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Sample records for dot-based quantification revealed

  1. Harnessing immunomagnetic separation and quantum dot-based quantification capacities for the enumeration of absolute levels of biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hoyoung; Hwang, Mintai P.; Lee, Jong-Wook; Choi, Jonghoon; Hyi Lee, Kwan

    2013-07-01

    The field of biomarker quantification has experienced a growth parallel to the discovery of new materials. In this paper, we propose an innovative system for the separation and quantification of biomarkers using a simple magnetic bead (MB)-quantum dot (QD) sandwich assay. The basis of the system lies in the interaction between histidine residues on protein G and Ni ions on QDs, and the use of imidazole to selectively detach QDs bound to target biomarkers, in effect enumerating the absolute number of biomarker units. We used C-reactive protein (CRP) as a proof-of-concept and demonstrated a detection sensitivity of 82.5 fmoles in 50 μl of sample volume, a commonly used analytical volume (e.g. ELISA). Although CRP was used as a model to conduct this study, the sensitivity and simplicity of this detachable system make it a viable approach in the quantification of other target analytes.

  2. Ultrasensitive detection and quantification of acidic disaccharides using capillary electrophoresis and quantum dot-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuqing; Cai, Chao; Li, Lingyun; Miao, Jianjun; Ucakturk, Ebru; Li, Guoyun; Ly, Mellisa; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and highly sensitive detection of the carbohydrate components of glycoconjugates is critical for advancing glycobiology. Fluorescence (or Forster) resonance energy transfer (FRET) is commonly used in detection of DNA, in protein structural biology, and in protease assays, but is less frequently applied to glycan analysis due to difficulties in inserting two fluorescent tags into small glycan structures. We report an ultrasensitive method for the detection and quantification of a chondroitin sulfate disaccharide based on FRET, involving a CdSe-ZnS core-shell nanocrystal quantum dot (QD)-streptavidin conjugate donor and a Cy5 acceptor. The disaccharide was doubly labeled with biotin and Cy5. QDs then served to concentrate the target disaccharide, enhancing the overall energy transfer efficiency, with unlinked QDs and Cy5-hydrazide producing nearly zero background signal in capillary electrophoresis using laser-induced fluorescence detection with two different band-pass filters. This method is generally applicable to the ultrasensitive analysis of acidic glycans and offers promise for the high-throughput disaccharide analysis of glycosaminoglycans. PMID:23985015

  3. In vivo behavior of NTBI revealed by automated quantification system.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoshi; Ikuta, Katsuya; Kato, Daisuke; Lynda, Addo; Shibusa, Kotoe; Niizeki, Noriyasu; Toki, Yasumichi; Hatayama, Mayumi; Yamamoto, Masayo; Shindo, Motohiro; Iizuka, Naomi; Kohgo, Yutaka; Fujiya, Mikihiro

    2016-08-01

    Non-Tf-bound iron (NTBI), which appears in serum in iron overload, is thought to contribute to organ damage; the monitoring of serum NTBI levels may therefore be clinically useful in iron-overloaded patients. However, NTBI quantification methods remain complex, limiting their use in clinical practice. To overcome the technical difficulties often encountered, we recently developed a novel automated NTBI quantification system capable of measuring large numbers of samples. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo behavior of NTBI in human and animal serum using this newly established automated system. Average NTBI in healthy volunteers was 0.44 ± 0.076 μM (median 0.45 μM, range 0.28-0.66 μM), with no significant difference between sexes. Additionally, serum NTBI rapidly increased after iron loading, followed by a sudden disappearance. NTBI levels also decreased in inflammation. The results indicate that NTBI is a unique marker of iron metabolism, unlike other markers of iron metabolism, such as serum ferritin. Our new automated NTBI quantification method may help to reveal the clinical significance of NTBI and contribute to our understanding of iron overload. PMID:27086349

  4. Visual quantification of embolism reveals leaf vulnerability to hydraulic failure.

    PubMed

    Brodribb, Timothy J; Skelton, Robert P; McAdam, Scott A M; Bienaimé, Diane; Lucani, Christopher J; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Vascular plant mortality during drought has been strongly linked to a failure of the internal water transport system caused by the rapid invasion of air and subsequent blockage of xylem conduits. Quantification of this critical process is greatly complicated by the existence of high water tension in xylem cells making them prone to embolism during experimental manipulation. Here we describe a simple new optical method that can be used to record spatial and temporal patterns of embolism formation in the veins of water-stressed leaves for the first time. Applying this technique in four diverse angiosperm species we found very strong agreement between the dynamics of embolism formation during desiccation and decline of leaf hydraulic conductance. These data connect the failure of the leaf water transport network under drought stress to embolism formation in the leaf xylem, and suggest embolism occurs after stomatal closure under extreme water stress. PMID:26742653

  5. Quantification of the stapedial reflex reveals delayed responses in autism.

    PubMed

    Lukose, Richard; Brown, Kevin; Barber, Carol M; Kulesza, Randy Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Autism is a developmental disorder characterized, in part, by sensory abnormalities. It is well established that most if not all patients with autism have problems with auditory processing, ranging from deafness to hyperacusis, and physiological testing of auditory function (i.e. auditory brain stem responses) implicates brain stem dysfunction in autism. Additionally, previous research from this lab has revealed significantly fewer auditory brain stem neurons in autistic subjects as young as 2 years of age. These observations have led us to hypothesize that objective, noninvasive measures of auditory function can be used as an early screening tool to identify neonates with an elevated risk of carrying a diagnosis of autism. Here, we provide a detailed quantitative investigation of the acoustic stapedial reflex (ASR), a three- or four-neuron brain stem circuit, in young autistic subjects and normal developing controls. Indeed, we find significantly lower thresholds, responses occurring at significantly longer latency and right-left asymmetry in autistic subjects. The results from this investigation support deficits in auditory function as a cardinal feature of autism and suggest that individuals with autism can be identified by their ASR responses. PMID:23825093

  6. A six-plex proteome quantification strategy reveals the dynamics of protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangjun; Cheng, Kai; Wei, Xiaoluan; Qin, Hongqiang; Chen, Rui; Liu, Jing; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-01-01

    MS1 full scan based quantification is one of the most popular approaches for large-scale proteome quantification. Typically only three different samples can be differentially labeled and quantified in a single experiment. Here we present a two stages stable isotope labeling strategy which allows six different protein samples (six-plex) to be reliably labeled and simultaneously quantified at MS1 level. Briefly in the first stage, isotope lysine-d0 (K0) and lysine-d4 (K4) are in vivo incorporated into different protein samples during cell culture. Then in the second stage, three of K0 and K4 labeled protein samples are digested by lysine C and in vitro labeled with light (2CH3), medium (2CD2H), and heavy (2(13)CD3) dimethyl groups, respectively. We demonstrated that this six-plex isotope labeling strategy could successfully investigate the dynamics of protein turnover in a high throughput manner. PMID:23661174

  7. Mass spectrometry-based absolute quantification reveals rhythmic variation of mouse circadian clock proteins.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Ryohei; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Ode, Koji L; Kanda, Genki N; Shinohara, Yuta; Sato, Aya; Matsumoto, Katsuhiko; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2016-06-14

    Absolute values of protein expression levels in cells are crucial information for understanding cellular biological systems. Precise quantification of proteins can be achieved by liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of enzymatic digests of proteins in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards. Thus, development of a simple and easy way for the preparation of internal standards is advantageous for the analyses of multiple target proteins, which will allow systems-level studies. Here we describe a method, termed MS-based Quantification By isotope-labeled Cell-free products (MS-QBiC), which provides the simple and high-throughput preparation of internal standards by using a reconstituted cell-free protein synthesis system, and thereby facilitates both multiplexed and sensitive quantification of absolute amounts of target proteins. This method was applied to a systems-level dynamic analysis of mammalian circadian clock proteins, which consist of transcription factors and protein kinases that govern central and peripheral circadian clocks in mammals. Sixteen proteins from 20 selected circadian clock proteins were successfully quantified from mouse liver over a 24-h time series, and 14 proteins had circadian variations. Quantified values were applied to detect internal body time using a previously developed molecular timetable method. The analyses showed that single time-point data from wild-type mice can predict the endogenous state of the circadian clock, whereas data from clock mutant mice are not applicable because of the disappearance of circadian variation. PMID:27247408

  8. Landscape and flux reveal a new global view and physical quantification of mammalian cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhe; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycles, essential for biological function, have been investigated extensively. However, enabling a global understanding and defining a physical quantification of the stability and function of the cell cycle remains challenging. Based upon a mammalian cell cycle gene network, we uncovered the underlying Mexican hat landscape of the cell cycle. We found the emergence of three local basins of attraction and two major potential barriers along the cell cycle trajectory. The three local basins of attraction characterize the G1, S/G2, and M phases. The barriers characterize the G1 and S/G2 checkpoints, respectively, of the cell cycle, thus providing an explanation of the checkpoint mechanism for the cell cycle from the physical perspective. We found that the progression of a cell cycle is determined by two driving forces: curl flux for acceleration and potential barriers for deceleration along the cycle path. Therefore, the cell cycle can be promoted (suppressed), either by enhancing (suppressing) the flux (representing the energy input) or by lowering (increasing) the barrier along the cell cycle path. We found that both the entropy production rate and energy per cell cycle increase as the growth factor increases. This reflects that cell growth and division are driven by energy or nutrition supply. More energy input increases flux and decreases barrier along the cell cycle path, leading to faster oscillations. We also identified certain key genes and regulations for stability and progression of the cell cycle. Some of these findings were evidenced from experiments whereas others lead to predictions and potential anticancer strategies. PMID:25228772

  9. Quantification of Maize Fine Streak Virus Genomic and Positive-sense RNAs in Infected Maize Reveals High Level Accumulation of ORF 3 and 4 MFSV Transcripts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification of Maize fine streak virus genomic and positive-sense RNAs in infected maize reveals high level accumulation of ORF 3 and 4 MFSV transcripts. We improved methods to analyze RNA produced by Maize fine streak virus (MVSF) within infected maize tissue using real-time RT-qPCR. We designe...

  10. Absolute Quantification of Matrix Metabolites Reveals the Dynamics of Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Walter W; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Sabatini, David M

    2016-08-25

    Mitochondria house metabolic pathways that impact most aspects of cellular physiology. While metabolite profiling by mass spectrometry is widely applied at the whole-cell level, it is not routinely possible to measure the concentrations of small molecules in mammalian organelles. We describe a method for the rapid and specific isolation of mitochondria and use it in tandem with a database of predicted mitochondrial metabolites ("MITObolome") to measure the matrix concentrations of more than 100 metabolites across various states of respiratory chain (RC) function. Disruption of the RC reveals extensive compartmentalization of mitochondrial metabolism and signatures unique to the inhibition of each RC complex. Pyruvate enables the proliferation of RC-deficient cells but has surprisingly limited effects on matrix contents. Interestingly, despite failing to restore matrix NADH/NAD balance, pyruvate does increase aspartate, likely through the exchange of matrix glutamate for cytosolic aspartate. We demonstrate the value of mitochondrial metabolite profiling and describe a strategy applicable to other organelles. PMID:27565352

  11. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  12. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test thismore » strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.« less

  13. Quantum Dots-based Reverse Phase Protein Microarray

    SciTech Connect

    Shingyoji, Masato; Gerion, Daniele; Pinkel, Dan; Gray, Joe W.; Chen, Fanqing

    2005-07-15

    CdSe nanocrystals, also called quantum dots (Qdots) are a novel class of fluorophores, which have a diameter of a few nanometers and possess high quantum yield, tunable emission wavelength and photostability. They are an attractive alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes. Quantum dots can be silanized to be soluble in aqueous solution under biological conditions, and thus be used in bio-detection. In this study, we established a novel Qdot-based technology platform that can perform accurate and reproducible quantification of protein concentration in a crude cell lysate background. Protein lysates have been spiked with a target protein, and a dilution series of the cell lysate with a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude has been used for this proof-of-concept study. The dilution series has been spotted in microarray format, and protein detection has been achieved with a sensitivity that is at least comparable to standard commercial assays, which are based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed diaminobenzidine (DAB) chromogenesis. The data obtained through the Qdot method has shown a close linear correlation between relative fluorescence unit and relative protein concentration. The Qdot results are in almost complete agreement with data we obtained with the well-established HRP-DAB colorimetric array (R{sup 2} = 0.986). This suggests that Qdots can be used for protein quantification in microarray format, using the platform presented here.

  14. Quantum dot-based microfluidic biosensor for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Ali, Md. Azahar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2015-05-01

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of an impedimetric microfluidic-based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequences specific to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The sensor chip is prepared by patterning an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate via wet chemical etching method followed by sealing with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel for fluid control. The fabricated microfluidic chip comprising of a patterned ITO substrate is modified by depositing cadmium selenide quantum dots (QCdSe) via Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Further, the QCdSe surface has been functionalized with specific DNA probe for CML detection. The probe DNA functionalized QCdSe integrated miniaturized system has been used to monitor target complementary DNA concentration by measuring the interfacial charge transfer resistance via hybridization. The presence of complementary DNA in buffer solution significantly results in decreased electro-conductivity of the interface due to presence of a charge barrier for transport of the redox probe ions. The microfluidic DNA biosensor exhibits improved linearity in the concentration range of 10-15 M to 10-11 M.

  15. Quantum dot-based microfluidic biosensor for cancer detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Ali, Md. Azahar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2015-05-11

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of an impedimetric microfluidic–based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequences specific to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The sensor chip is prepared by patterning an indium–tin–oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate via wet chemical etching method followed by sealing with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel for fluid control. The fabricated microfluidic chip comprising of a patterned ITO substrate is modified by depositing cadmium selenide quantum dots (QCdSe) via Langmuir–Blodgett technique. Further, the QCdSe surface has been functionalized with specific DNA probe for CML detection. The probe DNA functionalized QCdSe integrated miniaturized system has been used to monitor target complementary DNA concentration by measuring the interfacial charge transfer resistance via hybridization. The presence of complementary DNA in buffer solution significantly results in decreased electro-conductivity of the interface due to presence of a charge barrier for transport of the redox probe ions. The microfluidic DNA biosensor exhibits improved linearity in the concentration range of 10{sup −15} M to 10{sup −11} M.

  16. Carbon-Dot-Based Nanosensors for the Detection of Intracellular Redox State.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Tian, Ye; Tian, Yefei; Wang, Yajun; Yang, Wuli

    2015-11-25

    Carbon-dot-based nanosensors are prepared through sequentially assembling a polymer/carbon dot multilayer shell on mesoporous silica nanoparticles with different crosslinking densities of disulfide bonds; they can be utilized to evaluate the gluthathione (GSH) concentration. In vitro cell assays demonstrate the feasibility of using such nanosensors in evaluating the intracellular redox state of different cells. PMID:26450796

  17. Quantum-dot based nanothermometry in optical plasmonic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Maestro, Laura Martinez; Zhang, Qiming; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min; Jaque, Daniel

    2014-11-03

    We report on the direct experimental determination of the temperature increment caused by laser irradiation in a optical recording media constituted by a polymeric film in which gold nanorods have been incorporated. The incorporation of CdSe quantum dots in the recording media allowed for single beam thermal reading of the on-focus temperature from a simple analysis of the two-photon excited fluorescence of quantum dots. Experimental results have been compared with numerical simulations revealing an excellent agreement and opening a promising avenue for further understanding and optimization of optical writing processes and media.

  18. A triple quantum dot based nano-electromechanical memory device

    SciTech Connect

    Pozner, R.; Lifshitz, E.; Peskin, U.

    2015-09-14

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are free-standing nano-structures with chemically tunable electronic properties. This tunability offers intriguing possibilities for nano-electromechanical devices. In this work, we consider a nano-electromechanical nonvolatile memory (NVM) device incorporating a triple quantum dot (TQD) cluster. The device operation is based on a bias induced motion of a floating quantum dot (FQD) located between two bound quantum dots (BQDs). The mechanical motion is used for switching between two stable states, “ON” and “OFF” states, where ligand-mediated effective interdot forces between the BQDs and the FQD serve to hold the FQD in each stable position under zero bias. Considering realistic microscopic parameters, our quantum-classical theoretical treatment of the TQD reveals the characteristics of the NVM.

  19. A triple quantum dot based nano-electromechanical memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozner, R.; Lifshitz, E.; Peskin, U.

    2015-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are free-standing nano-structures with chemically tunable electronic properties. This tunability offers intriguing possibilities for nano-electromechanical devices. In this work, we consider a nano-electromechanical nonvolatile memory (NVM) device incorporating a triple quantum dot (TQD) cluster. The device operation is based on a bias induced motion of a floating quantum dot (FQD) located between two bound quantum dots (BQDs). The mechanical motion is used for switching between two stable states, "ON" and "OFF" states, where ligand-mediated effective interdot forces between the BQDs and the FQD serve to hold the FQD in each stable position under zero bias. Considering realistic microscopic parameters, our quantum-classical theoretical treatment of the TQD reveals the characteristics of the NVM.

  20. Single-cell quantification of IL-2 response by effector and regulatory T cells reveals critical plasticity in immune response

    PubMed Central

    Feinerman, Ofer; Jentsch, Garrit; Tkach, Karen E; Coward, Jesse W; Hathorn, Matthew M; Sneddon, Michael W; Emonet, Thierry; Smith, Kendall A; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how the immune system decides between tolerance and activation by antigens requires addressing cytokine regulation as a highly dynamic process. We quantified the dynamics of interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling in a population of T cells during an immune response by combining in silico modeling and single-cell measurements in vitro. We demonstrate that IL-2 receptor expression levels vary widely among T cells creating a large variability in the ability of the individual cells to consume, produce and participate in IL-2 signaling within the population. Our model reveals that at the population level, these heterogeneous cells are engaged in a tug-of-war for IL-2 between regulatory (Treg) and effector (Teff) T cells, whereby access to IL-2 can either increase the survival of Teff cells or the suppressive capacity of Treg cells. This tug-of-war is the mechanism enforcing, at the systems level, a core function of Treg cells, namely the specific suppression of survival signals for weakly activated Teff cells but not for strongly activated cells. Our integrated model yields quantitative, experimentally validated predictions for the manipulation of Treg suppression. PMID:21119631

  1. Quantification of human-associated fecal indicators reveal sewage from urban watersheds as a source of pollution to Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Templar, Hayley A; Dila, Deborah K; Bootsma, Melinda J; Corsi, Steven R; McLellan, Sandra L

    2016-09-01

    Sewage contamination of urban waterways from sewer overflows and failing infrastructure is a major environmental and public health concern. Fecal coliforms (FC) are commonly employed as fecal indicator bacteria, but do not distinguish between human and non-human sources of fecal contamination. Human Bacteroides and human Lachnospiraceae, two genetic markers for human-associated indicator bacteria, were used to identify sewage signals in two urban rivers and the estuary that drains to Lake Michigan. Grab samples were collected from the rivers throughout 2012 and 2013 and hourly samples were collected in the estuary across the hydrograph during summer 2013. Human Bacteroides and human Lachnospiraceae were highly correlated with each other in river samples (Pearson's r = 0.86), with average concentrations at most sites elevated during wet weather. These human indicators were found during baseflow, indicating that sewage contamination is chronic in these waterways. FC are used for determining total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) in management plans; however, FC concentrations alone failed to prioritize river reaches with potential health risks. While 84% of samples with >1000 CFU/100 ml FC had sewage contamination, 52% of samples with moderate (200-1000 CFU/100 ml) and 46% of samples with low (<200 CFU/100 ml) FC levels also had evidence of human sewage. Load calculations in the in the Milwaukee estuary revealed storm-driven sewage contamination varied greatly among events and was highest during an event with a short duration of intense rain. This work demonstrates urban areas have unrecognized sewage inputs that may not be adequately prioritized for remediation by the TMDL process. Further analysis using these approaches could determine relationships between land use, storm characteristics, and other factors that drive sewage contamination in urban waterways. PMID:27236594

  2. Quantification of human-associated fecal indicators reveal sewage from urban watersheds as a source of pollution to Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Templar, Hayley A.; Dila, Deborah K.; Bootsma, Melinda J.; Corsi, Steven; McLellan, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Sewage contamination of urban waterways from sewer overflows and failing infrastructure is a major environmental and public health concern. Fecal coliforms (FC) are commonly employed as fecal indicator bacteria, but do not distinguish between human and non-human sources of fecal contamination. Human Bacteroides and humanLachnospiraceae, two genetic markers for human-associated indicator bacteria, were used to identify sewage signals in two urban rivers and the estuary that drains to Lake Michigan. Grab samples were collected from the rivers throughout 2012 and 2013 and hourly samples were collected in the estuary across the hydrograph during summer 2013. Human Bacteroides and human Lachnospiraceae were highly correlated with each other in river samples (Pearson’s r = 0.86), with average concentrations at most sites elevated during wet weather. These human indicators were found during baseflow, indicating that sewage contamination is chronic in these waterways. FC are used for determining total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) in management plans; however, FC concentrations alone failed to prioritize river reaches with potential health risks. While 84% of samples with >1000 CFU/100 ml FC had sewage contamination, 52% of samples with moderate (200–1000 CFU/100 ml) and 46% of samples with low (<200 CFU/100 ml) FC levels also had evidence of human sewage. Load calculations in the in the Milwaukee estuary revealed storm-driven sewage contamination varied greatly among events and was highest during an event with a short duration of intense rain. This work demonstrates urban areas have unrecognized sewage inputs that may not be adequately prioritized for remediation by the TMDL process. Further analysis using these approaches could determine relationships between land use, storm characteristics, and other factors that drive sewage contamination in urban waterways.

  3. Single Cell Quantification of Reporter Gene Expression in Live Adult Caenorhabditis elegans Reveals Reproducible Cell-Specific Expression Patterns and Underlying Biological Variation

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Alexander R.; Tedesco, Patricia M.; Sands, Bryan; Johnson, Thomas E.; Brent, Roger

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans, differences in complex phenotypes such as lifespan correlate with the level of expression of particular engineered reporter genes. In single celled organisms, quantitative understanding of responses to extracellular signals and of cell-to-cell variation in responses has depended on precise measurement of reporter gene expression. Here, we developed microscope-based methods to quantify reporter gene expression in cells of Caenorhabditis elegans with low measurement error. We then quantified expression in strains that carried different configurations of Phsp-16.2-fluorescent-protein reporters, in whole animals, and in all 20 cells of the intestine tissue, which is responsible for most of the fluorescent signal. Some animals bore more recently developed single copy Phsp-16.2 reporters integrated at defined chromosomal sites, others, “classical” multicopy reporter gene arrays integrated at random sites. At the level of whole animals, variation in gene expression was similar: strains with single copy reporters showed the same amount of animal-to-animal variation as strains with multicopy reporters. At the level of cells, in animals with single copy reporters, the pattern of expression in cells within the tissue was highly stereotyped. In animals with multicopy reporters, the cell-specific expression pattern was also stereotyped, but distinct, and somewhat more variable. Our methods are rapid and gentle enough to allow quantification of expression in the same cells of an animal at different times during adult life. They should allow investigators to use changes in reporter expression in single cells in tissues as quantitative phenotypes, and link those to molecular differences. Moreover, by diminishing measurement error, they should make possible dissection of the causes of the remaining, real, variation in expression. Understanding such variation should help reveal its contribution to differences in complex

  4. Pump dependence of the dynamics of quantum dot based waveguide absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, Evgeny A.; Erneux, Thomas; Piwonski, Tomasz; Pulka, Jaroslaw; Huyet, Guillaume; Houlihan, John

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear two stage recovery of quantum dot based reverse-biased waveguide absorbers is investigated experimentally and analytically as a function of the initial ground state occupation probability of the dot. The latter is controlled experimentally by the pump pulse power. The slow stage of the recovery is exponential and its basic timescale is independent of pump power. The fast stage of the recovery is a logistic function which we analyze in detail. The relative strength of slow to fast components is highlighted and the importance of higher order absorption processes at the highest pump level is demonstrated.

  5. Nanoscale Techniques for Investigating Material Issues in Quantum Dot Based Nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Ganapathi Prabhu Sai

    The current scaling of feature size of complementary metal oxide semiconductor transistors has been predicted to reach its limits by around the end of this decade. Therefore, several competing strategies for the post-CMOS era are under investigation. The focus of this dissertation in on two key materials issues pertaining to semiconductor nanostructures, more specifically Ge-Si quantum dot based nano-electronics. A key issue here is the understanding of local chemistry of these nano-structures because the local chemistry affects the positions of the electronic band edges of these structures relative to that of the surrounding matrix, which in-turn affects the carrier localization properties. While the nano-scale chemistry of the QDs is relatively well understood, the chemistry of QDMs is not as well understood. Therefore, focus of this dissertation is the understanding of detailed nano-scale chemistry of QDMs. Another key issue arises from the use of the focused ion beam (FIB) for controlled delivery of dopant ions into the QDs and the QDMs for creating controlled dopant profiles at the nanoscale, and for templating the growth of these structures. The materials issue associated with this application of the FIB is the damage recovery of ion implanted (FIB) regions. Although ion implantation damage and recovery of Si implanted using commercial broad area implantation implanters is well understood, the FIB implantation damage and recovery of Si is not as well understood. The focus of this research is thus to understand the effect of high ion implantation current density in the FIB, and the effect of FIB ion species (Si, Ge and Ga) on the damage recovery of Si. With regards to the first body of research Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was used for mapping the chemistry of QDMs in the epitaxy of Si 0.7Ge0.3 on Si(100). The AES study shows that the pit bases of QDMs are richest in Ge, which is consistent with one existing paper on composition distribution within these

  6. A Novel Quantum Dots-Based Point of Care Test for Syphilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Ding; He, Rong; Guo, Qin; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Xueqing; Huang, Peng; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-05-01

    One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care) test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots-based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91-100%), while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68-91%) and 100% (95% CI, 91-100%), respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot-based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold-based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening.

  7. A novel quantum dots-based point of care test for syphilis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Li, Ding; He, Rong; Guo, Qin; Wang, Kan; Zhang, Xueqing; Huang, Peng; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-01-01

    One-step lateral flow test is recommended as the first line screening of syphilis for primary healthcare settings in developing countries. However, it generally shows low sensitivity. We describe here the development of a novel fluorescent POC (Point Of Care) test method to be used for screening for syphilis. The method was designed to combine the rapidness of lateral flow test and sensitiveness of fluorescent method. 50 syphilis-positive specimens and 50 healthy specimens conformed by Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) were tested with Quantum Dot-labeled and colloidal gold-labeled lateral flow test strips, respectively. The results showed that both sensitivity and specificity of the quantum dots-based method reached up to 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91-100%), while those of the colloidal gold-based method were 82% (95% CI, 68-91%) and 100% (95% CI, 91-100%), respectively. In addition, the naked-eye detection limit of quantum dot-based method could achieve 2 ng/ml of anti-TP47 polyclonal antibodies purified by affinity chromatography with TP47 antigen, which was tenfold higher than that of colloidal gold-based method. In conclusion, the quantum dots were found to be suitable for labels of lateral flow test strip. Its ease of use, sensitiveness and low cost make it well-suited for population-based on-the-site syphilis screening. PMID:20672123

  8. Quantum-dot based ultrafast photoconductive antennae for efficient THz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodetsky, Andrei; Bazieva, Natalia; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2016-03-01

    Here we overview our work on quantum dot based THz photoconductive antennae, capable of being pumped at very high optical intensities of higher than 1W optical mean power, i.e. about 50 times higher than the conventional LT-GaAs based antennae. Apart from high thermal tolerance, defect-free GaAs crystal layers in an InAs:GaAs quantum dot structure allow high carrier mobility and ultra-short photo carrier lifetimes simultaneously. Thus, they combine the advantages and lacking the disadvantages of GaAs and LT-GaAs, which are the most popular materials so far, and thus can be used for both CW and pulsed THz generation. By changing quantum dot size, composition, density of dots and number of quantum dot layers, the optoelectronic properties of the overall structure can be set over a reasonable range-compact semiconductor pump lasers that operate at wavelengths in the region of 1.0 μm to 1.3 μm can be used. InAs:GaAs quantum dot-based antennae samples show no saturation in pulsed THz generation for all average pump powers up to 1W focused into 30 μm spot. Generated THz power is super-linearly proportional to laser pump power. The generated THz spectrum depends on antenna design and can cover from 150 GHz up to 1.5 THz.

  9. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the QD-based DNA Nanosensor. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06326d

  10. A novel method for high-throughput detection and quantification of neutrophil extracellular traps reveals ROS-independent NET release with immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Kraaij, Tineke; Tengström, Fredrik C; Kamerling, Sylvia W A; Pusey, Charles D; Scherer, H Ulrich; Toes, Rene E M; Rabelink, Ton J; van Kooten, Cees; Teng, Y K Onno

    2016-06-01

    A newly-described first-line immune defence mechanism of neutrophils is the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Immune complexes (ICxs) induce low level NET release. As such, the in vitro quantification of NETs is challenging with current methodologies. In order to investigate the role of NET release in ICx-mediated autoimmune diseases, we developed a highly sensitive and automated method for quantification of NETs. After labelling human neutrophils with PKH26 and extracellular DNA with Sytox green, cells are fixed and automatically imaged with 3-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy (3D-CLSM). NET release is then quantified with digital image analysis whereby the NET amount (Sytox green area) is corrected for the number of imaged neutrophils (PKH26 area). A high sensitivity of the assay is achieved by a) significantly augmenting the area of the well imaged (11%) as compared to conventional assays (0.5%) and b) using a 3D imaging technique for optimal capture of NETs, which are topologically superimposed on neutrophils. In this assay, we confirmed low levels of NET release upon human ICx stimulation which were positive for citrullinated histones and neutrophil elastase. In contrast to PMA-induced NET release, ICx-induced NET release was unchanged when co-incubated with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI). We were able to quantify NET release upon stimulation with serum from RA and SLE patients, which was not observed with normal human serum. To our knowledge, this is the first semi-automated assay capable of sensitive detection and quantification of NET release at a low threshold by using 3D CLSM. The assay is applicable in a high-throughput manner and allows the in vitro analysis of NET release in ICx-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26925759

  11. Highly sensitive detection of DNA methylation levels by using a quantum dot-based FRET method.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunfei; Zhang, Honglian; Liu, Fangming; Wu, Zhenhua; Lu, Shaohua; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhong, Xinhua; Mao, Hongju

    2015-11-01

    DNA methylation is the most frequently studied epigenetic modification that is strongly involved in genomic stability and cellular plasticity. Aberrant changes in DNA methylation status are ubiquitous in human cancer and the detection of these changes can be informative for cancer diagnosis. Herein, we reported a facile quantum dot-based (QD-based) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique for the detection of DNA methylation. The method relies on methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes for the differential digestion of genomic DNA based on its methylation status. Digested DNA is then subjected to PCR amplification for the incorporation of Alexa Fluor-647 (A647) fluorophores. DNA methylation levels can be detected qualitatively through gel analysis and quantitatively by the signal amplification from QDs to A647 during FRET. Furthermore, the methylation levels of three tumor suppressor genes, PCDHGB6, HOXA9 and RASSF1A, in 20 lung adenocarcinoma and 20 corresponding adjacent nontumorous tissue (NT) samples were measured to verify the feasibility of the QD-based FRET method and a high sensitivity for cancer detection (up to 90%) was achieved. Our QD-based FRET method is a convenient, continuous and high-throughput method, and is expected to be an alternative for detecting DNA methylation as a biomarker for certain human cancers. PMID:26446775

  12. In Vivo Quantification of Inflammation in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Rats Using Fluorine-19 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reveals Immune Cell Recruitment outside the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia; Narsinh, Kazim; Morel, Penelope A.; Xu, Hongyan; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    Progress in identifying new therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) can be accelerated by using imaging biomarkers of disease progression or abatement in model systems. In this study, we evaluate the ability to noninvasively image and quantitate disease pathology using emerging “hot-spot” 19F MRI methods in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) rat, a model of MS. Rats with clinical symptoms of EAE were compared to control rats without EAE, as well as to EAE rats that received daily prophylactic treatments with cyclophosphamide. Perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsion was injected intravenously, which labels predominately monocytes and macrophages in situ. Analysis of the spin-density weighted 19F MRI data enabled quantification of the apparent macrophage burden in the central nervous system and other tissues. The in vivo MRI results were confirmed by extremely high-resolution 19F/1H magnetic resonance microscopy in excised tissue samples and histopathologic analyses. Additionally, 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intact tissue samples was used to assay the PFC biodistribution in EAE and control rats. In vivo hot-spot 19F signals were detected predominantly in the EAE spinal cord, consistent with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates. Surprising, prominent 19F hot-spots were observed in bone-marrow cavities adjacent to spinal cord lesions; these were not observed in control animals. Quantitative evaluation of cohorts receiving cyclophosphamide treatment displayed significant reduction in 19F signal within the spinal cord and bone marrow of EAE rats. Overall, 19F MRI can be used to quantitatively monitored EAE disease burden, discover unexpected sites of inflammatory activity, and may serve as a sensitive biomarker for the discovery and preclinical assessment of novel MS therapeutic interventions. PMID:26485716

  13. Highly sensitive detection of DNA methylation levels by using a quantum dot-based FRET method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yunfei; Zhang, Honglian; Liu, Fangming; Wu, Zhenhua; Lu, Shaohua; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhong, Xinhua; Mao, Hongju

    2015-10-01

    DNA methylation is the most frequently studied epigenetic modification that is strongly involved in genomic stability and cellular plasticity. Aberrant changes in DNA methylation status are ubiquitous in human cancer and the detection of these changes can be informative for cancer diagnosis. Herein, we reported a facile quantum dot-based (QD-based) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique for the detection of DNA methylation. The method relies on methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes for the differential digestion of genomic DNA based on its methylation status. Digested DNA is then subjected to PCR amplification for the incorporation of Alexa Fluor-647 (A647) fluorophores. DNA methylation levels can be detected qualitatively through gel analysis and quantitatively by the signal amplification from QDs to A647 during FRET. Furthermore, the methylation levels of three tumor suppressor genes, PCDHGB6, HOXA9 and RASSF1A, in 20 lung adenocarcinoma and 20 corresponding adjacent nontumorous tissue (NT) samples were measured to verify the feasibility of the QD-based FRET method and a high sensitivity for cancer detection (up to 90%) was achieved. Our QD-based FRET method is a convenient, continuous and high-throughput method, and is expected to be an alternative for detecting DNA methylation as a biomarker for certain human cancers.DNA methylation is the most frequently studied epigenetic modification that is strongly involved in genomic stability and cellular plasticity. Aberrant changes in DNA methylation status are ubiquitous in human cancer and the detection of these changes can be informative for cancer diagnosis. Herein, we reported a facile quantum dot-based (QD-based) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique for the detection of DNA methylation. The method relies on methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes for the differential digestion of genomic DNA based on its methylation status. Digested DNA is then subjected to PCR

  14. Abundance of four sulfur mustard-DNA adducts ex vivo and in vivo revealed by simultaneous quantification in stable isotope dilution-ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lijun; Wei, Yuxia; Chen, Jia; Shi, Huiqin; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yajiao; He, Jun; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Tingfen; Xie, Jianwei; Peng, Shuangqing

    2014-04-21

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating vesicant and causes blisters upon contact with skin, eyes, and respiratory organs. It covalently links with DNAs by forming four mono- or cross-link adducts. In this article, the reference standards of SM-DNA adducts and deuterated analogues were first synthesized with simplified procedures containing only one or two steps and using less toxic chemical 2-(2-chloroethylthio)ethanol or nontoxic chemical thiodiglycol as starting materials. A sensitive and high-throughput simultaneous quantification method of N(7)-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]guanine (N(7)-HETEG), O(6)-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]guanine (O(6)-HETEG), N(3)-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]adenine (N(3)-HETEA), and bis[2-(guanin-7-yl)ethyl]sulfide (Bis-G) in the Sprague-Dawley rat derma samples was developed by stable isotope dilution-ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-UPLC-MS/MS) with the aim of revealing the real metabolic behaviors of four adducts. The method was validated, the limit of detection (S/N ratio greater than 10) was 0.01, 0.002, 0.04, and 0.11 fmol on column for N(7)-HETEG, O(6)-HETEG, Bis-G, and N(3)-HETEA, respectively, and the lower limit of quantification (S/N ratio greater than 20) was 0.04, 0.01, 0.12, and 0.33 fmol on column for N(7)-HETEG, O(6)-HETEG, Bis-G, and N(3)-HETEA, respectively. The accuracy of this method was determined to be 76% to 129% (n = 3), and both the interday (n = 6) and intraday (n = 7) precisions were less than 10%. The method was further applied for the quantifications of four adducts in the derma of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to SM ex vivo and in vivo, and all adducts had time- and dose-effect relationships. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the real presented status of four DNA adducts was simultaneously revealed by the MS-based method, in which Bis-G showed much higher abundance than the result previously reported and N(3

  15. Multi-color colloidal quantum dot based light emitting diodes micropatterned on silicon hole transporting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ashwini; Hoshino, Kazunori; Kim, Sunmin; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2009-06-01

    We present a colloidal quantum dot based light emitting diode (QD-LED) which utilizes the p-type silicon substrate as the hole transporting layer. A microcontact printing technique was introduced to pattern self-assembled CdSe/ZnS QD films, which allowed creation of an LED with well-defined geometry suitable for monolithic integration on silicon substrates. Our QD-LED consists of multi-layers of inorganic materials: a combination of Au (thickness: 5 nm) and Ag (12 nm) as the cathode, a ZnO:SnO2 mixture (ratio 3:1, 40 nm) as the electron transporting layer, CdSe/ZnS QDs as the light emission layer, 1 nm SiO2 as an energy barrier layer, and p-type silicon as the hole transporting layer. These printed QD-LEDs are capable of multi-color emission peaked at wavelengths of 576 nm, 598 nm, and 622 nm, corresponding to sizes of the embedded QDs with the diameters of 8.4 nm, 9.0 nm, and 9.8 nm respectively. The optimal thickness of the quantum dot layers needed for light emission is characterized using atomic force microscopy: for 8.4 nm QDs, the value is 33 nm (± 5 nm) or ~4 ML (monolayers). Larger turn on voltages were measured (2, 4 and 5 V) for the smaller average particle diameters (9.8 nm, 9.0 nm and 8.4 nm, respectively). The mixture ratio of Zn and Sn was optimized (40% Zn and 25% Sn) to maintain proper hole-electron recombination at the QD layer and avoid the yellowish-white emission from ZnO/SnO2.

  16. Quantification of Leishmania (Viannia) Kinetoplast DNA in Ulcers of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Reveals Inter-site and Inter-sampling Variability in Parasite Load

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Milagros; Valencia, Braulio M.; Jara, Marlene; Alba, Milena; Boggild, Andrea K.; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Arevalo, Jorge; Adaui, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a skin disease caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania. Few studies have assessed the influence of the sample collection site within the ulcer and the sampling method on the sensitivity of parasitological and molecular diagnostic techniques for CL. Sensitivity of the technique can be dependent upon the load and distribution of Leishmania amastigotes in the lesion. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for Leishmania (Viannia) minicircle kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) detection and parasite load quantification in biopsy and scraping samples obtained from 3 sites within each ulcer (border, base, and center) as well as in cytology brush specimens taken from the ulcer base and center. A total of 248 lesion samples from 31 patients with laboratory confirmed CL of recent onset (≤3 months) were evaluated. The kDNA-qPCR detected Leishmania DNA in 97.6% (242/248) of the examined samples. Median parasite loads were significantly higher in the ulcer base and center than in the border in biopsies (P<0.0001) and scrapings (P = 0.0002). There was no significant difference in parasite load between the ulcer base and center (P = 0.80, 0.43, and 0.07 for biopsy, scraping, and cytology brush specimens, respectively). The parasite load varied significantly by sampling method: in the ulcer base and center, the descending order for the parasite load levels in samples was: cytology brushes, scrapings, and biopsies (P<0.0001); in the ulcer border, scrapings had higher parasite load than biopsies (P<0.0001). There was no difference in parasite load according to L. braziliensis and L. peruviana infections (P = 0.4). Conclusion/Significance Our results suggest an uneven distribution of Leishmania amastigotes in acute CL ulcers, with higher parasite loads in the ulcer base and center, which has implications for bedside collection of diagnostic specimens. The use of scrapings and cytology brushes is

  17. Dystrophin quantification

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Karen; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Taylor, Laura E.; Vulin, Adeline; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Torelli, Silvia; Feng, Lucy; Janghra, Narinder; Bonne, Gisèle; Beuvin, Maud; Barresi, Rita; Henderson, Matt; Laval, Steven; Lourbakos, Afrodite; Campion, Giles; Straub, Volker; Voit, Thomas; Sewry, Caroline A.; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Flanigan, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We formed a multi-institution collaboration in order to compare dystrophin quantification methods, reach a consensus on the most reliable method, and report its biological significance in the context of clinical trials. Methods: Five laboratories with expertise in dystrophin quantification performed a data-driven comparative analysis of a single reference set of normal and dystrophinopathy muscle biopsies using quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. We developed standardized protocols and assessed inter- and intralaboratory variability over a wide range of dystrophin expression levels. Results: Results from the different laboratories were highly concordant with minimal inter- and intralaboratory variability, particularly with quantitative immunohistochemistry. There was a good level of agreement between data generated by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, although immunohistochemistry was more sensitive. Furthermore, mean dystrophin levels determined by alternative quantitative immunohistochemistry methods were highly comparable. Conclusions: Considering the biological function of dystrophin at the sarcolemma, our data indicate that the combined use of quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blotting are reliable biochemical outcome measures for Duchenne muscular dystrophy clinical trials, and that standardized protocols can be comparable between competent laboratories. The methodology validated in our study will facilitate the development of experimental therapies focused on dystrophin production and their regulatory approval. PMID:25355828

  18. Simultaneous quantification of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes reveals that a shallow arctic methane seep is a net sink for greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, J.; Greinert, J.; Ruppel, C. D.; Silyakova, A.; Vielstädte, L.; Magen, C.; Casso, M.; Bunz, S.; Mienert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Warming of high-latitude continental-margin oceans has the potential to release large quantities of carbon from gas hydrate and other sedimentary reservoirs. To assess how carbon mobilized from the seafloor might amplify global warming or alter ocean chemistry, a robust analysis of the concentrations and isotopic content of methane and carbon dioxide (CO2) in the water column and atmosphere is required. To this effect, a gas analysis system consisting of three cavity ring-down spectrometers was developed to obtain a real-time, three-dimensional characterization of the distribution and isotopic variability of methane and CO2 at a shallow (<100 m water depth) bubbling methane seep offshore of western Svalbard. Surface water methane concentrations from the continuous-flow CRDS system agreed remarkably well with discrete samples analyzed by the GC-based headspace analysis technique and with a CRDS-based discrete sample analysis module. Reliable carbon isotope data were also obtained from the CRDSs once an isotopic calibration routine was applied. The resulting data revealed that CO2 uptake from the atmosphere within the surface water methane plume overlying the gas seep was elevated by 36-45% relative to surrounding waters. In comparison to the positive radiative forcing effect expected from the methane emissions, the negative radiative forcing potential from CO2 uptake was 32-43 times greater. Lower water temperatures, elevated chlorophyll-fluorescence and 13C-enriched CO2 within the surface methane plume suggest that bubble-driven upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water stimulated CO2 uptake by phytoplankton. The observation that a shallow methane seep has a net negative radiative forcing effect challenges the widely-held perception that methane seeps contribute to the global atmospheric greenhouse gas burden.

  19. A graphene quantum dot-based FRET system for nuclear-targeted and real-time monitoring of drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Wang, Zhuyuan; Zong, Shenfei; Chen, Peng; Zhu, Dan; Wu, Lei; Cui, Yiping

    2015-09-01

    A graphene quantum dot-based FRET system is demonstrated for nuclear-targeted drug delivery, which allows for real-time monitoring of the drug release process through FRET signals. In such a system, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) simultaneously serve as the carriers of drugs and donors of FRET pairs. Additionally, a peptide TAT as the nuclear localization signal is conjugated to GQDs, which facilitates the transportation of the delivery system to the nucleus. We have demonstrated that: (a) both the conjugated TAT and small size of GQDs contribute to targeting the nucleus, which results in a significantly enhanced intranuclear accumulation of drugs; (b) FRET signals being extremely sensitive to the distance between donors and acceptors are capable of real-time monitoring of the separation process of drugs and GQDs, which is more versatile in tracking the drug release dynamics. Our strategy for the assembly of a FRET-based drug delivery system may be unique and universal for monitoring the dynamic release process. This study may give more exciting new opportunities for improving the therapeutic efficacy and tracking precision.A graphene quantum dot-based FRET system is demonstrated for nuclear-targeted drug delivery, which allows for real-time monitoring of the drug release process through FRET signals. In such a system, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) simultaneously serve as the carriers of drugs and donors of FRET pairs. Additionally, a peptide TAT as the nuclear localization signal is conjugated to GQDs, which facilitates the transportation of the delivery system to the nucleus. We have demonstrated that: (a) both the conjugated TAT and small size of GQDs contribute to targeting the nucleus, which results in a significantly enhanced intranuclear accumulation of drugs; (b) FRET signals being extremely sensitive to the distance between donors and acceptors are capable of real-time monitoring of the separation process of drugs and GQDs, which is more versatile in tracking

  20. Quantum dot-based multiplexed imaging in malignant ascites: a new model for malignant ascites classification

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Juan; Peng, Chun-Wei; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Cui, Ran; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study are to establish a new method for simultaneously detecting the interactions between cancer cells and immunocytes in malignant ascites (MA) and to propose a new model for MA classification. Methods A quantum dot (QD)-based multiplexed imaging technique was developed for simultaneous in situ imaging of cancer cells, lymphocytes, and macrophages. This method was first validated in gastric cancer tissues, and then was applied to MA samples from 20 patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from gastrointestinal and gynecological origins. The staining features of MA and the interactions between cancer cells and immunocytes in the ascites were further analyzed and correlated with clinical features. Results The QD-based multiplexed imaging technique was able to simultaneously show gastric cancer cells, infiltrating macrophages, and lymphocytes in tumor tissue, and the technique revealed the distinctive features of the cancer tumor microenvironment. When this multiplexed imaging protocol was applied to MA cytology, different features of the interactions and quantitative relations between cancer cells and immunocytes were observed. On the basis of these features, MA could be classified into immunocyte-dominant type, immunocyte-reactive type, cancer cell-dominant type, and cell deletion type; the four categories were statistically different in terms of the ratio of cancer cells to immunocytes (P<0.001). Moreover, in the MA, the ratio of cancer cells to immunocytes was higher for patients with gynecological and gastric cancers than for those with colorectal cancer. Conclusion The newly developed QD-based multiplexed imaging technique was able to better reveal the interactions between cancer cells and immunocytes. This advancement allows for better MA classification and, thereby, allows for treatment decisions to be more individualized. PMID:25784803

  1. Tunable Carbon-Dot-Based Dual-Emission Fluorescent Nanohybrids for Ratiometric Optical Thermometry in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanxi; Lin, Huihui; Xu, Zhenzhu; Huang, Yijun; Humphrey, Mark G; Zhang, Chi

    2016-03-01

    The use of carbon-dot-based dual-emission fluorescent nanohybrids (DEFNs) as versatile nanothermometry devices for spatially resolved temperature measurements in living cells is demonstrated. The carbon dots (CDs) are prepared in the organic phase and display tunable photoluminescence (PL) across a wide visible range by adjusting the excitation wavelengths and extend of N-doping. DEFNs are formed in a straightforward fashion from CDs (emitting blue PL) and gold nanoclusters (AuNCs, emitting red PL). The DEFNs display ideal single-excitation, dual-emission with two well-resolved, intensity-comparable fluorescence peaks, and function in optical thermometry with high reliability and accuracy by exploiting the temperature sensitivity of their fluorescence intensity ratio (blue/red). Furthermore, the DEFNs have been introduced into cells, exhibiting good biocompatibility, and have facilitated physiological temperature measurements in the range of 25-45 °C; the DEFNs can therefore function as "non-contact" tools for the accurate measurement of temperature and its gradient inside a living cell. PMID:26909643

  2. Label-Free Carbon-Dots-Based Ratiometric Fluorescence pH Nanoprobes for Intracellular pH Sensing.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Jingfang; He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Xu, Fengzhou; Liu, Jinquan; Tang, Jinlu; Yang, Xue; Huang, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Measuring pH in living cells is of great importance for better understanding cellular functions as well as providing pivotal assistance for early diagnosis of diseases. In this work, we report the first use of a novel kind of label-free carbon dots for intracellular ratiometric fluorescence pH sensing. By simple one-pot hydrothermal treatment of citric acid and basic fuchsin, the carbon dots showing dual emission bands at 475 and 545 nm under single-wavelength excitation were synthesized. It is demonstrated that the fluorescence intensities of the as-synthesized carbon dots at the two emissions are pH-sensitive simultaneously. The intensity ratio (I475 nm/I545 nm) is linear against pH values from 5.2 to 8.8 in buffer solution, affording the capability as ratiometric probes for intracellular pH sensing. It also displays that the carbon dots show excellent reversibility and photostability in pH measurements. With this nanoprobe, quantitative fluorescence imaging using the ratio of two emissions (I475 nm/I545 nm) for the detection of intracellular pH were successfully applied in HeLa cells. In contrast to most of the reported nanomaterials-based ratiometric pH sensors which rely on the attachment of additional dyes, these carbon-dots-based ratiometric probes are low in toxicity, easy to synthesize, and free from labels. PMID:27334762

  3. Enhancement of CdSe/ZnS quantum dot-based LED by core-shell modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Won; Kim, Ju-Seong; Lee, Jae-Sung; Jeong, Hyun-Min; Gopalan, Sai-Anand; Kang, Shin-Won; Kang, Byoung-Ho; Lee, Seung-Ha; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed an analysis of quantum-dot-based light-emitting diodes (QD-based LEDs) to investigate the defects at the interface between the core and the shell of the quantum dots (QDs) using gradient-shell QDs (CdSe/Cd1-xZnxSe1-ySy/ZnS, G-QDs) and single-shell QDs (CdSe/ZnS, S-QDs). QDs of the general core-shell type have defects at the core and shell junction interface due to the different lattice constants. However, G-QDs have a low number of lattice defects in the form of a step function between the core and the shell owing to their chemical composition and can more easily confine electron-hole pairs (EHP). Therefore, we fabricated QD-based LEDs by using two emissive layer (G-QDs and S-QDs) and analyzed their characteristics, including their brightness and efficiency.

  4. A Modified Quantum Dot-Based Dot Blot Assay for Rapid Detection of Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Jingfan; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2016-08-28

    Vibrio anguillarum, a devastating pathogen causing vibriosis among marine fish, is prevailing in worldwide fishery industries and accounts for grievous economic losses. Therefore, a rapid on-site detection and diagnostic technique for this pathogen is in urgent need. In this study, two mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against V. anguillarum, 6B3-C5 and 8G3-B5, were generated by using hybridoma technology and their isotypes were characterized. MAb 6B3-C5 was chosen as the detector antibody and conjugated with quantum dots. Based on MAb 6B3- C5 labeled with quantum dots, a modified dot blot assay was developed for the on-site determination of V. anguillarum. It was found that the method had no cross-reactivity with other than V. anguillarum bacteria. The detection limit (LOD) for V. anguillarum was 1 × 10(3) CFU/ml in cultured bacterial suspension samples, which was a 100-fold higher sensitivity than the reported colloidal gold immunochromatographic test strip. When V. anguillarum was mixed with turbot tissue homogenates, the LOD was 1 × 10(3) CFU/ml, suggesting that tissue homogenates did not influence the detection capabilities. Preenrichment with the tissue homogenates for 12 h could raise the LOD up to 1 × 10(2) CFU/ml, confirming the reliability of the method. PMID:27116991

  5. Carbon-dot-based ratiometric fluorescent probe for imaging and biosensing of superoxide anion in live cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Ding, Changqin; Zhu, Anwei; Tian, Yang

    2014-07-15

    In this article, a ratiometric fluorescent biosensor for O2(•-) was developed, by employing carbon dots (C-Dots) as the reference fluorophore and hydroethidine (HE), a specific organic molecule toward O2(•-), playing the role as both specific recognition element and response signal. The hybrid fluorescent probe CD-HE only emitted at 525 nm is ascribed to C-Dots, while HE was almost nonfluorescent, upon excitation at 488 nm. However, after reaction with O2(•-), a new emission peak ascribed to the reaction products of HE and O2(•-) was clearly observed at 610 nm. Meanwhile, this peak gradually increased with the increasing concentration of O2(•-) but the emission peak at 525 nm stayed constant, leading to a ratiometric detection of O2(•-). The inorganic-organic fluorescent sensor exhibited high sensitivity, a broad dynamic linear range of ~5 × 10(-7)-1.4 × 10(-4) M, and low detection limit down to 100 nM. The present probe also showed high accuracy and excellent selectivity for O2(•-) over other reactive oxygen species (ROS), metal ions, and so on. Moreover, the C-Dot-based inorganic-organic probe demonstrated long-term stability against pH changes and continuous light illumination, good cell-permeability, and low cytotoxicity. Accordingly, the developed fluorescent biosensor was eventually applied for intracellular bioimaging and biosensing of O2(•-) changes upon oxidative stress. PMID:24932576

  6. Quantum dots-based double-color imaging of HER2 positive breast cancer invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiu-Li; Peng, Chun-Wei; Chen, Chuang; Yang, Xue-Qin; Hu, Ming-Bai; Xia, He-Shun; Liu, Shao-Ping; and others

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} HER2 level is closely related to the biologic behaviors of breast cancer cells. {yields} A new method to simultaneously image HER2 and type IV collagen was established. {yields} HER2 status and type IV collagen degradation predict breast cancer invasion. {yields} The complex interactions between tumor and its environment were revealed. -- Abstract: It has been well recognized that human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) level in breast cancer (BC) is closely related to the malignant biologic behaviors of the tumor, including invasion and metastasis. Yet, there has been a lack of directly observable evidence to support such notion. Here we report a quantum dots (QDs)-based double-color imaging technique to simultaneously show the HER2 level on BC cells and the type IV collagen in the tumor matrix. In benign breast tumor, the type IV collagen was intact. With the increasing of HER2 expression level, there has been a progressive decrease in type IV collagen around the cancer nest. At HER2 (3+) expression level, there has virtually been a total destruction of type IV collagen. Moreover, HER2 (3+) BC cells also show direct invasion into the blood vessels. This novel imaging method provides direct observable evidence to support the theory that the HER2 expression level is directly related to BC invasion.

  7. Scoliosis quantification: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Kawchuk, Greg; McArthur, Ross

    1997-01-01

    Scoliotic curvatures have long been a focus of attention for clinicians and research scientists alike. The study, treatment and ultimately, the prevention of this prevalent health condition are impeded by the absence of an accurate, reliable, convenient and safe method of scoliosis quantification. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current methods of scoliosis quantification for clinicians who address this condition in their practices.

  8. Quantification of thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid in toxicant-exposed cells by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry reveals an intrinsic antagonistic response to oxidative stress-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Chan, Wan

    2015-03-16

    Carcinogenic formaldehyde is produced by endogenous protein oxidation and various exogenous sources. With formaldehyde being both ubiquitous in the ambient environment and one of the most common reactive carbonyls produced from endogenous metabolism, quantifying formaldehyde exposure is an essential step in risk assessments. We present in this study an approach to assess the risk of exposure to oxidative stress by quantifying thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (TA), a cysteine-conjugated metabolite of formaldehyde in toxicant-exposed Escherichia coli. The method entails TA derivatization with ethyl chloroformate, addition of isotope-labeled TA derivatives as internal standards, solid-phase extraction of the derivatives, and quantification by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). After validating for accuracy and precision, the developed method was used to detect TA in oxidizing agent-exposed E. coli samples. Dose-dependent TA formation was observed in E. coli exposed to hydroxyl radical mediators Fe(2+)-EDTA, H2O2, and NaOCl, indicating the potential use of TA as a biomarker of exposure to oxidative stress and disease risk. PMID:25325739

  9. Rapid and Multiplexed MicroRNA Diagnostic Assay Using Quantum Dot-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xue; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2015-08-25

    The detection of next generation microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers has become a highly important aspect for clinical diagnostics. We use multiplexed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a luminescent Tb complex and three different semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) to sensitively detect three different miRNAs from a single 150 μL sample with ca. 1 nM (subpicomol) detection limits. The rapid and amplification-free mix-and-measure assay format is based on careful design of miRNA base pairing and stacking to selectively detect different miRNAs with very strong sequence homologies. Clinical applicability is demonstrated by sensitive multiplexed quantification of three miRNAs at low (2 to 10 nM) and varying concentrations in samples that contained up to 10% serum. PMID:26192765

  10. Quantification of nonclassicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, C.; Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2012-11-01

    To quantify single-mode nonclassicality, we start from an operational approach. A positive semidefinite observable is introduced to describe a measurement setup. The quantification is based on the negativity of the normally ordered version of this observable. Perfect operational quantumness corresponds to the quantum-noise-free measurement of the chosen observable. Surprisingly, even moderately squeezed states may exhibit perfect quantumness for a properly designed measurement. The quantification is also considered from an axiomatic viewpoint, based on the algebraic structure of the quantum states and the quantum superposition principle. Basic conclusions from both approaches are consistent with this fundamental principle of the quantum world.

  11. Neutron-encoded mass signatures for multiplexed proteome quantification.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Alexander S; Merrill, Anna E; Bailey, Derek J; Still, Amelia J; Westphall, Michael S; Strieter, Eric R; Pagliarini, David J; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-04-01

    We describe a protein quantification method called neutron encoding that exploits the subtle mass differences caused by nuclear binding energy variation in stable isotopes. These mass differences are synthetically encoded into amino acids and incorporated into yeast and mouse proteins via metabolic labeling. Mass spectrometry analysis with high mass resolution (>200,000) reveals the isotopologue-embedded peptide signals, permitting quantification. Neutron encoding will enable highly multiplexed proteome analysis with excellent dynamic range and accuracy. PMID:23435260

  12. Trap-Assisted Transport and Non-Uniform Charge Distribution in Sulfur-Rich PbS Colloidal Quantum Dot-based Solar Cells with Selective Contacts.

    PubMed

    Malgras, Victor; Zhang, Guanran; Nattestad, Andrew; Clarke, Tracey M; Mozer, Attila J; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kim, Jung Ho

    2015-12-01

    This study reports evidence of dispersive transport in planar PbS colloidal quantum dot heterojunction-based devices as well as the effect of incorporating a MoO3 hole selective layer on the charge extraction behavior. Steady state and transient characterization techniques are employed to determine the complex recombination processes involved in such devices. The addition of a selective contact drastically improves the device efficiency up to 3.15% (especially due to increased photocurrent and decreased series resistance) and extends the overall charge lifetime by suppressing the main first-order recombination pathway observed in device without MoO3. The lifetime and mobility calculated for our sulfur-rich PbS-based devices are similar to previously reported values in lead-rich quantum dots-based solar cells. Nevertheless, strong Shockley-Read-Hall mechanisms appear to keep restricting charge transport, as the equilibrium voltage takes more than 1 ms to be established. PMID:26541422

  13. Quantificational logic of context

    SciTech Connect

    Buvac, Sasa

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we extend the Propositional Logic of Context, to the quantificational (predicate calculus) case. This extension is important in the declarative representation of knowledge for two reasons. Firstly, since contexts are objects in the semantics which can be denoted by terms in the language and which can be quantified over, the extension enables us to express arbitrary first-order properties of contexts. Secondly, since the extended language is no longer only propositional, we can express that an arbitrary predicate calculus formula is true in a context. The paper describes the syntax and the semantics of a quantificational language of context, gives a Hilbert style formal system, and outlines a proof of the system`s completeness.

  14. Multiplexed quantification for data-independent acquisition.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Catherine E; Hebert, Alexander S; Rensvold, Jarred W; Westphall, Michael S; Pagliarini, David J; Coon, Joshua J

    2015-03-01

    Data-independent acquisition (DIA) strategies provide a sensitive and reproducible alternative to data-dependent acquisition (DDA) methods for large-scale quantitative proteomic analyses. Unfortunately, DIA methods suffer from incompatibility with common multiplexed quantification methods, specifically stable isotope labeling approaches such as isobaric tags and stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Here we expand the use of neutron-encoded (NeuCode) SILAC to DIA applications (NeuCoDIA), producing a strategy that enables multiplexing within DIA scans without further convoluting the already complex MS(2) spectra. We demonstrate duplex NeuCoDIA analysis of both mixed-ratio (1:1 and 10:1) yeast and mouse embryo myogenesis proteomes. Analysis of the mixed-ratio yeast samples revealed the strong accuracy and precision of our NeuCoDIA method, both of which were comparable to our established MS(1)-based quantification approach. NeuCoDIA also uncovered the dynamic protein changes that occur during myogenic differentiation, demonstrating the feasibility of this methodology for biological applications. We consequently establish DIA quantification of NeuCode SILAC as a useful and practical alternative to DDA-based approaches. PMID:25621425

  15. Multiplexed Quantification for Data-Independent Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Catherine E.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Rensvold, Jarred W.; Westphall, Michael S.; Pagliarini, David J.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition (DIA) strategies provide a sensitive and reproducible alternative to data-dependent acquisition (DDA) methods for large-scale quantitative proteomic analyses. Unfortunately, DIA methods suffer from incompatibility with common multiplexed quantification methods, specifically stable isotope labeling approaches such as isobaric tags and stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Here we expand the use of neutron-encoded (NeuCode) SILAC to DIA applications (NeuCoDIA), producing a strategy that enables multiplexing within DIA scans without further convoluting the already complex MS2 spectra. We demonstrate duplex NeuCoDIA analysis of both mixed-ratio (1:1 and 10:1) yeast and mouse embryo myogenesis proteomes. Analysis of the mixed-ratio yeast samples revealed the strong accuracy and precision of our NeuCoDIA method, both of which were comparable to our established MS1-based quantification approach. NeuCoDIA also uncovered the dynamic protein changes that occur during myogenic differentiation, demonstrating the feasibility of this methodology for biological applications. We consequently establish DIA quantification of NeuCode SILAC as a useful and practical alternative to DDA-based approaches. PMID:25621425

  16. Quantum dot-based isothermal chain elongation for fluorescence detection of specific DNA sequences via template-dependent surface-hybridization.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenqing; Lau, Choiwan; Lu, Jianzhong

    2012-04-01

    A new quantum dot-based method to detect specific sequences of DNA is proposed. The capture and reporter probes do not hybridize to each other, but in the presence of a template they can anneal to each other via the formation of a stable ternary complex. Because of the specific design of the capture and reporter probes, the 5' end of the template target DNA remains free to hybridize with another reporter. In this way, each capture DNA is an initiator strand that triggers a cascade of hybridization events between the target DNA and the reporter probe. This forms a superstructure, enhances base stacking, and produces a strong fluorescent signal. The introduction of T4 DNA ligase further stabilizes the superstructure and greatly increases the fluorescence intensity, and the detection limit is as low as 10 fM. This fluorescence method is advantageous over conventional techniques because of its excellent ability to discriminate single base-pair mismatches and single nucleotide gap or flap. This simple technique is promising for improving medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22343986

  17. ZnCuInS/ZnSe/ZnS Quantum Dot-Based Downconversion Light-Emitting Diodes and Their Thermal Effect

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Wenyan; Zhang, Yu; Ruan, Cheng; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Tieqiang; Feng, Yi; Gao, Wenzhu; Yin, Jingzhi; Wang, Yiding; Riley, Alexis P.; et al

    2015-01-01

    The quantum dot-based light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) were fabricated using blue GaN chips and red-, yellow-, and green-emitting ZnCuInS/ZnSe/ZnS QDs. The power efficiencies were measured as 14.0 lm/W for red, 47.1 lm/W for yellow, and 62.4 lm/W for green LEDs at 2.6 V. The temperature effect of ZnCuInS/ZnSe/ZnS QDs on these LEDs was investigated using CIE chromaticity coordinates, spectral wavelength, full width at half maximum (FWHM), and power efficiency (PE). The thermal quenching induced by the increased surface temperature of the device was confirmed to be one of the important factors to decrease power efficiencies while the CIE chromaticity coordinates changed little due to themore » low emission temperature coefficients of 0.022, 0.050, and 0.068 nm/°C for red-, yellow-, and green-emitting ZnCuInS/ZnSe/ZnS QDs. These indicate that ZnCuInS/ZnSe/ZnS QDs are more suitable for downconversion LEDs compared to CdSe QDs.« less

  18. A panel of promoter methylation markers for invasive and noninvasive early detection of NSCLC using a quantum dots-based FRET approach.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunfei; Bai, Yanan; Mao, Hailei; Hong, Qunying; Yang, Dawei; Zhang, Honglian; Liu, Fangming; Wu, Zhenhua; Jin, Qinghui; Zhou, Hongbo; Cao, Jian; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhong, Xinhua; Mao, Hongju

    2016-11-15

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) leads to a significant proportion of cancer-related deaths, and early detection of NSCLC can significantly increase cancer survival rates. A promising approach has been studied to exploit DNA methylation, which is closely correlated to early cancer diagnosis. Herein, in order to realize the early detection of NSCLC, we utilized the developed quantum dots-based (QDs-based) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) nanosensor technique to analyze the promoter methylation in early stage NSCLC tissue samples and noninvasive bronchial brushing specimens. Using this method, the methylation levels can be quantitatively determined by measuring the signal amplification during FRET. A panel of three tumor suppressor genes (PCDHGB6, HOXA9 and RASSF1A) was assessed in 50 paired early stage NSCLC and their adjacent nontumorous tissue (NT) samples, and 50 early stage NSCLC bronchial brushing and normal specimens. The combined detection was able to identify not only tissue samples but noninvasive bronchial brushing specimens from control cases with a high degree of sensitivity of 92% (AUC=0.977, P<0.001) and 80% (AUC=0.907, P<0.001) respectively, indicating the versatility of promoter expression in invasive and noninvasive NSCLC samples. Therefore this approach can be used to sensitively analyze the methylation levels of cancer-related genes, which might be a potential tool for noninvasive early clinical diagnosis of cancers. PMID:27240011

  19. Efficient in vitro and in vivo pulmonary delivery of nucleic acid by carbon dot-based nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Pierrat, Philippe; Wang, Rongrong; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Lux, Marie; Didier, Pascal; Kichler, Antoine; Pons, Françoise; Lebeau, Luc

    2015-05-01

    Cationic carbon dots were fabricated by pyrolysis of citric acid and bPEI25k under microwave radiation. Various nanoparticles were produced in a 20-30% yield through straightforward modifications of the reaction parameters (stoichiometry of the reactants and energy supply regime). Particular attention was paid to the purification of the reaction products to ensure satisfactory elimination of the residual starting polyamine. Intrinsic properties of the particles (size, surface charge, photoluminescence and quantum yield) were measured and their ability to form stable complexes with nucleic acid was determined. Their potential to deliver plasmid DNA or small interfering RNA to various cell lines was investigated and compared to that of bPEI25k. The pDNA in vitro transfection efficiency of these carbon dots was similar to that of the parent PEI, as was their cytotoxicity. The higher cytotoxicity of bPEI25k/siRNA complexes when compared to that of the CD/siRNA complexes however had marked consequences on the gene silencing efficiency of the two carriers. These results are not fully consistent with those in some earlier reports on similar nanoparticles, revealing that toxicity of the carbon dots strongly depends on their protocol of fabrication. Finally, these carriers were evaluated for in vivo gene delivery through the non-invasive pulmonary route in mice. High transgene expression was obtained in the lung that was similar to that obtained with the golden standard formulation GL67A, but was associated with significantly lower toxicity. Post-functionalization of these carbon dots with PEG or targeting moieties should significantly broaden their scope and practical implications in improving their in vivo transfection efficiency and biocompatibility. PMID:25771019

  20. Wrappers, Aspects, Quantification and Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    Talk overview: Object infrastructure framework (OIF). A system development to simplify building distributed applications by allowing independent implementation of multiple concern. Essence and state of AOP. Trinity. Quantification over events. Current work on a generalized AOP technology.

  1. Rapid screening and identification of dominant B cell epitopes of HBV surface antigen by quantum dot-based fluorescence polarization assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhongji; Song, Ruihua; Chen, Yue; Zhu, Yang; Tian, Yanhui; Li, Ding; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-03-01

    A method for quickly screening and identifying dominant B cell epitopes was developed using hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen as a target. Eleven amino acid fragments from HBV surface antigen were synthesized by 9-fluorenylmethoxy carbonyl solid-phase peptide synthesis strategy, and then CdTe quantum dots were used to label the N-terminals of all peptides. After optimizing the factors for fluorescence polarization (FP) immunoassay, the antigenicities of synthetic peptides were determined by analyzing the recognition and combination of peptides and standard antibody samples. The results of FP assays confirmed that 10 of 11 synthetic peptides have distinct antigenicities. In order to screen dominant antigenic peptides, the FP assays were carried out to investigate the antibodies against the 10 synthetic peptides of HBV surface antigen respectively in 159 samples of anti-HBV surface antigen-positive antiserum. The results showed that 3 of the 10 antigenic peptides may be immunodominant because the antibodies against them existed more widely among the samples and their antibody titers were higher than those of other peptides. Using three dominant antigenic peptides, 293 serum samples were detected for HBV infection by FP assays; the results showed that the antibody-positive ratio was 51.9% and the sensitivity and specificity were 84.3% and 98.2%, respectively. In conclusion, a quantum dot-based FP assay is a very simple, rapid, and convenient method for determining immunodominant antigenic peptides and has great potential in applications such as epitope mapping, vaccine designing, or clinical disease diagnosis in the future.

  2. Influence of the active layer nanomorphology on device performance for ternary PbS(x)Se(1-x) quantum dots based solution-processed infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Song, Taojian; Cheng, Haijuan; Fu, Chunjie; He, Bo; Li, Weile; Xu, Junfeng; Tang, Yi; Yang, Shengyi; Zou, Bingsuo

    2016-04-22

    In this paper, the influence of the active layer nanomorphology on device performance for ternary PbS(x)Se(1-x) quantum dot-based solution-processed infrared photodetector is presented. Firstly, ternary PbS(x)Se(1-x) quantum dots (QDs) in various chemical composition were synthesized and the bandgap of the ternary PbS(x)Se(1-x) QDs can be controlled by the component ratio of S/(S + Se), and then field-effect transistor (FET) based photodetectors Au/PbS0.4Se0.6:P3HT/PMMA/Al, in which ternary PbS0.4Se0.6 QDs doped with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) act as the active layer and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the dielectric layer, were presented. By changing the weight ratio of P3HT to PbS0.4Se0.6 QDs (K = M(P3HT):M(QDs)) in dichlorobenzene solution, we found that the device with K = 2:1 shows optimal electrical property in dark; however, the device with K = 1:2 demonstrated optimal performance under illumination, showing a maximum responsivity and specific detectivity of 55.98 mA W(-1) and 1.02 × 10(10) Jones, respectively, at low V(DS) = -10 V and V(G) = 3 V under 980 nm laser with an illumination intensity of 0.1 mW cm(-2). By measuring the atomic force microscopy phase images of PbS0.4Se0.6:P3HT films in different weight ratio K, our experimental data show that the active layer nanomorphology has a great influence on the device performance. Also, it provides an easy way to fabricate high performance solution-processed infrared photodetector. PMID:26963474

  3. Influence of the active layer nanomorphology on device performance for ternary PbS x Se1-x quantum dots based solution-processed infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taojian; Cheng, Haijuan; Fu, Chunjie; He, Bo; Li, Weile; Xu, Junfeng; Tang, Yi; Yang, Shengyi; Zou, Bingsuo

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the influence of the active layer nanomorphology on device performance for ternary PbS x Se1-x quantum dot-based solution-processed infrared photodetector is presented. Firstly, ternary PbS x Se1-x quantum dots (QDs) in various chemical composition were synthesized and the bandgap of the ternary PbS x Se1-x QDs can be controlled by the component ratio of S/(S + Se), and then field-effect transistor (FET) based photodetectors Au/PbS0.4Se0.6:P3HT/PMMA/Al, in which ternary PbS0.4Se0.6 QDs doped with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) act as the active layer and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the dielectric layer, were presented. By changing the weight ratio of P3HT to PbS0.4Se0.6 QDs (K = MP3HT:MQDs) in dichlorobenzene solution, we found that the device with K = 2:1 shows optimal electrical property in dark; however, the device with K = 1:2 demonstrated optimal performance under illumination, showing a maximum responsivity and specific detectivity of 55.98 mA W-1 and 1.02 × 1010 Jones, respectively, at low V DS = -10 V and V G = 3 V under 980 nm laser with an illumination intensity of 0.1 mW cm-2. By measuring the atomic force microscopy phase images of PbS0.4Se0.6:P3HT films in different weight ratio K, our experimental data show that the active layer nanomorphology has a great influence on the device performance. Also, it provides an easy way to fabricate high performance solution-processed infrared photodetector.

  4. Nitrogen quantification with SNMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goschnick, J.; Natzeck, C.; Sommer, M.

    1999-04-01

    Plasma-based secondary neutral mass spectrometry (plasma SNMS) is a powerful analytical method for determining the elemental concentrations of almost any kind of material at low cost by using a cheap quadrupole mass filter. However, a quadrupole-based mass spectrometer is limited to nominal mass resolution. Atomic signals are sometimes superimposed by molecular signals (2 or 3 atomic clusters such as CH +, CH 2+ or metal oxide clusters) and/or intensities of double-charged species. Especially in the case of nitrogen several interferences can impede the quantification. This article reports on methods to recognize and deconvolute superpositions of N + with CH 2+, Li 2+, and Si 2+ at mass 14 D (Debye) occurring during analysis of organic and inorganic substances. The recognition is based on the signal pattern of N +, Li +, CH +, and Si +. The latter serve as indicators for a probable interference of molecular or double-charged species with N on mass 14 D. The subsequent deconvolution use different shapes of atomic and cluster kinetic energy distributions (kEDs) to determine the quantities of the intensity components by a linear fit of N + and non-atomic kEDs obtained from several organic and inorganic standards into the measured kED. The atomic intensity fraction yields a much better nitrogen concentration than the total intensity of mass 14 D after correction.

  5. Quantification of human responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  6. Chiral quantum dot based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the use of stereospecific chiral stabilising molecules has also opened another avenue of interest in the area of quantum dot (QD) research. The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important quantum dot materials containing chiral defects, study their properties and explore their applications. The utilisation of chiral penicillamine stabilisers allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS quantum nanostructures which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. It was also demonstrated that all three types of QDs (D-, L-, and Rac penicillamine stabilised) show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. In this work the chiral CdS based quantum nanostructures have also been doped by copper metal ions and new chiral penicilamine stabilized CuS nanoparticles have been prepared and investigated. It was found that copper doping had a strong effect at low levels in the synthesis of chiral CdS nanostructures. We expect that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in biotechnology, sensing and asymmetric synthesis.

  7. MAMA Software Features: Quantification Verification Documentation-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-21

    This document reviews the verification of the basic shape quantification attributes in the MAMA software against hand calculations in order to show that the calculations are implemented mathematically correctly and give the expected quantification results.

  8. Selective and absolute quantification of endogenous hypochlorous acid with quantum-dot conjugated microbeads.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Cyun; Lu, Hsueh-Han; Wang, Wei-Ti; Liau, Ian

    2011-11-01

    Endogenous hypochlorous acid (HOCl) secreted by leukocytes plays a critical role in both the immune defense of mammalians and the pathogenesis of various diseases intimately related to inflammation. We report the first selective and absolute quantification of endogenous HOCl produced by leukocytes in vitro and in vivo with a novel quantum dot-based sensor. An activated human neutrophil secreted 6.5 ± 0.9 × 10(8) HOCl molecules into its phagosome, and kinetic measurement for the secretions showed that the extracellular generation of HOCl was temporally retarded, but the quantity eventually attained a level comparable with its intraphagosomal counterpart with a delay of about 1.5 h. The quantity of HOCl secreted from the hepatic leukocytes of rats with or without stimulation of lipopolysaccharide was also determined. These results indicate a possibility to extend our approach to not only clinical settings for quantitative assessment of the bactericidal capability of isolated leukocytes of patients but also fundamental biomedical research that requires critical evaluation of the inflammatory response of animals. PMID:21950322

  9. Neutron-encoded mass signatures for multi-plexed proteome quantification

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Alexander S; Merrill, Anna E; Bailey, Derek J; Still, Amelia J; Westphall, Michael S; Streiter, Eric R; Pagliarini, David J; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-01-01

    We describe a protein quantification method that exploits the subtle mass differences caused by neutron-binding energy variation in stable isotopes. These mass differences are synthetically encoded into amino acids and incorporated into yeast and mouse proteins with metabolic labeling; analysis with high mass resolution (>100,000) reveals the isotopologue-embedded peptide signals permitting quantification. We conclude neutron encoding will enable high levels of multi-plexing (> 10) with high dynamic range and accuracy. PMID:23435260

  10. Disposable integrated bismuth citrate-modified screen-printed immunosensor for ultrasensitive quantum dot-based electrochemical assay of C-reactive protein in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, Christos; Prodromidis, Mamas; Economou, Anastasios; Petrou, Panagiota; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2015-07-30

    A novel immunosensor based on graphite screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) modified with bismuth citrate was developed for the voltammetric determination of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum using quantum dots (QDs) labels. The sandwich-type immunoassay involved physisorption of CRP capture antibody on the surface of the sensor, sequential immunoreactions with CRP and biotinylated CRP reporter antibody and finally reaction with streptavidin-conjugated PbS QDs. The quantification of the target protein was performed with acidic dissolution of the PbS QDs and anodic stripping voltammetric detection of the Pb(II) released. Detection was performed at bismuth nanodomains formed on the sensor surface during the electrolytic preconcentration step, as bismuth citrate was reduced to metallic bismuth simultaneously with the deposition of Pb on the surface of the immunosensor. Under optimal conditions, the response was linear over the range 0.2-100 ng mL(-1) CRP and the limit of detection was 0.05 ng mL(-1) CRP. Since the modified SPE serves as both the biorecognition element and the QDs reader, the analytical procedure is simplified, the drawbacks of existing electroplated immunosensors are minimized while the proposed disposable sensing platform provides convenient, low-cost and ultrasensitive detection of proteins and wider scope for mass-production. PMID:26320633

  11. 3D-printed biosensor with poly(dimethylsiloxane) reservoir for magnetic separation and quantum dots-based immunolabeling of metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Heger, Zbynek; Zitka, Jan; Cernei, Natalia; Krizkova, Sona; Sztalmachova, Marketa; Kopel, Pavel; Masarik, Michal; Hodek, Petr; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-06-01

    Currently, metallothioneins (MTs) are extensively investigated as the molecular biomarkers and the significant positive association of the MT amount was observed in tumorous versus healthy tissue of various types of malignant tumors, including head and neck cancer. Thus, we proposed a biosensor with fluorescence detection, comprising paramagnetic nanoparticles (nanomaghemite core with gold nanoparticles containing shell) for the magnetic separation of MT, based on affinity of its sulfhydryl groups toward gold. Biosensor was crafted from PDMS combined with technology of 3D printing and contained reservoir with volume of 50 μL linked to input (sample/detection components and washing/immunobuffer) and output (waste). For the immunolabeling of immobilized MT anti-MT antibodies conjugated to CdTe quantum dots through synthetic heptapeptide were employed. After optimization of fundamental conditions of the immunolabeling (120 min, 20°C, and 1250 rpm) we performed it on a surface of paramagnetic nanoparticles in the biosensor reservoir, with evaluation of fluorescence of quantum dots (λexc 400 nm, and λem 555 nm). The developed biosensor was applied for quantification of MT in cell lines derived from spinocellular carcinoma (cell line 122P-N) and fibroblasts (122P-F) and levels of the biomarker were found to be about 90 nM in tumor cells and 37 nM in fibroblasts. The proposed system is able to work with low volumes (< 100 μL), with low acquisition costs and high portability. PMID:25735231

  12. Preparation of graphene quantum dots based core-satellite hybrid spheres and their use as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for visual determination of mercury(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Mengjuan; Wang, Chengquan; Qian, Jing; Wang, Kan; Yang, Zhenting; Liu, Qian; Mao, Hanping; Wang, Kun

    2015-08-12

    We herein proposed a simple and effective strategy for preparing graphene quantum dots (GQDs)-based core-satellite hybrid spheres and further explored the feasibility of using such spheres as the ratiometric fluorescence probe for the visual determination of Hg(2+). The red-emitting CdTe QDs were firstly entrapped in the silica nanosphere to reduce their toxicity and improve their photo and chemical stabilities, thus providing a built-in correction for environmental effects, while the GQDs possessing good biocompatibility and low toxicity were electrostatic self-assembly on the silica surface acting as reaction sites. Upon exposure to the increasing contents of Hg(2+), the blue fluorescence of GQDs can be gradually quenched presumably due to facilitating nonradiative electron/hole recombination annihilation. With the embedded CdTe QDs as the internal standard, the variations of the tested solution display continuous fluorescence color changes from blue to red, which can be easily observed by the naked eye without any sophisticated instrumentations and specially equipped laboratories. This sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg(2+) in a broad linear range of 10 nM-22 μM with a low detection limit of 3.3 nM (S/N = 3), much lower than the allowable Hg(2+) contents in drinking water set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This prototype ratiometric probe is of good simplicity, low toxicity, excellent stabilities, and thus potentially attractive for Hg(2+) quantification related biological systems. PMID:26320973

  13. Design of Fe₃O₄@SiO₂@Carbon Quantum Dot Based Nanostructure for Fluorescence Sensing, Magnetic Separation, and Live Cell Imaging of Fluoride Ion.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Sasmita; Sahu, Swagatika; Nayak, Santoshi; Ghosh, Sudip K

    2015-07-28

    A robust reusable fluoride sensor comprised of a receptor in charge of the chemical recognition and a fluorophore responsible for signal recognition has been designed. Highly fluorescent carbon quantum dot (CD) and magnetically separable nickel ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) complex bound-silica coated magnetite nanoparticle (Fe3O4@SiO2-EDTA-Ni) have been used as fluorophore and fluoride ion receptor, respectively. The assay is based on the exchange reaction between the CD and F(-), which persuades the binding of fluoride to magnetic receptor. This method is highly sensitive, fast, and selective for fluoride ion in aqueous solution. The linear response range of fluoride (R(2) = 0.992) was found to be 1-20 μM with a minimum detection limit of 0.06 μM. Excellent magnetic property and superparamagnetic nature of the receptor are advantageous for the removal and well quantification of fluoride ion. The practical utility of the method is well tested with tap water. Because of high sensitivity, reusability, effectivity, and biocompatibility, it exhibits great promise as a fluorescent probe for intracellular detection of fluoride. PMID:26114840

  14. Statistical Approach to Protein Quantification*

    PubMed Central

    Gerster, Sarah; Kwon, Taejoon; Ludwig, Christina; Matondo, Mariette; Vogel, Christine; Marcotte, Edward M.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Bühlmann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A major goal in proteomics is the comprehensive and accurate description of a proteome. This task includes not only the identification of proteins in a sample, but also the accurate quantification of their abundance. Although mass spectrometry typically provides information on peptide identity and abundance in a sample, it does not directly measure the concentration of the corresponding proteins. Specifically, most mass-spectrometry-based approaches (e.g. shotgun proteomics or selected reaction monitoring) allow one to quantify peptides using chromatographic peak intensities or spectral counting information. Ultimately, based on these measurements, one wants to infer the concentrations of the corresponding proteins. Inferring properties of the proteins based on experimental peptide evidence is often a complex problem because of the ambiguity of peptide assignments and different chemical properties of the peptides that affect the observed concentrations. We present SCAMPI, a novel generic and statistically sound framework for computing protein abundance scores based on quantified peptides. In contrast to most previous approaches, our model explicitly includes information from shared peptides to improve protein quantitation, especially in eukaryotes with many homologous sequences. The model accounts for uncertainty in the input data, leading to statistical prediction intervals for the protein scores. Furthermore, peptides with extreme abundances can be reassessed and classified as either regular data points or actual outliers. We used the proposed model with several datasets and compared its performance to that of other, previously used approaches for protein quantification in bottom-up mass spectrometry. PMID:24255132

  15. Quantification of wastewater sludge dewatering.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Samuel J; Studer, Lindsay J; Dixon, David R; Hillis, Peter; Rees, Catherine A; Wall, Rachael C; Cavalida, Raul G; Usher, Shane P; Stickland, Anthony D; Scales, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Quantification and comparison of the dewatering characteristics of fifteen sewage sludges from a range of digestion scenarios are described. The method proposed uses laboratory dewatering measurements and integrity analysis of the extracted material properties. These properties were used as inputs into a model of filtration, the output of which provides the dewatering comparison. This method is shown to be necessary for quantification and comparison of dewaterability as the permeability and compressibility of the sludges varies by up to ten orders of magnitude in the range of solids concentration of interest to industry. This causes a high sensitivity of the dewaterability comparison to the starting concentration of laboratory tests, thus simple dewaterability comparison based on parameters such as the specific resistance to filtration is difficult. The new approach is demonstrated to be robust relative to traditional methods such as specific resistance to filtration analysis and has an in-built integrity check. Comparison of the quantified dewaterability of the fifteen sludges to the relative volatile solids content showed a very strong correlation in the volatile solids range from 40 to 80%. The data indicate that the volatile solids parameter is a strong indicator of the dewatering behaviour of sewage sludges. PMID:26003332

  16. Detection and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Dialysates

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Denoroy, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive analytical methods are needed for the separation and quantification of neurotransmitters obtained in microdialysate studies. This unit describes methods that permit quantification of nanomolar concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites (high-pressure liquid chromatography electrochemical detection), acetylcholine (HPLC-coupled to an enzyme reactor), and amino acids (HPLC-fluorescence detection; capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection). PMID:19575473

  17. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA quantification of various forensic materials.

    PubMed

    Andréasson, H; Nilsson, M; Budowle, B; Lundberg, H; Allen, M

    2006-12-01

    Due to the different types and quality of forensic evidence materials, their DNA content can vary substantially, and particularly low quantities can impact the results in an identification analysis. In this study, the quantity of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA was determined in a variety of materials using a previously described real-time PCR method. DNA quantification in the roots and distal sections of plucked and shed head hairs revealed large variations in DNA content particularly between the root and the shaft of plucked hairs. Also large intra- and inter-individual variations were found among hairs. In addition, DNA content was estimated in samples collected from fingerprints and accessories. The quantification of DNA on various items also displayed large variations, with some materials containing large amounts of nuclear DNA while no detectable nuclear DNA and only limited amounts of mitochondrial DNA were seen in others. Using this sensitive real-time PCR quantification assay, a better understanding was obtained regarding DNA content and variation in commonly analysed forensic evidence materials and this may guide the forensic scientist as to the best molecular biology approach for analysing various forensic evidence materials. PMID:16427750

  18. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  19. Classification and quantification of leaf curvature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyuan; Jia, Liguo; Mao, Yanfei; He, Yuke

    2010-01-01

    Various mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in polarity, cell division, and auxin response are characterized by certain types of leaf curvature. However, comparison of curvature for clarification of gene function can be difficult without a quantitative measurement of curvature. Here, a novel method for classification and quantification of leaf curvature is reported. Twenty-two mutant alleles from Arabidopsis mutants and transgenic lines deficient in leaf flatness were selected. The mutants were classified according to the direction, axis, position, and extent of leaf curvature. Based on a global measure of whole leaves and a local measure of four regions in the leaves, the curvature index (CI) was proposed to quantify the leaf curvature. The CI values accounted for the direction, axis, position, and extent of leaf curvature in all of the Arabidopsis mutants grown in growth chambers. Comparison of CI values between mutants reveals the spatial and temporal variations of leaf curvature, indicating the strength of the mutant alleles and the activities of the corresponding genes. Using the curvature indices, the extent of curvature in a complicated genetic background becomes quantitative and comparable, thus providing a useful tool for defining the genetic components of leaf development and to breed new varieties with leaf curvature desirable for the efficient capture of sunlight for photosynthesis and high yields. PMID:20400533

  20. Quantum Dots-Based Quantitative and In Situ Multiple Imaging on Ki67 and Cytokeratin to Improve Ki67 Assessment in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Ai Ping; Chen, Jia Mei; Xiang, Qing Ming; Chen, Chuang; Sun, Sheng-Rong; Pang, Dai-Wen; Liu, Juan; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background As a marker for tumor cell proliferation, Ki67 has important impacts on breast cancer (BC) prognosis. Although immunohistochemical staining is the current standard method, variations in analytical practice make it difficult for pathologists to manually measure Ki67 index. This study was to develop a fluorescent spectrum-based quantitative analysis of Ki67 expression by quantum-dots (QDs) multiple imaging technique. Methods A QDs-based in situ multiple fluorescent imaging method was developed, which stained nuclear Ki67 as red signal and cytoplasmic cytokeratin (CK) as green signal. Both Ki67 and CK signals were automatically separated and quantified by professional spectrum analysis software. This technique was applied to tissue microarrays from 240 BC patients. Both Ki67 and CK values, and Ki67/CK ratio were obtained for each patient, and their prognostic value on 5-year disease free survival was assessed. Results This method simultaneously stains nuclear Ki67 and cytoplasmic CK with clear signal contrast, making it easy for signal separation and quantification. The total fluorescent signal intensities of both Ki67 sum and CK sum were obtained, and Ki67/CK ratio calculated. Ki67 sum and Ki67/CK ratio were each attributed into two grades by X-tile software based on the best P value principle. Multivariate analysis showed Ki67 grade (P = 0.047) and Ki67/CK grade (P = 0.004) were independent prognostic factors. Furthermore, area under curve (AUC) of ROC analysis for Ki67/CK grade (AUC: 0.683, 95%CI: 0.613–0.752) was higher than Ki67 grade (AUC: 0.665, 95%CI: 0.596–0.734) and HER-2 gene (AUC: 0.586, 95%CI: 0.510–0.661), but lower than N stage (AUC: 0.760, 95%CI: 0.696–0.823) and histological grade (AUC: 0.756, 95%CI: 0.692–0.820) on predicting the risk for recurrence. Conclusions A QDs-based quantitative and in situ multiple imaging on Ki67 and CK was developed to improve Ki67 assessment in BC, and Ki67/CK grade had better performance than Ki67

  1. Quantification Bias Caused by Plasmid DNA Conformation in Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the gold standard for the quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences. However, a serious concern has been revealed in a recent report: supercoiled plasmid standards cause significant over-estimation in qPCR quantification. In this study, we investigated the effect of plasmid DNA conformation on the quantification of DNA and the efficiency of qPCR. Our results suggest that plasmid DNA conformation has significant impact on the accuracy of absolute quantification by qPCR. DNA standard curves shifted significantly among plasmid standards with different DNA conformations. Moreover, the choice of DNA measurement method and plasmid DNA conformation may also contribute to the measurement error of DNA standard curves. Due to the multiple effects of plasmid DNA conformation on the accuracy of qPCR, efforts should be made to assure the highest consistency of plasmid standards for qPCR. Thus, we suggest that the conformation, preparation, quantification, purification, handling, and storage of standard plasmid DNA should be described and defined in the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) to assure the reproducibility and accuracy of qPCR absolute quantification. PMID:22194997

  2. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  3. Advancing agricultural greenhouse gas quantification*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olander, Lydia; Wollenberg, Eva; Tubiello, Francesco; Herold, Martin

    2013-03-01

    1. Introduction Better information on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and mitigation potential in the agricultural sector is necessary to manage these emissions and identify responses that are consistent with the food security and economic development priorities of countries. Critical activity data (what crops or livestock are managed in what way) are poor or lacking for many agricultural systems, especially in developing countries. In addition, the currently available methods for quantifying emissions and mitigation are often too expensive or complex or not sufficiently user friendly for widespread use. The purpose of this focus issue is to capture the state of the art in quantifying greenhouse gases from agricultural systems, with the goal of better understanding our current capabilities and near-term potential for improvement, with particular attention to quantification issues relevant to smallholders in developing countries. This work is timely in light of international discussions and negotiations around how agriculture should be included in efforts to reduce and adapt to climate change impacts, and considering that significant climate financing to developing countries in post-2012 agreements may be linked to their increased ability to identify and report GHG emissions (Murphy et al 2010, CCAFS 2011, FAO 2011). 2. Agriculture and climate change mitigation The main agricultural GHGs—methane and nitrous oxide—account for 10%-12% of anthropogenic emissions globally (Smith et al 2008), or around 50% and 60% of total anthropogenic methane and nitrous oxide emissions, respectively, in 2005. Net carbon dioxide fluxes between agricultural land and the atmosphere linked to food production are relatively small, although significant carbon emissions are associated with degradation of organic soils for plantations in tropical regions (Smith et al 2007, FAO 2012). Population growth and shifts in dietary patterns toward more meat and dairy consumption will lead to

  4. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    PubMed

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/. PMID:26935399

  5. The NASA Langley Multidisciplinary Uncertainty Quantification Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the formulation of an uncertainty quantification challenge problem consisting of five subproblems. These problems focus on key aspects of uncertainty characterization, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty propagation, extreme-case analysis, and robust design.

  6. MAMA Software Features: Visual Examples of Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-20

    This document shows examples of the results from quantifying objects of certain sizes and types in the software. It is intended to give users a better feel for some of the quantification calculations, and, more importantly, to help users understand the challenges with using a small set of ‘shape’ quantification calculations for objects that can vary widely in shapes and features. We will add more examples to this in the coming year.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification in Solidification Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, K.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Numerical models have been used to simulate solidification processes, to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. Often validation of such models has been done through comparison to a few or single experiments, in which agreement is dependent on both model and experimental uncertainty. As a first step to quantifying the uncertainty in the models, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis were performed on a simple steady state 1D solidification model of continuous casting of weld filler rod. This model includes conduction, advection, and release of latent heat was developed for use in uncertainty quantification in the calculation of the position of the liquidus and solidus and the solidification time. Using this model, a Smolyak sparse grid algorithm constructed a response surface that fit model outputs based on the range of uncertainty in the inputs to the model. The response surface was then used to determine the probability density functions (PDF's) of the model outputs and sensitivities of the inputs. This process was done for a linear fraction solid and temperature relationship, for which there is an analytical solution, and a Scheil relationship. Similar analysis was also performed on a transient 2D model of solidification in a rectangular domain.

  8. Stirling Convertor Fasteners Reliability Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor; Kovacevich, Tiodor; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Onboard Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) being developed for NASA s deep-space science and exploration missions require reliable operation for up to 14 years and beyond. Stirling power conversion is a candidate for use in an RPS because it offers a multifold increase in the conversion efficiency of heat to electric power and reduced inventory of radioactive material. Structural fasteners are responsible to maintain structural integrity of the Stirling power convertor, which is critical to ensure reliable performance during the entire mission. Design of fasteners involve variables related to the fabrication, manufacturing, behavior of fasteners and joining parts material, structural geometry of the joining components, size and spacing of fasteners, mission loads, boundary conditions, etc. These variables have inherent uncertainties, which need to be accounted for in the reliability assessment. This paper describes these uncertainties along with a methodology to quantify the reliability, and provides results of the analysis in terms of quantified reliability and sensitivity of Stirling power conversion reliability to the design variables. Quantification of the reliability includes both structural and functional aspects of the joining components. Based on the results, the paper also describes guidelines to improve the reliability and verification testing.

  9. Rapid digital quantification of microfracture populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Leonel A.; Laubach, Stephen E.

    2006-03-01

    Populations of microfractures are a structural fabric in many rocks deformed at upper crustal conditions. In some cases these fractures are visible in transmitted-light microscopy as fluid-inclusion planes or cement filled microfractures, but because SEM-based cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals more fractures and delineates their shapes, sizes, and crosscutting relations, it is a more effective structural tool. Yet at magnifications of 150-300×, at which many microfractures are visible, SEM-CL detectors image only small sample areas (0.5-0.1 mm 2) relative to fracture population patterns. The substantial effort required to image and measure centimeter-size areas at high-magnification has impeded quantitative study of microfractures. We present a method for efficient collection of mosaics of high-resolution CL imagery, a preparation method that allows samples to be any size while retaining continuous imagery of rock (no gaps), and software that facilitates fracture mapping and data reduction. Although the method introduced here was developed for CL imagery, it can be used with any other kind of images, including mosaics from petrographic microscopes. Compared with manual measurements, the new method increases several fold the number of microfractures imaged without a proportional increase in level of effort, increases the accuracy and repeatability of fracture measurements, and speeds quantification and display of fracture population attributes. We illustrate the method on microfracture arrays in dolostone from NE Mexico and sandstone from NW Scotland. We show that key aspects of microfracture population attributes are only fully manifest at scales larger than a single thin section.

  10. Optical and electrical characterizations of a single step ion beam milling mesa devices of chloride passivated PbS colloidal quantum dots based film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hechster, Elad; Shapiro, Arthur; Lifshitz, Efrat; Sarusi, Gabby

    2016-07-01

    Colloidal Quantum Dots (CQDs) are of increasing interest, thanks to their quantum size effect that gives rise to their usage in various applications, such as biological tagging, solar cells and as the sensitizing layer of night vision devices. Here, we analyze the optical absorbance of chloride passivated PbS CQDs as well as revealing a correlation between their photoluminescence and sizes distribution, using theoretical models and experimental results from the literature. Next, we calculate the CQDs resistivity as a film. Although resistivity can be calculated from sheet resistance measurement using four point probes, such measurement is usually carried-out on the layer's surface that in most cases has dangling bonds and surface states, which might affect the charges flow and modify the resistivity. Therefore; our approach, which was applied in this work, is to extract the actual resistivity from measurements that are performed along the film's thickness (z-direction). For this intent, we fabricated gold capped PbS mesas devices using a single step Ion Beam Milling (IBM) process where we milled the gold and the PbS film continually, and then measured the vertical resistance. Knowing the mesas' dimensions, we calculate the resistivity. To the best of our knowledge, no previous work has extracted, vertically, the resistivity of chloride passivated PbS CQDs using the above method.

  11. Antioxidant Activity and Validation of Quantification Method for Lycopene Extracted from Tomato.

    PubMed

    Cefali, Letícia Caramori; Cazedey, Edith Cristina Laignier; Souza-Moreira, Tatiana Maria; Correa, Marcos Antônio; Salgado, Hérida Regina Nunes; Isaac, Vera Lucia Borges

    2015-01-01

    Lycopene is a carotenoid found in tomatoes with potent antioxidant activity. The aim of the study was to obtain an extract containing lycopene from four types of tomatoes, validate a quantification method for the extracts by HPLC, and assess its antioxidant activity. Results revealed that the tomatoes analyzed contained lycopene and antioxidant activity. Salad tomato presented the highest concentration of this carotenoid and antioxidant activity. The quantification method exhibited linearity with a correlation coefficient of 0.9992. Tests for the assessment of precision, accuracy, and robustness achieved coefficients with variation of less than 5%. The LOD and LOQ were 0.0012 and 0.0039 μg/mL, respectively. Salad tomato can be used as a source of lycopene for the development of topical formulations, and based on performed tests, the chosen method for the identification and quantification of lycopene was considered to be linear, precise, exact, selective, and robust. PMID:26525253

  12. Uncertainty Quantification in Climate Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, K.; Safta, C.; Berry, R.; Debusschere, B.; Najm, H.

    2011-12-01

    We address challenges that sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification methods face when dealing with complex computational models. In particular, climate models are computationally expensive and typically depend on a large number of input parameters. We consider the Community Land Model (CLM), which consists of a nested computational grid hierarchy designed to represent the spatial heterogeneity of the land surface. Each computational cell can be composed of multiple land types, and each land type can incorporate one or more sub-models describing the spatial and depth variability. Even for simulations at a regional scale, the computational cost of a single run is quite high and the number of parameters that control the model behavior is very large. Therefore, the parameter sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation face significant difficulties for climate models. This work employs several algorithmic avenues to address some of the challenges encountered by classical uncertainty quantification methodologies when dealing with expensive computational models, specifically focusing on the CLM as a primary application. First of all, since the available climate model predictions are extremely sparse due to the high computational cost of model runs, we adopt a Bayesian framework that effectively incorporates this lack-of-knowledge as a source of uncertainty, and produces robust predictions with quantified uncertainty even if the model runs are extremely sparse. In particular, we infer Polynomial Chaos spectral expansions that effectively encode the uncertain input-output relationship and allow efficient propagation of all sources of input uncertainties to outputs of interest. Secondly, the predictability analysis of climate models strongly suffers from the curse of dimensionality, i.e. the large number of input parameters. While single-parameter perturbation studies can be efficiently performed in a parallel fashion, the multivariate uncertainty analysis

  13. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  14. Separation and quantification of microalgal carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Templeton, David W; Quinn, Matthew; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Hyman, Deborah; Laurens, Lieve M L

    2012-12-28

    Structural carbohydrates can constitute a large fraction of the dry weight of algal biomass and thus accurate identification and quantification is important for summative mass closure. Two limitations to the accurate characterization of microalgal carbohydrates are the lack of a robust analytical procedure to hydrolyze polymeric carbohydrates to their respective monomers and the subsequent identification and quantification of those monosaccharides. We address the second limitation, chromatographic separation of monosaccharides, here by identifying optimum conditions for the resolution of a synthetic mixture of 13 microalgae-specific monosaccharides, comprised of 8 neutral, 2 amino sugars, 2 uronic acids and 1 alditol (myo-inositol as an internal standard). The synthetic 13-carbohydrate mix showed incomplete resolution across 11 traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but showed improved resolution and accurate quantification using anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) as well as alditol acetate derivatization followed by gas chromatography (for the neutral- and amino-sugars only). We demonstrate the application of monosaccharide quantification using optimized chromatography conditions after sulfuric acid analytical hydrolysis for three model algae strains and compare the quantification and complexity of monosaccharides in analytical hydrolysates relative to a typical terrestrial feedstock, sugarcane bagasse. PMID:23177152

  15. Carotid intraplaque neovascularization quantification software (CINQS).

    PubMed

    Akkus, Zeynettin; van Burken, Gerard; van den Oord, Stijn C H; Schinkel, Arend F L; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Bosch, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Intraplaque neovascularization (IPN) is an important biomarker of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. As IPN can be detected by contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), imaging-biomarkers derived from CEUS may allow early prediction of plaque vulnerability. To select the best quantitative imaging-biomarkers for prediction of plaque vulnerability, a systematic analysis of IPN with existing and new analysis algorithms is necessary. Currently available commercial contrast quantification tools are not applicable for quantitative analysis of carotid IPN due to substantial motion of the carotid artery, artifacts, and intermittent perfusion of plaques. We therefore developed a specialized software package called Carotid intraplaque neovascularization quantification software (CINQS). It was designed for effective and systematic comparison of sets of quantitative imaging biomarkers. CINQS includes several analysis algorithms for carotid IPN quantification and overcomes the limitations of current contrast quantification tools and existing carotid IPN quantification approaches. CINQS has a modular design which allows integrating new analysis tools. Wizard-like analysis tools and its graphical-user-interface facilitate its usage. In this paper, we describe the concept, analysis tools, and performance of CINQS and present analysis results of 45 plaques of 23 patients. The results in 45 plaques showed excellent agreement with visual IPN scores for two quantitative imaging-biomarkers (The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92 and 0.93). PMID:25561454

  16. Quantification of sweat gland innervation

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H.; Illigens, Ben M. W.; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a novel method to quantify the density of nerve fibers innervating sweat glands in healthy control and diabetic subjects, to compare the results to an unbiased stereologic technique, and to identify the relationship to standardized physical examination and patient-reported symptom scores. Methods: Thirty diabetic and 64 healthy subjects had skin biopsies performed at the distal leg and distal and proximal thigh. Nerve fibers innervating sweat glands, stained with PGP 9.5, were imaged by light microscopy. Sweat gland nerve fiber density (SGNFD) was quantified by manual morphometry. As a gold standard, three additional subjects had biopsies analyzed by confocal microscopy using unbiased stereologic quantification. Severity of neuropathy was measured by standardized instruments including the Neuropathy Impairment Score in the Lower Limb (NIS-LL) while symptoms were measured by the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument. Results: Manual morphometry increased with unbiased stereology (r = 0.93, p < 0.01). Diabetic subjects had reduced SGNFD compared to controls at the distal leg (p < 0.001), distal thigh (p < 0.01), and proximal thigh (p < 0.05). The SGNFD at the distal leg of diabetic subjects decreased as the NIS-LL worsened (r = −0.89, p < 0.001) and was concordant with symptoms of reduced sweat production (p < 0.01). Conclusions: We describe a novel method to quantify the density of nerve fibers innervating sweat glands. The technique differentiates groups of patients with mild diabetic neuropathy from healthy control subjects and correlates with both physical examination scores and symptoms relevant to sudomotor dysfunction. This method provides a reliable structural measure of sweat gland innervation that complements the investigation of small fiber neuropathies. GLOSSARY AOI = area of interest; CI = confidence interval; ICC = intraclass correlation coefficient; IENFD = intraepidermal nerve fiber density; IgG = immunoglobulin G; NIS

  17. Tumor Quantification in Clinical Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Bading, James; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used extensively in clinical oncology for tumor detection, staging and therapy response assessment. Quantitative measurements of tumor uptake, usually in the form of standardized uptake values (SUVs), have enhanced or replaced qualitative interpretation. In this paper we review the current status of tumor quantification methods and their applications to clinical oncology. Factors that impede quantitative assessment and limit its accuracy and reproducibility are summarized, with special emphasis on SUV analysis. We describe current efforts to improve the accuracy of tumor uptake measurements, characterize overall metabolic tumor burden and heterogeneity of tumor uptake, and account for the effects of image noise. We also summarize recent developments in PET instrumentation and image reconstruction and their impact on tumor quantification. Finally, we offer our assessment of the current development needs in PET tumor quantification, including practical techniques for fully quantitative, pharmacokinetic measurements. PMID:24312151

  18. Predicting human age with bloodstains by sjTREC quantification.

    PubMed

    Ou, Xue-ling; Gao, Jun; Wang, Huan; Wang, Hong-sheng; Lu, Hui-ling; Sun, Hong-yu

    2012-01-01

    The age-related decline of signal joint T-cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs) in human peripheral blood has been demonstrated in our previous study and other reports. Until now, only a few studies on sjTREC detection in bloodstain samples were reported, which were based on a small sample of subjects of a limited age range, although bloodstains are much more frequently encountered in forensic practice. In this present study, we adopted the sensitive Taqman real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method to perform sjTREC quantification in bloodstains from individuals ranging from 0-86 years old (n = 264). The results revealed that sjTREC contents in human bloodstains were declined in an age-dependent manner (r = -0.8712). The formula of age estimation was Age = -7.1815Y-42.458 ± 9.42 (Y dCt(TBP-sjTREC); 9.42 standard error). Furthermore, we tested for the influence of short- or long- storage time by analyzing fresh and stored bloodstains from the same individuals. Remarkably, no statistically significant difference in sjTREC contents was found between the fresh and old DNA samples over a 4-week of storage time. However, significant loss (0.16-1.93 dCt) in sjTREC contents was detected after 1.5 years of storage in 31 samples. Moreover, preliminary sjTREC quantification from up to 20-year-old bloodstains showed that though the sjTREC contents were detectable in all samples and highly correlated with donor age, a time-dependent decrease in the correlation coefficient r was found, suggesting the predicting accuracy of this described assay would be deteriorated in aged samples. Our findings show that sjTREC quantification might be also suitable for age prediction in bloodstains, and future researches into the time-dependent or other potential impacts on sjTREC quantification might allow further improvement of the predicting accuracy. PMID:22879970

  19. Advancing agricultural greenhouse gas quantification*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olander, Lydia; Wollenberg, Eva; Tubiello, Francesco; Herold, Martin

    2013-03-01

    1. Introduction Better information on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and mitigation potential in the agricultural sector is necessary to manage these emissions and identify responses that are consistent with the food security and economic development priorities of countries. Critical activity data (what crops or livestock are managed in what way) are poor or lacking for many agricultural systems, especially in developing countries. In addition, the currently available methods for quantifying emissions and mitigation are often too expensive or complex or not sufficiently user friendly for widespread use. The purpose of this focus issue is to capture the state of the art in quantifying greenhouse gases from agricultural systems, with the goal of better understanding our current capabilities and near-term potential for improvement, with particular attention to quantification issues relevant to smallholders in developing countries. This work is timely in light of international discussions and negotiations around how agriculture should be included in efforts to reduce and adapt to climate change impacts, and considering that significant climate financing to developing countries in post-2012 agreements may be linked to their increased ability to identify and report GHG emissions (Murphy et al 2010, CCAFS 2011, FAO 2011). 2. Agriculture and climate change mitigation The main agricultural GHGs—methane and nitrous oxide—account for 10%-12% of anthropogenic emissions globally (Smith et al 2008), or around 50% and 60% of total anthropogenic methane and nitrous oxide emissions, respectively, in 2005. Net carbon dioxide fluxes between agricultural land and the atmosphere linked to food production are relatively small, although significant carbon emissions are associated with degradation of organic soils for plantations in tropical regions (Smith et al 2007, FAO 2012). Population growth and shifts in dietary patterns toward more meat and dairy consumption will lead to

  20. The quantification of hydrogen and methane in contaminated groundwater: validation of robust procedures for sampling and quantification.

    PubMed

    Dorgerloh, Ute; Becker, Roland; Theissen, Hubert; Nehls, Irene

    2010-10-01

    A number of currently recommended sampling techniques for the determination of hydrogen in contaminated groundwater were compared regarding the practical proficiency in field campaigns. Key characteristics of appropriate sampling procedures are reproducibility of results, robustness against varying field conditions such as hydrostatic pressure, aquifer flow, and biological activity. Laboratory set-ups were used to investigate the most promising techniques. Bubble stripping with gas sampling bulbs yielded reproducible recovery of hydrogen and methane which could be verified for groundwater sampled in two field campaigns. The methane content of the groundwater was confirmed by analysis of directly pumped samples thus supporting the trueness of the stripping results. Laboratory set-ups and field campaigns revealed that bubble stripping of hydrogen may be restricted to the type of used pump. Concentrations of dissolved hydrogen after bubble stripping with an electrically driven submersible pump were about one order of magnitude higher than those obtained from diffusion sampling. The gas chromatographic determination for hydrogen and methane requires manual injection of gas samples and detection by a pulsed discharge detector (PDD) and allows limits of quantification of 3 nM dissolved hydrogen and 1 µg L⁻¹ dissolved methane in groundwater. The combined standard uncertainty of the bubble stripping and GC/PDD quantification of hydrogen in field samples was 7% at 7.8 nM and 18% for 78 nM. PMID:20730246

  1. HPC Analytics Support. Requirements for Uncertainty Quantification Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Purohit, Sumit; Rodriguez, Luke R.

    2015-05-01

    This report outlines techniques for extending benchmark generation products so they support uncertainty quantification by benchmarked systems. We describe how uncertainty quantification requirements can be presented to candidate analytical tools supporting SPARQL. We describe benchmark data sets for evaluating uncertainty quantification, as well as an approach for using our benchmark generator to produce data sets for generating benchmark data sets.

  2. Colour thresholding and objective quantification in bioimaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Gerber, M. A.; Torre-Bueno, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Computer imaging is rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the quantification of variables in research and medicine. Whilst its use in medicine has largely been limited to qualitative observations, imaging in applied basic sciences, medical research and biotechnology demands objective quantification of the variables in question. In black and white densitometry (0-256 levels of intensity) the separation of subtle differences between closely related hues from stains is sometimes very difficult. True-colour and real-time video microscopy analysis offer choices not previously available with monochrome systems. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of colour thresholding, which has so far proven indispensable for proper objective quantification of the products of histochemical reactions and/or subtle differences in tissue and cells. In addition, we provide interested, but untrained readers with basic information that may assist decisions regarding the most suitable set-up for a project under consideration. Data from projects in progress at Tulane are shown to illustrate the advantage of colour thresholding over monochrome densitometry and for objective quantification of subtle colour differences between experimental and control samples.

  3. Quantification of Cannabinoid Content in Cannabis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Zhang, F.; Jia, K.; Wen, M.; Yuan, Ch.

    2015-09-01

    Cannabis is an economically important plant that is used in many fields, in addition to being the most commonly consumed illicit drug worldwide. Monitoring the spatial distribution of cannabis cultivation and judging whether it is drug- or fiber-type cannabis is critical for governments and international communities to understand the scale of the illegal drug trade. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the cannabinoids content in cannabis could be spectrally quantified using a spectrometer and to identify the optimal wavebands for quantifying the cannabinoid content. Spectral reflectance data of dried cannabis leaf samples and the cannabis canopy were measured in the laboratory and in the field, respectively. Correlation analysis and the stepwise multivariate regression method were used to select the optimal wavebands for cannabinoid content quantification based on the laboratory-measured spectral data. The results indicated that the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content in cannabis leaves could be quantified using laboratory-measured spectral reflectance data and that the 695 nm band is the optimal band for THC content quantification. This study provides prerequisite information for designing spectral equipment to enable immediate quantification of THC content in cannabis and to discriminate drug- from fiber-type cannabis based on THC content quantification in the field.

  4. Cues, quantification, and agreement in language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Darren; Bulkes, Nyssa Z

    2015-12-01

    We investigated factors that affect the comprehension of subject-verb agreement in English, using quantification as a window into the relationship between morphosyntactic processes in language production and comprehension. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants read sentences with grammatical and ungrammatical verbs, in which the plurality of the subject noun phrase was either doubly marked (via overt plural quantification and morphological marking on the noun) or singly marked (via only plural morphology on the noun). Both acceptability judgments and the ERP data showed heightened sensitivity to agreement violations when quantification provided an additional cue to the grammatical number of the subject noun phrase, over and above plural morphology. This is consistent with models of grammatical comprehension that emphasize feature prediction in tandem with cue-based memory retrieval. Our results additionally contrast with those of prior studies that showed no effects of plural quantification on agreement in language production. These findings therefore highlight some nontrivial divergences in the cues and mechanisms supporting morphosyntactic processing in language production and comprehension. PMID:25987192

  5. Dielectrophoretic immobilization of proteins: Quantification by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Knigge, Xenia; Bier, Frank F; Wenger, Christian; Hölzel, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    The combination of alternating electric fields with nanometer-sized electrodes allows the permanent immobilization of proteins by dielectrophoretic force. Here, atomic force microscopy is introduced as a quantification method, and results are compared with fluorescence microscopy. Experimental parameters, for example the applied voltage and duration of field application, are varied systematically, and the influence on the amount of immobilized proteins is investigated. A linear correlation to the duration of field application was found by atomic force microscopy, and both microscopical methods yield a square dependence of the amount of immobilized proteins on the applied voltage. While fluorescence microscopy allows real-time imaging, atomic force microscopy reveals immobilized proteins obscured in fluorescence images due to low S/N. Furthermore, the higher spatial resolution of the atomic force microscope enables the visualization of the protein distribution on single nanoelectrodes. The electric field distribution is calculated and compared to experimental results with very good agreement to atomic force microscopy measurements. PMID:26010162

  6. Experimental investigations for uncertainty quantification in brake squeal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, A.; Massa, F.; Lallemand, B.; Tison, T.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to improve the correlation between the experimental and the numerical prediction of unstable frequencies for automotive brake systems considering uncertainty. First, an experimental quantification of uncertainty and a discussion analysing the contributions of uncertainty to a numerical squeal simulation are proposed. Frequency and transient simulations are performed considering nominal values of model parameters, determined experimentally. The obtained results are compared with those derived from experimental tests to highlight the limitation of deterministic simulations. The effects of the different kinds of uncertainty detected in working conditions of brake system, the pad boundary condition, the brake system material properties and the pad surface topography are discussed by defining different unstable mode classes. Finally, a correlation between experimental and numerical results considering uncertainty is successfully proposed for an industrial brake system. Results from the different comparisons reveal also a major influence of the pad topography and consequently the contact distribution.

  7. Quantification of taurine in energy drinks using ¹H NMR.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Monika; Felbinger, Christine; Christoph, Norbert; Wachter, Helmut; Wiest, Johannes; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    The consumption of so called energy drinks is increasing, especially among adolescents. These beverages commonly contain considerable amounts of the amino sulfonic acid taurine, which is related to a magnitude of various physiological effects. The customary method to control the legal limit of taurine in energy drinks is LC-UV/vis with postcolumn derivatization using ninhydrin. In this paper we describe the quantification of taurine in energy drinks by (1)H NMR as an alternative to existing methods of quantification. Variation of pH values revealed the separation of a distinct taurine signal in (1)H NMR spectra, which was applied for integration and quantification. Quantification was performed using external calibration (R(2)>0.9999; linearity verified by Mandel's fitting test with a 95% confidence level) and PULCON. Taurine concentrations in 20 different energy drinks were analyzed by both using (1)H NMR and LC-UV/vis. The deviation between (1)H NMR and LC-UV/vis results was always below the expanded measurement uncertainty of 12.2% for the LC-UV/vis method (95% confidence level) and at worst 10.4%. Due to the high accordance to LC-UV/vis data and adequate recovery rates (ranging between 97.1% and 108.2%), (1)H NMR measurement presents a suitable method to quantify taurine in energy drinks. PMID:24094700

  8. Adaptive Fourier modeling for quantification of tremor.

    PubMed

    Riviere, C N; Reich, S G; Thakor, N V

    1997-06-01

    A new computational method for quantification of tremor, the weighted frequency Fourier linear combiner (WFLC), is presented. This technique rapidly determines the frequency and amplitude of tremor by adjusting its filter weights according to a gradient search method. It provides continual tracking of frequency and amplitude modulations over the course of a test. By quantifying time-varying characteristics, the WFLC assists in correctly interpreting the results of spectral analysis, particularly for recordings exhibiting multiple spectral peaks. It therefore supplements spectral analysis, providing a more accurate picture of tremor than spectral analysis alone. The method has been incorporated into a desktop tremor measurement system to provide clinically useful analysis of tremor recorded during handwriting and drawing using a digitizing tablet. Simulated data clearly demonstrate tracking of variations in frequency and amplitude. Clinical recordings then show specific examples of quantification of time-varying aspects of tremor. PMID:9210577

  9. Uncertainty quantification for porous media flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Mike; Demyanov, Vasily; Erbas, Demet

    2006-09-01

    Uncertainty quantification is an increasingly important aspect of many areas of computational science, where the challenge is to make reliable predictions about the performance of complex physical systems in the absence of complete or reliable data. Predicting flows of oil and water through oil reservoirs is an example of a complex system where accuracy in prediction is needed primarily for financial reasons. Simulation of fluid flow in oil reservoirs is usually carried out using large commercially written finite difference simulators solving conservation equations describing the multi-phase flow through the porous reservoir rocks. This paper examines a Bayesian Framework for uncertainty quantification in porous media flows that uses a stochastic sampling algorithm to generate models that match observed data. Machine learning algorithms are used to speed up the identification of regions in parameter space where good matches to observed data can be found.

  10. Uncertainty quantification of effective nuclear interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2016-03-01

    We give a brief review on the development of phenomenological NN interactions and the corresponding quantification of statistical uncertainties. We look into the uncertainty of effective interactions broadly used in mean field calculations through the Skyrme parameters and effective field theory counterterms by estimating both statistical and systematic uncertainties stemming from the NN interaction. We also comment on the role played by different fitting strategies on the light of recent developments.

  11. Whitepaper on Uncertainty Quantification for MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark L.

    2015-12-17

    The MPACT code provides the ability to perform high-fidelity deterministic calculations to obtain a wide variety of detailed results for very complex reactor core models. However MPACT currently does not have the capability to propagate the effects of input data uncertainties to provide uncertainties in the calculated results. This white paper discusses a potential method for MPACT uncertainty quantification (UQ) based on stochastic sampling.

  12. Comparative study between extraction techniques and column separation for the quantification of sinigrin and total isothiocyanates in mustard seed.

    PubMed

    Cools, Katherine; Terry, Leon A

    2012-07-15

    Glucosinolates are β-thioglycosides which are found naturally in Cruciferae including the genus Brassica. When enzymatically hydrolysed, glucosinolates yield isothiocyanates and give a pungent taste. Both glucosinolates and isothiocyanates have been linked with anticancer activity as well as antifungal and antibacterial properties and therefore the quantification of these compounds is scientifically important. A wide range of literature exists on glucosinolates, however the extraction and quantification procedures differ greatly resulting in discrepancies between studies. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the most popular extraction procedures to identify the most efficacious method and whether each extraction can also be used for the quantification of total isothiocyanates. Four extraction techniques were compared for the quantification of sinigrin from mustard cv. Centennial (Brassica juncea L.) seed; boiling water, boiling 50% (v/v) aqueous acetonitrile, boiling 100% methanol and 70% (v/v) aqueous methanol at 70 °C. Prior to injection into the HPLC, the extractions which involved solvents (acetonitrile or methanol) were freeze-dried and resuspended in water. To identify whether the same extract could be used to measure total isothiocyanates, a dichloromethane extraction was carried out on the sinigrin extracts. For the quantification of sinigrin alone, boiling 50% (v/v) acetonitrile was found to be the most efficacious extraction solvent of the four tested yielding 15% more sinigrin than the water extraction. However, the removal of the acetonitrile by freeze-drying had a negative impact on the isothiocyanate content. Quantification of both sinigrin and total isothiocyanates was possible when the sinigrin was extracted using boiling water. Two columns were compared for the quantification of sinigrin revealing the Zorbax Eclipse to be the best column using this particular method. PMID:22743340

  13. Quantification of Carbon Nanotubes in Environmental Matrices: Current Capabilities, Case Studies, and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Elijah J; Flores-Cervantes, D Xanat; Bucheli, Thomas D; Elliott, Lindsay C C; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Gogos, Alexander; Hanna, Shannon; Kägi, Ralf; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Bustos, Antonio R Montoro; Plata, Desiree L; Reipa, Vytas; Westerhoff, Paul; Winchester, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have numerous exciting potential applications and some that have reached commercialization. As such, quantitative measurements of CNTs in key environmental matrices (water, soil, sediment, and biological tissues) are needed to address concerns about their potential environmental and human health risks and to inform application development. However, standard methods for CNT quantification are not yet available. We systematically and critically review each component of the current methods for CNT quantification including CNT extraction approaches, potential biases, limits of detection, and potential for standardization. This review reveals that many of the techniques with the lowest detection limits require uncommon equipment or expertise, and thus, they are not frequently accessible. Additionally, changes to the CNTs (e.g., agglomeration) after environmental release and matrix effects can cause biases for many of the techniques, and biasing factors vary among the techniques. Five case studies are provided to illustrate how to use this information to inform responses to real-world scenarios such as monitoring potential CNT discharge into a river or ecotoxicity testing by a testing laboratory. Overall, substantial progress has been made in improving CNT quantification during the past ten years, but additional work is needed for standardization, development of extraction techniques from complex matrices, and multimethod comparisons of standard samples to reveal the comparability of techniques. PMID:27050152

  14. Fluorescence-linked Antigen Quantification (FLAQ) Assay for Fast Quantification of HIV-1 p24Gag

    PubMed Central

    Gesner, Marianne; Maiti, Mekhala; Grant, Robert; Cavrois, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence-linked antigen quantification (FLAQ) assay allows a fast quantification of HIV-1 p24Gag antigen. Viral supernatant are lysed and incubated with polystyrene microspheres coated with polyclonal antibodies against HIV-1 p24Gag and detector antibodies conjugated to fluorochromes (Figure 1). After washes, the fluorescence of microspheres is measured by flow cytometry and reflects the abundance of the antigen in the lysate. The speed, simplicity, and wide dynamic range of the FLAQ assay are optimum for many applications performed in HIV-1 research laboratories.

  15. Experimental validation of 2D uncertainty quantification for digital image correlation.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2010-03-01

    Because digital image correlation (DIC) has become such an important and standard tool in the toolbox of experimental mechanicists, a complete uncertainty quantification of the method is needed. It should be remembered that each DIC setup and series of images will have a unique uncertainty based on the calibration quality and the image and speckle quality of the analyzed images. Any pretest work done with a calibrated DIC stereo-rig to quantify the errors using known shapes and translations, while useful, do not necessarily reveal the uncertainty of a later test. This is particularly true with high-speed applications where actual test images are often less than ideal. Work has previously been completed on the mathematical underpinnings of DIC uncertainty quantification and is already published, this paper will present corresponding experimental work used to check the validity of the uncertainty equations.

  16. QconCAT: Internal Standard for Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kerry Bauer; Turko, Illarion V; Phinney, Karen W

    2016-01-01

    Protein quantification based on stable isotope labeling-mass spectrometry involves adding known quantities of stable isotope-labeled internal standards into biological samples. The internal standards are analogous to analyte molecules and quantification is achieved by comparing signals from isotope-labeled and analyte molecules. This methodology is broadly applicable to proteomics research, biomarker discovery and validation, and clinical studies, which require accurate and precise protein abundance measurements. One such internal standard platform for protein quantification is concatenated peptides (QconCAT). This chapter describes a protocol for the design, expression, characterization, and application of the QconCAT strategy for protein quantification. PMID:26791984

  17. Development of a VHH-Based Erythropoietin Quantification Assay.

    PubMed

    Kol, Stefan; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Adema, Simon; Hermans, Pim

    2015-08-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) quantification during cell line selection and bioreactor cultivation has traditionally been performed with ELISA or HPLC. As these techniques suffer from several drawbacks, we developed a novel EPO quantification assay. A camelid single-domain antibody fragment directed against human EPO was evaluated as a capturing antibody in a label-free biolayer interferometry-based quantification assay. Human recombinant EPO can be specifically detected in Chinese hamster ovary cell supernatants in a sensitive and pH-dependent manner. This method enables rapid and robust quantification of EPO in a high-throughput setting. PMID:25764454

  18. Volumetric quantification of fluid flow reveals fish's use of hydrodynamic stealth to capture evasive prey

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, Brad J.; Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2014-01-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, predation on zooplankton by fish provides a major pathway for the transfer of energy to higher trophic levels. Copepods are an abundant zooplankton group that sense hydromechanical disturbances produced by approaching predators and respond with rapid escapes. Despite this capability, fish capture copepods with high success. Previous studies have focused on the predatory strike to elucidate details of this interaction. However, these raptorial strikes and resulting suction are only effective at short range. Thus, small fish must closely approach highly sensitive prey without triggering an escape in order for a strike to be successful. We use a new method, high-speed, infrared, tomographic particle image velocimetry, to investigate three-dimensional fluid patterns around predator and prey during approaches. Our results show that at least one planktivorous fish (Danio rerio) can control the bow wave in front of the head during the approach and consumption of prey (copepod). This alters hydrodynamic profiles at the location of the copepod such that it is below the threshold required to elicit an escape response. We find this behaviour to be mediated by the generation of suction within the buccopharyngeal cavity, where the velocity into the mouth roughly matches the forward speed of the fish. These results provide insight into how animals modulate aspects of fluid motion around their bodies to overcome escape responses and enhance prey capture. PMID:24227312

  19. Precise quantification of silica and ceria nanoparticle uptake revealed by 3D fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Torrano, Adriano A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Particle_in_Cell-3D is a powerful method to quantify the cellular uptake of nanoparticles. It combines the advantages of confocal fluorescence microscopy with fast and precise semi-automatic image analysis. In this work we present how this method was applied to investigate the impact of 310 nm silica nanoparticles on human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) in comparison to a cancer cell line derived from the cervix carcinoma (HeLa). The absolute number of intracellular silica nanoparticles within the first 24 h was determined and shown to be cell type-dependent. As a second case study, Particle_in_Cell-3D was used to assess the uptake kinetics of 8 nm and 30 nm ceria nanoparticles interacting with human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These small nanoparticles formed agglomerates in biological medium, and the particles that were in effective contact with cells had a mean diameter of 417 nm and 316 nm, respectively. A significant particle size-dependent effect was observed after 48 h of interaction, and the number of intracellular particles was more than four times larger for the 316 nm agglomerates. Interestingly, our results show that for both particle sizes there is a maximum dose of intracellular nanoparticles at about 24 h. One of the causes for such an interesting and unusual uptake behavior could be cell division. PMID:25383274

  20. Quantification of tsunami-induced flows on a Mediterranean carbonate ramp reveals catastrophic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slootman, Arnoud; Cartigny, Matthieu J. B.; Moscariello, Andrea; Chiaradia, Massimo; de Boer, Poppe L.

    2016-06-01

    Cool-water carbonates are the dominant limestones in the Mediterranean Basin since the Early Pliocene. Their deposition typically resulted in ramp morphologies due to high rates of resedimentation. Several such fossil carbonate ramps are characterised by a bimodal facies stacking pattern, where background deposition of subaqueous dune and/or tempestite deposits is repeatedly interrupted by anomalously thick sedimentary units, dominated by backset-stratification formed by supercritical flows. A multitude of exceptional triggers (e.g. storms, floods, tsunamis) have been invoked to explain the origin of these supercritical flows, which, in the absence of a quantitative analysis, remains speculative as yet. Here, for the first time, the catastrophic evolution of one such Mediterranean carbonate ramp, on Favignana Island (Italy), is quantified by combining 87Sr/86Sr dating, outcrop-based palaeoflow reconstructions and hydraulic calculations. We demonstrate that rare tsunami-induced flows, occurring on average once every 14 to 35 kyr, lasting a few hours only, deposited the anomalously thick backset-bedded units that form half of the sedimentary record. In between such events, cumulative two years of storm-induced flows deposited the remaining half of the succession by the stacking of subaqueous dunes. The two to four orders of magnitude difference in average recurrence period between the two flow types, and their associated sedimentation rates, emphasises the genetic differences between the two styles of deposition. In terms of sediment transport, the studied carbonate ramp was inactive for at least 99% of the time with gradual progradation during decennial to centennial storm activity. Carbonate ramp evolution attained a catastrophic signature by the contribution of rare tsunamis, producing short-lived, high-energy sediment gravity flows.

  1. Subcellular fractionation of human liver reveals limits in global proteomic quantification from isolated fractions.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Wegler, Christine; Artursson, Per

    2016-09-15

    The liver plays an important role in metabolism and elimination of xenobiotics, including drugs. Determination of concentrations of proteins involved in uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics is required to understand and predict elimination mechanisms in this tissue. In this work, we have fractionated homogenates of snap-frozen human liver by differential centrifugation and performed quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of each fraction. Concentrations of proteins were calculated by the "total protein approach". A total of 4586 proteins were identified by at least five peptides and were quantified in all fractions. We found that the xenobiotics transporters of the canalicular and basolateral membranes were differentially enriched in the subcellular fractions and that phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, the cytochrome P450s and the UDP-glucuronyl transferases, have complex subcellular distributions. These findings show that there is no simple way to scale the data from measurements in arbitrarily selected membrane fractions using a single scaling factor for all the proteins of interest. This study also provides the first absolute quantitative subcellular catalog of human liver proteins obtained from frozen tissue specimens. Our data provide quantitative insights into the subcellular distribution of proteins and can be used as a guide for development of fractionation procedures. PMID:27311553

  2. High-throughput optical quantification of mechanosensory habituation reveals neurons encoding memory in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Takuma; Ohtani, Yasuko; Kumiya, Yuta; Igarashi, Ryuji; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    A major goal of neuroscience studies is to identify the neurons and molecules responsible for memory. Mechanosensory habituation in Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple form of learning and memory, in which a circuit of several sensory neurons and interneurons governs behavior. However, despite the usefulness of this paradigm, there are hardly any systems for rapid and accurate behavioral genetic analysis. Here, we developed a multiplexed optical system to genetically analyze C. elegans mechanosensory habituation, and identified two interneurons involved in memory formation. The system automatically trains large populations of animals and simultaneously quantifies the behaviors of various strains by optically discriminating between transgenic and nontransgenic animals. Biochemical and cell-specific behavioral analyses indicated that phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a factor known to regulate memory allocation, was facilitated during training and this phosphorylation in AVA and AVD interneurons was required for habituation. These interneurons are a potential target for cell-specific exploration of the molecular substrates of memory. PMID:25404296

  3. Quantification of intensive hybrid coastal reclamation for revealing its impacts on macrozoobenthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaguo; Cui, Baoshan; Zheng, Jingjing; Xie, Tian; Wang, Qing; Li, Shanze

    2015-01-01

    Managing and identifying the sources of anthropogenic stress in coastal wetlands requires an in-depth understanding of relationships between species diversity and human activities. Empirical and experimental studies provide clear evidence that coastal reclamation can have profound impacts on marine organisms, but the focus of such studies is generally on comparative or laboratory research. We developed a compound intensity index (reclamation intensity index, RI) on hybrid coastal reclamation, to quantify the impacts of reclamation on coastal ecosystems. We also made use of mean annual absolute changes to a number of biotic variables (biodiversity, species richness, biomass of total macrozoobenthos, and species richness and biomass of Polychaeta, Mollusca, Crustacea, and Echinodermata) to determine Hedges’d index, which is a measure of the potential effects of coastal reclamation. Our results showed that there was significant difference of coastal reclamation intensity between Yellow Sea, East China Sea and South China Sea, the biological changes in effect sizes of the three regions differed greatly over time. Our modelling analyses showed that hybrid coastal reclamation generally had significant negative impacts on species diversity and biomass of macrozoobenthos. These relationships varied among different taxonomic groups and included both linear and nonlinear relationships. The results indicated that a high-intensity of coastal reclamation contributed to a pronounced decline in species diversity and biomass, while lower-intensity reclamation, or reclamation within certain thresholds, resulted in a small increase in species diversity and biomass. These results have important implications for biodiversity conservation and the ecological restoration of coastal wetlands in face of the intensive reclamation activities.

  4. QUANTIFICATION OF TISSUE PROPERTIES IN SMALL VOLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    J. MOURANT; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The quantification of tissue properties by optical measurements will facilitate the development of noninvasive methods of cancer diagnosis and detection. Optical measurements are sensitive to tissue structure which is known to change during tumorigenesis. The goals of the work presented in this paper were to verify that the primary scatterers of light in cells are structures much smaller than the nucleus and then to develop an optical technique that can quantify parameters of structures the same size as the scattering features in cells. Polarized, elastic back-scattering was found to be able to quantify changes in scattering properties for turbid media consisting of scatterers of the size found in tissue.

  5. Tutorial examples for uncertainty quantification methods.

    SciTech Connect

    De Bord, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    This report details the work accomplished during my 2015 SULI summer internship at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. During this internship, I worked on multiple tasks with the common goal of making uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods more accessible to the general scientific community. As part of my work, I created a comprehensive numerical integration example to incorporate into the user manual of a UQ software package. Further, I developed examples involving heat transfer through a window to incorporate into tutorial lectures that serve as an introduction to UQ methods.

  6. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Seifried, Jeffrey E.

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  7. Concurrent quantification of multiple nanoparticle bound states

    PubMed Central

    Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Weaver, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The binding of nanoparticles to in vivo targets impacts their use for medical imaging, therapy, and the study of diseases and disease biomarkers. Though an array of techniques can detect binding in vitro, the search for a robust in vivo method continues. The spectral response of magnetic nanoparticles can be influenced by a variety of changes in their physical environment including viscosity and binding. Here, the authors show that nanoparticles in these different environmental states produce spectral responses, which are sufficiently unique to allow for simultaneous quantification of the proportion of nanoparticles within each state. Methods: The authors measured the response to restricted Brownian motion using an array of magnetic nanoparticle designs. With a chosen optimal particle type, the authors prepared particle samples in three distinct environmental states. Various combinations of particles within these three states were measured concurrently and the authors attempted to solve for the quantity of particles within each physical state. Results: The authors found the spectral response of the nanoparticles to be sufficiently unique to allow for accurate quantification of up to three bound states with errors on the order of 1.5%. Furthermore, the authors discuss numerous paths for translating these measurements to in vivo applications. Conclusions: Multiple nanoparticle environmental states can be concurrently quantified using the spectral response of the particles. Such an ability, if translated to the in vivo realm, could provide valuable information about the fate of nanoparticles in vivo or improve the efficacy of nanoparticle based treatments. PMID:21520825

  8. Virus detection and quantification using electrical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Mustafa, Farah; Ali, Lizna M.; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2014-01-01

    Here we identify and quantitate two similar viruses, human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV), suspended in a liquid medium without labeling, using a semiconductor technique. The virus count was estimated by calculating the impurities inside a defined volume by observing the change in electrical parameters. Empirically, the virus count was similar to the absolute value of the ratio of the change of the virus suspension dopant concentration relative to the mock dopant over the change in virus suspension Debye volume relative to mock Debye volume. The virus type was identified by constructing a concentration-mobility relationship which is unique for each kind of virus, allowing for a fast (within minutes) and label-free virus quantification and identification. For validation, the HIV and FIV virus preparations were further quantified by a biochemical technique and the results obtained by both approaches corroborated well. We further demonstrate that the electrical technique could be applied to accurately measure and characterize silica nanoparticles that resemble the virus particles in size. Based on these results, we anticipate our present approach to be a starting point towards establishing the foundation for label-free electrical-based identification and quantification of an unlimited number of viruses and other nano-sized particles. PMID:25355078

  9. Quantification of ontogenetic allometry in ammonoids.

    PubMed

    Korn, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Ammonoids are well-known objects used for studies on ontogeny and phylogeny, but a quantification of ontogenetic change has not yet been carried out. Their planispirally coiled conchs allow for a study of "longitudinal" ontogenetic data, that is data of ontogenetic trajectories that can be obtained from a single specimen. Therefore, they provide a good model for ontogenetic studies of geometry in other shelled organisms. Using modifications of three cardinal conch dimensions, computer simulations can model artificial conchs. The trajectories of ontogenetic allometry of these simulations can be analyzed in great detail in a theoretical morphospace. A method for the classification of conch ontogeny and quantification of the degree of allometry is proposed. Using high-precision cross-sections, the allometric conch growth of real ammonoids can be documented and compared. The members of the Ammonoidea show a wide variety of allometric growth, ranging from near isometry to monophasic, biphasic, or polyphasic allometry. Selected examples of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic ammonoids are shown with respect to their degree of change during ontogeny of the conch. PMID:23134208

  10. Quantification noise in single cell experiments

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, M.; Kirchner, B.; Müller, H.; Holzhauer, C.; Mann, W.; Pfaffl, M. W.

    2011-01-01

    In quantitative single-cell studies, the critical part is the low amount of nucleic acids present and the resulting experimental variations. In addition biological data obtained from heterogeneous tissue are not reflecting the expression behaviour of every single-cell. These variations can be derived from natural biological variance or can be introduced externally. Both have negative effects on the quantification result. The aim of this study is to make quantitative single-cell studies more transparent and reliable in order to fulfil the MIQE guidelines at the single-cell level. The technical variability introduced by RT, pre-amplification, evaporation, biological material and qPCR itself was evaluated by using RNA or DNA standards. Secondly, the biological expression variances of GAPDH, TNFα, IL-1β, TLR4 were measured by mRNA profiling experiment in single lymphocytes. The used quantification setup was sensitive enough to detect single standard copies and transcripts out of one solitary cell. Most variability was introduced by RT, followed by evaporation, and pre-amplification. The qPCR analysis and the biological matrix introduced only minor variability. Both conducted studies impressively demonstrate the heterogeneity of expression patterns in individual cells and showed clearly today's limitation in quantitative single-cell expression analysis. PMID:21745823

  11. Simple quantification of in planta fungal biomass.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Michael; Periyannan, Sambasivam K; Feechan, Angela; Dry, Ian; Schumann, Ulrike; Lagudah, Evans; Pryor, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    An accurate assessment of the disease resistance status of plants to fungal pathogens is an essential requirement for the development of resistant crop plants. Many disease resistance phenotypes are partial rather than obvious immunity and are frequently scored using subjective qualitative estimates of pathogen development or plant disease symptoms. Here we report a method for the accurate comparison of total fungal biomass in plant tissues. This method, called the WAC assay, is based upon the specific binding of the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin to fungal chitin. The assay is simple, high-throughput, and sensitive enough to discriminate between single Puccinia graminis f.sp tritici infection sites on a wheat leaf segment. It greatly lends itself to replication as large volumes of tissue can be pooled from independent experiments and assayed to provide truly representative quantification, or, alternatively, fungal growth on a single, small leaf segment can be quantified. In addition, as the assay is based upon a microscopic technique, pathogen infection sites can also be examined at high magnification prior to quantification if desired and average infection site areas are determined. Previously, we have demonstrated the application of the WAC assay for quantifying the growth of several different pathogen species in both glasshouse grown material and large-scale field plots. Details of this method are provided within. PMID:24643560

  12. Centerline optimization using vessel quantification model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wenli; Dachille, Frank; Meissner, Michael

    2005-04-01

    An accurate and reproducible centerline is needed in many vascular applications, such as virtual angioscopy, vessel quantification, and surgery planning. This paper presents a progressive optimization algorithm to refine a centerline after it is extracted. A new centerline model definition is proposed that allows quantifiable minimum cross-sectional area. A centerline is divided into a number of segments. Each segment corresponds to a local generalized cylinder. A reference frame (cross-section) is set up at the center point of each cylinder. The position and the orientation of the cross-section are optimized within each cylinder by finding the minimum cross-sectional area. All local-optimized center points are approximated by a NURBS curve globally, and the curve is re-sampled to the refined set of center points. This refinement iteration, local optimization plus global approximation, converges to the optimal centerline, yielding a smooth and accurate central axis curve. The application discussed in this paper is vessel quantification and virtual angioscopy. However, the algorithm is a general centerline refinement method that can be applied to other applications that need accurate and reproducible centerlines.

  13. Quantification of prebiotics in commercial infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Carlos; Prodanov, Marin; Olano, Agustín; Corzo, Nieves; Montilla, Antonia

    2016-03-01

    Since breastfeeding is not always possible, infant formulas (IFs) are supplemented with prebiotic oligosaccharides, such as galactooligosaccharides (GOS) and/or fructooligosaccharides (FOS) to exert similar effects to those of the breast milk. Nowadays, a great number of infant formulas enriched with prebiotics are disposal in the market, however there are scarce data about their composition. In this study, the combined use of two chromatographic methods (GC-FID and HPLC-RID) for the quantification of carbohydrates present in commercial infant formulas have been used. According to the results obtained by GC-FID for products containing prebiotics, the content of FOS, GOS and GOS/FOS was in the ranges of 1.6-5.0, 1.7-3.2, and 0.08-0.25/2.3-3.8g/100g of product, respectively. HPLC-RID analysis allowed quantification of maltodextrins with degree of polymerization (DP) up to 19. The methodology proposed here may be used for routine quality control of infant formula and other food ingredients containing prebiotics. PMID:26471520

  14. Accurate episomal HIV 2-LTR circles quantification using optimized DNA isolation and droplet digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the detection of episomal HIV 2-LTR circles is a potential marker for ongoing viral replication. Quantification of 2-LTR circles is based on quantitative PCR or more recently on digital PCR assessment, but is hampered due to its low abundance. Sample pre-PCR processing is a critical step for 2-LTR circles quantification, which has not yet been sufficiently evaluated in patient derived samples. Materials and Methods We compared two sample processing procedures to more accurately quantify 2-LTR circles using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Episomal HIV 2-LTR circles were either isolated by genomic DNA isolation or by a modified plasmid DNA isolation, to separate the small episomal circular DNA from chromosomal DNA. This was performed in a dilution series of HIV-infected cells and HIV-1 infected patient derived samples (n=59). Samples for the plasmid DNA isolation method were spiked with an internal control plasmid. Results Genomic DNA isolation enables robust 2-LTR circles quantification. However, in the lower ranges of detection, PCR inhibition caused by high genomic DNA load substantially limits the amount of sample input and this impacts sensitivity and accuracy. Moreover, total genomic DNA isolation resulted in a lower recovery of 2-LTR templates per isolate, further reducing its sensitivity. The modified plasmid DNA isolation with a spiked reference for normalization was more accurate in these low ranges compared to genomic DNA isolation. A linear correlation of both methods was observed in the dilution series (R2=0.974) and in the patient derived samples with 2-LTR numbers above 10 copies per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), (R2=0.671). Furthermore, Bland–Altman analysis revealed an average agreement between the methods within the 27 samples in which 2-LTR circles were detectable with both methods (bias: 0.3875±1.2657 log10). Conclusions 2-LTR circles

  15. Relative and absolute quantification of postsynaptic density proteome isolated from rat forebrain and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dongmei; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Rush, John; Ramm, Elizabeth; Schlager, Max A; Duong, Duc M; Xu, Ping; Wijayawardana, Sameera R; Hanfelt, John; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Sheng, Morgan; Peng, Junmin

    2006-06-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) of central excitatory synapses is essential for postsynaptic signaling, and its components are heterogeneous among different neuronal subtypes and brain structures. Here we report large scale relative and absolute quantification of proteins in PSDs purified from adult rat forebrain and cerebellum. PSD protein profiles were determined using the cleavable ICAT strategy and LC-MS/MS. A total of 296 proteins were identified and quantified with 43 proteins exhibiting statistically significant abundance change between forebrain and cerebellum, indicating marked molecular heterogeneity of PSDs between different brain regions. Moreover we utilized absolute quantification strategy, in which synthetic isotope-labeled peptides were used as internal standards, to measure the molar abundance of 32 key PSD proteins in forebrain and cerebellum. These data confirm the abundance of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and PSD-95 and reveal unexpected stoichiometric ratios between glutamate receptors, scaffold proteins, and signaling molecules in the PSD. Our data also demonstrate that the absolute quantification method is well suited for targeted quantitative proteomic analysis. Overall this study delineates a crucial molecular difference between forebrain and cerebellar PSDs and provides a quantitative framework for measuring the molecular stoichiometry of the PSD. PMID:16507876

  16. Is biofilm removal properly assessed? Comparison of different quantification methods in a 96-well plate system.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Philipp; Rosenberg, Urs; Schneider, Jana; Mauerhofer, Stefan; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-05-01

    Various methods have been reported to quantify total biofilm or different components of biofilm; however, these methods are often confusedly used, leading to discrepancies and misleading results. In this study, different methods for quantification of biofilm, including those for total biomass, total amount of bacterial cells, viable cell number, and amount of extracellular polymeric substances, were systematically compared in microtiter plates. To evaluate which method is suitable for assessment of biofilm removal and for bacterial killing, biofilm samples were treated with various cleaners possessing removing and/or killing capacities. It was found that most of the methods tested in this study in general exhibited high reproducibility and repeatability. Crystal Violet staining was a simple but reliable method for total biomass quantification. Total bacteria cell numbers could be reliably quantified by the fluorescent DNA-binding dye Acridine Orange. Viable cells could be quantified by either an ATP-based assay or a proliferation assay. Both of these viability methods showed a broad detection range and led to precise measurement. For quantification of proteins in the biofilm, staining with fluorescein isothiocyanate was most suitable. Furthermore, it was revealed that a combination of different methods is required to determine if a cleaner kills or removes biofilm. PMID:26923144

  17. Fluorometric quantification of polyphosphate in environmental plankton samples: extraction protocols, matrix effects, and nucleic acid interference.

    PubMed

    Martin, Patrick; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S

    2013-01-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is a ubiquitous biochemical with many cellular functions and comprises an important environmental phosphorus pool. However, methodological challenges have hampered routine quantification of polyP in environmental samples. We tested 15 protocols to extract inorganic polyphosphate from natural marine samples and cultured cyanobacteria for fluorometric quantification with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) without prior purification. A combination of brief boiling and digestion with proteinase K was superior to all other protocols, including other enzymatic digestions and neutral or alkaline leaches. However, three successive extractions were required to extract all polyP. Standard addition revealed matrix effects that differed between sample types, causing polyP to be over- or underestimated by up to 50% in the samples tested here. Although previous studies judged that the presence of DNA would not complicate fluorometric quantification of polyP with DAPI, we show that RNA can cause significant interference at the wavelengths used to measure polyP. Importantly, treating samples with DNase and RNase before proteinase K digestion reduced fluorescence by up to 57%. We measured particulate polyP along a North Pacific coastal-to-open ocean transect and show that particulate polyP concentrations increased toward the open ocean. While our final method is optimized for marine particulate matter, different environmental sample types may need to be assessed for matrix effects, extraction efficiency, and nucleic acid interference. PMID:23104409

  18. Evaluation of the Accuracy of Liver Lesion DCEUS Quantification With Respiratory Gating.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Damianos; Leen, Edward; Averkiou, Michalakis A

    2016-02-01

    Confidence in the accuracy of dynamic contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) quantification parameters is imperative for the correct diagnosis of liver lesion perfusion characteristics. An important source of uncertainty in liver DCEUS acquisitions is artifacts introduced by respiratory motion. The objective of this study is to construct a respiratory motion simulation model (RMSM) of dual contrast imaging mode acquisitions of liver lesions in order to evaluate an algorithm for automatic respiratory gating (ARG). The respiratory kinetics as well as the perfusion models of the liver lesion and parenchyma used by the RMSM were solely derived from clinical data. The quality of fit (of the DCEUS data onto the bolus kinetics model) depends on the respiration amplitude. Similar trends in terms of quality of fit as a function of respiration amplitude were observed from RMSM and clinical data. The errors introduced on the DCEUS quantification under the influence of respiration were evaluated. The RMSM revealed that the error in the liver lesion DCEUS quantification parameters significantly decreased (p < 0.001) from a maximum of 32.3% to 6.2% when ARG was used. The use of RMSM clearly demonstrates the capability of the ARG algorithm in significantly reducing errors introduced from both in-plane and out-of-plane respiratory motion. PMID:26452276

  19. Quantification of Internalized Silica Nanoparticles via STED Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peuschel, Henrike; Ruckelshausen, Thomas; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette

    2015-01-01

    The development of safe engineered nanoparticles (NPs) requires a detailed understanding of their interaction mechanisms on a cellular level. Therefore, quantification of NP internalization is crucial to predict the potential impact of intracellular NP doses, providing essential information for risk assessment as well as for drug delivery applications. In this study, the internalization of 25 nm and 85 nm silica nanoparticles (SNPs) in alveolar type II cells (A549) was quantified by application of super-resolution STED (stimulated emission depletion) microscopy. Cells were exposed to equal particle number concentrations (9.2 × 1010 particles mL−1) of each particle size and the sedimentation of particles during exposure was taken into account. Microscopy images revealed that particles of both sizes entered the cells after 5 h incubation in serum supplemented and serum-free medium. According to the in vitro sedimentation, diffusion, and dosimetry (ISDD) model 20–27% of the particles sedimented. In comparison, 102-103 NPs per cell were detected intracellularly serum-containing medium. Furthermore, in the presence of serum, no cytotoxicity was induced by the SNPs. In serum-free medium, large agglomerates of both particle sizes covered the cells whereas only high concentrations (≥ 3.8 × 1012 particles mL−1) of the smaller particles induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26125028

  20. NMR method for accurate quantification of polysorbate 80 copolymer composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Aifa; Meng, Yang; Ning, Tingting; Yang, Huaxin; Ding, Lixia; Xiao, Xinyue; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    (13)C NMR spectroscopic integration employing short relaxation delays and a 30° pulse width was evaluated as a quantitative tool for analyzing the components of polysorbate 80. (13)C NMR analysis revealed that commercial polysorbate 80 formulations are a complex oligomeric mixture of sorbitan polyethoxylate esters and other intermediates, such as isosorbide polyethoxylate esters and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) esters. This novel approach facilitates the quantification of the component ratios. In this study, the ratios of the three major oligomers in polysorbate 80 were measured and the PEG series was found to be the major component of commercial polysorbate 80. The degree of polymerization of -CH2CH2O- groups and the ratio of free to bonded -CH2CH2O- end groups, which correlate with the hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the polymer, were analyzed, and were suggested to be key factors for assessing the likelihood of adverse biological reactions to polysorbate 80. The (13)C NMR data suggest that the feed ratio of raw materials and reaction conditions in the production of polysorbate 80 are not well controlled. Our results demonstrate that (13)C NMR is a universal, powerful tool for polysorbate analysis. Such analysis is crucial for the synthesis of a high-quality product, and is difficult to obtain by other methods. PMID:26356097

  1. Cloning and quantification of ferret serum amyloid A.

    PubMed

    Aratani, Hitoshi; Segawa, Takao; Itou, Takuya; Sakai, Takeo

    2013-01-31

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is used as a biomarker for infections and inflammation in humans and veterinary medicine. We cloned ferret cDNA encoding SAA from the liver of a ferret via reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The sequence of the cDNA clone revealed that ferret SAA has an open reading frame of 387 bp that encodes 129 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of ferret SAA has 96.1, 89.9, 86.0, 83.8, 83.0, 73.8 and 65.3% similarity to the mink, dog, cat, cattle, horse, human and mouse SAA genes, respectively. Compared to human SAA, the deduced ferret SAA amino acid sequence had an insertion of an 8-amino acid fragment between amino acids 88 and 95. Recombinant ferret SAA (rfrSAA) was expressed using an Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain, BL21 Star. Using Western blot analysis, anti-SAA mAb provided with the multispecies SAA ELISA kit reacted with purified rfrSAA. A significant dose-response relationship was observed between the rfrSAA protein and a commercial multispecies SAA ELISA kit. In contrast, rfrSAA was not recognized with the antibodies included in a commercial human SAA ELISA kit. These results suggest that the structure of ferret SAA is antigenically similar to other domestic animal SAAs, and the multispecies ELISA kit allows for the detection and quantification of ferret SAA in vivo. PMID:22972465

  2. Survey and Evaluate Uncertainty Quantification Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Engel, David W.; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2012-02-01

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that will develop and deploy state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models with uncertainty quantification, optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset will incorporate commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and will also develop new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. The CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. The goal of CCSI is to deliver a toolset that can simulate the scale-up of a broad set of new carbon capture technologies from laboratory scale to full commercial scale. To provide a framework around which the toolset can be developed and demonstrated, we will focus on three Industrial Challenge Problems (ICPs) related to carbon capture technologies relevant to U.S. pulverized coal (PC) power plants. Post combustion capture by solid sorbents is the technology focus of the initial ICP (referred to as ICP A). The goal of the uncertainty quantification (UQ) task (Task 6) is to provide a set of capabilities to the user community for the quantification of uncertainties associated with the carbon

  3. Quantification of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Esben; Jensen, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    In metabolically healthy humans, adipose tissue is exquisitely sensitive to insulin. Similar to muscle and liver, adipose tissue lipolysis is insulin resistant in adults with central obesity and type 2 diabetes. Perhaps uniquely, however, insulin resistance in adipose tissue may directly contribute to development of insulin resistance in muscle and liver because of the increased delivery of free fatty acids to those tissues. It has been hypothesized that insulin adipose tissue resistance may precede other metabolic defects in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, precise and reproducible quantification of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity, in vivo, in humans, is an important measure. Unfortunately, no consensus exists on how to determine adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. We review the methods available to quantitate adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and will discuss their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:27073214

  4. Quantification of Glutathione in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel W.; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant intracellular thiol with diverse functions from redox signaling, xenobiotic detoxification, and apoptosis. The quantification of GSH is an important measure for redox capacity and oxidative stress. This protocol quantifies total GSH from Caenorhabditis elegans, an emerging model organism for toxicology studies. GSH is measured using the 5,5′-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) cycling method originally created for cell and tissue samples but optimized for whole worm extracts. DTNB reacts with GSH to from a 5′-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid (TNB) chromophore with maximum absorbance of 412 nm. This method is both rapid and sensitive, making it ideal for studies involving a large number of transgenic nematode strains. PMID:26309452

  5. Recurrence quantification analysis of global stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, João A.; Caiado, Jorge

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates the presence of deterministic dependencies in international stock markets using recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). The results are based on a large set of free float-adjusted market capitalization stock indices, covering a period of 15 years. The statistical tests suggest that the dynamics of stock prices in emerging markets is characterized by higher values of RQA measures when compared to their developed counterparts. The behavior of stock markets during critical financial events, such as the burst of the technology bubble, the Asian currency crisis, and the recent subprime mortgage crisis, is analyzed by performing RQA in sliding windows. It is shown that during these events stock markets exhibit a distinctive behavior that is characterized by temporary decreases in the fraction of recurrence points contained in diagonal and vertical structures.

  6. Quantification of variability in trichome patterns

    PubMed Central

    Greese, Bettina; Hülskamp, Martin; Fleck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    While pattern formation is studied in various areas of biology, little is known about the noise leading to variations between individual realizations of the pattern. One prominent example for de novo pattern formation in plants is the patterning of trichomes on Arabidopsis leaves, which involves genetic regulation and cell-to-cell communication. These processes are potentially variable due to, e.g., the abundance of cell components or environmental conditions. To elevate the understanding of regulatory processes underlying the pattern formation it is crucial to quantitatively analyze the variability in naturally occurring patterns. Here, we review recent approaches toward characterization of noise on trichome initiation. We present methods for the quantification of spatial patterns, which are the basis for data-driven mathematical modeling and enable the analysis of noise from different sources. Besides the insight gained on trichome formation, the examination of observed trichome patterns also shows that highly regulated biological processes can be substantially affected by variability. PMID:25431575

  7. Feature isolation and quantification of evolving datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Identifying and isolating features is an important part of visualization and a crucial step for the analysis and understanding of large time-dependent data sets (either from observation or simulation). In this proposal, we address these concerns, namely the investigation and implementation of basic 2D and 3D feature based methods to enhance current visualization techniques and provide the building blocks for automatic feature recognition, tracking, and correlation. These methods incorporate ideas from scientific visualization, computer vision, image processing, and mathematical morphology. Our focus is in the area of fluid dynamics, and we show the applicability of these methods to the quantification and tracking of three-dimensional vortex and turbulence bursts.

  8. Quantification of Osteon Morphology Using Geometric Histomorphometrics.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Scott; Cunningham, Craig; Felts, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Many histological methods in forensic anthropology utilize combinations of traditional histomorphometric parameters which may not accurately describe the morphology of microstructural features. Here, we report the novel application of a geometric morphometric method suitable when considering structures without anatomically homologous landmarks for the quantification of complete secondary osteon size and morphology. The method is tested for its suitability in the measurement of intact secondary osteons using osteons digitized from transverse femoral diaphyseal sections prepared from two human individuals. The results of methodological testing demonstrate the efficacy of the technique when applied to intact secondary osteons. In providing accurate characterization of micromorphology within the robust mathematical framework of geometric morphometrics, this method may surpass traditional histomorphometric variables currently employed in forensic research and practice. A preliminary study of the intersectional histomorphometric variation within the femoral diaphysis is made using this geometric histomorphometric method to demonstrate its potential. PMID:26478136

  9. Quantification of diacylglycerol by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    vom Dorp, Katharina; Dombrink, Isabel; Dörmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) is an important intermediate of lipid metabolism and a component of phospholipase C signal transduction. Quantification of DAG in plant membranes represents a challenging task because of its low abundance. DAG can be measured by direct infusion mass spectrometry (MS) on a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer after purification from the crude plant lipid extract via solid-phase extraction on silica columns. Different internal standards are employed to compensate for the dependence of the MS and MS/MS signals on the chain length and the presence of double bonds in the acyl moieties. Thus, using a combination of single MS and MS/MS experiments, quantitative results for the different molecular species of DAGs from Arabidopsis can be obtained. PMID:23681522

  10. Uncertainty quantification in DIC with Kriging regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dezhi; DiazDelaO, F. A.; Wang, Weizhuo; Lin, Xiaoshan; Patterson, Eann A.; Mottershead, John E.

    2016-03-01

    A Kriging regression model is developed as a post-processing technique for the treatment of measurement uncertainty in classical subset-based Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Regression is achieved by regularising the sample-point correlation matrix using a local, subset-based, assessment of the measurement error with assumed statistical normality and based on the Sum of Squared Differences (SSD) criterion. This leads to a Kriging-regression model in the form of a Gaussian process representing uncertainty on the Kriging estimate of the measured displacement field. The method is demonstrated using numerical and experimental examples. Kriging estimates of displacement fields are shown to be in excellent agreement with 'true' values for the numerical cases and in the experimental example uncertainty quantification is carried out using the Gaussian random process that forms part of the Kriging model. The root mean square error (RMSE) on the estimated displacements is produced and standard deviations on local strain estimates are determined.

  11. Carotenoid Extraction and Quantification from Capsicum annuum

    PubMed Central

    Richins, Richard D.; Kilcrease, James; Rodgriguez-Uribe, Laura; O'Connell, Mary A.

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are ubiquitous pigments that play key roles in photosynthesis and also accumulate to high levels in fruit and flowers. Specific carotenoids play essential roles in human health as these compounds are precursors for Vitamin A; other specific carotenoids are important sources of macular pigments and all carotenoids are important anti-oxidants. Accurate determination of the composition and concentration of this complex set of natural products is therefore important in many different scientific areas. One of the richest sources of these compounds is the fruit of Capsicum; these red, yellow and orange fruit accumulate multiple carotenes and xanthophylls. This report describes the detailed method for the extraction and quantification of specific carotenes and xanthophylls.

  12. Multispectral image analysis for algal biomass quantification.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas E; Macon, Keith; Berberoglu, Halil

    2013-01-01

    This article reports a novel multispectral image processing technique for rapid, noninvasive quantification of biomass concentration in attached and suspended algae cultures. Monitoring the biomass concentration is critical for efficient production of biofuel feedstocks, food supplements, and bioactive chemicals. Particularly, noninvasive and rapid detection techniques can significantly aid in providing delay-free process control feedback in large-scale cultivation platforms. In this technique, three-band spectral images of Anabaena variabilis cultures were acquired and separated into their red, green, and blue components. A correlation between the magnitude of the green component and the areal biomass concentration was generated. The correlation predicted the biomass concentrations of independently prepared attached and suspended cultures with errors of 7 and 15%, respectively, and the effect of varying lighting conditions and background color were investigated. This method can provide necessary feedback for dilution and harvesting strategies to maximize photosynthetic conversion efficiency in large-scale operation. PMID:23554374

  13. Kinetic quantification of plyometric exercise intensity.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Fauth, McKenzie L; Garceau, Luke R; Petushek, Erich J

    2011-12-01

    Ebben, WP, Fauth, ML, Garceau, LR, and Petushek, EJ. Kinetic quantification of plyometric exercise intensity. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3288-3298, 2011-Quantification of plyometric exercise intensity is necessary to understand the characteristics of these exercises and the proper progression of this mode of exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the kinetic characteristics of a variety of plyometric exercises. This study also sought to assess gender differences in these variables. Twenty-six men and 23 women with previous experience in performing plyometric training served as subjects. The subjects performed a variety of plyometric exercises including line hops, 15.24-cm cone hops, squat jumps, tuck jumps, countermovement jumps (CMJs), loaded CMJs equal to 30% of 1 repetition maximum squat, depth jumps normalized to the subject's jump height (JH), and single leg jumps. All plyometric exercises were assessed with a force platform. Outcome variables associated with the takeoff, airborne, and landing phase of each plyometric exercise were evaluated. These variables included the peak vertical ground reaction force (GRF) during takeoff, the time to takeoff, flight time, JH, peak power, landing rate of force development, and peak vertical GRF during landing. A 2-way mixed analysis of variance with repeated measures for plyometric exercise type demonstrated main effects for exercise type and all outcome variables (p ≤ 0.05) and for the interaction between gender and peak vertical GRF during takeoff (p ≤ 0.05). Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons identified a number of differences between the plyometric exercises for the outcome variables assessed (p ≤ 0.05). These findings can be used to guide the progression of plyometric training by incorporating exercises of increasing intensity over the course of a program. PMID:22080319

  14. Quantification of heterogeneity observed in medical images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been much recent interest in the quantification of visually evident heterogeneity within functional grayscale medical images, such as those obtained via magnetic resonance or positron emission tomography. In the case of images of cancerous tumors, variations in grayscale intensity imply variations in crucial tumor biology. Despite these considerable clinical implications, there is as yet no standardized method for measuring the heterogeneity observed via these imaging modalities. Methods In this work, we motivate and derive a statistical measure of image heterogeneity. This statistic measures the distance-dependent average deviation from the smoothest intensity gradation feasible. We show how this statistic may be used to automatically rank images of in vivo human tumors in order of increasing heterogeneity. We test this method against the current practice of ranking images via expert visual inspection. Results We find that this statistic provides a means of heterogeneity quantification beyond that given by other statistics traditionally used for the same purpose. We demonstrate the effect of tumor shape upon our ranking method and find the method applicable to a wide variety of clinically relevant tumor images. We find that the automated heterogeneity rankings agree very closely with those performed visually by experts. Conclusions These results indicate that our automated method may be used reliably to rank, in order of increasing heterogeneity, tumor images whether or not object shape is considered to contribute to that heterogeneity. Automated heterogeneity ranking yields objective results which are more consistent than visual rankings. Reducing variability in image interpretation will enable more researchers to better study potential clinical implications of observed tumor heterogeneity. PMID:23453000

  15. Uncertainty Quantification of Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, D. D.; Brandon, S. T.; Covey, C. C.; Domyancic, D. M.; Johannesson, G.; Klein, R.; Tannahill, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Significant uncertainties exist in the temperature response of the climate system to changes in the levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. We report progress to quantify the uncertainties of equilibrium climate sensitivity using perturbed parameter ensembles of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Through a strategic initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been developing uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods and incorporating them into a software framework called the UQ Pipeline. We have applied this framework to generate a large number of ensemble simulations using Latin Hypercube and other schemes to sample up to three dozen uncertain parameters in the atmospheric (CAM) and sea ice (CICE) model components of CESM. The parameters sampled are related to many highly uncertain processes, including deep and shallow convection, boundary layer turbulence, cloud optical and microphysical properties, and sea ice albedo. An extensive ensemble database comprised of more than 46,000 simulated climate-model-years of recent climate conditions has been assembled. This database is being used to train surrogate models of CESM responses and to perform statistical calibrations of the CAM and CICE models given observational data constraints. The calibrated models serve as a basis for propagating uncertainties forward through climate change simulations using a slab ocean model configuration of CESM. This procedure is being used to quantify the probability density function of equilibrium climate sensitivity accounting for uncertainties in climate model processes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and was funded by the Uncertainty Quantification Strategic Initiative Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project at LLNL under project tracking code 10-SI-013. (LLNL-ABS-491765)

  16. Detection and Quantification of Rotenoids from Clitoria fairchildiana and its Lipids Profile.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rauldenis A F; David, Jorge M; David, Juceni P

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the isolation and quantification of rotenoids from crude organic extracts of different parts of Clitoria fairchildiana R. A. Howard (Leguminosae) by HPLC-DAD. The lipid composition and the Artemia salina cytotoxic activities of the isolates were also conducted. Clitoriacetal (1), 6-deoxyclitoriacetal (2), stemonal and stemonone were isolated by chromatographic procedures and identified by usual spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques. Clitoriacetal and 6-deoxyclitoriacetal were not found in all parts of the plant, such as leaves and petals, but in the roots they occur in higher concentration. The activity against brine shrimp revealed that the root extract (LD50 = 158 ppm) was the more active. PMID:27319136

  17. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  18. Quantification of uncertainties for application in detonation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Miao; Ma, Zhibo

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation has become an important means in designing detonation systems, and the quantification of its uncertainty is also necessary to reliability certification. As to quantifying the uncertainty, it is the most important to analyze how the uncertainties occur and develop, and how the simulations develop from benchmark models to new models. Based on the practical needs of engineering and the technology of verification & validation, a framework of QU(quantification of uncertainty) is brought forward in the case that simulation is used on detonation system for scientific prediction. An example is offered to describe the general idea of quantification of simulation uncertainties.

  19. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  20. Extended Forward Sensitivity Analysis for Uncertainty Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2008-09-01

    This report presents the forward sensitivity analysis method as a means for quantification of uncertainty in system analysis. The traditional approach to uncertainty quantification is based on a “black box” approach. The simulation tool is treated as an unknown signal generator, a distribution of inputs according to assumed probability density functions is sent in and the distribution of the outputs is measured and correlated back to the original input distribution. This approach requires large number of simulation runs and therefore has high computational cost. Contrary to the “black box” method, a more efficient sensitivity approach can take advantage of intimate knowledge of the simulation code. In this approach equations for the propagation of uncertainty are constructed and the sensitivity is solved for as variables in the same simulation. This “glass box” method can generate similar sensitivity information as the above “black box” approach with couples of runs to cover a large uncertainty region. Because only small numbers of runs are required, those runs can be done with a high accuracy in space and time ensuring that the uncertainty of the physical model is being measured and not simply the numerical error caused by the coarse discretization. In the forward sensitivity method, the model is differentiated with respect to each parameter to yield an additional system of the same size as the original one, the result of which is the solution sensitivity. The sensitivity of any output variable can then be directly obtained from these sensitivities by applying the chain rule of differentiation. We extend the forward sensitivity method to include time and spatial steps as special parameters so that the numerical errors can be quantified against other physical parameters. This extension makes the forward sensitivity method a much more powerful tool to help uncertainty analysis. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time and space steps with other

  1. Quantification of ecotoxicological tests based on bioluminescence using Polaroid film.

    PubMed

    Tamminen, Manu V; Virta, Marko P J

    2007-01-01

    Assays based on the measurement of bacterial luminescence are widely used in ecotoxicology. Bacterial strains responding either to general toxicity or specific pollutants are rapid, cost-effective and easy to use. However, quantification of the signal requires relatively expensive instrumentation. We show here that the detection of luminescence of BioTox, a Vibrio fischeri-based toxicity test, and of a specific recombinant bacterial strain for arsenic determination, is possible using common Polaroid film. The exposed films can be used for visual or computer-assisted quantification of the signal. Qualitative visual comparison to standards can be used in the rapid and relatively accurate estimation of toxicity or pollutant concentration. The computer-assisted method significantly improves the accuracy and quantification of the results. The results obtained by computer-assisted quantification were in good agreement with the values obtained with a luminometer. PMID:16949132

  2. Recent application of quantification II in Japanese medical research.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Kudo, A

    1979-01-01

    Hayashi's Quantification II is a method of multivariate discrimination analysis to manipulate attribute data as predictor variables. It is very useful in the medical research field for estimation, diagnosis, prognosis, evaluation of epidemiological factors, and other problems based on multiplicity of attribute data. In Japan, this method is so well known that most of the computer program packages include the Hayashi Quantification, but it seems to be yet unfamiliar with the method for researchers outside Japan. In view of this situation, we introduced 19 selected articles of recent applications of the Quantification II in Japanese medical research. In reviewing these papers, special mention is made to clarify how the researchers were satisfied with findings provided by the method. At the same time, some recommendations are made about terminology and program packages. Also a brief discussion of the background of the quantification methods is given with special reference to the Behaviormetric Society of Japan. PMID:540587

  3. Experimental quantification of the tactile spatial responsivity of human cornea.

    PubMed

    Beiderman, Yevgeny; Belkin, Michael; Rotenstreich, Ygal; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    We present the first experimental quantification of the tactile spatial responsivity of the cornea and we teach a subject to recognize spatial tactile shapes that are stimulated on their cornea. PMID:26158088

  4. Software-assisted serum metabolite quantification using NMR.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Sang; Hyeon, Jin-Seong; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-08-31

    The goal of metabolomics is to analyze a whole metabolome under a given set of conditions, and accurate and reliable quantitation of metabolites is crucial. Absolute concentration is more valuable than relative concentration; however, the most commonly used method in NMR-based serum metabolic profiling, bin-based and full data point peak quantification, provides relative concentration levels of metabolites and are not reliable when metabolite peaks overlap in a spectrum. In this study, we present the software-assisted serum metabolite quantification (SASMeQ) method, which allows us to identify and quantify metabolites in NMR spectra using Chenomx software. This software uses the ERETIC2 utility from TopSpin to add a digitally synthesized peak to a spectrum. The SASMeQ method will advance NMR-based serum metabolic profiling by providing an accurate and reliable method for absolute quantification that is superior to bin-based quantification. PMID:27506360

  5. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  6. Numerical Uncertainty Quantification for Radiation Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brooke; Blattnig, Steve; Clowdsley, Martha

    2007-01-01

    Recently a new emphasis has been placed on engineering applications of space radiation analyses and thus a systematic effort of Verification, Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VV&UQ) of the tools commonly used for radiation analysis for vehicle design and mission planning has begun. There are two sources of uncertainty in geometric discretization addressed in this paper that need to be quantified in order to understand the total uncertainty in estimating space radiation exposures. One source of uncertainty is in ray tracing, as the number of rays increase the associated uncertainty decreases, but the computational expense increases. Thus, a cost benefit analysis optimizing computational time versus uncertainty is needed and is addressed in this paper. The second source of uncertainty results from the interpolation over the dose vs. depth curves that is needed to determine the radiation exposure. The question, then, is what is the number of thicknesses that is needed to get an accurate result. So convergence testing is performed to quantify the uncertainty associated with interpolating over different shield thickness spatial grids.

  7. Quantification of biological aging in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Daniel W.; Caspi, Avshalom; Houts, Renate; Cohen, Harvey J.; Corcoran, David L.; Danese, Andrea; Harrington, HonaLee; Israel, Salomon; Levine, Morgan E.; Schaefer, Jonathan D.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Ben; Yashin, Anatoli I.; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Antiaging therapies show promise in model organism research. Translation to humans is needed to address the challenges of an aging global population. Interventions to slow human aging will need to be applied to still-young individuals. However, most human aging research examines older adults, many with chronic disease. As a result, little is known about aging in young humans. We studied aging in 954 young humans, the Dunedin Study birth cohort, tracking multiple biomarkers across three time points spanning their third and fourth decades of life. We developed and validated two methods by which aging can be measured in young adults, one cross-sectional and one longitudinal. Our longitudinal measure allows quantification of the pace of coordinated physiological deterioration across multiple organ systems (e.g., pulmonary, periodontal, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, and immune function). We applied these methods to assess biological aging in young humans who had not yet developed age-related diseases. Young individuals of the same chronological age varied in their “biological aging” (declining integrity of multiple organ systems). Already, before midlife, individuals who were aging more rapidly were less physically able, showed cognitive decline and brain aging, self-reported worse health, and looked older. Measured biological aging in young adults can be used to identify causes of aging and evaluate rejuvenation therapies. PMID:26150497

  8. Shape regression for vertebra fracture quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Michael Tillge; de Bruijne, Marleen; Tanko, Laszlo B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2005-04-01

    Accurate and reliable identification and quantification of vertebral fractures constitute a challenge both in clinical trials and in diagnosis of osteoporosis. Various efforts have been made to develop reliable, objective, and reproducible methods for assessing vertebral fractures, but at present there is no consensus concerning a universally accepted diagnostic definition of vertebral fractures. In this project we want to investigate whether or not it is possible to accurately reconstruct the shape of a normal vertebra, using a neighbouring vertebra as prior information. The reconstructed shape can then be used to develop a novel vertebra fracture measure, by comparing the segmented vertebra shape with its reconstructed normal shape. The vertebrae in lateral x-rays of the lumbar spine were manually annotated by a medical expert. With this dataset we built a shape model, with equidistant point distribution between the four corner points. Based on the shape model, a multiple linear regression model of a normal vertebra shape was developed for each dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation. The reconstructed shape was calculated for each dataset using these regression models. The average prediction error for the annotated shape was on average 3%.

  9. Damage detection using multivariate recurrence quantification analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. M.; Trickey, S. T.; Seaver, M.

    2006-02-01

    Recurrence-quantification analysis (RQA) has emerged as a useful tool for detecting subtle non-stationarities and/or changes in time-series data. Here, we extend the RQA analysis methods to multivariate observations and present a method by which the "length scale" parameter ɛ (the only parameter required for RQA) may be selected. We then apply the technique to the difficult engineering problem of damage detection. The structure considered is a finite element model of a rectangular steel plate where damage is represented as a cut in the plate, starting at one edge and extending from 0% to 25% of the plate width in 5% increments. Time series, recorded at nine separate locations on the structure, are used to reconstruct the phase space of the system's dynamics and subsequently generate the multivariate recurrence (and cross-recurrence) plots. Multivariate RQA is then used to detect damage-induced changes to the structural dynamics. These results are then compared with shifts in the plate's natural frequencies. Two of the RQA-based features are found to be more sensitive to damage than are the plate's frequencies.

  10. Quantification of contaminants associated with LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crutcher, E. R.; Nishimura, L. S.; Warner, K. J.; Wascher, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    The quantification of contaminants on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and associated hardware or tools is addressed. The purpose of this study was to provide a background data base for the evaluation of the surface of the LDEF and the effects of orbital exposure on that surface. This study necessarily discusses the change in the distribution of contaminants on the LDEF with time and environmental exposure. Much of this information may be of value for the improvement of contamination control procedures during ground based operations. The particulate data represents the results of NASA contractor monitoring as well as the results of samples collected and analyzed by the authors. The data from the tapelifts collected in the Space Shuttle Bay at Edwards Air Force Base and KSC are also presented. The amount of molecular film distributed over the surface of the LDEF is estimated based on measurements made at specific locations and extrapolated over the surface area of the LDEF. Some consideration of total amount of volatile-condensible materials available to form the resultant deposit is also presented. All assumptions underlying these estimates are presented along with the rationale for the conclusions. Each section is presented in a subsection for particles and another for molecular films.

  11. Uncertainty Quantification of Modelling of Equiaxed Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, K.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of metal alloy solidification are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. Often validation of such models has been done through comparison to sparse experimental data, to which agreement can be misinterpreted due to both model and experimental uncertainty. Uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis are performed on a transient model of solidification of Al-4.5 wt.% Cu in a rectangular cavity, with equiaxed (grain refined) solidification morphology. This model solves equations for momentum, temperature, and species conservation; UQ and sensitivity analysis are performed for the degree of macrosegregation. A Smolyak sparse grid algorithm is used to select input values to construct a response surface fit to model outputs. The response surface is then used as a surrogate for the solidification model to determine the sensitivities and probability density functions of the model outputs. Uncertain model inputs of interest include the secondary dendrite arm spacing, equiaxed particle size, and fraction solid at which the rigid mushy zone forms. Similar analysis was also performed on a transient model of direct chill casting of the same alloy.

  12. Quantification of extracellular UDP-galactose

    PubMed Central

    Lazarowski, Eduardo R.

    2009-01-01

    The human P2Y14 receptor is potently activated by UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc), UDP-galactose (UDP-Gal), UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), and UDP-glucuronic acid. Recently, cellular release of UDP-Glc and UDP-GlcNAc has been reported, but whether additional UDP-sugars are endogenous agonists for the P2Y14 receptor remains poorly defined. In the present study, we describe an assay for the quantification of UDP-Gal with sub-nanomolar sensitivity. This assay is based on the enzymatic conversion of UDP-Gal to UDP, using 1–4-β-galactosyltransferase. UDP is subsequently phosphorylated by nucleoside diphosphokinase in the presence of [γ32P]ATP and the formation of [γ32P]UTP is monitored by high performance liquid chromatography. The overall conversion of UDP-Gal to [γ32P]UTP was linear between 0.5 and 30 nM UDP-Gal. Extracellular UDP-Gal was detected on resting cultures of various cell types, and increased release of UDP-Gal was observed in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells stimulated with the protease-activated receptor agonist thrombin. Occurrence of regulated release of UDP-Gal suggests that, in addition to its role in glycosylation reactions, UDP-Gal is an important extracellular signaling molecule. PMID:19699703

  13. Quantification of the vocal folds’ dynamic displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Socorro Hernández-Montes, María; Muñoz, Silvino; De La Torre, Manuel; Flores, Mauricio; Pérez, Carlos; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Fast dynamic data acquisition techniques are required to investigate the motional behavior of the vocal folds (VFs) when they are subjected to a steady air-flow through the trachea. High-speed digital holographic interferometry (DHI) is a non-invasive full-field-of-view technique that has proved its usefulness to study rapid and non-repetitive object movements. Hence it is an ideal technique used here to measure VF displacements and vibration patterns at 2000 fps. Analyses from a set of 200 displacement images showed that VFs’ vibration cycles are established along their width (y) and length (x). Furthermore, the maximum deformation for the right and left VFs’ area may be quantified from these images, which in itself represents an important result in the characterization of this structure. At a controlled air pressure, VF displacements fall within the range ~100-1740 nm, with a calculated precision and accuracy that yields a variation coefficient of 1.91%. High-speed acquisition of full-field images of VFs and their displacement quantification are on their own significant data in the study of their functional and physiological behavior since voice quality and production depend on how they vibrate, i.e. their displacement amplitude and frequency. Additionally, the use of high speed DHI avoids prolonged examinations and represents a significant scientific and technological alternative contribution in advancing the knowledge and working mechanisms of these tissues.

  14. Uncertainty quantification for systems of conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Poette, Gael Despres, Bruno Lucor, Didier

    2009-04-20

    Uncertainty quantification through stochastic spectral methods has been recently applied to several kinds of non-linear stochastic PDEs. In this paper, we introduce a formalism based on kinetic theory to tackle uncertain hyperbolic systems of conservation laws with Polynomial Chaos (PC) methods. The idea is to introduce a new variable, the entropic variable, in bijection with our vector of unknowns, which we develop on the polynomial basis: by performing a Galerkin projection, we obtain a deterministic system of conservation laws. We state several properties of this deterministic system in the case of a general uncertain system of conservation laws. We then apply the method to the case of the inviscid Burgers' equation with random initial conditions and we present some preliminary results for the Euler system. We systematically compare results from our new approach to results from the stochastic Galerkin method. In the vicinity of discontinuities, the new method bounds the oscillations due to Gibbs phenomenon to a certain range through the entropy of the system without the use of any adaptative random space discretizations. It is found to be more precise than the stochastic Galerkin method for smooth cases but above all for discontinuous cases.

  15. Quantification of rigidity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Behrooz; Esteki, Ali; Ebrahimi-Takamjani, Esmaeal; Shahidi, Golam-Ali; Khamseh, Fatemeh; Moinodin, Marzieh

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, a new method for quantification of rigidity in elbow joint of Parkinsonian patients is introduced. One of the most known syndromes in Parkinson's disease (PD) is increased passive stiffness in muscles, which leads to rigidity in joints. Clinical evaluation of stiffness in wrist and/or elbow, commonly used by clinicians, is based on Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating System (UPDRS). Subjective nature of this method may influence the accuracy and precision of evaluations. Hence, introducing an objective standard method based on quantitative measurements may be helpful. A test rig was designed and fabricated to measure range of motion and viscous and elastic components of passive stiffness in elbow joint. Measurements were done for 41 patients and 11 controls. Measures were extracted using Matlab-R14 software and statistic analyses were done by Spss-13. Relation between each computed measure and the level of illness were analyzed. Results showed a better correlation between viscous component of stiffness and UPDRS score compared to the elastic component. Results of this research may help to introduce a standard objective method for evaluation of PD. PMID:17909970

  16. Quantification of moving target cyber defenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, Katheryn A.; Cybenko, George

    2015-05-01

    Current network and information systems are static, making it simple for attackers to maintain an advantage. Adaptive defenses, such as Moving Target Defenses (MTD) have been developed as potential "game-changers" in an effort to increase the attacker's workload. With many new methods being developed, it is difficult to accurately quantify and compare their overall costs and effectiveness. This paper compares the tradeoffs between current approaches to the quantification of MTDs. We present results from an expert opinion survey on quantifying the overall effectiveness, upfront and operating costs of a select set of MTD techniques. We find that gathering informed scientific opinions can be advantageous for evaluating such new technologies as it offers a more comprehensive assessment. We end by presenting a coarse ordering of a set of MTD techniques from most to least dominant. We found that seven out of 23 methods rank as the more dominant techniques. Five of which are techniques of either address space layout randomization or instruction set randomization. The remaining two techniques are applicable to software and computer platforms. Among the techniques that performed the worst are those primarily aimed at network randomization.

  17. Benchmarking RNA-Seq quantification tools

    PubMed Central

    Chandramohan, R.; Wu, Po-Yen; Phan, J.H.; Wang, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-Seq, a deep sequencing technique, promises to be a potential successor to microarraysfor studying the transcriptome. One of many aspects of transcriptomics that are of interest to researchers is gene expression estimation. With rapid development in RNA-Seq, there are numerous tools available to estimate gene expression, each producing different results. However, we do not know which of these tools produces the most accurate gene expression estimates. In this study we have addressed this issue using Cufflinks, IsoEM, HTSeq, and RSEM to quantify RNA-Seq expression profiles. Comparing results of these quantification tools, we observe that RNA-Seq relative expression estimates correlate with RT-qPCR measurements in the range of 0.85 to 0.89, with HTSeq exhibiting the highest correlation. But, in terms of root-mean-square deviation of RNA-Seq relative expression estimates from RT-qPCR measurements, we find HTSeq to produce the greatest deviation. Therefore, we conclude that, though Cufflinks, RSEM, and IsoEM might not correlate as well as HTSeq with RT-qPCR measurements, they may produce expression values with higher accuracy. PMID:24109770

  18. Comparison of analysis methods for airway quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.

    2012-03-01

    Diseased airways have been known for several years as a possible contributing factor to airflow limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD). Quantification of disease severity through the evaluation of airway dimensions - wall thickness and lumen diameter - has gained increased attention, thanks to the availability of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Novel approaches have focused on automated methods of measurement as a faster and more objective means that the visual assessment routinely employed in the clinic. Since the Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) method of airway measurement was introduced two decades ago [1], several new techniques for quantifying airways have been detailed in the literature, but no approach has truly become a standard for such analysis. Our own research group has presented two alternative approaches for determining airway dimensions, one involving a minimum path and the other active contours [2, 3]. With an increasing number of techniques dedicated to the same goal, we decided to take a step back and analyze the differences of these methods. We consequently put to the test our two methods of analysis and the FWHM approach. We first measured a set of 5 airways from a phantom of known dimensions. Then we compared measurements from the three methods to those of two independent readers, performed on 35 airways in 5 patients. We elaborate on the differences of each approach and suggest conclusions on which could be defined as the best one.

  19. Isolation, quantification, and analysis of chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Beth A; Bendich, Arnold J

    2011-01-01

    Many areas of chloroplast research require methods that can assess the quality and quantity of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA). The study of chloroplast functions that depend on the proper maintenance and expression of the chloroplast genome, understanding cpDNA replication and repair, and the development of technologies for chloroplast transformation are just some of the disciplines that require the isolation of high-quality cpDNA. Arabidopsis thaliana offers several advantages for studying these processes because of the sizeable collection of mutants and natural varieties (accessions) available from stock centers and a broad community of researchers that has developed many other genetic resources. Several approaches for the isolation and quantification of cpDNA have been developed, but little consideration has been given to the strengths and weaknesses and the type of information obtained by each method, especially with respect to A. thaliana. Here, we provide protocols for obtaining high-quality cpDNA for PCR and other applications, and we evaluate several different isolation and analytical methods in order to build a robust framework for the study of cpDNA with this model organism. PMID:21822838

  20. Uncertainty quantification in reacting flow modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Le MaÒitre, Olivier P.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Knio, Omar M.; Ghanem, Roger Georges; Najm, Habib N.

    2003-10-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) in the computational modeling of physical systems is important for scientific investigation, engineering design, and model validation. In this work we develop techniques for UQ based on spectral and pseudo-spectral polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, and we apply these constructions in computations of reacting flow. We develop and compare both intrusive and non-intrusive spectral PC techniques. In the intrusive construction, the deterministic model equations are reformulated using Galerkin projection into a set of equations for the time evolution of the field variable PC expansion mode strengths. The mode strengths relate specific parametric uncertainties to their effects on model outputs. The non-intrusive construction uses sampling of many realizations of the original deterministic model, and projects the resulting statistics onto the PC modes, arriving at the PC expansions of the model outputs. We investigate and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and identify their utility under different conditions. We also outline areas where ongoing and future research are needed to address challenges with both approaches.

  1. Legionella spp. isolation and quantification from greywater

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Sara; Blanky, Marina; Friedler, Eran; Halpern, Malka

    2015-01-01

    Legionella, an opportunistic human pathogen whose natural environment is water, is transmitted to humans through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Legionella has been isolated from a high diversity of water types. Due its importance as a pathogen, two ISO protocols have been developed for its monitoring. However, these two protocols are not suitable for analyzing Legionella in greywater (GW). GW is domestic wastewater excluding the inputs from toilets and kitchen. It can serve as an alternative water source, mainly for toilet flushing and garden irrigation; both producing aerosols that can cause a risk for Legionella infection. Hence, before reuse, GW has to be treated and its quality needs to be monitored. The difficulty of Legionella isolation from GW strives in the very high load of contaminant bacteria. Here we describe a modification of the ISO protocol 11731:1998 that enables the isolation and quantification of Legionella from GW samples. The following modifications were made:•To enable isolation of Legionella from greywater, a pre-filtration step that removes coarse matter is recommended.•Legionella can be isolated after a combined acid-thermic treatment that eliminates the high load of contaminant bacteria in the sample. PMID:26740925

  2. Quantification of periodic breathing in premature infants

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Mary A.; Fairchild, Karen D.; Patel, Manisha; Sinkin, Robert A.; Clark, Matthew T.; Moorman, J. Randall; Lake, Douglas E.; Kattwinkel, John; Delos, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodic breathing (PB), regular cycles of short apneic pauses and breaths, is common in newborn infants. To characterize normal and potentially pathologic PB, we used our automated apnea detection system and developed a novel method for quantifying PB. We identified a preterm infant who died of SIDS and who, on review of her breathing pattern while in the NICU, had exaggerated PB. Methods We analyzed the chest impedance signal for short apneic pauses and developed a wavelet transform method to identify repetitive 10–40 second cycles of apnea/breathing. Clinical validation was performed to distinguish PB from apnea clusters and determine the wavelet coefficient cutoff having optimum diagnostic utility. We applied this method to analyze the chest impedance signals throughout the entire NICU stays of all 70 infants born at 32 weeks’ gestation admitted over a two-and-a-half year period. This group includes an infant who died of SIDS and her twin. Results For infants of 32 weeks’ gestation, the fraction of time spent in PB peaks 7–14 days after birth at 6.5%. During that time the infant that died of SIDS spent 40% of each day in PB and her twin spent 15% of each day in PB. Conclusions This wavelet transform method allows quantification of normal and potentially pathologic PB in NICU patients. PMID:26012526

  3. Broadband acoustic quantification of stratified turbulence.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Andone C; Geyer, W Rockwell; Scully, Malcolm E

    2013-07-01

    High-frequency broadband acoustic scattering techniques have enabled the remote, high-resolution imaging and quantification of highly salt-stratified turbulence in an estuary. Turbulent salinity spectra in the stratified shear layer have been measured acoustically and by in situ turbulence sensors. The acoustic frequencies used span 120-600 kHz, which, for the highly stratified and dynamic estuarine environment, correspond to wavenumbers in the viscous-convective subrange (500-2500 m(-1)). The acoustically measured spectral levels are in close agreement with spectral levels measured with closely co-located micro-conductivity probes. The acoustically measured spectral shapes allow discrimination between scattering dominated by turbulent salinity microstructure and suspended sediments or swim-bladdered fish, the two primary sources of scattering observed in the estuary in addition to turbulent salinity microstructure. The direct comparison of salinity spectra inferred acoustically and by the in situ turbulence sensors provides a test of both the acoustic scattering model and the quantitative skill of acoustical remote sensing of turbulence dissipation in a strongly sheared and salt-stratified estuary. PMID:23862783

  4. Legionella spp. isolation and quantification from greywater.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Sara; Blanky, Marina; Friedler, Eran; Halpern, Malka

    2015-01-01

    Legionella, an opportunistic human pathogen whose natural environment is water, is transmitted to humans through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Legionella has been isolated from a high diversity of water types. Due its importance as a pathogen, two ISO protocols have been developed for its monitoring. However, these two protocols are not suitable for analyzing Legionella in greywater (GW). GW is domestic wastewater excluding the inputs from toilets and kitchen. It can serve as an alternative water source, mainly for toilet flushing and garden irrigation; both producing aerosols that can cause a risk for Legionella infection. Hence, before reuse, GW has to be treated and its quality needs to be monitored. The difficulty of Legionella isolation from GW strives in the very high load of contaminant bacteria. Here we describe a modification of the ISO protocol 11731:1998 that enables the isolation and quantification of Legionella from GW samples. The following modifications were made:•To enable isolation of Legionella from greywater, a pre-filtration step that removes coarse matter is recommended.•Legionella can be isolated after a combined acid-thermic treatment that eliminates the high load of contaminant bacteria in the sample. PMID:26740925

  5. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  6. Streptavidin conjugation and quantification-a method evaluation for nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Pablo Darío; Behnke, Thomas; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2016-06-01

    Aiming at the development of validated protocols for protein conjugation of nanomaterials and the determination of protein labeling densities, we systematically assessed the conjugation of the model protein streptavidin (SAv) to 100-, 500-, and 1000-nm-sized polystyrene and silica nanoparticles and dye-encoded polymer particles with two established conjugation chemistries, based upon achievable coupling efficiencies and labeling densities. Bioconjugation reactions compared included EDC/sulfo NHS ester chemistry for direct binding of the SAv to carboxyl groups at the particle surface and maleimide-thiol chemistry in conjunction with heterobifunctional PEG linkers and aminated nanoparticles (NPs). Quantification of the total and functional amounts of SAv on these nanomaterials and unreacted SAv in solution was performed with the BCA assay and the biotin-FITC (BF) titration, relying on different signal generation principles, which are thus prone to different interferences. Our results revealed a clear influence of the conjugation chemistry on the amount of NP crosslinking, yet under optimized reaction conditions, EDC/sulfo NHS ester chemistry and the attachment via heterobifunctional PEG linkers led to comparably efficient SAv coupling and good labeling densities. Particle size can obviously affect protein labeling densities and particularly protein functionality, especially for larger particles. For unstained nanoparticles, direct bioconjugation seems to be the most efficient strategy, whereas for dye-encoded nanoparticles, PEG linkers are to be favored for the prevention of dye-protein interactions which can affect protein functionality specifically in the case of direct SAv binding. Moreover, an influence of particle size on achievable protein labeling densities and protein functionality could be demonstrated. PMID:27038055

  7. High performance liquid chromatography-charged aerosol detection applying an inverse gradient for quantification of rhamnolipid biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Beate; Baune, Matthias; Jungkeit, Janek; Tiso, Till; Blank, Lars M; Hayen, Heiko

    2016-07-15

    A method using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to charged-aerosol detection (HPLC-CAD) was developed for the quantification of rhamnolipid biosurfactants. Qualitative sample composition was determined by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The relative quantification of different derivatives of rhamnolipids including di-rhamnolipids, mono-rhamnolipids, and their precursors 3-(3-hydroxyalkanoyloxy)alkanoic acids (HAAs) differed for two compared LC-MS instruments and revealed instrument dependent responses. Our here reported HPLC-CAD method provides uniform response. An inverse gradient was applied for the absolute quantification of rhamnolipid congeners to account for the detector's dependency on the solvent composition. The CAD produces a uniform response not only for the analytes but also for structurally different (nonvolatile) compounds. It was demonstrated that n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside or deoxycholic acid can be used as alternative standards. The method of HPLC-ultra violet (UV) detection after a derivatization of rhamnolipids and HAAs to their corresponding phenacyl esters confirmed the obtained results but required additional, laborious sample preparation steps. Sensitivity determined as limit of detection and limit of quantification for four mono-rhamnolipids was in the range of 0.3-1.0 and 1.2-2.0μg/mL, respectively, for HPLC-CAD and 0.4 and 1.5μg/mL, respectively, for HPLC-UV. Linearity for HPLC-CAD was at least 0.996 (R(2)) in the calibrated range of about 1-200μg/mL. Hence, the here presented HPLC-CAD method allows absolute quantification of rhamnolipids and derivatives. PMID:27283098

  8. US weapons secrets revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, R.S.; Arkin, W.M.

    1993-03-01

    Extraordinary details have only recently been revealed about the struggle over the control of early U.S. nuclear weapons and their initial deployments abroad. The information comes from a newly declassified top secret report, part of a larger study, The History of the Strategic Arms Competition, 1945-1972, commissioned by Defense Secretary James R. Schlisinger in summer 1974.

  9. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-09-01

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10(-6). The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings. PMID:22892645

  10. Quantification of asphaltene precipitation by scaling equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janier, Josefina Barnachea; Jalil, Mohamad Afzal B. Abd.; Samin, Mohamad Izhar B. Mohd; Karim, Samsul Ariffin B. A.

    2015-02-01

    Asphaltene precipitation from crude oil is one of the issues for the oil industry. The deposition of asphaltene occurs during production, transportation and separating process. The injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) during enhance oil recovery (EOR) is believed to contribute much to the precipitation of asphaltene. Precipitation can be affected by the changes in temperature and pressure on the crude oil however, reduction in pressure contribute much to the instability of asphaltene as compared to temperature. This paper discussed the quantification of precipitated asphaltene in crude oil at different high pressures and at constant temperature. The derived scaling equation was based on the reservoir condition with variation in the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) mixed with Dulang a light crude oil sample used in the experiment towards the stability of asphaltene. A FluidEval PVT cell with Solid Detection System (SDS) was the instrument used to gain experimental knowledge on the behavior of fluid at reservoir conditions. Two conditions were followed in the conduct of the experiment. Firstly, a 45cc light crude oil was mixed with 18cc (40%) of CO2 and secondly, the same amount of crude oil sample was mixed with 27cc (60%) of CO2. Results showed that for a 45cc crude oil sample combined with 18cc (40%) of CO2 gas indicated a saturation pressure of 1498.37psi and asphaltene onset point was 1620psi. Then for the same amount of crude oil combined with 27cc (60%) of CO2, the saturation pressure was 2046.502psi and asphaltene onset point was 2230psi. The derivation of the scaling equation considered reservoir temperature, pressure, bubble point pressure, mole percent of the precipitant the injected gas CO2, and the gas molecular weight. The scaled equation resulted to a third order polynomial that can be used to quantify the amount of asphaltene in crude oil.

  11. Quantification of nitrotyrosine in nitrated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingyi; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    For kinetic studies of protein nitration reactions, we have developed a method for the quantification of nitrotyrosine residues in protein molecules by liquid chromatography coupled to a diode array detector of ultraviolet-visible absorption. Nitrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and nitrated ovalbumin (OVA) were synthesized and used as standards for the determination of the protein nitration degree (ND), which is defined as the average number of nitrotyrosine residues divided by the total number of tyrosine residues in a protein molecule. The obtained calibration curves of the ratio of chromatographic peak areas of absorbance at 357 and at 280 nm vs. nitration degree are nearly the same for BSA and OVA (relative deviations <5%). They are near-linear at low ND (< 0.1) and can be described by a second-order polynomial fit up to \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document}$$ {\\hbox{ND}} = 0.5\\left( {{R^2} > 0.99} \\right) $$\\end{document}. A change of chromatographic column led to changes in absolute peak areas but not in the peak area ratios and related calibration functions, which confirms the robustness of the analytical method. First results of laboratory experiments confirm that the method is applicable for the investigation of the reaction kinetics of protein nitration. The main advantage over alternative methods is that nitration degrees can be efficiently determined without hydrolysis or digestion of the investigated protein molecules. PMID:20300739

  12. Extended quantification of the generalized recurrence plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, Maik; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    The generalized recurrence plot is a modern tool for quantification of complex spatial patterns. Its application spans the analysis of trabecular bone structures, Turing structures, turbulent spatial plankton patterns, and fractals. But, it is also successfully applied to the description of spatio-temporal dynamics and the detection of regime shifts, such as in the complex Ginzburg-Landau- equation. The recurrence plot based determinism is a central measure in this framework quantifying the level of regularities in temporal and spatial structures. We extend this measure for the generalized recurrence plot considering additional operations of symmetry than the simple translation. It is tested not only on two-dimensional regular patterns and noise but also on complex spatial patterns reconstructing the parameter space of the complex Ginzburg-Landau-equation. The extended version of the determinism resulted in values which are consistent to the original recurrence plot approach. Furthermore, the proposed method allows a split of the determinism into parts which based on laminar and non-laminar regions of the two-dimensional pattern of the complex Ginzburg-Landau-equation. A comparison of these parts with a standard method of image classification, the co-occurrence matrix approach, shows differences especially in the description of patterns associated with turbulence. In that case, it seems that the extended version of the determinism allows a distinction of phase turbulence and defect turbulence by means of their spatial patterns. This ability of the proposed method promise new insights in other systems with turbulent dynamics coming from climatology, biology, ecology, and social sciences, for example.

  13. Detection and Quantification of Citrullinated Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Moelants, Eva A. V.; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background Posttranslational deimination or citrullination by peptidylarginine deiminases (PAD) regulates the biological function of proteins and may be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. This posttranslational modification of arginine was recently discovered on inflammatory chemokines including CXCL8 and CXCL10, and significantly reduced their biological activity. To evaluate the importance of these modified chemokines in patients, methods for the detection and quantification of citrullinated chemokines are needed. Since citrullination only results in an increase of the protein mass with one mass unit and the loss of one positive charge, selective biochemical detection is difficult. Therefore, we developed an antibody-based method to specifically detect and quantify citrullination on a protein of interest. Methodology/Principal Findings First, the citrullinated proteins were chemically modified with antipyrine and 2,3-butanedione at low pH. Such selectively modified citrullines were subsequently detected and quantified by specific antibodies raised against a modified citrulline-containing peptide. The specificity of this two-step procedure was validated for citrullinated CXCL8 ([Cit5]CXCL8). Specific detection of [Cit5]CXCL8 concentrations between 1 and 50 ng/ml was possible, also in complex samples containing an excess of contaminating proteins. This novel detection method was used to evaluate the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the citrullination of inflammatory chemokines induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and granulocytes. LPS had no significant effect on the induction of CXCL8 citrullination in human PBMCs and granulocytes. However, granulocytes, known to contain PAD, were essential for the production of significant amounts of [Cit5]CXCL8. Conclusion/Significance The newly developed antibody-based method to specifically detect and quantify chemically modified

  14. Statistical Quantification of Methylation Levels by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guodong; Yi, Nengjun; Absher, Devin; Zhi, Degui

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Recently, next-generation sequencing-based technologies have enabled DNA methylation profiling at high resolution and low cost. Methyl-Seq and Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing (RRBS) are two such technologies that interrogate methylation levels at CpG sites throughout the entire human genome. With rapid reduction of sequencing costs, these technologies will enable epigenotyping of large cohorts for phenotypic association studies. Existing quantification methods for sequencing-based methylation profiling are simplistic and do not deal with the noise due to the random sampling nature of sequencing and various experimental artifacts. Therefore, there is a need to investigate the statistical issues related to the quantification of methylation levels for these emerging technologies, with the goal of developing an accurate quantification method. Methods In this paper, we propose two methods for Methyl-Seq quantification. The first method, the Maximum Likelihood estimate, is both conceptually intuitive and computationally simple. However, this estimate is biased at extreme methylation levels and does not provide variance estimation. The second method, based on Bayesian hierarchical model, allows variance estimation of methylation levels, and provides a flexible framework to adjust technical bias in the sequencing process. Results We compare the previously proposed binary method, the Maximum Likelihood (ML) method, and the Bayesian method. In both simulation and real data analysis of Methyl-Seq data, the Bayesian method offers the most accurate quantification. The ML method is slightly less accurate than the Bayesian method. But both our proposed methods outperform the original binary method in Methyl-Seq. In addition, we applied these quantification methods to simulation data and show that, with sequencing depth above 40–300 (which varies with different tissue samples) per cleavage site, Methyl-Seq offers a comparable quantification

  15. Quantification of chemical gaseous plumes on hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Sidi

    The passive remote chemical plume quantification problem may be approached from multiple aspects, corresponding to a variety of physical effects that may be exploited. Accordingly, a diversity of statistical quantification algorithms has been proposed in the literature. The ultimate performance and algorithmic complexity of each is influenced by the assumptions made about the scene, which may include the presence of ancillary measurements or particular background/plume features that may or may not be present. In this work, we evaluate and investigate the advantages and limitations of a number of quantification algorithms that span a variety of such assumptions. With these in-depth insights we gain, a new quantification algorithm is proposed for single gas quantification which is superior to all state-of-the-art algorithms in every almost every aspects including applicability, accuracy, and efficiency. The new method, called selected-band algorithm, achieves its superior performance through an accurate estimation of the unobservable off-plume radiance. The reason why off-plume radiance is recoverable relies on a common observation that most chemical gases only exhibit strong absorptive behavior in certain spectral bands. Those spectral bands where the gas absorption is almost zero or small are ideal to carry out background estimation. In this thesis, the new selected-band algorithm is first derived from its favorable narrow-band sharp-featured gas and then extended to an iterative algorithm that suits all kinds of gases. The performance improvement is verified by simulated data for a variety of experimental settings.

  16. GMO quantification: valuable experience and insights for the future.

    PubMed

    Milavec, Mojca; Dobnik, David; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Gruden, Kristina; Zel, Jana

    2014-10-01

    Cultivation and marketing of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been unevenly adopted worldwide. To facilitate international trade and to provide information to consumers, labelling requirements have been set up in many countries. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is currently the method of choice for detection, identification and quantification of GMOs. This has been critically assessed and the requirements for the method performance have been set. Nevertheless, there are challenges that should still be highlighted, such as measuring the quantity and quality of DNA, and determining the qPCR efficiency, possible sequence mismatches, characteristics of taxon-specific genes and appropriate units of measurement, as these remain potential sources of measurement uncertainty. To overcome these problems and to cope with the continuous increase in the number and variety of GMOs, new approaches are needed. Statistical strategies of quantification have already been proposed and expanded with the development of digital PCR. The first attempts have been made to use new generation sequencing also for quantitative purposes, although accurate quantification of the contents of GMOs using this technology is still a challenge for the future, and especially for mixed samples. New approaches are needed also for the quantification of stacks, and for potential quantification of organisms produced by new plant breeding techniques. PMID:25182968

  17. Absolute and relative quantification of RNA modifications via biosynthetic isotopomers

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Stefanie; Ochel, Antonia; Thüring, Kathrin; Spenkuch, Felix; Neumann, Jennifer; Sharma, Sunny; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Schneider, Dirk; Helm, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In the resurging field of RNA modifications, quantification is a bottleneck blocking many exciting avenues. With currently over 150 known nucleoside alterations, detection and quantification methods must encompass multiple modifications for a comprehensive profile. LC–MS/MS approaches offer a perspective for comprehensive parallel quantification of all the various modifications found in total RNA of a given organism. By feeding 13C-glucose as sole carbon source, we have generated a stable isotope-labeled internal standard (SIL-IS) for bacterial RNA, which facilitates relative comparison of all modifications. While conventional SIL-IS approaches require the chemical synthesis of single modifications in weighable quantities, this SIL-IS consists of a nucleoside mixture covering all detectable RNA modifications of Escherichia coli, yet in small and initially unknown quantities. For absolute in addition to relative quantification, those quantities were determined by a combination of external calibration and sample spiking of the biosynthetic SIL-IS. For each nucleoside, we thus obtained a very robust relative response factor, which permits direct conversion of the MS signal to absolute amounts of substance. The application of the validated SIL-IS allowed highly precise quantification with standard deviations <2% during a 12-week period, and a linear dynamic range that was extended by two orders of magnitude. PMID:25129236

  18. Extended Forward Sensitivity Analysis for Uncertainty Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are playing more important roles to quantify uncertainties and realize high fidelity simulations in engineering system analyses, such as transients happened in a complex nuclear reactor system. Traditional V&V in the reactor system analysis focused more on the validation part or did not differentiate verification and validation. The traditional approach to uncertainty quantification is based on a 'black box' approach. The simulation tool is treated as an unknown signal generator, a distribution of inputs according to assumed probability density functions is sent in and the distribution of the outputs is measured and correlated back to the original input distribution. The 'black box' method mixes numerical errors with all other uncertainties. It is also not efficient to perform sensitivity analysis. Contrary to the 'black box' method, a more efficient sensitivity approach can take advantage of intimate knowledge of the simulation code. In these types of approaches equations for the propagation of uncertainty are constructed and the sensitivities are directly solved for as variables in the simulation. This paper presents the forward sensitivity analysis as a method to help uncertainty qualification. By including time step and potentially spatial step as special sensitivity parameters, the forward sensitivity method is extended as one method to quantify numerical errors. Note that by integrating local truncation errors over the whole system through the forward sensitivity analysis process, the generated time step and spatial step sensitivity information reflect global numerical errors. The discretization errors can be systematically compared against uncertainties due to other physical parameters. This extension makes the forward sensitivity method a much more powerful tool to help uncertainty qualification. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time and space steps with other interested physical parameters, the simulation is allowed

  19. Methane bubbling: from speculation to quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinham, A. R.; Dunbabin, M.; Yuan, Z.

    2013-12-01

    magnitude from 500 to 100 000 mg m-2 d-1 depending on time of day and water depth. Average storage bubble flux rates between reservoirs varied by two orders of magnitude from 1 200 to 15 000 mg m-2 d-1, with the primary driver likely to be catchment forest cover. The relative contribution of bubbling to total fluxes varied from 10% to more than 90% depending on the reservoir and time of sampling. This method was consistently shown to greatly improve the spatial mapping and quantification of methane bubbling rates from reservoir surfaces and reduces the uncertainty associated with the determining the relative contribution of bubbling to total flux.

  20. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques of SCALE/TSUNAMI

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T; Mueller, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI). The TSUNAMI code suite can quantify the predicted change in system responses, such as k{sub eff}, reactivity differences, or ratios of fluxes or reaction rates, due to changes in the energy-dependent, nuclide-reaction-specific cross-section data. Where uncertainties in the neutron cross-section data are available, the sensitivity of the system to the cross-section data can be applied to propagate the uncertainties in the cross-section data to an uncertainty in the system response. Uncertainty quantification is useful for identifying potential sources of computational biases and highlighting parameters important to code validation. Traditional validation techniques often examine one or more average physical parameters to characterize a system and identify applicable benchmark experiments. However, with TSUNAMI correlation coefficients are developed by propagating the uncertainties in neutron cross-section data to uncertainties in the computed responses for experiments and safety applications through sensitivity coefficients. The bias in the experiments, as a function of their correlation coefficient with the intended application, is extrapolated to predict the bias and bias uncertainty in the application through trending analysis or generalized linear least squares techniques, often referred to as 'data adjustment.' Even with advanced tools to identify benchmark experiments, analysts occasionally find that the application models include some feature or material for which adequately similar benchmark experiments do not exist to support validation. For example, a criticality safety analyst may want to take credit for the presence of fission products in spent nuclear fuel. In such cases, analysts sometimes rely on 'expert judgment' to select an

  1. Revealing power in truth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Jeremy Shiffman’s editorial appropriately calls on making all forms of power more apparent and accountable, notably productive power derived from expertise and claims to moral authority. This commentary argues that relationships based on productive power can be especially difficult to reveal in global health policy because of embedded notions about the nature of power and politics. Yet, it is essential to recognize that global health is shot through with power relationships, that they can take many forms, and that their explicit acknowledgement should be part of, rather than factored out of, any reform of global health governance. PMID:25844390

  2. Next generation of food allergen quantification using mass spectrometric systems.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Martina; Clarke, Dean; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-08-01

    Food allergies are increasing worldwide and becoming a public health concern. Food legislation requires detailed declarations of potential allergens in food products and therefore an increased capability to analyze for the presence of food allergens. Currently, antibody-based methods are mainly utilized to quantify allergens; however, these methods have several disadvantages. Recently, mass spectrometry (MS) techniques have been developed and applied to food allergen analysis. At present, 46 allergens from 11 different food sources have been characterized using different MS approaches and some specific signature peptides have been published. However, quantification of allergens using MS is not routinely employed. This review compares the different aspects of food allergen quantification using advanced MS techniques including multiple reaction monitoring. The latter provides low limits of quantification for multiple allergens in simple or complex food matrices, while being robust and reproducible. This review provides an overview of current approaches to analyze food allergens, with specific focus on MS systems and applications. PMID:24824675

  3. Isobaric Labeling-Based Relative Quantification in Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays a key role in relative quantitative comparisons of proteins in order to understand their functional role in biological systems upon perturbation. In this review, we review studies that examine different aspects of isobaric labeling-based relative quantification for shotgun proteomic analysis. In particular, we focus on different types of isobaric reagents and their reaction chemistry (e.g., amine-, carbonyl-, and sulfhydryl-reactive). Various factors, such as ratio compression, reporter ion dynamic range, and others, cause an underestimation of changes in relative abundance of proteins across samples, undermining the ability of the isobaric labeling approach to be truly quantitative. These factors that affect quantification and the suggested combinations of experimental design and optimal data acquisition methods to increase the precision and accuracy of the measurements will be discussed. Finally, the extended application of isobaric labeling-based approach in hyperplexing strategy, targeted quantification, and phosphopeptide analysis are also examined. PMID:25337643

  4. Symmetry quantification and mapping using convergent beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyou-Hyun; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm to quantify symmetry recorded in convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns and use it for symmetry mapping in materials applications. We evaluate the effectiveness of the profile R-factor (R(p)) and the normalized cross-correlation coefficient (γ) for quantifying the amount of symmetry in a CBED pattern. The symmetry quantification procedures are automated and the algorithm is implemented as a DM (Digital Micrograph(©)) script. Experimental and simulated CBED patterns recorded from a Si single crystal are used to calibrate the proposed algorithm for the symmetry quantification. The proposed algorithm is then applied to a Si sample with defects to test the sensitivity of symmetry quantification to defects. Using the mirror symmetry as an example, we demonstrate that the normalized cross-correlation coefficient provides an effective and robust measurement of the symmetry recorded in experimental CBED patterns. PMID:23142747

  5. Superlattice band structure: New and simple energy quantification condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiz, F.

    2014-10-01

    Assuming an approximated effective mass and using Bastard's boundary conditions, a simple method is used to calculate the subband structure for periodic semiconducting heterostructures. Our method consists to derive and solve the energy quantification condition (EQC), this is a simple real equation, composed of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, and does not need any programming effort or sophistic machine to solve it. For less than ten wells heterostructures, we have derived and simplified the energy quantification conditions. The subband is build point by point; each point presents an energy level. Our simple energy quantification condition is used to calculate the subband structure of the GaAs/Ga0.5Al0.5As heterostructures, and build its subband point by point for 4 and 20 wells. Our finding shows a good agreement with previously published results.

  6. The Universe Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Pam

    1998-10-01

    The Universe is a bewildering place to the uninitiated. The concepts and theories that govern space seem complex and often contradictory. The Universe Revealed provides the keys to unlocking the wonders of the cosmos. Elegantly written and lavishly illustrated, it begins with the Sun and stretches through our solar system into deepest space. Lucid prose, written by many of the people who have shaped our current thinking on space, and spectacular photographs make the physics of the Universe accessible and provide a solid background for understanding the most recent astronomical discoveries. Covering the most intriguing features of the cosmos, the topics discussed range from the Earth and global warming to cosmic collisions and the size of the Universe. Major sections examine the Solar System, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and the observational techniques used by astronomers, both amateur and professional. The Universe Revealed represents the collaboration of internationally renowned experts in astronomy and cosmology, with contributions from authors including David Malin, F. Duccio Macchetto, Iain Nicholson, Neil Bone, Ian Ridpath, Seth Shostak, Mike Lancaster, Steve Miller, Ken Croswell, Geoff McNamara, and Steven Young. This extraordinary blend of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, will appeal to amateur and armchair astronomers alike.

  7. Large scale systematic proteomic quantification from non-metastatic to metastatic colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuefei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Shaowen; Jin, Hong; Wang, Wenhai; Yang, Pengyuan

    2015-07-01

    A systematic proteomic quantification of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer tissues from stage I to stage IIIC was performed in large scale. 1017 proteins were identified with 338 proteins in quantitative changes by label free method, while 341 proteins were quantified with significant expression changes among 6294 proteins by iTRAQ method. We found that proteins related to migration expression increased and those for binding and adherent decreased during the colorectal cancer development according to the gene ontology (GO) annotation and ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The integrin alpha 5 (ITA5) in integrin family was focused, which was consistent with the metastasis related pathway. The expression level of ITA5 decreased in metastasis tissues and the result has been further verified by Western blotting. Another two cell migration related proteins vitronectin (VTN) and actin-related protein (ARP3) were also proved to be up-regulated by both mass spectrometry (MS) based quantification results and Western blotting. Up to now, our result shows one of the largest dataset in colorectal cancer proteomics research. Our strategy reveals a disease driven omics-pattern for the metastasis colorectal cancer.

  8. Biochemical analysis and quantification of hematopoietic stem cells by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelig, Udi; Dror, Ziv; Iskovich, Svetlana; Zwielly, Amir; Ben-Harush, Miri; Nathan, Ilana; Mordechai, Shaul; Kapelushnik, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    Identification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in different stages of maturation is one of the major issues in stem cell research and bone marrow (BM) transplantation. Each stage of maturation of HSCs is characterized by a series of distinct glycoproteins present on the cell plasma membrane surface, named a cluster of differentiation (CD). Currently, complicated and expensive procedures based on CD expression are needed for identification and isolation of HSCs. This method is under dispute, since the correct markers' composition is not strictly clear, thus there is need for a better method for stem cell characterization. In the present study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is employed as a novel optical method for identification and characterization of HSCs based on their entire biochemical features. FTIR spectral analysis of isolated mice HSCs reveals several spectral markers related to lipids, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates, which distinguish HSCs from BM cells. The unique ``open'' conformation of HSC DNA as identified by FTIR is exploited for HSCs quantification in the BM. The proposed method of FTIR spectroscopy for HSC identification and quantification can contribute to stem cell research and BM transplantation.

  9. Online updating and uncertainty quantification using nonstationary output-only measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Ka-Veng; Kuok, Sin-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Extended Kalman filter (EKF) is widely adopted for state estimation and parametric identification of dynamical systems. In this algorithm, it is required to specify the covariance matrices of the process noise and measurement noise based on prior knowledge. However, improper assignment of these noise covariance matrices leads to unreliable estimation and misleading uncertainty estimation on the system state and model parameters. Furthermore, it may induce diverging estimation. To resolve these problems, we propose a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm for online estimation of the noise parameters which are used to characterize the noise covariance matrices. There are three major appealing features of the proposed approach. First, it resolves the divergence problem in the conventional usage of EKF due to improper choice of the noise covariance matrices. Second, the proposed approach ensures the reliability of the uncertainty quantification. Finally, since the noise parameters are allowed to be time-varying, nonstationary process noise and/or measurement noise are explicitly taken into account. Examples using stationary/nonstationary response of linear/nonlinear time-varying dynamical systems are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach. Furthermore, comparison with the conventional usage of EKF will be provided to reveal the necessity of the proposed approach for reliable model updating and uncertainty quantification.

  10. Quantification of SAHA-Dependent Changes in Histone Modifications Using Data-Independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Krautkramer, Kimberly A.; Reiter, Lukas; Denu, John M.; Dowell, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are important regulators of chromatin structure and gene expression. Quantitative analysis of histone PTMs by mass spectrometry remains extremely challenging due to the complex and combinatorial nature of histone PTMs. The most commonly used mass spectrometry-based method for high-throughput histone PTM analysis is data-dependent acquisition (DDA). However, stochastic precursor selection and dependence on MS1 ions for quantification impede comprehensive interrogation of histone PTM states using DDA methods. To overcome these limitations, we utilized a data-independent acquisition (DIA) workflow that provides superior run-to-run consistency and post-acquisition flexibility in comparison to DDA methods. In addition, we developed a novel DIA-based methodology to quantify isobaric, co-eluting histone peptides that lack unique MS2 transitions. Our method enabled deconvolution and quantification of histone PTMs that are otherwise refractory to quantitation, including the heavily acetylated tail of histone H4. Using this workflow, we investigated the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) on the global histone PTM state of human breast cancer MCF7 cells. A total of 62 unique histone PTMs were quantified, revealing novel SAHA-induced changes in acetylation and methylation of histones H3 and H4. PMID:26120868

  11. Quantification of SAHA-Dependent Changes in Histone Modifications Using Data-Independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Krautkramer, Kimberly A; Reiter, Lukas; Denu, John M; Dowell, James A

    2015-08-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are important regulators of chromatin structure and gene expression. Quantitative analysis of histone PTMs by mass spectrometry remains extremely challenging due to the complex and combinatorial nature of histone PTMs. The most commonly used mass spectrometry-based method for high-throughput histone PTM analysis is data-dependent acquisition (DDA). However, stochastic precursor selection and dependence on MS1 ions for quantification impede comprehensive interrogation of histone PTM states using DDA methods. To overcome these limitations, we utilized a data-independent acquisition (DIA) workflow that provides superior run-to-run consistency and postacquisition flexibility in comparison to DDA methods. In addition, we developed a novel DIA-based methodology to quantify isobaric, co-eluting histone peptides that lack unique MS2 transitions. Our method enabled deconvolution and quantification of histone PTMs that are otherwise refractory to quantitation, including the heavily acetylated tail of histone H4. Using this workflow, we investigated the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) on the global histone PTM state of human breast cancer MCF7 cells. A total of 62 unique histone PTMs were quantified, revealing novel SAHA-induced changes in acetylation and methylation of histones H3 and H4. PMID:26120868

  12. Clinical PET Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Flow Quantification.

    PubMed

    Juneau, Daniel; Erthal, Fernanda; Ohira, Hiroshi; Mc Ardle, Brian; Hessian, Renée; deKemp, Robert A; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac PET imaging is a powerful tool for the assessment of coronary artery disease. Many tracers with different advantages and disadvantages are available. It has several advantages over single photon emission computed tomography, including superior accuracy and lower radiation exposure. It provides powerful prognostic information, which can help to stratify patients and guide clinicians. The addition of flow quantification enables better detection of multivessel disease while providing incremental prognostic information. Flow quantification provides important physiologic information, which may be useful to individualize patient therapy. This approach is being applied in some centers, but requires standardization before it is more widely applied. PMID:26590781

  13. Detection and quantification of chimerism by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    George, David; Czech, Juliann; John, Bobby; Yu, Min; Jennings, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of chimerism and microchimerism is proving to be increasingly valuable for hematopoietic cell transplantation as well as non-transplant conditions. However, methods that are available to quantify low-level chimerism lack accuracy. Therefore, we developed and validated a method for quantifying chimerism based on digital PCR technology. We demonstrate accurate quantification that far exceeds what is possible with analog qPCR down to 0.01% with the potential to go even lower. Also, this method is inherently more informative than qPCR. We expect the advantages of digital PCR will make it the preferred method for chimerism analysis. PMID:23974275

  14. Quantification of Cellular Proliferation in Mouse Atherosclerotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Fuster, José J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive cell proliferation within atherosclerotic plaques plays an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis. Macrophage proliferation in particular has become a major focus of attention in the cardiovascular field because it appears to mediate most of macrophage expansion in mouse atherosclerotic arteries. Therefore, quantification of cell proliferation is an essential part of the characterization of atherosclerotic plaques in experimental studies. This chapter describes two variants of a simple immunostaining protocol that allow for the quantification of cellular proliferation in mouse atherosclerotic lesions based on the detection of the proliferation-associated antigen Ki-67. PMID:26445791

  15. A quick colorimetric method for total lipid quantification in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Byreddy, Avinesh R; Gupta, Adarsha; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2016-06-01

    Discovering microalgae with high lipid productivity are among the key milestones for achieving sustainable biodiesel production. Current methods of lipid quantification are time intensive and costly. A rapid colorimetric method based on sulfo-phospho-vanillin (SPV) reaction was developed for the quantification of microbial lipids to facilitate screening for lipid producing microalgae. This method was successfully tested on marine thraustochytrid strains and vegetable oils. The colorimetric method results correlated well with gravimetric method estimates. The new method was less time consuming than gravimetric analysis and is quantitative for lipid determination, even in the presence of carbohydrates, proteins and glycerol. PMID:27050419

  16. Quantification of toxicological effects for dichloromethane. Draft report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The source documents for background information used to develop the report on the quantification of toxicological effects for dichloromethane are the health assessment document (HAD) for dichloromethane and a subsequent addendum to the HAD (U.S. EPA, 1985b). In addition, some references published since 1985 are discussed. To summarize the results of the quantification of toxicological effects, a One-day Health Advisory of 10,000 ug/L for a 10-kg child was calculated, based on an acute oral study in rats reported by Kimura et al. (1971). No suitable data for the derivation of a Ten-day Health Advisory were found in the available literature.

  17. Brief review of uncertainty quantification for particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, M. H.; Teixeira, R. S.; Koiller, J.; Santos, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Metrological studies for particle image velocimetry (PIV) are recent in literature. An attempt to evaluate the uncertainty quantifications (UQ) of the PIV velocity field are in evidence. Therefore, a short review on main sources of uncertainty in PIV and available methodologies for its quantification are presented. In addition, the potential of some mathematical techniques, coming from the area of geometric mechanics and control, that could interest the fluids UQ community are highlighted as good possibilities. “We must measure what is measurable and make measurable what cannot be measured” (Galileo)

  18. Practical quantification of necrosis in histological whole-slide images.

    PubMed

    Homeyer, André; Schenk, Andrea; Arlt, Janine; Dahmen, Uta; Dirsch, Olaf; Hahn, Horst K

    2013-06-01

    Since the histological quantification of necrosis is a common task in medical research and practice, we evaluate different image analysis methods for quantifying necrosis in whole-slide images. In a practical usage scenario, we assess the impact of different classification algorithms and feature sets on both accuracy and computation time. We show how a well-chosen combination of multiresolution features and an efficient postprocessing step enables the accurate quantification necrosis in gigapixel images in less than a minute. The results are general enough to be applied to other areas of histological image analysis as well. PMID:23796718

  19. Quantification is Neither Necessary Nor Sufficient for Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Luca; Maul, Andrew; Torres Irribarra, David; Wilson, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Being an infrastructural, widespread activity, measurement is laden with stereotypes. Some of these concern the role of measurement in the relation between quality and quantity. In particular, it is sometimes argued or assumed that quantification is necessary for measurement; it is also sometimes argued or assumed that quantification is sufficient for or synonymous with measurement. To assess the validity of these positions the concepts of measurement and quantitative evaluation should be independently defined and their relationship analyzed. We contend that the defining characteristic of measurement should be the structure of the process, not a feature of its results. Under this perspective, quantitative evaluation is neither sufficient nor necessary for measurement.

  20. Pitfalls of DNA Quantification Using DNA-Binding Fluorescent Dyes and Suggested Solutions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hiromi; Einaga, Naoki; Esumi, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    The Qubit fluorometer is a DNA quantification device based on the fluorescence intensity of fluorescent dye binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Qubit is generally considered useful for checking DNA quality before next-generation sequencing because it measures intact dsDNA. To examine the most accurate and suitable methods for quantifying DNA for quality assessment, we compared three quantification methods: NanoDrop, which measures UV absorbance; Qubit; and quantitative PCR (qPCR), which measures the abundance of a target gene. For the comparison, we used three types of DNA: 1) DNA extracted from fresh frozen liver tissues (Frozen-DNA); 2) DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver tissues comparable to those used for Frozen-DNA (FFPE-DNA); and 3) DNA extracted from the remaining fractions after RNA extraction with Trizol reagent (Trizol-DNA). These DNAs were serially diluted with distilled water and measured using three quantification methods. For Frozen-DNA, the Qubit values were not proportional to the dilution ratio, in contrast with the NanoDrop and qPCR values. This non-proportional decrease in Qubit values was dependent on a lower salt concentration, and over 1 mM NaCl in the DNA solution was required for the Qubit measurement. For FFPE-DNA, the Qubit values were proportional to the dilution ratio and were lower than the NanoDrop values. However, electrophoresis revealed that qPCR reflected the degree of DNA fragmentation more accurately than Qubit. Thus, qPCR is superior to Qubit for checking the quality of FFPE-DNA. For Trizol-DNA, the Qubit values were proportional to the dilution ratio and were consistently lower than the NanoDrop values, similar to FFPE-DNA. However, the qPCR values were higher than the NanoDrop values. Electrophoresis with SYBR Green I and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) quantification demonstrated that Trizol-DNA consisted mostly of non-fragmented ssDNA. Therefore, Qubit is not always the most accurate method for

  1. Evaluation of the reliability of maize reference assays for GMO quantification.

    PubMed

    Papazova, Nina; Zhang, David; Gruden, Kristina; Vojvoda, Jana; Yang, Litao; Buh Gasparic, Meti; Blejec, Andrej; Fouilloux, Stephane; De Loose, Marc; Taverniers, Isabel

    2010-03-01

    A reliable PCR reference assay for relative genetically modified organism (GMO) quantification must be specific for the target taxon and amplify uniformly along the commercialised varieties within the considered taxon. Different reference assays for maize (Zea mays L.) are used in official methods for GMO quantification. In this study, we evaluated the reliability of eight existing maize reference assays, four of which are used in combination with an event-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay validated and published by the Community Reference Laboratory (CRL). We analysed the nucleotide sequence variation in the target genomic regions in a broad range of transgenic and conventional varieties and lines: MON 810 varieties cultivated in Spain and conventional varieties from various geographical origins and breeding history. In addition, the reliability of the assays was evaluated based on their PCR amplification performance. A single base pair substitution, corresponding to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reported in an earlier study, was observed in the forward primer of one of the studied alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) (70) assays in a large number of varieties. The SNP presence is consistent with a poor PCR performance observed for this assay along the tested varieties. The obtained data show that the Adh1 (70) assay used in the official CRL NK603 assay is unreliable. Based on our results from both the nucleotide stability study and the PCR performance test, we can conclude that the Adh1 (136) reference assay (T25 and Bt11 assays) as well as the tested high mobility group protein gene assay, which also form parts of CRL methods for quantification, are highly reliable. Despite the observed uniformity in the nucleotide sequence of the invertase gene assay, the PCR performance test reveals that this target sequence might occur in more than one copy. Finally, although currently not forming a part of official quantification methods, zein and SSIIb

  2. Pitfalls of DNA Quantification Using DNA-Binding Fluorescent Dyes and Suggested Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hiromi; Einaga, Naoki; Esumi, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    The Qubit fluorometer is a DNA quantification device based on the fluorescence intensity of fluorescent dye binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Qubit is generally considered useful for checking DNA quality before next-generation sequencing because it measures intact dsDNA. To examine the most accurate and suitable methods for quantifying DNA for quality assessment, we compared three quantification methods: NanoDrop, which measures UV absorbance; Qubit; and quantitative PCR (qPCR), which measures the abundance of a target gene. For the comparison, we used three types of DNA: 1) DNA extracted from fresh frozen liver tissues (Frozen-DNA); 2) DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver tissues comparable to those used for Frozen-DNA (FFPE-DNA); and 3) DNA extracted from the remaining fractions after RNA extraction with Trizol reagent (Trizol-DNA). These DNAs were serially diluted with distilled water and measured using three quantification methods. For Frozen-DNA, the Qubit values were not proportional to the dilution ratio, in contrast with the NanoDrop and qPCR values. This non-proportional decrease in Qubit values was dependent on a lower salt concentration, and over 1 mM NaCl in the DNA solution was required for the Qubit measurement. For FFPE-DNA, the Qubit values were proportional to the dilution ratio and were lower than the NanoDrop values. However, electrophoresis revealed that qPCR reflected the degree of DNA fragmentation more accurately than Qubit. Thus, qPCR is superior to Qubit for checking the quality of FFPE-DNA. For Trizol-DNA, the Qubit values were proportional to the dilution ratio and were consistently lower than the NanoDrop values, similar to FFPE-DNA. However, the qPCR values were higher than the NanoDrop values. Electrophoresis with SYBR Green I and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) quantification demonstrated that Trizol-DNA consisted mostly of non-fragmented ssDNA. Therefore, Qubit is not always the most accurate method for

  3. Gusev's Rim Revealed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image on sol 91 (April 5, 2004). Spirit is looking to the southeast, and through the martian haze has captured the rim of Gusev Crater approximately 80 kilometers (49.7 miles) away on the horizon.

    The right side of this image reveals the portion of the crater edge that descends into the mouth of Ma'adim Vallis, a channel that opens into Gusev Crater. Spirit is currently traveling toward the informally named 'Columbia Hills,' which lie to the left of the region pictured here.

    This image is similar to a panoramic camera image taken on sol 68, but Gusev's ridge is more visible here because the atmospheric dust caused by winter dust storms has settled. Scientists expect to get even clearer images than this one in upcoming sols.

    This image has been modified to make the crater rim more visible.

  4. Improved Strategies and Optimization of Calibration Models for Real-time PCR Absolute Quantification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time PCR absolute quantification applications rely on the use of standard curves to make estimates of DNA target concentrations in unknown samples. Traditional absolute quantification approaches dictate that a standard curve must accompany each experimental run. However, t...

  5. Reliability quantification and visualization for electric microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Mayank

    and parallel with the area Electric Power Systems (EPS), (3) includes the local EPS and may include portions of the area EPS, and (4) is intentionally planned. A more reliable electric power grid requires microgrids to operate in tandem with the EPS. The reliability can be quantified through various metrics for performance measure. This is done through North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) metrics in North America. The microgrid differs significantly from the traditional EPS, especially at asset level due to heterogeneity in assets. Thus, the performance cannot be quantified by the same metrics as used for EPS. Some of the NERC metrics are calculated and interpreted in this work to quantify performance for a single asset and group of assets in a microgrid. Two more metrics are introduced for system level performance quantification. The next step is a better representation of the large amount of data generated by the microgrid. Visualization is one such form of representation which is explored in detail and a graphical user interface (GUI) is developed as a deliverable tool to the operator for informative decision making and planning. Electronic appendices-I and II contain data and MATLAB© program codes for analysis and visualization for this work.

  6. Desert Stone Mantles: Quantification and Significance of Self-Organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgitt, David; Rosser, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Desert stone mantles exhibit sorting patterns which are evidence of self-organisation. Previous investigations of stone mantles developed on Late Tertiary and Quaternary basalts in arid northeastern Jordan, revealed distinct variations in the nature of stone cover both downslope and between lithologies of different age. However, manual field measurements of clast size and shape did not preserve information about the spatial configuration of the stone surface. Improved digital image capture and analysis techniques, including using a kite-based platform for vertical photography of the surface, has permitted the nature of stone mantles to be examined and modelled in greater detail. Image analysis has been assisted by the strong contrast in colour between the basalt clasts and the underlying surface enabling a binary classification of images, from which data on size, shape and position of clasts can be readily acquired. Quantification of self-organisation through a box-counting technique for measuring fractal dimension and a procedure using Thiessen polygons to determine ‘locking structures' indicates a general increase in organisation of the stone mantle downslope. Recognition of emergent behaviour requires an explanation in terms of positive feedback between controlling process and the influence of surface form. A series of rainfall simulation and infiltration experiments have been undertaken on plots to assess the variation in surface hydrology as a response to variations in ground surface and slope profile form. The relative contribution of runoff events of varying size and the degree to which the ground surface configuration accelerates or restricts modification of the surface influences the overall evolution of slope profiles via the erosion, transfer and deposition of both surface clasts and the underlying fine grained sediments. Critical to this modification is the interplay between the surface configuration, rainfall and runoff. The experiments presented

  7. Quantification of tocopherols and tocotrienols in soybean oil by supercritical-fluid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Méjean, Marie; Brunelle, Alain; Touboul, David

    2015-07-01

    For the most effective analytical strategies, development and validation include optimization of such analytical variables as resolution, detectability, sensitivity, simplicity, cost effectiveness, flexibility, and speed. However, other aspects concerning operator safety and environmental impact are not considered at the same level. The result has been many unintended negative effects of analytical methods developed to investigate different kinds of sample, especially hydrophobic compounds that generate a large amount of chemical waste and have a strong negative environmental impact. In this context, quantification of tocopherols and tocotrienols, i.e. the vitamin E family, is usually achieved by normal-phase liquid chromatography using large volumes of toxic organic solvents, or reversed-phase liquid chromatography using a high percentage of methanol for elution. We propose here a "greener" analytical strategy, including the hyphenation of supercritical-fluid chromatography, using CO2 and ethanol as mobile phase, NH2 as stationary phase, and mass spectrometry for the detection and quantification of vitamin E congeners in soybean oil. An atmospheric-pressure photoionization (APPI) source seemed significantly more sensitive and robust than electrospray or atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI). This method led to shortened analysis time (less than 5 min) and was revealed to be as sensitive as more traditional approaches, with limits of detection and quantification in the tens of μg L(-1). PMID:25822159

  8. Simultaneous Genotyping and Quantification of Hepatitis B Virus for Genotypes B and C by Real-Time PCR Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Xiu-Yu; Guo, Jin-Jun; Zeng, Ai-Zhong; Hu, Jie-Li; Huang, Wen-Xiang; Shan, You-Lan; Huang, Ai-Long

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important cause of human chronic liver diseases and is a major public health problem. Viral load and HBV genotype play critical roles in determining clinical outcomes and response to antiviral treatment in hepatitis B patients. Viral genotype detection and quantification assays are currently in use with different levels of effectiveness. In this study, the performance of a real-time genotyping and quantitative PCR (GQ-PCR)-based assay was evaluated. Through the use of genotype-specific primers and probes, this assay provides simultaneous identification and quantification of genotypes B and C in a single reaction. Our GQ-PCR correctly identified all predefined genotypes B and C, and no cross-reaction between genotypes B and C were observed. The GQ-PCR identified more cases of HBV infections with mixed genotypes B and C than direct sequencing did. Samples from 127 HBV-infected Chinese patients were genotyped with GQ-PCR, revealing 56.7% HBV as genotype B, 13.4% as genotype C, and 29.8% as mixed genotypes B and C. This assay provides a reliable, efficient, and cost-effective means for quantification of the B and C genotypes of HBV in single or mixed infections. This assay is suitable for sequential monitoring of viral load levels and for determining the relationship between the genotype viral load and stage of disease in Asians. PMID:20720032

  9. Furan quantification in bread crust: development of a simple and sensitive method using headspace-trap GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Huault, Lucie; Descharles, Nicolas; Rega, Barbara; Bistac, Sophie; Bosc, Véronique; Giampaoli, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    To study reactivity in bread crust during the baking process in the pan, we followed furan mainly resulting from Maillard and caramelisation reactions in cereal products. Furan quantification is commonly performed with automatic HS-static GC-MS. However, we showed that the automatic HS-trap GC-MS method can improve the sensitivity of the furan quantification. Indeed, this method allowed the LOD to be decreased from 0.3 ng g(-1) with HS-static mode to 0.03 ng g(-1) with HS-trap mode under these conditions. After validation of this method for furan quantification in bread crust, a difference between the crust extracted from the bottom and from the sides of the bread was evident. The quantity of furan in the bottom crust was five times lower than in the side crust, revealing less reactivity on the bottom than on the sides of the bread during the baking process in the pan. Differences in water content may explain these variations in reactivity. PMID:26666729

  10. 15 CFR 990.52 - Injury assessment-quantification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Injury assessment-quantification. 990.52 Section 990.52 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE...

  11. Quantification of Wheat Grain Arabinoxylans Using a Phloroglucinol Colorimetric Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabinoxylans (AX) play a critical role in end-use quality and nutrition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). An efficient, accurate method of AX quantification is desirable as AX plays an important role in processing, end use quality and human health. The objective of this work was to evaluate a stand...

  12. Comparison of DNA Quantification Methods for Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jérôme D.; Ludlow, Andrew T.; LaRanger, Ryan; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool that depends on loading a precise amount of DNA onto a flowcell. NGS strategies have expanded our ability to investigate genomic phenomena by referencing mutations in cancer and diseases through large-scale genotyping, developing methods to map rare chromatin interactions (4C; 5C and Hi-C) and identifying chromatin features associated with regulatory elements (ChIP-seq, Bis-Seq, ChiA-PET). While many methods are available for DNA library quantification, there is no unambiguous gold standard. Most techniques use PCR to amplify DNA libraries to obtain sufficient quantities for optical density measurement. However, increased PCR cycles can distort the library’s heterogeneity and prevent the detection of rare variants. In this analysis, we compared new digital PCR technologies (droplet digital PCR; ddPCR, ddPCR-Tail) with standard methods for the titration of NGS libraries. DdPCR-Tail is comparable to qPCR and fluorometry (QuBit) and allows sensitive quantification by analysis of barcode repartition after sequencing of multiplexed samples. This study provides a direct comparison between quantification methods throughout a complete sequencing experiment and provides the impetus to use ddPCR-based quantification for improvement of NGS quality. PMID:27048884

  13. DeMix-Q: Quantification-Centered Data Processing Workflow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Käll, Lukas; Zubarev, Roman A

    2016-04-01

    For historical reasons, most proteomics workflows focus on MS/MS identification but consider quantification as the end point of a comparative study. The stochastic data-dependent MS/MS acquisition (DDA) gives low reproducibility of peptide identifications from one run to another, which inevitably results in problems with missing values when quantifying the same peptide across a series of label-free experiments. However, the signal from the molecular ion is almost always present among the MS(1)spectra. Contrary to what is frequently claimed, missing values do not have to be an intrinsic problem of DDA approaches that perform quantification at the MS(1)level. The challenge is to perform sound peptide identity propagation across multiple high-resolution LC-MS/MS experiments, from runs with MS/MS-based identifications to runs where such information is absent. Here, we present a new analytical workflow DeMix-Q (https://github.com/userbz/DeMix-Q), which performs such propagation that recovers missing values reliably by using a novel scoring scheme for quality control. Compared with traditional workflows for DDA as well as previous DIA studies, DeMix-Q achieves deeper proteome coverage, fewer missing values, and lower quantification variance on a benchmark dataset. This quantification-centered workflow also enables flexible and robust proteome characterization based on covariation of peptide abundances. PMID:26729709

  14. Quantification and Single-Spore Detection of Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microscopic identification and quantification of Phakopsora pachyrhizi spores from environmental samples, spore traps, and laboratory specimens can represent a challenge. Such reports, especially from passive spore traps, commonly describe the number of “rust-like” spores; for other forensic sa...

  15. Colorimetric Quantification and in Situ Detection of Collagen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteban, Francisco J.; del Moral, Maria L.; Sanchez-Lopez, Ana M.; Blanco, Santos; Jimenez, Ana; Hernandez, Raquel; Pedrosa, Juan A.; Peinado, Maria A.

    2005-01-01

    A simple multidisciplinary and inexpensive laboratory exercise is proposed, in which the undergraduate student may correlate biochemical and anatomical findings. The entire practical session can be completed in one 2.5-3 hour laboratory period, and consists of the quantification of collagen and total protein content from tissue sections--without…

  16. Identification and quantification of methanogenic archaea in adult chicken ceca

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methanogens, members of the domain Archaea, have been isolated from various animals but few reports exists regarding the isolation of methanogens from chicken, goose, and turkey feces. By using molecular methods for the identification and quantification of methanogenic archea in adult chicken ceca,...

  17. Literacy and Language Education: The Quantification of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Tara

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes international policy contexts of adult literacy and language assessment and the shift toward standardization through measurement tools. It considers the implications the quantification of learning outcomes has for pedagogy and practice and for the social inclusion of transnational migrants.

  18. Current Issues in the Quantification of Federal Reserved Water Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookshire, David S.; Watts, Gary L.; Merrill, James L.

    1985-11-01

    This paper examines the quantification of federal reserved water rights from legal, institutional, and economic perspectives. Special attention is directed toward Indian reserved water rights and the concept of practicably irrigable acreage. We conclude by examining current trends and exploring alternative approaches to the dilemma of quantifying Indian reserved water rights.

  19. Infectious Viral Quantification of Chikungunya Virus-Virus Plaque Assay.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parveen; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    The plaque assay is an essential method for quantification of infectious virus titer. Cells infected with virus particles are overlaid with a viscous substrate. A suitable incubation period results in the formation of plaques, which can be fixed and stained for visualization. Here, we describe a method for measuring Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) titers via virus plaque assays. PMID:27233264

  20. Identification and Quantification Soil Redoximorphic Features by Digital Image Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil redoximorphic features (SRFs) have provided scientists and land managers with insight into relative soil moisture for approximately 60 years. The overall objective of this study was to develop a new method of SRF identification and quantification from soil cores using a digital camera and imag...

  1. Macroscopic inspection of ape feces: what's in a quantification method?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Caroline A; McGrew, William C

    2014-06-01

    Macroscopic inspection of feces has been used to investigate primate diet. The limitations of this method to identify food-items to species level have long been recognized, but ascertaining aspects of diet (e.g., folivory) are achievable by quantifying food-items in feces. Quantification methods applied include rating food-items using a scale of abundance, estimating their percentage volume, and weighing food-items. However, verification as to whether or not composition data differ, depending on which quantification method is used during macroscopic inspection, has not been done. We analyzed feces collected from ten adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) of the Kanyawara community in Kibale National Park, Uganda. We compare dietary composition totals obtained from using different quantification methods and ascertain if sieve mesh size influences totals calculated. Finally, this study validates findings from direct observation of feeding by the same individuals from whom the fecal samples had been collected. Contrasting diet composition totals obtained by using different quantification methods and sieve mesh sizes can influence folivory and frugivory estimates. However, our findings were based on the assumption that fibrous matter contained pith and leaf fragments only, which remains to be verified. We advocate macroscopic inspection of feces can be a valuable tool to provide a generalized overview of dietary composition for primate populations. As most populations remain unhabituated, scrutinizing and validating indirect measures are important if they are to be applied to further understand inter- and intra-species dietary variation. PMID:24482001

  2. Comparison of DNA Quantification Methods for Next Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Robin, Jérôme D; Ludlow, Andrew T; LaRanger, Ryan; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2016-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool that depends on loading a precise amount of DNA onto a flowcell. NGS strategies have expanded our ability to investigate genomic phenomena by referencing mutations in cancer and diseases through large-scale genotyping, developing methods to map rare chromatin interactions (4C; 5C and Hi-C) and identifying chromatin features associated with regulatory elements (ChIP-seq, Bis-Seq, ChiA-PET). While many methods are available for DNA library quantification, there is no unambiguous gold standard. Most techniques use PCR to amplify DNA libraries to obtain sufficient quantities for optical density measurement. However, increased PCR cycles can distort the library's heterogeneity and prevent the detection of rare variants. In this analysis, we compared new digital PCR technologies (droplet digital PCR; ddPCR, ddPCR-Tail) with standard methods for the titration of NGS libraries. DdPCR-Tail is comparable to qPCR and fluorometry (QuBit) and allows sensitive quantification by analysis of barcode repartition after sequencing of multiplexed samples. This study provides a direct comparison between quantification methods throughout a complete sequencing experiment and provides the impetus to use ddPCR-based quantification for improvement of NGS quality. PMID:27048884

  3. Juvenile Hormone Extraction, Purification, and Quantification in Ants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is an important insect hormone known to have many effects on development, reproduction, and behavior in both solitary and social insects. A number of questions using ants as a model involve JH. This procedure allows for quantification of circulating levels of JH III, which can ...

  4. The Role of Uncertainty Quantification for Reactor Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatores, M.; Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of uncertainties is a crucial step in design. The comparison of a-priori uncertainties with the target accuracies, allows to define needs and priorities for uncertainty reduction. In view of their impact, the uncertainty analysis requires a reliability assessment of the uncertainty data used. The choice of the appropriate approach and the consistency of different approaches are discussed.

  5. THE QUANTIFICATION OF FUNCTIONAL LOAD--A LINGUISTIC PROBLEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HOCKETT, C.F.

    MEASUREMENT CRITERIA ARE DEVELOPED FOR THE QUANTIFICATION OF THE FUNCTIONAL LOAD OF THE PHONEMES OF A LANGUAGE. THE CONCEPT OF FUNCTIONAL LOAD OR YIELD, FROM CERTAIN THEORIES OF LINGUISTIC CHANGE, STATES THAT SOME CONTRASTS BETWEEN THE DISTINCTIVE SOUNDS OF A LANGUAGE DO MORE WORK THAN OTHERS BY OCCURRING MORE FREQUENTLY AND IN MORE LINGUISTIC…

  6. Quantification of confocal images of biofilms grown on irregular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sommerfeld Ross, Stacy; Tu, Mai Han; Falsetta, Megan L; Ketterer, Margaret R; Kiedrowski, Megan R; Horswill, Alexander R; Apicella, Michael A; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Fiegel, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial biofilms grow on many types of surfaces, including flat surfaces such as glass and metal and irregular surfaces such as rocks, biological tissues and polymers. While laser scanning confocal microscopy can provide high-resolution images of biofilms grown on any surface, quantification of biofilm-associated bacteria is currently limited to bacteria grown on flat surfaces. This can limit researchers studying irregular surfaces to qualitative analysis or quantification of only the total bacteria in an image. In this work, we introduce a new algorithm called modified connected volume filtration (MCVF) to quantify bacteria grown on top of an irregular surface that is fluorescently labeled or reflective. Using the MCVF algorithm, two new quantification parameters are introduced. The modified substratum coverage parameter enables quantification of the connected-biofilm bacteria on top of the surface and on the imaging substratum. The utility of MCVF and the modified substratum coverage parameter were shown with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms grown on human airway epithelial cells. A second parameter, the percent association, provides quantified data on the colocalization of the bacteria with a labeled component, including bacteria within a labeled tissue. The utility of quantifying the bacteria associated with the cell cytoplasm was demonstrated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae biofilms grown on cervical epithelial cells. This algorithm provides more flexibility and quantitative ability to researchers studying biofilms grown on a variety of irregular substrata. PMID:24632515

  7. A Quantification Approach to Popular American Theatre: Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Alan

    A previously relatively unexplored area of theater history studies is the quantification of titles, authors, and locations of productions of plays in Canada and the United States. Little is known, for example, about the number of times any one play was staged, especially in the earlier days of American drama. A project which counts productions on…

  8. The Role of Uncertainty Quantification for Reactor Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatores, M.; Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.

    2015-01-15

    The quantification of uncertainties is a crucial step in design. The comparison of a-priori uncertainties with the target accuracies, allows to define needs and priorities for uncertainty reduction. In view of their impact, the uncertainty analysis requires a reliability assessment of the uncertainty data used. The choice of the appropriate approach and the consistency of different approaches are discussed.

  9. Quantification of major allergen parvalbumin in 22 species of fish by SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Yang, Tao; Yu, Cheng-Tao; Ume, Chiaki; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Shimakura, Kuniyoshi; Shiomi, Kazuo; Hamada-Sato, Naoko

    2016-03-01

    Fish is an important causative material of food allergy. Although the allergenicity of fish is considered to correlate with the content of parvalbumin, the major fish allergen, available information about the parvalbumin content in fish is limited. In this study, a simple and reliable quantification method for fish parvalbumin by SDS-PAGE was first established. Application of the SDS-PAGE method to 22 species of fish revealed a marked variation in parvalbumin content among fish. Furthermore, the parvalbumin content was found to be higher in dorsal white muscle than in ventral white muscle, in rostral part of white muscle than in caudal part of white muscle and in white muscle than in dark muscle. IgE reactivity of fish was roughly proportional to parvalbumin content. Interestingly, large-sized migratory fish, such as salmon, swordfish and tuna, were commonly very low in both parvalbumin content and IgE reactivity. PMID:26471564

  10. GoIFISH: a system for the quantification of single cell heterogeneity from IFISH images.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Anne; Rye, Inga H; Almendro, Vanessa; Helland, Aslaug; Russnes, Hege G; Markowetz, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Molecular analysis has revealed extensive intra-tumor heterogeneity in human cancer samples, but cannot identify cell-to-cell variations within the tissue microenvironment. In contrast, in situ analysis can identify genetic aberrations in phenotypically defined cell subpopulations while preserving tissue-context specificity. GoIFISHGoIFISH is a widely applicable, user-friendly system tailored for the objective and semi-automated visualization, detection and quantification of genomic alterations and protein expression obtained from fluorescence in situ analysis. In a sample set of HER2-positive breast cancers GoIFISHGoIFISH is highly robust in visual analysis and its accuracy compares favorably to other leading image analysis methods. GoIFISHGoIFISH is freely available at www.sourceforge.net/projects/goifish/. PMID:25168174