout the study indicated the nitrogen oxidation efficiency of the RAS biofilter was minimally impacted by the FFC treatment.

  7. Techniques for Computing the DFT Using the Residue Fermat Number Systems and VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Chang, J. J.; Hsu, I. S.; Pei, D. Y.; Reed, I. S.

    1985-01-01

    The integer complex multiplier and adder over the direct sum of two copies of a finite field is specialized to the direct sum of the rings of integers modulo Fermat numbers. Such multiplications and additions can be used in the implementation of a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of a sequence of complex numbers. The advantage of the present approach is that the number of multiplications needed for the DFT can be reduced substantially over the previous approach. The architectural designs using this approach are regular, simple, expandable and, therefore, naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  8. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2008-02-01

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

  9. Safety of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Tufan, Fatih; Kamali, Sevil; Erer, Burak; Gul, Ahmet; Inanc, Murat; Ocal, Lale; Konice, Meral; Aral, Orhan

    2007-11-01

    It is reported that the usage of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (HD-IVIG) in systemic autoimmune diseases is associated with various adverse events in a wide range of severity. We aimed to investigate the frequency and profile of adverse events in a group of patients with diffuse connective tissue diseases and Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) who were administrated HD-IVIG for different indications. We recorded the data of 38 patients (25 females and 13 males) aged 38 +/- 15 (12-75) years who were followed up with the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune diseases between 1994 and 2006 according to a predefined protocol. Patients with active disease were treated with HD-IVIG and standard immunosuppressives concomitantly. We evaluated the occurrence of allergy, acute renal failure, thromboembolic events, neutropenia, hemolytic anemia, aseptic meningitis, and vasculitis during infusion therapy of HD-IVIG and in the following 3 weeks. We commenced a total of 130 infusions of HD-IVIG. Patients were administrated 1-12 (3.4 +/- 2.6) infusions of HD-IVIG as needed. Indications for HD-IVIG were unresponsiveness or partial response to standard treatment, severe infections along with disease activity, and severe thrombocytopenia in the preoperative period in 97, 23, and 5% of patients, respectively. Minor adverse events were seen in two patients during HD-IVIG infusions. One patient with WG developed rapidly progressive renal failure during severe disease flare between HD-IVIG infusions. Another patient with WG developed recurrence of deep-vein thrombosis during severe disease flare 3 months after HD-IVIG. Both events were attributed to severe disease activity. Adverse events like allergy, acute renal failure, thromboembolic events, hematological problems, aseptic meningitis, and vasculitis are reported in different frequencies (1-81%) in patients who were administered HD-IVIG for systemic autoimmune diseases. HD-IVIG is considered a safe treatment in selected patients

  10. Mean glandular dose coefficients (D(g)N) for x-ray spectra used in contemporary breast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Nosratieh, Anita; Hernandez, Andrew; Shen, Sam Z; Yaffe, Martin J; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2015-09-21

    To develop tables of normalized glandular dose coefficients D(g)N for a range of anode-filter combinations and tube voltages used in contemporary breast imaging systems. Previously published mono-energetic D(g)N values were used with various spectra to mathematically compute D(g)N coefficients. The tungsten anode spectra from TASMICS were used; molybdenum and rhodium anode-spectra were generated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The spectra were filtered with various thicknesses of Al, Rh, Mo or Cu. An initial half value layer (HVL) calculation was made using the anode and filter material. A range of the HVL values was produced with the addition of small thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a surrogate for the breast compression paddle, to produce a range of HVL values at each tube voltage. Using a spectral weighting method, D(g)N coefficients for the generated spectra were calculated for breast glandular densities of 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50% and 100% for a range of compressed breast thicknesses from 3 to 8 cm. Eleven tables of normalized glandular dose (D(g)N) coefficients were produced for the following anode/filter combinations: W + 50 μm Ag, W + 500 μm Al, W + 700 μm Al, W + 200 μm Cu, W + 300 μm Cu, W + 50 μm Rh, Mo + 400 μm Cu, Mo + 30 μm Mo, Mo + 25 μm Rh, Rh + 400 μm Cu and Rh + 25 μm Rh. Where possible, these results were compared to previously published D(g)N values and were found to be on average less than 2% different than previously reported values.Over 200 pages of D(g)N coefficients were computed for modeled x-ray system spectra that are used in a number of new breast imaging applications. The reported values were found to be in excellent agreement when compared to published values. PMID:26348995

  11. Techniques for computing the discrete Fourier transform using the quadratic residue Fermat number systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, T. K.; Chang, J. J.; Hsu, I. S.; Pei, D. Y.; Reed, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    The complex integer multiplier and adder over the direct sum of two copies of finite field developed by Cozzens and Finkelstein (1985) is specialized to the direct sum of the rings of integers modulo Fermat numbers. Such multiplication over the rings of integers modulo Fermat numbers can be performed by means of two integer multiplications, whereas the complex integer multiplication requires three integer multiplications. Such multiplications and additions can be used in the implementation of a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of a sequence of complex numbers. The advantage of the present approach is that the number of multiplications needed to compute a systolic array of the DFT can be reduced substantially. The architectural designs using this approach are regular, simple, expandable and, therefore, naturally suitable for VLSI implementation.

  12. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

    SciTech Connect

    Balmain, Allan; Song, Ihn Young

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  13. SU-E-J-122: The CBCT Dose Calculation Using a Patient Specific CBCT Number to Mass Density Conversion Curve Based On a Novel Image Registration and Organ Mapping Method in Head-And-Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J; Lasio, G; Chen, S; Zhang, B; Langen, K; Prado, K; D’Souza, W; Yi, B; Huang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a CBCT HU correction method using a patient specific HU to mass density conversion curve based on a novel image registration and organ mapping method for head-and-neck radiation therapy. Methods: There are three steps to generate a patient specific CBCT HU to mass density conversion curve. First, we developed a novel robust image registration method based on sparseness analysis to register the planning CT (PCT) and the CBCT. Second, a novel organ mapping method was developed to transfer the organs at risk (OAR) contours from the PCT to the CBCT and corresponding mean HU values of each OAR were measured in both the PCT and CBCT volumes. Third, a set of PCT and CBCT HU to mass density conversion curves were created based on the mean HU values of OARs and the corresponding mass density of the OAR in the PCT. Then, we compared our proposed conversion curve with the traditional Catphan phantom based CBCT HU to mass density calibration curve. Both curves were input into the treatment planning system (TPS) for dose calculation. Last, the PTV and OAR doses, DVH and dose distributions of CBCT plans are compared to the original treatment plan. Results: One head-and-neck cases which contained a pair of PCT and CBCT was used. The dose differences between the PCT and CBCT plans using the proposed method are −1.33% for the mean PTV, 0.06% for PTV D95%, and −0.56% for the left neck. The dose differences between plans of PCT and CBCT corrected using the CATPhan based method are −4.39% for mean PTV, 4.07% for PTV D95%, and −2.01% for the left neck. Conclusion: The proposed CBCT HU correction method achieves better agreement with the original treatment plan compared to the traditional CATPhan based calibration method.

  14. Comparison of the dose distribution obtained from dosimetric systems with intensity modulated radiotherapy planning system in the treatment of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökçe, M.; Uslu, D. Koçyiǧit; Ertunç, C.; Karalı, T.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) plan of prostate cancer patients with different dose verification systems in dosimetric aspects and to compare these systems with each other in terms of reliability, applicability and application time. Dosimetric control processes of IMRT plan of three prostate cancer patients were carried out using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), ion chamber (IC) and 2D Array detector systems. The difference between the dose values obtained from the dosimetric systems and treatment planning system (TPS) were found to be about % 5. For the measured (TLD) and calculated (TPS) doses %3 percentage differences were obtained for the points close to center while percentage differences increased at the field edges. It was found that TLD and IC measurements will increase the precision and reliability of the results of 2D Array.

  15. Isothermal calorimetry: a predictive tool to model drug-propellant interactions in pressurized metered dose systems.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Jesslynn; Gaisford, Simon; Boyd, Ben J; Young, Paul M; Traini, Daniela

    2014-01-30

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate gas perfusion isothermal calorimetry (ITC) as a method to characterize the physicochemical changes of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) intended to be formulated in pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) after exposure to a model propellant. Spray dried samples of beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) and salbutamol sulphate (SS) were exposed to controlled quantities of 2H,3H-decafluoropentane (HPFP) to determine whether ITC could be used as a suitable analytical method for gathering data on the behavioural properties of the powders in real time. The crystallization kinetics of BDP and the physiochemical properties of SS were successfully characterized using ITC and supported by a variety of other analytical techniques. Correlations between real and model propellant systems were also established using hydrofluoroalkane (HFA-227) propellant. In summary, ITC was found to be suitable for gathering data on the crystallization kinetics of BDP and SS. In a wider context, this work will have implications on the use of ITC for stability testing of APIs in HFA-based pMDIs. PMID:24325938

  16. Importance of Dose Settings in the X-Ray Systems Used for Interventional Radiology: A National Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Vano, E. Sanchez, R.; Fernandez, J. M.; Rosales, F.; Garcia, M. A.; Sotil, J.; Hernandez, J.; Carrera, F.; Ciudad, J.; Soler, M. M.; Ballester, T.

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the differences in dose settings among the X-ray units involved in a national survey of patient doses in interventional radiology (IR). The survey was promoted by the National Society of IR and involved 10 centers. As part of the agreed quality control for the survey, entrance doses were measured in a 20-cm-thick acrylic phantom simulating a medium-sized patient. A standard digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging protocol for the abdomen was used at the different centers. The center of the phantom was placed at the isocenter of the C-arm system during the measurements to simulate clinical conditions. Units with image intensifiers and flat detectors were involved in the survey. Entrance doses for low, medium, and high fluoroscopy modes and DSA acquisitions were measured for a field of view of 20 cm (or closest). A widespread range of entrance dose values was obtained: 4.5-18.6, 9.2-28.4, and 15.4-51.5 mGy/min in low, medium, and high fluoroscopy mode, respectively, and 0.7-5.0 mGy/DSA image. The ratios between the maximum and the minimum values measured (3-4 for fluoroscopy and 7 for DSA) suggest an important margin for optimization. The calibration factor for the dose-area product meter was also included in the survey and resulted in a mean value of 0.73, with a standard deviation of 0.07. It seems clear that the dose setting for the X-ray systems used in IR requires better criteria and approaches.

  17. Primary central nervous system lymphoma treated with high-dose methotrexate and rituximab: A single-institution experience

    PubMed Central

    LY, K. INA; CREW, LAURA L.; GRAHAM, CARRIE A.; MRUGALA, MACIEJ M.

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX) improves the outcome in patients with systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but its benefit in primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is unclear. In the present study, a single-institution retrospective analysis was performed for 12 patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL treated with combined high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) and RTX. MTX was administered biweekly at 8 g/m2/dose until a complete response (CR) was achieved or for a maximum of eight doses. RTX was provided for a total of eight weekly doses at 375 mg/m2/dose. Following a median of 11 cycles of MTX, the radiographic overall response rate was 91% and the CR rate was 58%. A CR was achieved after a median 6 cycles of MTX. The median progression-free survival time was 22 months and the median overall survival time has not yet been attained. These results compare favorably to single-agent HD-MTX and suggest a role for immunochemotherapy in the treatment of PCNSL. PMID:27123138

  18. Optimized computational method for determining the beta dose distribution using a multiple-element thermoluminescent dosimeter system

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, L.; Levine, S.H.; Catchen, G.L.

    1987-07-01

    This paper describes an optimization method for determining the beta dose distribution in tissue, and it describes the associated testing and verification. The method uses electron transport theory and optimization techniques to analyze the responses of a three-element thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) system. Specifically, the method determines the effective beta energy distribution incident on the dosimeter system, and thus the system performs as a beta spectrometer. Electron transport theory provides the mathematical model for performing the optimization calculation. In this calculation, parameters are determined that produce calculated doses for each of the chip/absorber components in the three-element TLD system. The resulting optimized parameters describe an effective incident beta distribution. This method can be used to determine the beta dose specifically at 7 mg X cm-2 or at any depth of interest. The doses at 7 mg X cm-2 in tissue determined by this method are compared to those experimentally determined using an extrapolation chamber. For a great variety of pure beta sources having different incident beta energy distributions, good agreement is found. The results are also compared to those produced by a commonly used empirical algorithm. Although the optimization method produces somewhat better results, the advantage of the optimization method is that its performance is not sensitive to the specific method of calibration.

  19. Systemic Low-Dose UVB Inhibits CD8 T Cells and Skin Inflammation by Alternative and Novel Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sabita; Rogers, Linda Joanne; Halliday, Gary Mark

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to UVB radiation before antigen delivery at an unirradiated site inhibits functional immunological responses. Mice treated dorsally with suberythemal low-dose UVB and immunized with ova in abdominal skin generated ova-specific CD8 T cells with a significantly decreased activation, expansion, and cytotoxic activity compared with unirradiated mice. UVB also impaired the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction to ova. Transfer of CD4+CD25+ cells from UVB-exposed mice did not suppress the ova-specific CD8 T-cell response or DTH reaction in unexposed mice, confirming that systemic low-dose UVB does not induce long-lived functional regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells. Repairing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer–type DNA damage and blocking aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling also did not reverse the immunosuppressive effect of UVB on ova-specific CD8 T cells and DTH, suggesting that cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor are not required in systemic low-dose UVB-induced immunosuppression. The known UVB chromophore, cis-urocanic acid, and reactive oxygen species triggered the inhibition of DTH caused by UVB, but they were not involved in the modulation of CD8 T cells. These findings indicate that systemic low-dose UVB impedes the primary response of antigen-specific CD8 T cells by a novel mechanism that is independent of pathways known to be involved in systemic suppression of DTH. PMID:21641400

  20. On magic numbers for super- and ultraheavy systems and hypothetical spherical double-magic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Ellithi, A. Y.; Adel, A.; Anwer, Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Based on the calculations of the shell and the residual pairing correction energies in the framework of Strutinsky's approach, we evaluated the proton and neutron magic numbers in the range 72 ≤ Z ≤ 282 and 96 ≤ N ≤ 540. New magic numbers and new islands of stability lie in a range defined by Green's formula and the two-neutrons drip lines are presented. Our calculations reproduced known spherical double-magic nuclei and present evidences on new spherical double-magic nuclei in super- and ultraheavy regions.

  1. Immunology by numbers: quantitation of antigen presentation completes the quantitative milieu of systems immunology!

    PubMed

    Purcell, Anthony W; Croft, Nathan P; Tscharke, David C

    2016-06-01

    We review approaches to quantitate antigen presentation using a variety of biological and biochemical readouts and highlight the emerging role of mass spectrometry (MS) in defining and quantifying MHC-bound peptides presented at the cell surface. The combination of high mass accuracy in the determination of the molecular weight of the intact peptide of interest and its signature pattern of fragmentation during tandem MS provide an unambiguous and definitive identification. This is in contrast to the potential receptor cross-reactivity towards closely related peptides and variable dose responsiveness seen in biological readouts. In addition, we gaze into the not too distant future where big data approaches in MS can be accommodated to quantify whole immunopeptidomes both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27060633

  2. Integration by parts identities in integer numbers of dimensions. A criterion for decoupling systems of differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Integration by parts identities (IBPs) can be used to express large numbers of apparently different d-dimensional Feynman Integrals in terms of a small subset of so-called master integrals (MIs). Using the IBPs one can moreover show that the MIs fulfil linear systems of coupled differential equations in the external invariants. With the increase in number of loops and external legs, one is left in general with an increasing number of MIs and consequently also with an increasing number of coupled differential equations, which can turn out to be very difficult to solve. In this paper we show how studying the IBPs in fixed integer numbers of dimension d = n with n ∈ N one can extract the information useful to determine a new basis of MIs, whose differential equations decouple as d → n and can therefore be more easily solved as Laurent expansion in (d - n).

  3. A mm-Scale Dosimetry System Based on Optically Stimulated Luminescence of Beryllium Oxide for Investigation of Dose Rate Profiles in Constricted Environments - 12219

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Marian; Jahn, Axel; Sommer, Dora; Henniger, Juergen; Praetorius, Reiner M.

    2012-07-01

    The dismantling of the former German fuel reprocessing research center Wiederaufbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe requires extensive investigations of contamination and dose rate inside of the shielded areas. Particularly for first the exploration of radiation field existing thermo-element pipes may offer access to the tanks and to other interesting points without the risk of contamination. Because of their small dimension, almost no active dosimetry systems are able to measure inside the pipes. New mm-scale luminescence dosimeters in combination with a packing and transport technique are presented. The dosimeters could measure doses from 0.1 mGy up to more than 100 Gy. Hence, over the possible exposure time durations, dose rates from μGyh{sup -1} up to 1000 Gyh{sup -1} are ascertainable. For potential users the system opens the opportunity for investigation of dose rates inside of shielding and in contaminated environments. Particularly in constricted environments the technique is a unique solution for dose and dose rate measurement tasks. Within the linear dose range up to several ten Gy, the uncertainty of the results is less than 5%. 100 Gy-doses can be specified within 20%, with individual high dose calibration of the detectors even better. For WAK and other potential users the system offers the opportunity to investigate dose rates inside of shieldings and in contaminated environments. Particularly in constricted environments the technique is an unique solution for dose and dose rate measurements. (authors)

  4. Deterministic replica-exchange method without pseudo random numbers for simulations of complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urano, Ryo; Okamoto, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    We propose a replica-exchange method (REM) which does not use pseudo random numbers. For this purpose, we first give a conditional probability for Gibbs sampling replica-exchange method (GSREM) based on the heat bath method. In GSREM, replica exchange is performed by conditional probability based on the weight of states using pseudo random numbers. From the conditional probability, we propose a new method called deterministic replica-exchange method (DETREM) that produces thermal equilibrium distribution based on a differential equation instead of using pseudo random numbers. This method satisfies the detailed balance condition using a conditional probability of Gibbs heat bath method and thus results can reproduce the Boltzmann distribution within the condition of the probability. We confirmed that the equivalent results were obtained by REM and DETREM with two-dimensional Ising model. DETREM can avoid problems of choice of seeds in pseudo random numbers for parallel computing of REM and gives analytic method for REM using a differential equation.

  5. Supplementary and Enrichment Series: The Complex Number System. Teachers' Commentary. SP-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Karl, Ed.

    This is one in a series of manuals for teachers using SMSG high school supplementary materials. The pamphlet includes commentaries on the sections of the student's booklet, answers to the exercises, and sample test questions. Topics covered include complex numbers, operations, standard form, equations, graphs and conjugates. (MP)

  6. 78 FR 5477 - Agency Information Collection Activities: InfoPass System, No Form Number; Extension, Without...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... information collection notice was previously published in the Federal Register on October 31, 2012, at 77 FR...Rulemaking Portal Web site at http://www.regulations.gov under e-Docket ID number USCIS-2009-0024 or via... Portal at www.regulations.gov , and will include any personal information you provide....

  7. Functional requirements for the Automated Transportation Management System: TTP number: RL 439002

    SciTech Connect

    Portsmouth, J.H.

    1992-12-31

    This requirements analysis, documents Department of Energy (DOE) transportation management procedures for the purpose of providing a clear and mutual understanding between users and designers of the proposed Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS). It is imperative that one understand precisely how DOE currently performs traffic management tasks; only then can an integrated system be proposed that successfully satisfies the major requirements of transportation managers and other system users. Accordingly, this report describes the current workings of DOE transportation organizations and then proposes a new system which represents a synthesis of procedures (both current and desired) which forms the basis for further systems development activities.

  8. Have DRG-based prospective payment systems influenced the number of secondary diagnoses in health care administrative data?

    PubMed

    Serdén, Lisbeth; Lindqvist, Rikard; Rosén, Måns

    2003-08-01

    Diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) are secondary patient classification systems based on primary classified medical data, in which single events of care are grouped into larger, economically and medically consistent groups. The main primary classified medical data are diagnoses and surgery codes. In Sweden, the number of secondary diagnoses per case increased during the 1990s. In the early 1990s some county councils introduced DRG systems. The present study investigated whether the introduction of such systems had influenced the number of secondary diagnoses. The nation-wide Hospital Discharge Register from 1988 to 2000 was used for the analyses. All regional hospitals were included, giving a database of 5,355,000 discharges. The hospitals were divided into those that had introduced prospective payment systems during the study period and those that had not. Among all regional hospitals, there was an increase in the number of coded secondary diagnoses, but also in the number of secondary diagnoses per case. Hospitals with prospective payment systems had a larger increase, starting after the system was introduced. Regional hospitals without prospect payment systems had a more constant increase, starting later and coinciding with the introduction of their DRG-based management systems. It is concluded that introduction of DRG-based systems, irrespective of use, focuses on recording diagnoses and therefore increases the number of diagnoses. Other reasons may also have contributed to the increase. It was found that the changes in the speciality mix, during the study period, have impact on the increase of secondary diagnoses. PMID:12849909

  9. EXPERIENCES IN DEVELOPING A NATIONAL DOSE REGISTER IN FINLAND AND MERGING IT WITH THE OVERALL SUPERVISORY DATA SYSTEM.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, M; Alén, R; Kiuru, A

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, a new national Dose Register has been under development in Finland. This article presents this work, the challenges in the project, the features of the new register and experiences in using it. There were several motivations for creating a new register. The technical implementation of the existing Dose Register needed to be reformed, and there was also a need to improve electronic communication and access to the recorded data. The development was challenging and took more time and effort than expected. Despite the challenges, the new system works quite reliably and enables the use of the registered data to more easily improve radiation safety. PMID:27179121

  10. A new VLSI complex integer multiplier which uses a quadratic-polynomial residue system with Fermat numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyu, H. C.; Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.; Hsu, I. S.; Chang, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    A quadratic-polynomial Fermat residue number system (QFNS) has been used to compute complex integer multiplications. The advantage of such a QFNS is that a complex integer multiplication requires only two integer multiplications. In this article, a new type Fermat number multiplier is developed which eliminates the initialization condition of the previous method. It is shown that the new complex multiplier can be implemented on a single VLSI chip. Such a chip is designed and fabricated in CMOS-Pw technology.

  11. The importance of pharmacist surveillance in a unit dose drug distribution system.

    PubMed

    Jarosinski, P F

    1978-09-01

    A study was conducted at a Public Health Service Hospital to determine if the pharmacist could provide important services to patient care while simultaneously performing the repetitious acts involved in unit dose drug distribution. During two five-week periods, the pharmacist actively questioned requests by the nursing staff for additional doses of medication to determine why these additional doses were needed. Also, during these periods the pharmacy actively questioned all doses returned in the dose medication carts which, according to doctor's orders, should have been administered to the patient. Results of these studies included the detection of some potentially dangerous deviations from accepted medication administration times (i.e., "twice" a day order given only four hours apart) as well as other problems, such as missed orders, medication "borrowing" which sometimes magnified errors, and underdosing. The conclusions from the studies are that the pharmacist can provide essential services while simultaneously performing the repetitious tasks of filling, checking, and exchanging unit dose medication cassettes. PMID:10238815

  12. SU-E-T-162: Evaluation of Dose Calculation of RayStation Planning System in Heterogeneous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H; Yi, B; Chung, H; Prado, K; Chen, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical reliability of heterogeneity-based dose algorithm using RayStation treatment planning system v.4.0. Methods: The collapsed cone dose calculations in RayStation (RaySearch, Sweden) were compared with the measurements (ion chamber and EBT2 film) and with an in-house Monte Carlo algorithm. A heterogeneous multi-layer phantom and CT images of 4 lung cancer patients were used here. The phantom, composed of multiple solid water slabs and Styrofoams, was irradiated with 6MV beams perpendicular to the layers. The MLC-defined field sizes were 5×5, 10×10, 15×15 and 20×20cm{sup 2}. The chamber was positioned at center of central solid water layer, and the films were placed at interfaces of solid water and Styrofoam. The RayStation dose and Monte Carlo dose were compared by performing absolute gamma analysis (3mm/3%): 1D gamma for PDD in the phantom and 3D gamma for patient volumes receiving dose above 10% of maximum dose. Results: The point dose differences between RayStation and ion chamber measurement were smaller than 1% for all of the field sizes. Between RayStation and film measurement, 5×5cm2 field had the maximum differences : <4mm for the penumbra and <0.3mm for the field width at all Styrofoam-and-solid-water interfaces. The absolute gamma analysis showed good agreement between RayStation and Monte Carlo. For PDD along beam axis in the phantom, the 1D gamma was 95.4, 98.6, 99.6 and 99.3% for field size 5×5, 10×10, 15×15 and 20×202 respectively. For dose comparison using patient CT images, 3D gamma was > 95% for all the patients. Conclusion: With respect to ion chamber/film measurement and Monte Carlo calculation, the collapsed cone algorithm in RayStation computed reasonable dose in both phantom and patient cases. Heterogeneity-based dose calculation of RayStation is clinically acceptable in heterogeneous media.

  13. Development of a phantom to validate high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment planning systems with heterogeneous algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, Eduardo S.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C. M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: This work presents the development of a phantom to verify the treatment planning system (TPS) algorithms used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. It is designed to measure the relative dose in a heterogeneous media. The experimental details used, simulation methods, and comparisons with a commercial TPS are also provided. Methods: To simulate heterogeneous conditions, four materials were used: Virtual Water™ (VM), BR50/50™, cork, and aluminum. The materials were arranged in 11 heterogeneity configurations. Three dosimeters were used to measure the relative response from a HDR {sup 192}Ir source: TLD-100™, Gafchromic{sup ®} EBT3 film, and an Exradin™ A1SL ionization chamber. To compare the results from the experimental measurements, the various configurations were modeled in the PENELOPE/penEasy Monte Carlo code. Images of each setup geometry were acquired from a CT scanner and imported into BrachyVision™ TPS software, which includes a grid-based Boltzmann solver Acuros™. The results of the measurements performed in the heterogeneous setups were normalized to the dose values measured in the homogeneous Virtual Water™ setup and the respective differences due to the heterogeneities were considered. Additionally, dose values calculated based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine-Task Group 43 formalism were compared to dose values calculated with the Acuros™ algorithm in the phantom. Calculated doses were compared at the same points, where measurements have been performed. Results: Differences in the relative response as high as 11.5% were found from the homogeneous setup when the heterogeneous materials were inserted into the experimental phantom. The aluminum and cork materials produced larger differences than the plastic materials, with the BR50/50™ material producing results similar to the Virtual Water™ results. Our experimental methods agree with the PENELOPE/penEasy simulations for most setups and dosimeters. The

  14. Biplane interventional pediatric system with cone-beam CT: dose and image quality characterization for the default protocols.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, Eva; Vañó, Eliseo; Alejo, Luis; Ubeda, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Larraya, Federico; Garayoa, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess image quality and radiation dose of a biplane angiographic system with cone-beam CT (CBCT) capability tuned for pediatric cardiac procedures. The results of this study can be used to explore dose reduction techniques. For pulsed fluoroscopy and cine modes, polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of various thicknesses and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were employed. Various fields of view (FOV) were selected. For CBCT, the study employed head and body dose phantoms, Catphan 504, and an anthropomorphic cardiology phantom. The study also compared two 3D rotational angiography protocols. The entrance surface air kerma per frame increases by a factor of 3-12 when comparing cine and fluoroscopy frames. The biggest difference in the signal-to- noise ratio between fluoroscopy and cine modes occurs at FOV 32 cm because fluoroscopy is acquired at a 1440 × 1440 pixel matrix size and in unbinned mode, whereas cine is acquired at 720 × 720 pixels and in binned mode. The high-contrast spatial resolution of cine is better than that of fluoroscopy, except for FOV 32 cm, because fluoroscopy mode with 32 cm FOV is unbinned. Acquiring CBCT series with a 16 cm head phantom using the standard dose protocol results in a threefold dose increase compared with the low-dose protocol. Although the amount of noise present in the images acquired with the low-dose protocol is much higher than that obtained with the standard mode, the images present better spatial resolution. A 1 mm diameter rod with 250 Hounsfield units can be distinguished in reconstructed images with an 8 mm slice width. Pediatric-specific protocols provide lower doses while maintaining sufficient image quality. The system offers a novel 3D imaging mode. The acquisition of CBCT images results in increased doses administered to the patients, but also provides further diagnostic information contained in the volumetric images. The assessed CBCT protocols provide images that are noisy, but with

  15. SU-E-T-219: Investigation of IMRT Out-Of-Field Dose Calculation Accuracy for a Commercial Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Inaccuracies in out-of-field calculations could lead to underestimation of dose to organs-at-risk. This study evaluates the dose calculation accuracy of a model-based calculation algorithm at points outside the primary treatment field for an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan using experimental measurements. Methods: The treatment planning system investigated is Varian Eclipse V.10 with Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA). The IMRT fields investigated are from real patient treatment plans. The doses from a dynamic (DMLC) IMRT brain plan were calculated and compared with measured doses at locations outside the primary treatment fields. Measurements were performed with a MatriXX system (2-D chamber array) placed in solid water. All fields were set vertically incident on the phantom and were 9 cm × 6 cm or smaller. The dose was normalized to the central axis for points up to 15 cm off isocenter. The comparisons were performed at depths of 2, 10, 15, and 20 cm Results: The measurements have shown that AAA calculations underestimate doses at points outside the primary treatment field. The underestimation occurs at 2 cm depth and decreases down to a factor of 2 as depth increases to 20 cm. In low dose (<2% of target dose) regions outside the primary fields the local dose underestimations can be >200% compared to measured doses. Relative to the plan target dose, the measured doses to points outside the field were less than 1% at shallow depths and less than 2% at greater depths. Conclusion: Compared to measurements, the AAA algorithm underestimated the dose at points outside the treatment field with the greatest differences observed at shallow depths. Despite large local dose uncertainties predicted by the treatment planning system, the impact of these uncertainties is expected to be insignificant as doses at these points were less than 1-2% of the prescribed treatment dose.

  16. A Comparative Study of Information-Based Source Number Estimation Methods and Experimental Validations on Mechanical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Zhousuo; Cao, Hongrui; He, Zhengjia; Zhu, Guanwen

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates one eigenvalue decomposition-based source number estimation method, and three information-based source number estimation methods, namely the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), Minimum Description Length (MDL) and Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC), and improves BIC as Improved BIC (IBIC) to make it more efficient and easier for calculation. The performances of the abovementioned source number estimation methods are studied comparatively with numerical case studies, which contain a linear superposition case and a both linear superposition and nonlinear modulation mixing case. A test bed with three sound sources is constructed to test the performances of these methods on mechanical systems, and source separation is carried out to validate the effectiveness of the experimental studies. This work can benefit model order selection, complexity analysis of a system, and applications of source separation to mechanical systems for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis purposes. PMID:24776935

  17. The Chinese number naming system and its impact on the arithmetic performance of pre-schoolers in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Sharon Sui Ngan

    2012-06-01

    Asian children, including Chinese children, perform better than their English-speaking peers in cross-national mathematics studies. This superior Asian performance is attributed to several factors including cultural beliefs, educational systems and practices, and the Chinese number naming system. Given the limited empirical evidence on pre-school mathematics learning in Chinese societies, the outcomes of Western studies are often borrowed and adopted in curriculum planning in Asian schools. The study reported in this paper investigated the performance of Hong Kong Chinese pre-school children based on Western studies involving English-speaking children, and examined the relationship between the Chinese number naming system and children's performance in number and operation concepts. Data were collected from 299 pre-school children aged between 3 and 5 years. The learning sequence of the children in mastering number and operation concepts was established using the Rasch Model. This study provides empirical evidence for the feasibility of borrowing lists of mathematics concepts from studies of English-speaking children to serve as a reference for school-based curriculum planning in a Chinese-speaking context. However, it is not enough to establish the relationship between children's performance and the Chinese number naming system. Classroom instruction and cultural beliefs in mathematics learning are also important in explaining children's performance.

  18. Two Cases of Refractory Thrombocytopenia in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus that Responded to Intravenous Low-Dose Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Jin; Kang, Mi-il; Kang, Yoon; Chung, Soo-jin; Park, Yong-Beom; Lee, Soo-Kon

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of thrombocytopenia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered in cases of current bleeding, severe bruising, or a platelet count below 50,000/µL. Corticosteroid is the first choice of medication for inducing remission, and immunosuppressive agents can be added when thrombocytopenia is refractory to corticosteroid or recurs despite it. We presented two SLE patients with thrombocytopenia who successfully induced remission after intravenous administration of low-dose cyclophosphamide (CYC) (500 mg fixed dose, biweekly for 3 months), followed by azathioprine (AZA) or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Both patients developed severe thrombocytopenia in SLE that did not respond to pulsed methylprednisolone therapy, and started the intravenous low-dose CYC therapy. In case 1, the platelet count increased to 50,000/µL after the first CYC infusion, and remission was maintained with low dose prednisolone and AZA. The case 2 achieved remission after three cycles of CYC, and the remission continued with low dose prednisolone and MMF. PMID:23487584

  19. Precision, high dose radiotherapy. II. Helium ion treatment of tumors adjacent to critical central nervous system structures

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.M.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Castro, J.R.; Collier, J.M.; Gauger, G.; Gutin, P.; Phillips, T.L.; Pitluck, S.; Walton, R.E.

    1985-07-01

    In this paper, the authors present a technique for treating relatively small, low grade tumors located very close to critical, radiation sensitive central nervous system structures such as the spinal cord and the brain stem. A beam of helium ions is used to irradiate the tumor. The nearby normal tissues are protected by exploiting the superb dose localization properties of this beam, particularly its well defined and controllable range in tissue, the increased dose deposited near the end of this range (i.e., the Bragg peak), the sharp decrease in dose beyond the Bragg peak, and the sharp penumbra of the beam. To illustrate the technique, the authors present a group of 19 patients treated for chordomas, meningiomas and low grade chondrosarcomas in the base of the skull or spinal column. They have been able to deliver high, uniform doses to the target volumes, while keeping the doses to the nearby critical tissues below the threshold for radiation damage. Follow-up on this group of patients is short, averaging 22 months (2 to 75 months). Currently, 15 patients have local control of their tumor. Two major complications, a spinal cord transsection and optic tract damage, are discussed in detail. Their treatment policies have been modified to minimize the risk of these complications in the future, and they are continuing to use this method to treat such patients.

  20. Proton therapy dose distribution comparison between Monte Carlo and a treatment planning system for pediatric patients with ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Yingcui; Beltran, Chris; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Compare dose distributions for pediatric patients with ependymoma calculated using a Monte Carlo (MC) system and a clinical treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: Plans from ten pediatric patients with ependymoma treated using double scatter proton therapy were exported from the TPS and calculated in our MC system. A field by field comparison of the distal edge (80% and 20%), distal fall off (80% to 20%), field width (50% to 50%), and penumbra (80% to 20%) were examined. In addition, the target dose for the full plan was compared. Results: For the 32 fields from the 10 patients, the average differences of distal edge at 80% and 20% on central axis between MC and TPS are -1.9 {+-} 1.7 mm (p < 0.001) and -0.6 {+-} 2.3 mm (p= 0.13), respectively. Excluding the fields that ranged out in bone or an air cavity, the 80% difference was -0.9 {+-} 1.7 mm (p= 0.09). The negative value indicates that MC was on average shallower than TPS. The average difference of the 63 field widths of the 10 patients is -0.7 {+-} 1.0 mm (p < 0.001), negative indicating on average the MC had a smaller field width. On average, the difference in the penumbra was 2.3 {+-} 2.1 mm (p < 0.001). The average of the mean clinical target volume dose differences is -1.8% (p= 0.001), negative indicating a lower dose for MC. Conclusions: Overall, the MC system and TPS gave similar results for field width, the 20% distal edge, and the target coverage. For the 80% distal edge and lateral penumbra, there was slight disagreement; however, the difference was less than 2 mm and occurred primarily in highly heterogeneous areas. These differences highlight that the TPS dose calculation cannot be automatically regarded as correct.

  1. Neural Signatures of Number Processing in Human Infants: Evidence for Two Core Systems Underlying Numerical Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Daniel C.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral research suggests that two cognitive systems are at the foundations of numerical thinking: one for representing 1-3 objects in parallel and one for representing and comparing large, approximate numerical magnitudes. We tested for dissociable neural signatures of these systems in preverbal infants by recording event-related potentials…

  2. The Greek Elementary School System. Curriculum Bulletin Number Twenty-Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ress, Constantine

    The Greek elementary school system is described in this booklet, which was developed for those teaching Greek children who come directly from Greek elementary schools to Chicago public schools. The Greek school system is described as different from the Chicago one in both content and methods of instruction; thus, the purpose of this document is to…

  3. Using Student Tracking Systems Effectively. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 66.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy H., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This collection of essays discusses some of the general concerns and issues related to tracking the flow of community college students through higher education. The chapters in the volume include: (1) "Tracking Systems and Student Flow," by Trudy H. Bers; (2) "Beyond the College: State Policy Impact on Student Tracking Systems," by Ann Kieffer…

  4. Cryptographically secure hardware random number generator dedicated for distributed measurement and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Pawel

    The chaotic signal generator based on the theory of nonlinear dynamical systems for applications in cryptographically secure distributed measurement and control systems with asymmetric resources is presented. This system was implemented on the basis of the physical chaotic electronic vibration generator in which the resonant circuit is composed of two capacitors, two resistors, coil and transistor, called the Colpitts oscillator. The presented system was designed, programmed and thoroughly tested in the term of cryptographic security in our laboratory, what there is the most important part of this publication. True cryptographic security was tested based on the author's software and the software environment called RDieHarder. The obtained results will be here presented and analyzed in detail with particular reference to the specificity of distributed measurement and control systems with asymmetric resources.

  5. W-026 acceptance test report system integration equipment (SIE)(submittal {number_sign} 018.6.A)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-01-27

    Acceptance testing of the System Integration Equipment (SIE) at Hanford was performed in two stages. The first was inconclusive, and resulted in a number of findings. These finding. are summarized as part of this report. The second stage of testing addressed these findings, and performed full system testing per the approved test procedure. This report includes summaries of all testing, results and finding.. Although the SIE did not in some cases perform as required for plant operations, it did perform per the system specification. (These discrepancies were noted and are addressed elsewhere.) Following testing, the system was formaLLy accepted. Documentation of this acceptance is incLuded in this report.

  6. Closed out Tank 241-SY-101 DACS system change request {number_sign}1--100

    SciTech Connect

    Gauck, G.J.

    1995-03-07

    This report is a compilation of system change requests processed during the development of the Data Acquisition and Control System for the Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation project. Tank 241-SY-101 is on the Hydrogen Watch List. The disposition of the request, date the change was installed, date verified, and whether an Acceptance Test Procedure was required and completed are described for each request change.

  7. Gödel's arithmetization procedure as the basis for a pattern recognition system: a nascent theory mapping pattern into number and number into phenomenal experience.

    PubMed

    Brigner, W L

    1983-12-01

    Prime numbers are used to code various dimensions of an input matrix (receptor surface), i.e., prime numbers code the position of each cell in the matrix, the position of each column and row constituted by the cells of the matrix, and the orientation of each such column or row. The coding permits any pattern or stimulus configuration to be changed into a single, unique number, viz., the serial product of the prime numbers which code the relevant dimensions of the pattern. Storage of a pattern is effected by storage of the serial product. By factoring the serial product, the pattern or stimulus configuration is analyzed into the dimensions (features) specified by the code. The factorization is also utilized in abstracting a schema, in approximating a feature count model, and in presenting a strategy for holistic vs sequential pattern processing. Finally, the relationship between the serial product representing a pattern and the phenomenal experience of a pattern is explored. PMID:6664792

  8. Modulation of photodynamic activity with Photofrin: effect of dose, time interval, fluence, and delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbo, Greta M.; Ballard, Jonathan R.; Harrison, Linda T.; Kik, Peter K.; Wieman, T. J.; Fingar, Victor H.

    2005-04-01

    A goal of our laboratory is to accurately define the parameters of light dose and drug dose that contribute to tissue destruction after Photodynamic therapy (PDT). Using Photofrin as sensitizer, we examined a range of drug doses, various intervals between injection and light treatment, and various fluence rates. The effect of Photofrin photosensitizer encapsulated in liposomal delivery vehicle was also studied. Three liposome delivery vehicles were chosen to deliver the photosensitizer in vivo: DPPC/cholesterol, DMPC/HPC and stealth liposomes. Tumor response and microvessel behaviour were examined in tumor and surrounding skin in a mouse model. Under these conditions, better selectivity of tissue damage was seen using some of the treatment. These data might be used to design better clinical protocols for patient care. In memory of Dr. Victor Fingar (Supported by R01 CA51771).

  9. On the Number of Invariant Cones and Existence of Periodic Orbits in 3-dim Discontinuous Piecewise Linear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Song-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Song

    For a family of discontinuous 3-dim homogeneous piecewise linear dynamical systems with two zones, we investigate the number of invariant cones and the existence of periodic orbits as a spatial relationship between the invariant manifolds of the subsystem changes. By studying the number of real roots of a quadratic equation induced by slopes of half straight lines starting from the origin in required domain, we obtain complete results on the number and stability of invariant cones. Especially, we prove that the maximum number of invariant cones is two, and obtain complete parameter regions on which there exist one or two invariant cones, on which one or two fake cones (corresponding to real roots of the quadratic equation that are not in the required domain) appear and on which an invariant cone will be foliated by periodic orbits.

  10. Agro-climatic classification systems for estimating the global distribution of livestock numbers and commodities.

    PubMed

    White, D H; Lubulwa, G A; Menz, K; Zuo, H; Wint, W; Slingenbergh, J

    2001-09-01

    Investment in agricultural research in developing countries is being increasingly targeted at those agro-climatic zones and issues where the economic and environmental benefits may be expected to be greatest. This first requires that the zones themselves be defined, along with information on domestic livestock numbers and commodity output within agro-climatic zones in different countries. Different methods for classifying agro-climatic zones were compared. These included methods based on estimated length of growing period (LGP) using rainfall and temperature data, the ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration (PET), and on more detailed agronomic models, remote sensing data and land use information. Zonation based on LGP has already been linked to existing national livestock data. By defining agro-climatic zones and relating concentrations of livestock populations to those of humans, it is possible to make realistic estimates of livestock populations and the production of livestock commodities for most developing countries. Detailed agro-climatic analyses of Mainland East Asia and Sri Lanka have recently been undertaken using the GROWEST agronomic model. Using this model as the basis of agro-climatic classification appears to be significantly superior, particularly in temperate environments, to approaches based solely on LGP. Different ways of subdividing countries and continents into agro-climatic or agro-ecological zones (AEZs) are reviewed in this paper. In addition, we show how the numbers of production and commodities from domestic livestock can be allocated to such zones. We also indicate how some of this information can be applied. PMID:11697667

  11. Integrated Computer-Enhanced Remote Viewing System. Quarterly report number 4, July--October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-30

    The Interactive, Computer-Enhanced, Remote Viewing System (ICERVS) is a system designed to provide a reliable geometric description of a robotic task space in a fashion that enables robotic remediation to be carried out more efficiently and economically than with present systems. The key elements are a faithful way to store empirical data and a friendly user interface that provides an operator with timely access to all that is known about a scene. The development of ICERVS is to occur in three phases. Phase 1 will focus on the development of the Data Library, which contains the geometric data about the task space and the objects in it, and the Toolkit, which includes the mechanisms for manipulating and displaying both empirical and model data. Phase 2 will concentrate on integrating these subsystems with a sensor subsystem into one working system. Some additional functionality will be incorporated in the Data Library and Toolkit subsystems. Phase 3 will expand the configuration to meet the needs of a full scale demonstration of the interactive mapping of some waste site to be identified. The second Phase of the ICERVS project consists of nine tasks. Significant efforts were devoted to the completion of Task 1: Intermediate System Design, and Task 3: Computer Upgrade. This report describes progress in these two tasks.

  12. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  13. Preliminary analysis of WL experiment number 701: Space environment effects on operating fiber optic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, E. W.; Padden, R. J.; Berry, J. N.; Sanchez, A. D.; Chapman, S. P.

    1991-01-01

    A brief overview of the analysis performed on WL Experiment number 701 is presented, highlighting the successful operation of the first know active fiber optic links orbited in space. Four operating fiber optic links were exposed to the space environment for a period exceeding five years, situated aboard and external to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Despite the prolonged space exposure to radiation, wide temperature extremums, atomic oxygen interactions, and micrometeorite and debris impacts, the optical data links performed well within specification limits. Early Phillips Laboratory tests and analyses performed on the experiment and its recovered magnetic tape data strongly indicate that fiber optic application in space will have a high success rate.

  14. Self-localization of a small number of Bose particles in a superfluid Fermi system

    SciTech Connect

    Targonska, Katarzyna; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2010-09-15

    We consider self-localization of a small number of Bose particles immersed in a large homogeneous superfluid mixture of fermions in three- and one-dimensional space. Bosons distort the density of surrounding fermions and create a potential well where they can form a bound state analogous to a small polaron state. In the three-dimensional volume, we observe the self-localization for repulsive interactions between bosons and fermions. In the one-dimensional case, bosons self-localize as well for attractive interactions, thereby forming, together with a pair of fermions at the bottom of the Fermi sea, a vector soliton. We analyze also thermal effects and show that small nonzero temperature affects the pairing function of the Fermi subsystem and has little influence on the self-localization phenomena.

  15. Numbered Heads Together as a Tier 1 Instructional Strategy in Multitiered Systems of Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, William C.; Maheady, Lawrence; Jasper, Andrea D.; Williamson, Robert L.; Murley, Renee C.; Stratton, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Federal mandates (Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, 2004; No Child Left Behind Act, 2001) require teachers to accommodate students with more diverse academic and behavioral needs in inclusive general educational settings. To assist general educators in meeting this instructional challenge, multi-tiered systems of support…

  16. Alignment in Complex Education Systems: Achieving Balance and Coherence. OECD Education Working Papers, Number 64

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Janet W.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of OECD countries now implement one form or another of standards-based assessment and evaluation. The core logic of standards-based systems rests upon the alignment of three key elements: "standards" defining the knowledge and skills--or "competences"--students are expected to have attained at different stages of their education;…

  17. International Perspectives on Problems of Higher Education: Access, Systems, Youth and Employment. Conference Papers Number Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burn, Barbara B., Ed.

    Contents include papers on access to higher education (Barbara B. Burn, Klaus von Dohnanyi, Lois Rice, William W. Turnbull, Burton R. Clark, Ernest L. Boyer, and John W. Nason); systems of higher education (Ernest L. Boyer, Alain Bienamye, Lyman A. Glenny, Torsten Husen, Hans Leussink, Edward F. Sheffield, Francis X. Sutton, and John W. Nason);…

  18. W-026, acceptance test report fire alarm system (submittal number 1571.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, T.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-16

    This Acceptance Test Report was written by 3-D Protection Systems, Inc., and PCL Construction. WRAP I Facility Engineering, Solid Waste Fire Safety, Kaiser Acceptance Inspector and Hanford Fire Department personnel witnessed this test. All exceptions were resolved. The resolutions are attached. Contractor`s Material and Test Certificates are attached. Results from Solid Waste Industrial Hygiene sound level surveys are also included.

  19. Number and Operations, Part 1: Building a System of Tens Casebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schifter, Deborah; Bastable, Virginia; Russell, Susan Jo

    2016-01-01

    The "Building a System of Tens Casebook" was developed as the key resource for participants' Developing Mathematical Ideas seminar experience. The thirty cases, written by teachers describing real situations and actual student thinking in their classrooms, provide the basis of each session's investigation of specific mathematical…

  20. The Emerging System of Higher Education in Italy: Report of a Seminar. Conference Report Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burn, Barbara B.

    The report explores the inner life of the Italian university system and describes the results of increased student access to a university that remains essentially elitist. It highlights the tensions and constraints that have placed Italian higher education in a state of suspended animation between mass entry and elitist structures. It is predicted…