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Sample records for dot stimuli comparison

  1. Inhibition in Dot Comparison Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Sarah; Gilmore, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Dot comparison tasks are commonly used to index an individual's Approximate Number System (ANS) acuity, but the cognitive processes involved in completing these tasks are poorly understood. Here, we investigated how factors including numerosity ratio, set size and visual cues influence task performance. Forty-four children aged 7-9 years completed…

  2. A comparison of monopolar and bipolar electrical stimuli and thermal stimuli in determining the vitality of human teeth.

    PubMed

    Moody, A B; Browne, R M; Robinson, P P

    1989-01-01

    The sensory threshold was determined for 50 teeth in 31 patients using constant-current stimuli of 0.1, 1.0 and 10 ms duration at 10 Hz through both monopolar and bipolar electrodes. The teeth were also tested with a cold stimulus (ethyl chloride on cotton wool), then extracted, processed and examined by light microscopy. Histologically, 38 teeth were vital and 7 non-vital. The best prediction of vitality was from ethyl chloride (80% correct) or bipolar stimuli of 10 ms duration and up to 200 microA (73% correct). The remaining 5 teeth had vital radicular pulps and necrotic tissue coronally, but a comparison between the results of monopolar and bipolar stimulation did not permit the detection of this group. There was no correlation between the electrical threshold and presence of caries, restorations, pulp stones or diffuse pulpal mineralization. PMID:2624561

  3. Preparation and characterization of multi stimuli-responsive photoluminescent nanocomposites of graphene quantum dots with hyperbranched polyethylenimine derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing; Liu, Hua-Ji; Cheng, Fa; Chen, Yu

    2014-06-01

    Oxidized graphene sheets (OGS) were treated with a hyperbranched polyethylenimine (PEI) under hydrothermal conditions to generate nanocomposites of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) functionalized with PEI (GQD-PEIs). The influence of the reaction temperature and the PEI/OGS feed ratio on the photoluminescence properties of the GQD-PEIs was studied. The obtained GQD-PEIs were characterized by TEM, dynamic light scattering, elemental analysis, FTIR, zeta potential measurements and 1H NMR spectroscopy, from which their structural information was inferred. Subsequently, isobutyric amide (IBAm) groups were attached to the GQD-PEIs through the amidation reaction of isobutyric anhydride with the PEI moieties, which resulted in GQD-PEI-IBAm nanocomposites. GQD-PEI-IBAm was not only thermoresponsive, but also responded to other stimuli, including inorganic salts, pH, and loaded organic guests. The cloud point temperature (Tcp) of aqueous solutions of GQD-PEI-IBAm could be modulated through changing the number of IBAm units in GQD-PEI-IBAm, by varying the type and concentration of the inorganic salts and loaded organic guests, or by varying the pH. All the obtained GQD-PEI-IBAm nanocomposites were photoluminescent, and their maximum emission wavelengths were not influenced by outside stimuli. Their emission intensities were influenced a little or negligibly by pH, traditional salting-out anions (Cl- and SO42-), and the relatively polar aspirin guest. However, the traditional salting-in I- anion and the more hydrophobic 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) guest could effectively quench their fluorescence. 2D NOESY 1H NMR spectra verified that GQD-PEI-IBAm accommodated the relatively polar aspirin guest using the PEI-IBAm shell, but adsorbed the relatively hydrophobic PBA guest through the nanographene core. The release rate of the guest encapsulated by the thermoresponsive GQD is different below and above Tcp.Oxidized graphene sheets (OGS) were treated with a hyperbranched

  4. Modulation of perceived contrast in the brightness comparison of asynchronous stimuli.

    PubMed

    Claessens, Peter M E; Oliveira Pereira, Lucas; Baldo, Marcus Vinícius C

    2015-01-01

    Comparative judgment is a crucial task in ecological settings, as well as in many experimental studies about basic aspects of perceptual processes. It has long been known that sequential comparison is prone to order effects. This phenomenon has received little attention and has often been discounted as a type of response bias. In the present study, we investigated brightness discrimination of two brief (100 ms) spatially disjoint luminance stimuli. In the first and second experiments, stimuli were presented against a dark background with a stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) from 0 to 200 ms, in a paradigm controlling for response bias. In the third experiment, stimuli were presented against a bright background. We demonstrate that the time interval between stimuli modulates and even inverts their perceived brightness difference, enhancing the second stimulus relative to the first. When the background is brighter than the target stimuli, the sign of the effect is inverted, suggesting that the underlying mechanism operates on contrast rather than brightness. The magnitude of this effect is shown to depend on SOA and average luminance level of the target stimuli. Hypotheses in terms of neural and attentional dynamics are proposed. PMID:25236921

  5. Automatic Direction of Spatial Attention to Male Versus Female Stimuli: A Comparison of Heterosexual Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Robert J; Curl, Catriona; Jobbins, Katherine; Lavington, Chloe; Gray, Nicola S

    2016-05-01

    Abundant research has shown that men's sexual attractions are more category-specific in relation to gender than women's are. We tested whether the early automatic allocation of spatial attention reflects these sexual attractions. The dot-probe task was used to assess whether spatial attention was attracted to images of either male or female models that were naked or partially clothed. In Experiment 1, men were faster if the target appeared after the female stimulus, whereas women were equally quick to respond to targets after male or female stimuli. In Experiment 2, neutral cues were introduced. Men were again faster to female images in comparison to male or neutral images, but showed no bias on the male versus neutral test. Women were faster to both male and female pictures in comparison to neutral pictures. However, in this experiment they were also faster to female pictures than to male pictures. The results suggest that early attentional processes reveal category-specific interest to the preferred sexual category for heterosexual men, and suggest that heterosexual women do not have category-specific guidance of attentional mechanisms. The technique may have promise in measuring sexual interest in other situations where participants may not be able, or may not be willing, to report upon their sexual interests (e.g., assessment of paedophilic interest). PMID:26857378

  6. Sexual preference for child and aggressive stimuli: comparison of rapists and child molesters using auditory and visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Miner, M H; West, M A; Day, D M

    1995-06-01

    154 Ss were tested using penile plethysmography as part of intake into a voluntary inpatient sex offender treatment program. The testing protocol included slide stimuli of nude males and females in four age categories ranging from age 1 to adult; audiotaped descriptions of sexual activity with children of both genders which included fondling, sexual contact with no resistance, coercive sexual contact, sexual assault, nonsexual assault, and consensual sexual contact with an adult; videotaped depictions of rape of an adult woman, nonsexual assault of an adult woman and consensual sexual involvement with an adult woman, and audiotaped descriptions that paralleled the videotapes. The results indicated that child molesters (male victim) show a decidedly more offense related arousal profile than either child molesters (female victim) or rapists, and that the profiles of child molesters (female victim) and rapists are remarkably similar, although statistically significantly different from each other. Rapists respond significantly more to rape and nonsexual assault than either of the two child molester groups, with child molesters with female victims responding more than those with male victims. In all three groups, the highest level of noncoercive adult responding was to women, with differences among offense groups present for visual stimuli, but not in response to auditory stimuli. Overall, the patterns of results are similar whether they are based on composites across stimulus modality or on the individual stimuli. PMID:7598675

  7. A direct comparison of the taste of electrical and chemical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Stevens, David A; Baker, Diane; Cutroni, Elizabeth; Frey, Alexander; Pugh, David; Lawless, Harry T

    2008-06-01

    Three multidimensional scaling studies were conducted to compare the taste qualities evoked from electrical and chemical stimulation, including ferrous sulfate as a typical "metallic" taste stimulus. Bipolar, anodal, and cathodal stimulation were delivered by 1.5- or 3-V batteries applied to the tongue. Solutions of chemical stimuli including prototypical tastes and binary mixtures were evaporated on small metal disks to provide tactile impressions similar to those of the battery stimuli and avoid any potential response biases induced by the subjects' knowledge of the form of the stimulus. Multidimensional unfolding was performed to place stimuli and verbal descriptors in common perceptual spaces. Bipolar, anodal, and cathodal stimuli were tested in separate experiments but generated very similar perceptual spaces and were differentiated from the chemical stimuli. Electrical stimuli were associated with descriptors, such as metallic, copper penny, and iron nail, regardless of the polarity of stimulation. Taste qualities evoked by electric stimuli may not be fully described by commonly used taste stimuli or their binary mixtures and appear most adequately described by a unique metallic taste. PMID:18316314

  8. Comparison of quantum confinement effects between quantum wires and dots

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingbo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-03-30

    Dimensionality is an important factor to govern the electronic structures of semiconductor nanocrystals. The quantum confinement energies in one-dimensional quantum wires and zero-dimensional quantum dots are quite different. Using large-scale first-principles calculations, we systematically study the electronic structures of semiconductor (including group IV, III-V, and II-VI) surface-passivated quantum wires and dots. The band-gap energies of quantum wires and dots have the same scaling with diameter for a given material. The ratio of band-gap-increases between quantum wires and dots is material-dependent, and slightly deviates from 0.586 predicted by effective-mass approximation. Highly linear polarization of photoluminescence in quantum wires is found. The degree of polarization decreases with the increasing temperature and size.

  9. Comparison of EEG propagation speeds under emotional stimuli on smartphone between the different anxiety states

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Tetsuya; Muramatsu, Ayumi; Hayashi, Takuto; Urata, Tatsuya; Taya, Masato; Mizuno-Matsumoto, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of different anxiety states on information processing as measured by an electroencephalography (EEG) using emotional stimuli on a smartphone. Twenty-three healthy subjects were assessed for their anxiety states using The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and divided into two groups: low anxiety (I, II) or high anxiety (III and IV, V). An EEG was performed while the participant was presented with emotionally laden audiovisual stimuli (resting, pleasant, and unpleasant sessions) and emotionally laden sentence stimuli (pleasant sentence, unpleasant sentence sessions) and EEG data was analyzed using propagation speed analysis. The propagation speed of the low anxiety group at the medial coronal for resting stimuli for all time segments was higher than those of high anxiety group. The low anxiety group propagation speeds at the medial sagittal for unpleasant stimuli in the 0–30 and 60–150 s time frames were higher than those of high anxiety group. The propagation speeds at 150 s for all stimuli in the low anxiety group were significantly higher than the correspondent propagation speeds of the high anxiety group. These events suggest that neural information processes concerning emotional stimuli differ based on current anxiety state. PMID:25540618

  10. Comparison of EEG propagation speeds under emotional stimuli on smartphone between the different anxiety states.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Tetsuya; Muramatsu, Ayumi; Hayashi, Takuto; Urata, Tatsuya; Taya, Masato; Mizuno-Matsumoto, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of different anxiety states on information processing as measured by an electroencephalography (EEG) using emotional stimuli on a smartphone. Twenty-three healthy subjects were assessed for their anxiety states using The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and divided into two groups: low anxiety (I, II) or high anxiety (III and IV, V). An EEG was performed while the participant was presented with emotionally laden audiovisual stimuli (resting, pleasant, and unpleasant sessions) and emotionally laden sentence stimuli (pleasant sentence, unpleasant sentence sessions) and EEG data was analyzed using propagation speed analysis. The propagation speed of the low anxiety group at the medial coronal for resting stimuli for all time segments was higher than those of high anxiety group. The low anxiety group propagation speeds at the medial sagittal for unpleasant stimuli in the 0-30 and 60-150 s time frames were higher than those of high anxiety group. The propagation speeds at 150 s for all stimuli in the low anxiety group were significantly higher than the correspondent propagation speeds of the high anxiety group. These events suggest that neural information processes concerning emotional stimuli differ based on current anxiety state. PMID:25540618

  11. Auditory Evoked Potentials with Different Speech Stimuli: a Comparison and Standardization of Values

    PubMed Central

    Didoné, Dayane Domeneghini; Oppitz, Sheila Jacques; Folgearini, Jordana; Biaggio, Eliara Pinto Vieira; Garcia, Michele Vargas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potentials (LLAEP) with speech sounds has been the subject of research, as these stimuli would be ideal to check individualś detection and discrimination. Objective The objective of this study is to compare and describe the values of latency and amplitude of cortical potentials for speech stimuli in adults with normal hearing. Methods The sample population included 30 normal hearing individuals aged between 18 and 32 years old with ontological disease and auditory processing. All participants underwent LLAEP search using pairs of speech stimuli (/ba/ x /ga/, /ba/ x /da/, and /ba/ x /di/. The authors studied the LLAEP using binaural stimuli at an intensity of 75dBNPS. In total, they used 300 stimuli were used (∼60 rare and 240 frequent) to obtain the LLAEP. Individuals received guidance to count the rare stimuli. The authors analyzed latencies of potential P1, N1, P2, N2, and P300, as well as the ampleness of P300. Results The mean age of the group was approximately 23 years. The averages of cortical potentials vary according to different speech stimuli. The N2 latency was greater for /ba/ x /di/ and P300 latency was greater for /ba/ x /ga/. Considering the overall average amplitude, it ranged from 5.35 and 7.35uV for different speech stimuli. Conclusion It was possible to obtain the values of latency and amplitude for different speech stimuli. Furthermore, the N2 component showed higher latency with the / ba / x / di / stimulus and P300 for /ba/ x / ga /. PMID:27096012

  12. Comparison of Methods for Collecting and Modeling Dissimilarity Data: Applications to Complex Sound Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Bruno L.; Guastavino, Catherine; Murphy, Emma; Ogg, Mattson; Smith, Bennett K.; McAdams, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Sorting procedures are frequently adopted as an alternative to dissimilarity ratings to measure the dissimilarity of large sets of stimuli in a comparatively short time. However, systematic empirical research on the consequences of this experiment-design choice is lacking. We carried out a behavioral experiment to assess the extent to which…

  13. Tones and numbers: a combined EEG-MEG study on the effects of musical expertise in magnitude comparisons of audiovisual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Kuchenbuch, Anja; Herholz, Sibylle C; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Pantev, Christo

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the cortical responses underlying magnitude comparisons of multisensory stimuli and examined the effect that musical expertise has in this process. The comparative judgments were based on a newly learned rule binding the auditory and visual stimuli within the context of magnitude comparisons: "the higher the pitch of the tone, the larger the number presented." The cortical responses were measured by simultaneous MEG\\EEG recordings and a combined source analysis with individualized realistic head models was performed. Musical expertise effects were investigated by comparing musicians to non-musicians. Congruent audiovisual stimuli, corresponding to the newly learned rule, elicited activity in frontotemporal and occipital areas. In contrast, incongruent stimuli activated temporal and parietal regions. Musicians when compared with nonmusicians showed increased differences between congruent and incongruent stimuli in a prefrontal region, thereby indicating that music expertise may affect multisensory comparative judgments within a generalized representation of analog magnitude. PMID:24916460

  14. A comparison of neural responses to appetitive and aversive stimuli in humans and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Dave J; Duncan, Niall W; Xu, Jiameng; Northoff, Georg

    2014-09-01

    Distinguishing potentially harmful or beneficial stimuli is necessary for the self-preservation and well-being of all organisms. This assessment requires the ongoing valuation of environmental stimuli. Despite much work on the processing of aversive- and appetitive-related brain signals, it is not clear to what degree these two processes interact across the brain. To help clarify this issue, this report used a cross-species comparative approach in humans (i.e. meta-analysis of imaging data) and other mammals (i.e. targeted review of functional neuroanatomy in rodents and non-human primates). Human meta-analysis results suggest network components that appear selective for appetitive (e.g. ventromedial prefrontal cortex, ventral tegmental area) or aversive (e.g. cingulate/supplementary motor cortex, periaqueductal grey) processing, or that reflect overlapping (e.g. anterior insula, amygdala) or asymmetrical, i.e. apparently lateralized, activity (e.g. orbitofrontal cortex, ventral striatum). However, a closer look at the known value-related mechanisms from the animal literature suggests that all of these macroanatomical regions are involved in the processing of both appetitive and aversive stimuli. Differential spatiotemporal network dynamics may help explain similarities and differences in appetitive- and aversion-related activity. PMID:25010558

  15. Comparison times are longer for hedonic than for intensity judgements of taste stimuli.

    PubMed

    Veldhuizen, Maria G; Vessaz, Melina N; Kroeze, Jan H A

    2005-03-16

    Response times of intensity and hedonic comparisons were determined in a within-subjects experimental design. Forced-choice paired comparisons of orange lemonades with various concentrations of added quinine sulfate were made by 48 subjects. Depending on experimental condition, the subjects had to focus either on intensity or on pleasantness and give their responses as fast as possible. The data showed shorter response times for intensity comparisons than for pleasantness comparisons. Although taste processing may be partially serial and partially parallel, the larger part of the response times and the differences between them may be due to cognitive processing. PMID:15763588

  16. A comparison of automated static dark stimuli with the Humphrey STATPAC program in glaucomatous visual field loss.

    PubMed Central

    Mutlukan, E

    1994-01-01

    Visual field examination is conventionally performed with bright stimuli on a dark background. Dark stimuli on a bright background, however, may provide different information as light increases and decreases are subject to parallel processing in the visual pathway. Twenty five eyes with primary open angle glaucoma and visual field loss were examined with the Humphrey visual field analyser thresholding program 30-2 and the computer assisted moving eye campimeter (CAMEC) using static dark stimuli at four different Weber contrast levels of -10 (n = 9), -22 (n = 25), -37 (n = 14), and -76% (n = 25) on a cathode ray tube with a background luminance of 10 cd/m2. The cumulative results obtained with STATPAC 'pattern deviation' empirical probability maps and the results from each contrast of the dark stimulus at identical test locations were compared at eccentricity annuli bands of 4-9, 10-20, and 21-28 degrees. Dark stimuli of lower contrast provided higher abnormal point detection rates. Furthermore, visual field defects to the low contrast dark stimuli were more extensive than those to the luminous stimuli. In conclusion, dark stimuli allowed the delineation between glaucomatous field defects and the normal regions in the central visual field. Images PMID:8148332

  17. Comparison studies of infrared photodetectors with a quantum-dot and a quantum-wire base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Tokhy, M. S.; Mahmoud, I. I.; Konber, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    This paper mainly presents a theoretical analysis for the characteristics of quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) and quantum wire infrared photodetectors (QRIPs). The paper introduces a unique mathematical model of solving Poisson's equations with the usage of Lambert W functions for infrared detectors' structures based on quantum effects. Even though QRIPs and QDIPs have been the subject of extensive researches and development during the past decade, it is still essential to implement theoretical models allowing to estimate the ultimate performance of those detectors such as photocurrent and its figure-of-merit detectivity vs. various parameter conditions such as applied voltage, number of quantum wire layers, quantum dot layers, lateral characteristic size, doping density, operation temperature, and structural parameters of the quantum dots (QDs), and quantum wires (QRs). A comparison is made between the computed results of the implemented models and fine agreements are observed. It is concluded from the obtained results that the total detectivity of QDIPs can be significantly lower than that in the QRIPs and main features of the QRIPs such as large gap between the induced photocurrent and dark current of QRIP which allows for overcoming the problems in the QDIPs. This confirms what is evaluated before in the literature. It is evident that by increasing the QD/QR absorption volume in QDIPs/QRIPs as well as by separating the dark current and photocurrents, the specific detectivity can be improved and consequently the devices can operate at higher temperatures. It is an interesting result and it may be benefit to the development of QDIP and QRIP for infrared sensing applications.

  18. Comparison of the contractile responses to irregular and regular trains of stimuli during microstimulation of single human motor axons.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Michael; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2014-04-01

    During voluntary contractions, human motoneurons discharge with a physiological variability of ∼20%. However, studies that have measured the contractile responses to microstimulation of single motor axons have used regular trains of stimuli with no variability. We tested the hypothesis that irregular (physiological) trains of stimuli produce greater contractile responses than regular (nonphysiological) trains of identical mean frequency but zero variability. High-impedance tungsten microelectrodes were inserted into the common peroneal nerve and guided into fascicles supplying a toe extensor muscle. Selective microstimulation was achieved for 14 single motor axons. Contractile responses were measured via an angular displacement transducer over the relevant toe. After the responses to regular trains of 10 stimuli extending from 2 to 100 Hz were recorded, irregular trains of 10 stimuli, based on the interspike intervals recorded from single motor units during voluntary contractions, were delivered. Finally, the stimulation sequences were repeated following a 2-min period of continuous stimulation at 10 Hz to induce muscle fatigue. Regular trains of stimuli generated a sigmoidal increase in displacement with frequency, whereas irregular trains, emulating the firing of volitionally driven motoneurons, displayed significantly greater responses over the same frequency range (8-24 Hz). This was maintained even in the presence of fatigue. We conclude that physiological discharge variability, which incorporates short and long interspike intervals, offers an advantage to the neuromuscular system by allowing motor units to operate on a higher level of the contraction-frequency curve and taking advantage of catch-like properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:24401713

  19. Statistical Comparison of Spike Responses to Natural Stimuli in Monkey Area V1 With Simulated Responses of a Detailed Laminar Network Model for a Patch of V1

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, Klaus; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Maass, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    A major goal of computational neuroscience is the creation of computer models for cortical areas whose response to sensory stimuli resembles that of cortical areas in vivo in important aspects. It is seldom considered whether the simulated spiking activity is realistic (in a statistical sense) in response to natural stimuli. Because certain statistical properties of spike responses were suggested to facilitate computations in the cortex, acquiring a realistic firing regimen in cortical network models might be a prerequisite for analyzing their computational functions. We present a characterization and comparison of the statistical response properties of the primary visual cortex (V1) in vivo and in silico in response to natural stimuli. We recorded from multiple electrodes in area V1 of 4 macaque monkeys and developed a large state-of-the-art network model for a 5 × 5-mm patch of V1 composed of 35,000 neurons and 3.9 million synapses that integrates previously published anatomical and physiological details. By quantitative comparison of the model response to the “statistical fingerprint” of responses in vivo, we find that our model for a patch of V1 responds to the same movie in a way which matches the statistical structure of the recorded data surprisingly well. The deviation between the firing regimen of the model and the in vivo data are on the same level as deviations among monkeys and sessions. This suggests that, despite strong simplifications and abstractions of cortical network models, they are nevertheless capable of generating realistic spiking activity. To reach a realistic firing state, it was not only necessary to include both N-methyl-d-aspartate and GABAB synaptic conductances in our model, but also to markedly increase the strength of excitatory synapses onto inhibitory neurons (>2-fold) in comparison to literature values, hinting at the importance to carefully adjust the effect of inhibition for achieving realistic dynamics in current network

  20. A pragmatic comparison of noise burst and electric shock unconditioned stimuli for fear conditioning research with many trials.

    PubMed

    Sperl, Matthias F J; Panitz, Christian; Hermann, Christiane; Mueller, Erik M

    2016-09-01

    Several methods that are promising for studying the neurophysiology of fear conditioning (e.g., EEG, MEG) require a high number of trials to achieve an adequate signal-to-noise ratio. While electric shock and white noise burst are among the most commonly used unconditioned stimuli (US) in conventional fear conditioning studies with few trials, it is unknown whether these stimuli are equally well suited for paradigms with many trials. Here, N = 32 participants underwent a 260-trial differential fear conditioning and extinction paradigm with a 240-trial recall test 24 h later and neutral faces as conditioned stimuli. In a between-subjects design, either white noise bursts (n = 16) or electric shocks (n = 16) served as US, and intensities were determined using the most common procedure for each US (i.e., a fixed 95 dB noise burst and a work-up procedure for electric shocks, respectively). In addition to differing US types, groups also differed in closely linked US-associated characteristics (e.g., calibration methods, stimulus intensities, timing). Subjective ratings (arousal/valence), skin conductance, and evoked heart period changes (i.e., fear bradycardia) indicated more reliable, extinction-resistant, and stable conditioning in the white noise burst versus electric shock group. In fear conditioning experiments where many trials are presented, white noise burst should serve as US. PMID:27286734

  1. The late positive potential (LPP) in response to varying types of emotional and cigarette stimuli in smokers: a content comparison.

    PubMed

    Minnix, Jennifer A; Versace, Francesco; Robinson, Jason D; Lam, Cho Y; Engelmann, Jeffrey M; Cui, Yong; Brown, Victoria L; Cinciripini, Paul M

    2013-07-01

    Identifying neural mechanisms associated with addiction has substantially improved the overall understanding of addictive processes. Indeed, research suggests that drug-associated cues may take advantage of neural mechanisms originally intended for emotional processing of stimuli relevant to survival. In this study, we investigated cortical responses to several categories of emotional cues (erotic, romance, pleasant objects, mutilation, sadness, and unpleasant objects) as well as two types of smoking-related cues (people smoking and cigarette-related objects). We recorded ERPs from 180 smokers prior to their participation in a smoking cessation clinical trial and assessed emotional salience by measuring the amplitude of the late positive potential (LPP; 400 to 600 ms after picture onset). As expected, emotional and cigarette-related pictures prompted a significantly larger LPP than neutral pictures. The amplitude of the LPP increased as a function of picture arousal level, with high-arousing erotic and mutilation pictures showing the largest response in contrast to low-arousing pleasant and unpleasant objects, which showed the smallest response (other than neutral). Compared to females, male participants showed larger LPPs for high-arousing erotic and mutilation pictures. However, unlike emotional pictures, no difference was noted for the LPP between cigarette stimuli containing people versus those containing only objects, suggesting that in contrast to emotional objects, cigarette-related objects are highly relevant for smokers. We also compared the smokers to a small (N=40), convenience sample of never-smokers. We found that never-smokers had significantly smaller LPPs in response to erotic and cigarette stimuli containing only objects compared to smokers. PMID:23643564

  2. Radiation Effects in Nanostructures: Comparison of Proton Irradiation Induced Changes on Quantum Dots and Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Swift, G.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W.; Tang, Y.; Wang, K.; Dowd, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Successful implementation of technology using self-forming semiconductor Quantum Dots (QDs) has already demonstrated that temperature independent Dirac-delta density of states can be exploited in low current threshold QD lasers and QD infrared photodetectors.

  3. Quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers: comparison to quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng W.; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-03-01

    We review a microscopic laser theory for quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers, in which carrier collisions are treated at the level of quantum kinetic equations. The computed characteristics of such a quantum-dot active material are compared to a state-of-the-art quantum-well quantum cascade laser. We find that the current requirement to achieve a comparable gain-length product is reduced compared to that of the quantum-well quantum cascade laser.

  4. A comparison between semi-spheroid- and dome-shaped quantum dots coupled to wetting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2014-06-15

    During the epitaxial growth method, self-assembled semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots (QDs) are formed on the wetting layer (WL). However for sake of simplicity, researchers sometimes assume semi-spheroid-shaped QDs to be dome-shaped (hemisphere). In this work, a detailed and comprehensive study on the difference between electronic and transition properties of dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots is presented. We will explain why the P-to-S intersubband transition behaves the way it does. The calculated results for intersubband P-to-S transition properties of quantum dots show two different trends for dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots. The results are interpreted using the probability of finding electron inside the dome/spheroid region, with emphasis on the effects of wetting layer. It is shown that dome-shaped and semi-spheroid-shaped quantum dots feature different electronic and transition properties, arising from the difference in lateral dimensions between dome- and semi-spheroid-shaped QDs. Moreover, an analogy is presented between the bound S-states in the quantum dots and a simple 3D quantum mechanical particle in a box, and effective sizes are calculated. The results of this work will benefit researchers to present more realistic models of coupled QD/WL systems and explain their properties more precisely.

  5. A Dot enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (Dot ELISA): comparison with standard fluorescent antibody test (FAT) for the diagnosis of rabies in animals.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, R; Nachimuthu, K; Padmanaban, V D

    1995-09-01

    A modified enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (Dot ELISA) is described for visual detection of rabies antigen in animals. The test materials were dotted onto the nitrocellulose paper and allowed to react with rabies antiserum. The bound antigen--anti-body were reacted with a peroxidase conjugated antirabbit immunoglobulin. Positive reactions were easily visualized as brown dots after enzyme degradation of the substrate. A total of 400 specimens from various geographical locations were tested with the dot ELISA technique, and also with the fluorescent antibody test (FAT), which was used as a reference method. The concordance between the two tests was 95.25%. The dot ELISA may have potential applications as a rapid, simple and economical field test in the diagnosis of rabies. PMID:8549116

  6. Comparison of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak Performance on a Motorized vs. a Nonmotorized Treadmill.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Amy L; Laurent, C Matthew; Fullenkamp, Adam M

    2016-07-01

    Morgan, AL, Laurent, CM, and Fullenkamp, AM. Comparison of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak performance on a motorized vs. a nonmotorized treadmill. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1898-1905, 2016-Despite growing popularity of nonmotorized treadmills (NMTs), little data exist regarding responses during exercise testing using this equipment, which is important when providing an appropriate exercise prescription. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physiological and perceptual responses during peak graded exercise tests (GXTs) on a motorized treadmill (MT) vs. NMT. Volunteers (12 men and 12 women aged 18-35 years) performed 2 peak GXT sessions (1 MT and 1 NMT). Respiratory gases and heart rate (HR) were collected each minute; perceptual response was estimated (Borg's 6-20 rating of perceived exertion [RPE] scale) during the final 10 seconds of each stage. Peak values (i.e., V[Combining Dot Above]O2, HR, speed) were determined during the final 10 seconds of each test; ventilatory threshold (VT) was assessed using the V-slope method. Paired t-tests matching variables measured at each stage of the GXT identified significantly higher values on the NMT for V[Combining Dot Above]O2 83% of the time, HR 67% of the time, and RPE 25% of the time. Interestingly though, neither peak V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (48.6 ± 9.2 ml·kg·min vs. 47.8 ± 8.9 ml·kg·min), peak HR (185 ± 9 b·min vs. 188 ± 10 b·min; p = 0.90), nor VT (72.7 ± 5.7% vs. 73.8 ± 5.4%) were significantly different on the NMT vs. the MT. However, significant differences were identified between NMT and MT tests for time to exhaustion (9:55 ± 1:49 vs. 12:05 ± 2:48; p < 0.01) and peak speed (8.0 ± 0.9 mph vs. 9.2 ± 1.4 mph; p < 0.01). Thus, although peak values obtained were similar between testing sessions on the NMT and MT, the majority of submaximal data were significantly different between trials. These differences are important when designing exercise prescriptions using submaximal values from NMT testing

  7. Do Rare Stimuli Evoke Large P3s by Being Unexpected? A Comparison of Oddball Effects Between Standard-Oddball and Prediction-Oddball Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Verleger, Rolf; Śmigasiewicz, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    The P3 component of event-related potentials increases when stimuli are rarely presented. It has been assumed that this oddball effect (rare-frequent difference) reflects the unexpectedness of rare stimuli. The assumption of unexpectedness and its link to P3 amplitude were tested here. A standard- oddball task requiring alternative key-press responses to frequent and rare stimuli was compared with an oddball-prediction task where stimuli had to be first predicted and then confirmed by key-pressing. Oddball effects in the prediction task depended on whether the frequent or the rare stimulus had been predicted. Oddball effects on P3 amplitudes and error rates in the standard oddball task closely resembled effects after frequent predictions. This corroborates the notion that these effects occur because frequent stimuli are expected and rare stimuli are unexpected. However, a closer look at the prediction task put this notion into doubt because the modifications of oddball effects on P3 by expectancies were entirely due to effects on frequent stimuli, whereas the large P3 amplitudes evoked by rare stimuli were insensitive to predictions (unlike response times and error rates). Therefore, rare stimuli cannot be said to evoke large P3 amplitudes because they are unexpected. We discuss these diverging effects of frequency and expectancy, as well as general differences between tasks, with respect to concepts and hypotheses about P3b’s function and conclude that each discussed concept or hypothesis encounters some problems, with a conception in terms of subjective relevance assigned to stimuli offering the most consistent account of these basic effects. PMID:27512527

  8. Comparison of DOT-ELISA and Standard-ELISA for Detection of the Vibrio cholerae Toxin in Culture Supernatants of Bacteria Isolated from Human and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Meza-Lucas, Antonio; Pérez-Villagómez, María-Fernanda; Martínez-López, José-Patricio; García-Rodea, Ricardo; Martínez-Castelán, María-Guadalupe; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; de-la-Rosa-Arana, Jorge-Luis; Villanueva-Zamudio, Altagracia

    2016-09-01

    A comparison of DOT-ELISA and Standard-ELISA was made for detection of Vibrio cholerae toxin in culture supernatants of bacteria isolated from human and environmental samples. A total of 293 supernatants were tested in a double blind assay. A correlation of 100 % was obtained between both techniques. The cholera toxin was found in 20 Inaba and 3 Ogawa strains. Positive samples were from seafood (17 samples), potable water (1 sample) and sewage (5 samples). The DOT-ELISA was useful as the standard-ELISA to confirm the presence of cholera toxin in the environmental samples. PMID:27407304

  9. Comparison of three empirical force fields for phonon calculations in CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Anne Myers

    2016-06-01

    Three empirical interatomic force fields are parametrized using structural, elastic, and phonon dispersion data for bulk CdSe and their predictions are then compared for the structures and phonons of CdSe quantum dots having average diameters of ˜2.8 and ˜5.2 nm (˜410 and ˜2630 atoms, respectively). The three force fields include one that contains only two-body interactions (Lennard-Jones plus Coulomb), a Tersoff-type force field that contains both two-body and three-body interactions but no Coulombic terms, and a Stillinger-Weber type force field that contains Coulombic interactions plus two-body and three-body terms. While all three force fields predict nearly identical peak frequencies for the strongly Raman-active "longitudinal optical" phonon in the quantum dots, the predictions for the width of the Raman peak, the peak frequency and width of the infrared absorption peak, and the degree of disorder in the structure are very different. The three force fields also give very different predictions for the variation in phonon frequency with radial position (core versus surface). The Stillinger-Weber plus Coulomb type force field gives the best overall agreement with available experimental data.

  10. Electrophoretic determination of ricin using immunogold silver staining--comparison with simple "protein dot" method.

    PubMed

    Terazawa, K; Griffiths, G D; Leith, A G; Green, M A

    1989-08-01

    Studies were performed to establish a sensitive electrophoretic immunodetection system for the highly toxic plant protein, ricin. This has potential criminal application as an agent for causing a delayed death following parenteral administration. The immunodetection system could be used to demonstrate residual traces of the toxin left in certain tissues of the victim's body. Following polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of ricin added to rat muscle tissue extracts, the gels were electro-blotted onto nitrocellulose paper and ricin bands probed for visualisation by immunostaining. Several immunostaining procedures were investigated in order to select the most sensitive. These included indirect immunoperoxidase, peroxidase-anti-peroxidase (PAP), avidin-biotin complex (ABC) and the immunogold silver staining (IGSS) procedures. The sensitivity of PAP and indirect immunoperoxidase methods were similar at around 50 ng while the ABC technique gave visible staining of 10 ng of electro-blotted ricin. The method with greatest sensitivity was undoubtedly IGSS, which resulted in unequivocal demonstration of 4 ng of ricin. The IGSS-immunoblotting system was considered to readily demonstrate the presence of ricin in muscle tissue from the injection site of dead victims. We compared this system with the very simple method of sample dot staining. Here, samples of ricin were spotted directly onto nitrocellulose. The dots were stained using the IGSS method which was found able to demonstrate less than 10 pg of ricin. PMID:2479790

  11. Hi-C Observations of Penumbral Bright Dots: Comparison with the IRIS Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, S. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Moore, R. L.; Savage, S. L.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We observed bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot penumbra by using data acquired by the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C). The sizes of these BDs are on the order of 1 arcsecond (1') and are therefore hard to identify using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly's (AIA) 0.6' pixel -1 resolution. These BDs become readily apparent with Hi-C's 0.1' pixel -1 resolution. Tian et al. (2014) found penumbral BDs in the transition region (TR) by using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). However, only a few of their dots could be associated with any enhanced brightness in AIA channels. In this work, we examine the characteristics of the penumbral BDs observed by Hi-C in a sunspot penumbra, including their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensity. We also attempt to relate these BDs to the IRIS BDs. There are fewer Hi-C BDs in the penumbra than seen by IRIS, though different sunspots were studied and Hi-C had a short observation time. We use 193 A Hi-C data from July 11, 2012 which observed from 18:52:00 UT{18:56:00 UT and supplement it with data from AIA's 193 A passband to see the complete lifetime of the dots that were born before and/or lasted longer than Hi-C's 5-minute observation period. We use additional AIA passbands and compare the light curves of the BDs at different temperatures to test whether the Hi-C BDs are TR BDs. We find that most Hi-C BDs show clear movement, and of those that do, they move in a radial direction, toward or away from the sunspot umbra, sometimes doing both. BDs interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to move less and last longer. We examine the properties of the Hi-C BDs and compare them with the IRIS BDs. Our BDs are similar to the exceptional values of the IRIS BDs: they move slower on average and their sizes and lifetimes are on the higher end of the distributions of IRIS BDs. We infer that our penumbral BDs are some of the larger BDs observed by IRIS.

  12. Quantum dot-ring nanostructure — A comparison of different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janus-Zygmunt, Iwona; Kȩdzierska, Barbara; Gorczyca-Goraj, Anna; Zipper, Elżbieta; Maśka, Maciej M.

    2016-03-01

    It has been shown recently that a nanostructure composed of a quantum dot (QD) surrounded by a quantum ring (QR) possesses a set of very unique characteristics that make it a good candidate for future nanoelectronic devices. Its main advantage is the ability to easily tune transport properties on demand by so-called “wavefunction engineering”. In practice, the distribution of the electron wavefunction in the nanostructure can be controlled by, e.g., electrical gating. In order to predict some particular properties of the system, one has to know the exact wavefunctions for different shapes of the confining potential that defines the structure. In this paper, we compare three different methods that can be used to determine the energy spectrum, electron wavefunctions and transport properties of the system under investigation. In the first approach, we utilize the cylindrical symmetry of the confining potential and solve only the radial part of the Schrödinger equation; in the second approach, we discretize the Schrödinger equation in two dimensions and find the eigenstates with the help of the Lanczös method; in the third approach, we use package Kwant to solve a tight-binding approximation of the original system. To study the transport properties in all these approaches, we calculate microscopically the strength of the coupling between the nanosystem and leads. In the first two approaches, we use the Bardeen method, in the third one calculations are performed with the help of package Kwant.

  13. In vitro immunotoxicology of quantum dots and comparison with dissolved cadmium and tellurium.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, Audrey; Fortier, Marlene; Gagne, Francois; Gagnon, Christian; Turcotte, Patrice; Tayabali, Azam; Davis, Thomas A; Auffret, Michel; Fournier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of products derived from nanotechnology has raised concerns about their potential toxicity, especially at the immunocompetence level in organisms. This study compared the immunotoxicity of cadmium sulfate/cadmium telluride (CdS/Cd-Te) mixture quantum dots (QDs) and their dissolved components, cadmium chloride (CdCl2 )/sodium telluride (NaTeO3 ) salts, and a CdCl2 /NaTeO3 mixture on four animal models commonly used in risk assessment studies: one bivalve (Mytilus edulis), one fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and two mammals (mice and humans). Our results of viability and phagocytosis biomarkers revealed that QDs were more toxic than dissolved metals for blue mussels. For other species, dissolved metals (Cd, Te, and Cd-Te mixture) were more toxic than the nanoparticles (NPs). The most sensitive species toward QDs, according to innate immune cells, was humans (inhibitory concentration [IC50 ] = 217 μg/mL). However, for adaptative immunity, lymphoblastic transformation in mice was decreased for small QD concentrations (EC50 = 4 μg/mL), and was more sensitive than other model species tested. Discriminant function analysis revealed that blue mussel hemocytes were able to discriminate the toxicity of QDs, Cd, Te, and Cd-Te mixture (Partial Wilk's λ = 0.021 and p < 0.0001). For rainbow trout and human cells, the immunotoxic effects of QDs were similar to those obtained with the dissolved fraction of Cd and Te mixture. For mice, the toxicity of QDs markedly differed from those observed with Cd, Te, and dissolved Cd-Te mixture. The results also suggest that aquatic species responded more differently than vertebrates to these compounds. The results lead to the recommendation that mussels and mice were most able to discriminate the effects of Cd-based NPs from the effects of dissolved Cd and Te at the immunocompetence level. PMID:23893621

  14. InAs/GaAs quantum-dot intermixing: comparison of various dielectric encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhashim, Hala H.; Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa; Majid, Mohammed A.; Ng, Tien K.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the impurity-free vacancy-disordering effect in InAs/GaAs quantum-dot (QD) laser structure based on seven dielectric capping layers. Compared to the typical SiO2 and Si3N4 films, HfO2 and SrTiO3 dielectric layers showed superior enhancement and suppression of intermixing up to 725°C, respectively. A QD peak ground-state differential blue shift of >175 nm (>148 meV) is obtained for HfO2 capped sample. Likewise, investigation of TiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO capping films showed unusual characteristics, such as intermixing-control caps at low annealing temperature (650°C) and interdiffusion-promoting caps at high temperatures (≥675°C). We qualitatively compared the degree of intermixing induced by these films by extracting the rate of intermixing and the temperature for ground-state and excited-state convergences. Based on our systematic characterization, we established reference intermixing processes based on seven different dielectric encapsulation materials. The tailored wavelength emission of ˜1060-1200 nm at room temperature and improved optical quality exhibited from intermixed QDs would serve as key materials for eventual realization of low-cost, compact, and agile lasers. Applications include solid-state laser pumping, optical communications, gas sensing, biomedical imaging, green-yellow-orange coherent light generation, as well as addressing photonic integration via area-selective, and postgrowth bandgap engineering.

  15. Comparison of Gated Audiovisual Speech Identification in Elderly Hearing Aid Users and Elderly Normal-Hearing Individuals: Effects of Adding Visual Cues to Auditory Speech Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Shahram; Lidestam, Björn; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared elderly hearing aid (EHA) users (n = 20) with elderly normal-hearing (ENH) listeners (n = 20) in terms of isolation points (IPs, the shortest time required for correct identification of a speech stimulus) and accuracy of audiovisual gated speech stimuli (consonants, words, and final words in highly and less predictable sentences) presented in silence. In addition, we compared the IPs of audiovisual speech stimuli from the present study with auditory ones extracted from a previous study, to determine the impact of the addition of visual cues. Both participant groups achieved ceiling levels in terms of accuracy in the audiovisual identification of gated speech stimuli; however, the EHA group needed longer IPs for the audiovisual identification of consonants and words. The benefit of adding visual cues to auditory speech stimuli was more evident in the EHA group, as audiovisual presentation significantly shortened the IPs for consonants, words, and final words in less predictable sentences; in the ENH group, audiovisual presentation only shortened the IPs for consonants and words. In conclusion, although the audiovisual benefit was greater for EHA group, this group had inferior performance compared with the ENH group in terms of IPs when supportive semantic context was lacking. Consequently, EHA users needed the initial part of the audiovisual speech signal to be longer than did their counterparts with normal hearing to reach the same level of accuracy in the absence of a semantic context. PMID:27317667

  16. Detection and typing of human papillomavirus using the Vira Type "in situ" kit: comparison with a conventional dot blot technique.

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner-Jones, B E; Bellomarino, V M; Borg, A J; Orzeszko, K; Garland, S M

    1990-01-01

    A new commercial kit (Vira Type "in situ", Life Technologies, Inc., Molecular Diagnostics Division, Guithersburg, Maryland, USA) for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 35 in routinely processed human anogenital tissue was compared with a conventional dot blot assay for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18. Both systems use double-stranded genomic DNA probes for the detection of type specific HPV DNA. The probes used on the dot blots were labelled with 32P and visualised autoradiographically. The Vira Type probes were labelled with biotin and visualised using a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate with NBT-BCIP substrate. Biopsy specimens from the cervix, vagina, and vulva of 46 women were processed by both methods and compared. The histological diagnoses ranged from benign changes, to dysplasia, and invasive carcinoma. Overall, 50% of biopsy specimens were positive for HPV DNA by dot blot hybridisation; only 39% were positive by Vira Type in situ hybridisation. Three of the specimens positive by the Vira Type "in situ" kit showed no cross hybridisation and were the same HPV type as the dot blot. A further 13 showed hybridisation, but the showed cross hybridisation, but the to the dot blot results. One biopsy specimen was positive for different HPV types by the two tests and one was positive by Vira Type and negative by dot blot. Six biopsy specimens were negative by Vira Type but positive by dot blot. It is concluded that the Vira Type "in situ" kit has a similar specificity but lower sensitivity than the dot blot hybridisation method for the detection of HPV DNA. Images PMID:2175755

  17. Attention samples stimuli rhythmically.

    PubMed

    Landau, Ayelet Nina; Fries, Pascal

    2012-06-01

    Overt exploration or sampling behaviors, such as whisking, sniffing, and saccadic eye movements, are often characterized by a rhythm. In addition, the electrophysiologically recorded theta or alpha phase predicts global detection performance. These two observations raise the intriguing possibility that covert selective attention samples from multiple stimuli rhythmically. To investigate this possibility, we measured change detection performance on two simultaneously presented stimuli, after resetting attention to one of them. After a reset flash at one stimulus location, detection performance fluctuated rhythmically. When the flash was presented in the right visual field, a 4 Hz rhythm was directly visible in the time courses of behavioral performance at both stimulus locations, and the two rhythms were in antiphase. A left visual field flash exerted only partial reset on performance and induced rhythmic fluctuation at higher frequencies (6-10 Hz). These findings show that selective attention samples multiple stimuli rhythmically, and they position spatial attention within the family of exploration behaviors. PMID:22633805

  18. Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  19. Transitive Responding in Hooded Crows Requires Linearly Ordered Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazareva, Olga F.; Smirnova, Anna A.; Bagozkaja, Maria S.; Zorina, Zoya A.; Rayevsky, Vladimir V.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2004-01-01

    Eight crows were taught to discriminate overlapping pairs of visual stimuli (A+ B-, B+ C-, C+ D-, and D+ E-). For 4 birds, the stimuli were colored cards with a circle of the same color on the reverse side whose diameter decreased from A to E (ordered feedback group). These circles were made available for comparison to potentially help the crows…

  20. Comparison of Burrowing and Stimuli-Evoked Pain Behaviors as End-Points in Rat Models of Inflammatory Pain and Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Arjun; Kuo, Andy; Jacob, Meera; Lourdesamy, Jacintha S.; Carvalho, Lara Melo Soares Pinho De; Nicholson, Janet R.; Corradini, Laura; Smith, Maree T.

    2016-01-01

    Establishment and validation of ethologically-relevant, non-evoked behavioral end-points as surrogate measures of spontaneous pain in rodent pain models has been proposed as a means to improve preclinical to clinical research translation in the pain field. Here, we compared the utility of burrowing behavior with hypersensitivity to applied mechanical stimuli for pain assessment in rat models of chronic inflammatory and peripheral neuropathic pain. Briefly, groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were habituated to the burrowing environment and trained over a 5-day period. Rats that burrowed ≤ 450 g of gravel on any 2 days of the individual training phase were excluded from the study. The remaining rats received either a unilateral intraplantar injection of Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) or saline, or underwent unilateral chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve- or sham-surgery. Baseline burrowing behavior and evoked pain behaviors were assessed prior to model induction, and twice-weekly until study completion on day 14. For FCA- and CCI-rats, but not the corresponding groups of sham-rats, evoked mechanical hypersensitivity developed in a temporal manner in the ipsilateral hindpaws. Although burrowing behavior also decreased in a temporal manner for both FCA-and CCI- rats, there was considerable inter-animal variability. By contrast, mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in the ipsilateral hindpaws of FCA- and CCI-rats respectively, exhibited minimal inter-animal variability. Our data collectively show that burrowing behavior is altered in rodent models of chronic inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathic pain. However, large group sizes are needed to ensure studies are adequately powered due to considerable inter-animal variability. PMID:27242458

  1. NESSTI: Norms for Environmental Sound Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Julia; Dzafic, Ilvana; Kazovsky, Maria; Copland, David A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we provide normative data along multiple cognitive and affective variable dimensions for a set of 110 sounds, including living and manmade stimuli. Environmental sounds are being increasingly utilized as stimuli in the cognitive, neuropsychological and neuroimaging fields, yet there is no comprehensive set of normative information for these type of stimuli available for use across these experimental domains. Experiment 1 collected data from 162 participants in an on-line questionnaire, which included measures of identification and categorization as well as cognitive and affective variables. A subsequent experiment collected response times to these sounds. Sounds were normalized to the same length (1 second) in order to maximize usage across multiple paradigms and experimental fields. These sounds can be freely downloaded for use, and all response data have also been made available in order that researchers can choose one or many of the cognitive and affective dimensions along which they would like to control their stimuli. Our hope is that the availability of such information will assist researchers in the fields of cognitive and clinical psychology and the neuroimaging community in choosing well-controlled environmental sound stimuli, and allow comparison across multiple studies. PMID:24023866

  2. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    photon emission to classical emission. Dual emission also provides these NCs with more advanced functionalities than the isolated components. The ability to better tailor the emission spectrum can be advantageous for color designed LEDs in lighting and display applications. The different response of the two emission colors to external stimuli enables ratiometric sensing. Control over hot carrier dynamics within such structures allows for photoluminescence upconversion. This Account first provides a description of the main hurdles toward the synthesis of colloidal double QDs and an overview of the growing library of synthetic pathways toward constructing them. The main discoveries regarding their photophysical properties are then described in detail, followed by an overview of potential applications taking advantage of the double-dot structure. Finally, a perspective and outlook for their future development is provided. PMID:27108870

  3. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    emission to classical emission. Dual emission also provides these NCs with more advanced functionalities than the isolated components. The ability to better tailor the emission spectrum can be advantageous for color designed LEDs in lighting and display applications. The different response of the two emission colors to external stimuli enables ratiometric sensing. Control over hot carrier dynamics within such structures allows for photoluminescence upconversion. This Account first provides a description of the main hurdles toward the synthesis of colloidal double QDs and an overview of the growing library of synthetic pathways toward constructing them. The main discoveries regarding their photophysical properties are then described in detail, followed by an overview of potential applications taking advantage of the double-dot structure. Finally, a perspective and outlook for their future development is provided. PMID:27108870

  4. Attentional and affective processing of sexual stimuli in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Marieke; van Leeuwen, Matthijs; Janssen, Erick; Newhouse, Sarah K; Heiman, Julia R; Laan, Ellen

    2012-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most common sexual problem in women. From an incentive motivation perspective, HSDD may be the result of a weak association between sexual stimuli and rewarding experiences. As a consequence, these stimuli may either lose or fail to acquire a positive meaning, resulting in a limited number of incentives that have the capacity to elicit a sexual response. According to current information processing models of sexual arousal, sexual stimuli automatically activate meanings and if these are not predominantly positive, processes relevant to the activation of sexual arousal and desire may be interrupted. Premenopausal U.S. and Dutch women with acquired HSDD (n = 42) and a control group of sexually functional women (n = 42) completed a single target Implicit Association Task and a Picture Association Task assessing automatic affective associations with sexual stimuli and a dot detection task measuring attentional capture by sexual stimuli. Results showed that women with acquired HSDD displayed less positive (but not more negative) automatic associations with sexual stimuli than sexually functional women. The same pattern was found for self-reported affective sex-related associations. Participants were slower to detect targets in the dot detection task that replaced sexual images, irrespective of sexual function status. As such, the findings point to the relevance of affective processing of sexual stimuli in women with HSDD, and imply that the treatment of HSDD might benefit from a stronger emphasis on the strengthening of the association between sexual stimuli and positive meaning and sexual reward. PMID:21892693

  5. Effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, F.M.; Mayhan, W.G.; Williams, J.K.; Heistad, D.D. )

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus. The authors used microspheres to measure blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum in anesthetized dogs and rabbits. A critical assumption of the microsphere method is that microspheres do not pass through arteriovenous shunts. Blood flow values obtained with simultaneous injection of 15- and 50-{mu}m microspheres were similar, which suggest that shunting of 15-{mu}m microspheres was minimal. Blood flow to choroid plexus under control conditions was 287 {plus minus} 26 (means {plus minus} SE) ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in dogs and 385 {plus minus} 73 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in rabbits. Consecutive measurements under control conditions indicated that values for blood flow are reproducible. Adenosine did not alter blood flow to cerebrum but increased blood flow to choroid plexus two- to threefold in dogs and rabbits. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine did not affect blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum but decreased blood flow to choroid plexus by {approx} 50%. The authors suggest that (1) the microsphere method provides reproducible valid measurements of blood flow to the choroid plexus in dogs and rabbits and (2) vasoactive stimuli may have profoundly different effects on blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum.

  6. Control by Contextual Stimuli in Novel Second-Order Conditional Discriminations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Gonzalez, Luis Antonio; Martinez, Hector

    2007-01-01

    Eighteen undergraduates participated in studies designed to examine the factors that produce transfer of contextual functions to novel stimuli in second-order conditional discriminations. In Study 1, participants selected comparison B1 given sample A1 and comparison B2 given sample A2 in a matching-to-sample procedure. Contextual stimuli X1 or X2…

  7. Headphone localization of speech stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, three dimensional acoustic display systems have been developed that synthesize virtual sound sources over headphones based on filtering by Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs), the direction-dependent spectral changes caused primarily by the outer ears. Here, 11 inexperienced subjects judged the apparent spatial location of headphone-presented speech stimuli filtered with non-individualized HRTFs. About half of the subjects 'pulled' their judgements toward either the median or the lateral-vertical planes, and estimates were almost always elevated. Individual differences were pronounced for the distance judgements; 15 to 46 percent of stimuli were heard inside the head with the shortest estimates near the median plane. The results infer that most listeners can obtain useful azimuth information from speech stimuli filtered by nonindividualized RTFs. Measurements of localization error and reversal rates are comparable with a previous study that used broadband noise stimuli.

  8. Psychopathy, aggression, and the processing of emotional stimuli in non-referred girls and boys.

    PubMed

    Kimonis, Eva R; Frick, Paul J; Fazekas, Holly; Loney, Bryan R

    2006-01-01

    Research shows that individuals with psychopathic traits differ in how they process negative emotional stimuli. However, it is unclear whether these differences are specific to certain types of negative emotional stimulus and whether they are more strongly associated with psychopathic traits or aggression. Further, it is not clear whether or not deficits in emotional processing generalize to females and ethnic minority individuals with psychopathic traits. In this study, we examined the emotional processing of visual stimuli using a dot-probe task in 50 non-referred girls and boys (mean age of 9.30; SD = 2.00). Overall, there was a significant association between proactive aggression and reduced responsiveness to distressing stimuli. In addition, the predicted association between psychopathic traits and reduced responsiveness to distressing stimuli was only found for children high on aggression. Also, the associations among aggression, psychopathic traits, and responsiveness to distressing stimuli did not differ for boys and girls. PMID:16491477

  9. Meet the Fribbles: novel stimuli for use within behavioural research

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Tom J.; Griffith, James W.; De Rossi, Stephanie; Hermans, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Clinical researchers make use of experimental models for mental disorders. In many cases, these models use stimuli that are relevant to the disorder under scrutiny, which allows one to experimentally investigate the factors that contribute to the development of the disorder. For example, one might use spiders or spider-like stimuli in the study of specific phobia. More broadly, researchers often make use of real-world stimuli such as images of animals, geometrical shapes or emotional words. However, these stimuli are often limited in their experimental controllability and their applicability to the disorder in question. We present a novel set of animal-like stimuli, called Fribbles, for use within behavioural research. Fribbles have desirable properties for use in research because they are similar to real-world stimuli, but due to their novelty, participants will not have had previous experience with them. They also have known properties that can be experimentally manipulated. We present an investigation into similarity between Fribbles in order to illustrate their utility in research that relies on comparisons between similar stimuli. Fribbles offer both experimental control and generalisability to the real world, although some consideration must be made concerning the properties that influence similarity between Fribbles when selecting them along a dimension of similarity. PMID:24575075

  10. Fluorescent carbon dot (C-dot) nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan; Pan, Xiaoyong; Gu, Liuqun; Ren, Wei; Cheng, Weiren; Kumar, Jatin N.; Liu, Ye

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescent carbon dot (C-dot) nanoclusters composed of C-dot-loaded hollow silica spheres are obtained via the dehydration of mannose, which is adsorbed onto hollow silica spheres or poly(ethylene glycol)-graft-hollow silica spheres (PEG-g-hollow silica). The structure of C-dot nanoclusters are confirmed using 1H NMR, FTIR, TEM and TGA. C-dot nanoclusters show a redshifted fluorescence emission with an increased excitation wavelength. Passivation with PEG diamines improve the quantum yields to ˜2%. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) results reflect the fact that C-dot nanoclusters can provide good cytoplasm imaging of live Hep G2 cells and live MCF-7 cells, and the imaging obtained is brighter and more even than those from free C-dots. With their combination of good photostability and low cytotoxicity, C-dot nanoclusters are promising for the production of higher quality bioimaging.

  11. OLFACTORY EVOKED RESPONSES TO ODOROUS STIMULI OF DIFFERENT INTENSITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In comparison to other senses the electrophysiology of olfaction has been little studied in man and some of the basic paradigms used in the study of the other senses have not yet been widely applied to its study. asic information such as the effect of stimuli of different intensi...

  12. Stimuli, Reinforcers, and Private Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Radical behaviorism considers private events to be a part of ongoing observable behavior and to share the properties of public events. Although private events cannot be measured directly, their roles in overt action can be inferred from mathematical models that relate private responses to external stimuli and reinforcers according to the same…

  13. Bayesian-based integration of multisensory naturalistic perithreshold stimuli.

    PubMed

    Regenbogen, Christina; Johansson, Emilia; Andersson, Patrik; Olsson, Mats J; Lundström, Johan N

    2016-07-29

    Most studies exploring multisensory integration have used clearly perceivable stimuli. According to the principle of inverse effectiveness, the added neural and behavioral benefit of integrating clear stimuli is reduced in comparison to stimuli with degraded and less salient unisensory information. Traditionally, speed and accuracy measures have been analyzed separately with few studies merging these to gain an understanding of speed-accuracy trade-offs in multisensory integration. In two separate experiments, we assessed multisensory integration of naturalistic audio-visual objects consisting of individually-tailored perithreshold dynamic visual and auditory stimuli, presented within a multiple-choice task, using a Bayesian Hierarchical Drift Diffusion Model that combines response time and accuracy. For both experiments, unisensory stimuli were degraded to reach a 75% identification accuracy level for all individuals and stimuli to promote multisensory binding. In Experiment 1, we subsequently presented uni- and their respective bimodal stimuli followed by a 5-alternative-forced-choice task. In Experiment 2, we controlled for low-level integration and attentional differences. Both experiments demonstrated significant superadditive multisensory integration of bimodal perithreshold dynamic information. We present evidence that the use of degraded sensory stimuli may provide a link between previous findings of inverse effectiveness on a single neuron level and overt behavior. We further suggest that a combined measure of accuracy and reaction time may be a more valid and holistic approach of studying multisensory integration and propose the application of drift diffusion models for studying behavioral correlates as well as brain-behavior relationships of multisensory integration. PMID:26719235

  14. Cognitive robotic system for learning of complex visual stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, A. S.; Rozhkov, A. S.

    2013-05-01

    The problem of learning of complex visual stimuli in cognitive robotics is considered. These stimuli should be selected on the base of rules supporting arbitrary comparisons of stimulus features with features of other salient objects (context). New perceptual knowledge representation based on the predicate logic is implemented to express such rules. Computable predicates are provided by low-level vision system. The rules are constructed using genetic algorithms on the base of a set of examples obtained by a robot during consequent trials. Dependence between the number of necessary trials and rule complexity is studied.

  15. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  16. The neural circuitry supporting goal maintenance during cognitive control: a comparison of expectancy AX-CPT and dot probe expectancy paradigms.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Garcia, Pilar; Lesh, Tyler A; Salo, Taylor; Barch, Deanna M; MacDonald, Angus W; Gold, James M; Ragland, J Daniel; Strauss, Milton; Silverstein, Steven M; Carter, Cameron S

    2016-02-01

    Goal maintenance is an aspect of cognitive control that has been identified as critical for understanding psychopathology according to criteria of the NIMH-sponsored CNTRICS (Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia) and Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiatives. CNTRICS proposed the expectancy AX-CPT, and its visual-spatial parallel the dot probe expectancy (DPX), as valid measures of the cognitive and neural processes thought to be relevant for goal maintenance. The goal of this study was to specifically examine the functional neural correlates and connectivity patterns of both goal maintenance tasks in the same subset of subjects to further validate their neural construct validity and clarify our understanding of the nature and function of the neural circuitry engaged by the tasks. Twenty-six healthy control subjects performed both the letter (AX) and dot pattern (DPX) variants of the CPT during fMRI. Behavioral performance was similar between tasks. The 2 tasks engaged the same brain networks including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and dorsal parietal regions, supporting their validity as complementary measures of the goal maintenance construct. Interestingly there was greater engagement of the frontal opercular insula region during the expectancy AX-CPT (letter) and greater functional connectivity between the PFC and medial temporal lobe in the DPX (dot pattern). These differences are consistent with differential recruitment of phonological and visual-spatial processes by the two tasks and suggest that additional long-term memory systems may be engaged by the dot probe version. PMID:26494483

  17. The neural circuitry supporting goal maintenance during cognitive control: a comparison of expectancy AX-CPT and dot probe expectancy paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Lesh, Tyler A.; Salo, Taylor; Barch, Deanna M.; MacDonald, Angus W.; Gold, James M.; Ragland, J. Daniel; Strauss, Milton; Silverstein, Steven M.; Carter, Cameron S.

    2016-01-01

    Goal maintenance is an aspect of cognitive control that has been identified as critical for understanding psychopathology according to criteria of the NIMH-sponsored CNTRICS (Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia) and Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiatives. CNTRICS proposed the expectancy AX-CPT, and its visual-spatial parallel the dot probe expectancy (DPX), as valid measures of the cognitive and neural processes thought to be relevant for goal maintenance. The goal of this study was to specifically examine the functional neural correlates and connectivity patterns of both goal maintenance tasks in the same subset of subjects to further validate their neural construct validity and clarify our understanding of the nature and function of the neural circuitry engaged by the tasks. Twenty-six healthy control subjects performed both the letter (AX) and dot pattern (DPX) variants of the CPT during fMRI. Behavioral performance was similar between tasks. The 2 tasks engaged the same brain networks including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and dorsal parietal regions, supporting their validity as complementary measures of the goal maintenance construct. Interestingly there was greater engagement of the frontal opercular insula region during the expectancy AX-CPT (letter) and greater functional connectivity between the PFC and medial temporal lobe in the DPX (dot pattern). These differences are consistent with differential recruitment of phonological and visual-spatial processes by the two tasks and suggest that additional long-term memory systems may be engaged by the dot probe version. PMID:26494483

  18. Enhanced brain susceptibility to negative stimuli in adolescents: ERP evidences

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jiajin; Ju, Enxia; Meng, Xianxin; Chen, Xuhai; Zhu, Siyu; Yang, Jiemin; Li, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies investigated neural substrates of emotional face processing in adolescents and its comparison with adults. As emotional faces elicit more of emotional expression recognition rather than direct emotional responding, it remains undetermined how adolescents are different from adults in brain susceptibility to emotionally stressful stimuli. Methods: Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded for highly negative (HN), moderately negative (MN), and neutral pictures in 20 adolescents and 20 adults while subjects performed a standard/deviant distinction task by pressing different keys, irrespective of the emotionality of deviant stimuli. Results: Adolescents exhibited more negative amplitudes for HN vs. neutral pictures in N1 (100–150 ms), P2 (130–190 ms), N2 (210–290 ms), and P3 (360–440 ms) components. In addition, adolescents showed more negative amplitudes for MN compared to neutral pictures in N1, P2, and N2 components. By contrast, adults exhibited significant emotion effects for HN stimuli in N2 and P3 amplitudes but not in N1 and P2 amplitudes, and they did not exhibit a significant emotion effect for MN stimuli at all these components. In the 210–290 ms time interval, the emotion effect for HN stimuli was significant across frontal and central regions in adolescents, while this emotion effect was noticeable only in the central region for adults. Conclusions: Adolescents are more emotionally sensitive to negative stimuli compared to adults, regardless of the emotional intensity of the stimuli, possibly due to the immature prefrontal control system over the limbic emotional inputs during adolescence. PMID:25972790

  19. The Impact of Stimuli on Affect in Persons With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Marx, Marcia S.; Thein, Khin; Dakheel-Ali, Maha

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine how presentation of different stimuli impacts affect in nursing home residents with dementia. Method Participants were 193 residents aged 60 to 101 years from 7 Maryland nursing homes who had a diagnosis of dementia (derived from the medical chart or obtained from the attending physician). Cognitive functioning was assessed via the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and data pertaining to activities of daily living were obtained through the Minimum Data Set. Affect was assessed using observations of the 5 moods from Lawton’s Modified Behavior Stream. Baseline observations of affect were performed for comparisons. During the study, each participant was presented with 25 predetermined engagement stimuli in random order over a period of 3 weeks. Stimuli were categorized as live social, simulated social, manipulative, work/task-related, music, reading, or individualized to the participant’s self-identity. The dates of data collection were 2005–2007. Results Differences between stimulus categories were significant for pleasure (F6,144 = 25.137, P < .001) and interest (F6,144 = 18.792, P < .001) but not for negative affect. Pleasure and interest were highest for the live social category, followed by self-identity and simulated social stimuli for pleasure, and for manipulative stimuli in terms of the effect on interest. The lowest levels of pleasure and interest were observed for music. Participants with higher cognitive function had significantly higher pleasure (F1,97 = 6.27, P < .05). Although the general trend of the impact of the different categories was similar for different levels of cognitive function, there were significant differences in pleasure in response to specific stimuli (interaction effect: F6,92 = 2.31, P < .05). Overall, social stimuli have the highest impact on affect in persons with dementia. Conclusions The findings of the present study are important, as affect is a major indicator of quality of life and this study is

  20. Effects of complex aural stimuli on mental performance.

    PubMed

    Vij, Mohit; Aghazadeh, Fereydoun; Ray, Thomas G; Hatipkarasulu, Selen

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of complex aural stimuli on mental performance. A series of experiments were designed to obtain data for two different analyses. The first analysis is a "Stimulus" versus "No-stimulus" comparison for each of the four dependent variables, i.e. quantitative ability, reasoning ability, spatial ability and memory of an individual, by comparing the control treatment with the rest of the treatments. The second set of analysis is a multi-variant analysis of variance for component level main effects and interactions. The two component factors are tempo of the complex aural stimuli and sound volume level, each administered at three discrete levels for all four dependent variables. Ten experiments were conducted on eleven subjects. It was found that complex aural stimuli influence the quantitative and spatial aspect of the mind, while the reasoning ability was unaffected by the stimuli. Although memory showed a trend to be worse with the presence of complex aural stimuli, the effect was statistically insignificant. Variation in tempo and sound volume level of an aural stimulus did not significantly affect the mental performance of an individual. The results of these experiments can be effectively used in designing work environments. PMID:15176128

  1. Emotional Stimuli and Motor Conversion Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voon, Valerie; Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Ameli, Rezvan; Roelofs, Karin; LaFrance, W. Curt, Jr.; Hallett, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Conversion disorder is characterized by neurological signs and symptoms related to an underlying psychological issue. Amygdala activity to affective stimuli is well characterized in healthy volunteers with greater amygdala activity to both negative and positive stimuli relative to neutral stimuli, and greater activity to negative relative to…

  2. Inter-dot strain field effect on the optoelectronic properties of realistic InP lateral quantum-dot molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Barettin, Daniele Auf der Maur, Matthias; De Angelis, Roberta; Prosposito, Paolo; Casalboni, Mauro; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2015-03-07

    We report on numerical simulations of InP surface lateral quantum-dot molecules on In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52 }P buffer, using a model strictly derived by experimental results by extrapolation of the molecules shape from atomic force microscopy images. Our study has been inspired by the comparison of a photoluminescence spectrum of a high-density InP surface quantum dot sample with a numerical ensemble average given by a weighted sum of simulated single quantum-dot spectra. A lack of experimental optical response from the smaller dots of the sample is found to be due to strong inter-dot strain fields, which influence the optoelectronic properties of lateral quantum-dot molecules. Continuum electromechanical, k{sup →}·p{sup →} bandstructure, and optical calculations are presented for two different molecules, the first composed of two dots of nearly identical dimensions (homonuclear), the second of two dots with rather different sizes (heteronuclear). We show that in the homonuclear molecule the hydrostatic strain raises a potential barrier for the electrons in the connection zone between the dots, while conversely the holes do not experience any barrier, which considerably increases the coupling. Results for the heteronuclear molecule show instead that its dots do not appear as two separate and distinguishable structures, but as a single large dot, and no optical emission is observed in the range of higher energies where the smaller dot is supposed to emit. We believe that in samples of such a high density the smaller dots result as practically incorporated into bigger molecular structures, an effect strongly enforced by the inter-dot strain fields, and consequently it is not possible to experimentally obtain a separate optical emission from the smaller dots.

  3. Inter-dot strain field effect on the optoelectronic properties of realistic InP lateral quantum-dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barettin, Daniele; Auf der Maur, Matthias; De Angelis, Roberta; Prosposito, Paolo; Casalboni, Mauro; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    We report on numerical simulations of InP surface lateral quantum-dot molecules on In0.48Ga0.52P buffer, using a model strictly derived by experimental results by extrapolation of the molecules shape from atomic force microscopy images. Our study has been inspired by the comparison of a photoluminescence spectrum of a high-density InP surface quantum dot sample with a numerical ensemble average given by a weighted sum of simulated single quantum-dot spectra. A lack of experimental optical response from the smaller dots of the sample is found to be due to strong inter-dot strain fields, which influence the optoelectronic properties of lateral quantum-dot molecules. Continuum electromechanical, k →.p → bandstructure, and optical calculations are presented for two different molecules, the first composed of two dots of nearly identical dimensions (homonuclear), the second of two dots with rather different sizes (heteronuclear). We show that in the homonuclear molecule the hydrostatic strain raises a potential barrier for the electrons in the connection zone between the dots, while conversely the holes do not experience any barrier, which considerably increases the coupling. Results for the heteronuclear molecule show instead that its dots do not appear as two separate and distinguishable structures, but as a single large dot, and no optical emission is observed in the range of higher energies where the smaller dot is supposed to emit. We believe that in samples of such a high density the smaller dots result as practically incorporated into bigger molecular structures, an effect strongly enforced by the inter-dot strain fields, and consequently it is not possible to experimentally obtain a separate optical emission from the smaller dots.

  4. Behavioral and ERP measures of attentional bias to threat in the dot-probe task: poor reliability and lack of correlation with anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kappenman, Emily S; Farrens, Jaclyn L; Luck, Steven J; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak

    2014-01-01

    The dot-probe task is often considered a gold standard in the field for investigating attentional bias to threat. However, serious issues with the task have been raised. Specifically, a number of studies have demonstrated that the traditional reaction time (RT) measure of attentional bias to threat in the dot-probe task has poor internal reliability and poor test-retest reliability. In addition, although threatening stimuli capture attention in other paradigms, attentional bias to threat has not usually been found in typical research participants in the dot-probe task. However, when attention is measured in the dot-probe task with the N2pc component of the event-related potential waveform, substantial attentional orienting to threat is observed, and the internal reliability is moderate. To provide a rigorous comparison of the reliability of this N2pc measure and the conventional behavioral measure, as well as to examine the relationship of these measures to anxiety, the present study examined the N2pc in conjunction with RT in the dot-probe task in a large sample of participants (N = 96). As in previous studies, RT showed no bias to threatening images across the sample and exhibited poor internal reliability. Moreover, this measure did not relate to trait anxiety. By contrast, the N2pc revealed a significant initial shift of attention to threat, and this measure was internally reliable. However, the N2pc was not correlated with trait anxiety, indicating that it does not provide a meaningful index of individual differences in anxiety in the dot-probe task. Together, these results indicate a serious need to develop new tasks and methods to more reliably investigate attentional bias to threat and its relationship to anxiety in both clinical and non-clinical populations. PMID:25538644

  5. Body image concern and selective attention to disgusting and non-self appearance-related stimuli.

    PubMed

    Onden-Lim, Melissa; Wu, Ray; Grisham, Jessica R

    2012-09-01

    Although selective attention to one's own appearance has been widely documented in studies of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), little is known about attentional bias toward non-self appearance-related stimuli in BDD. Furthermore, despite reports of heightened experience of disgust in BDD, it is unknown whether these individuals differentially attend to disgusting stimuli and whether disgust is important in processing of unattractive stimuli. We used a dot probe procedure to investigate the relationship between dysmorphic concern, a defining feature of BDD, and selective attention to faces, attractive, unattractive and disgusting images in a female heterosexual student population (N=92). At the long stimulus presentation (1000 ms), dysmorphic concern was positively associated with attention to faces in general and attractive appearance-related images. In contrast, at the short stimulus presentation (200 ms), there was a positive association between dysmorphic concern and disgusting images. Implications for theoretical models of BDD are discussed. PMID:22898205

  6. The quantum Hall effect in quantum dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Greshnov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    It is proposed to use quantum dots in order to increase the temperatures suitable for observation of the integer quantum Hall effect. A simple estimation using Fock-Darwin spectrum of a quantum dot shows that good part of carriers localized in quantum dots generate the intervals of plateaus robust against elevated temperatures. Numerical calculations employing local trigonometric basis and highly efficient kernel polynomial method adopted for computing the Hall conductivity reveal that quantum dots may enhance peak temperature for the effect by an order of magnitude, possibly above 77 K. Requirements to potentials, quality and arrangement of the quantum dots essential for practical realization of such enhancement are indicated. Comparison of our theoretical results with the quantum Hall measurements in InAs quantum dot systems from two experimental groups is also given.

  7. A Comparison of Antibacterial Activity of Selected Thyme (Thymus) Species by Means of the Dot Blot Test with Direct Bioautographic Detection.

    PubMed

    Orłowska, Marta; Kowalska, Teresa; Sajewicz, Mieczysław; Jesionek, Wioleta; Choma, Irena M; Majer-Dziedzic, Barbara; Szymczak, Grażyna; Waksmundzka-Hajnos, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Bioautography carried out with the aid of thin-layer chromatographic adsorbents can be used to assess antibacterial activity in samples of different origin. It can either be used as a simple and cost-effective detection method applied to a developed chromatogram, or to the dot blot test performed on a chromatographic plate, where total antibacterial activity of a sample is scrutinized. It was an aim of this study to compare antibacterial activity of 18 thyme (Thymus) specimens and species (originating from the same gardening plot and harvested in the same period of time) by means of a dot blot test with direct bioautography. A two-step extraction of herbal material was applied, and at step two the polar fraction of secondary metabolites was obtained under the earlier optimized extraction conditions [methanol-water (27+73, v/v), 130°C]. This fraction was then tested for its antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis bacteria. It was established that all investigated extracts exhibited antibacterial activity, yet distinct differences were perceived in the size of the bacterial growth inhibition zones among the compared thyme species. Based on the results obtained, T. citriodorus "golden dwarf" (sample No. 5) and T. marschallianus (sample No. 6) were selected as promising targets for further investigations and possible inclusion in a herbal pharmacopeia, which is an essential scientific novelty of this study. PMID:26268965

  8. Spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Maciej

    Recent advancements in nanotechnology create a need for a better understanding of the underlying physical processes that lead to the different behavior of nanoscale structures in comparison to bulk materials. The influence of the surrounding environment on the physical and optical properties of nanoscale objects embedded inside them is of particular interest. This research is focused on the optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots which are zero-dimensional nanostructures. There are many investigation techniques for measuring the local parameters and structural characteristics of Quantum Dot structures. They include X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy, etc. However, none of these is suitable for the study of large areas of quantum dots matrices and substrates. The existence of spatial inhomogeneity in the quantum dots allows for a deeper and better understanding of underlying physical processes responsible in particular for the observed changes in photoluminescence (PL) characteristics. Spectroscopic PL mapping can reveal areas of improved laser performance of InAs - InGaAs quantum dots structures. Establishing physical mechanisms responsible for two different types of spatial PL inhomogeneity in InAs/InGaAs quantum dots structures for laser applications was the first objective of this research. Most of the bio-applications of semiconductor quantum dots utilize their superior optical properties over organic fluorophores. Therefore, optimization of QD labeling performance with biomolecule attachment was another focus of this research. Semiconductor quantum dots suspended in liquids were investigated, especially the influence of surrounding molecules that may be attached or bio-conjugated to the quantum dots for specific use in biological reactions on the photoluminescence spectrum. Provision of underlying physical mechanisms of optical property instability of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots used for biological

  9. Modulating the processing of emotional stimuli by cognitive demand.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, Tanja S; Sternkopf, Melanie A; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute; Turetsky, Bruce I; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2012-03-01

    Emotional processing is influenced by cognitive processes and vice versa, indicating a profound interaction of these domains. The investigation of the neural mechanisms underlying this interaction is not only highly relevant for understanding the organization of human brain function. Rather, it may also help in understanding dysregulated emotions in affective disorders and in elucidating the neurobiology of cognitive behavioural therapy (e.g. in borderline personality disorder), which aims at modulating dysfunctional emotion processes by cognitive techniques, such as restructuring. In the majority of earlier studies investigating the interaction of emotions and cognition, the main focus has been on the investigation of the effects of emotional stimuli or, more general, emotional processing, e.g. instituted by emotional material that needed to be processed, on cognitive performance and neural activation patterns. Here we pursued the opposite approach and investigated the modulation of implicit processing of emotional stimuli by cognitive demands using an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging--study on a motor short-term memory paradigm with emotional interferences. Subjects were visually presented a finger-sequence consisting either of four (easy condition) or six (difficult condition) items, which they had to memorize. After a short pause positive, negative or neutral International affective picture system pictures or a green dot (as control condition) were presented. Subjects were instructed to reproduce the memorized sequence manually as soon as the picture disappeared. Analysis showed that with increasing cognitive demand (long relative to short sequences), neural responses to emotional pictures were significantly reduced in amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex. In contrast, the more difficult task evoked stronger activation in a widespread frontoparietal network. As stimuli were task-relevant go-cues and hence had to be processed perceptually, we

  10. Luminescent Quantum Dots as Ultrasensitive Biological Labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming

    2000-03-01

    Highly luminescent semiconductor quantum dots have been covalently coupled to biological molecules for use in ultrasensitive biological detection. This new class of luminescent labels is considerably brighter and more resistant againt photobleaching in comparison with organic dyes. Quantum dots labeled with the protein transferrin undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) in cultured HeLa cells, and those dots that were conjugated to immunomolecules recognize specific antibodies or antigens. In addition, we show that DNA functionalized quantum dots can be used to target specific genes by hybridization. We expect that quantum dot bioconjugates will have a broad range of biological applications, such as ligand-receptor interactions, real-time monitoring of molecular trafficking inside living cells, multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), high-sensitivity detection in miniaturized devices (e.g., DNA chips), and fluorescent tagging of combinatorial chemical libraries. A potential clinical application is the use of quantum dots for ultrasensitive viral RNA detection, in which as low as 100 copies of hepatitis C and HIV viruses per ml blood should be detected.

  11. Visual stimuli: past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westheimer, Gerald

    2013-03-01

    The fundamental properties of light and the principles of the structure and function of the visual system were discovered at a time when the only light sources were the sun and the flame of a candle. Contributions by Newton, Huygens, Thomas Young and Purkinje, Helmholtz's ophthalmoscope - all preceded the first incandescent filament. Light bulbs, Xenon arcs, lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), computer monitors then sequentially enlarged the arsenal, and so did the steps from Nicol prism to Polaroid in polarizing light, and from glass and interference filters to laser light in generating monochromatic light. Technological advances have a deep impact on the research topics at any one time, expanding their scope. In particular, utilization of computers now allows the generation and manipulation of targets permitting questions to be approached that could not have been envisaged at the dawn of the technological era of vision research. Just beyond the immediate grasp of even the most thoughtful vision scientist, however, is the concern that stimulus sets originating in mathematicians' and physicists' toolboxes fail to capture some essential ingredients indigenous to human vision. The quest to study vision with stimuli in its own terms continues.

  12. Quantum dot device tunable from single to triple dot system

    SciTech Connect

    Rogge, M. C.; Haug, R. J.; Pierz, K.

    2013-12-04

    We present a lateral quantum dot device which has a tunable number of quantum dots. Depending on easily tunable gate voltages, one, two or three quantum dots are found. They are investigated in transport and charge detection.

  13. The method of constant stimuli is inefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Fitzhugh, Andrew

    1990-01-01

    Simpson (1988) has argued that the method of constant stimuli is as efficient as adaptive methods of threshold estimation and has supported this claim with simulations. It is shown that Simpson's simulations are not a reasonable model of the experimental process and that more plausible simulations confirm that adaptive methods are much more efficient that the method of constant stimuli.

  14. Decimetric radio dot emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészárosová, H.; Karlický, M.; Sawant, H. S.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.; de Andrade, M. C.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We study a rare type of solar radio bursts called decimetric dot emissions. Aims: In the period 1999-2001, 20 events of decimetric dot emissions observed by the Brazilian Solar Spectroscope (BSS) in the frequency range 950-2640 MHz are investigated statistically and compared with radio fine structures of zebras and fibers. Methods: For the study of the spectral characteristics of the dot emissions we use specially developed Interactive Data Language (IDL) software called BSSView and basic statistical methods. Results: We have found that the dm dot emissions, contrary to the fine structures of the type IV bursts (i.e. zebras, fibers, lace bursts, spikes), are not superimposed on any background burst emission. In the radio spectrum, in most cases the dot emissions form chains that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. Because some zebras and fibers, especially those observed with high time and high spectral resolutions, also show emission dots (but superimposed on the background burst emission), we compared the spectral parameters of the dot emissions with the dots being the fine structure of zebras and fibers. For both these dots, similar spectral characteristics were found. Some similarities of the dot emissions can be found also with the lace bursts and spikes. For some events the dot emissions show structural evolution from patterns resembling fibers to patterns resembling zebras and vice versa, or they evolve into fully chaotic patterns. Conclusions: For the first time, we present decimetric dot emissions that appear to be arranged in zebra patterns or fibers. We propose that these emissions are generated by the plasma emission mechanism at the locations in the solar atmosphere where the double resonance condition is fulfilled.

  15. Narcissism dimensions differentially moderate selective attention to evaluative stimuli in incarcerated offenders

    PubMed Central

    Krusemark, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Christopher; Newman, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Narcissistic personality disorder is associated with distinguishing traits including self-enhancement, arrogance and intense reactivity to ego threat. Theoretical accounts of narcissism suggest these heterogeneous behaviors reflect a defensive motivational style that functions to both uphold and protect the self-concept. However, the notion that narcissism can be characterized by grandiose and vulnerable dimensions raises the possibility that these diverse behaviors represent distinct expressions of narcissistic defensiveness. The present study examined whether both dimensions exhibit a general defensive style marked by selective attention to evaluative stimuli or are differentially associated with selective attention to positive and negative information, respectively. Using a dot probe task consisting of valenced and neutral trait adjectives, we evaluated these hypotheses in a group of male offenders. Results indicated that vulnerable narcissism was associated with attention biases for both positive and negative stimuli, though the dimension was further distinguished by disengagement difficulties and a greater recognition memory bias in response to negative words. Conversely, grandiose narcissism was associated with increased accuracy when attending to positive stimuli and directing attention away from negative stimuli. Overall, these findings suggest narcissistic individuals share motivated selective attention in response to evaluative stimuli, while simultaneously highlighting important phenotypic differences between grandiose and vulnerable dimensions. PMID:25330183

  16. Study of polycation-capped Mn:ZnSe quantum dots as a novel fluorescent probe for living cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaobo; Li, Zheng; Wang, Tianlong; Xie, Jin; Wang, Pei-Nan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Chen, Li; Mi, Lan

    2014-05-01

    Transition metal manganese ion (Mn(2+)) doped zinc selenide quantum dots (Mn:ZnSe D-Dots) have been considered as a new material for fluorescent probes in biological labeling. However, this application is limited by the low membrane permeability of D-Dots. In this work, Mn:ZnSe D-Dots were capped with the polycation Sofast to label living cells. For the first time, the efficiency of cellular uptake in living cells is significantly enhanced. Various molar ratios of Sofast to D-Dots were explored and compared to obtain the optimal reaction conditions between Sofast and D-Dots for preparing Sofast/D-Dots nano-compound. A comparison on the fluorescence labeling ability of living cells were made between Sofast/D-Dots and pure D-Dots. Results from laser scanning confocal microscope show that Sofast/D-Dots complexes enter the cells more efficiently than pure D-Dots, even with a lower concentration and shorter incubation time. The cytotoxicities of D-Dots and Sofast/D-Dots were also studied. It was found that Sofast/D-Dots have a much lower cytotoxicity than cadmium-containing quantum dots (i.e. CdTe and CdTe/ZnS). Our results suggest that the non-heavy-metal-containing Sofast/D-Dots complexes have a great potential in the application of biological labeling, especially of long-time bioimaging in living cells. PMID:24488596

  17. Effective Stimuli for Constructing Reliable Neuron Models

    PubMed Central

    Druckmann, Shaul; Berger, Thomas K.; Schürmann, Felix; Hill, Sean; Markram, Henry; Segev, Idan

    2011-01-01

    The rich dynamical nature of neurons poses major conceptual and technical challenges for unraveling their nonlinear membrane properties. Traditionally, various current waveforms have been injected at the soma to probe neuron dynamics, but the rationale for selecting specific stimuli has never been rigorously justified. The present experimental and theoretical study proposes a novel framework, inspired by learning theory, for objectively selecting the stimuli that best unravel the neuron's dynamics. The efficacy of stimuli is assessed in terms of their ability to constrain the parameter space of biophysically detailed conductance-based models that faithfully replicate the neuron's dynamics as attested by their ability to generalize well to the neuron's response to novel experimental stimuli. We used this framework to evaluate a variety of stimuli in different types of cortical neurons, ages and animals. Despite their simplicity, a set of stimuli consisting of step and ramp current pulses outperforms synaptic-like noisy stimuli in revealing the dynamics of these neurons. The general framework that we propose paves a new way for defining, evaluating and standardizing effective electrical probing of neurons and will thus lay the foundation for a much deeper understanding of the electrical nature of these highly sophisticated and non-linear devices and of the neuronal networks that they compose. PMID:21876663

  18. Comparison of two methods for selegiline determination: A flow-injection chemiluminescence method using cadmium sulfide quantum dots and corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khataee, Alireza; Lotfi, Roya; Hasanzadeh, Aliyeh; Iranifam, Mortaza; Zarei, Mahmoud; Joo, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    Two analytical approaches including chemiluminescence (CL) and corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) were developed for sensitive determination of selegiline (SG). We found that the CL intensity of the KMnO4-Na2S2O3 CL system was significantly enhanced in the presence of L-cysteine capped CdS quantum dots (QDs). A possible CL mechanism for this CL reaction is proposed. In the presence of SG, the enhanced CL system was inhibited. Based on this inhibition, a simple and sensitive flow-injection CL method was proposed for the determination of SG. Under optimum experimental conditions, the decreased CL intensity was proportional to SG concentration in the range of 0.01 to 30.0 mg L- 1. The detection limit (3σ) was 0.004 mg L- 1. Also, SG was determined using CD-IMS, and under optimum conditions of CD-IMS, calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.15 to 42.0 mg L- 1, with a detection limit (3σ) of 0.03 mg L- 1. The precision of the two methods was calculated by analyzing samples containing 5.0 mg L- 1 of SG (n = 11). The relative standard deviations (RSDs%) of the flow-injection CL and CD-IMS methods are 2.17% and 3.83%, respectively. The proposed CL system exhibits a higher sensitivity and precision than the CD-IMS method for the determination of SG.

  19. Comparison between dot-immunoblotting assay and clinical sign determination method for quantifying avian infectious bronchitis virus vaccine by titration in embryonated eggs.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Seong-su; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Noh, Jin-Yong; Hong, Woo-tack; Gwon, Gyeong-Bin; Jeong, Jei-Hyun; Jeong, Sol; Youn, Ha-Na; Heo, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2016-04-01

    A sensitive and specific method for measuring the vaccine titer of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is important to commercial manufacturers for improving vaccine quality. Typically, IBV is titrated in embryonated chicken eggs, and the infectivity of the virus dilutions is determined by assessing clinical signs in the embryos as evidence of viral propagation. In this study, we used a dot-immunoblotting assay (DIA) to measure the titers of IBV vaccines that originated from different pathogenic strains or attenuation methods in embryonated eggs, and we compared this assay to the currently used method, clinical sign evaluation. To compare the two methods, we used real-time reverse transcription-PCR, which had the lowest limit of detection for propagated IBV. As a clinical sign of infection, dwarfism of the embryo was quantified using the embryo: egg (EE) index. The DIA showed 9.41% higher sensitivity and 15.5% higher specificity than the clinical sign determination method. The DIA was particularly useful for measuring the titer of IBV vaccine that did not cause apparent stunting but propagated in embryonated chicken eggs such as a heat-adapted vaccine strain. The results of this study indicate that the DIA is a rapid, sensitive, reliable method for determining IBV vaccine titer in embryonated eggs at a relatively low cost. PMID:26802454

  20. Nanocomposite liposomes containing quantum dots and anticancer drugs for bioimaging and therapeutic delivery: a comparison of cationic, PEGylated and deformable liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chih-Jen; Sung, Calvin T.; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A.; Huang, Yu-Jie; Fang, Jia-You

    2013-08-01

    Multifunctional liposomes loaded with quantum dots (QDs) and anticancer drugs were prepared for simultaneous bioimaging and drug delivery. Different formulations, including cationic, PEGylated and deformable liposomes, were compared for their theranostic efficiency. We had evaluated the physicochemical characteristics of these liposomes. The developed liposomes were examined using experimental platforms of cytotoxicity, cell migration, cellular uptake, in vivo melanoma imaging and drug accumulation in tumors. The average size of various nanocomposite liposomes was found to be 92-134 nm. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of QDs within liposomal bilayers. The incorporation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Span 20 into the liposomes greatly increased the fluidity of the bilayers. The liposomes provided sustained release of camptothecin and irinotecan. The cytotoxicity and cell migration assay demonstrated superior activity of cationic liposomes compared with other carriers. Cationic liposomes also showed a significant fluorescence signal in melanoma cells after internalization. The liposomes were intratumorally administered to a melanoma-bearing mouse. Cationic liposomes showed the brightest fluorescence in tumors, followed by classical liposomes. This signal could last for up to 24 h for cationic nanosystems. Intratumoral accumulation of camptothecin from free control was 35 nmol g-1 it could be increased to 50 nmol g-1 after loading with cationic liposomes. However, encapsulation of irinotecan into liposomes did not further increase intratumoral drug accumulation. Cationic liposomes were preferable to other liposomes as nanocarriers in both bioimaging and therapeutic approaches.

  1. Comparison of magneto-optical properties of various excitonic complexes in CdTe and CdSe self-assembled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobak, J.; Smoleński, T.; Goryca, M.; Rousset, J.-G.; Pacuski, W.; Bogucki, A.; Oreszczuk, K.; Kossacki, P.; Nawrocki, M.; Golnik, A.; Płachta, J.; Wojnar, P.; Kruse, C.; Hommel, D.; Potemski, M.; Kazimierczuk, T.

    2016-07-01

    We present a comparative study of two self-assembled quantum dot (QD) systems based on II–VI compounds: CdTe/ZnTe and CdSe/ZnSe. Using magneto-optical techniques we investigated a large population of individual QDs. The systematic photoluminescence studies of emission lines related to the recombination of neutral exciton X, biexciton XX, and singly charged excitons (X+, X‑) allowed us to determine average parameters describing CdTe QDs (CdSe QDs): X–XX transition energy difference 12 meV (24 meV); fine-structure splitting δ1=0.14 meV (δ1=0.47 meV); g-factor g  =  2.12 (g  =  1.71) diamagnetic shift γ=2.5 μeV T‑2 (γ =1.3 μeV T‑2). We find also statistically significant correlations between various parameters describing internal structure of excitonic complexes.

  2. Comparison of magneto-optical properties of various excitonic complexes in CdTe and CdSe self-assembled quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kobak, J; Smoleński, T; Goryca, M; Rousset, J-G; Pacuski, W; Bogucki, A; Oreszczuk, K; Kossacki, P; Nawrocki, M; Golnik, A; Płachta, J; Wojnar, P; Kruse, C; Hommel, D; Potemski, M; Kazimierczuk, T

    2016-07-01

    We present a comparative study of two self-assembled quantum dot (QD) systems based on II-VI compounds: CdTe/ZnTe and CdSe/ZnSe. Using magneto-optical techniques we investigated a large population of individual QDs. The systematic photoluminescence studies of emission lines related to the recombination of neutral exciton X, biexciton XX, and singly charged excitons (X(+), X(-)) allowed us to determine average parameters describing CdTe QDs (CdSe QDs): X-XX transition energy difference 12 meV (24 meV); fine-structure splitting δ1=0.14 meV (δ1=0.47 meV); g-factor g  =  2.12 (g  =  1.71); diamagnetic shift γ=2.5 μeV T(-2) (γ =1.3 μeV T(-2)). We find also statistically significant correlations between various parameters describing internal structure of excitonic complexes. PMID:27173643

  3. Nanocomposite liposomes containing quantum dots and anticancer drugs for bioimaging and therapeutic delivery: a comparison of cationic, PEGylated and deformable liposomes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chih-Jen; Sung, Calvin T; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Huang, Yu-Jie; Fang, Jia-You

    2013-08-16

    Multifunctional liposomes loaded with quantum dots (QDs) and anticancer drugs were prepared for simultaneous bioimaging and drug delivery. Different formulations, including cationic, PEGylated and deformable liposomes, were compared for their theranostic efficiency. We had evaluated the physicochemical characteristics of these liposomes. The developed liposomes were examined using experimental platforms of cytotoxicity, cell migration, cellular uptake, in vivo melanoma imaging and drug accumulation in tumors. The average size of various nanocomposite liposomes was found to be 92–134 nm. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of QDs within liposomal bilayers. The incorporation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Span 20 into the liposomes greatly increased the fluidity of the bilayers. The liposomes provided sustained release of camptothecin and irinotecan. The cytotoxicity and cell migration assay demonstrated superior activity of cationic liposomes compared with other carriers. Cationic liposomes also showed a significant fluorescence signal in melanoma cells after internalization. The liposomes were intratumorally administered to a melanoma-bearing mouse. Cationic liposomes showed the brightest fluorescence in tumors, followed by classical liposomes. This signal could last for up to 24 h for cationic nanosystems. Intratumoral accumulation of camptothecin from free control was 35 nmol g(−1); it could be increased to 50 nmol g(−1) after loading with cationic liposomes. However, encapsulation of irinotecan into liposomes did not further increase intratumoral drug accumulation. Cationic liposomes were preferable to other liposomes as nanocarriers in both bioimaging and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23867977

  4. Ultra-bright and stimuli-responsive fluorescent nanoparticles for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Battistelli, Giulia; Cantelli, Andrea; Guidetti, Gloria; Manzi, Jeannette; Montalti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) are unique contrast agents for bioimaging. Examples of molecular-based fluorescent NPs with brightness similar or superior to semiconductor quantum dots have been reported. These ultra-bright NPs consist of a silica or polymeric matrix that incorporate the emitting dyes as individual moieties or aggregates and promise to be more biocompatible than semiconductor quantum dots. Ultra-bright materials result from heavy doping of the structural matrix, a condition that entails a close mutual proximity of the doping dyes. Ground state and excited state interactions between the molecular emitters yield aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) and proximity-caused quenching (PCQ). In combination with Föster resonance energy transfer (FRET) ACQ and PCQ originate collective phenomena that produce amplified quenching of the nanoprobes. In this focus article, we discuss strategies to achieve ultra-bright nanoprobes avoiding ACQ and PCQ also exploiting aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Amplified quenching, on the other hand, is also proposed as a strategy to design stimuli-responsive fluorogenic probes through disaggregation-induced emission (DIE) in alternative to AIE. As an advantage, DIE consents to design stimuli-responsive materials starting from a large variety of precursors. On the contrary, AIE is characteristic of a limited number of species. Examples of stimuli-responsive fluorogenic probes based on DIE are discussed. PMID:26017007

  5. Sex attracts: investigating individual differences in attentional bias to sexual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kagerer, Sabine; Wehrum, Sina; Klucken, Tim; Walter, Bertram; Vaitl, Dieter; Stark, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the impact of sexual stimuli and the influence of sexual motivation on the performance in a dot-probe task and a line-orientation task in a large sample of males and females. All pictures (neutral, erotic) were rated on the dimensions of valence, arousal, disgust, and sexual arousal. Additionally, questionnaires measuring sexual interest/desire/motivation were employed. The ratings of the sexual stimuli point to a successful picture selection because sexual arousal did not differ between the sexes. The stimuli were equally arousing for men and women. Higher scores in the employed questionnaires measuring sexual interest/desire/motivation led to higher sexual arousal ratings of the sex pictures. Attentional bias towards sex pictures was observed in both experimental tasks. The attentional biases measured by the dot-probe and the line-orientation task were moderately intercorrelated suggesting attentional bias as a possible marker for a sex-attention trait. Finally, only the sexual sensation seeking score correlated with the attentional biases of the two tasks. Future research is needed to increase the predictive power of these indirect measures of sexual interest. PMID:25238545

  6. Quantum Dots: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-11-10

    This review covers the description of the methodologies typically used for the calculation of the electronic structure of self-assembled and colloidal quantum dots. These are illustrated by the results of their application to a selected set of physical effects in quantum dots.

  7. Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Hepp, Aloysius; Bailey, Sheila G.

    2002-10-01

    We have been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe, CuInS2, and CuInSe2 for use in an intermediate bandgap solar cell. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Bawendi, et. al., in the early 1990's. However, unlike previous work in this area we have also utilized single-source precursor molecules in the synthesis process. We will present XRD, TEM, SEM and EDS characterization of our initial attempts at fabricating these quantum dots. Investigation of the size distributions of these nanoparticles via laser light scattering and scanning electron microscopy will be presented. Theoretical estimates on appropriate quantum dot composition, size, and inter-dot spacing along with potential scenarios for solar cell fabrication will be discussed.

  8. Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Hepp, Aloysius; Bailey, Sheila G.

    2002-01-01

    We have been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe, CuInS2, and CuInSe2 for use in an intermediate bandgap solar cell. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Bawendi, et. al., in the early 1990's. However, unlike previous work in this area we have also utilized single-source precursor molecules in the synthesis process. We will present XRD, TEM, SEM and EDS characterization of our initial attempts at fabricating these quantum dots. Investigation of the size distributions of these nanoparticles via laser light scattering and scanning electron microscopy will be presented. Theoretical estimates on appropriate quantum dot composition, size, and inter-dot spacing along with potential scenarios for solar cell fabrication will be discussed.

  9. Generalized Habituation of Concept Stimuli in Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkender, Patricia J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of selective generalization of habituation on the basis of meaningful categories of stimuli. Also explored are the sex differences in conceptual generalization of habituation. Subjects were 36 toddlers with a mean age of 40 months. (SDH)

  10. Stimuli, Reinforcers, and the Persistence of Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, John A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews evidence from basic and translational research with pigeons and humans suggesting that the persistence of operant behavior depends on the contingency between stimuli and reinforcers, and considers some implications for clinical interventions. (Contains 4 figures.)

  11. Priming effects on the perceived grouping of ambiguous dot patterns.

    PubMed

    Kurylo, Daniel D; Bukhari, Farhan

    2015-09-01

    For ambiguous stimuli, complex dynamics guide processes of perceptual grouping. Previous studies have suggested two opposing effects on grouping that are produced by the preliminary stimulus state: one that enhances grouping towards the existing structure, and another that opposes this structure. To examine effects of the preliminary state on grouping directly, measurements were made of perceived grouping of dot patterns that followed a visual prime. Three stimuli were presented in sequence: prime, target, and mask. Targets were composed of an evenly spaced dot grid in which grouping was established by similarity in luminance. Subjects indicated the dominant perceived grouping. The prime either corresponded to or opposed the prevailing organization of the target. Contrary to the hypothesis, solid-line primes biased grouping away from the structure of the prime, even when the prevailing organization of dot patterns strongly favored the primes' structure. This effect occurred, although to a lesser extent, when primes did not occupy the same location of targets, but were presented in a marginal area surrounding the grid. Priming effects did not occur for primes constructed of dot patterns. Effects found here may be attributed to a forward masking effect by primes, which more effectively disrupts grouping of patterns matched to the prime. Effects may also be attributed to a type of pattern contrast, in which a grouped pattern dissimilar to primes gains salience. For the pattern contrast model, the partial activation of multiple grouped configurations is compared to the pattern of the solid-line primes. PMID:25281427

  12. Bile salts are effective taste stimuli in channel catfish.

    PubMed

    Rolen, S H; Caprio, J

    2008-09-01

    Bile salts are known olfactory stimuli for teleosts, but only a single report has indicated that the taste system of a fish was sensitive to this class of stimuli. Here, gustatory responses of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, to four bile salts that included taurine-, glycine- and non-conjugated compounds along with three stimulatory amino acids as a comparison were investigated using extracellular electrophysiological techniques. Integrated multiunit responses were obtained from the branch of the facial nerve innervating taste buds on the maxillary barbel. Bile salts were shown to be highly effective facial taste stimuli, with estimated electrophysiological thresholds for three of the four tested bile salts of approximately 10(-11) mol l(-1) to 10(-10) mol l(-1), slightly lower by 1-2 log units than those to amino acids in the same species. Although the sensitivity of the facial taste system of the channel catfish to bile salts is high, the relative magnitude of the response to suprathreshold concentrations of bile salts was significantly less than that to amino acids. Multiunit cross-adaptation experiments indicate that bile salts and amino acids bind to relatively independent receptor sites; however, nerve-twig data and single-fiber recordings suggest that both independent and shared neural pathways exist for the transmission of bile salt and amino acid information to the primary gustatory nucleus of the medulla. PMID:18723536

  13. Comparison of two methods for selegiline determination: A flow-injection chemiluminescence method using cadmium sulfide quantum dots and corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Khataee, Alireza; Lotfi, Roya; Hasanzadeh, Aliyeh; Iranifam, Mortaza; Zarei, Mahmoud; Joo, Sang Woo

    2016-01-15

    Two analytical approaches including chemiluminescence (CL) and corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) were developed for sensitive determination of selegiline (SG). We found that the CL intensity of the KMnO4-Na2S2O3 CL system was significantly enhanced in the presence of L-cysteine capped CdS quantum dots (QDs). A possible CL mechanism for this CL reaction is proposed. In the presence of SG, the enhanced CL system was inhibited. Based on this inhibition, a simple and sensitive flow-injection CL method was proposed for the determination of SG. Under optimum experimental conditions, the decreased CL intensity was proportional to SG concentration in the range of 0.01 to 30.0 mg L(-1). The detection limit (3σ) was 0.004 mg L(-1). Also, SG was determined using CD-IMS, and under optimum conditions of CD-IMS, calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.15 to 42.0 mg L(-1), with a detection limit (3σ) of 0.03 mg L(-1). The precision of the two methods was calculated by analyzing samples containing 5.0 mg L(-1) of SG (n=11). The relative standard deviations (RSDs%) of the flow-injection CL and CD-IMS methods are 2.17% and 3.83%, respectively. The proposed CL system exhibits a higher sensitivity and precision than the CD-IMS method for the determination of SG. PMID:26318702

  14. Comparison of Toxicity of CdSe: ZnS Quantum Dots on Male Reproductive System in Different Stages of Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Gholamreza; Valipoor, Akram; Parivar, Kazem; Modaresi, Mehrdad; Noori, Ali; Gharamaleki, Hamideh; Taheri, Jafar; Kazemi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Quantum dots (QDs) are new types of fluorescent materials for biological labeling. QDs toxicity study is an essential requirement for future clinical applications. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate cytotoxic effects of CdSe: ZnS QDs on male reproductive system. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, the different concentrations of CdSe: ZnS QDs (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) were injected to 32 male mice (adult group) and 24 pregnant mice (embryo group) on day 8 of gestation. The histological changes of testis and epididymis were studied by a light microscopy, and the number of seminiferous tubules between two groups was compared. One-way analysis of variance (one-way Anova) using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, SPSS Inc., USA) version 16 were performed for statistical analysis. Results In adult group, histological studies of testis tissues showed a high toxicity of CdSe: ZnS in 40 mg/kg dose followed by a decrease in lamina propria; destruction in interstitial tissue; deformation of seminiferous tubules; and a reduction in number of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids. However, there was an interesting result in fetal testis development, meaning there was no significant effect on morphology and structure of the seminiferous tubules and number of sperm stem cells. Also histological study of epididymis tissues in both groups (adult and embryo groups) showed no significant effect on morphology and structure of tubule and epithelial cells, but there was a considerable reduction in number of spermatozoa in the lumen of the epididymal duct in 40 mg/kg dose of adult group. Conclusion The toxicity of QDs on testicular tissue of the mice embryo and adult are different before and after puberty. Due to lack of research in this field, this study can be an introduction to evaluate the toxicity of QDs on male reproduction system in different stages of development. PMID:26985339

  15. Cytotoxicity of quantum dots used for in vitro cellular labeling: role of QD surface ligand, delivery modality, cell type, and direct comparison to organic fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Bradburne, Christopher E; Delehanty, James B; Boeneman Gemmill, Kelly; Mei, Bing C; Mattoussi, Hedi; Susumu, Kimihiro; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B; Dawson, Philip E; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-09-18

    Interest in taking advantage of the unique spectral properties of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) has driven their widespread use in biological applications such as in vitro cellular labeling/imaging and sensing. Despite their demonstrated utility, concerns over the potential toxic effects of QD core materials on cellular proliferation and homeostasis have persisted, leaving in question the suitability of QDs as alternatives for more traditional fluorescent materials (e.g., organic dyes, fluorescent proteins) for in vitro cellular applications. Surprisingly, direct comparative studies examining the cytotoxic potential of QDs versus these more traditional cellular labeling fluorophores remain limited. Here, using CdSe/ZnS (core/shell) QDs as a prototypical assay material, we present a comprehensive study in which we characterize the influence of QD dose (concentration and incubation time), QD surface capping ligand, and delivery modality (peptide or cationic amphiphile transfection reagent) on cellular viability in three human cell lines representing various morphological lineages (epithelial, endothelial, monocytic). We further compare the effects of QD cellular labeling on cellular proliferation relative to those associated with a panel of traditionally employed organic cell labeling fluorophores that span a broad spectral range. Our results demonstrate the important role played by QD dose, capping ligand structure, and delivery agent in modulating cellular toxicity. Further, the results show that at the concentrations and time regimes required for robust QD-based cellular labeling, the impact of our in-house synthesized QD materials on cellular proliferation is comparable to that of six commercial cell labeling fluorophores. Cumulatively, our results demonstrate that the proper tuning of QD dose, surface ligand, and delivery modality can provide robust in vitro cell labeling reagents that exhibit minimal impact on cellular viability. PMID:23879393

  16. Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles from ionic cellulose derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonggui; Heinze, Thomas; Zhang, Kai

    2015-12-01

    Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles (NPs) based on sustainable polymeric feedstock still need more exploration in comparison with NPs based on synthetic polymers. In this report, stimuli-responsive NPs from novel ionic cellulose derivatives were prepared via a facile nanoprecipitation. Cellulose 10-undecenoyl ester (CUE) with a degree of substitution (DS) of 3 was synthesized by esterification of cellulose with 10-undecenoyl chloride. Then, CUE was modified by photo-induced thiol-ene reactions, in order to obtain organo-soluble ionic cellulose derivatives with DSs of ~3, namely cellulose 11-((3-carboxyl)ethylthio)undecanoate (CUE-MPA), cellulose 11-((2-aminoethyl)thio)undecanoate (CUE-CA), cellulose 11-(2-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)thio)undecanoate (CUE-DEAET) and cellulose 11-(2-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)thio)undecanoate (CUE-DMAET). CUE-MPA could be transformed into NPs with average diameters in the range of 80-330 nm, but these NPs did not show particular stimuli-responsive properties. Moreover, the dropping technique resulted in smaller NPs than a dialysis technique. Stable NPs with average diameters in the range of 90-180 nm showing pH-responsive and switchable sizes were obtained from CUE-DEAET and CUE-DMAET possessing tertiary amines using nanoprecipitation. Thus, altering the terminal functional groups will be a new approach to prepare stimuli-responsive cellulose-derived polymeric NPs.Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles (NPs) based on sustainable polymeric feedstock still need more exploration in comparison with NPs based on synthetic polymers. In this report, stimuli-responsive NPs from novel ionic cellulose derivatives were prepared via a facile nanoprecipitation. Cellulose 10-undecenoyl ester (CUE) with a degree of substitution (DS) of 3 was synthesized by esterification of cellulose with 10-undecenoyl chloride. Then, CUE was modified by photo-induced thiol-ene reactions, in order to obtain organo-soluble ionic cellulose derivatives with DSs of ~3, namely cellulose

  17. Binocular combination of second-order stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiawei; Liu, Rong; Zhou, Yifeng; Hess, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Phase information is a fundamental aspect of visual stimuli. However, the nature of the binocular combination of stimuli defined by modulations in contrast, so-called second-order stimuli, is presently not clear. To address this issue, we measured binocular combination for first- (luminance modulated) and second-order (contrast modulated) stimuli using a binocular phase combination paradigm in seven normal adults. We found that the binocular perceived phase of second-order gratings depends on the interocular signal ratio as has been previously shown for their first order counterparts; the interocular signal ratios when the two eyes were balanced was close to 1 in both first- and second-order phase combinations. However, second-order combination is more linear than previously found for first-order combination. Furthermore, binocular combination of second-order stimuli was similar regardless of whether the carriers in the two eyes were correlated, anti-correlated, or uncorrelated. This suggests that, in normal adults, the binocular phase combination of second-order stimuli occurs after the monocular extracting of the second-order modulations. The sensory balance associated with this second-order combination can be obtained from binocular phase combination measurements. PMID:24404180

  18. Binocular Combination of Second-Order Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei; Liu, Rong; Zhou, Yifeng; Hess, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Phase information is a fundamental aspect of visual stimuli. However, the nature of the binocular combination of stimuli defined by modulations in contrast, so-called second-order stimuli, is presently not clear. To address this issue, we measured binocular combination for first- (luminance modulated) and second-order (contrast modulated) stimuli using a binocular phase combination paradigm in seven normal adults. We found that the binocular perceived phase of second-order gratings depends on the interocular signal ratio as has been previously shown for their first order counterparts; the interocular signal ratios when the two eyes were balanced was close to 1 in both first- and second-order phase combinations. However, second-order combination is more linear than previously found for first-order combination. Furthermore, binocular combination of second-order stimuli was similar regardless of whether the carriers in the two eyes were correlated, anti-correlated, or uncorrelated. This suggests that, in normal adults, the binocular phase combination of second-order stimuli occurs after the monocular extracting of the second-order modulations. The sensory balance associated with this second-order combination can be obtained from binocular phase combination measurements. PMID:24404180

  19. Fractionated Reaction Time Responses to Auditory and Electrocutaneous Stimuli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beehler, Pamela J. Hoyes; Kamen, Gary

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to equate auditory and electrocutaneous stimuli. These equated stimuli were used in a second investigation examining neuromotor responses to stimuli of varying intensity. Results are provided. (Author/MT)

  20. Pointing Hand Stimuli Induce Spatial Compatibility Effects and Effector Priming

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Akio; Michimata, Chikashi

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the automatic influence of perceiving a picture that indicates other’s action on one’s own task performance in terms of spatial compatibility and effector priming. Participants pressed left and right buttons with their left and right hands respectively, depending on the color of a central dot target. Preceding the target, a left or right hand stimulus (pointing either to the left or right with the index or little finger) was presented. In Experiment 1, with brief presentation of the pointing hand, a spatial compatibility effect was observed: responses were faster when the direction of the pointed finger and the response position were spatially congruent than when incongruent. The spatial compatibility effect was larger for the pointing index finger stimulus compared to the pointing little finger stimulus. Experiment 2 employed longer duration of the pointing hand stimuli. In addition to the spatial compatibility effect for the pointing index finger, the effector priming effect was observed: responses were faster when the anatomical left/right identity of the pointing and response hands matched than when the pointing and response hands differed in left/right identity. The results indicate that with sufficient processing time, both spatial/symbolic and anatomical features of a static body part implying another’s action simultaneously influence different aspects of the perceiver’s own action. Hierarchical coding, according to which an anatomical code is used only when a spatial code is unavailable, may not be applicable if stimuli as well as responses contain anatomical features. PMID:23637688

  1. Emotional stimuli and motor conversion disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Ameli, Rezvan; Roelofs, Karin; LaFrance, W. Curt; Hallett, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Conversion disorder is characterized by neurological signs and symptoms related to an underlying psychological issue. Amygdala activity to affective stimuli is well characterized in healthy volunteers with greater amygdala activity to both negative and positive stimuli relative to neutral stimuli, and greater activity to negative relative to positive stimuli. We investigated the relationship between conversion disorder and affect by assessing amygdala activity to affective stimuli. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging study using a block design incidental affective task with fearful, happy and neutral face stimuli and compared valence contrasts between 16 patients with conversion disorder and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. The patients with conversion disorder had positive movements such as tremor, dystonia or gait abnormalities. We also assessed functional connectivity between the amygdala and regions associated with motor preparation. A group by affect valence interaction was observed. Post hoc analyses revealed that whereas healthy volunteers had greater right amygdala activity to fearful versus neutral compared with happy versus neutral as expected, there were no valence differences in patients with conversion disorder. There were no group differences observed. The time course analysis also revealed greater right amygdala activity in patients with conversion disorder for happy stimuli (t = 2.96, P = 0.006) (with a trend for fearful stimuli, t = 1.81, P = 0.08) compared with healthy volunteers, with a pattern suggestive of impaired amygdala habituation even when controlling for depressive and anxiety symptoms. Using psychophysiological interaction analysis, patients with conversion disorder had greater functional connectivity between the right amygdala and the right supplementary motor area during both fearful versus neutral, and happy versus neutral ‘stimuli’ compared with healthy volunteers. These results were confirmed with

  2. Short term memory for tactile stimuli.

    PubMed

    Gallace, Alberto; Tan, Hong Z; Haggard, Patrick; Spence, Charles

    2008-01-23

    Research has shown that unreported information stored in rapidly decaying visual representations may be accessed more accurately using partial report than using full report procedures (e.g., [Sperling, G., 1960. The information available in brief visual presentations. Psychological Monographs, 74, 1-29.]). In the 3 experiments reported here, we investigated whether unreported information regarding the actual number of tactile stimuli presented in parallel across the body surface can be accessed using a partial report procedure. In Experiment 1, participants had to report the total number of stimuli in a tactile display composed of up to 6 stimuli presented across their body (numerosity task), or else to detect whether or not a tactile stimulus had previously been presented in a position indicated by a visual probe given at a variable delay after offset of a tactile display (i.e., partial report). The results showed that participants correctly reported up to 3 stimuli in the numerosity judgment task, but their performance was significantly better than chance when up to 5 stimuli were presented in the partial report task. This result shows that short-lasting tactile representations can be accessed using partial report procedures similar to those used previously in visual studies. Experiment 2 showed that the duration of these representations (or the time available to consciously access them) depends on the number of stimuli presented in the display (the greater the number of stimuli that are presented, the faster their representation decays). Finally, the results of a third experiment showed that the differences in performance between the numerosity judgment and partial report tasks could not be explained solely in terms of any difference in task difficulty. PMID:18083147

  3. Attentional Processing of Faces in ASD: A Dot-Probe Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David J.; Heavey, Lisa; Reidy, John

    2012-01-01

    The present study used the Dot-Probe paradigm to explore attentional allocation to faces compared with non-social images in high-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing controls. There was no evidence of attentional bias in either group when stimuli were presented at individually calculated…

  4. Dots and Cubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Bryan L.

    1974-01-01

    Illustrated is the mathematical analysis of a three-dimensional game using techniques from the calculus of finite differences. This game is an analog of the familiar two-dimensional game, Dots and Squares. (JP)

  5. Recall and recognition hypermnesia for Socratic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kazén, Miguel; Solís-Macías, Víctor M

    2016-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigate hypermnesia, net memory improvements with repeated testing of the same material after a single study trial. In the first experiment, we found hypermnesia across three trials for the recall of word solutions to Socratic stimuli (dictionary-like definitions of concepts) replicating Erdelyi, Buschke, and Finkelstein and, for the first time using these materials, for their recognition. In the second experiment, we had two "yes/no" recognition groups, a Socratic stimuli group presented with concrete and abstract verbal materials and a word-only control group. Using signal detection measures, we found hypermnesia for concrete Socratic stimuli-and stable performance for abstract stimuli across three recognition tests. The control group showed memory decrements across tests. We interpret these findings with the alternative retrieval pathways (ARP) hypothesis, contrasting it with alternative theories of hypermnesia, such as depth of processing, generation and retrieve-recognise. We conclude that recognition hypermnesia for concrete Socratic stimuli is a reliable phenomenon, which we found in two experiments involving both forced-choice and yes/no recognition procedures. PMID:25523628

  6. Stimuli-responsive materials in analytical separation.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Rosa A; Carro, Antonia M; Concheiro, Angel; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    This review focuses on the fundamentals of stimuli-responsive materials and their applications to three common separation techniques, namely extraction, chromatography, and electrophoresis. Although still little investigated, materials that switch their affinity for the analyte on and off as a function of tiny changes in physical and biochemical variables offer relevant advantages for analyte extraction, concentration, and separation. Temperature and/or pH-responsive polymers in the form of chains or networks, which are dispersed in the sample as free entities or after being grafted onto beads (which may incorporate magnetic cores), enable quantitative capture and/or elution of the analyte under mild conditions and without needing organic solvents. Regarding liquid-chromatography separation, responsive stationary phases enable the implementation of "all-in-water" procedures in which retention times are modulated by means of temperature or pH gradients. Other stimuli that can be externally applied, for example light or magnetic fields, can also be used for efficient extraction or separation of the target substance without altering the composition of the sample matrix. Moreover, stimuli-responsiveness enables straightforward recycling of solid and/or stationary phases for a prolonged lifetime. Improved understanding of the phase transitions of stimuli-responsive materials and design of suitable formats for analytical applications should enable wider and more successful application of stimuli-responsive materials in analytical separations. PMID:25910881

  7. Stimuli-responsive dendrimers in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Huang, Quan; Chang, Hong; Xiao, Jianru; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-03-01

    Dendrimers have shown great promise as carriers in drug delivery due to their unique structures and superior properties. However, the precise control of payload release from a dendrimer matrix still presents a great challenge. Stimuli-responsive dendrimers that release payloads in response to a specific trigger could offer distinct clinical advantages over those dendrimers that release payloads passively. These smart polymers are designed to specifically release their payloads at targeted regions or at constant release profiles for specific therapies. They represent an attractive alternative to targeted dendrimers and enable dendrimer-based therapeutics to be more effective, more convenient, and much safer. The wide range of stimuli, either endogenous (acid, enzyme, and redox potentials) or exogenous (light, ultrasound, and temperature change), allows great flexibility in the design of stimuli-responsive dendrimers. In this review article, we will highlight recent advances and opportunities in the development of stimuli-responsive dendrimers for the treatment of various diseases, with emphasis on cancer. Specifically, the applications of stimuli-responsive dendrimers in drug delivery as well as their mechanisms are intensively reviewed. PMID:26806314

  8. Dynamic bioactive stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Heather Marie

    This dissertation focuses on the design, synthesis, and development of antimicrobial and anticoagulant surfaces of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) polymers. Aliphatic polymeric surfaces of PE and PP polymers functionalized using click chemistry reactions by the attachment of --COOH groups via microwave plasma reactions followed by functionalization with alkyne moieties. Azide containing ampicillin (AMP) was synthesized and subsequently clicked into the alkyne prepared PE and PP surfaces. Compared to non-functionalized PP and PE surfaces, the AMP clicked surfaces exhibited substantially enhanced antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. To expand the biocompatibility of polymeric surface anticoagulant attributes, PE and PTFE surfaces were functionalized with pH-responsive poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P2VP) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polyelectrolyte tethers terminated with NH2 and COOH groups. The goal of these studies was to develop switchable stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces that interact with biological environments and display simultaneous antimicrobial and anticoagulant properties. Antimicrobial AMP was covalently attached to --COOH terminal ends of protected PAA, while anticoagulant heparin (HEP) was attached to terminal --NH2 groups of P2VP. When pH < 2.3, the P2VP segments are protonated and extend, but for pH > 5.5, they collapse while the PAA segments extend. Such surfaces, when exposed to Staphylococcus aureus, inhibit bacterial growth due to the presence of AMP, as well as are effective anticoagulants due to the presence of covalently attached HEP. Comparison of these "dynamic" pH responsive surfaces with "static" surfaces terminated with AMP entities show significant enhancement of longevity and surface activity against microbial film formation. The last portion of this dissertation focuses on the covalent attachment of living T1 and Φ11 bacteriophages (phages) on PE and PTFE surface

  9. Verbal Establishing Stimuli: Testing the Motivative Effect of Stimuli in a Derived Relation with Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ju, Winifred C.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined whether the presentation of stimuli in equivalence relations with consequences increases the operant behavior that produces these consequences. In Experiment 1, both normal words and experimentally trained equivalence stimuli did so with young children. In Experiment 2, results were similar with college students. Here, a…

  10. VEP Responses to Op-Art Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    O’Hare, Louise; Clarke, Alasdair D. F.; Pollux, Petra M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Several types of striped patterns have been reported to cause adverse sensations described as visual discomfort. Previous research using op-art-based stimuli has demonstrated that spurious eye movement signals can cause the experience of illusory motion, or shimmering effects, which might be perceived as uncomfortable. Whilst the shimmering effects are one cause of discomfort, another possible contributor to discomfort is excessive neural responses: As striped patterns do not have the statistical redundancy typical of natural images, they are perhaps unable to be encoded efficiently. If this is the case, then this should be seen in the amplitude of the EEG response. This study found that stimuli that were judged to be most comfortable were also those with the lowest EEG amplitude. This provides some support for the idea that excessive neural responses might also contribute to discomfort judgements in normal populations, in stimuli controlled for perceived contrast. PMID:26422207

  11. Transformation of the Discriminative and Eliciting Functions of Generalized Relational Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougher, Michael J.; Hamilton, Derek; Fink, Brandi; Harrington, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    In three experiments, match-to-sample procedures were used with undergraduates to establish arbitrary relational functions for three abstract visual stimuli. In the presence of samples A, B, and C, participants were trained to select the smallest, middle, and largest member, respectively, of a series of three-comparison arrays. In Experiment 1,…

  12. Electrodermal Activity to Auditory Stimuli in Autistic, Retarded, and Normal Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Sheila; Gruzelier, John

    1984-01-01

    Electrodermal activity to auditory stimuli was compared in 20 autistic children and their matched retarded and normal controls (N=80). The autistic children were virtually indistinguishable in individual features of electrodermal activity from controls when both chronological and mental age comparisons were accounted for. (Author/CL)

  13. Effects of data limitations on heartbeat detection in the method of constant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Brener, J; Ring, C; Liu, X

    1994-05-01

    In the method of constant stimuli applied to measuring heartbeat detection, subjects judge the simultaneity of heartbeats and exteroceptive comparison stimuli presented at various intervals after the R-wave (0, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 ms). Using versions of this procedure, investigators have found that between 20% (Yates, Jones, Marie, & Hogben, 1985) and 54% (Brener, Liu, & Ring, 1993) of subjects can detect heartbeat sensations. Whereas Yates et al. used a single comparison stimulus on each trial and Brener et al. used 10, the present study examined whether this disparity in heartbeat detection performance could be attributed to the number of comparison stimuli presented on each trial. In each of 360 trials, 30 subjects judged the simultaneity of heartbeat sensations and tones following 1, 5, or 10 comparison stimulus presentations. Significantly fewer subjects met the criterion for heartbeat detection with 1 tone presentation (13%) than with either 5 (43%) or 10 (47%) tone presentations. It is concluded that a single stimulus presentation imposes data limitations that result in underestimation of the accuracy of heartbeat detection. The presentation of at least 5 stimuli in each trial alleviates this limitation. PMID:8008794

  14. Depth Perception Not Found in Human Observers for Static or Dynamic Anti-Correlated Random Dot Stereograms

    PubMed Central

    Hibbard, Paul B.; Scott-Brown, Kenneth C.; Haigh, Emma C.; Adrain, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in visual neuroscience is that of linking neural activity with perceptual experience. In the case of binocular depth perception, important insights have been achieved through comparing neural responses and the perception of depth, for carefully selected stimuli. One of the most important types of stimulus that has been used here is the anti-correlated random dot stereogram (ACRDS). In these stimuli, the contrast polarity of one half of a stereoscopic image is reversed. While neurons in cortical area V1 respond reliably to the binocular disparities in ACRDS, they do not create a sensation of depth. This discrepancy has been used to argue that depth perception must rely on neural activity elsewhere in the brain. Currently, the psychophysical results on which this argument rests are not clear-cut. While it is generally assumed that ACRDS do not support the perception of depth, some studies have reported that some people, some of the time, perceive depth in some types of these stimuli. Given the importance of these results for understanding the neural correlates of stereopsis, we studied depth perception in ACRDS using a large number of observers, in order to provide an unambiguous conclusion about the extent to which these stimuli support the perception of depth. We presented observers with random dot stereograms in which correlated dots were presented in a surrounding annulus and correlated or anti-correlated dots were presented in a central circular region. While observers could reliably report the depth of the central region for correlated stimuli, we found no evidence for depth perception in static or dynamic anti-correlated stimuli. Confidence ratings for stereoscopic perception were uniformly low for anti-correlated stimuli, but showed normal variation with disparity for correlated stimuli. These results establish that the inability of observers to perceive depth in ACRDS is a robust phenomenon. PMID:24416195

  15. Skidmore Clips of Neutral and Expressive Scenarios (SCENES): Novel dynamic stimuli for social cognition research.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Casey A; Weeks, Justin W; Taylor, Lea; Karnedy, Colten

    2015-12-30

    Social cognition research has relied primarily on photographic emotional stimuli. Such stimuli likely have limited ecological validity in terms of representing real world social interactions. The current study presents evidence for the validity of a new stimuli set of dynamic social SCENES (Skidmore Clips of Emotional and Neutral Expressive Scenarios). To develop these stimuli, ten undergraduate theater students were recruited to portray members of an audience. This audience was configured to display (seven) varying configurations of social feedback, ranging from unequivocally approving to unequivocally disapproving (including three different versions of balanced/neutral scenes). Validity data were obtained from 383 adult participants recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk. Each participant viewed three randomly assigned scenes and provided a rating of the perceived criticalness of each scene. Results indicate that the SCENES reflect the intended range of emotionality, and pairwise comparisons suggest that the SCENES capture distinct levels of critical feedback. Overall, the SCENES stimuli set represents a publicly available (www.scenesstimuli.com) resource for researchers interested in measuring social cognition in the presence of dynamic and naturalistic social stimuli. PMID:26553146

  16. Potential bronchoconstrictor stimuli in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.R.; Fine, J.M.; Gordon, T.; Sheppard, D.

    1989-02-01

    Acid fog is complex and contains multiple stimuli that may be capable of inducing bronchoconstriction. These stimuli include sulfuric and nitric acids, the principal inorganic acids present; sulfites, formed in the atmosphere as a reaction product of sulfur dioxide and water droplets; fog water itself, a hypoosmolar aerosol; the organic acid hydroxymethanesulfonate, the bisulfite adduct of formaldehyde; and gaseous pollutants, e.g., sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, ozone. Given this complexity, evaluation of the respiratory health effects of naturally occurring acid fog requires assessment of the bronchoconstrictor potency of each component stimulus and possible interactions among these stimuli. We summarize the results of three studies that involve characterization of the bronchoconstrictor potency of acid fog stimuli and/or their interaction in subjects with asthma. The results of the first study indicate that titratable acidity appears to be a more important stimulus to bronchoconstriction than is pH. The results of the second study demonstrate that sulfite species are capable of inducing bronchoconstriction, especially when inhaled at acid pH. The results of the third study suggest that acidity can potentiate hypoosmolar fog-induced bronchoconstriction.

  17. Potential bronchoconstrictor stimuli in acid fog.

    PubMed Central

    Balmes, J R; Fine, J M; Gordon, T; Sheppard, D

    1989-01-01

    Acid fog is complex and contains multiple stimuli that may be capable of inducing bronchoconstriction. These stimuli include sulfuric and niric acids, the principal inorganic acids present; sulfites, formed in the atmosphere as a reaction product of sulfur dioxide and water droplets; fog water itself, a hypoosmolar aerosol; the organic acid hydroxymethanesulfonate, the bisulfite adduct of formaldehyde; and gaseous pollutants, e.g., sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, ozone. Given this complexity, evaluation of the respiratory health effects of naturally occurring acid fog requires assessment of the bronchoconstrictor potency of each component stimulus and possible interactions among these stimuli. We summarize the results of three studies that involve characterization of the bronchoconstrictor potency of acid fog stimuli and/or their interaction in subjects with asthma. The results of the first study indicate that titratable acidity appears to be a more important stimulus to bronchoconstriction than is pH. The results of the second study demonstrate that sulfite species are capable of inducing bronchoconstriction, especially when inhaled at acid pH. The results of the third study suggest that acidity can potentiate hypoosmolar fog-induced bronchoconstriction. PMID:2539989

  18. Responses to Urban Stimuli: A Balanced Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Daniel M.

    1980-01-01

    Proposes an alternative to Milgram's overload model of urban behavior. Suggests that intense, complex and/or novel stimuli may lead to positive as well as negative effects, and that this may vary across persons or over time. Presents data that confirm the importance of urban complexity as an organizing variable. (Author/GC)

  19. Musicians' Perception of Beat in Monotonic Stimuli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Assesses musicians' perceptions of beat in monotonic stimuli and attempts to define empirically the range of perceived beat tempo in music. Subjects performed a metric pulse in response to periodic stimulus tones. Results indicate a relatively narrow range within which beats are perceived by trained musicians. (LS)

  20. Categorization of Multidimensional Stimuli by Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Mark E.; Grace, Randolph C.

    2011-01-01

    Six pigeons responded in a visual category learning task in which the stimuli were dimensionally separable Gabor patches that varied in frequency and orientation. We compared performance in two conditions which varied in terms of whether accurate performance required that responding be controlled jointly by frequency and orientation, or…

  1. Contingent Stimuli Signal Subsequent Reinforcer Ratios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutros, Nathalie; Davison, Michael; Elliffe, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Conditioned reinforcer effects may be due to the stimulus' discriminative rather than its strengthening properties. While this was demonstrated in a frequently-changing choice procedure, a single attempt to replicate in a relatively static choice environment failed. We contend that this was because the information provided by the stimuli was…

  2. Regional brain responses in nulliparous women to emotional infant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Jessica L; Landi, Nicole; Kober, Hedy; Worhunsky, Patrick D; Rutherford, Helena J V; Mencl, W Einar; Mayes, Linda C; Potenza, Marc N

    2012-01-01

    Infant cries and facial expressions influence social interactions and elicit caretaking behaviors from adults. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that neural responses to infant stimuli involve brain regions that process rewards. However, these studies have yet to investigate individual differences in tendencies to engage or withdraw from motivationally relevant stimuli. To investigate this, we used event-related fMRI to scan 17 nulliparous women. Participants were presented with novel infant cries of two distress levels (low and high) and unknown infant faces of varying affect (happy, sad, and neutral) in a randomized, counter-balanced order. Brain activation was subsequently correlated with scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System scale. Infant cries activated bilateral superior and middle temporal gyri (STG and MTG) and precentral and postcentral gyri. Activation was greater in bilateral temporal cortices for low- relative to high-distress cries. Happy relative to neutral faces activated the ventral striatum, caudate, ventromedial prefrontal, and orbitofrontal cortices. Sad versus neutral faces activated the precuneus, cuneus, and posterior cingulate cortex, and behavioral activation drive correlated with occipital cortical activations in this contrast. Behavioral inhibition correlated with activation in the right STG for high- and low-distress cries relative to pink noise. Behavioral drive correlated inversely with putamen, caudate, and thalamic activations for the comparison of high-distress cries to pink noise. Reward-responsiveness correlated with activation in the left precentral gyrus during the perception of low-distress cries relative to pink noise. Our findings indicate that infant cry stimuli elicit activations in areas implicated in auditory processing and social cognition. Happy infant faces may be encoded as rewarding, whereas sad faces activate regions associated with empathic processing. Differences in motivational

  3. Sex differences in event-related potentials and attentional biases to emotional facial stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Pfabigan, Daniela M.; Lamplmayr-Kragl, Elisabeth; Pintzinger, Nina M.; Sailer, Uta; Tran, Ulrich S.

    2014-01-01

    Attentional processes play an important role in the processing of emotional information. Previous research reported attentional biases during stimulus processing in anxiety and depression. However, sex differences in the processing of emotional stimuli and higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders among women, compared to men, suggest that attentional biases may also differ between the two sexes. The present study used a modified version of the dot probe task with happy, angry, and neutral facial stimuli to investigate the time course of attentional biases in healthy volunteers. Moreover, associations of attentional biases with alexithymia were examined on the behavioral and physiological level. Event-related potentials were measured while 21 participants (11 women) performed the task, utilizing also for the first time a difference wave approach in the analysis to highlight emotion-specific aspects. Women showed overall enhanced probe P1 amplitudes compared to men, in particular after rewarding facial stimuli. Using the difference wave approach, probe P1 amplitudes appeared specifically enhanced with regard to congruently presented happy facial stimuli among women, compared to men. Both methods yielded enhanced probe P1 amplitudes after presentation of the emotional stimulus in the left compared to the right visual hemifield. Probe P1 amplitudes correlated negatively with self-reported alexithymia, most of these correlations were only observable in women. Our results suggest that women orient their attention to a greater extent to facial stimuli than men and corroborate that alexithymia is a correlate of reduced emotional reactivity on a neuronal level. We recommend using a difference wave approach when addressing attentional processes of orientation and disengagement also in future studies. PMID:25566151

  4. Appetitive responses to computer-generated visual stimuli by the praying mantis Sphodromantis lineola (Burr.).

    PubMed

    Prete, F R; Mahaffey, R J

    1993-01-01

    Tethered adult female praying mantises, Sphodromantis lineola (Burr.), were presented with various computer-generated visual stimuli that moved against patterned or homogeneous white backgrounds in predetermined patterns and at predetermined speeds. The degrees to which the stimulus configurations elicited appetitive behaviors (attempting to approach and/or striking) indicated the relative degrees to which the stimuli were classified as prey. Mantises readily struck at cartoon "crickets" that subtended visual angles as great as 24.5 deg x 62.5 deg, but response rate was suppressed if the stimuli were superimposed on horizontally moving patterned backgrounds. Mantises also displayed appetitive behaviors to moving black squares (edge lengths = 10-47 deg) that moved in predetermined "erratic" paths; however, their response rates were affected by several factors: (1) response rate declined as edge length increased over 10 deg; (2) striking was emitted to stimuli viewed from 23 mm (but not farther) away; and (3) both stimulus displacement rate (distance moved between video frames) and apparent speed (video frame rate) dramatically affected the releasing strength of the stimuli. Finally, mantises responded appetitively to random dot patterns moving synchronously against identically patterned backgrounds and to pairs of black squares moving synchronously against a white background. However, in the latter case, response rate declined as the squares were moved farther apart horizontally or vertically. These and previous results from our laboratory on mantises are congruent with behavioral results obtained from other insects such as flies (Diptera) and dragon flies (Odonata) and suggest that there are neuroanatomical similarities between these groups. PMID:8338803

  5. Dot-Projection Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry of Gossamer Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Black, Jonathan T.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Dorrington, Adrian A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the technique of using hundreds or thousands of projected dots of light as targets for photogrammetry and videogrammetry of gossamer space structures. Photogrammetry calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of each target on the structure, and videogrammetry tracks the coordinates versus time. Gossamer structures characteristically contain large areas of delicate, thin-film membranes. Examples include solar sails, large antennas, inflatable solar arrays, solar power concentrators and transmitters, sun shields, and planetary balloons and habitats. Using projected-dot targets avoids the unwanted mass, stiffness, and installation costs of traditional retroreflective adhesive targets. Four laboratory applications are covered that demonstrate the practical effectiveness of white-light dot projection for both static-shape and dynamic measurement of reflective and diffuse surfaces, respectively. Comparisons are made between dot-projection videogrammetry and traditional laser vibrometry for membrane vibration measurements. The paper closes by introducing a promising extension of existing techniques using a novel laser-induced fluorescence approach.

  6. The temporal primacy of self-related stimuli and negative stimuli: an ERP-based comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Luo, Junlong; Zhao, Na; Hu, Yinying; Yan, Lingyue; Gao, Xiangping

    2016-10-01

    Numerous studies have shown there exist attention biases for self-related and negative stimuli. Few studies, however, have been carried out to compare the effects of such stimuli on the neural mechanisms of early attentional alertness and subsequent cognitive processing. The purpose of the present study was to examine the temporal primacy of both self-related stimuli and negative stimuli in the neurophysiologic level. In a modified oddball task, event-related potentials of the deviant stimuli (i.e., self-face, negative face and neutral face) were recorded. Results revealed that larger P2 amplitudes were elicited by self-related and negative stimuli than by neutral stimuli. Negative stimuli, however, elicited shorter P2 latencies than self-related and neutral stimuli. As for the N2 component, self-related and negative stimuli elicited smaller amplitudes and shorter latencies than neutral stimuli, but otherwise did not differ. Self-related stimuli also elicited larger P3 and late positive component (LPC) amplitudes than negative and neutral stimuli. The pattern of results suggests that the primacy of negative stimuli occurred at an early attention stage of processing, while the primacy of self-related stimuli occurred at the subsequent cognitive evaluation and memory stage. PMID:26513485

  7. The visual mismatch negativity elicited with visual speech stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Files, Benjamin T.; Auer, Edward T.; Bernstein, Lynne E.

    2013-01-01

    The visual mismatch negativity (vMMN), deriving from the brain's response to stimulus deviance, is thought to be generated by the cortex that represents the stimulus. The vMMN response to visual speech stimuli was used in a study of the lateralization of visual speech processing. Previous research suggested that the right posterior temporal cortex has specialization for processing simple non-speech face gestures, and the left posterior temporal cortex has specialization for processing visual speech gestures. Here, visual speech consonant-vowel (CV) stimuli with controlled perceptual dissimilarities were presented in an electroencephalography (EEG) vMMN paradigm. The vMMNs were obtained using the comparison of event-related potentials (ERPs) for separate CVs in their roles as deviant vs. their roles as standard. Four separate vMMN contrasts were tested, two with the perceptually far deviants (i.e., “zha” or “fa”) and two with the near deviants (i.e., “zha” or “ta”). Only far deviants evoked the vMMN response over the left posterior temporal cortex. All four deviants evoked vMMNs over the right posterior temporal cortex. The results are interpreted as evidence that the left posterior temporal cortex represents speech contrasts that are perceived as different consonants, and the right posterior temporal cortex represents face gestures that may not be perceived as different CVs. PMID:23882205

  8. Startle auditory stimuli enhance the performance of fast dynamic contractions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Río-Rodríguez, Dan; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Acero, Rafael M

    2014-01-01

    Fast reaction times and the ability to develop a high rate of force development (RFD) are crucial for sports performance. However, little is known regarding the relationship between these parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of auditory stimuli of different intensities on the performance of a concentric bench-press exercise. Concentric bench-presses were performed by thirteen trained subjects in response to three different conditions: a visual stimulus (VS); a visual stimulus accompanied by a non-startle auditory stimulus (AS); and a visual stimulus accompanied by a startle auditory stimulus (SS). Peak RFD, peak velocity, onset movement, movement duration and electromyography from pectoralis and tricep muscles were recorded. The SS condition induced an increase in the RFD and peak velocity and a reduction in the movement onset and duration, in comparison with the VS and AS condition. The onset activation of the pectoralis and tricep muscles was shorter for the SS than for the VS and AS conditions. These findings point out to specific enhancement effects of loud auditory stimulation on the rate of force development. This is of relevance since startle stimuli could be used to explore neural adaptations to resistance training. PMID:24489967

  9. Startle Auditory Stimuli Enhance the Performance of Fast Dynamic Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Río-Rodríguez, Dan; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Acero, Rafael M.

    2014-01-01

    Fast reaction times and the ability to develop a high rate of force development (RFD) are crucial for sports performance. However, little is known regarding the relationship between these parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of auditory stimuli of different intensities on the performance of a concentric bench-press exercise. Concentric bench-presses were performed by thirteen trained subjects in response to three different conditions: a visual stimulus (VS); a visual stimulus accompanied by a non-startle auditory stimulus (AS); and a visual stimulus accompanied by a startle auditory stimulus (SS). Peak RFD, peak velocity, onset movement, movement duration and electromyography from pectoralis and tricep muscles were recorded. The SS condition induced an increase in the RFD and peak velocity and a reduction in the movement onset and duration, in comparison with the VS and AS condition. The onset activation of the pectoralis and tricep muscles was shorter for the SS than for the VS and AS conditions. These findings point out to specific enhancement effects of loud auditory stimulation on the rate of force development. This is of relevance since startle stimuli could be used to explore neural adaptations to resistance training. PMID:24489967

  10. DOT Transmit Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Gin, Jonathan W.; Sahasrabudhe, Adit; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Space Optical Terminal (DOT) transmit module demonstrates the DOT downlink signaling in a flight electronics assembly that can be qualified for deep space. The assembly has the capability to generate an electronic pulse-position modulation (PPM) waveform suitable for driving a laser assembly to produce the optical downlink signal. The downlink data enters the assembly through a serializer/ deserializer (SERDES) interface, and is encoded using a serially concatenated PPM (SCPPM) forward error correction code. The encoded data is modulated using PPM with an inter-symbol guard time to aid in receiver synchronization. Monitor and control of the assembly is via a low-voltage differential signal (LVDS) interface

  11. Preschoolers' Dot Enumeration Abilities Are Markers of Their Arithmetic Competence

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Sarah A.; Reeve, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The abilities to enumerate small sets of items (e.g., dots) and to compare magnitudes are claimed to be indexes of core numerical competences that scaffold early math development. Insofar as this is correct, these abilities may be diagnostic markers of math competence in preschoolers. However, unlike magnitude comparison abilities, little research has examined preschoolers' ability to enumerate small sets, or its significance for emerging math abilities; which is surprising since dot enumeration is a marker of school-aged children's math competence. It is nevertheless possible that general cognitive functions (working memory, response inhibition in particular) are associated with preschoolers' math abilities and underlie nascent dot enumeration abilities. We investigated whether preschoolers' dot enumeration abilities predict their non-verbal arithmetic ability, over and above the influence of working memory and response inhibition. Two measures of dot enumeration ability were examined—inverse efficiency and paradigm specific (response time profiles) measures—to determine which has the better diagnostic utility as a marker of math competence. Seventy-eight 42-to-57 month-olds completed dot enumeration, working memory, response inhibition, and non-verbal addition and subtraction tasks. Dot enumeration efficiency predicted arithmetic ability over and above the influence of general cognitive functions. While dot enumeration efficiency was a better predictor of arithmetic ability than paradigm specific response time profiles; the response time profile displaying the smallest subitizing range and steepest subitizing slope, also displayed poor addition abilities, suggesting a weak subitizing profile may have diagnostic significance in preschoolers. Overall, the findings support the claim that dot enumeration abilities and general cognitive functions are markers of preschoolers' math ability. PMID:24714052

  12. Structural analysis of site-controlled InAs/InP quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, B.; Elvira, D.; Le Gratiet, L.; Largeau, L.; Beaudoin, G.; Troadec, D.; Abram, I.; Beveratos, A.; Robert-Philip, I.; Patriarche, G.; Sagnes, I.

    2011-11-01

    We present atomic-scale characterization of site-controlled InAs/InP(001) quantum dots grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using nano-area selective area growth. We have developed for this purpose a process combining e-beam lithography, inductively coupled-plasma etching and focused ion beam etching to isolate a few quantum dots. The size, the shape and the composition of the quantum dots are investigated by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy. A comparison with the well-known single self-assembled quantum dots highlights the specificities of our growth mode compared to the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode.

  13. Physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Watanuki, Shigeki; Kim, Yeon-Kyu

    2005-01-01

    The specific physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli were investigated in this study. Various physiological responses of the brain (encephaloelectrogram; EEG), autonomic nervous system (ANS), immune system and endocrine system were monitored when pleasant stimuli such as odors, emotional pictures and rakugo, a typical Japanese comical story-telling, were presented to subjects. The results revealed that (i) EEG activities of the left frontal brain region were enhanced by a pleasant odor; (ii) emotional pictures related to primitive element such as nudes and erotic couples elevated vasomotor sympathetic nervous activity; and (iii) an increase in secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) and a decrease in salivary cortisol (s-cortisol) were induced by rakugo-derived linguistic pleasant emotion. Pleasant emotion is complicated state. However, by considering the evolutionary history of human being, it is possible to assess and evaluate pleasant emotion from certain physiological responses by appropriately summating various physiological parameters. PMID:15684559

  14. The aperture problem in contoured stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Kane, David; Bex, Peter J.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    A moving object elicits responses from V1 neurons tuned to a broad range of locations, directions, and spatiotemporal frequencies. Global pooling of such signals can overcome their intrinsic ambiguity in relation to the object’s direction/speed (the “aperture problem”); here we examine the role of low-spatial frequencies (SF) and second-order statistics in this process. Subjects made a 2AFC fine direction-discrimination judgement of ‘naturally’ contoured stimuli viewed rigidly translating behind a series of small circular apertures. This configuration allowed us to manipulate the scene in several ways; by randomly switching which portion of the stimulus was presented behind each aperture or by occluding certain spatial frequency bands. We report that global motion integration is (a) largely insensitive to the second-order statistics of such stimuli and (b) is rigidly broadband even in the presence of a disrupted low SF component. PMID:19810794

  15. Photonic water dynamically responsive to external stimuli.

    PubMed

    Sano, Koki; Kim, Youn Soo; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Ebina, Yasuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Aida, Takuzo

    2016-01-01

    Fluids that contain ordered nanostructures with periodic distances in the visible-wavelength range, anomalously exhibit structural colours that can be rapidly modulated by external stimuli. Indeed, some fish can dynamically change colour by modulating the periodic distance of crystalline guanine sheets cofacially oriented in their fluid cytoplasm. Here we report that a dilute aqueous colloidal dispersion of negatively charged titanate nanosheets exhibits structural colours. In this 'photonic water', the nanosheets spontaneously adopt a cofacial geometry with an ultralong periodic distance of up to 675 nm due to a strong electrostatic repulsion. Consequently, the photonic water can even reflect near-infrared light up to 1,750 nm. The structural colour becomes more vivid in a magnetic flux that induces monodomain structural ordering of the colloidal dispersion. The reflective colour of the photonic water can be modulated over the entire visible region in response to appropriate physical or chemical stimuli. PMID:27572806

  16. Engineering nanomedicines using stimuli-responsive biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yapei; Byrne, James D.; Napier, Mary E.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to engineer particles has the potential to shift the paradigm in the creation of new medicines and diagnostics. Complete control over particle characteristics, such as size, shape, mechanical property, and surface chemistry, can enable rapid translation and facilitate the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of particle technologies for the treatment of cancer, infectious diseases, diabetes, and a host of other major illnesses. The incorporation of natural and artificial external stimuli to trigger the release of drugs enables exquisite control over the release profiles of drugs in a given environment. In this article, we examine several readily scalable top-down methods for the fabrication of shape-specific particles that utilize stimuli-responsive biomaterials for controlled drug delivery. Special attention is given to Particle Replication In Nonwetting Templates (PRINT®) technology and the application of novel triggered-release synthetic and natural polymers. PMID:22266128

  17. Preparation of stimuli for timbre perception studies.

    PubMed

    Labuschagne, Ilse B; Hanekom, Johan J

    2013-09-01

    Stimuli used in timbre perception studies must be controlled carefully in order to yield meaningful results. During psychoacoustic testing of individual timbre properties, (1) it must be ensured that timbre properties do not co-vary, as timbre properties are often not independent from one another, and (2) the potential influence of loudness, pitch, and perceived duration must be eliminated. A mathematical additive synthesis method is proposed which allows complete control over two spectral parameters, the spectral centroid (corresponding to brightness) and irregularity, and two temporal parameters, log rise-time (LRT) and a parameter characterizing the sustain/decay segment, while controlling for covariation in the spectral centroid and irregularity. Thirteen musical instrument sounds were synthesized. Perceptual data from six listeners indicate that variation in the four timbre properties mainly influences loudness and that perceived duration and pitch are not influenced significantly for the stimuli of longer duration (2 s) used here. Trends across instruments were found to be similar. PMID:23967955

  18. Cortical gating of oropharyngeal sensory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wheeler-Hegland, Karen; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W

    2010-01-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials provide a measure of cortical neuronal activation in response to various types of sensory stimuli. In order to prevent flooding of the cortex with redundant information various sensory stimuli are gated cortically such that response to stimulus 2 (S2) is significantly reduced in amplitude compared to stimulus 1 (S1). Upper airway protective mechanisms, such as swallowing and cough, are dependent on sensory input for triggering and modifying their motor output. Thus, it was hypothesized that central neural gating would be absent for paired-air puff stimuli applied to the oropharynx. Twenty-three healthy adults (18-35 years) served as research participants. Pharyngeal sensory evoked potentials (PSEPs) were measured via 32-electrode cap (10-20 system) connected to SynAmps(2) Neuroscan EEG System. Paired-pulse air puffs were delivered with an inter-stimulus interval of 500 ms to the oropharynx using a thin polyethylene tube connected to a flexible laryngoscope. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a repeated measures analysis of variance. There were no significant differences found for the amplitudes S1 and S2 for any of the four component PSEP peaks. Mean gating ratios were above 0.90 for each peak. Results supports our hypothesis that sensory central neural gating would be absent for component PSEP peaks with paired-pulse stimuli delivered to the oropharynx. This may be related to the need for constant sensory monitoring necessary for adequate airway protection associated with swallowing and coughing. PMID:21423402

  19. Inversion of contrast polarity abolishes spontaneous preferences for face-like stimuli in newborn chicks.

    PubMed

    Rosa Salva, Orsola; Regolin, Lucia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2012-03-01

    A spontaneous preference for face-like stimuli has been demonstrated in domestic chicks, similar to that shown by human newborns, suggesting evolutionary continuity across species. Inversion of contrast polarity of face-like stimuli abolishes face preferences in human newborns. Here we investigated the effects of contrast polarity inversion and brain lateralization in chicks' preferences for faces. In Experiment 1 face-naïve chicks were tested with a negative face obtained from a stimulus that elicited preferential approach in previous research. As in human newborns, reversal of contrast polarity abolished face-preferences. Experiments 2, 3 and 5 investigated the effect of adding a pupil-like dot within the inner features of the negative and of positive stimuli (a manipulation that re-established face-preference in human newborns). Chicks reacted to this by avoiding the face stimulus. In Experiments 4 and 6 we found that the preference expressed by chicks having only their left eye (right hemisphere) in use changed according to contrast polarity, whereas it remained unaffected in chicks having their right eye in use. Thus, in domestic chicks, as in human beings, a stimulus is perceived as face-like only if it presents the correct luminance pattern expected for a face under natural top-lit illumination and the right hemisphere seems to play a crucial role in this kind of social orienting responses. PMID:22155610

  20. Stark effect in ensembles of polar (0001) Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N/GaN quantum dots and comparison with semipolar (11−22) ones

    SciTech Connect

    Leroux, M.; Brault, J.; Kahouli, A.; Damilano, B.; Mierry, P. de; Korytov, M.; Maghraoui, D.; Kim, Je-Hyung; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a continuous-wave photoluminescence study of Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N/GaN quantum dots grown by ammonia-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire, either on the wurtzite polar (0001) or the semipolar (11−22) plane. Due to interface polarization discontinuities, the polar dots are strongly red-shifted by the Stark effect and emit in the visible range. Carrier injection screening of the polarization charges has been studied. A model relying on average dot heights and dot height variances, as measured by transmission electron microscopy, is proposed. It can account for the injection dependent luminescence energies and efficiencies. The electric field discontinuity deduced from the fittings is in good agreement with theoretical expectations for our barrier composition. On the contrary, semipolar quantum dot ensembles always emit above the gap of GaN strained to Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N. Their luminescence linewidth is significantly lower than that of polar ones, and their energy does not shift with injection. Our study then confirms the expected strong decrease of the Stark effect for (11−22) grown (Al,Ga)N/GaN heterostructures.

  1. Anagrus breviphragma Soyka Short Distance Search Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Elisabetta; Berzolla, Alessia; Oppo, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    Anagrus breviphragma Soyka (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) successfully parasitises eggs of Cicadella viridis (L.) (Homoptera: Cicadellidae), embedded in vegetal tissues, suggesting the idea of possible chemical and physical cues, revealing the eggs presence. In this research, three treatments were considered in order to establish which types of cue are involved: eggs extracted from leaf, used as a control, eggs extracted from leaf and cleaned in water and ethanol, used to evaluate the presence of chemicals soluble in polar solvents, and eggs extracted from leaf and covered with Parafilm (M), used to avoid physical stimuli due to the bump on the leaf surface. The results show that eggs covered with Parafilm present a higher number of parasitised eggs and a lower probing starting time with respect to eggs washed with polar solvents or eggs extracted and untreated, both when the treatments were singly tested or when offered in sequence, independently of the treatment position. These results suggest that the exploited stimuli are not physical due to the bump but chemicals that can spread in the Parafilm, circulating the signal on the whole surface, and that the stimuli that elicit probing and oviposition are not subjected to learning. PMID:26543865

  2. Visual stimuli recruit intrinsically generated cortical ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jae-eun Kang; Ayzenshtat, Inbal; Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The cortical microcircuit is built with recurrent excitatory connections, and it has long been suggested that the purpose of this design is to enable intrinsically driven reverberating activity. To understand the dynamics of neocortical intrinsic activity better, we performed two-photon calcium imaging of populations of neurons from the primary visual cortex of awake mice during visual stimulation and spontaneous activity. In both conditions, cortical activity is dominated by coactive groups of neurons, forming ensembles whose activation cannot be explained by the independent firing properties of their contributing neurons, considered in isolation. Moreover, individual neurons flexibly join multiple ensembles, vastly expanding the encoding potential of the circuit. Intriguingly, the same coactive ensembles can repeat spontaneously and in response to visual stimuli, indicating that stimulus-evoked responses arise from activating these intrinsic building blocks. Although the spatial properties of stimulus-driven and spontaneous ensembles are similar, spontaneous ensembles are active at random intervals, whereas visually evoked ensembles are time-locked to stimuli. We conclude that neuronal ensembles, built by the coactivation of flexible groups of neurons, are emergent functional units of cortical activity and propose that visual stimuli recruit intrinsically generated ensembles to represent visual attributes. PMID:25201983

  3. Spatial Brightness Perception of Trichromatic Stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.; Houser, Kevin W.

    2012-11-16

    An experiment was conducted to examine the effect of tuning optical radiation on brightness perception for younger (18-25 years of age) and older (50 years of age or older) observers. Participants made forced-choice evaluations of the brightness of a full factorial of stimulus pairs selected from two groups of four metameric stimuli. The large-field stimuli were created by systematically varying either the red or the blue primary of an RGB LED mixture. The results indicate that light stimuli of equal illuminance and chromaticity do not appear equally bright to either younger or older subjects. The rank-order of brightness is not predicted by any current model of human vision or theory of brightness perception including Scotopic to Photopic or Cirtopic to Photopic ratio theory, prime color theory, correlated color temperature, V(λ)-based photometry, color quality metrics, linear brightness models, or color appearance models. Age may affect brightness perception when short-wavelength primaries are used, especially those with a peak wavelength shorter than 450 nm. The results suggest further development of metrics to predict brightness perception is warranted, and that including age as a variable in predictive models may be valuable.

  4. Stimuli-responsive polymersomes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Thambi, Thavasyappan; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Doo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of mortality and remains a major challenge for modern chemotherapy. Recent advances in cancer therapy have made a modest impact on patient survival. Nanomedicine represents an innovative field with significant potential to improve cancer treatment. Nanomedicine utilizes numerous nanoconstructs, including polymersomes, micelles, and drug conjugates, to deliver therapeutic agents at the target site of interest. In particular, polymeric vesicles, also known as polymersomes, are self-assembled amphiphilic polymers in which an aqueous compartment is enclosed by a thick bilayer membrane. Unlike liposomes, polymersomes consist of high-molecular-weight amphiphilic polymer analogues. Since polymersomes are prepared using synthetic amphiphilic polymers, the bilayer membrane thickness can be readily altered by tuning the molecular weight of hydrophobic blocks. As a consequence, the polymersomes prepared from high-molecular-weight amphiphiles strengthen their membranes, making them inherently more stable than liposomes. The intriguing aggregation of polymersomes offers numerous advantages, including stability, tunable membrane properties, and the capability of encapsulating hydrophilic and hydrophobic agents. Owing to these properties, polymersomes are attractive candidates for various applications such as drug delivery, gene therapy, and tissue engineering. Although these properties have placed polymersomes at the forefront of drug delivery applications, to attain an enhanced therapeutic effect polymersomes are supposed to rapidly release the drug at the target site. To fulfill this requirement, stimuli-responsive polymersomes that respond to various internal or external stimuli have been developed. This review focuses on recently developed stimuli-responsive polymersomes and their potential application in cancer therapy. PMID:26456625

  5. The influence of stimulus repetition on duration judgments with simple stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Birngruber, Teresa; Schröter, Hannes; Ulrich, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the effects of stimulus repetition vs. stimulus novelty on perceived duration. In a reminder task, a standard and a comparison stimulus were presented consecutively in each trial, and the comparison was either a repetition of the standard or a different stimulus. Pseudowords (Experiment 1) or strings of consonants (Experiment 2) were used as stimuli and the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) between the standard and the comparison was either constant or variable. Participants were asked to judge whether the comparison was shorter or longer than the standard. In both experiments, we observed shorter judged durations for repeated than for novel comparisons whereas the manipulation of the ISI had no pronounced effects on duration judgments. The finding of shorter duration judgments for repeated as compared to novel nonwords replicates the results of a previous study (Matthews, 2011) which employed highly complex stimulus material. The present study shows that changes of simple, semantically meaningless stimuli are sufficient to result in a shorter perceived duration of repeated as compared to novel stimuli. PMID:26347682

  6. PREFACE: Quantum Dot 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert A.

    2010-09-01

    These conference proceedings contain the written papers of the contributions presented at Quantum Dot 2010 (QD2010). The conference was held in Nottingham, UK, on 26-30 April 2010. The conference addressed topics in research on: 1. Epitaxial quantum dots (including self-assembled and interface structures, dots defined by electrostatic gates etc): optical properties and electron transport quantum coherence effects spin phenomena optics of dots in cavities interaction with surface plasmons in metal/semiconductor structures opto-electronics applications 2. Novel QD structures: fabrication and physics of graphene dots, dots in nano-wires etc 3. Colloidal quantum dots: growth (shape control and hybrid nanocrystals such as metal/semiconductor, magnetic/semiconductor) assembly and surface functionalisation optical properties and spin dynamics electrical and magnetic properties applications (light emitting devices and solar cells, biological and medical applications, data storage, assemblers) The Editors Acknowledgements Conference Organising Committee: Maurice Skolnick (Chair) Alexander Tartakovskii (Programme Chair) Pavlos Lagoudakis (Programme Chair) Max Migliorato (Conference Secretary) Paola Borri (Publicity) Robert Taylor (Proceedings) Manus Hayne (Treasurer) Ray Murray (Sponsorship) Mohamed Henini (Local Organiser) International Advisory Committee: Yasuhiko Arakawa (Tokyo University, Japan) Manfred Bayer (Dortmund University, Germany) Sergey Gaponenko (Stepanov Institute of Physics, Minsk, Belarus) Pawel Hawrylak (NRC, Ottawa, Canada) Fritz Henneberger (Institute for Physics, Berlin, Germany) Atac Imamoglu (ETH, Zurich, Switzerland) Paul Koenraad (TU Eindhoven, Nethehrlands) Guglielmo Lanzani (Politecnico di Milano, Italy) Jungil Lee (Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Korea) Henri Mariette (CNRS-CEA, Grenoble, France) Lu Jeu Sham (San Diego, USA) Andrew Shields (Toshiba Research Europe, Cambridge, UK) Yoshihisa Yamamoto (Stanford University, USA) Artur

  7. Polydiacetylene-enclosed near-infrared fluorescent semiconducting polymer dots for bioimaging and sensing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Jing; Kuo, Shih-Yu; Huang, Ya-Chi; Chen, Chuan-Pin; Chan, Yang-Hsiang

    2014-05-20

    Semiconducting polymer dots (P-dots) recently have emerged as a new type of ultrabright fluorescent probe with promising applications in biological imaging and detection. With the increasing desire for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescing probes for in vivo biological measurements, the currently available NIR-emitting P-dots are very limited and the leaching of the encapsulated dyes/polymers has usually been a concern. To address this challenge, we first embedded the NIR dyes into the matrix of poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorene)-co-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-co-4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole] (PF-BT-DBT) polymer and then enclosed the doped P-dots with polydiacetylenes (PDAs) to avoid potential leakage of the entrapped NIR dyes from the P-dot matrix. These PDA-enclosed NIR-emitting P-dots not only emitted much stronger NIR fluorescence than conventional organic molecules but also exhibited enhanced photostability over CdTe quantum dots, free NIR dyes, and gold nanoclusters. We next conjugated biomolecules onto the surface of the resulting P-dots and demonstrated their capability for specific cellular labeling without any noticeable nonspecific binding. To employ this new class of material as a facile sensing platform, an easy-to-prepare test paper, obtained by soaking the paper into the PDA-enclosed NIR-emitting P-dot solution, was used to sense external stimuli such as ions, temperature, or pH, depending on the surface functionalization of PDAs. We believe these PDA-coated NIR-fluorescing P-dots will be very useful in a variety of bioimaging and analytical applications. PMID:24749695

  8. EEG Oscillation Evidences of Enhanced Susceptibility to Emotional Stimuli during Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianxin; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Ling; Li, Xiang; Yao, Bo; Ding, Xinsheng; Yuan, JiaJin; Yang, Jiemin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our recent event-related potential (ERP) study showed that adolescents are more emotionally sensitive to negative events compared to adults, regardless of the valence strength of the events. The current work aimed to confirm this age-related difference in response to emotional stimuli of diverse intensities by examining Electroencephalography (EEG) oscillatory power in time-frequency analysis. Methods: Time-frequency analyses were performed on the EEG data recorded for highly negative (HN), moderately negative (MN) and Neutral pictures in 20 adolescents and 20 adults during a covert emotional task. The results showed a significant age by emotion interaction effect in the theta and beta oscillatory power during the 500–600 ms post stimulus. Results: Adolescents showed significantly less pronounced theta synchronization (ERS, 5.5–7.5 Hz) for HN stimuli, and larger beta desynchronization (ERD; 18–20 Hz) for both HN and MN stimuli, in comparison with neutral stimuli. By contrast, adults exhibited no significant emotion effects in theta and beta frequency bands. In addition, the analysis of the alpha spectral power (10.5–12 Hz; 850–950 ms) showed a main effect of emotion, while the emotion by age interaction was not significant. Irrespective of adolescents or adults, HN and MN stimuli elicited enhanced alpha suppression compared to Neutral stimuli, while the alpha power was similar across HN and MN conditions. Conclusions: These results confirmed prior findings that adolescents are more sensitive to emotionally negative stimuli compared to adults, regardless of emotion intensity, possibly due to the developing prefrontal control system during adolescence. PMID:27242568

  9. Elevated Fear Conditioning to Socially Relevant Unconditioned Stimuli in Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lissek, Shmuel; Levenson, Jessica; Biggs, Arter L.; Johnson, Linda L.; Ameli, Rezvan; Pine, Daniel S.; Grillon, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Objective Though conditioned fear has long been acknowledged as an important etiologic mechanism in social anxiety disorder, past psychophysiological experiments have found no differences in general conditionability among social anxiety patients using generally aversive but socially nonspecific unconditioned stimuli (e.g., unpleasant odors and painful pressure). The authors applied a novel fear conditioning paradigm consisting of socially relevant unconditioned stimuli of critical facial expressions and verbal feedback. This study represents the first effort to assess the conditioning correlates of social anxiety disorder within an ecologically enhanced paradigm. Method Subjects with social anxiety disorder and age- and gender-matched healthy comparison subjects underwent differential classical conditioning. Conditioned stimuli included images of three neutral facial expressions, each of which was paired with one of three audiovisual unconditioned stimuli: negative insults with critical faces (USneg), positive compliments with happy faces (USpos), or neutral comments with neutral faces (USneu). The conditioned response was measured as the fear-potentiation of the startle-blink reflex elicited during presentation of the conditioned stimuli. Results Only social anxiety subjects demonstrated fear conditioning in response to facial expressions, as the startle-blink reflex was potentiated by the CSneg versus both CSneu and CSpos among those with the disorder, while healthy comparison subjects displayed no evidence of conditioned startle-potentiation. Such group differences in conditioning were independent of levels of anxiety to the unconditioned stimulus, implicating associative processes rather than increased unconditioned stimulus reactivity as the active mechanism underlying enhanced conditioned startle-potentiation among social anxiety subjects. Conclusions Results support a conditioning contribution to social anxiety disorder and underscore the importance of

  10. Pattern of cortical activation during processing of aversive stimuli in traumatized survivors of war and torture.

    PubMed

    Catani, Claudia; Adenauer, Hannah; Keil, Julian; Aichinger, Hannah; Neuner, Frank

    2009-09-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with an altered processing of threat-related stimuli. In particular, an attentional bias towards threat cues has been consistently found in behavioral studies. However, it is unclear whether increased attention towards threat cues translates into preferential processing as neurophysiological studies have yielded inconsistent findings. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neocortical activity related to the processing of aversive stimuli in patients with PTSD. 36 survivors of war and torture with PTSD, 21 Trauma Controls and 20 Unexposed Subjects participated in a visual evoked magnetic field study using flickering pictures of varying affective valence as stimulus material. Minimum norm source localization was carried out to estimate the distribution of sources of the evoked neuromagnetic activity in the brain. Statistical permutation analyses revealed reduced steady-state visual evoked field amplitudes over occipital areas in response to aversive pictures for PTSD patients and for Trauma Controls in comparison to unexposed subjects. Furthermore, PTSD patients showed a hyperactivation of the superior parietal cortex selectively in response to aversive stimuli, which was related to dissociative symptoms as well as to torture severity. The results indicate a different pattern of cortical activation driven by aversive stimuli depending on the experience of multiple traumatic events and PTSD. Whereas, a decreased visual processing of aversive stimuli seems to be associated with trauma exposure in general, the superior parietal activity might represent a specific process linked to the diagnosis of PTSD. PMID:19360450

  11. Olfactory Stimuli Increase Presence in Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Munyan, Benson G.; Neer, Sandra M.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Jentsch, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Exposure therapy (EXP) is the most empirically supported treatment for anxiety and trauma-related disorders. EXP consists of repeated exposure to a feared object or situation in the absence of the feared outcome in order to extinguish associated anxiety. Key to the success of EXP is the need to present the feared object/event/situation in as much detail and utilizing as many sensory modalities as possible, in order to augment the sense of presence during exposure sessions. Various technologies used to augment the exposure therapy process by presenting multi-sensory cues (e.g., sights, smells, sounds). Studies have shown that scents can elicit emotionally charged memories, but no prior research has examined the effect of olfactory stimuli upon the patient’s sense of presence during simulated exposure tasks. Methods 60 adult participants navigated a mildly anxiety-producing virtual environment (VE) similar to those used in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Participants had no autobiographical memory associated with the VE. State anxiety, Presence ratings, and electrodermal (EDA) activity were collected throughout the experiment. Results Utilizing a Bonferroni corrected Linear Mixed Model, our results showed statistically significant relationships between olfactory stimuli and presence as assessed by both the Igroup Presence Questionnaire (IPQ: R2 = 0.85, (F(3,52) = 6.625, p = 0.0007) and a single item visual-analogue scale (R2 = 0.85, (F(3,52) = 5.382, p = 0.0027). State anxiety was unaffected by the presence or absence of olfactory cues. EDA was unaffected by experimental condition. Conclusion Olfactory stimuli increase presence in virtual environments that approximate those typical in exposure therapy, but did not increase EDA. Additionally, once administered, the removal of scents resulted in a disproportionate decrease in presence. Implications for incorporating the use of scents to increase the efficacy of exposure therapy is discussed. PMID

  12. Transformation of the Discriminative and Eliciting Functions of Generalized Relational Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Dougher, Michael J; Hamilton, Derek A; Fink, Brandi C; Harrington, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    In three experiments, match-to-sample procedures were used with undergraduates to establish arbitrary relational functions for three abstract visual stimuli. In the presence of samples A, B, and C, participants were trained to select the smallest, middle, and largest member, respectively, of a series of three-comparison arrays. In Experiment 1, the B (choose middle) stimulus was then used to train a steady rate of keyboard pressing before the A (choose smallest) and the C (choose largest) stimuli were presented. Participants pressed slower to A and faster to C than to B. Then B was paired with mild shock in a Pavlovian procedure with skin conductance change as the dependent variable. When presented with A and C, 6 of 8 experimental participants showed smaller skin conductance changes to A and larger skin conductance changes to C than to B. In Experiment 2, A was then used as a sample in a match-to-sample procedure to establish an arbitrary size ranking among four same-sized colored circle comparisons. One of the middle circles was then used to establish a steady rate of pressing before the other circles were presented. Five of 6 participants responded slower to the “smaller” circle and faster to the “larger” circle than they did to the “middle” circle. In Experiment 3, A, B, and C were then presented on a series of test trials requiring participants to pick the comparison that was less than, greater than, or equal to the sample. Novel stimuli were included on some trials. Results indicated that the relational training procedures produced derived relations among the stimuli used in training and that these allowed correct inferences of relative size ranking among novel stimuli. PMID:17970414

  13. Stimuli-responsive chromism in organophosphorus chemistry.

    PubMed

    Reus, Christian; Baumgartner, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Changes in color are one of the most obvious and easily followed responses that can be induced by an external stimulus. π-Conjugated organophosphorus compounds are on the rise to challenge established systems by opening up new and simple pathways to diversely modified optoelectronic properties--the main challenge for the development of new chromic materials. Relevant stimuli highlighted in this Frontier article include electronic current (electrochromism), light (photochromism), solvent polarity (solvatochromism), aggregation formation (aggregation induced emission, AIE), mechanical force (mechanochromism), temperature (thermochromism), organic solvent vapor (vapochromism), and pH (halochromism). PMID:26286166

  14. A Single Mechanism Can Account for Human Perception of Depth in Mixed Correlation Random Dot Stereograms.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Sid; Cumming, Bruce G; Read, Jenny C A

    2016-05-01

    In order to extract retinal disparity from a visual scene, the brain must match corresponding points in the left and right retinae. This computationally demanding task is known as the stereo correspondence problem. The initial stage of the solution to the correspondence problem is generally thought to consist of a correlation-based computation. However, recent work by Doi et al suggests that human observers can see depth in a class of stimuli where the mean binocular correlation is 0 (half-matched random dot stereograms). Half-matched random dot stereograms are made up of an equal number of correlated and anticorrelated dots, and the binocular energy model-a well-known model of V1 binocular complex cells-fails to signal disparity here. This has led to the proposition that a second, match-based computation must be extracting disparity in these stimuli. Here we show that a straightforward modification to the binocular energy model-adding a point output nonlinearity-is by itself sufficient to produce cells that are disparity-tuned to half-matched random dot stereograms. We then show that a simple decision model using this single mechanism can reproduce psychometric functions generated by human observers, including reduced performance to large disparities and rapidly updating dot patterns. The model makes predictions about how performance should change with dot size in half-matched stereograms and temporal alternation in correlation, which we test in human observers. We conclude that a single correlation-based computation, based directly on already-known properties of V1 neurons, can account for the literature on mixed correlation random dot stereograms. PMID:27196696

  15. A Single Mechanism Can Account for Human Perception of Depth in Mixed Correlation Random Dot Stereograms

    PubMed Central

    Cumming, Bruce G.

    2016-01-01

    In order to extract retinal disparity from a visual scene, the brain must match corresponding points in the left and right retinae. This computationally demanding task is known as the stereo correspondence problem. The initial stage of the solution to the correspondence problem is generally thought to consist of a correlation-based computation. However, recent work by Doi et al suggests that human observers can see depth in a class of stimuli where the mean binocular correlation is 0 (half-matched random dot stereograms). Half-matched random dot stereograms are made up of an equal number of correlated and anticorrelated dots, and the binocular energy model—a well-known model of V1 binocular complex cells—fails to signal disparity here. This has led to the proposition that a second, match-based computation must be extracting disparity in these stimuli. Here we show that a straightforward modification to the binocular energy model—adding a point output nonlinearity—is by itself sufficient to produce cells that are disparity-tuned to half-matched random dot stereograms. We then show that a simple decision model using this single mechanism can reproduce psychometric functions generated by human observers, including reduced performance to large disparities and rapidly updating dot patterns. The model makes predictions about how performance should change with dot size in half-matched stereograms and temporal alternation in correlation, which we test in human observers. We conclude that a single correlation-based computation, based directly on already-known properties of V1 neurons, can account for the literature on mixed correlation random dot stereograms. PMID:27196696

  16. Stimuli-Responsive Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nature employs a variety of tactics to precisely time and execute the processes and mechanics of life, relying on sequential sense and response cascades to transduce signaling events over multiple length and time scales. Many of these tactics, such as the activation of a zymogen, involve the direct manipulation of a material by a stimulus. Similarly, effective therapeutics and diagnostics require the selective and efficient homing of material to specific tissues and biomolecular targets with appropriate temporal resolution. These systems must also avoid undesirable or toxic side effects and evade unwanted removal by endogenous clearing mechanisms. Nanoscale delivery vehicles have been developed to package materials with the hope of delivering them to select locations with rates of accumulation and clearance governed by an interplay between the carrier and its cargo. Many modern approaches to drug delivery have taken inspiration from natural activatable materials like zymogens, membrane proteins, and metabolites, whereby stimuli initiate transformations that are required for cargo release, prodrug activation, or selective transport. This Perspective describes key advances in the field of stimuli-responsive nanomaterials while highlighting some of the many challenges faced and opportunities for development. Major hurdles include the increasing need for powerful new tools and strategies for characterizing the dynamics, morphology, and behavior of advanced delivery systems in situ and the perennial problem of identifying truly specific and useful physical or molecular biomarkers that allow a material to autonomously distinguish diseased from normal tissue. PMID:25474531

  17. Remindings influence the interpretation of ambiguous stimuli.

    PubMed

    Tullis, Jonathan G; Braverman, Michael; Ross, Brian H; Benjamin, Aaron S

    2014-02-01

    Remindings-stimulus-guided retrievals of prior events-may help us interpret ambiguous events by linking the current situation to relevant prior experiences. Evidence suggests that remindings play an important role in interpreting complex ambiguous stimuli (Ross & Bradshaw Memory & Cognition, 22, 591-605, 1994); here, we evaluate whether remindings will influence word interpretation and memory in a new paradigm. Learners studied words on distinct visual backgrounds and generated a sentence for each word. Homographs were preceded by a biasing cue on the same background three items earlier, preceded by a biasing cue on a different background three items earlier, or followed by a biasing cue on the same background three items later. When biasing cues preceded the homographs on the same backgrounds as the homographs, the meanings of the homographs in learner-generated sentences were consistent with the biasing cues more often than in the other two conditions. These results show that remindings can influence word interpretation. In addition, later memory for the homographs and cues was greater when the meaning of the homograph in the sentence was consistent with the earlier biasing cue, suggesting that remindings enhanced mnemonic performance. Remindings play an important role in how we interpret ambiguous stimuli and enhance memory for the involved material. PMID:23835617

  18. Continuum Models of Stimuli-responsive Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei

    Immersed in a solution of small molecules and ions, a network of long-chain polymers may imbibe the solution and swell, resulting in a polymeric gel. Depending on the molecular structure of the polymers, the amount of swelling can be regulated by moisture, mechanical forces, ionic strength, electric field, pH value, and many other types of stimuli. Starting from the basic principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, this chapter formulates a field theory of the coupled large deformation and mass transportation in a neutral polymeric gel. The theory is then extended to study polyelectrolyte gels with charge-carrying networks by accounting for the electromechanical coupling and migration of solute ions. While the theoretical framework is adaptable to various types of material models, some representative ones are described through specific free-energy functions and kinetic laws. A specific material law for pH-sensitive gels—a special type of polyelectrolyte gels—is introduced as an example of incorporating chemical reactions in modeling stimuli-responsive gels. Finally, a simplified theory for the equilibrium but inhomogeneous swelling of a polymeric gel is deduced. The theory and the specific material models are illustrated through several examples.

  19. Mimicking biophysical stimuli within bone tumor microenvironment*

    PubMed Central

    Marturano-Kruik, A.; Yeager, K.; Bach, D.; Villasante, A.; Cimetta, E.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo, cells reside in a complex environment regulating their fate and function. Most of this complexity is lacking in standard in vitro models, leading to readouts falling short of predicting the actual in vivo situation. The use of engineering tools, combined with deep biological knowledge, leads to the development and use of bioreactors providing biologically sound niches. Such bioreactors offer new tools for biological research, and are now also entering the field of cancer research. Here we present the development and validation of a modular bioreactor system providing: (i) high throughput analyses, (ii) a range of biological conditions, (iii) high degree of control, and (iv) application of physiological stimuli to the cultured samples. The bioreactor was used to engineer a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model of cancer, where the effects of mechanical stimulation on the tumor phenotype were evaluated. Mechanical stimuli applied to the engineered tumor model activated the mechanotransduction machinery and resulted in measurable changes of mRNA levels towards a more aggressive tumor phenotype. PMID:26737062

  20. Acquisition of matching-to-sample performance in rats using visual stimuli on nose keys.

    PubMed

    Iversen, I H

    1993-05-01

    Steady and blinking white lights were projected on three nose keys arranged horizontally on one wall. The procedure was a conditional discrimination with a sample stimulus presented on the middle key and comparison stimuli on the side keys. Three rats acquired simultaneous "identity matching." Accuracy reached 80% in about 25 sessions and 90% or higher after about 50 sessions. Acquisition progressed through several stages of repeated errors, alteration between comparison keys from trial to trial, preference of specific keys or stimuli, and a gradual lengthening of strings of consecutive trials with correct responses. An analysis of the acquisition curves for individual trial configurations indicated that the matching-to-sample performance possibly consisted of separate discriminations. PMID:8315365

  1. Dual-monitor deterministic hardware for visual stimuli generation in neuroscience experiments.

    PubMed

    Gazziro, Mario; Almeida, Lirio

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development of a dual-monitor visual stimulus generator that is used in neuroscience experiments with invertebrates such as flies. The experiment consists in the visualization of two fixed images that are displaced horizontally according to the stimulus data. The system was developed using off-the-shelf FPGA kits and it is capable of displaying 640x480 pixels with 256 intensity levels at 200 frames per second (FPS) on each monitor. A Raster plot of the experiment with the superimposed stimuli was generated as the result of this work. A novel architecture was developed, using the same DOT Clock for both monitors, and its implementation generates a perfect synchronism in both devices. PMID:21096378

  2. Nonvolatile Quantum Dot Gate Memory (NVQDM): Tunneling Rate from Quantum Well Channel to Quantum Dot Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasaneen, El-Sayed; Heller, Evan; Bansal, Rajeev; Jain, Faquir

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we compute the tunneling of electrons in a nonvolatile quantum dot memory (NVQDM) cell during the WRITE operation. The transition rate of electrons from a quantum well channel to the quantum dots forming the floating gate is calculated using a recently reported method by Chuang et al.[1]. Tunneling current is computed based on transport of electrons from the channel to the floating quantum dots. The maximum number of electrons on a dot is calculated using surface electric field and break down voltage of the tunneling dielectric material. Comparison of tunneling for silicon oxide and high-k dielectric gate insulators is also described. Capacitance-Voltage characteristics of a NVQDM device are calculated by solving the Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently. In addition, the READ operation of the memory has been investigated analytically. Results for 70 nm channel length Si NVQDMs are presented. Threshold voltage is calculated including the effect of the charge on nanocrystal quantum dots. Current-voltage characteristics are obtained using BSIM3v3 model [2-3]. This work is supported by Office of Navel Research (N00014210883, Dr. D. Purdy, Program Monitor), Connecticut Innovations Inc./TranSwitch (CII # 00Y17), and National Science Foundation (CCR-0210428) grants. [1] S. L. Chuang and N. Holonyak, Appl. Phys. Lett., 80, pp. 1270, 2002. [2] Y. Chen et. al., BSIM3v3 Manual, Elect. Eng. and Comp. Dept., U. California, Berkeley, CA, 1996. [3] W. Liu, MOSFET Models for SPICE Simulation, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2001.

  3. Nanoporous frameworks exhibiting multiple stimuli responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Pintu K.; Olsen, Gregory L.; Kiss, Vladimir; Klajn, Rafal

    2014-04-01

    Nanoporous frameworks are polymeric materials built from rigid molecules, which give rise to their nanoporous structures with applications in gas sorption and storage, catalysis and others. Conceptually new applications could emerge, should these beneficial properties be manipulated by external stimuli in a reversible manner. One approach to render nanoporous frameworks responsive to external signals would be to immobilize molecular switches within their nanopores. Although the majority of molecular switches require conformational freedom to isomerize, and switching in the solid state is prohibited, the nanopores may provide enough room for the switches to efficiently isomerize. Here we describe two families of nanoporous materials incorporating the spiropyran molecular switch. These materials exhibit a variety of interesting properties, including reversible photochromism and acidochromism under solvent-free conditions, light-controlled capture and release of metal ions, as well reversible chromism induced by solvation/desolvation.

  4. MULTIFUNCTIONAL AND STIMULI-SENSITIVE PHARMACEUTICAL NANOCARRIERS

    PubMed Central

    Torchilin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Currently used pharmaceutical nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles, demonstrate a broad variety of useful properties, such as longevity in the body; specific targeting to certain disease sites; enhanced intracellular penetration; contrast properties allowing for direct carrier visualization in vivo; stimili-sensitivity, and others. Some of those pharmaceutical carriers have already made their way into clinic, while others are still under preclinical development. In certain cases, the pharmaceutical nanocarriers combine several of the listed properties. Long-circulating immunoliposomes capable of prolonged residence in the blood and specific target recognition represent one of examples of this kind. The engineering of multifunctional pharmaceutical nanocarriers combining several useful properties in one particle can significantly enhance the efficacy of many therapeutic and diagnostic protocols. This paper considers the current status and possible future directions in the emerging area of multifunctional nanocarriers with primary attention on the combination of such properties as longevity, targetability, intracellular penetration, contrast loading, and stimuli sensitivity. PMID:18977297

  5. Stimuli dependent impedance of conductive magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Xuan, Shouhu; Dong, Bo; Xu, Feng; Gong, Xinglong

    2016-02-01

    The structure dependent impedance of conductive magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) under different loads and magnetic fields has been studied in this work. By increasing the weight fraction of iron particles, the conductivity of the MREs increased. Dynamic mechanical measurements and synchrotron radiation x-ray computed tomography (SR-CT) were used and they provided reasons for the electrical properties changing significantly under pressure and magnetic field stimulation. The high sensitivity of MREs to external stimuli renders them suitable for application in force or magnetic field sensors. The equivalent circuit model was proposed to analyze the impedance response of MREs and it fits the experimental results very well. Each circuit component reflected the change of the inner interface under different conditions, thus relative changes in the microstructure could be distinguished. This method could be used not only to detect the structural changes in the MRE but also to provide a great deal of valuable information for the further understanding of the MR mechanism.

  6. Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zifkin, Benjamin G; Inoue, Yushi

    2004-01-01

    Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli may be triggered by patterned and flashing displays that are now ubiquitous. The seizures may be clinically generalized, but unilateral and bilateral myoclonic attacks also may be triggered, especially in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and recently, clearly focal reflex occipital lobe seizures have been described. Some seizure-triggering properties of video displays can be identified, such as perceived brightness, pattern, flicker frequency, and color. Knowledge of these is useful in planning individual treatment and in designing regulations for screen content of television broadcasts or for other video displays. Some subjects will also be sensitive to cognitive or action-programming activation, especially when playing video games, and this can increase the chance of seizure triggering. Nonspecific factors such as sleep deprivation, prolonged exposure, and drug or alcohol use also may play a role in reflex seizure occurrence. PMID:14706042

  7. Working memory of emotional stimuli: Electrophysiological characterization.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Dominique; García-Rubio, María J; González, E Kirstin; Tapia, Manuel; López-Martín, Sara; Román, Francisco J; Capilla, Almudena; Martínez, Kenia; Colom, Roberto; Carretié, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Memorizing emotional stimuli in a preferential way seems to be one of the adaptive strategies brought on by evolution for supporting survival. However, there is a lack of electrophysiological evidence on this bias in working memory. The present study analyzed the influence of emotion on the updating component of working memory. Behavioral and electrophysiological indices were measured from a 3-back task using negative, neutral, and positive faces. Electrophysiological data evidenced an emotional influence on the working memory sensitive P3 component, which presented larger amplitudes for negative matching faces compared to neutral ones. This effect originated in the superior parietal cortex, previously reported to be involved in N-back tasks. Additionally, P3 results showed a correlation with reaction times, where higher amplitudes were associated with faster responses for negative matching faces. These findings indicate that electrophysiological measures seem to be very suitable indices of the emotional influence on working memory. PMID:27402441

  8. Memory of Germinant Stimuli in Bacterial Spores

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiwei; Faeder, James R.; Setlow, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial spores, despite being metabolically dormant, possess the remarkable capacity to detect nutrients and other molecules in their environment through a biochemical sensory apparatus that can trigger spore germination, allowing the return to vegetative growth within minutes of exposure of germinants. We demonstrate here that bacterial spores of multiple species retain memory of transient exposures to germinant stimuli that can result in altered responses to subsequent exposure. The magnitude and decay of these memory effects depend on the pulse duration as well as on the separation time, incubation temperature, and pH values between the pulses. Spores of Bacillus species germinate in response to nutrients that interact with germinant receptors (GRs) in the spore’s inner membrane, with different nutrient types acting on different receptors. In our experiments, B. subtilis spores display memory when the first and second germinant pulses target different receptors, suggesting that some components of spore memory are downstream of GRs. Furthermore, nonnutrient germinants, which do not require GRs, exhibit memory either alone or in combination with nutrient germinants, and memory of nonnutrient stimulation is found to be more persistent than that induced by GR-dependent stimuli. Spores of B. cereus and Clostridium difficile also exhibit germination memory, suggesting that memory may be a general property of bacterial spores. These observations along with experiments involving strains with mutations in various germination proteins suggest a model in which memory is stored primarily in the metastable states of SpoVA proteins, which comprise a channel for release of dipicolinic acid, a major early event in spore germination. PMID:26604257

  9. Electrochromic nanocrystal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Shim, M; Guyot-Sionnest, P

    2001-03-23

    Incorporating nanocrystals into future electronic or optoelectronic devices will require a means of controlling charge-injection processes and an understanding of how the injected charges affect the properties of nanocrystals. We show that the optical properties of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots can be tuned by an electrochemical potential. The injection of electrons into the quantum-confined states of the nanocrystal leads to an electrochromic response, including a strong, size-tunable, midinfrared absorption corresponding to an intraband transition, a bleach of the visible interband exciton transitions, and a quench of the narrow band-edge photoluminescence. PMID:11264530

  10. Coulomb Mediated Hybridization of Excitons in Coupled Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardelt, P.-L.; Gawarecki, K.; Müller, K.; Waeber, A. M.; Bechtold, A.; Oberhofer, K.; Daniels, J. M.; Klotz, F.; Bichler, M.; Kuhn, T.; Krenner, H. J.; Machnikowski, P.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    We report Coulomb mediated hybridization of excitonic states in optically active InGaAs quantum dot molecules. By probing the optical response of an individual quantum dot molecule as a function of the static electric field applied along the molecular axis, we observe unexpected avoided level crossings that do not arise from the dominant single-particle tunnel coupling. We identify a new few-particle coupling mechanism stemming from Coulomb interactions between different neutral exciton states. Such Coulomb resonances hybridize the exciton wave function over four different electron and hole single-particle orbitals. Comparisons of experimental observations with microscopic eight-band k .p calculations taking into account a realistic quantum dot geometry show good agreement and reveal that the Coulomb resonances arise from broken symmetry in the artificial semiconductor molecule.

  11. Gating of attention towards food stimuli in binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Florian; Naumann, Eva; Biehl, Stefanie; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Cognitive models of eating disorders propose that attentional biases for disorder-relevant stimuli contribute to eating disorder pathology. Empirical evidence of a contribution of attentional biases for binge eating disorder (BED) is still scarce. The aim of the present study was to assess attention engagement towards, and disengagement from, food stimuli in overweight females with BED (n = 25) and a group of overweight and obese women without BED (OW; n = 30). Participants completed a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm with food and neutral words as target stimuli. This task can be used to decompose an attentional bias for food stimuli into its stimulus engagement and stimulus disengagement components. Findings indicate that facilitated stimulus engagement for food stimuli over neutral stimuli was more pronounced in the BED group compared to the OW group. Conversely, there were no substantial disengagement effects in either group. Thereby, results support the idea that early attentional processes are biased in BED. PMID:26212270

  12. Posturographic destabilization in eating disorders in female patients exposed to body image related phobic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Forghieri, M; Monzani, D; Mackinnon, A; Ferrari, S; Gherpelli, C; Galeazzi, G M

    2016-08-26

    Human postural control is dependent on the central integration of vestibular, visual and proprioceptive inputs. Psychological states can affect balance control: anxiety, in particular, has been shown to influence balance mediated by visual stimuli. We hypothesized that patients with eating disorders would show postural destabilization when exposed to their image in a mirror and to the image of a fashion model representing their body ideal in comparison to body neutral stimuli. Seventeen females patients attending a day centre for the treatment of eating disorders were administered psychometric measures of body dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and underwent posturographic measures with their eyes closed, open, watching a neutral stimulus, while exposed to a full length mirror and to an image of a fashion model corresponding to their body image. Results were compared to those obtained by eighteen healthy subjects. Eating disordered patients showed higher levels of body dissatisfaction and higher postural destabilization than controls, but this was limited to the conditions in which they were exposed to their mirror image or a fashion model image. Postural destabilization under these conditions correlated with measures of body dissatisfaction. In eating disordered patients, body related stimuli seem to act as phobic stimuli in the posturographic paradigm used. If confirmed, this has the potential to be developed for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:27397012

  13. Caffeine deprivation state modulates coffee consumption but not attentional bias for caffeine-related stimuli.

    PubMed

    Stafford, L D; Yeomans, M R

    2005-11-01

    Previous research has shown that caffeine deprivation state can exert a strong influence on the ability of caffeine to reinforce behaviour. Recent work has also found evidence for an attentional bias in habitual caffeine users. It remains unclear whether deprivation state can influence attentional bias. Here we explored the relationship between caffeine deprivation, attentional bias to caffeine-related stimuli and subsequent caffeine reinforcement measured by consumption of coffee. In three experiments, participants (between-subjects: n=28; within-subjects: n=20, within-subjects: n=20) were preloaded with either caffeine (experiments 1 and 3 : 100 mg; experiment 2 : 150 mg) or placebo, and in experiments 1 and 2 they completed a novel attentional bias task involving pre-attentive word recognition, and in experiment 3 a dot-probe task. In experiments 2 and 3, this was followed by a test of coffee consumption. Greater recognition for caffeine-related words (experiments 1 and 2) and faster reaction times to probes replacing caffeine-related rather than control stimuli (experiment 3) confirmed caffeine-related attentional biases, but in no case was this affected by manipulation of caffeine-deprivation state. Participants in a deprived versus nondeprived state, however, experienced increases in drowsiness and headaches (experiment 2) and reduced alertness (experiment 3). Further, coffee consumption was greatest when participants were caffeine-deprived than when they were nondeprived. Findings are discussed in relation to prevailing theories of drug addiction. PMID:16170233

  14. Differences in the responses of heterozygous carriers of colorblindness and normal controls to briefly presented stimuli.

    PubMed

    Cohn, S A; Emmerich, D S; Carlson, E A

    1989-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted in order to investigate the possible effects of X-inactivation (Lyon, 1961) on female carriers of colorblindness. The results of the first experiment, like those of Grützner et al. (1976), were consistent with the prediction of the Lyon (1961) hypothesis that the retinas of female carriers are composed of mosaic patches of colorblind and normal areas. In this first experiment, rows and columns of colored spots were presented tachistoscopically, and subjects were asked to identify the colors of the spots. In the second experiment, plates from the Ishihara test of colorblindness were presented tachistoscopically and subjects were asked to identify the number which was embedded in the pattern of colored dots. Both experiments support the Lyon hypothesis in that female carriers were found to have more difficulty in perceiving patterns of colored stimuli than did control subjects, and they suggest that the amount of time that a carrier has to scan colored stimuli plays an important role in her ability to accurately perceive them. PMID:2800352

  15. Invisible visual stimuli elicit increases in alpha-band power.

    PubMed

    Bareither, Isabelle; Chaumon, Maximilien; Bernasconi, Fosco; Villringer, Arno; Busch, Niko A

    2014-09-01

    The cerebral cortex responds to stimuli of a wide range of intensities. Previous studies have demonstrated that undetectably weak somatosensory stimuli cause a functional deactivation or inhibition in somatosensory cortex. In the present study, we tested whether invisible visual stimuli lead to similar responses, indicated by an increase in EEG alpha-band power-an index of cortical excitability. We presented subliminal and supraliminal visual stimuli after estimating each participant's detection threshold. Stimuli consisted of peripherally presented small circular patches that differed in their contrast to a background consisting of a random white noise pattern. We demonstrate that subliminal and supraliminal stimuli each elicit specific neuronal response patterns. Supraliminal stimuli evoked an early, strongly phase-locked lower-frequency response representing the evoked potential and induced a decrease in alpha-band power from 400 ms on. By contrast, subliminal visual stimuli induced an increase of non-phase-locked power around 300 ms that was maximal within the alpha-band. This response might be due to an inhibitory mechanism, which reduces spurious visual activation that is unlikely to result from external stimuli. PMID:24872526

  16. Multi-Stimuli Responsive Macromolecules and Their Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jiaming; Gordon, Mallory; Ventura, Judy; Li, Longyu; Thayumanavan, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we outline examples that illustrate the design criteria for achieving macromolecular assemblies that incorporate a combination of two or more chemical, physical or biological stimuli-responsive components. Progress in both fundamental investigation into the phase transformations of these polymers in response to multiple stimuli and their utilization in a variety of pratical applications have been highlighted. Using these examples, we aim to explain the origin of employed mechanisms of stimuli responsiveness which may serve as a guideline to inspire future design of multi-stimuli responsive materials. PMID:23765263

  17. Time- and Space-Order Effects in Timed Discrimination of Brightness and Size of Paired Visual Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patching, Geoffrey R.; Englund, Mats P.; Hellstrom, Ake

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance of both response probability and response time for testing models of choice, there is a dearth of chronometric studies examining systematic asymmetries that occur over time- and space-orders in the method of paired comparisons. In this study, systematic asymmetries in discriminating the magnitude of paired visual stimuli are…

  18. Size-Minimized Quantum Dots for Molecular and Cellular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Wen, Mary M.; Wang, May D.; Nie, Shuming

    Semiconductor quantum dots, tiny light-emitting particles on thenanometer scale, are emerging as a new class of fluorescent labels for a broad range of molecular and cellular applications. In comparison with organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, they have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tunable light emission, intense signal brightness, resistance to photobleaching, and broadband absorption for simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. Here we report new advances in minimizing the hydrodynamic sizes of quantum dots using multidentate and multifunctional polymer coatings. A key finding is that a linear polymer containing grafted amine and thiol coordinating groups can coat nanocrystals and lead to a highly compact size, exceptional colloidal stability, strong resistance to photobleaching, and high fluorescence quantum yields. This has allowed a new generation of bright and stable quantum dots with small hydrodynamic diameters between 5.6 and 9.7 nm with tunable fluorescence emission from the visible (515 nm) to the near infrared (720 nm). These quantum dots are well suited for molecular and cellular imaging applications in which the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size needs to be minimized. Together with the novel properties of new strain-tunable quantum dots, these findings will be especially useful for multicolor and super-resolution imaging at the single-molecule level.

  19. Neural responses to one- and two-tone stimuli in the hearing organ of the dengue vector mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Ben J.; Wyttenbach, Robert A.; Harrington, Laura C.; Hoy, Ronald R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies demonstrate that mosquitoes listen to each other's wing beats just prior to mating in flight. Field potentials from sound-transducing neurons in the antennae contain both sustained and oscillatory components to pure and paired tone stimuli. Described here is a direct comparison of these two types of response in the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Across a wide range of frequencies and intensities, sustained responses to one- and two-tone stimuli are about equal in magnitude to oscillatory responses to the beats produced by two-tone stimuli. All of these responses are much larger than the oscillatory responses to one-tone stimuli. Similarly, the frequency range extends up to at least the fifth harmonic of the male flight tone for sustained responses to one- and two-tone stimuli and oscillatory responses at the beat frequency of two-tone stimuli, whereas the range of oscillatory response to a one-tone stimulus is limited to, at most, the third harmonic. Thresholds near the fundamental of the flight tone are lower for oscillatory responses than for sustained deflections, lower for males than for females, and within the behaviorally relevant range. A simple model of the transduction process can qualitatively account for both oscillatory and sustained responses to pure and paired tones. These data leave open the question as to which of several alternative strategies underlie flight tone matching behavior in mosquitoes. PMID:20348350

  20. Use of a Remote Eye-Tracker for the Analysis of Gaze during Treadmill Walking and Visual Stimuli Exposition.

    PubMed

    Serchi, V; Peruzzi, A; Cereatti, A; Della Croce, U

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the visual strategies adopted while walking in cognitively engaging environments is extremely valuable. Analyzing gaze when a treadmill and a virtual reality environment are used as motor rehabilitation tools is therefore critical. Being completely unobtrusive, remote eye-trackers are the most appropriate way to measure the point of gaze. Still, the point of gaze measurements are affected by experimental conditions such as head range of motion and visual stimuli. This study assesses the usability limits and measurement reliability of a remote eye-tracker during treadmill walking while visual stimuli are projected. During treadmill walking, the head remained within the remote eye-tracker workspace. Generally, the quality of the point of gaze measurements declined as the distance from the remote eye-tracker increased and data loss occurred for large gaze angles. The stimulus location (a dot-target) did not influence the point of gaze accuracy, precision, and trackability during both standing and walking. Similar results were obtained when the dot-target was replaced by a static or moving 2D target and "region of interest" analysis was applied. These findings foster the feasibility of the use of a remote eye-tracker for the analysis of gaze during treadmill walking in virtual reality environments. PMID:26904671

  1. Effects of Emotional Stimuli on Cardiovascular Responses in Patients with Essential Hypertension Based on Brain/Behavioral Systems

    PubMed Central

    Taban Sadeghi, Mohammadreza; Namdar, Hossein; Vahedi, Shahram; Aslanabadi, Naser; Ezzati, Davoud; Sadeghi, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Effects of emotional stimuli on hemodynamics in patients with essential hypertension based on brain/behavioral systems have not been studied broadly. Methods: Eighty five essential hypertensive male patients who had completed Carver-White BIS/BAS scale were enrolled to the study. Later, 25 BIS and 25 BAS patients were selected and their blood pressure and heart rate were recorded prior to stimuli induction. Participants were then exposed to stressor pictures. After that, 15 minutes of relaxation and cognitive tasks were performed. Finally, the participants were exposed to pleasant pictures. The blood pressure and heart rate were recorded after presenting of 2 stimuli. Results: Our study showed that BIS patients achieved higher scores in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate in comparison with BAS patients after presenting stressful stimuli. Also, BAS patients achieved lower scores in systolic blood pressure and heart rate in comparison with BIS patients after presenting pleasant stimuli. Conclusion: In summary, BIS patients experience negative emotions more than BAS patients. Therefore, the role of induced mood states is important in relation to physical health. PMID:24404349

  2. Relating tribological stimuli to somatosensory electroencephalographic responses.

    PubMed

    Oezguen, Novaf; Schubert, Kristof J; Bergmann, Ronny; Bennewitz, Roland; Strauss, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    The present study deals with the extraction of neural correlates evoked by tactile stimulation of the human fingertip. A reciprocal sliding procedure was performed using a home-built tribometer while simultaneously electroencephalographic (EEG) data from the somatosensory cortex was recorded. The tactile stimuli were delivered by a sliding block with equidistant, perpendicular ridges. The experiments were designed and performed in a fully passive way to prevent attentional locked influences from the subjects. In order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of event related single-trials (ERPs), nonlocal means in addition to 2D-anisotropic denoising schemes based on tight Gabor frames were applied. This novel approach allowed for an easier extraction of ERP alternations. A negative correlation between the latency of the P100 component of the resulting brain responses and the intensity of the underlying lateral forces was found. These findings lead to the conclusion that an increasing stimulus intensity results in a decreasing latency of the brain responses. PMID:26738177

  3. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  4. The Search for Optimal Visual Stimuli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ellis, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In 1983, Watson, Barlow and Robson published a brief report in which they explored the relative visibility of targets that varied in size, shape, spatial frequency, speed, and duration (referred to subsequently here as WBR). A novel aspect of that paper was that visibility was quantified in terms of threshold contrast energy, rather than contrast. As they noted, this provides a more direct measure of the efficiency with which various patterns are detected, and may be more edifying as to the underlying detection machinery. For example, under certain simple assumptions, the waveform of the most efficiently detected signal is an estimate of the receptive field of the visual system's most efficient detector. Thus one goal of their experiment Basuto search for the stimulus that the 'eye sees best'. Parenthetically, the search for optimal stimuli may be seen as the most general and sophisticated variant of the traditional 'subthreshold summation' experiment, in which one measures the effect upon visibility of small probes combined with a base stimulus.

  5. Happiness increases distraction by auditory deviant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Unguetti, Antonia Pilar; Parmentier, Fabrice B R

    2016-08-01

    Rare and unexpected changes (deviants) in an otherwise repeated stream of task-irrelevant auditory distractors (standards) capture attention and impair behavioural performance in an ongoing visual task. Recent evidence indicates that this effect is increased by sadness in a task involving neutral stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that such effect may not be limited to negative emotions but reflect a general depletion of attentional resources by examining whether a positive emotion (happiness) would increase deviance distraction too. Prior to performing an auditory-visual oddball task, happiness or a neutral mood was induced in participants by means of the exposure to music and the recollection of an autobiographical event. Results from the oddball task showed significantly larger deviance distraction following the induction of happiness. Interestingly, the small amount of distraction typically observed on the standard trial following a deviant trial (post-deviance distraction) was not increased by happiness. We speculate that happiness might interfere with the disengagement of attention from the deviant sound back towards the target stimulus (through the depletion of cognitive resources and/or mind wandering) but help subsequent cognitive control to recover from distraction. PMID:26302716

  6. Psychophysiological Response Patterns to Affective Film Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Marieke G. N.; Jentgens, Pia; Beckers, Tom; Kindt, Merel

    2013-01-01

    Psychophysiological research on emotion utilizes various physiological response measures to index activation of the defense system. Here we tested 1) whether acoustic startle reflex (ASR), skin conductance response (SCR) and heart rate (HR) elicited by highly arousing stimuli specifically reflect a defensive state and 2) the relation between resting heart rate variability (HRV) and affective responding. In a within-subject design, participants viewed film clips with a positive, negative and neutral content. In contrast to SCR and HR, we show that ASR differentiated between negative, neutral and positive states and can therefore be considered as a reliable index of activation of the defense system. Furthermore, resting HRV was associated with affect-modulated characteristics of ASR, but not with SCR or HR. Interestingly, individuals with low-HRV showed less differentiation in ASR between affective states. We discuss the important value of ASR in psychophysiological research on emotion and speculate on HRV as a potential biological marker for demarcating adaptive from maladaptive responding. PMID:23646134

  7. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  8. Stereotypic vision: how stereotypes disambiguate visual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Correll, Joshua; Wittenbrink, Bernd; Crawford, Matthew T; Sadler, Melody S

    2015-02-01

    Three studies examined how participants use race to disambiguate visual stimuli. Participants performed a first-person-shooter task in which Black and White targets appeared holding either a gun or an innocuous object (e.g., a wallet). In Study 1, diffusion analysis (Ratcliff, 1978) showed that participants rapidly acquired information about a gun when it appeared in the hands of a Black target, and about an innocuous object in the hands of a White target. For counterstereotypic pairings (armed Whites, unarmed Blacks), participants acquired information more slowly. In Study 2, eye tracking showed that participants relied on more ambiguous information (measured by visual angle from fovea) when responding to stereotypic targets; for counterstereotypic targets, they achieved greater clarity before responding. In Study 3, participants were briefly exposed to targets (limiting access to visual information) but had unlimited time to respond. In spite of their slow, deliberative responses, they showed racial bias. This pattern is inconsistent with control failure and suggests that stereotypes influenced identification of the object. All 3 studies show that race affects visual processing by supplementing objective information. PMID:25603373

  9. Stimuli-responsive cement-reinforced rubber.

    PubMed

    Musso, Simone; Robisson, Agathe; Maheshwar, Sudeep; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2014-05-14

    In this work, we report the successful development of a cement-rubber reactive composite with reversible mechanical properties. Initially, the composite behaves like rubber containing inert filler, but when exposed to water, it increases in volume and reaches a stiffness that is intermediate between that of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) and hydrated cement, while maintaining a relatively large ductility characteristic of rubber. After drying, the modulus increases even further up to 400 MPa. Wet/drying cycles prove that the elastic modulus can reversibly change between 150 and 400 MPa. Utilizing attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), we demonstrate that the high pH produced by the hydration of cement triggers the hydrolysis of the rubber nitrile groups into carboxylate anions. Thus, the salt bridges, generated between the carboxylate anions of the elastomer and the cations of the filler, are responsible for the reversible variations in volume and elastic modulus of the composite as a consequence of environmental moisture exposure. These results reveal that cement nanoparticles can successfully be used to accomplish a twofold task: (a) achieve an original postpolymerization modification that allows one to work with carboxylate HNBR (HXNBR) not obtained by direct copolymerization of carboxylate monomers with butadiene, and (b) synthesize a stimuli-responsive polymeric composite. This new type of material, having an ideal behavior for sealing application, could be used as an alternative to cement for oil field zonal isolation applications. PMID:24734968

  10. Optical properties of CdS and CdS/ZnS quantum dots synthesized by reverse micelle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Vu Thi Kim; Viet Ha, Chu; Tien Ha, Le; Nhu Dat, Nguyen

    2009-09-01

    The CdS and CdS/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots have been synthesized by reverse micelle method using sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) surfactant agent. The quantum dot diameter is about 2.5 to 4 nm depending on the concentration of the surfactant agent. It is interesting that, in contrast to other colloidal methods, the size of quantum dots does not depend on the growth time. The absorption spectra of CdS quantum dots show the narrow size distribution. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra include two bands, the intrinsic emission of CdS nanocrystals and the emission of surface states. There is noticeable increase of the PL intensity and subsequent photostability of CdS/ZnS core-shell quantum dots in comparison with CdS quantum dots without the ZnS shell.

  11. Imagery Arousal as a Function of Exposure to Artistic Stimuli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilotta, Joseph

    The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent music and art can arouse imagery experiences in an audience. Because of the relationship found between imagery and the arts in past research, it was hypothesized that artistic stimuli would have a greater influence on imagery than other kinds of stimuli (art-information or non-artistic).…

  12. Exploring Visuomotor Priming Following Biological and Non-Biological Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowen, E.; Bradshaw, C.; Galpin, A.; Lawrence, A.; Poliakoff, E.

    2010-01-01

    Observation of human actions influences the observer's own motor system, termed visuomotor priming, and is believed to be caused by automatic activation of mirror neurons. Evidence suggests that priming effects are larger for biological (human) as opposed to non-biological (object) stimuli and enhanced when viewing stimuli in mirror compared to…

  13. Comparing Methods of Identifying Reinforcing Stimuli in School Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damon, Sharon; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Fiorello, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Reinforcement-based interventions, the most frequently used treatments for school-age children, rely on accurately identifying stimuli that will serve to reinforce appropriate classroom behavior. Research has consistently demonstrated that the results from a forced-choice pairing procedure are the best predictors of reinforcing stimuli.…

  14. Subliminal sexual stimuli facilitate genital response in women.

    PubMed

    Ponseti, Jorge; Bosinski, Hartmut A G

    2010-10-01

    Visual sexual stimuli (VSS) are believed to undergo an automatic process of stimulus appraisal and (genital or subjective) response generation. Consistent with this belief, studies have found that subliminal VSS can facilitate responses to subsequent sexual stimulus presentations. We tested whether subliminal sexual stimuli facilitated a genital response in women and, furthermore, whether this genital response could be modulated by both opposite-sex stimuli and same-sex stimuli (i.e., whether the genital response to subliminal stimuli is category-specific or nonspecific). Twenty heterosexual women underwent vaginal photoplethysmography while being subliminally (20 ms) exposed to same-sex, opposite-sex, and nonsexual slides in a priming experiment. Vaginal pulse amplitude was increased when target stimuli were preceded by both opposite-sex and same-sex priming stimuli relative to nonsexual priming stimuli. This finding suggests that subliminal VSS were subjected to automatic stimulus processing, thereby facilitating nonspecific genital response preparation. Results are discussed in terms of implicit and explicit memory access and the evolutionary benefit of female nonspecific genital response. PMID:20041283

  15. Inverse Target- and Cue-Priming Effects of Masked Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattler, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    The processing of a visual target that follows a briefly presented prime stimulus can be facilitated if prime and target stimuli are similar. In contrast to these positive priming effects, inverse priming effects (or negative compatibility effects) have been found when a mask follows prime stimuli before the target stimulus is presented: Responses…

  16. Freeze or Flee? Negative Stimuli Elicit Selective Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Zachary; Verges, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Humans preferentially attend to negative stimuli. A consequence of this automatic vigilance for negative valence is that negative words elicit slower responses than neutral or positive words on a host of cognitive tasks. Some researchers have speculated that negative stimuli elicit a general suppression of motor activity, akin to the freezing…

  17. Conditional Reinforcers and Informative Stimuli in a Constant Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutros, Nathalie; Davison, Michael; Elliffe, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Five pigeons responded on steady-state concurrent variable-interval variable-interval schedules of food presentation in which half of the foods were removed and replaced with nonfood stimuli. Across conditions, the stimuli were either paired or unpaired with food, and the correlation between the ratio of food deliveries on the two alternatives and…

  18. Logical Rules and the Classification of Integral-Dimension Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Daniel R.; Nosofsky, Robert M.; Donkin, Christopher; Denton, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    A classic distinction in perceptual information processing is whether stimuli are composed of separable dimensions, which are highly analyzable, or integral dimensions, which are processed holistically. Previous tests of a set of logical-rule models of classification have shown that separable-dimension stimuli are processed serially if the…

  19. Identity Matching-to-Sample with Olfactory Stimuli in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Tracy; Pitts, Raymond C.; Galizio, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Identity matching-to-sample has been difficult to demonstrate in rats, but most studies have used visual stimuli. There is evidence that rats can acquire complex forms of olfactory stimulus control, and the present study explored the possibility that identity matching might be facilitated in rats if olfactory stimuli were used. Four rats were…

  20. Sex Differences in Response to Visual Sexual Stimuli: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Heather A.; Wallen, Kim

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews what is currently known about how men and women respond to the presentation of visual sexual stimuli. While the assumption that men respond more to visual sexual stimuli is generally empirically supported, previous reports of sex differences are confounded by the variable content of the stimuli presented and measurement techniques. We propose that the cognitive processing stage of responding to sexual stimuli is the first stage in which sex differences occur. The divergence between men and women is proposed to occur at this time, reflected in differences in neural activation, and contribute to previously reported sex differences in downstream peripheral physiological responses and subjective reports of sexual arousal. Additionally, this review discusses factors that may contribute to the variability in sex differences observed in response to visual sexual stimuli. Factors include participant variables, such as hormonal state and socialized sexual attitudes, as well as variables specific to the content presented in the stimuli. Based on the literature reviewed, we conclude that content characteristics may differentially produce higher levels of sexual arousal in men and women. Specifically, men appear more influenced by the sex of the actors depicted in the stimuli while women’s response may differ with the context presented. Sexual motivation, perceived gender role expectations, and sexual attitudes are possible influences. These differences are of practical importance to future research on sexual arousal that aims to use experimental stimuli comparably appealing to men and women and also for general understanding of cognitive sex differences. PMID:17668311

  1. Emotional content of stimuli improves visuospatial working memory.

    PubMed

    González-Garrido, Andrés Antonio; López-Franco, Adriana Liset; Gómez-Velázquez, Fabiola Reveca; Ramos-Loyo, Julieta; Sequeira, Henrique

    2015-01-12

    Processing and storage in visuospatial working memory (VSWM) seem to depend on attention-based mechanisms. In order to explore the effect of attention-attractive stimuli, such as emotional faces on VSWM performance, ERPs were obtained from 20 young adults while reproducing spatial sequences of six facial (happy and neutral) and non-facial control stimuli in inverse order. Behavioral performances revealed that trials with happy facial expressions resulted in a significantly higher amount of correct responses. For positive emotional facial stimuli, N170 amplitude was higher over right temporo-parietal regions, while P2 amplitude was higher over frontal and lower over parietal regions. In addition, LPP amplitude was also significantly higher for this type of stimuli. Both behavioral and electrophysiological results support the notion of the domain-general attention-based mechanism of VSWM maintenance, in which spatial to-be-remembered locations might be influenced by the emotional content of the stimuli. PMID:25445376

  2. Rapid temporal recalibration is unique to audiovisual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Van der Burg, Erik; Orchard-Mills, Emily; Alais, David

    2015-01-01

    Following prolonged exposure to asynchronous multisensory signals, the brain adapts to reduce the perceived asynchrony. Here, in three separate experiments, participants performed a synchrony judgment task on audiovisual, audiotactile or visuotactile stimuli and we used inter-trial analyses to examine whether temporal recalibration occurs rapidly on the basis of a single asynchronous trial. Even though all combinations used the same subjects, task and design, temporal recalibration occurred for audiovisual stimuli (i.e., the point of subjective simultaneity depended on the preceding trial's modality order), but none occurred when the same auditory or visual event was combined with a tactile event. Contrary to findings from prolonged adaptation studies showing recalibration for all three combinations, we show that rapid, inter-trial recalibration is unique to audiovisual stimuli. We conclude that recalibration occurs at two different timescales for audiovisual stimuli (fast and slow), but only on a slow timescale for audiotactile and visuotactile stimuli. PMID:25200176

  3. Emotional attention for erotic stimuli: Cognitive and brain mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sennwald, Vanessa; Pool, Eva; Brosch, Tobias; Delplanque, Sylvain; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Sander, David

    2016-06-01

    It has long been posited that among emotional stimuli, only negative threatening information modulates early shifts of attention. However, in the last few decades there has been an increase in research showing that attention is also involuntarily oriented toward positive rewarding stimuli such as babies, food, and erotic information. Because reproduction-related stimuli have some of the largest effects among positive stimuli on emotional attention, the present work reviews recent literature and proposes that the cognitive and cerebral mechanisms underlying the involuntarily attentional orientation toward threat-related information are also sensitive to erotic information. More specifically, the recent research suggests that both types of information involuntarily orient attention due to their concern relevance and that the amygdala plays an important role in detecting concern-relevant stimuli, thereby enhancing perceptual processing and influencing emotional attentional processes. PMID:26179894

  4. Optimal Decision Stimuli for Risky Choice Experiments: An Adaptive Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cavagnaro, Daniel R.; Gonzalez, Richard; Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Collecting data to discriminate between models of risky choice requires careful selection of decision stimuli. Models of decision making aim to predict decisions across a wide range of possible stimuli, but practical limitations force experimenters to select only a handful of them for actual testing. Some stimuli are more diagnostic between models than others, so the choice of stimuli is critical. This paper provides the theoretical background and a methodological framework for adaptive selection of optimal stimuli for discriminating among models of risky choice. The approach, called Adaptive Design Optimization (ADO), adapts the stimulus in each experimental trial based on the results of the preceding trials. We demonstrate the validity of the approach with simulation studies aiming to discriminate Expected Utility, Weighted Expected Utility, Original Prospect Theory, and Cumulative Prospect Theory models. PMID:24532856

  5. Optimal Decision Stimuli for Risky Choice Experiments: An Adaptive Approach.

    PubMed

    Cavagnaro, Daniel R; Gonzalez, Richard; Myung, Jay I; Pitt, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    Collecting data to discriminate between models of risky choice requires careful selection of decision stimuli. Models of decision making aim to predict decisions across a wide range of possible stimuli, but practical limitations force experimenters to select only a handful of them for actual testing. Some stimuli are more diagnostic between models than others, so the choice of stimuli is critical. This paper provides the theoretical background and a methodological framework for adaptive selection of optimal stimuli for discriminating among models of risky choice. The approach, called Adaptive Design Optimization (ADO), adapts the stimulus in each experimental trial based on the results of the preceding trials. We demonstrate the validity of the approach with simulation studies aiming to discriminate Expected Utility, Weighted Expected Utility, Original Prospect Theory, and Cumulative Prospect Theory models. PMID:24532856

  6. The virtual people set: developing computer-generated stimuli for the assessment of pedophilic sexual interest.

    PubMed

    Dombert, Beate; Mokros, Andreas; Brückner, Eva; Schlegl, Verena; Antfolk, Jan; Bäckström, Anna; Zappalà, Angelo; Osterheider, Michael; Santtila, Pekka

    2013-12-01

    The implicit assessment of pedophilic sexual interest through viewing-time methods necessitates visual stimuli. There are grave ethical and legal concerns against using pictures of real children, however. The present report is a summary of findings on a new set of 108 computer-generated stimuli. The images vary in terms of gender (female/male), explicitness (naked/clothed), and physical maturity (prepubescent, pubescent, and adult) of the persons depicted. A series of three studies tested the internal and external validity of the picture set. Studies 1 and 2 yielded good-to-high estimates of observer agreement with regard to stimulus maturity levels by two methods (categorization and paired comparison). Study 3 extended these findings with regard to judgments made by convicted child sexual offenders. PMID:23296092

  7. Violent Reactions from Non-Shock Stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandusky, Harold

    2007-06-01

    Most reactions are thermally initiated, whether from direct heating or dissipation of energy from mechanical, shock, or electrical stimuli. For other than prompt shock initiation, the reaction must be able to spread through porosity or over large surface area to become more violent than just rupturing any confinement. While burning rates are important, high-strain mechanical properties are nearly so, either by reducing existing porosity or generating additional surface area through fracture. The first example is deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in porous beds. During the early stages, weak compressive waves ahead of the convective ignition front will reduce porosity, thereby restricting the spread of combustion and the pressure buildup. If, however, pressure increases faster than can be relieved by loss of confinement, coalescing compressive waves can initiate reaction at hot spots from rapid pore collapse. This compressive reaction can drive a shockwave that transits to detonation, the most violent reaction in any scenario. It has been shown that reaction violence is reduced in DDT experiments if the binder is softened, either by raising the initial temperature or adding a solvent. An example of the role of mechanical properties in enhancing reaction violence through fracturing occurs when cavities in projectile fills collapse during acceleration in the gun barrel, which is referred to as setback. Explosives with soft rubber binders will deform and undergo mild reaction from shear heating within the explosive and adiabatic compression of any gas in the cavity. Stiff explosives are similarly ignited, but also fracture and generate additional surface area for a violent event. The last example to be considered is slow cook-off, where thermal damage can increase burning rate as well as provide porosity to enhance the pressure buildup. As reaction spreads from the zone of thermal run-away, an explosive binder that resists breakup will limit the violence.

  8. Quantum dots: Rethinking the electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishnoi, Dimple

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the Quantum dots are quite interesting for the electronics industry. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-scale crystals, which have unique photo physical, quantum electrical properties, size-dependent optical properties, There small size means that electrons do not have to travel as far as with larger particles, thus electronic devices can operate faster. Cheaper than modern commercial solar cells while making use of a wider variety of photon energies, including "waste heat" from the sun's energy. Quantum dots can be used in tandem cells, which are multi junction photovoltaic cells or in the intermediate band setup. PbSe (lead selenide) is commonly used in quantum dot solar cells.

  9. Exploring Combinations of Different Color and Facial Expression Stimuli for Gaze-Independent BCIs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Jin, Jing; Daly, Ian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xingyu; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some studies have proven that a conventional visual brain computer interface (BCI) based on overt attention cannot be used effectively when eye movement control is not possible. To solve this problem, a novel visual-based BCI system based on covert attention and feature attention has been proposed and was called the gaze-independent BCI. Color and shape difference between stimuli and backgrounds have generally been used in examples of gaze-independent BCIs. Recently, a new paradigm based on facial expression changes has been presented, and obtained high performance. However, some facial expressions were so similar that users couldn't tell them apart, especially when they were presented at the same position in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm. Consequently, the performance of the BCI is reduced. New Method: In this paper, we combined facial expressions and colors to optimize the stimuli presentation in the gaze-independent BCI. This optimized paradigm was called the colored dummy face pattern. It is suggested that different colors and facial expressions could help users to locate the target and evoke larger event-related potentials (ERPs). In order to evaluate the performance of this new paradigm, two other paradigms were presented, called the gray dummy face pattern and the colored ball pattern. Comparison with Existing Method(s): The key point that determined the value of the colored dummy faces stimuli in BCI systems was whether the dummy face stimuli could obtain higher performance than gray faces or colored balls stimuli. Ten healthy participants (seven male, aged 21–26 years, mean 24.5 ± 1.25) participated in our experiment. Online and offline results of four different paradigms were obtained and comparatively analyzed. Results: The results showed that the colored dummy face pattern could evoke higher P300 and N400 ERP amplitudes, compared with the gray dummy face pattern and the colored ball pattern. Online results showed that

  10. Emotional enhancement of immediate memory: Positive pictorial stimuli are better recognized than neutral or negative pictorial stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Chainay, Hanna; Michael, George A.; Vert-pré, Mélissa; Landré, Lionel; Plasson, Amandine

    2012-01-01

    We examined emotional memory enhancement (EEM) for negative and positive pictures while manipulating encoding and retrieval conditions. Two groups of 40 participants took part in this study. Both groups performed immediate implicit (categorization task) and explicit (recognition task) retrieval, but for one group the tasks were preceded by incidental encoding and for the other group by intentional encoding. As indicated by the sensitivity index (dʹ), after incidental encoding positive stimuli were easier to recognize than negative and neutral stimuli. Participants’ response criterion was more liberal for negative stimuli than for both positive and neutral ones, independent of encoding condition. In the implicit retrieval task, participants were slower in categorizing positive than negative and neutral stimuli. However, the priming effect was larger for emotional than for neutral stimuli. These results are discussed in the context of the idea that the effect of emotion on immediate memory enhancement may depend on the intentionality to encode and retrieve information. PMID:22956991

  11. Influence of shape on electron transport in ballistic quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. J.; Katine, J. A.; Westervelt, R. M.; Gossard, A. C.

    1994-12-01

    We have investigated the low-temperature (T=0.43-4.25 K) magnetotransport of quantum dots fabricated in the shape of an open circle and a circle having a central bar. The characteristic magnetic fields for both coherent backscattering and conductance fluctuations are strongly shape dependent: both are larger by a factor >=3 in the device with the central bar. Comparison of large and small devices of nominally identical shape shows that characteristic trajectory areas are proportional to the device area.

  12. Numerosity judgments for tactile stimuli distributed over the body surface.

    PubMed

    Gallace, Alberto; Tan, Hong Z; Spence, Charles

    2006-01-01

    A large body of research now supports the claim that two different and dissociable processes are involved in making numerosity judgments regarding visual stimuli: subitising (fast and nearly errorless) for up to 4 stimuli, and counting (slow and error-prone) when more than 4 stimuli are presented. We studied tactile numerosity judgments for combinations of 1-7 vibrotactile stimuli presented simultaneously over the body surface. In experiment 1, the stimuli were presented once, while in experiment 2 conditions of single presentation and repeated presentation of the stimulus were compared. Neither experiment provided any evidence for a discontinuity in the slope of either the RT or error data suggesting that subitisation does not occur for tactile stimuli. By systematically varying the intensity of the vibrotactile stimuli in experiment 3, we were able to demonstrate that participants were not simply using the 'global intensity' of the whole tactile display to make their tactile numerosity judgments, but were, instead, using information concerning the number of tactors activated. The results of the three experiments reported here are discussed in relation to current theories of counting and subitising, and potential implications for the design of tactile user interfaces are highlighted. PMID:16583769

  13. Neural Processing of Emotional Musical and Nonmusical Stimuli in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Atchley, Ruth Ann; Chrysikou, Evangelia; Martin, Laura E.; Clair, Alicia A.; Ingram, Rick E.; Simmons, W. Kyle; Savage, Cary R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and striatum are part of the emotional neural circuitry implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD). Music is often used for emotion regulation, and pleasurable music listening activates the dopaminergic system in the brain, including the ACC. The present study uses functional MRI (fMRI) and an emotional nonmusical and musical stimuli paradigm to examine how neural processing of emotionally provocative auditory stimuli is altered within the ACC and striatum in depression. Method Nineteen MDD and 20 never-depressed (ND) control participants listened to standardized positive and negative emotional musical and nonmusical stimuli during fMRI scanning and gave subjective ratings of valence and arousal following scanning. Results ND participants exhibited greater activation to positive versus negative stimuli in ventral ACC. When compared with ND participants, MDD participants showed a different pattern of activation in ACC. In the rostral part of the ACC, ND participants showed greater activation for positive information, while MDD participants showed greater activation to negative information. In dorsal ACC, the pattern of activation distinguished between the types of stimuli, with ND participants showing greater activation to music compared to nonmusical stimuli, while MDD participants showed greater activation to nonmusical stimuli, with the greatest response to negative nonmusical stimuli. No group differences were found in striatum. Conclusions These results suggest that people with depression may process emotional auditory stimuli differently based on both the type of stimulation and the emotional content of that stimulation. This raises the possibility that music may be useful in retraining ACC function, potentially leading to more effective and targeted treatments. PMID:27284693

  14. Single to quadruple quantum dots with tunable tunnel couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, T.; Noiri, A.; Obata, T.; Yoneda, J.; Yoshida, K.; Otsuka, T.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-03-17

    We prepare a gate-defined quadruple quantum dot to study the gate-tunability of single to quadruple quantum dots with finite inter-dot tunnel couplings. The measured charging energies of various double dots suggest that the dot size is governed by the gate geometry. For the triple and quadruple dots, we study the gate-tunable inter-dot tunnel couplings. For the triple dot, we find that the effective tunnel coupling between side dots significantly depends on the alignment of the center dot potential. These results imply that the present quadruple dot has a gate performance relevant for implementing spin-based four-qubits with controllable exchange couplings.

  15. Optically active quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Valerie; Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important optically active quantum dot (QD) based materials, study their properties and explore their biological applications. For the first time chiral II-VI QDs have been prepared by us using microwave induced heating with the racemic (Rac), D- and L-enantiomeric forms of penicillamine as stabilisers. Circular dichroism (CD) studies of these QDs have shown that D- and L-penicillamine stabilised particles produced mirror image CD spectra, while the particles prepared with a Rac mixture showed only a weak signal. It was also demonstrated that these QDs show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. These QDs have demonstrated highly specific chiral recognition of various biological species including aminoacids. The utilisation of chiral stabilisers also allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS nano-tetrapods, which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. Biological testing of chiral CdS nanotetrapods displayed a chiral bias for an uptake of the D- penicillamine stabilised nano-tetrapods by cancer cells. It is expected that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in nanobiotechnology, medicine and optical chemo- and bio-sensing.

  16. Electron states in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Dhayal, Suman S.; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Ruda, Harry E.; Nair, Selvakumar V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, the electronic structures of quantum dots (QDs) of nine direct band gap semiconductor materials belonging to the group II-VI and III-V families are investigated, within the empirical tight-binding framework, in the effective bond orbital model. This methodology is shown to accurately describe these systems, yielding, at the same time, qualitative insights into their electronic properties. Various features of the bulk band structure such as band-gaps, band curvature, and band widths around symmetry points affect the quantum confinement of electrons and holes. These effects are identified and quantified. A comparison with experimental data yields good agreement with the calculations. These theoretical results would help quantify the optical response of QDs of these materials and provide useful input for applications.

  17. Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon dots for highly selective and sensitive detection of Hg (II) ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo; Yu, Bin; You, Tianyan

    2015-12-15

    Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon dots (N,S/C-dots) with high fluorescence quantum yields (FLQY, 25%) was successfully synthesized by a one-step microwave-assisted method. In comparison with nitrogen doped C-dots (N/C-dots) prepared using the same method, the resulting N,S/C-dots featured small particle size, uniform surface state, insensitive FL properties to excitation wavelengths and environmental conditions, negligible cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. Simultaneous doping of N and S effectively promoted electron-transfer and coordination interaction between N,S/C-dots and Hg(2+). Thus, when used as fluorescence probe for Hg(2+) label-free detection, the resulting N,S/C-dots showed good detection sensitivity and ion selectivity. The limit of detection was 2 μM; among 15 metal ions investigated, only Fe(3+) showed interference to the Hg(2+) detection. Fortunately, this interference could be effectively shielded using a chelating agent sodium hexametaphoshpate. The applicability of N,S/C-dots as fluorescence probe for Hg(2+) detection in lake water and tap water was demonstrated. Finally, based on its favorable features of negligible cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility, the N,S/C-dots were successfully applied to probe Hg(2+) in living cells, which broaden its application in biological system. PMID:26143466

  18. Neurons in Striate Cortex Signal Disparity in Half-Matched Random-Dot Stereograms

    PubMed Central

    Read, Jenny C. A.; Cumming, Bruce G.

    2016-01-01

    Human stereopsis can operate in dense “cyclopean” images containing no monocular objects. This is believed to depend on the computation of binocular correlation by neurons in primary visual cortex (V1). The observation that humans perceive depth in half-matched random-dot stereograms, although these stimuli have no net correlation, has led to the proposition that human depth perception in these stimuli depends on a distinct “matching” computation possibly performed in extrastriate cortex. However, recording from disparity-selective neurons in V1 of fixating monkeys, we found that they are in fact able to signal disparity in half-matched stimuli. We present a simple model that explains these results. This reinstates the view that disparity-selective neurons in V1 provide the initial substrate for perception in dense cyclopean stimuli, and strongly suggests that separate correlation and matching computations are not necessary to explain existing data on mixed correlation stereograms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The initial step in stereoscopic 3D vision is generally thought to be a correlation-based computation that takes place in striate cortex. Recent research has argued that there must be an additional matching computation involved in extracting stereoscopic depth in random-dot stereograms. This is based on the observation that humans can perceive depth in stimuli with a mean binocular correlation of zero (where a correlation-based mechanism should not signal depth). We show that correlation-based cells in striate cortex do in fact signal depth here because they convert fluctuations in the correlation level into a mean change in the firing rate. Our results reinstate the view that these cells provide a sufficient substrate for the perception of stereoscopic depth. PMID:27559177

  19. Humans can discriminate more than 1 trillion olfactory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bushdid, C; Magnasco, M O; Vosshall, L B; Keller, A

    2014-03-21

    Humans can discriminate several million different colors and almost half a million different tones, but the number of discriminable olfactory stimuli remains unknown. The lay and scientific literature typically claims that humans can discriminate 10,000 odors, but this number has never been empirically validated. We determined the resolution of the human sense of smell by testing the capacity of humans to discriminate odor mixtures with varying numbers of shared components. On the basis of the results of psychophysical testing, we calculated that humans can discriminate at least 1 trillion olfactory stimuli. This is far more than previous estimates of distinguishable olfactory stimuli. It demonstrates that the human olfactory system, with its hundreds of different olfactory receptors, far outperforms the other senses in the number of physically different stimuli it can discriminate. PMID:24653035

  20. Do extraverts process social stimuli differently from introverts?

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Inna; Ng, Rowena; Bellugi, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    The personality trait of extraversion has been linked to the network of brain systems controlling sensitivity to cues of reward and generating approach behavior in response, but little is known about whether extraverts’ neural circuits are especially sensitive to social stimuli, given their preference for social engagement. Utilizing event-related potential (ERP) methodology, this study demonstrates that variation on the extraversion dimension is associated with the extent to which social stimuli evoke enhanced allocation of attention. Specifically, higher scores on extraversion were found to be associated with higher amplitudes of the P300 component of the ERPs elicited by human faces. This finding suggests that social stimuli carry enhanced motivational significance for individuals characterized by high extraversion, and that individual differences in personality are related to meaningful individual differences in neural responses to social stimuli. PMID:21738558

  1. CLE Peptide Signaling and Crosstalk with Phytohormones and Environmental Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Zhang, Guohua; Wu, Mengyao

    2015-01-01

    The CLE (CLAVATA3/Endosperm surrounding region-related) peptide family is one of the best-studied secreted peptide families in plants. Accumulated data have revealed that CLE genes play vital roles on stem cell homeostasis in different types of meristems. Additionally, CLE genes have been found to perform various biological roles in plant growth and development, and in response to environmental stimuli. With recent advances on our understanding of CLE peptide function, it is showing that the existence of potential crosstalks of CLE peptides with phytohormones and external stimuli. Complex interactions exist in which CLE petides coordinate with hormones to regulate plant growth and development, and in response to external stimuli. In this article, we present recent advances in cell-cell communication that is mediated by CLE peptides combining with phytohormones and external stimuli, and suggest additional Arabidopsis CLE genes that are likely to be controlled by hormones and environmental cues. PMID:26779239

  2. Transport through graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güttinger, J.; Molitor, F.; Stampfer, C.; Schnez, S.; Jacobsen, A.; Dröscher, S.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2012-12-01

    We review transport experiments on graphene quantum dots and narrow graphene constrictions. In a quantum dot, electrons are confined in all lateral dimensions, offering the possibility for detailed investigation and controlled manipulation of individual quantum systems. The recently isolated two-dimensional carbon allotrope graphene is an interesting host to study quantum phenomena, due to its novel electronic properties and the expected weak interaction of the electron spin with the material. Graphene quantum dots are fabricated by etching mono-layer flakes into small islands (diameter 60-350 nm) with narrow connections to contacts (width 20-75 nm), serving as tunneling barriers for transport spectroscopy. Electron confinement in graphene quantum dots is observed by measuring Coulomb blockade and transport through excited states, a manifestation of quantum confinement. Measurements in a magnetic field perpendicular to the sample plane allowed to identify the regime with only a few charge carriers in the dot (electron-hole transition), and the crossover to the formation of the graphene specific zero-energy Landau level at high fields. After rotation of the sample into parallel magnetic field orientation, Zeeman spin splitting with a g-factor of g ≈ 2 is measured. The filling sequence of subsequent spin states is similar to what was found in GaAs and related to the non-negligible influence of exchange interactions among the electrons.

  3. Spontaneous attention to faces in Asperger syndrome using ecologically valid static stimuli.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Mary; McPhillips, Martin; Mulhern, Gerry; Riby, Deborah M

    2013-11-01

    Previous eye tracking research on the allocation of attention to social information by individuals with autism spectrum disorders is equivocal and may be in part a consequence of variation in stimuli used between studies. The current study explored attention allocation to faces, and within faces, by individuals with Asperger syndrome using a range of static stimuli where faces were either viewed in isolation or viewed in the context of a social scene. Results showed that faces were viewed typically by the individuals with Asperger syndrome when presented in isolation, but attention to the eyes was significantly diminished in comparison to age and IQ-matched typical viewers when faces were viewed as part of social scenes. We show that when using static stimuli, there is evidence of atypicality for individuals with Asperger syndrome depending on the extent of social context. Our findings shed light on the previous explanations of gaze behaviour that have emphasised the role of movement in atypicalities of social attention in autism spectrum disorders and highlight the importance of consideration of the realistic portrayal of social information for future studies. PMID:22987893

  4. Electrodermal and behavioral responses of children with autism spectrum disorders to sensory and repetitive stimuli.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Carolyn; Hessl, David; Macari, Suzanne L; Ozonoff, Sally; Green, Cherie; Rogers, Sally J

    2014-08-01

    Parents frequently report that their children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) respond atypically to sensory stimuli. Repetitive behaviors are also part of the ASD behavioral profile. Abnormal physiological arousal may underlie both of these symptoms. Electrodermal activity (EDA) is an index of sympathetic nervous system arousal. The goals of this study were twofold: (1) to pilot methods for collecting EDA data in young children and (2) to examine hypothesized relationships among EDA, and sensory symptoms and repetitive behaviors in children with ASD as compared with children with typical development. EDA was recorded on 54 young children with ASD and on 33 children with typical development (TD) during a protocol that included baseline, exposure to sensory and repetitive stimuli, and play. Parents completed standardized questionnaires regarding their child's sensory symptoms and repetitive behaviors. Frequency and type of repetitive behavior during play was coded offline. Comparisons between EDA data for ASD and TD groups indicated no significant between-group differences in any measures. Parents of children with ASD reported more abnormal responses to sensory stimuli and more repetitive behaviors, but scores on these measures were not significantly correlated with EDA or with frequency of observed repetitive behaviors. Parent report of frequency and severity of sensory symptoms was significantly correlated with reports of repetitive behaviors in both groups. Although parents of children with ASD report high levels of sensory symptoms and repetitive behaviors, these differences are not related to measured EDA arousal or reactivity. PMID:24788961

  5. Prism adaptation contrasts perceptual habituation for repetitive somatosensory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Torta, D M; Tatu, M K; Cotroneo, D; Alamia, A; Folegatti, A; Trojan, J

    2016-03-01

    Prism adaptation (PA) is a non-invasive procedure that requires performing a visuo-motor pointing task while wearing prism goggles inducing a visual displacement of the pointed target. This procedure involves a reorganization of sensorimotor coordination, and induces long-lasting effects on numerous higher-order cognitive functions in healthy volunteers and neglect patients. Prismatic displacement (PD) of the visual field can be induced when prisms are worn but no sensorimotor task is required. In this case, it is unlikely that any subsequent reorganization takes place. The effects of PD are short-lived in the sense that they last as long as prisms are worn. In this study we aimed, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, at investigating whether PA and PD induce changes in the perception of intensity of nociceptive and non- nociceptive somatosensory stimuli. We induced, in healthy volunteers, PD (experiment 1), or PA (experiment 2) and asked participants to rate the intensity of the stimuli applied to the hand undergoing the visuo-proprioceptive conflict (experiment 1) or adaptation (experiment 2). Our results indicate that: 1) the visuo-proprioceptive conflict induced by PD does not reduce the perceived intensity of the stimuli, 2) PA prevents perceptual habituation for both nociceptive and non-nociceptive somatosensory stimuli. Moreover, to investigate the possible underlying mechanisms of the effects of PA we conducted a third experiment in which stimuli were applied both at the adapted and the non-adapted hand. In line with the results of experiment 2, we found that perceptual habituation was prevented for stimuli applied onto the adapted hand. Moreover, we observed the same finding for stimuli applied onto the non-adapted hand. This result suggests that the detention of habituation is not merely driven by changes in spatial attention allocation. Taken together, these data indicate that prisms can affect the perceived intensity of somatosensory stimuli

  6. siRNA Delivery by Stimuli-Sensitive Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Salzano, Giuseppina; Costa, Daniel F.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in late 1990s, small interfering RNA (siRNA) has become a significant biopharmaceutical research tool and a powerful option for the treatment of different human diseases based on altered gene-expression. Despite promising data from many pre-clinical studies, concrete hurdles still need to be overcome to bring therapeutic siRNAs in clinic. The design of stimuli-sensitive nanopreparations for gene therapy is a lively area of the current research. Compared to conventional systems for siRNA delivery, this type of platform can respond to local stimuli that are characteristics of the pathological area of interest, allowing the release of nucleic acids at the desired site. Acidic pH, abnormal levels of enzymes, altered redox potential and magnetic field are examples of stimuli exploited in the design of stimuli-sensitive nanoparticles. In this review, we discuss on recent stimuli-sensitive strategies for siRNA delivery and we highlight on the potential of combining multiple stimuli-sensitive strategies in the same nano-platform for a better therapeutic outcome. PMID:26486143

  7. Super-size me: self biases increase to larger stimuli.

    PubMed

    Sui, Jie; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2015-04-01

    Prior work has shown that simple perceptual match responses to pairings of shapes and labels are more efficient if the pairing is associated with the participant (e.g., circle-you) than if it is associated with another familiar person (e.g., square-friend). There is a similar advantage for matching associations with high-value rewards (circle-£9) versus low-value rewards (square-£1) (Sui, He, & Humphreys Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 38, 1105-1117, 2012). Here we evaluated the relations between the self- and reward-bias effects by introducing occasional trials in which the size of a shape was varied unexpectedly (large or small vs. a standard medium). Participants favored stimuli that were larger than the standard when stimuli were associated with the self, and this enhancement of self bias was predicted by the degree of self bias that participants showed to standard (medium) sized stimuli. Although we observed a correlation between the magnitudes of the self and reward biases over participants, reward-bias effects were not increased to large stimuli. The data suggest both overlapping and independent components of the self and reward biases, and that self biases are uniquely enhanced when stimuli increase in size, consistent with previously reported motivational biases favoring large stimuli. PMID:25112393

  8. Multisensory numerosity judgments for visual and tactile stimuli.

    PubMed

    Gallace, Alberto; Tan, Hong Z; Spence, Charles

    2007-05-01

    To date, numerosity judgments have been studied only under conditions of unimodal stimulus presentation. It is therefore unclear whether the same limitations on correctly reporting the number of unimodal visual or tactile stimuli presented in a display might be expected under conditions in which participants have to count stimuli presented simultaneously in two or more different sensory modalities. In Experiment 1, we investigated numerosity judgments using both unimodal and bimodal displays consisting of one to six vibrotactile stimuli (presented over the body surface) and one to six visual stimuli (seen on the body via mirror reflection). Participants had to count the number of stimuli regardless of their modality of presentation. Bimodal numerosity judgments were significantly less accurate than predicted on the basis of an independent modality-specific resources account, thus showing that numerosity judgments might rely on a unitary amodal system instead. The results of a second experiment demonstrated that divided attention costs could not account for the poor performance in the bimodal conditions of Experiment 1. We discuss these results in relation to current theories of cross-modal integration and to the cognitive resources and/or common higher order spatial representations possibly accessed by both visual and tactile stimuli. PMID:17727102

  9. Corticospinal Excitability Preceding the Grasping of Emotion-Laden Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Campos, Anaelli Aparecida; de Oliveira, Laura Alice Santos; Della-Maggiore, Valeria; Esteves, Paula Oliveira; Rodrigues, Erika de Carvalho; D. Vargas, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary theories posit that emotions prime organisms for action. This study examined whether corticospinal excitability (CSE) is modulated by the emotional valence of a to-be-grasped stimulus. CSE was estimated based on the amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and recorded on the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. Participants were instructed to grasp (ACTION condition) or just look at (NO-ACTION condition) unpleasant, pleasant and neutral stimuli. TMS pulses were applied randomly at 500 or 250 ms before a go signal. MEP amplitudes were normalized within condition by computing a ratio for the emotion-laden stimuli by reference to the neutral stimuli. A divergent valence effect was observed in the ACTION condition, where the CSE ratio was higher during the preparation to grasp unpleasant compared to pleasant stimuli. In addition, the CSE ratio was lower for pleasant stimuli during the ACTION condition compared to the NO-ACTION condition. Altogether, these results indicate that motor preparation is selectively modulated by the valence of the stimulus to be grasped. The lower CSE for pleasant stimuli may result from the need to refrain from executing an imminent action. PMID:24732961

  10. Superconducting Nanotube Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönenberger, Christian

    2007-03-01

    In this talk, I will focus on charge transport in carbon nanotube devices with superconducting source and drain contacts in the finite-bias non-equilibrium transport regime. As contact material, bi-layers of Au and Al were used and transport has been studied at temperatures in the 0.1 K range. Because carbon nanotubes are quantum dots (qdots), we in fact explore the physics of qdots with superconducting contacts, something which only recently became possible thanks to carbon nanotubes and most recently to semiconducting nanowires. In my talk, I will first summarize our pioneering work on multiwalled carbon nanotubes in which we could demonstrate proximity induced effects both in the weak and the strong coupling regime. In the latter an intriguing interplay between superconductivity and Kondo physics appears. Then, I will discuss the physics of multiple Andreev reflection in a situation when only one resonant state is present and compare this with experimental results. Finally, I will compare our early results with our recent measurements on single-wall carbon nanotubes. This work has been supported by the Swiss Institute on Nanoscience, the Swiss National Science Foundation, EU projects DIENOW and HYSWITCH. I gratefully acknowledge contribution of the following persons to this work (in alphabetic order): B. Babic, W. Belzig, C. Bruder, M. R. Buitelaar, J.-C. Cuevas, A. Eichler, L. Forro, J. Gobrecht, M. Gr"aber, M. Iqbal, T. Kontos, A. Levy Yeyati, A. Martin-Rodero, T. Nussbaumer, S. Oberholzer, C. Strunk, H. Scharf, J. Trbovic, E. Vecino, M. Weiss

  11. Chiral Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nozomu; Wang, Yichun; Elvati, Paolo; Qu, Zhi-Bei; Kim, Kyoungwon; Jiang, Shuang; Baumeister, Elizabeth; Lee, Jaewook; Yeom, Bongjun; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Lee, Jaebeom; Violi, Angela; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2016-02-23

    Chiral nanostructures from metals and semiconductors attract wide interest as components for polarization-enabled optoelectronic devices. Similarly to other fields of nanotechnology, graphene-based materials can greatly enrich physical and chemical phenomena associated with optical and electronic properties of chiral nanostructures and facilitate their applications in biology as well as other areas. Here, we report that covalent attachment of l/d-cysteine moieties to the edges of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) leads to their helical buckling due to chiral interactions at the "crowded" edges. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the GQDs revealed bands at ca. 210-220 and 250-265 nm that changed their signs for different chirality of the cysteine edge ligands. The high-energy chiroptical peaks at 210-220 nm correspond to the hybridized molecular orbitals involving the chiral center of amino acids and atoms of graphene edges. Diverse experimental and modeling data, including density functional theory calculations of CD spectra with probabilistic distribution of GQD isomers, indicate that the band at 250-265 nm originates from the three-dimensional twisting of the graphene sheet and can be attributed to the chiral excitonic transitions. The positive and negative low-energy CD bands correspond to the left and right helicity of GQDs, respectively. Exposure of liver HepG2 cells to L/D-GQDs reveals their general biocompatibility and a noticeable difference in the toxicity of the stereoisomers. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that d-GQDs have a stronger tendency to accumulate within the cellular membrane than L-GQDs. Emergence of nanoscale chirality in GQDs decorated with biomolecules is expected to be a general stereochemical phenomenon for flexible sheets of nanomaterials. PMID:26743467

  12. Optical Fiber Sensing Using Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Pedro; Martins, Manuel António; Trindade, Tito; Santos, José Luís; Farahi, Faramarz

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, as biochemical sensors are reviewed. Quantum dots have unique optical properties that make them promising alternatives to traditional dyes in many luminescence based bioanalytical techniques. An overview of the more relevant progresses in the application of quantum dots as biochemical probes is addressed. Special focus will be given to configurations where the sensing dots are incorporated in solid membranes and immobilized in optical fibers or planar waveguide platforms.

  13. Low Threshold Quantum Dot Lasers.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Veena Hariharan; Mahadevu, Rekha; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-04-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have replaced conventional inorganic phosphors in numerous applications. Despite their overall successes as emitters, their impact as laser materials has been severely limited. Eliciting stimulated emission from quantum dots requires excitation by intense short pulses of light typically generated using other lasers. In this Letter, we develop a new class of quantum dots that exhibit gain under conditions of extremely low levels of continuous wave illumination. We observe thresholds as low as 74 mW/cm(2) in lasers made from these materials. Due to their strong optical absorption as well as low lasing threshold, these materials could possibly convert light from diffuse, polychromatic sources into a laser beam. PMID:26978011

  14. Saccadic latency is modulated by emotional content of spatially filtered face stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, Rachel L; Hibbard, Paul B; Chalmers, Kirsty; Sahraie, Arash

    2012-12-01

    Models of attention and emotion assign a special status to the processing of threat. While evidence for threat-related attentional bias in highly anxious individuals is robust, effects in the normal population are mixed. An important explanation for the absence of threat-related attentional bias in nonanxious individuals may relate to the spatial frequency components of stimuli. Here we report behavioral data from two experiments examining the relationship between spatial frequency components of emotional and neutral faces and fast saccadic orienting behavior. In Experiment 1 participants had to saccade toward a single face, filtered to include mostly low, high or broad spatial frequencies (LSF, HSF or BSF), posing a fearful, happy or neutral expression presented for 20 ms in the periphery. At BSF a general emotional effect was found whereby saccadic responses were faster for fearful and happy faces relative to neutral, with no significant differences between fearful and happy faces. At LSF both fearful and happy faces had shorter saccadic latencies in comparison to neutral, demonstrating an emotional bias consistent with the BSF data. However, at LSF fearful faces resulted in significantly faster saccades than happy faces indicating that this bias was stronger for threat-related faces. There was no difference in saccadic responses between any emotions at HSF. Experiment 2 showed that the emotional bias diminished for inverted stimuli suggesting that the results were not attributable to low-level image properties. The findings suggest an overall advantage in the oculomotor system for orientation to emotional stimuli and at LSF in particular, a significantly faster localization of threat conveyed by the face stimuli in all individuals. PMID:22775132

  15. Excitonic optical properties of wurtzite ZnS quantum dots under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Zaiping; Garoufalis, Christos S.; Baskoutas, Sotirios; Bester, Gabriel

    2015-03-21

    By means of atomistic empirical pseudopotentials combined with a configuration interaction approach, we have studied the optical properties of wurtzite ZnS quantum dots in the presence of strong quantum confinement effects as a function of pressure. We find the pressure coefficients of quantum dots to be highly size-dependent and reduced by as much as 23% in comparison to the bulk value of 63 meV/GPa obtained from density functional theory calculations. The many-body excitonic effects on the quantum dot pressure coefficients are found to be marginal. The absolute gap deformation potential of quantum dots originates mainly from the energy change of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital state. Finally, we find that the exciton spin-splitting increases nearly linearly as a function of applied pressure.

  16. Self-assembly drives quantum dot photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Plain, J; Sonnefraud, Y; Viste, P; Lérondel, G; Huant, S; Royer, P

    2009-03-01

    Engineering the spectral properties of quantum dots can be achieved by a control of the quantum dots organization on a substrate. Indeed, many applications of quantum dots as LEDs are based on the realization of a 3D architecture of quantum dots. In this contribution, we present a systematic study of the quantum dot organization obtained on different chemically modified substrates. By varying the chemical affinity between the quantum dots and the substrate, the quantum dot organization is strongly modified from the 2D monolayer to the 3D aggregates. Then the photoluminescence of the different obtained samples has been systematically studied and correlated with the quantum dot film organization. We clearly show that the interaction between the substrate and the quantum dot must be stronger than the quantum dot-quantum dot interaction to avoid 3D aggregation and that these organization strongly modified the photoluminescence of the film rather than intrinsic changes of the quantum dot induced by pure surface chemistry. PMID:18792763

  17. Anomalous polarization in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. H.; Jiang, H.; Sun, X.; Lin, H. Q.

    2000-04-01

    The coupled quantum dots can be designed to possess negative polarizability in low-lying excited states. In an electric field, the coupled dots are polarized, and the dipole moment of the coupled dots is reversed by absorbing one photon. This photoswitch effect is a new photoinduced phenomenon.

  18. A colloidal quantum dot spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jie; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2015-07-01

    Spectroscopy is carried out in almost every field of science, whenever light interacts with matter. Although sophisticated instruments with impressive performance characteristics are available, much effort continues to be invested in the development of miniaturized, cheap and easy-to-use systems. Current microspectrometer designs mostly use interference filters and interferometric optics that limit their photon efficiency, resolution and spectral range. Here we show that many of these limitations can be overcome by replacing interferometric optics with a two-dimensional absorptive filter array composed of colloidal quantum dots. Instead of measuring different bands of a spectrum individually after introducing temporal or spatial separations with gratings or interference-based narrowband filters, a colloidal quantum dot spectrometer measures a light spectrum based on the wavelength multiplexing principle: multiple spectral bands are encoded and detected simultaneously with one filter and one detector, respectively, with the array format allowing the process to be efficiently repeated many times using different filters with different encoding so that sufficient information is obtained to enable computational reconstruction of the target spectrum. We illustrate the performance of such a quantum dot microspectrometer, made from 195 different types of quantum dots with absorption features that cover a spectral range of 300 nanometres, by measuring shifts in spectral peak positions as small as one nanometre. Given this performance, demonstrable avenues for further improvement, the ease with which quantum dots can be processed and integrated, and their numerous finely tuneable bandgaps that cover a broad spectral range, we expect that quantum dot microspectrometers will be useful in applications where minimizing size, weight, cost and complexity of the spectrometer are critical.

  19. Reversible Photoswitching of Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Syamantak; Verma, Navneet Chandra; Gupta, Abhishek; Nandi, Chayan Kanti

    2015-01-01

    We present a method of reversible photoswitching in carbon nanodots with red emission. A mechanism of electron transfer is proposed. The cationic dark state, formed by the exposure of red light, is revived back to the bright state with the very short exposure of blue light. Additionally, the natural on-off state of carbon dot fluorescence was tuned using an electron acceptor molecule. Our observation can make the carbon dots as an excellent candidate for the super-resolution imaging of nanoscale biomolecules within the cell. PMID:26078266

  20. Accommodation and pupil responses to random-dot stereograms.

    PubMed

    Suryakumar, Rajaraman; Allison, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the dynamics of accommodative and pupillary responses to random-dot stereograms presented in crossed and uncrossed disparity in six visually normal young adult subjects (mean age=25.8±3.1 years). Accommodation and pupil measures were monitored monocularly with a custom built photorefraction system while subjects fixated at the center of a random-dot stereogram. On each trial, the stereogram initially depicted a flat plane and then changed to depict a sinusoidal corrugation in depth while fixation remained constant. Increase in disparity specified depth resulted in pupil constriction during both crossed and uncrossed disparity presentations. The change in pupil size between crossed and uncrossed disparity conditions was not significantly different (p>0.05). The change in pupil size was also accompanied by a small concomitant increase in accommodation. In addition, the dynamic properties of pupil responses varied as a function of their initial (starting) diameter. The finding that accommodation and pupil responses increased with disparity regardless of the sign of retinal disparity suggests that these responses were driven by apparent depth rather than shifts in mean simulated distance of the stimulus. Presumably the need for the increased depth of focus when viewing stimuli extended in depth results in pupil constriction which also results in a concomitant change in accommodation. Starting position effects in pupil response confirm the non-linearity in the operating range of the pupil. PMID:25891121

  1. Behavioral evidence showing the predominance of diffuse pain stimuli over discrete stimuli in influencing perception.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K V; Pearl, G S; Honeycutt, C

    1976-01-01

    This experiment was directed toward determining the relative effectiveness of discrete and diffuse pain stimuli in influencing perception and behavior. Shocks to the footpads were used to activate the discrete pain pathways and shocks to the upper canine teeth to activate the diffuse pain pathways. In the first phase of this experiment, cats were trained to escape from foot shock in a shuttle box. Current applied to the feet was varied in ascending and descending sequences for each animal according to the psychophysical method of limits and each animal was trained until stable thresholds for escape responding were achieved. In the second phase of the experiment, the effect on behavior of simultaneous activation of both the discrete and diffuse pain systems was assessed. The principal finding is this experiment was that excape responding that was well established when foot shock was presented alone was routinely abolished on trials when tooth shock and foot shock were presented together. These results were interpreted as indicating that the diffuse pain system was prepotent in influencing behavior when both the discrete and diffuse pain systems were activated simultaneously. PMID:1011300

  2. Lissajous Rocking Ratchet: Realization in a Semiconductor Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, Sergey; Kästner, Bernd; Schumacher, Hans W.; Kohler, Sigmund; Ludwig, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Breaking time-reversal symmetry (TRS) in the absence of a net bias can give rise to directed steady-state nonequilibrium transport phenomena such as ratchet effects. Here we present, theoretically and experimentally, the concept of a Lissajous rocking ratchet based on breaking TRS. Our system is a semiconductor quantum dot with periodically modulated dot-lead tunnel barriers. Broken TRS gives rise to single electron tunneling current. Its direction is fully controlled by exploring frequency and phase relations between the two barrier modulations. The concept of Lissajous ratchets can be realized in a large variety of different systems, including nanoelectrical, nanoelectromechanical, or superconducting circuits. It promises applications based on a detailed on-chip comparison of radio-frequency signals.

  3. Reading Comprehension Strategy: Rainbow Dots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Claire; Lo, Lusa

    2008-01-01

    An action research study was conducted using the Rainbow Dots strategy to evaluate its effectiveness on reading comprehension skills in a third-grade class with students both with and without a specific learning disability. Results of the study indicated that students' overall performances in reading comprehension have increased. Students also…

  4. Designing quantum dots for solotronics

    PubMed Central

    Kobak, J.; Smoleński, T.; Goryca, M.; Papaj, M.; Gietka, K.; Bogucki, A.; Koperski, M.; Rousset, J.-G.; Suffczyński, J.; Janik, E.; Nawrocki, M.; Golnik, A.; Kossacki, P.; Pacuski, W.

    2014-01-01

    Solotronics, optoelectronics based on solitary dopants, is an emerging field of research and technology reaching the ultimate limit of miniaturization. It aims at exploiting quantum properties of individual ions or defects embedded in a semiconductor matrix. It has already been shown that optical control of a magnetic ion spin is feasible using the carriers confined in a quantum dot. However, a serious obstacle was the quenching of the exciton luminescence by magnetic impurities. Here we show, by photoluminescence studies on thus-far-unexplored individual CdTe dots with a single cobalt ion and CdSe dots with a single manganese ion, that even if energetically allowed, nonradiative exciton recombination through single-magnetic-ion intra-ionic transitions is negligible in such zero-dimensional structures. This opens solotronics for a wide range of as yet unconsidered systems. On the basis of results of our single-spin relaxation experiments and on the material trends, we identify optimal magnetic-ion quantum dot systems for implementation of a single-ion-based spin memory. PMID:24463946

  5. Differing ERP patterns caused by suction and puff stimuli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Baek, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jung-Chul; Park, Sung-Jun; Jeong, Ul-Ho; Gim, Seon-Young; You, Ji Hye; Kim, Sung-Pil; Lim, Dae-Woon; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2015-05-01

    The present study compared event-related potential (ERP) patterns for two stimuli types, puff and suction, by applying these stimuli to the fingers; ERP patterns for the two stimuli were compared at C3, an area related to somatosensory perception, and at FC5, an area related to motor function. Participants were 12 healthy males in their 20s (mean age=23.1±2.0 years). One session consisted of a Control Phase (3s), a Stimulation Phase (3s), and a Rest Phase (9s). During the Stimulation Phase, a 4-psi suction or puff stimulus was applied to the first joint of the right index finger. After completion of the session, a subjective magnitude test was presented. In all phases, electroencephalography signals were recorded. We extracted maximum positive amplitude and minimum negative amplitude as well as relevant latency values for C3 and FC5 signals. Suction and puff stimuli had similar subjective magnitude scores. For both C3 and FC5, the maximum and minimum amplitude latency was reached earlier for the suction stimulus than for the puff stimulus. In conclusion, when suction and puff stimuli of the same intensity were applied to the fingers, the suction stimulus caused a more sensitive response in the somatosensory area (C3) and motor area (FC5) than did the puff stimulus. PMID:25823997

  6. The distinctiveness of ionic and nonionic bitter stimuli.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marion E; Bouverat, Brian P; MacKinnon, Bruce I; Hettinger, Thomas P

    2004-01-01

    The diverse chemical structures of stimuli that are bitter to humans suggest a need for multiple bitter receptors. Reactions of golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) to 1 mM quinine hydrochloride, 3 mM denatonium benzoate, 180 mM magnesium sulfate, 30-100 mM caffeine, and 1-1.5 mM sucrose octaacetate (SOA) were studied to address whether there are multiple sensations elicited by bitter stimuli. Methods included behavioral generalization of LiCl-induced conditioned taste aversions (CTAs), intake preference tests, and electrophysiological recordings from the chorda tympani (CT) nerve. The five compounds, all bitter to humans, were all innately aversive to hamsters. CTA for the ionic quinine.HCl, denatonium benzoate, and MgSO(4) mutually cross-generalized and these ionic compounds were effective CT stimuli. Yet, the hamsters were much less sensitive to denatonium than humans, requiring a 100,000 times higher concentration for detection. CTA for nonionic caffeine and SOA did not cross-generalize to quinine or the other two ionic stimuli and these nonionic compounds were not effective CT stimuli. SOA and caffeine may elicit aversive reflexes or systemic reactions rather than taste sensations in the animals. Thus, the three ionic and two nonionic compounds form separate aversive stimulus classes in hamsters, neither of which appears to be a close homologue of the human bitter taste. PMID:14741226

  7. Stimuli responsive upconversion luminescence nanomaterials and films for various applications.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Ming-Kiu; Bai, Gongxun; Hao, Jianhua

    2015-03-21

    Upconversion luminescence (UCL) refers to nonlinear optical processes, which can convert near-infrared photons to short-wavelength emission. Recent advances in nanotechnology have contributed to the development of photon upconversion materials as promising new generation candidates of fluorescent bioprobes and spectral converters for biomedical and optoelectronic applications. Apart from the remarkable photoluminescence of the materials under photon excitation, some UCL materials may exhibit intrinsic magnetic, ferroelectric, X-ray absorption properties, and so on. These interesting characteristics provide an opportunity for us to couple a single stimulus or multiple stimuli (electric field, magnetic field, X-ray, electron beam, temperature and pH, etc.) to various types of UCL materials. In this review, we will primarily focus on the stimuli responsive properties of UCL materials beyond light-matter interaction, which can aid both fundamental research and widespread applications of the materials. The mechanisms of the response to various stimuli in the UCL materials are discussed. This article will also highlight recent advances in the development of these materials in response to various stimuli and their applications in multimodal bioimaging, drug delivery and release, electro-optical devices, magnetic, temperature and pH sensors and multiple anti-counterfeiting inks. Lastly, we will present potential directions of future research and challenging issues which arise in expanding the applications of stimuli responsive UCL materials. PMID:25200182

  8. Private Stimuli, Covert Responses, and Private Events: Conceptual Remarks

    PubMed Central

    Tourinho, Emmanuel Zagury

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I discuss the concepts of private stimuli, covert responses, and private events, emphasizing three aspects: the conditions under which private stimuli may acquire discriminative functions to verbal responses, the conditions of unobservability of covert responses, and the complexity of events or phenomena described as private. I argue that the role of private stimuli in the control of self-descriptive verbal responses is dependent on a relation (correlation or equivalence relation) with public stimuli, and that responses vary along a continuum of observability. These remarks on private stimuli and covert responses are introductory to an examination of the varying complexity of phenomena described as private. I argue that private events is a verbal response emitted under the control of phenomena of different degrees of complexity, and I interpret these phenomena, based on the principle of selection by consequences. I introduce the notion of inclusiveness to suggest that some phenomena related to privacy are less or more complex as they include relations of a phylogenetic, ontogenetic, and cultural origin. PMID:22478451

  9. Stimuli-responsive smart nanogels for cancer diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Motoi; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2010-04-01

    This article discusses stimuli-responsive poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-coated (PEGylated) nanogels and their biomedical applications. Preparation and characterization of stimuli-responsive PEGylated nanogels composed of a crosslinked poly(2-[N,N-diethylamino]ethyl methacrylate) (PEAMA) core and PEG tethered chains are initially described. Stimuli-responsive PEGylated nanogels show unique properties and functions in synchronizing with the reversible volume phase transition of the PEAMA core in response to the extracellular pH (7-6.5) of a tumor environment as well as endosomal/lysosomal pH (6.5-5.0) and temperature. We list several biomedical applications of stimuli-responsive PEGylated nanogels, including (19)F magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRS/I) probe to visualize acidosis (tumor tissue), intracellular drug and siRNA delivery, antennas for cancer photothermal therapy and apoptosis probe for monitoring response to cancer therapy. Thus, stimuli-responsive PEGylated nanogels can be utilized as smart nanomedicines for cancer diagnostics and therapy. PMID:20394537

  10. Protein-surface interactions on stimuli-responsive polymeric biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Cross, Michael C; Toomey, Ryan G; Gallant, Nathan D

    2016-04-01

    Responsive surfaces: a review of the dependence of protein adsorption on the reversible volume phase transition in stimuli-responsive polymers. Specifically addressed are a widely studied subset: thermoresponsive polymers. Findings are also generalizable to other materials which undergo a similarly reversible volume phase transition. As of 2015, over 100,000 articles have been published on stimuli-responsive polymers and many more on protein-biomaterial interactions. Significantly, fewer than 100 of these have focused specifically on protein interactions with stimuli-responsive polymers. These report a clear trend of increased protein adsorption in the collapsed state compared to the swollen state. This control over protein interactions makes stimuli-responsive polymers highly useful in biomedical applications such as wound repair scaffolds, on-demand drug delivery, and antifouling surfaces. Outstanding questions are whether the protein adsorption is reversible with the volume phase transition and whether there is a time-dependence. A clear understanding of protein interactions with stimuli-responsive polymers will advance theoretical models, experimental results, and biomedical applications. PMID:26942693