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Sample records for double barrier qdb

  1. DIII-D Quiescent Double Barrier Regime Experiments and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T.A.; Burrell, K.H.; DeBoo, J.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Jayakumar, R.J.; Kaiser, T.B .; Kinsey, J.E.; Lasnier, C.J.; Lao, L.L.; Makowski, M.A.; McKee, G.R.; Moyer, R.A.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Rhodes, T.L.; Rudakov, D.L.; Staebler, G.M.; West, W.P.

    2002-07-01

    Discharges characteristic of the quiescent double barrier (QDB) regime [1] are attractive for development of advanced tokamak (AT) scenarios relevant to fusion reactors [2] and they offer near term advantages for exploring and developing control techniques. We continue to explore the QDB regime in DIII-D to improve understanding of formation and control of these discharges and to explore scaling to steady-state reactors. The formation of an internal transport barrier (ITB) provides a naturally peaked core pressure profile. This peaking in density in combination with the H-mode-like edge barrier and pedestal provide a path to high performance. We have achieved {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89P} {approx} 7 for several energy confinement times ({le} 25 {tau}{sub E}). We discuss here a combination of modeling and experiments using electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) to demonstrate steady state, current-driven equilibria and control of the current distribution, safety factor q, and density profile. Experimental conditions leading to formation of the QDB discharge require establishing two distinct and separated barrier regions, a core region near {rho} {approx} 0.5 and an edge barrier outside {rho} > 0.95, {rho} is the square root of toroidal flux (radial coordinate). A region of higher transport due to a change in polarity of the E x B shearing rate [1] separates the core barrier from the H-mode edge. It is this separation in barriers that so far has required use of counter-NBI to establish QDB conditions. Balanced NBI should also allow this separation of barriers. The edge corresponds to the quiescent H-mode (QH) conditions [3]. In this quiescent edge region, the normally observed transient loss associated with edge-localized-mode (ELM) activity is replaced with a steady particle loss driven by a coherent oscillation residing outside the pedestal region. This edge harmonic oscillation (EHO) [2] typically exhibits 2 or 3 harmonics of a fundamental frequency near 10 kHz. We find this combination of a core ITB and the QH-mode edge to be extremely robust and to produce slowly varying, high performance discharge parameters, Fig. 1, for long durations {approx} 3 s. These conditions are generally limited by the duration of the NBI system and a slow evolution to lower q values as the Ohmic current moves inward on the resistive time scale for diffusion.

  2. Edge Stability and Performance of the ELM-Free Quiescent H-Mode and the Quiescent Double Barrier Mode on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    West, W P; Burrell, K H; Casper, T A; . Doyle, E J; Snyder, P B; Gohil, P; Lao, L L; Lasnier, C J; Leonard, A W; Nave, M F; Osborne, T H; Thomas, D M; Wang, G; Zeng, L

    2004-12-03

    The quiescent H (QH) mode, an edge localized mode (ELM)-free, high-confinement mode, combines well with an internal transport barrier to form quiescent double barrier (QDB) stationary state, high performance plasmas. The QH-mode edge pedestal pressure is similar to that seen in ELMing phases of the same discharge, with similar global energy confinement. The pedestal density in early ELMing phases of strongly pumped counter injection discharges drops and a transition to QH-mode occurs, leading to lower calculated edge bootstrap current. Plasmas current ramp experiment and ELITE code modeling of edge stability suggest that QH-modes lie near an edge current stability boundary. At high triangularity, QH-mode discharges operate at higher pedestal density and pressure, and have achieved ITER level values of {beta}{sub PED} and {nu}*. The QDB achieves performance of {alpha}{sub N}H{sub 89} {approx} 7 in quasi-stationary conditions for a duration of 10 tE, limited by hardware. Recently we demonstrated stationary state QDB discharges with little change in kinetic and q profiles (q{sub 0} > 1) for 2 s, comparable to ELMing ''hybrid scenarios'', yet without the debilitating effects of ELMs. Plasma profile control tools, including electron cyclotron heating and current drive and neutral beam heating, have been demonstrated to control simultaneously the q profile development, the density peaking, impurity accumulation and plasma beta.

  3. CURRENT DRIVE AND PRESSURE PROFILE MODIFICATION WITH ELECTRON CYCLOTRON POWER IN DIII-D QUIESCENT DOUBLE BARRIER EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    CASPER,TA; BURRELL,KH; DOYLE,EJ; GOHIL,P; GREENFIELD,CM; GROEBNER,RJ; JAYAKUMAR,RJ; MAKOWSKI,MA; RHODES,TL; WEST,WP

    2003-07-01

    OAK-B135 High confinement mode (H-mode) operation is a leading scenario for burning plasma devices due to its inherently high energy-confinement characteristics. The quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) offers these same advantages with the additional attraction of more steady edge conditions where the highly transient power loads due to edge localized mode (ELM) activity is replaced by the steadier power and particle losses associated with an edge harmonic oscillation (EHO). With the addition of an internal transport barrier (ITB), the capability is introduced for independent control of both the edge conditions and the core confinement region giving potential control of fusion power production for an advanced tokamak configuration. The quiescent double barrier (QDB) conditions explored in DIII-D experiments exhibit these characteristics and have resulted in steady plasma conditions for several confinement times ({approx} 26 {tau}{sub E}) with moderately high stored energy, {beta}{sub N}H{sub 89} {approx} 7 for 10 {tau}{sub E}.

  4. RECENT EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF EDGE AND INTERNAL TRANSPORT BARRIERS IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    P. GOHIL; L.R. BAYLOR; K.H. BURRELL; T.A. CASPER; E.J. DOYLE; C.M. GREENFIELD; T.C. JERNIGAN; J.E. KINSEY; C.J LASNIER; R.A. MOYER; M. MURAKAMI; T.L. RHODES; D.L. RUDAKOV; G.M. STAEBLER; G. WANG; J.G. WATKINS; W.P. WEST; L.ZENG

    2002-08-01

    Results from recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have revealed many important details on transport barriers at the plasma edge and in the plasma core. These experiments include: (a) the formation of the H-mode edge barrier directly by pellet injection; (b) the formation of a quiescent H-mode edge barrier (QH-mode) which is free from edge localized modes (ELMs), but which still exhibits good density and radiative power control; (c) the formation of multiple transport barriers, such as the quiescent double barrier (QDB) which combines a internal transport barrier with the quiescent H-mode edge barrier. Results from the pellet-induced H-mode experiments indicate that: (a) the edge temperature (electron or ion) is not a critical parameter for the formation of the H-mode barrier, (b) pellet injection leads to an increased gradient in the radial electric field, E{sub r}, at the plasma edge; (c) the experimentally determined edge parameters at barrier transition are well below the predictions of several theories on the formation of the H-mode barrier, (d) pellet injection can lower the threshold power required to form the H-mode barrier. The quiescent H-mode barrier exhibits good density control as the result of continuous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity at the plasma edge called the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO). The EHO enhances the edge particle transport while maintaining a good energy transport barrier. The ability to produce multiple barriers in the QDB regime has led to long duration, high performance plasmas with {beta}{sub NH{sub 89}} values of 7 for up to 10 times the confinement time. Density profile control in the plasma core of QDB plasmas has been demonstrated using on-axis ECH.

  5. A double barrier memristive device.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M; Ziegler, M; Kolberg, L; Soni, R; Dirkmann, S; Mussenbrock, T; Kohlstedt, H

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantum mechanical memristive Nb/Al/Al2O3/NbxOy/Au device which consists of an ultra-thin memristive layer (NbxOy) sandwiched between an Al2O3 tunnel barrier and a Schottky-like contact. A highly uniform current distribution for the LRS (low resistance state) and HRS (high resistance state) for areas ranging between 70 μm2 and 2300 μm2 were obtained, which indicates a non-filamentary based resistive switching mechanism. In a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis we show evidence that resistive switching originates from oxygen diffusion and modifications of the local electronic interface states within the NbxOy layer, which influences the interface properties of the Au (Schottky) contact and of the Al2O3 tunneling barrier, respectively. The presented device might offer several benefits like an intrinsic current compliance, improved retention and no need for an electric forming procedure, which is especially attractive for possible applications in highly dense random access memories or neuromorphic mixed signal circuits. PMID:26348823

  6. A double barrier memristive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, M.; Ziegler, M.; Kolberg, L.; Soni, R.; Dirkmann, S.; Mussenbrock, T.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2015-09-01

    We present a quantum mechanical memristive Nb/Al/Al2O3/NbxOy/Au device which consists of an ultra-thin memristive layer (NbxOy) sandwiched between an Al2O3 tunnel barrier and a Schottky-like contact. A highly uniform current distribution for the LRS (low resistance state) and HRS (high resistance state) for areas ranging between 70 μm2 and 2300 μm2 were obtained, which indicates a non-filamentary based resistive switching mechanism. In a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis we show evidence that resistive switching originates from oxygen diffusion and modifications of the local electronic interface states within the NbxOy layer, which influences the interface properties of the Au (Schottky) contact and of the Al2O3 tunneling barrier, respectively. The presented device might offer several benefits like an intrinsic current compliance, improved retention and no need for an electric forming procedure, which is especially attractive for possible applications in highly dense random access memories or neuromorphic mixed signal circuits.

  7. A double barrier memristive device

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M.; Ziegler, M.; Kolberg, L.; Soni, R.; Dirkmann, S.; Mussenbrock, T.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantum mechanical memristive Nb/Al/Al2O3/NbxOy/Au device which consists of an ultra-thin memristive layer (NbxOy) sandwiched between an Al2O3 tunnel barrier and a Schottky-like contact. A highly uniform current distribution for the LRS (low resistance state) and HRS (high resistance state) for areas ranging between 70 μm2 and 2300 μm2 were obtained, which indicates a non-filamentary based resistive switching mechanism. In a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis we show evidence that resistive switching originates from oxygen diffusion and modifications of the local electronic interface states within the NbxOy layer, which influences the interface properties of the Au (Schottky) contact and of the Al2O3 tunneling barrier, respectively. The presented device might offer several benefits like an intrinsic current compliance, improved retention and no need for an electric forming procedure, which is especially attractive for possible applications in highly dense random access memories or neuromorphic mixed signal circuits. PMID:26348823

  8. Phonon tunneling through a double barrier system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas, Diosdado; de León-Pérez, Fernando; Pérez-Álvarez, R.; Arriaga, J.

    2015-04-01

    The tunneling of optical and acoustic phonons at normal incidence on a double-barrier is studied in this paper. Transmission coefficients and resonance conditions are derived theoretically under the assumption that the long-wavelength approximation is valid. It is shown that the behavior of the transmission coefficients for the symmetric double barrier has a Lorentzian form close to resonant frequencies and that Breit-Wigner's formula have a general validity in one-dimensional phonon tunneling. Authors also study the so-called generalized Hartman effect in the tunneling of long-wavelength phonons and show that this effect is a numerical artifact resulting from taking the opaque limit before exploring the variation with a finite barrier width. This study could be useful for the design of acoustic devices.

  9. Double- and triple-barrier Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, R.; Giordano, A.

    2014-11-01

    A generalization of the semi-classical model describing the Josephson dynamics of tri-layer superconducting systems is given by assuming a constant non-null arbitrary superconducting phase for the inner electrode and the presence of inhomogeneities in the superconducting coupling between electrodes. Extension of the model to triple-barrier Josephson junctions is proposed. Integer and fractional Shapiro steps are predicted and their amplitudes are calculated.

  10. Optical Comparison of Single and Double Dielectric barrier plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershkowitz, Noah; Oksuz, Lutfi; Hoskinson, Alan

    2009-11-01

    Time resolved ICCD pictures are taken for double and single surface barrier discharge plasma actuator for thick and thin powered electrodes. The filament and jet propagation minimum speeds are measured for both single and double barrier actuators. Optical emission spectra are measured using a monochromator. In a typical OES spectrum, O2, O^+, CO, OH, N, N2, N2^+ and also optical emission lines from exposed electrodes (stainless steel, copper and tungsten lines) were observed for single barrier actuators. The optical data are fit by SPECAIR code^1. The translational and rotational temperatures are found to be approximately room temperature while the vibrational temperatures were1700 K and 1200 K, the electron temperatures were 3200 K and 2400 K for thick and thin electrode respectively. The different regimes in a discharge will be discussed.

  11. Double Barriers and Magnetic Field in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redouani, Ilham; Jellal, Ahmed; Bahlouli, Hocine

    2015-12-01

    We study the transmission probability in an AB-stacked bilayer graphene of Dirac fermions scattered by a double-barrier structure in the presence of a magnetic field. We take into account the full four bands structure of the energy spectrum and use the suitable boundary conditions to determine the transmission probability. Our numerical results show that for energies higher than the interlayer coupling, four ways for transmission are possible while for energies less than the height of the barrier, Dirac fermions exhibit transmission resonances and only one transmission channel is available. We show that, for AB-stacked bilayer graphene, there is no Klein tunneling at normal incidence. We find that the transmission displays sharp peaks inside the transmission gap around the Dirac point within the barrier regions while they are absent around the Dirac point in the well region. The effect of the magnetic field, interlayer electrostatic potential, and various barrier geometry parameters on the transmission probabilities is also discussed.

  12. Anomalous capacitance of quantum well double-barrier diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boric, Olga; Tolmunen, Timo J.; Kollberg, Erik; Frerking, Margaret A.

    1992-01-01

    The S-parameters of several different quantum well double barrier diodes have been measured. A technique has been developed for measuring whisker contacted diodes with an HP 8510B automatic network analyzer. Special coaxial mounts using K-connectors were designed to enable measurements up to 20 GHz. The voltage-dependent conductance and capacitance were derived from the measured reflection coefficient of each device. The C/V characteristics were observed to exhibit an anomalous increase at voltages corresponding to the negative differential resistance region (NDR). These are the first reported S-parameter measurements in the negative differential resistance region of quantum well double barrier diodes. A theory is presented that explains, in part, the observed results.

  13. Dynamics of kicked particles in a double-barrier structure.

    PubMed

    Pal, Harinder; Santhanam, M S

    2010-11-01

    We study the classical and quantum dynamics of periodically kicked particles placed initially within an open double-barrier structure. This system does not obey the Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem and displays chaotic dynamics. The phase-space features induced by non-KAM nature of the system lead to dynamical features such as the nonequilibrium steady state, classically induced saturation of energy growth and momentum filtering. We also comment on the experimental feasibility of this system as well as its relevance in the context of current interest in classically induced localization and chaotic ratchets. PMID:21230568

  14. Double barrier system for an in situ conversion process

    DOEpatents

    McKinzie, Billy John [Houston, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Cowan, Kenneth Michael [Sugar land, TX; Deeg, Wolfgang Friedrich Johann [Houston, TX; Wong, Sau-Wai [Rijswijk, NL

    2009-05-05

    A barrier system for a subsurface treatment area is described. The barrier system includes a first barrier formed around at least a portion of the subsurface treatment area. The first barrier is configured to inhibit fluid from exiting or entering the subsurface treatment area. A second barrier is formed around at least a portion of the first barrier. A separation space exists between the first barrier and the second barrier.

  15. Double tearing modes in the presence of internal transport barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X. M.; Tang, C. J.; Peng, X. D.; Qiu, X. M.

    2011-07-15

    The linear characteristics of double tearing modes (DTMs) in the presence of internal transport barrier (ITB) are investigated in a cylindrical tokamak plasma. A simple model describing density profile of ITB is suggested. Combining the safety factor profile given by Bierwage et al.[Phys. Plasmas 12, 082504 (2005); 14, 022107 (2007)], the DTMs spectra, scaling laws, and relationships between growth rate and density profile factor in the presence of ITB are studied, respectively. The results show that the resistive drift instability occurs in the case of high poloidal mode numbers. A transition from DTMs to the resistive drift instability is observed, and the dependence of DTMs growth rate on the magnetic Reynolds number has changed greatly due to the presence of ITB. In addition, the linear growth rates of the modes including those with low and high poloidal mode number increase when the plasma density profile steepens in the presence of ITB whatever the inter-resonant distance is smaller or larger.

  16. Quantum resonances and time decay for a double-barrier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Here we consider the time evolution of a one-dimensional quantum system with a double barrier given by a couple of two repulsive Dirac's deltas. In such a pedagogical model we give, by means of the theory of quantum resonances, the explicit expression of the dominant terms of < \\psi ,{{{e}}}-{{i}{tH}}φ > , where H is the double-barrier Hamiltonian operator and where ψ and ϕ are two test functions.

  17. Sequential tunneling of holes in p-type semiconductor double-barrier heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadares, E. C.; Sheard, F. W.; Eaves, L.

    We propose an extension of Bardeen's transfer Hamiltonian formalism to treat the sequential tunneling of holes in p-type semiconductor heterostructures displaying weakly coupled QW's. Our discussion is aimed at modeling recent resonant magnetotunneling experiments on double-barrier heterostructures displaying an emitter accumulation layer and wide barriers.

  18. Vanishing optical isolation barrier in double ion-implanted lithium niobate waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkisov, S.S.; Williams, E.K.; Ila, D.; Venkateswarlu, P.; Poker, D.B.

    1996-04-01

    Isolation properties at different propagation directions have been studied for an optical barrier between two superposed planar waveguides produced by MeV He{sup +} implantation in LiNbO{sub 3}. The barrier exists while the modes of the double structure propagate along the optic axis. The spacing between the modes measured with a prism coupler features efficiently isolated waveguides. The barrier {open_quote}{open_quote}vanishes{close_quote}{close_quote} when the directional angle between an extraordinary wave and the optic axis exceeds 50{degree}. In this case the mode spacing shows strong coupling between the waveguides that makes the double structure similar to a single waveguide with double thickness. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Development of double cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge ion source.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Iwama, Takashi; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Ariyada, Osamu; Furuya, Hiroko; Takekawa, Kenichi

    2011-03-21

    This paper deals with the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ion source composed of the outer cylindrical dielectric tube and the inner grounded metallic tube electrode. The sample gas is supplied through the inner ceramic tube. In this ion source, the DBD plasma is localized in the DBD tube so that the sample gases can be ionized just outside of the ceramic tube by the DBD excited helium gas without being exposed in the plasma jet. Besides, ambient air does not take part in the ionization of the sample vapor because ionization takes place inside the DBD ion source. Thus, this method is totally free from contaminants in ambient air. It was found that this ion source is capable of soft, high-sensitivity, and reproducible ionization. Application of this technique to the analysis of methamphetamine, carbaryl and basil leaf was given. PMID:21240423

  20. Force Measurements of Single and Double Barrier DBD Plasma Actuators in Quiescent Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Hershkowitz, Noah; Ashpis, David E.

    2008-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the force induced by both single (one electrode insulated) and double (both electrodes insulated) dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators in quiescent air. We have shown that, for single barrier actuators, as the electrode diameter decreased below those values previously studied the induced Force increases exponentially rather than linearly. This behavior has been experimentally verified using two different measurement techniques: stagnation probe measurements of the induced flow velocity and direct measurement of the force using an electronic balance. In addition, we have shown the the induced force is independent of the material used for the exposed electrode. The same techniques have shown that the induced force of a double barrier actuator increases with decreasing narrow electrode diameter.

  1. Tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Park, Jeong Young

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers. The tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell is composed of two metal/semiconductor interfaces. Two types of tandem cells were fabricated using TiO2/Au/Si and TiO2/Au/TiO2, and photocurrent enhancement was detected. The double Schottky barriers lead to an additional pathway for harvesting hot electrons, which is enhanced through multiple reflections between the two barriers with different energy ranges. In addition, light absorption is improved by the band-to-band excitation of both semiconductors with different band gaps. Short-circuit current and energy conversion efficiency of the tandem-structured TiO2/Au/Si increased by 86% and 70%, respectively, compared with Au/Si metal/semiconductor nanodiodes, showing an overall solar energy conversion efficiency of 5.3%. PMID:24694838

  2. Tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Park, Jeong Young

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate a tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers. The tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell is composed of two metal/semiconductor interfaces. Two types of tandem cells were fabricated using TiO2/Au/Si and TiO2/Au/TiO2, and photocurrent enhancement was detected. The double Schottky barriers lead to an additional pathway for harvesting hot electrons, which is enhanced through multiple reflections between the two barriers with different energy ranges. In addition, light absorption is improved by the band-to-band excitation of both semiconductors with different band gaps. Short-circuit current and energy conversion efficiency of the tandem-structured TiO2/Au/Si increased by 86% and 70%, respectively, compared with Au/Si metal/semiconductor nanodiodes, showing an overall solar energy conversion efficiency of 5.3%.

  3. Tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Park, Jeong Young

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers. The tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell is composed of two metal/semiconductor interfaces. Two types of tandem cells were fabricated using TiO2/Au/Si and TiO2/Au/TiO2, and photocurrent enhancement was detected. The double Schottky barriers lead to an additional pathway for harvesting hot electrons, which is enhanced through multiple reflections between the two barriers with different energy ranges. In addition, light absorption is improved by the band-to-band excitation of both semiconductors with different band gaps. Short-circuit current and energy conversion efficiency of the tandem-structured TiO2/Au/Si increased by 86% and 70%, respectively, compared with Au/Si metal/semiconductor nanodiodes, showing an overall solar energy conversion efficiency of 5.3%. PMID:24694838

  4. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) with Double Tunnel Junction Contact and Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y; Soibel, Alexander; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Rafol, Sir B.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice based complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) has already demonstrated very good performance in long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detection. In this work, we describe results on a modified CBIRD device that incorporates a double tunnel junction contact designed for robust device and focal plane array processing. The new device also exhibited reduced turn-on voltage. We also report results on the quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD). By incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the InAsSb absorber of the standard nBn detector structure, the QD-BIRD extend the detector cutoff wavelength from approximately 4.2 micrometers to 6 micrometers, allowing the coverage of the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The device has been observed to show infrared response at 225 K.

  5. Ideal MHD stability of double transport barrier plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. Q.; Wang, S. J.; Lao, L. L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Chu, M. S.; Brennan, D. P.; Groebner, R. J.; Zhao, L.

    2008-01-01

    The ideal MHD stability for double transport barrier (DTB or DB) plasmas with varying edge and internal barrier width and height was investigated, using the ideal MHD stability code GATO. A moderate ratio of edge transport barriers (ETB) height to internal transport barriers (ITBs) height is found to be beneficial to MHD stability and the βN is limited by global low n instabilities. For moderate ITB width DB plasmas, if the ETB is weak, the stability is limited by n = 1 (n is the toroidal mode number) global mode; whereas if the ETB is strong it is limited by intermediate-n edge peeling-ballooning modes. Broadening the ITB can improve stability if the ITB half width wi lsim 0.3. For very broad ITB width plasmas the stability is limited by stability to a low n (n > 1) global mode.

  6. Electrical properties and the double Gaussian distribution of inhomogeneous barrier heights in Se/n-GaN Schottky barrier diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal Reddy, V.; Janardhanam, V.; Leem, Chang-Hyun; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2014-03-01

    The temperature dependent electrical characteristics of Se/n-GaN Schottky barrier diode have been investigated in the temperature range of 130-400 K in the steps of 30 K. The estimated barrier height (ϕbo) and ideality factor n are found to be 0.46 eV and 3.83 at 130 K, 0.92 eV and 1.29 at 400 K. The ϕbo and n are found to be strongly temperature dependent and while the ϕbo decreases and the n increase with decreasing temperature. Such behavior of ϕbo and n is attributed to Schottky barrier inhomogeneities, explained by the assumption of Gaussian distribution of barrier heights at the metal/semiconductor interface. Experimental results revealed the existence of a double Gaussian distribution with mean barrier height values of 1.33 and 0.90 eV and standard deviations (σo) of 0.0289 and 0.010 V, respectively. The modified ln(Io/T2) - (q2σo2/2k2T2) versus 103/T plot gives ϕbo and Richardson constant (A∗) values as 1.30 and 0.88 eV, 23.6 and 19.2 A/cm2 K2 at 400 and 130 K, respectively without using the temperature coefficient of the barrier height. Further, the barrier height obtained from C-V method decreases with an increase in temperature. It is also noted that the barrier height value estimated from the C-V method is higher than that estimated from the I-V method at various temperatures. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are presented. The interface state density (Nss) is found to be decreased with an increasing temperature. The reverse-bias leakage current mechanism of Se/n-GaN Schottky diode is investigated. Both Poole-Frenkel and Schottky emissions are described and discussed.

  7. Coherent transmission of nodal Dirac fermions through a graphene-based superconducting double barrier junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chunxu; Wei, Ke-Wei; Yang, Gui; Yang, Yanling

    2013-05-01

    Transport characteristics of relativistic electrons through graphene-based d-wave superconducting double barrier junction and ferromagnet/ d-wave superconductor/normal metal double junction have been investigated based on the Dirac-Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation. We have first presented the results of superconducting double barrier junction. In the subgap regime, both the crossed Andreev and nonlocal tunneling conductance all oscillate with the bias voltage due to the formation of Andreev bound states in the normal metal region. Moreover, the critical voltage beyond which the crossed Andreev conductance becomes to zero decreases with increasing value of superconducting pair potential α. In the presence of the ferromagnetism, the MR through graphene-based ferromagnet/ d-wave superconductor/normal metal double junction has been investigated. It is shown that the MR increases from exchange splitting h 0=0 to h 0= E F (Fermi energy), and then it goes down. At h 0= E F, MR reaches its maximum 100. In contrast to the case of a single superconducting barrier, Andreev bound states also manifest itself in the zero bias MR, which result in a series of peaks except the maximum one at h 0= E F. Besides, the resonance peak of the MR can appear at certain bias voltage and structure parameter. Those phenomena mean that the coherent transmission can be tuned by superconducting pair potential, structure parameter, and external bias voltage, which benefits the spin-polarized electron device based on the graphene materials.

  8. Spin-polarized electron transport through a non-magnetic double barrier semiconductor heterostructure [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasekar, K.; Navaneethakrishnan, K.

    2005-06-01

    The spin-polarized electron resonant tunneling at zero magnetic field through a double barrier hetero structure of non-magnetic III V semiconductor is theoretically investigated within the envelop function approximation and the Kane model for the bulk. An elegant model is proposed to study the combined effects of Dresselhaus and in-plane Rashba spin orbit interactions on the spin-dependent tunneling through double barriers of strained hetero structures. Enhanced degree of spin-polarization and easily tunable wider range of energy for a specific polarization are predicted. We estimate that the polarization can reach cent percent with moderate applied electric field. Our investigations show that spin-relaxation can be suppressed by compensating the bulk and structural inversion symmetries using appropriate electric potential. This effect could be engineered in the fabrication of spin-dependent optoelectronic devices.

  9. Double methyl substitution in simple alkenes leads to low-barrier reactions towards molecular fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Qiang; Tsai, Chen-Hsun; Chen, Andrew F.; Lu, Yu-Ju; Lin, Jim J.

    2011-06-01

    The reactions of F2 with isomers of butene were investigated with crossed-beam reactive scattering and ab initio computations. Only one product channel F + C4H8F was observed in the experiments; the HF + C4H7F channel was searched but not found. The reaction path of F2 + C4H8 → F + C4H8F was studied theoretically. Very low barriers of less than 1 kcal/mol were found for the F2 reactions with cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, and isobutene, which all contain two methyl substitution groups. This theoretical prediction, yet to be confirmed experimentally, suggests that double methyl substituted Cdbnd C double bonds can react with F2 almost without a barrier.

  10. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes using resonant tunneling double barrier structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seung Yoon; Jo, Sung Jin; Kim, Chang Su; Choi, Sang Hun; Noh, Joo Hyon; Baik, Hong Koo; Jeong, Hee Seong; Han, Dong Won; Song, Seung Yong; Lee, Kyu Sung

    2007-08-01

    A semitransparent cathode of indium tin oxide (ITO)/Ag/ITO was developed as a resonant tunneling double barrier structure for transparent organic light-emitting diodes. A weak negative differential resistance was observed in devices using a 100nm thick ITO/Ag/ITO layer as a cathode in combination with a thin LiF /Al layer. The current injection of devices was dominated by resonant tunneling, which induced no luminance at low voltage. This was achieved by employing an e-beam evaporated ITO/Ag/ITO cathode due to the double quantum barriers of ITO and the quantum well of Ag. The authors also applied the multilayer cathode to small molecule devices, which showed the same resonant tunneling currents.

  11. Electrical degradation of double-Schottky barrier in ZnO varistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jinliang; Cheng, Chenlu; Hu, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Researches on electrical degradation of double-Schottky barrier in ZnO varistors are reviewed, aimed at the constitution of a full picture of universal degradation mechanism within the perspective of defect. Recent advances in study of ZnO materials by atomic-scale first-principles calculations are partly included and discussed, which brings to our attention distinct cognition on the native point defects and their profound impact on degradation.

  12. Photocurrent response in a double barrier structure with quantum dots quantum well inserted in central well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bing; Zhou, Xia; Tang, Yan; Gan, Huadong; Zhu, Hui; Li, Guirong; Zheng, Houzhi

    2006-07-01

    We report the photocurrent response in a double barrier structure with quantum dots-quantum well inserted in central well. When this quantum dots-quantum well hybrid heterostructure is biased beyond +1 or -1 V, the photocurrent response manifests itself as a step-like enhancement, increasing linearly with the light intensity. Most probably, at proper bias condition, the pulling down of the X minimum of GaAs at the outgoing interface of the emitter barrier by the photovoltaic effect in GaAs QW will initiate the Γ-X-X tunneling at much lower bias as compared with that in the dark. That gives rise to the observed photocurrent response.

  13. Equilibrium properties of double-screened dipole-barrier SINIS Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Branislav K.; Freericks, J. K.; Miller, P.

    2002-02-01

    We report on a self-consistent microscopic study of the dc Josephson effect in SINIS junctions, where screened dipole layers at the SN interfaces generate a double-barrier multilayered SIN structure. Our approach starts from a microscopic Hamiltonian defined on a simple cubic lattice, with an attractive Hubbard term accounting for the short coherence length superconducting order in the semi-infinite leads, and a spatially extended charge distribution (screened dipole layer) induced by the difference in Fermi energies of the superconductor S and the clean normal metal interlayer N. We analyze the influence of such spatially inhomogeneous barriers on the proximity effect, the current-phase relations, the critical supercurrent and the normal-state junction resistance, for different normal interlayer thicknesses and barrier heights. These results are of relevance for high-Tc grain boundary junctions, and also reveal one of the mechanisms that can lead to low critical currents of apparently ballistic SNS junctions while increasing its normal-state resistance in a much weaker fashion. When the N region is a doped semiconductor, we find a substantial change in the dipole layer (generated by a small Fermi-level mismatch) upon crossing the superconducting critical temperature, which is a signature of the proximity effect and which might be related to recent Raman studies in Nb/InAs bilayers.

  14. Mechanisms governing the interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coating system with double ceramic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Fan, Xueling; Wang, T. J.

    2016-05-01

    A systematic study of factors affecting the interfacial delamination of thermal barrier coating system (TBCs) with double ceramic layers (DCL) is presented. Crack driving forces for delaminations at two weak interfaces are examined. The results show that a thicker outermost ceramic layer can induce dramatic increase in crack driving force and make the interface between two ceramic coatings become more prone to delamination. The behavior is shown to be more prominent in TBCs with stiffer outmost coating. The thickness ratio of two ceramic layers is an important parameter for controlling the failure mechanisms and determining the lifetime of DCL TBCs under inservice condition. By accounting for the influences of thickness ratio of two ceramic layers and interfacial fracture toughnesses of two involved interfaces, the fracture mechanism map of DCL TBCs has been constructed, in which different failure mechanisms are identified. The results quanlitatively agree with the aviliable experimental data.

  15. Modulation of spin transfer torque amplitude in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clment, P.-Y.; Baraduc, C.; Ducruet, C.; Vila, L.; Chshiev, M.; Diny, B.

    2015-09-01

    Magnetization switching induced by spin transfer torque is used to write magnetic memories (Magnetic Random Access Memory, MRAM) but can be detrimental to the reading process. It would be quite convenient therefore to modulate the efficiency of spin transfer torque. A solution is adding an extra degree of freedom by using double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with two spin-polarizers, with controllable relative magnetic alignment. We demonstrate, for these structures, that the amplitude of in-plane spin transfer torque on the middle free layer can be efficiently tuned via the magnetic configuration of the electrodes. Using the proposed design could thus pave the way towards more reliable read/write schemes for MRAM. Moreover, our results suggest an intriguing effect associated with the out-of-plane (field-like) spin transfer torque, which has to be further investigated.

  16. Double Barrier Resonant Tunneling Transistor with a Fully Two Dimensional Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    MOON,J.S.; SIMMONS,JERRY A.; RENO,JOHN L.; BACA,WES E.; BLOUNT,MARK A.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.; JONES,ERIC D.

    2000-07-13

    A novel planar resonant tunneling transistor is demonstrated. The growth structure is similar to that of a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD), except for a fully two-dimensional (2D) emitter formed by a quantum well. Current is fed laterally into the emitter, and the 2D--2D resonant tunneling current is controlled by a surface gate. This unique device structure achieves figures-of-merit, i.e. peak current densities and peak voltages, approaching that of state-of-the-art RTDs. Most importantly, sensitive control of the peak current and voltage is achieved by gating of the emitter quantum well subband energy. This quantum tunneling transistor shows exceptional promise for ultra-high speed and multifunctional operation at room temperature.

  17. Modulation of spin transfer torque amplitude in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Clément, P.-Y.; Baraduc, C. Chshiev, M.; Diény, B.; Ducruet, C.; Vila, L.

    2015-09-07

    Magnetization switching induced by spin transfer torque is used to write magnetic memories (Magnetic Random Access Memory, MRAM) but can be detrimental to the reading process. It would be quite convenient therefore to modulate the efficiency of spin transfer torque. A solution is adding an extra degree of freedom by using double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with two spin-polarizers, with controllable relative magnetic alignment. We demonstrate, for these structures, that the amplitude of in-plane spin transfer torque on the middle free layer can be efficiently tuned via the magnetic configuration of the electrodes. Using the proposed design could thus pave the way towards more reliable read/write schemes for MRAM. Moreover, our results suggest an intriguing effect associated with the out-of-plane (field-like) spin transfer torque, which has to be further investigated.

  18. QUIESCENT DOUBLE BARRIER H-MODE PLASMAS IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. BURRELL; M.E. AUSTIN; D.P. BRENNAN; J.C. DeBOO; E.J. DOYLE; C. FENZI; C. FUCHS; P. GOHIL; R.J. GROEBNER; L.L. LAO; T.C. LUCE; M.A. MAKOWSKI; G.R. McKEE; R.A. MOYER; C.C. PETTY; M. PORKOLAB; C.L.RETTIG; T.L. RHODES; J.C. ROST; B.W. STALLARD; E.J. STRAIT; E.J. SYNAKOWSKI; M.R. WADE; J.G. WATKINS; W.P. WEST

    2000-11-01

    High confinement (H-mode) operation is the choice for next-step tokamak devices based either on conventional or advanced tokamak physics. This choice, however, comes at a significant cost for both the conventional and advanced tokamaks because of the effects of edge localized modes (ELMs). ELMs can produce significant erosion in the divertor and can affect the beta limit and reduced core transport regions needed for advanced tokamak operation. Experimental results from DIII-D [J.L. Luxon, et al., Plasma Phys. and Contr. Nucl. Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987) Vol. I, p. 159] this year have demonstrated a new operating regime, the quiescent H-mode regime, which solves these problems. We have achieved quiescent H-mode operation which is ELM-free and yet has good density and impurity control. In addition, we have demonstrated that an internal transport barrier can be produced and maintained inside the H-mode edge barrier for long periods of time (>3.5 seconds or >25 energy confinement times {tau}{sub E}), yielding a quiescent double barrier regime. By slowly ramping the input power, we have achieved {beta}{sub N} H{sub 89} = 7 for up to 5 times the {tau}{sub E} of 150 ms. The {beta}{sub N} H{sub 89} values of 7 substantially exceed the value of 4 routinely achieved in standard ELMing H-mode. The key factors in creating the quiescent H-mode operation are neutral beam injection in the direction opposite to the plasma current (counter injection) plus cryopumping to reduce the density. Density and impurity control in the quiescent H-mode is possible because of the presence of an edge magnetic hydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation, the edge harmonic oscillation, which enhances the edge particle transport while leaving the energy transport unaffected.

  19. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs/AlAs double-barrier resonant tunnelling devices on (311)A substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henini, M.; Hayden, R. K.; Valadares, E. C.; Eaves, L.; Hill, G.; Pate, M. A.

    1992-02-01

    The authors investigate resonant tunnelling in p-type silicon-doped GaAs/AlAs double-barrier quantum well structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on the (311)A GaAs surface. Their current-voltage characteristics compare favourably with structures grown on the conventional (100) orientation using beryllium as the acceptor.

  20. Double-Stranded RNA Attenuates the Barrier Function of Human Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bálint, Zoltán; Zabini, Diana; Konya, Viktoria; Nagaraj, Chandran; Végh, Attila G.; Váró, György; Wilhelm, Imola; Fazakas, Csilla; Krizbai, István A.; Heinemann, Akos; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Circulating RNA may result from excessive cell damage or acute viral infection and can interact with vascular endothelial cells. Despite the obvious clinical implications associated with the presence of circulating RNA, its pathological effects on endothelial cells and the governing molecular mechanisms are still not fully elucidated. We analyzed the effects of double stranded RNA on primary human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (hPAECs). The effect of natural and synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) on hPAECs was investigated using trans-endothelial electric resistance, molecule trafficking, calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis, gene expression and proliferation studies. Furthermore, the morphology and mechanical changes of the cells caused by synthetic dsRNA was followed by in-situ atomic force microscopy, by vascular-endothelial cadherin and F-actin staining. Our results indicated that exposure of hPAECs to synthetic dsRNA led to functional deficits. This was reflected by morphological and mechanical changes and an increase in the permeability of the endothelial monolayer. hPAECs treated with synthetic dsRNA accumulated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, the proliferation rate of the cells in the presence of synthetic dsRNA was significantly decreased. Furthermore, we found that natural and synthetic dsRNA modulated Ca2+ signaling in hPAECs by inhibiting the sarco-endoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) which is involved in the regulation of the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and thus cell growth. Even upon synthetic dsRNA stimulation silencing of SERCA3 preserved the endothelial monolayer integrity. Our data identify novel mechanisms by which dsRNA can disrupt endothelial barrier function and these may be relevant in inflammatory processes. PMID:23755110

  1. Double-stranded RNA attenuates the barrier function of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Zoltán; Zabini, Diana; Konya, Viktoria; Nagaraj, Chandran; Végh, Attila G; Váró, György; Wilhelm, Imola; Fazakas, Csilla; Krizbai, István A; Heinemann, Akos; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Circulating RNA may result from excessive cell damage or acute viral infection and can interact with vascular endothelial cells. Despite the obvious clinical implications associated with the presence of circulating RNA, its pathological effects on endothelial cells and the governing molecular mechanisms are still not fully elucidated. We analyzed the effects of double stranded RNA on primary human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (hPAECs). The effect of natural and synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) on hPAECs was investigated using trans-endothelial electric resistance, molecule trafficking, calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis, gene expression and proliferation studies. Furthermore, the morphology and mechanical changes of the cells caused by synthetic dsRNA was followed by in-situ atomic force microscopy, by vascular-endothelial cadherin and F-actin staining. Our results indicated that exposure of hPAECs to synthetic dsRNA led to functional deficits. This was reflected by morphological and mechanical changes and an increase in the permeability of the endothelial monolayer. hPAECs treated with synthetic dsRNA accumulated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, the proliferation rate of the cells in the presence of synthetic dsRNA was significantly decreased. Furthermore, we found that natural and synthetic dsRNA modulated Ca(2+) signaling in hPAECs by inhibiting the sarco-endoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) which is involved in the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and thus cell growth. Even upon synthetic dsRNA stimulation silencing of SERCA3 preserved the endothelial monolayer integrity. Our data identify novel mechanisms by which dsRNA can disrupt endothelial barrier function and these may be relevant in inflammatory processes. PMID:23755110

  2. SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS Growth of InGaN and double heterojunction structure with InGaN back barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linyu, Shi; Jincheng, Zhang; Hao, Wang; Junshuai, Xue; Xinxiu, Ou; Xiaofan, Fu; Ke, Chen; Yue, Hao

    2010-12-01

    We study the growth of an InGaN and AlGaN/GaN/InGaN/GaN double heterojunction structure by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). It is found that the crystal quality of the InGaN back barrier layer significantly affects the electronic property of the AlGaN/GaN/InGaN/GaN double heterojunction. A high crystal quality InGaN layer is obtained by optimizing the growth pressure and temperature. Due to the InGaN layer polarization field opposite to that in the AlGaN layer, an additional potential barrier is formed between the GaN and the InGaN layer, which enhances carrier confinement of the 2DEG and reduces the buffer leakage current of devices. The double heterojunction high-electron-mobility transistors with an InGaN back barrier yield a drain induced barrier lowering of 1.5 mV/V and the off-sate source-drain leakage current is as low as 2.6 μA/mm at VDS = 10 V.

  3. High magnetic field tunneling transport in a double quantum well-triple barrier resonant tunneling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macks, L. D.; Brown, S. A.; Starrett, R. P.; Clark, R. G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Reed, M. A.; Fernando, C. J. L.; Frensley, W. R.; Matyi, Richard J.

    1994-07-01

    We have measured the magnetotransport of double GaAs quantum well-triple AlAs barrier resonant tunneling heterostructures in pulsed magnetic fields up to 48 T, and temperatures down to 0.3 K. The tunneling structure is designed for a near-simultaneous (triple) resonance, under bias, of the quantum well energy levels and the lowest quasi-2D emitter state. The fan chart of the I( V) resonances is more complex than that of a single quantum well since both emitter-well and well-well transitions can occur, which can be discriminated by voltage dependence. In addition to transitions corresponding to the emission of an LO phonon, we also observe at high field a transition which may correspond to the absorption of an LO phonon (emitter-well). Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in the tunnel current of all resonances are observed. At the near-triple resonance, corresponding to a populated 2D well density of n s= 4.5 × 10 11 cm -2, a SdH peak (at 0.3 K) is observed at 29 T, assigned to a Landau level filling factor of {2}/{3}. This peak weakens by 2 K, whereas the integer filling factor peaks are unchanged with temperature.

  4. In-pile performance of a double-walled tube and a tritium permeation barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magielsen, A. J.; Bakker, K.; Chabrol, C.; Conrad, R.; van der Laan, J. G.; Rigal, E.; Stijkel, M. P.

    2002-12-01

    In two recent irradiation experiments in the HFR Petten, tritium permeation rates through representative materials to be used as cooling tubes of the water-cooled lithium-lead blanket have been measured in-pile. These latest experiments in the EXOTIC 8 series (E 8.9 and E 8.10) are made of a double wall tube (DWT) and a T91 tube with an Fe-Al/Al 2O 3 layer acting as tritium permeation barrier (TPB). These tubes contain annular pebble beds of ceramic breeder materials for the helium-cooled pebble bed concept blanket as tritium breeding material. Both experiments are built up of two concentric and independently purged containments allowing on-line tritium release rate and permeation rate measurements. In-pile operation has ended in March 2001 after 450 full power days and resulted in an irradiation damage of approximately 2.6 and 3.2 dpa, respectively in T91 steel. This paper reports on the experimental results obtained for in-pile tritium permeation and discusses the influence of purge gas compositions, temperature and irradiation on tritium permeation through the DWT and TPB.

  5. Long-Range Phase Coherence in Double-Barrier Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with a Large Thick Metallic Quantum Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, B. S.; Yang, H. X.; Zuo, Y. L.; Devaux, X.; Lengaigne, G.; Hehn, M.; Lacour, D.; Andrieu, S.; Chshiev, M.; Hauet, T.; Montaigne, F.; Mangin, S.; Han, X. F.; Lu, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Double-barrier heterostructures are model systems for the study of electron tunneling and discrete energy levels in a quantum well (QW). Until now resonant tunneling phenomena in metallic QWs have been observed for limited thicknesses (1-2 nm) under which electron phase coherence is conserved. In the present study we show evidence of QW resonance states in Fe QWs up to 12 nm thick and at room temperature in fully epitaxial double MgAlOx barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. The electron phase coherence displayed in this QW is of unprecedented quality because of a homogenous interface phase shift due to the small lattice mismatch at the Fe -MgAlOx interface. The physical understanding of the critical role of interface strain on QW phase coherence will greatly promote the development of spin-dependent quantum resonant tunneling applications.

  6. Resonant level lifetime in GaAs-AlAs double-barrier structures including. Gamma. - X mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, T.F. ); Cai, W.; Hu, P. ); Lax, M. AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 ); Shum, K.; Alfano, R.R. )

    1991-06-15

    A quantitative model for calculation of the lifetime of quasibound states, including the {Gamma}-{ital X} transfer, in a AlAs-GaAs-AlAs double-barrier structure is presented. When device is designed that a {Gamma}-like energy level approaches to an {ital X}-like energy level, anticrossing of the {Gamma}-{ital X} transition occurs and the lifetime of the state can be several orders larger than that of a pure {Gamma} system.

  7. Double-Layer Gadolinium Zirconate/Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chen; Jordan, Eric H.; Harris, Alan B.; Gell, Maurice; Roth, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with lower thermal conductivity, increased resistance to calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS), and improved high-temperature capability, compared to traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) TBCs, are essential to higher efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. Double-layer rare-earth zirconate/YSZ TBCs are a promising solution. From a processing perspective, solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process with its unique and beneficial microstructural features can be an effective approach to obtaining the double-layer microstructure. Previously durable low-thermal-conductivity YSZ TBCs with optimized layered porosity, called the inter-pass boundaries (IPBs) were produced using the SPPS process. In this study, an SPPS gadolinium zirconate (GZO) protective surface layer was successfully added. These SPPS double-layer TBCs not only retained good cyclic durability and low thermal conductivity, but also demonstrated favorable phase stability and increased surface temperature capabilities. The CMAS resistance was evaluated with both accumulative and single applications of simulated CMAS in isothermal furnaces. The double-layer YSZ/GZO exhibited dramatic improvement in the single application, but not in the continuous one. In addition, to explore their potential application in integrated gasification combined cycle environments, double-layer TBCs were tested under high-temperature humidity and encouraging performance was recorded.

  8. Study of the Wigner function at the device boundaries in one-dimensional single- and double-barrier structures

    SciTech Connect

    Savio, Andrea; Poncet, Alain

    2011-02-01

    In this work, we compute the Wigner distribution function on one-dimensional devices from wave functions generated by solving the Schroedinger equation. Our goal is to investigate certain issues that we encountered in implementing Wigner transport equation solvers, such as the large discrepancies observed between the boundary conditions and the solution in the neighborhood of the boundaries. By evaluating the Wigner function without solving the Wigner transport equation, we intend to ensure that the actual boundary conditions are consistent with those commonly applied in literature. We study both single- and double-barrier unbiased structures. We use simple potential profiles, so that we can compute the wave functions analytically for better accuracy. We vary a number of structure geometry, material, meshing, and numerical parameters, among which are the contact length, the barrier height, the number of incident wave functions, and the numerical precision used for the computations, and we observe how the Wigner function at the device boundaries is affected. For the double-barrier structures, we look at the density matrix function and we study a model for the device transmission spectrum which helps explain the lobelike artifacts that we observe on the Wigner function.

  9. SCC-DFTB Energy Barriers for Single and Double Proton Transfer Processes in the Model Molecular Systems Malonaldehyde and Porphycene

    SciTech Connect

    Walewski, L.; Krachtus, D; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C; Bala, P.; Lesyng, B.

    2005-09-01

    Self-consistent charge-density functional tight-binding SCC-DFTB is a computationally efficient method applicable to large (bio)molecular systems in which (bio)chemical reactions may occur. Among these reactions are proton transfer processes. This method, along with more advanced ab initio techniques, is applied in this study to compute intramolecular barriers for single and double proton transfer processes in the model systems, malonaldehyde and porphycene, respectively. SCC-DFTB is compared with experimental data and higher-level ab initio calculations. For malonaldehyde, the SCC-DFTB barrier height is 3.1 kcal/mol in vacuo and 4.2 kcal/mol in water solution. In the case of porphycene, the minimum energy pathways for double intramolecular proton transfer were determined using the conjugate peak refinement (CPR) method. Six isomers of porphycene were ordered according to energy. The only energetically allowed pathway was found to connect two symmetrical trans states via an unstable cis-A isomer. The SCC-DFTB barrier heights are 11.1 kcal/mol for the trans-cis-A process, and 7.4 kcal/mol for the reverse cis-A-trans one with the energy difference of 3.7 kcal/mol between the trans- and cis-A states. The method provides satisfactory energy results when compared with reference ab initio and experimental data.

  10. Donor-assisted resonant electron tunneling in double-barrier heterostructures under tilted magnetic fields: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, H.; Beltrán Ríos, C. L.; Arce, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study of the current-voltage characteristics of a double-barrier heterostructure doped with a layer of shallow donors in the middle of the well and subjected to a magnetic field tilted with respect to the growth direction is reported. The parent materials are assumed to possess simple cubic lattices, the electronic structure of the system is modeled by means of a one-band tight-binding Hamiltonian, and the current is evaluated employing the Keldysh nonequilibrium formalism. The results reveal the magnetocompression of the donor wavefunction, in good qualitative agreement with the experimental report of Patané et al [Phys Rev Lett 105 236804 (2010)].

  11. Resonant tunneling through double barrier graphene systems: A comparative study of Klein and non-Klein tunneling structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Vargas, I.; Madrigal-Melchor, J.; Oubram, O.

    2012-10-01

    We study the resonant tunneling effects through double barrier graphene systems (DBGSs). We have considered two types of DBGSs in order to take into account or rule out Klein tunneling effects: (1) the well-known and documented electrostatic-barrier structures (EBSs) created by means of electrostatic probes that act perpendicularly to the graphene sheet; and (2) substrate-barrier structures (SBSs) built sitting the graphene layer on alternating substrates, such as SiO2 and SiC, which are capable of non-open and open an energy bandgap on graphene. The transfer matrix approach is used to obtain the transmittance, linear-regime conductance, and electronic structure for different set of parameters such as electron energy, electron incident angle, barrier, and well widths. Particular attention is paid to the asymmetric characteristics of the DBGSs, as well as to the main differences between Klein and non-Klein tunneling structures. We find that: (1) the transmission properties can be modulated readily changing the energy and angle of the incident electrons, the widths of the well and barrier regions; (2) the linear-regime conductance is easily enhancing, diminishing, and shifted changing from symmetric to asymmetric DBGSs configuration overall in the case of non-Klein tunneling structures; (3) the conductance shows an oscillatory behavior as function of the well width, with peaks that are directly related to the opening and opening-closure of bound-state subbands for EBSs and SBSs, respectively. Finally, it is important to mention that electrostatic DBGSs or substrate DBGSs could be more suitable depending on a specific application, and in the case of non-Klein tunneling structures, they seem possible considering the sophistication of the current epitaxial growth techniques and whenever substrates that open an energy bandgap on graphene, without diminishing the carrier's mobility, be experimentally discovered.

  12. Electronic transmission and dwell time on a double barrier system with an accelerating quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, S.; Yilmaz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant tunneling quantum structures consist of asymmetric wells and barriers have been investigated to find their optimized geometrical parameters and potential profile by the numerical calculations. The results show that the widths and the depths of the asymmetric wells have a significant effect on the transmission coefficient and the dwell time. The properties exhibited in this work may establish guidance to the device applications.

  13. Macroscopic quantum tunneling of a Bose-Einstein condensate through double Gaussian barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kenji; Urban, Gregor; Weidemüller, Matthias; Carr, Lincoln D.

    2015-05-01

    Macroscopic quantum tunneling is one of the great manifestations of quantum physics, not only showing passage through a potential barrier but also emerging in a many-body wave function. We study a quasi-1D Bose-Einstein condensate of Lithium, confined by two Gaussian barriers, and show that in an experimentally realistic potential tens of thousands of atoms tunnel on time scales of 10 to 100 ms. Using a combination of variational and WKB approximations based on the Gross-Pitaevskii or nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we show that many unusual tunneling features appear due to the nonlinearity, including the number of trapped atoms exhibiting non-exponential decay, severe distortion of the barriers by the mean field, and even formation of a triple barrier in certain regimes. In the first 10ms, nonlinear many-body effects make the tunneling rates significantly larger than background loss rates, from 10 to 70 Hz. Thus we conclude that macroscopic quantum tunneling can be observed on experimental time scales. Funded by NSF, AFOSR, the Alexander von Humboldt foundation, and the Heidelberg Center for Quantum Dynamics.

  14. Conductance and resonant tunneling in multi-channel double barrier structures under transverse and longitudinal electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Pereyra, Pedro Mendoza-Figueroa, M. G.

    2015-03-21

    Transport properties of electrons through biased double barrier semiconductor structures with finite transverse width w{sub y}, in the presence of a channel-mixing transverse electric field E{sub T} (along the y-axis), were studied. We solve the multichannel Schrödinger equation using the transfer matrix method and transport properties, like the conductance G and the transmission coefficients T{sub ij} have been evaluated as functions of the electrons' energy E and the transverse and longitudinal (bias) electric forces, f{sub T} and f{sub b}. We show that peak-suppression effects appear, due to the applied bias. Similarly, coherent interference of wave-guide states induced by the transverse field is obtained. We show also that the coherent interference of resonant wave-guide states gives rise to resonant conductance, which can be tuned to produce broad resonant peaks, implying operation frequencies of the order of 10 THz or larger.

  15. High-performance 4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky diodes with double resistive termination extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liu; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Sheng-Bei; Dong, Lin; Liu, Xing-Fang; Fan, Zhong-Chao; Liu, Bin; Yan, Guo-Guo; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Wan-Shun; Sun, Guo-Sheng; He, Zhi; Yang, Fu-Hua

    2013-09-01

    4H-SiC junction barrier Schottky (JBS) diodes with a high-temperature annealed resistive termination extension (HARTE) are designed, fabricated and characterized in this work. The differential specific on-state resistance of the device is as low as 3.64 mΩ·cm2 with a total active area of 2.46 × 10-3 cm2. Ti is the Schottky contact metal with a Schottky barrier height of 1.08 V and a low onset voltage of 0.7 V. The ideality factor is calculated to be 1.06. Al implantation annealing is performed at 1250°C in Ar, while good reverse characteristics are achieved. The maximum breakdown voltage is 1000 V with a leakage current of 9 × 10-5 A on chip level. These experimental results show good consistence with the simulation results and demonstrate that high-performance 4H-SiC JBS diodes can be obtained based on the double HARTE structure.

  16. Tunneling magnetoresistance tuned by a vertical electric field in an AA-stacked graphene bilayer with double magnetic barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dali; Jin, Guojun

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effect of a vertical electric field on the electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in an AA-stacked graphene bilayer modulated by the double magnetic barriers with parallel or antiparallel configuration. The results show that the electronic transmission properties in the system are sensitive to the magnetic-barrier configuration and the bias voltage between the graphene layers. In particular, it is found that for the antiparallel configuration, within the low energy region, the blocking effect is more obvious compared with the case for the parallel configuration, and even there may exist a transmission spectrum gap which can be arbitrarily tuned by the field-induced interlayer bias voltage. We also demonstrate that the significant discrepancy between the conductance for both parallel and antiparallel configurations would result in a giant tunneling magnetoresistance ratio, and further the maximal magnetoresistance ratio can be strongly modified by the interlayer bias voltage. This leads to the possible realization of high-quality magnetic sensors controlled by a vertical electric field in the AA-stacked graphene bilayer.

  17. First passage time distributions of anomalous biased diffusion with double absorbing barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gang; Qiu, Xiaogang

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the first passage time (FPT) problem of anomalous diffusion governed by the Galilei variant fractional diffusion-advection equation in the semi-infinite and finite domains subject to an absorbing boundary condition. We obtain explicit solutions for the FPT distributions and the corresponding Laplace transforms for both zero and constant drift cases by using the method of separation of variables as well as the properties of the Fox H function. An important relation between the FPT distributions corresponding to one and two absorbing barriers is revealed to determine the conditional FPT distributions. It shows that the proportion between the conditional FPT distributions only depends on the general Péclet number. We further discuss the asymptotic behavior of the FPT distributions and confirm our theoretical analysis by numerical results.

  18. Perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions with double barrier and single or synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer

    SciTech Connect

    Cuchet, Léa; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stéphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Prejbeanu, Ioan L.; Dieny, Bernard

    2015-06-21

    The magnetic properties of double tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy were investigated. Two synthetic antiferromagnetic references are used, while the middle storage magnetic layer can be either a single ferromagnetic or a synthetic antiferromagnetic FeCoB-based layer, with a critical thickness as large as 3.0 nm. Among the different achievable magnetic configurations in zero field, those with either antiparallel references, and single ferromagnetic storage layer, or parallel references, and synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer, are of particular interest since they allow increasing the efficiency of spin transfer torque writing and the thermal stability of the stored information as compared to single tunnel junctions. The latter configuration can be preferred when stray fields would favour a parallel orientation of the reference layers. In this case, the synthetic antiferromagnetic storage layer is also less sensitive to residual stray fields.

  19. Application of the double-indicator technique for measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability in humans.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, G M

    1994-01-01

    This review examines and evaluates the double-indicator technique for utilization in quantitative measurements of the transport of substances across the human blood-brain barrier (BBB). The classic double-indicator method and its limitations are described along with a new approach for correction of capillary heterogeneity and tracer backflux. This approach considers the total course of the venous outflow curves and involves a short-time experiment model that incorporates calculations of parameters for transport from the blood into the brain and from the brain back to the blood, for the uptake of neurons and glia cells, and for the tracer distribution volume. A modification of the double-indicator technique with intravenous instead of intracarotid bolus injection is discussed along with advantages and limitations of this technique. The application of the method is described and examples are given for D-glucose as well as for some large neutral amino acids and flow tracers. On the basis of the model, it is demonstrated that after crossing the BBB, D-glucose distributes in the brain interstitial fluid volume, and already at the peak of the glucose outflow curves, the apparent extraction is significantly influenced by backflux from the brain. For large neutral amino acids, the permeability from the interstitial fluid space back to the blood is approximately 10 times higher than the permeability from the blood into the brain. Such a difference in permeabilities across the BBB can almost entirely be ascribed to the effect of a nonlinear transport system combined with a relatively small brain amino acid metabolism. This high and rapid backflux causes methodological problems when estimating blood-to-brain transfer of amino acids with traditional in vivo methods. The method is also evaluated for high-permeable substances. Water and the two flow tracers ethyl cysteinate dimer and hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime and the obtained values for brain extraction and distribution volume compare well with those obtained by other methods. Finally, ethical aspects and the future role and possibilities of the double-indicator technique are discussed and related to other methods for determination of BBB permeabilities in the living human brain. PMID:8186068

  20. Effect of heterostructure design on current-voltage characteristics in AlxGa1-xN/GaN double-barriers resonant tunneling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucherit, M.; Soltani, A.; Rousseau, M.; Farvacque, J.-L.; DeJaeger, J.-C.

    2012-12-01

    Ballistic transport in double-barriers resonant tunneling diodes based on GaN is investigated in this work using the non-equilibrium Green's functions formalism. The electron density of states, the electrons concentration, and the current-voltage characteristics are calculated taking into account the internal electric field induced in the AlxGa1-xN/GaN heterostructures. The effect of the geometrical parameters on the evolution of the current resonances characteristics was analyzed qualitatively by varying GaN quantum well width, thicknesses and height of the AlxGa1-xN barriers.

  1. Dynamic characteristics of double-barrier nanostructures with asymmetric barriers of finite height and widths in a strong ac electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenkov, V. A.

    2013-12-15

    The theory of the interaction of a monoenergetic flow of injected electrons with a strong high-frequency ac electric field in resonant-tunneling diode (RTD) structures with asymmetric barriers of finite height and width is generalized. In the quasi-classical approximation, electron wavefunctions and tunneling functions in the quantum well and barriers are found. Analytical expressions for polarization currents in RTDs are derived in both the general case and in a number of limiting cases. It is shown that the polarization currents and radiation power in RTDs with asymmetric barriers strongly depend on the ratio of the probabilities of electron tunneling through the emitter and collector barriers. In the quantum mode, when δ = ε − ε{sub r} = ħω ≪ Γ (ε is the energy of electrons injected in the RTD, ħ is Planck’s constant, ω is the ac field frequency, ε{sub r} and Γ are the energy and width of the resonance level, respectively), the active polarization current in a field of E ≈ 2.8ħω/ea (e is the electron charge and a is the quantum-well width) reaches a maximum equal in magnitude to 84% of the direct resonant current, if the probability of electron tunneling through the emitter barrier is much higher than that through the collector barrier. The radiation-generation power at frequencies of ω = 10{sup 12}–10{sup 13} s{sup −1} can reach 10{sup 5}–10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2} in this case.

  2. KTiOPO4 double barrier optical waveguides produced by Rb+-K+ ion exchange and subsequent He+-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Liang-Ling; Zhang, Hai-Kun; Chen, Tao

    2016-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of KTiOPO4 optical waveguides formed by Rb+-K+ ion exchange in high-purity RbNO3 melt at 340°C for 90 min and subsequent He+-ion irradiation at energy of 500 keV and fluence of 3×1016 ions/cm2. The irradiation of KTiOPO4 crystals with He+ ions was simulated using the stopping range of ions in matter (SRIM'2006) software. The dark mode spectra of the samples were measured with the prism coupling method. The reconstructed refractive index profiles of the planar waveguide show a barrier in the middle of the guiding region, and a refractive index enhancement region on each side of the barrier, indicating the formation of a double waveguide.

  3. Double Gaussian distribution of barrier height observed in densely packed GaN nanorods over Si (111) heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Lokesh; Chandan, Greeshma; Mukundan, Shruthi; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Roul, Basanta

    2014-12-21

    GaN nanorods were grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on intrinsic Si (111) substrates which were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. The current–voltage characteristics of the GaN nanorods on Si (111) heterojunction were obtained from 138 to 493 K which showed the inverted rectification behavior. The I-V characteristics were analyzed in terms of thermionic emission model. The temperature variation of the apparent barrier height and ideality factor along with the non-linearity of the activation energy plot indicated the presence of lateral inhomogeneities in the barrier height. The observed two temperature regimes in Richardson's plot could be well explained by assuming two separate Gaussian distribution of the barrier heights.

  4. Sign of coupling in barrier-separated Bose-Einstein condensates and stability of double-ring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.; Haigh, T. J.; Zuelicke, U.

    2010-02-15

    We revisit recent claims about the instability of nonrotating tunnel coupled annular Bose-Einstein condensates leading to the emergence of angular momentum Josephson oscillation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 050401 (2007)]. It was predicted that all stationary states with uniform density become unstable in certain parameter regimes. By careful analysis, we arrive at a different conclusion. We show that there is a stable nonrotating and uniform ground state for any value of the tunnel coupling and repulsive interactions. The instability of an excited state with {pi} phase difference between the condensates can be interpreted in terms of the familiar snake instability. We further discuss the sign of the tunnel coupling through a separating barrier, which carries significance for the nature of the stationary states. It is found to always be negative for physical reasons.

  5. Noninvasive and transient blood-brain barrier opening in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's double transgenic mice using focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Choi, James J; Wang, Shougang; Brown, Truman R; Small, Scott A; Duff, Karen E K; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2008-07-01

    The spatio-temporal nature of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening as a brain drug delivery method was investigated in Alzheimer's disease model mice. The left hippocampus of transgenic (APP/PS1, n = 3) and nontransgenic (n = 3) mice was sonicated (frequency: 1.525 MHz, peak-negative pressure: 600 kPa, pulse length: 20 ms, duty cycle: 20%, duration: 1 min) in vivo, through their intact skin and skull, after intravenous injection of microbubbles (SonoVue; 25 microl). Sequential, high-field MR images (9.4 Tesla) were acquired before and after injection of gadolinium (Omniscan, 0.75 ml, molecular weight: 573.7 Da) on two separate days for each mouse. Gadolinium deposits through the ultrasound-induced BBB opening in the left hippocampus revealed significant contrast-enhancement in the MRI. On the following day, MRI revealed significant BBB closure within the same region. However, the BBB opening extent and BBB closing timeline varied in different regions within the same sonicated location. This indicates that opening and closing were dependent on the brain region targeted. No significant difference in BBB opening or closing behaviors was observed between the APP/PS1 and the nontransgenic mice. In conclusion, a BBB-impermeable molecule was noninvasively, transiently and reproducibly delivered to the hippocampus of Alzheimer's APP/PS1 mice. PMID:19149463

  6. Will the use of double barrier result in sustained release of vancomycin? Optimization of parameters for preparation of a new antibacterial alginate-based modern dressing.

    PubMed

    Kurczewska, Joanna; Sawicka, Paulina; Ratajczak, Magdalena; Gajęcka, Marzena; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2015-12-30

    The aim of this research was to prepare and characterize an alginate-based wound dressing containing vancomycin immobilized at the silica surface. The silica samples functionalized with amine, diol and carboxylic acid groups were loaded with 7.8, 5.7 and 7.1wt.% of the antibiotic respectively. The immobilized drug was encapsulated in alginate or gelatin/alginate gels and the average concentration of vancomycin was about 10mg per g of the dried gel. The effect of functional organic groups at the silica surface on the release rate of the drug was investigated. Only the drug immobilized at Si-amine in alginate matrix was found to demonstrate slower release from the proposed wound dressing. The in vitro release profiles for other silica carriers did not show significant differences in relation to the free loaded drug. The presence of gelatin had a favourable impact on the slowing down of the drug release from the dressing with a double barrier. All the gels studied with vancomycin immobilized at the silica surface demonstrated antimicrobial activity against various bacteria. A reduction of the drug dose to a half had no effect on changing microbiological activity of gels. PMID:26541298

  7. Application of double camel-like gate structures for a GaAs field-effect transistor with extremely high potential barrier height and gate turn-on voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Jung-Hui; Chiu, Shao-Yen; Lour, Wen-Shiung; Guo, Der-Feng; Liu, Wen-Chau

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, extremely high potential barrier height and gate turn-on voltage in an n+/p+/n+/p+/n GaAs field-effect transistor employing double camel-like gate structures are demonstrated. The gate potential barrier height of the double camel-like gate is substantially enhanced by the addition of another n+/p+ layer in the gate region, as compared with the conventional n+/p+/n single camel-like gate structure. The influence of gate structure layers on the depletion depth, potential barrier height, transconductance and gate voltage swing are addressed. Experimental results show that a relatively high gate turn-on voltage up to +4.9 V is realized because two reverse-biased junctions of the double camel-like gate structures absorb part of the positive gate voltage. In addition, an extremely broad gate voltage swing greater than 4.6 V with the transconductance above 100 mS mm-1 is observed. These results indicate that the studied device is suitable for linear and signal amplifiers and inverter circuit applications.

  8. Probiotic supplementation affects markers of intestinal barrier, oxidation, and inflammation in trained men; a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Probiotics are an upcoming group of nutraceuticals claiming positive effects on athletes gut health, redox biology and immunity but there is lack of evidence to support these statements. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled trial to observe effects of probiotic supplementation on markers of intestinal barrier, oxidation and inflammation, at rest and after intense exercise. 23 trained men received multi-species probiotics (1010 CFU/day, EcologicPerformance or OMNi-BiOTiCPOWER, n?=?11) or placebo (n?=?12) for 14?weeks and performed an intense cycle ergometry over 90 minutes at baseline and after 14?weeks. Zonulin and ?1-antitrypsin were measured from feces to estimate gut leakage at baseline and at the end of treatment. Venous blood was collected at baseline and after 14?weeks, before and immediately post exercise, to determine carbonyl proteins (CP), malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidation status of lipids (TOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Statistical analysis used multifactorial analysis of variance (ANOVA). Level of significance was set at p??0.1). CP increased significantly from pre to post exercise in both groups at baseline and in the placebo group after 14?weeks of treatment (p?=?0.006). After 14?weeks, CP concentrations were tendentially lower with probiotics (p?=?0.061). TOS was slightly increased above normal in both groups, at baseline and after 14?weeks of treatment. There was no effect of supplementation or exercise on TOS. At baseline, both groups showed considerably higher TNF-? concentrations than normal. After 14?weeks TNF-? was tendentially lower in the supplemented group (p?=?0.054). IL-6 increased significantly from pre to post exercise in both groups (p?=?0.001), but supplementation had no effect. MDA was not influenced, neither by supplementation nor by exercise. Conclusions The probiotic treatment decreased Zonulin in feces, a marker indicating enhanced gut permeability. Moreover, probiotic supplementation beneficially affected TNF-? and exercise induced protein oxidation. These results demonstrate promising benefits for probiotic use in trained men. Clinical trial registry http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT01474629 PMID:22992437

  9. Ultradeformable lipid vesicles can penetrate the skin and other semi-permeable barriers unfragmented. Evidence from double label CLSM experiments and direct size measurements.

    PubMed

    Cevc, Gregor; Schätzlein, Andreas; Richardsen, Holger

    2002-08-19

    The stability of various aggregates in the form of lipid bilayer vesicles was tested by three different methods before and after crossing different semi-permeable barriers. First, polymer membranes with pores significantly smaller than the average aggregate diameter were used as the skin barrier model; dynamic light scattering was employed to monitor vesicle size changes after barrier passage for several lipid mixtures with different bilayer elasticities. This revealed that vesicles must adapt their size and/or shape, dependent on bilayer stability and elasto-mechanics, to overcome an otherwise confining pore. For the mixed lipid aggregates with highly flexible bilayers (Transfersomes), the change is transient and only involves vesicle shape and volume adaptation. The constancy of ultradeformable vesicle size before and after pores penetration proves this. This is remarkable in light of the very strong aggregate deformation during an enforced barrier passage. Simple phosphatidylcholine vesicles, with less flexible bilayers, lack such capability and stability. Conventional liposomes are therefore fractured during transport through a semi-permeable barrier; as reported by other researchers, liposomes are fragmented to the size of a narrow pore if sufficient pressure is applied across the barrier; otherwise, liposomes clog the pores. The precise outcome depends on trans-barrier flux and/or on relative vesicle vs. pore size. Lipid vesicles applied on the skin behave accordingly. Mixed lipid vesicles penetrate the skin if they are sufficiently deformable. If this is the case, they cross inter-cellular constrictions in the organ without significant composition or size modification. To prove this, we labelled vesicles with two different fluorescent markers and applied the suspension on intact murine skin without occlusion. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of the skin then revealed a practically indistinguishable distribution of both labels in the stratum corneum, corroborating the first assumption. To confirm the second postulate, we compared vesicle size in the starting suspension and in the blood after non-invasive transcutaneous aggregate delivery. Size exclusion chromatograms of sera from the mice that received ultradeformable vesicles on the skin were undistinguishable from the results measured with the original vesicle suspension. Taken together, the results support our previous postulate that ultradeformable vesicles penetrate the skin intact, that is, without permanent disintegration. PMID:12100992

  10. A Paired, Double-Blind, Randomized Comparison of a Moisturizing Durable Barrier Cream to 10% Glycerine Cream in the Prophylactic Management of Postmastectomy Irradiation Skin Care: Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Peter H.; Plant, Natalie; Graham, Jennifer L.; Browne, Lois; Borg, Martin; Capp, Anne; Delaney, Geoff P.; Harvey, Jennifer; Kenny, Lisbeth; Francis, Michael; Zissiadis, Yvonne

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A previous, unblinded study demonstrated that an alcohol-free barrier film containing an acrylate terpolymer (ATP) was effective in reducing skin reactions compared with a 10% glycerine cream (sorbolene). The different appearances of these products precluded a blinded comparison. To test the acrylate terpolymer principle in a double-blinded manner required the use of an alternative cream formulation, a moisturizing durable barrier cream (MDBC); the study was conducted by the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) as protocol 04.01. Methods and Materials: A total of 333 patients were randomized; 1 patient was ineligible and 14 patients withdrew or had less than 7 weeks' observations, leaving 318 for analysis. The chest wall was divided into medial and lateral compartments, and patients were randomized to have MDBC applied daily to the medial or lateral compartment and sorbolene to the other compartment. Weekly observations, photographs, and symptom scores (pain and pruritus) were collected to week 12 or resolution of skin reactions if earlier. Skin dose was confirmed by centrally calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results: Rates of medial and lateral compartment Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), version 3, greater than or equal to grade 3 skin reactions were 23% and 41%, but rates by skin care product were identical at 32%. There was no significant difference between MDBC and sorbolene in the primary endpoint of peak skin reactions or secondary endpoints of area-under-the-curve skin reaction scores. Conclusions: The MDBC did not reduce the peak skin reaction compared to sorbolene. It is possible that this is related to the difference in the formulation of the cream compared with the film formulation. Skin dosimetry verification and double blinding are essential for radiation skin care comparative studies.

  11. Raman spectrum, conformational stability, barriers to internal rotations and DFT calculations of 1,1,1-trifluoro-propane-2-thione with double-internal-symmetric rotor.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Tarek A; Farag, Rabei S

    2005-12-01

    The Raman spectrum (3500-100 cm-1) of 1,1,1-trifluoro-propane-2-thione (TFPT), CF3C(S)CH3 of the solid phase has been recorded. The internal rotation of CH3 and/or CF3 moieties around CC bonds in TFPT allow five hypothetical conformers (Cs and C1 point groups). Aided by quantum chemical (QC) calculations, the Cc conformer is the only stable form (CF3 and CH3 groups are eclipsing the CS bond) which contains a planar FCC(S)CH backbone and possess intramolecular hydrogen sulfur interactions. However, other conformations (with the orientation of sulfur atom being trans to either hydrogen or fluorine atom) are either transition states or not fully converged geometry with "gauche" orientation. Moreover, the calculation were carried out at the level of Becke three Lee-Yan-Parr (B3LYP) parameters up to 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The torsional barriers are adequately described by a three-fold potential, V3 which have been determined utilizing the optimized structural parameters from the B3LYP/6-31G(d) basis set along with potential surface scan. Barriers of 1.28 kcal/mol (448 cm-1) and 1.94 kcal/mol (678 cm-1) were calculated for CH3 and CF3 symmetric rotors, respectively. Complete vibrational assignments have been reported for the stable Cc isomer which is supported by normal coordinate analysis and potential energy distributions (PEDs) for all fundamentals. Moreover, equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies are compared to the corresponding experimental values of acetone, 1,1,1-trifluoroacetone (TFA), hexafluoroacetone (HFA) and other molecules having the CF3 moiety whenever appropriate. PMID:16303627

  12. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; Wowczuk, Andrew; Vellenoweth, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

  13. Fast beam stacking using rf barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Capista, D.; Griffin, J.; Ng, K.-Y.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Two barrier RF systems were fabricated, tested and installed in the Fermilab Main Injector. Each can provide 8 kV rectangular pulses (the RF barriers) at 90 kHz. When a stationary barrier is combined with a moving barrier, injected beams from the Booster can be continuously deflected, folded and stacked in the Main Injector, which leads to doubling of the beam intensity. This paper gives a report on the beam experiment using this novel technology.

  14. Microstructures and properties of double-ceramic-layer thermal barrier coatings of La2(Zr0.7Ce0.3)2O7/8YSZ made by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Xiang, Jianying; Huang, Jihua; Zhao, Xingke

    2015-06-01

    A double-ceramic-layer (DCL) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) of La2(Zr0.7Ce0.3)2O7/8YSZ (LZ7C3/8YSZ) was prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The phase structure, composition, thermal conductivity, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, adhesion strength and thermal shock behavior of the LZ7C3/8YSZ coating were investigated. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the phase structures of top coat LZ7C3 was different from the powder for spraying, which consists of pyrochlore LZ and fluorite LC structures. Main peaks between LZ and LC in as-sprayed LZ7C3 have almost overlapping diffracted angles and approximately equal diffracted intensity. Thermal shock lifetime and adhesion strength of the DCL LZ7C3/8YSZ coating are enhanced significantly as compared to single LZ7C3 coating, and are very close to that of single 8YSZ coating. The mechanisms of performance improvement are considered to be effictive reduction of stress concentration between substrate and LZ7C3 coating by 8YSZ buffer effect, and the gentle thermal gradient initiated at the time of quenching in water. The DCL LZ7C3/8YSZ coating has lower thermal conductivity than 8YSZ, which was only 25% of 8YSZ bulk material and 65% of 8YSZ coating by APS.

  15. Finite element simulation of stress distribution and development in 8YSZ and double-ceramic-layer La2Zr2O7/8YSZ thermal barrier coatings during thermal shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L. Wang; Wang, Y.; Zhang, W. Q.; Sun, X. G.; He, J. Q.; Pan, Z. Y.; Wang, C. H.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, the thermal stress of the double-ceramic-layer (DCL) La2Zr2O7/8YSZ thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) during thermal shock has been calculated. The residual stress of the coating after being sprayed has been regarded as the initial condition of the first thermal cycle. The characteristic of the stress development during the thermal cycle has been discussed, and the influence of the defects on the failure mode during the thermal cycle has also been discussed systematically. Finite element simulation results show that there exist higher radial thermal shock stresses on the ceramic layer surface of these two coatings. There also exist higher thermal stress gradient at the interface between the ceramic layer and the metallic layer. Higher thermal stress in 8YSZ/NiCoCrAlY coating lead to the decrease of thermal shock property as compared to that of LZ/8YSZ/NiCoCrAlY coating. The addition of LZ ceramic layer can increase the insulation temperature, impede the oxygen transferring to the bond coating and can also reduce the thermal stress. Considering from the aspects of thermal insulation ability and the thermal shock resistance ability, DCL type LZ/8YSZ TBCs is a more promising coating material compared with the single-ceramic-layer (SCL) type 8YSZ TBCs for the application.

  16. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified version of the THALES double heterostructure (DH) p-i-n device, but with even wider bandgap barriers inserted at the contact layer/absorber layer interfaces. It is designed to work with either bulk semiconductors or superlattices as the absorber material. The superlattice bandgap can be adjusted to match the desired absorption cutoff wavelength. This infrared detector has the potential of high-sensitivity operation at higher operating temperatures. This would reduce cooling requirements, thereby reducing the power, mass, and volume of the equipment and allowing an increased mission science return.

  17. Epidermal Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Natsuga, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis functions as a physical barrier to the external environment and works to prevent loss of water from the skin. Numerous factors have been implicated in the formation of epidermal barriers, such as cornified envelopes, corneocytes, lipids, junctional proteins, proteases, protease inhibitors, antimicrobial peptides, and transcription factors. This review illustrates human diseases (ichthyoses) and animal models in which the epidermal barrier is disrupted or dysfunctional at steady state owing to ablation of one or more of the above factors. These diseases and animal models help us to understand the complicated mechanisms of epidermal barrier formation and give further insights on epidermal development. PMID:24692192

  18. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  19. Exocyclic push-pull conjugated compounds. Part 3. An experimental NMR and theoretical MO ab initio study of the structure, the electronic properties and barriers to rotation about the exocyclic partial double bond in 2- exo-methylene- and 2-cyanoimino-quinazolines and -benzodiazepines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassi, R.; Bertarini, C.; Hilfert, L.; Kempter, G.; Kleinpeter, E.; Spindler, J.; Taddei, F.; Thomas, S.

    2000-03-01

    The structure of a number of 2- exo-methylene substituted quinazolines and benzodiazepines, respectively, 1, 3a, b, 4( X=-CN, -COOEt ) and their 2-cyanoimino substituted analogues 2, 3c, d( X=-CN, -SO 2C 6H 4-Me (p) was completely assigned by the whole arsenal of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic methods. The E/ Z isomerism at the exo-cyclic double bond was determined by both NMR spectroscopy and confirmed by ab initio quantum chemical calculations; the Z isomer is the preferred one, its amount proved dependent on steric hindrance. Due to the push-pull effect in this part of the molecules the restricted rotation about the partial C 2,C 11 and C 2,N 11 double bonds, could also be studied and the barrier to rotation measured by dynamic NMR spectroscopy. The free energies of activation of this dynamic process proved very similar along the compounds studied but being dependent on the polarity of the solvent. Quantum chemical calculations at the ab initio level were employed to prove the stereochemistry at the exo-cyclic partial double bonds of 1- 4, to calculate the barriers to rotation but also to discuss in detail both the ground and the transition state of the latter dynamic process in order to better understand electronic, inter- and intramolecular effects on the barrier to rotation which could be determined experimentally. In the cyanoimino substituted compounds 2, 3c, d, the MO ab initio calculations evidence the isomer interconversion to be better described by the internal rotation process than by the lateral shift mechanism.

  20. Language barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ngwakongnwi, Emmanuel; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Musto, Richard; King-Shier, Kathryn M.; Quan, Hude

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of regular medical doctors (RMDs), as well as awareness and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services, by official language minorities (OLMs) in Canada. Design Analysis of data from the 2006 postcensal survey on the vitality of OLMs. Setting Canada. Participants In total, 7691 English speakers in Quebec and 12 376 French speakers outside Quebec, grouped into those who experienced language barriers and those with no language barriers. Main outcome measures Health services utilization (HSU) by the presence of language barriers; HSU measures included having an RMD, use of an RMD’s services, and awareness of and use of telephone health lines or telehealth services. Multivariable models examined the associations between HSU and language barriers. Results After adjusting for age and sex, English speakers residing in Quebec with limited proficiency in French were less likely to have RMDs (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.66, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.87) and to use the services of their RMDs (AOR 0.65, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.86), but were more likely to be aware of the existence of (AOR 1.50, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.93) and to use (AOR 1.43, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.11) telephone health lines or telehealth services. This pattern of having and using RMDs and telehealth services was not observed for French speakers residing outside of Quebec. Conclusion Overall we found variation in HSU among the language barrier populations, with lower use observed in Quebec. Age older than 45 years, male sex, being married or in common-law relationships, and higher income were associated with having RMDs for OLMs. PMID:23242902

  1. Overcoming Barriers.

    PubMed

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie; Schmidt, Kari L

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Neal-Boylan's program of scholarship has always focused on nurse workforce issues. She recently published two books related to how nurses work. One (The Nurse's Reality Gap: Overcoming Barriers Between Academic Achievement and Clinical Success; Neal-Boylan, 2013) focused on the experience of new graduates from baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral programs. The second book, The Nurse's Reality Shift: Using Our History to Transform Our Future (Neal-Boylan, 2014), focuses on the problems nursing continues to face throughout our history and has failed to correct. PMID:26200309

  2. Search for Spin Filtering By Electron Tunneling Through Ferromagnetic EuS Barriers in Pbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figielski, T.; Morawski, A.; Wosinski, T.; Wrotek, S.; Makosa, A.; Lusakowska, E.; Story, T.; Sipatov, A. Yu.; Szczerbakow, A.; Grasza, K.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Perpendicular transport through single- and double-barrier heterostructures consisting of ferromagnetic EuS layers embedded into PbS matrix was investigated. Manifestations of both resonant tunneling and spin filtering through EuS barrier have been observed.

  3. Reliability Estimation for Double Containment Piping

    SciTech Connect

    L. Cadwallader; T. Pinna

    2012-08-01

    Double walled or double containment piping is considered for use in the ITER international project and other next-generation fusion device designs to provide an extra barrier for tritium gas and other radioactive materials. The extra barrier improves confinement of these materials and enhances safety of the facility. This paper describes some of the design challenges in designing double containment piping systems. There is also a brief review of a few operating experiences of double walled piping used with hazardous chemicals in different industries. This paper recommends approaches for the reliability analyst to use to quantify leakage from a double containment piping system in conceptual and more advanced designs. The paper also cites quantitative data that can be used to support such reliability analyses.

  4. Double Vision.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S.; Volpe, Nicholas J.

    2001-07-01

    When evaluating a patient with a complaint of double vision, it is important to distinguish monocular versus binocular diplopia, which are differentiated by asking the patient to cover each eye separately. In the setting of binocular double vision, one of the two images disappears when either eye is covered, because diplopia is the result of ocular misalignment. On the other hand, monocular double vision resolves when the affected eye is covered, but remains when the opposite eye is occluded. Causes of monocular diplopia include cataract, refractive error, and retinal disease, which can be managed accordingly by an ophthalmologist. However, an unusual form of monocular double vision can occur in the setting of cortical dysfunction. Cerebral polyopia describes the perception of multiple images and arises from an occipital disturbance. It can occur with migraine headaches and can be accompanied by a homonymous hemianopia. Palinopsia refers to the persistence of an image that is no longer in view (visual perseveration or stroboscopic effect) and results from an occipital lesion as well. The exact mechanism of polyopia and palinopsia are uncertain and both conditions are extremely rare. The majority of this discussion will focus on binocular double vision and its management. The main treatment objective of binocular diplopia is to restore the largest area of single binocular vision. Ideally, patients would be able to achieve single vision in all fields of gaze, but this is not always possible. The majority of patients are treated with either prism lenses or eye muscle surgery. PMID:11389808

  5. Sprache als Barriere (Language as a Barrier)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattheier, Klaus

    1974-01-01

    The concept of language barrier has its derivations in the fields of dialectology, sociology and psychology. In contemporary usage however, the concept has two meanings i.e. regional-cultural barrier and socio-cultural barrier. (Text is in German.) (DS)

  6. Double Layers in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Alton C. (Editor); Moorehead, Tauna W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: laboratory double layers; ion-acoustic double layers; pumping potential wells; ion phase-space vortices; weak double layers; electric fields and double layers in plasmas; auroral double layers; double layer formation in a plasma; beamed emission from gamma-ray burst source; double layers and extragalactic jets; and electric potential between plasma sheet clouds.

  7. Enhanced spin-torque in double tunnel junctions using a nonmagnetic-metal spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H.; Cheng, Y. H.; Ko, C. W.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2015-10-12

    This study proposes an enhancement in the spin-transfer torque of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) designed with double-barrier layer structure using a nonmagnetic metal spacer, as a replacement for the ferromagnetic material, which is traditionally used in these double-barrier stacks. Our calculation results show that the spin-transfer torque and charge current density of the proposed double-barrier MTJ can be as much as two orders of magnitude larger than the traditional double-barrier one. In other words, the proposed double-barrier MTJ has a spin-transfer torque that is three orders larger than that of the single-barrier stack. This improvement may be attributed to the quantum-well states that are formed in the nonmagnetic metal spacer and the resonant tunneling mechanism that exists throughout the system.

  8. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon emission to classical emission. Dual emission also provides these NCs with more advanced functionalities than the isolated components. The ability to better tailor the emission spectrum can be advantageous for color designed LEDs in lighting and display applications. The different response of the two emission colors to external stimuli enables ratiometric sensing. Control over hot carrier dynamics within such structures allows for photoluminescence upconversion. This Account first provides a description of the main hurdles toward the synthesis of colloidal double QDs and an overview of the growing library of synthetic pathways toward constructing them. The main discoveries regarding their photophysical properties are then described in detail, followed by an overview of potential applications taking advantage of the double-dot structure. Finally, a perspective and outlook for their future development is provided. PMID:27108870

  9. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole–dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon emission to classical emission. Dual emission also provides these NCs with more advanced functionalities than the isolated components. The ability to better tailor the emission spectrum can be advantageous for color designed LEDs in lighting and display applications. The different response of the two emission colors to external stimuli enables ratiometric sensing. Control over hot carrier dynamics within such structures allows for photoluminescence upconversion. This Account first provides a description of the main hurdles toward the synthesis of colloidal double QDs and an overview of the growing library of synthetic pathways toward constructing them. The main discoveries regarding their photophysical properties are then described in detail, followed by an overview of potential applications taking advantage of the double-dot structure. Finally, a perspective and outlook for their future development is provided. PMID:27108870

  10. Double well isomerization rate constants in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Anthony G.; Hynes, James T.

    1985-02-01

    The rate constant k for a double well isomerization in solution is calculated over the entire friction range. The importance of frequency-dependent friction for both the vibrational energy transfer (VET) and barrier passage components of k is described. Rapid suppression of the VET transfer component with increasing degrees of freedom is discussed.

  11. Barrier RF stacking at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    A key issue to upgrade the luminosity of the Tevatron Run2 program and to meet the neutrino requirement of the NuMI experiment at Fermilab is to increase the proton intensity on the target. This paper introduces a new scheme to double the number of protons from the Main Injector (MI) to the pbar production target (Run2) and to the pion production target (NuMI). It is based on the fact that the MI momentum acceptance is about a factor of four larger than the momentum spread of the Booster beam. Two RF barriers--one fixed, another moving--are employed to confine the proton beam. The Booster beams are injected off-momentum into the MI and are continuously reflected and compressed by the two barriers. Calculations and simulations show that this scheme could work provided that the Booster beam momentum spread can be kept under control. Compared with slip stacking, a main advantage of this new method is small beam loading effect thanks to the low peak beam current. The RF barriers can be generated by an inductive device, which uses nanocrystal magnet alloy (Finemet) cores and fast high voltage MOSFET switches. This device has been designed and fabricated by a Fermilab-KEK-Caltech team. The first bench test was successful. Beam experiments are being planned.

  12. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Ramsey, David R.; Stampfer, Joseph F.; Macdonald, John M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  13. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  14. The Barriers Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Confederation Coll. of Applied Arts and Technology, Thunder Bay (Ontario).

    In 1987, the Barriers Project was initiated by Confederation College of Applied Arts and Technology to engage 31 selected community colleges in Canada in an organized self-appraisal of institutional barriers to the enrollment of part-time credit students. From the outset, colleges were encouraged to limit their investigation to barriers over which

  15. Barrier cell sheath formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kesner, J

    1980-04-01

    The solution for electrostatic potential within a simply modeled tandem mirror thermal barrier is seen to exhibit a sheath at each edge of the cell. The formation of the sheath requires ion collisionality and the analysis assmes that the collisional trapping rate into the barrier is considerably slower than the barrier pump rate.

  16. An Interesting Stein Double-Double Pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Report on the observation of the double double pairing of two Stein discoveries in Cygnus. Each of the component pairs (STI9001 and STI2471) were discovered by Johan Stein in 1903 and 1909 respectively.

  17. Double Your Major, Double Your Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Rossi, Alison F.; Hersch, Joni

    2008-01-01

    We use the 2003 National Survey of College Graduates to provide the first estimates of the effect on earnings of having a double major. Overall, double majoring increases earnings by 2.3% relative to having a single major among college graduates without graduate degrees. Most of the gains from having a double major come from choosing fields across…

  18. Comparing barrier algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Jordan, Harry F.

    1987-01-01

    A barrier is a method for synchronizing a large number of concurrent computer processes. After considering some basic synchronization mechanisms, a collection of barrier algorithms with either linear or logarithmic depth are presented. A graphical model is described that profiles the execution of the barriers and other parallel programming constructs. This model shows how the interaction between the barrier algorithms and the work that they synchronize can impact their performance. One result is that logarithmic tree structured barriers show good performance when synchronizing fixed length work, while linear self-scheduled barriers show better performance when synchronizing fixed length work with an imbedded critical section. The linear barriers are better able to exploit the process skew associated with critical sections. Timing experiments, performed on an eighteen processor Flex/32 shared memory multiprocessor, that support these conclusions are detailed.

  19. Multilayer moisture barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  20. Barriers to screening mammography.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BRCA) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the USA, and mammography is an effective means for the early detection of BRCA. Identifying the barriers to screening mammography can inform research, policy and practice aiming to increase mammography adherence. A literature review was conducted to determine common barriers to screening mammography adherence. PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched to identify studies published between 2000 and 2012 that examined barriers associated with reduced mammography adherence. Three thematic groups of barriers, based on social ecology, were identified from the literature: healthcare system-level, social and individual-level barriers. Researchers must consider screening behaviour in context and, therefore, should simultaneously consider each level of barriers when attempting to understand screening behaviour and create interventions to increase mammography adherence. PMID:25793490

  1. Coastal barrier reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.G.; Sangree, J.B.; Sneider, R.M.

    1988-09-01

    Coastal barriers are long, narrow, wave-built, sandy islands parallel to the shore. Part of the island has a beach, but many have sand dunes and areas of vegetation above the high-tide line. A lagoon or estuary is behind the barrier on the protected side away from the ocean. Coastal barrier reservoirs can hold major accumulations of oil and gas. Coastal barriers can build by three major processes; addition of sand washed onto the beach from breaker bars, addition on one end by sand washed from the other end and moved by riptides, and deposition of sand into the lagoon by waves breaking over the barrier during storms. Galveston Island, offshore Texas, is a good example of a modern coastal barrier. Waves in the Gulf of Mexico have sufficient energy to transport and deposit fine-grained sand on Galveston Island. (Fine-grained sand is the coarsest sand available in upper Texas coastal waters). Other examples of modern coastal barriers are found in the Gulf of California, where medium-sized sands are deposited. An example of an ancient deposit was found in the Elk City field, where the barrier beach was composed of well-sorted gravel and coarse sand.

  2. Penetration resistant barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, William R.; Mead, Keith E.; Street, Henry K.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a barrier for resisting penetration by such as hand tools and oxy-acetylene cutting torches. The barrier comprises a layer of firebrick, which is preferably epoxy impregnated sandwiched between inner and outer layers of steel. Between the firebrick and steel are layers of resilient rubber-like filler.

  3. Transforming Education: Overcoming Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Jane L.; Goren, Paul D.

    Barriers to progress in educational reform exist inside and outside the education system. Some arise where new practices encounter traditional expectations and boundaries, but others go much deeper than education, such as poverty, racism, local political conflicts, and human resistance to change. The following five categories of barriers are…

  4. The Dissertation Barriers Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kathy E.; Kluever, Raymond C.

    Barriers to doctoral dissertation completion were identified from a review of empirical studies of doctoral graduates and graduate students who had not completed a dissertation (ABD students) and reviews of components of doctoral persistence. The Dissertation Barriers Scale, comprising 45 items, was constructed and administered jointly with 2…

  5. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  6. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  7. Nonadiabatic Processes Near Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdorfer, J.; Rohringer, N.; Krstic, Predrag S; Reinhold, Carlos O

    2004-07-01

    Non-adiabatic processes in the near-adiabatic limit are controlled by the local dynamics near barriers. The barrier can be a feature of a local potential in coordinate space but can also be an effective dynamical barrier along a generalized "reaction" coordinate. Saddle point potentials represent a special and important case in point. Dynamical barriers give rise to hidden and avoided crossings in adiabatic potential curves. The local dynamics of non-adiabatic transitions is therefore often analyzed in terms of hidden crossings (HC) and avoided crossings (AC) models. We will revisit the theory of local barrier dynamics and present two recent diverse applications in atomic and condensed matter physics: the low-velocity limit of inelastic transitions and the levitation problem in Integer Quantum Hall systems.

  8. A double-double/double-single computation package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-12-01

    The DDFUNIDSFUN software permits a new or existing Fortran-90 program to utilize double-double precision (approx. 31 digits) or double-single precision (approx. 14 digits) arithmetic. Double-double precision is required by a rapidly expandirtg body of scientific computations in physics and mathematics, for which the conventional 64-bit IEEE computer arithmetic (about 16 decimal digit accuracy) is not sufficient. Double-single precision permits users of systems that do not have hardware 64-bit IEEE arithmetic (such as some game systems)more » to perform arithmetic at a precision nearly as high as that of systems that do. Both packages run significantly faster Than using multiple precision or arbitrary precision software for this purpose. The package includes an extensive set of low-level routines to perform high-precision arithmetic, including routines to calculate various algebraic and transcendental functions, such as square roots, sin, ccc, exp, log and others. In addition, the package includes high-level translation facilities, so that Fortran programs can utilize these facilities by making only a few changes to conventional Fortran programs. In most cases, the only changes that are required are to change the type statements of variables that one wishes to be treated as multiple precision, plus a few other minor changes. The DDFUN package is similar in functionality to the double-double part of the GD package, which was previously written at LBNL. However, the DDFUN package is written exclusively in Fortran-90, thus avoidIng difficulties that some users experience when using GD, which includes both Fortran-90 and C++ code.« less

  9. Woods-Saxon Equivalent to a Double Folding Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A. S.; Marques, L.; Zhang, X. X.; Luzio, M. A.; Guillaumon, P.; Condori, R. Pampa; Lichtenthäler, R.

    2016-02-01

    A Woods-Saxon equivalent to a double folding potential in the nuclear surface region is obtained for the heavy-ion scattering potential. The Woods-Saxon potential has fixed geometry and was used as a bare potential in the analysis of elastic scattering angular distributions of several stable systems. A new analytical formula for the position and height of the Coulomb barrier is presented, which reproduces the results obtained using double folding potentials. This simple formula has been applied to estimate the fusion cross section above the Coulomb barrier. A comparison with experimental data is presented.

  10. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  11. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper. 2 tabs.

  12. Vehicle barrier systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The ground vehicle is one of the most effective tools available to an adversary force. Vehicles can be used to penetrate many types of perimeter barriers, transport equipment, and personnel rapidly over long distances, and deliver large amounts of explosives directly to facilities in suicide missions. The function of a vehicle barrier system is to detain or disable a defined threat vehicle at a selected distance from a protected facility. Numerous facilities are installing, or planning to install, vehicle barrier systems and many of these facilities are requesting guidance to do so adequately. Therefore, vehicle barriers are being evaluated to determine their stopping capabilities so that systems can be designed that are both balanced and capable of providing a desired degree of protection. Equally important, many of the considerations that should be taken into account when establishing a vehicle barrier system have been identified. These considerations which pertain to site preparation, barrier selection, system integration and operation, and vehicle/barrier interaction, are discussed in this paper.

  13. Complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An infrared detector having a hole barrier region adjacent to one side of an absorber region, an electron barrier region adjacent to the other side of the absorber region, and a semiconductor adjacent to the electron barrier.

  14. Superlattice barrier varactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, C.; Sun, J. P.; Chen, W. L.; Munns, G.; East, J.; Haddad, G.

    1992-01-01

    SBV (Single Barrier Varactor) diodes have been proposed as alternatives to Schottky barrier diodes for harmonic multiplier applications. However, these show a higher current than expected. The excess current is due to X valley transport in the barrier. We present experimental results showing that the use of a superlattice barrier and doping spikes in the GaAs depletion regions on either side of the barrier can reduce the excess current and improve the control of the capacitance vs. voltage characteristic. The experimental results consist of data taken from two types of device structures. The first test structure was used to study the performance of AlAs/GaAs superlattice barriers. The wafer was fabricated into 90 micron diameter mesa diodes and the resulting current vs. voltage characteristics were measured. A 10 period superlattice structure with a total thickness of approximately 400 A worked well as an electron barrier. The structure had a current density of about one A/sq cm at one volt at room temperature. The capacitance variation of these structures was small because of the design of the GaAs cladding layers. The second test structure was used to study cladding layer designs. These wafers were InGaAs and InAlAs layers lattice matched to an InP substrate. The layers have n(+) doping spikes near the barrier to increase the zero bias capacitance and control the shape of the capacitance vs. voltage characteristic. These structures have a capacitance ratio of 5:1 and an abrupt change from maximum to minimum capacitance. The measurements were made at 80 K. Based on the information obtained from these two structures, we have designed a structure that combines the low current density barrier with the improved cladding layers. The capacitance and current-voltage characteristics from this structure are presented.

  15. Luminescence upconversion in colloidal double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Zvicka; Neeman, Lior; Oron, Dan

    2013-09-01

    Luminescence upconversion nanocrystals capable of converting two low-energy photons into a single photon at a higher energy are sought-after for a variety of applications, including bioimaging and photovoltaic light harvesting. Currently available systems, based on rare-earth-doped dielectrics, are limited in both tunability and absorption cross-section. Here we present colloidal double quantum dots as an alternative nanocrystalline upconversion system, combining the stability of an inorganic crystalline structure with the spectral tunability afforded by quantum confinement. By tailoring its composition and morphology, we form a semiconducting nanostructure in which excited electrons are delocalized over the entire structure, but a double potential well is formed for holes. Upconversion occurs by excitation of an electron in the lower energy transition, followed by intraband absorption of the hole, allowing it to cross the barrier to a higher energy state. An overall conversion efficiency of 0.1% per double excitation event is achieved. PMID:23912060

  16. Double Outlet Right Ventricle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cardiac Arrest Valve Disease Vulnerable Plaque Double Outlet Right Ventricle | Share Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a rare form of congenital ... pulmonary artery sends oxygen-poor blood from the right ventricle into the lungs, and the aorta sends ...

  17. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  18. Chromosome doubling method

    DOEpatents

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  19. Fusion of the {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm System at Near Barrier Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Paes, B.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Nunes, V.; Canto, L. F.

    2010-08-04

    We analyze the data for complete fusion of the {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm system at near barrier energies by performing coupled channel calculations using a double-folding potential as the bare potential. We use a recently proposed new method of analysis by the introduction of dimensionless fusion functions. We observe enhancement of the fusion cross section at energies below the Coulomb barrier and suppression above the barrier.

  20. Information barriers and authentication.

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D. W.; Wolford, J. K.

    2001-01-01

    Acceptance of nuclear materials into a monitoring regime is complicated if the materials are in classified shapes or have classified composition. An attribute measurement system with an information barrier can be emplo,yed to generate an unclassified display from classified measurements. This information barrier must meet two criteria: (1) classified information cannot be released to the monitoring party, and (2) the monitoring party must be convinced that the unclassified output accurately represents the classified input. Criterion 1 is critical to the host country to protect the classified information. Criterion 2 is critical to the monitoring party and is often termed the 'authentication problem.' Thus, the necessity for authentication of a measurement system with an information barrier stems directly from the description of a useful information barrier. Authentication issues must be continually addressed during the entire development lifecycle of the measurement system as opposed to being applied only after the system is built.

  1. Barrier Island Hazard Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkey, Orrin H.; Neal, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Describes efforts to evaluate and map the susceptibility of barrier islands to damage from storms, erosion, rising sea levels and other natural phenomena. Presented are criteria for assessing the safety and hazard potential of island developments. (WB)

  2. Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70's by Dr,. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also to provide protection. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components. The primary purpose of the thermal barrier coatings will be to reduce thermal fatigue as the engine peak cylinder pressure will nearly be doubled. As the coatings result in higher available energy in the exhaust gas, efficiency gains are achieved through use of this energy by turbochargers, turbocompounding or thermoelectric generators.

  3. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; McQueen, Miles A.

    1996-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests stable in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use.

  4. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

    1996-04-16

    A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

  5. Quantum finance Hamiltonian for coupon bond European and barrier options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2008-03-01

    Coupon bond European and barrier options are financial derivatives that can be analyzed in the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum finance. Forward interest rates are modeled as a two-dimensional quantum field theory and its Hamiltonian and state space is defined. European and barrier options are realized as transition amplitudes of the time integrated Hamiltonian operator. The double barrier option for a financial instrument is “knocked out” (terminated with zero value) if the price of the underlying instrument exceeds or falls below preset limits; the barrier option is realized by imposing boundary conditions on the eigenfunctions of the forward interest rates’ Hamiltonian. The price of the European coupon bond option and the zero coupon bond barrier option are calculated. It is shown that, is general, the constraint function for a coupon bond barrier option can—to a good approximation—be linearized. A calculation using an overcomplete set of eigenfunctions yields an approximate price for the coupon bond barrier option, which is given in the form of an integral of a factor that results from the barrier condition times another factor that arises from the payoff function.

  6. QUIESCENT H-MODE, AN ELM-FREE HIGH-CONFINEMENT MODE ON DIII-D WITH POTENTIAL FOR STATIONARY STATE OPERATION

    SciTech Connect

    WEST,WP; BURRELL,KH; deGRASSIE,JS; DOYLE,EJ; GREENFIELD,CM; LASNIER,CJ; SNYDER,PB; ZENG,L

    2003-08-01

    OAK-B135 The quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) is an ELM-free and stationary state mode of operation discovered on DIII-D. This mode achieves H-mode levels of confinement and pedestal pressure while maintaining constant density and radiated power. The elimination of edge localized modes (ELMs) and their large divertor loads while maintaining good confinement and good density control is of interest to next generation tokamaks. This paper reports on the correlations found between selected parameters in a QH-mode database developed from several hundred DIII-D counter injected discharges. Time traces of key plasma parameters from a QH-mode discharge are shown. On DIII-D the negative going plasma current (a) indicates that the beam injection direction is counter to the plasma current direction, a common feature of all QH-modes. The D{sub {alpha}} time behavior (c) shows that soon after high powered beam heating (b) is applied, the discharge makes a transition to ELMing H-mode, then the ELMs disappear, indicating the start of the QH period that lasts for the remainder of the high power beam heating (3.5 s). Previously published work showing density and temperature profiles indicates that long-pulse, high-triangularity QH discharges develop an internal transport barrier in combination with the QH edge barrier. These discharges are known as quiescent, double-barrier discharges (QDB). The H-factor (d) and stored energy (c) rise then saturate at a constant level and the measured axial and minimum safety factors remain above 1.0 for the entire QH duration. During QDB operation the performance of the plasma can be very good, with {beta}{sub N}*H{sub 89L} product reaching 7 for > 10 energy confinement times. These discharges show promise that a stationary state can be achieved.

  7. A Typology of Career Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Hee; Yu, Kumlan; Lee, Sang Min

    2008-01-01

    While most studies have focused primarily on the correlates of career barriers, research examining specific career barrier typology experienced among college students remains limited. Employing cluster analysis, this study explored the career barrier typology of 318 college students using the Korean college students' Career Barrier Inventory…

  8. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  9. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    DOEpatents

    Shurter, Roger P.

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  10. On models of double porosity poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Claude; Royer, Pascale

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the modelling of fluid-filled poroelastic double porosity media under quasi-static and dynamic regimes. The double porosity model is derived from a two-scale homogenization procedure, by considering a medium locally characterized by blocks of poroelastic Biot microporous matrix and a surrounding system of fluid-filled macropores or fractures. The derived double porosity description is a two-pressure field poroelastic model with memory and viscoelastic effects. These effects result from the `time-dependent' interaction between the pressure fields in the two pore networks. It is shown that this homogenized double porosity behaviour arises when the characteristic time of consolidation in the microporous domain is of the same order of magnitude as the macroscopic characteristic time of transient regime. Conversely, single porosity behaviours occur when both timescales are clearly distinct. Moreover, it is established that the phenomenological approaches that postulate the coexistence of two pressure fields in `instantaneous' interaction only describe media with two pore networks separated by an interface flow barrier. Hence, they fail at predicting and reproducing the behaviour of usual double porosity media. Finally, the results are illustrated for the case of stratified media.

  11. Micro heat barrier

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2003-08-12

    A highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  12. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-10-09

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  13. Skin barrier in rosacea*

    PubMed Central

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  14. Segmented Thermal Barrier Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The article has a macro-segmented thermal barrier coating due to the presence of a pattern of three-dimensional features. The features may be a series of raised ribs formed on the substrate surface and being spaced from 0.05 inches to 0.30 apart. The ribs have a width ranging from 0.005 inches to 0.02 inches, and a height ranging from 25% to 100% of the thickness of the barrier coating. Alternately, the features may be a similar pattern of grooves formed in the surface of the substrate. Other embodiments provide segmentation by grooves or ribs in the bond coat or alternately grooves formed in the thermal barrier layer.

  15. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  16. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.; Leibert, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A coating system which contains a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating is applied to metal surfaces such as turbine blades and provides both low thermal conductivity and improved adherence when exposed to high temperature gases or liquids. The bond coating contains NiCrAlY and the thermal barrier coating contains a reflective oxide. The reflective oxides ZrO2-Y2O3 and ZrO2-MgO have demonstrated significant utility in high temperature turbine applications.

  17. Ice barrier construction

    SciTech Connect

    Finucane, R. G.; Jahns, H. O.

    1985-06-18

    A method is provided for constructing spray ice barriers to protect offshore structures in a frigid body of water from mobile ice, waves and currents. Water is withdrawn from the body of water and is sprayed through ambient air which is below the freezing temperature of the water so that a substantial amount of the water freezes as it passes through the air. The sprayed water is directed to build up a mass of ice having a size and shape adapted to protect the offshore structure. Spray ice barriers can also be constructed for the containment of pollutant spills.

  18. Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

  19. Observing Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  20. Barrier Free Site Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Richard K., Ed.

    The booklet provides information for the design and evaluation of a barrier free outdoor environment for handicapped individuals. Section 1 discusses the scope of the study, defines terms, cites pertinent laws and legislation, describes cost/benefit factors, and surveys population statistics. Section 2 considers recommended design details in the…

  1. Barriers to obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Marina; Taylor, Valerie; Wharton, Sean; Sharma, Arya M

    2008-05-01

    Obesity, one of the most prevalent health problems in the Western world, is a chronic and progressive condition. Therefore, as with other chronic diseases, patients with obesity require lifelong treatment. Long-term efficacy and effectiveness of obesity treatments is notoriously poor. This may in part be attributable to the substantial barriers that undermine long-term obesity management strategies. These can include lack of recognition of obesity as a chronic condition, low socioeconomic status, time constraints, intimate saboteurs, and a wide range of comorbidities including mental health, sleep, chronic pain, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and endocrine disorders. Furthermore, medications used to treat some of these disorders may further undermine weight-loss efforts. Lack of specific obesity training of health professionals, attitudes and beliefs as well as coverage and availability of obesity treatments can likewise pose important barriers. Health professionals need to take care to identify, acknowledge and address these barriers where possible to increase patient success as well as compliance and adherence with treatments. Failure to do so may further undermine the sense of failure, low self esteem and self efficacy already common among obese individuals. Addressing treatment barriers can save resources and increase the prospect of long-term success. PMID:18395160

  2. Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A better than average view of the Great Barrier Reef was captured by SeaWiFS on a recent overpass. There is sunglint northeast of the reef and there appears to be some sort of filamentous bloom in the Capricorn Channel.

  3. Thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  4. Barriers Regarding Using Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekenoogen, John Russell

    2014-01-01

    The University of Florida (UF) used an open-source course management system (CMS) called Sakai. Sakai was the fourth CMS the university has used to help teach live, blended (or hybrid), and online courses over the past ten years. The objective of this dissertation was to identify what barriers may be preventing university personnel from using…

  5. The Fission Barrier Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L. G.

    2008-04-17

    Fission excitation functions have been measured for a chain of neighboring compound nuclei from {sup 207}Po to {sup 212}Po. We present a new analysis which provides a determination of the fission barriers and ground state shell effects with nearly spectroscopic accuracy. The accuracy achieved in this analysis may lead to a future detailed exploration of the saddle mass surface and its spectroscopy.

  6. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxide thermal barrier coating comprises ZrO3-Yb2O3 that is plasma sprayed onto a previously applied bond coating. The zirconia is partially stabilized with about 124 w/o ytterbia to insure cubic, monoclinic, and terragonal phases.

  7. Barriers to School Restructuring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheane, Kim; Bierlein, Louann

    In 1990, the Arizona legislature initiated the Arizona School Restructuring Pilot Project. This report identifies local- and state-level barriers encountered in the first 2 years. Outcomes are presented for the 15 pilot schools--11 elementary and 4 high schools--that were selected in a competitive grant process. Data were collected through school…

  8. Simulation of low Schottky barrier MOSFETs using an improved Multi-subband Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Valur; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Hellström, Per-Erik; Selmi, Luca; Östling, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    We present a simple and efficient approach to implement Schottky barrier contacts in a Multi-subband Monte Carlo simulator by using the subband smoothening technique to mimic tunneling at the Schottky junction. In the absence of scattering, simulation results for Schottky barrier MOSFETs are in agreement with ballistic Non-Equilibrium Green's Functions calculations. We then include the most relevant scattering mechanisms, and apply the model to the study of double gate Schottky barrier MOSFETs representative of the ITRS 2015 high performance device. Results show that a Schottky barrier height of less than approximately 0.15 eV is required to outperform the doped source/drain structure.

  9. Dynamics in asymmetric double-well condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, H. M.; Jezek, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates in asymmetric double wells is studied. We construct a two-mode model and analyze the properties of the corresponding phase-space diagram, showing in particular that the minimum of the phase-space portrait becomes shifted from the origin as a consequence of the nonvanishing overlap between the ground and excited states from which the localized states are derived. We further incorporate effective interaction corrections in the set of two-mode model parameters. Such a formalism is applied to a recent experimentally explored system, which is confined by a toroidal trap with radial barriers forming an arbitrary angle between them. We confront the model results with Gross-Pitaevskii simulations for various angle values finding a very good agreement. We also analyze the accuracy of a previously employed simple model for moving barriers, exploring a possible improvement that could cover a wider range of trap asymmetries.

  10. Multidimensional period doubling structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yup; Flom, Dvir; Ben-Abraham, Shelomo I

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops the formalism necessary to generalize the period doubling sequence to arbitrary dimension by straightforward extension of the substitution and recursion rules. It is shown that the period doubling structures of arbitrary dimension are pure point diffractive. The symmetries of the structures are pointed out. PMID:27126116

  11. Stability of barrier buckets with short barrier separations

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    A barrier bucket with very short or zero rf-barrier separation (relative to the barrier widths) has its synchrotron tune decreasing from a very large value towards the bucket boundary. As a result, chaotic region may form near the bucket center and extends outward under increasing modulation of rf voltage and/or rf phase. Application is made to those barrier buckets used in momentum mining at the Fermilab Recycler Ring.

  12. Caffeine improves barrier function in male skin.

    PubMed

    Brandner, J M; Behne, M J; Huesing, B; Moll, I

    2006-10-01

    The influence of androgens, especially testosterone and its effector dihydrotestosterone, results in a constitutive disadvantage for male skin, e.g. reduced viability of hair at the scalp and reduced epidermal permeability barrier repair capacity. Dihydrotestosterone can act, among others, as an adenyl cyclase inhibitor. Caffeine on the other hand is an inexpensive and (in regular doses) harmless substance used in various cosmetic products, which can act as a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. To prove the hypothesis that caffeine as a phosphodiesterase inhibitor is able to override testosterone-induced effects on barrier function, we performed a double-blind placebo controlled study with healthy volunteers. In this study, 0.5% caffeine in a hydroxyethylcellulose gel preparation (HEC) was applied on one forearm, HEC without caffeine on the other forearm of male and female volunteers for 7 days and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured before and at the end of the treatment period. Basal TEWL did not differ significantly between male and female subjects but the application of caffeine significantly reduced TEWL in male skin compared with female skin. We conclude that caffeine is beneficial for barrier function in male skin. PMID:18489298

  13. Chaotic correlations in barrier billiards with arbitrary barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbaldestin, A. H.; Adamson, L. N. C.

    2013-06-01

    We study autocorrelation functions in symmetric barrier billiards for golden mean trajectories with arbitrary barriers. Renormalization analysis reveals the presence of a chaotic invariant set and thus that, for a typical barrier, there are chaotic correlations. The chaotic renormalization set is the analogue of the so-called orchid that arises in a generalized Harper equation.

  14. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  15. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  16. Emerging double helical nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-08-21

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures. PMID:24756184

  17. Emerging double helical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Wei, Fei

    2014-07-01

    As one of the most important and land-mark structures found in nature, a double helix consists of two congruent single helices with the same axis or a translation along the axis. This double helical structure renders the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) the crucial biomolecule in evolution and metabolism. DNA-like double helical nanostructures are probably the most fantastic yet ubiquitous geometry at the nanoscale level, which are expected to exhibit exceptional and even rather different properties due to the unique organization of the two single helices and their synergistic effect. The organization of nanomaterials into double helical structures is an emerging hot topic for nanomaterials science due to their promising exceptional unique properties and applications. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art research progress for the fabrication of double-helical nanostructures based on `bottom-up' and `top-down' strategies. The relevant nanoscale, mesoscale, and macroscopic scale fabrication methods, as well as the properties of the double helical nanostructures are included. Critical perspectives are devoted to the synthesis principles and potential applications in this emerging research area. A multidisciplinary approach from the scope of nanoscience, physics, chemistry, materials, engineering, and other application areas is still required to the well-controlled and large-scale synthesis, mechanism, property, and application exploration of double helical nanostructures.

  18. Tight junctions form a barrier in porcine hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Christiane; Brandner, Johanna M; Laue, Michael; Raesch, Simon S; Hansen, Steffi; Failla, Antonio V; Vidal, Sabine; Moll, Ingrid; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-02-01

    Follicular penetration has gained increasing interest regarding (i) safety concerns about (environmentally born) xenobiotics available to the hair follicle (HF), e.g. nanomaterials or allergens which should not enter the skin, and (ii) the possibility for non-invasive follicular drug and antigen delivery. However, not much is known about barriers in the HF which have to be surpassed upon uptake and/or penetration into surrounding tissue. Thus, aim of this work was a detailed investigation of this follicular barrier function, as well as particle uptake into the HF of porcine skin which is often used as a model system for human skin for such purposes. We show that follicular tight junctions (TJs) form a continuous barrier from the infundibulum down to the suprabulbar region, complementary to the stratum corneum in the most exposed upper follicular region, but remaining as the only barrier in the less accessible lower follicular regions. In the bulbar region of the HF no TJ barrier was found, demonstrating the importance of freely supplying this hair-forming part with e.g. nutrients or hormones from the dermal microenvironment. Moreover, the dynamic character of the follicular TJ barrier was shown by modulating its permeability using EDTA. After applying polymeric model-nanoparticles (154nm) to the skin, transmission electron microscopy revealed that the majority of the particles were localized in the upper part of the HF where the double-barrier is present. Only few penetrated deeper, reaching regions where TJs act as the only barrier, and no particles were observed in the bulbar, barrier-less region. Lastly, the equivalent expression and distribution of TJ proteins in human and porcine HF further supports the suitability of porcine skin as a predictive model to study the follicular penetration and further biological effects of dermally applied nanomaterials in humans. PMID:26785612

  19. Can-Filled Crash Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Crash barrier composed largely of used aluminum beverage cans protects occupants of cars in collisions with poles or trees. Lightweight, can-filled barrier very effective in softening impact of an automobile in head-on and off-angle collisions. Preliminary results indicate barrier is effective in collisions up to 40 mi/h (64 km/h).

  20. Amosphous diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, E.; So, F. C. T.; Nicolet, M-A.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous W-Zr and W-N alloys were investigated as diffusion barriers in silicon metallization schemes. Data were presented showing that amorphous W-Zr crystallizes at 900 C, which is 200 C higher than amorphous W-Ni films, and that both films react with metallic overlayers at temperatures far below the crystllization temperature. Also, W-N alloys (crystalline temperature of 600 C) were successfully incorporated as a diffusion barrier in contact structures with both Al and Ag overlayers. The thermal stability of the electrical characteristics of shallow n(+)p junctions significantly improved by incorporating W-N layers in the contact system. One important fact demonstated was the critical influence of the deposition parameters during formation of these carriers.

  1. Underground waste barrier structure

    DOEpatents

    Saha, Anuj J.; Grant, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

  2. Barrier breaching device

    DOEpatents

    Honodel, C.A.

    1983-06-01

    A barrier breaching device that is designed primarily for opening holes in interior walls of buildings uses detonating fuse for explosive force. The fuse acts as the ribs or spokes of an umbrella-like device that may be opened up to form a cone. The cone is placed against the wall so that detonating fuse that rings the base of the device and which is ignited by the spoke-like fuses serves to cut a circular hole in the wall.

  3. Barrier infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A superlattice-based infrared absorber and the matching electron-blocking and hole-blocking unipolar barriers, absorbers and barriers with graded band gaps, high-performance infrared detectors, and methods of manufacturing such devices are provided herein. The infrared absorber material is made from a superlattice (periodic structure) where each period consists of two or more layers of InAs, InSb, InSbAs, or InGaAs. The layer widths and alloy compositions are chosen to yield the desired energy band gap, absorption strength, and strain balance for the particular application. Furthermore, the periodicity of the superlattice can be "chirped" (varied) to create a material with a graded or varying energy band gap. The superlattice based barrier infrared detectors described and demonstrated herein have spectral ranges covering the entire 3-5 micron atmospheric transmission window, excellent dark current characteristics operating at least 150K, high yield, and have the potential for high-operability, high-uniformity focal plane arrays.

  4. Double Degenerate Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K.

    2011-09-21

    In this study, angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation in double degenerate binary (DDB)systems (NS + NS, NS + WD, WD + WD, and AM CVn) is studied. Energy loss by gravitational waves has been estimated for each type of systems.

  5. Double aortic arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... These defects cause an abnormal formation called a vascular ring -- a circle of blood vessels. Normally, the aorta ... septal defect Double aortic arch is very rare. Vascular rings make up a small percentage of all congenital ...

  6. Double Star Sketching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jeremy; Argyle, R. W.

    The details of your growing record of double star observations can easily be kept in a spreadsheet with columns included for position angle, separation, magnitude, and color. Those entries provide the raw data needed to describe your stellar journeys. However, the essence of what draws you to doubles may not be as obvious when you review your notes. What inspires you to observe double stars? Is it the challenge of resolving a close pair, or pulling a faint secondary out of its companion's glare? Or is it the stunning beauty of a colorful duo or closely matched twins? Do you enjoy tracking the progress of short-period doubles? All of these passions and more can be readily captured by sketches in a way that vividly supplements your tabular data.

  7. The magnetic barrier at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. L.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Altitude profiles of the Venus magnetic barrier are derived here from a statistical analysis of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer data. The outer boundary of the magnetic barrier is then compared with the obstacle expected from gasdynamic models of the bow shock, and the stagnation pressure is compared with that expected from gasdynamic theory. The magnetic barrier is strongest at the subsolar point and weakens as expected with increasing solar zenith angle. The existence of a north-south asymmetry in the barrier strength is also demonstrated. The magnetic barrier is about 200 km thick at the subsolar point and 800 km thick at the terminator. The magnetic barrier transfers most of the solar wind dynamic pressure to the ionosphere via the enhanced magnetic pressure. The convected field gasdynamic model predicts the correct bow shock location if the magnetic barrier is treated as the obstacle.

  8. Oil spill barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Milgram, J.H.

    1981-12-01

    There is disclosed in the present application, a barrier comprising a curtain fitted to stiffening struts at regular intervals along its length and provided with rigid flotation in the form of blocks of foam secured to the rearward side of the curtain. The blocks of foam are hinged so that, in use, they are located on the upper half of the curtain, but for stowing, the blocks are extended over substantially the entire width of the curtain so as to reduce the required stowage space.

  9. Information barrier functional requirements

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D.; Whiteson, R.

    1998-12-31

    for the purpose of this paper, the authors have used the term functional requirement to indicate a required task rather than the recommended method for accomplishing this task. The creation of effective information barrier technology will proceed as a series of steps: (1) IB conceptual Description; (2) IB Functional Requirements (this document--ongoing); (3) IB hardware and software specification; (4) IB hardware and software construction; and (5) IB implementation. This functional requirements document is not intended to supplant or supersede the conceptual description; rather, these functional requirements are intended to be used along with the earlier description to help generate hardware and software requirements.

  10. Stability of barrier buckets with zero RF-barrier separations

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-03-01

    A barrier bucket with very small separation between the rf barriers (relative to the barrier widths) or even zero separation has its synchrotron tune decreasing rather slowly from a large value towards the boundary of the bucket. As a result, large area at the bucket edges can become unstable under the modulation of rf voltage and/or rf phase. In addition, chaotic regions may form near the bucket center and extend outward under increasing modulation. Application is made to those barrier buckets used in the process of momentum mining at the Fermilab Recycler Ring.

  11. Synthetic Eelgrass Oil Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, T. G.

    2013-05-01

    Although surviving in situ micro-organisms eventually consume spilled oil, extensive inundation of shore biota by oil requires cleanup to enable ecological recovery within normal time scales. Although effective in calm seas and quiet waters, oil is advected over and under conventional curtain oil booms by wave actions and currents when seas are running. Most sorbent booms are not reusable, and are usually disposed of in landfills, creating excessive waste. A new concept is proposed for a floating oil barrier, to be positioned off vulnerable coasts, to interdict, contain, and sequester spilled oil, which can then be recovered and the barrier reused. While conventional oil boom designs rely principally on the immiscibility of oil in water and its relative buoyancy, the new concept barrier avoids the pitfalls of the former by taking advantage of the synergistic benefits of numerous fluid and material properties, including: density, buoyancy, elasticity, polarity, and surface area to volume ratio. Modeled after Zostera marina, commonly called eelgrass, the new barrier, referred to as synthetic eelgrass (SE), behaves analogously. Eelgrass has very long narrow, ribbon-like, leaves which support periphyton, a complex matrix of algae and heterotrophic microbes, which position themselves there to extract nutrients from the seawater flowing past them. In an analogous fashion, oil on, or in, seawater, which comes in contact with SE, is adsorbed on the surface and sequestered there. Secured to the bottom, in shoal waters, SE rises to the surface, and, if the tide is low enough, floats on the sea surface down wind, or down current to snare floating oil. The leaves of SE, called filaments, consist of intrinsically buoyant strips of ethylene methyl acrylate, aka EMA. EMA, made of long chain, saturated, hydrocarbon molecules with nearly homogeneous electron charge distributions, is a non-polar material which is oleophilic and hydrophobic. Oil must be in close proximity to the surface of filaments because the physical, van der Waals, forces, the basis for their adhesion to the surface, are weak and act over only a short distance. SE can be deployed in a fashion similar to a demersal fishing "longline". Oil can be "caught" by replacing baited hooks and snoods with closely spaced filaments of EMA. Adsorption of floating oil requires the filaments be long enough to reach the surface, and float, as eelgrass at low tide, on the surface for some distance. Laying multiple, parallel, lines of SE offshore, makes it possible to recover each, one at a time, and replace it without breeching the barrier to oil that they form. As EMA is tough and elastic, with a large surface area to volume ratio, by virtue of being formed as an open-cell foam, considerable oil is adsorbed and can be recovered by squeezing the oil out of the filaments. Lines of SE can be redeployed and do not have to be discarded.

  12. Clear signatures of specific inelastic and transfer channels in the distribution of fusion barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, C.R.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D.J.; Leigh, J.R.; Lemmon, R.C.; Lestone, J.P.; Mein, J.C.; Newton, J.O.; Timmers, H. ); Rowley, N. Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 5XH ); Kruppa, A.T. )

    1994-06-27

    Fusion excitation functions for [sup 144]Sm + [sup 16]O and [sup 17]O have been measured to high precision. The extracted fusion barrier distributions show a double-peaked structure which is interpreted in terms of coupling to inelastic excitations of the target. The effect of the neutron stripping channel is evident in the reaction with [sup 17]O. These barrier distributions show clearly the signatures of specific inelastic and transfer channels.

  13. Performing a local barrier operation

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-03-04

    Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value of the counter, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

  14. Performing a local barrier operation

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-03-04

    Performing a local barrier operation with parallel tasks executing on a compute node including, for each task: retrieving a present value of a counter; calculating, in dependence upon the present value of the counter and a total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a base value of the counter, the base value representing the counter's value prior to any task joining the local barrier; calculating, in dependence upon the base value and the total number of tasks performing the local barrier operation, a target value, the target value representing the counter's value when all tasks have joined the local barrier; joining the local barrier, including atomically incrementing the value of the counter; and repetitively, until the present value of the counter is no less than the target value of the counter: retrieving the present value of the counter and determining whether the present value equals the target value.

  15. Problems in characterizing barrier performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Harry F.

    1988-01-01

    The barrier is a synchronization construct which is useful in separating a parallel program into parallel sections which are executed in sequence. The completion of a barrier requires cooperation among all executing processes. This requirement not only introduces the wait for the slowest process delay which is inherent in the definition of the synchronization, but also has implications for the efficient implementation and measurement of barrier performance in different systems. Types of barrier implementation and their relationship to different multiprocessor environments are described. Then the problem of measuring the performance of barrier implementations on specific machine architecture is discussed. The fact that the barrier synchronization requires the cooperation of all processes makes the problem of performance measurement similarly global. Making non-intrusive measurements of sufficient accuracy can be tricky on systems offering only rudimentary measurement tools.

  16. LOUISIANA BARRIER ISLAND EROSION STUDY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H., Jr.; Penland, Shea; Williams, S. Jeffress; Suter, John R.

    1987-01-01

    During 1986, the U. S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey began a five-year cooperative study focused on the processes which cause erosion of barrier islands. These processes must be understood in order to predict future erosion and to better manage our coastal resources. The study area includes the Louisiana barrier islands which serve to protect 41% of the nation's wetlands. These islands are eroding faster than any other barrier islands in the United States, in places greater than 20 m/yr. The study is divided into three parts: geological development of barrier islands, quantitative processes of barrier island erosion and applications of results. The study focuses on barrier islands in Louisiana although many of the results are applicable nationwide.

  17. Double Emulsion Templated Celloidosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriaga, Laura R.; Marquez, Samantha M.; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Chang, Connie; Wilking, Jim; Monroy, Francisco; Marquez, Manuel; Weitz, David A.

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel approach for fabricating celloidosomes, which represent a hollow and spherical three-dimensional self-assembly of living cells encapsulating an aqueous core. Glass- capillary microfluidics is used to generate monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion templates using lipids as stabilizers. Such templates allow for obtaining single but also double concentric celloidosomes. In addition, after a solvent removal step the double emulsion templates turn into monodisperse lipid vesicles, whose membrane spontaneously phase separates when choosing the adequate lipid composition, providing the adequate scaffold for fabricating Janus-celloidosomes. These structures may find applications in the development of bioreactors in which the synergistic effects of two different types of cells selectively adsorbed on one of the vesicle hemispheres may be exploited.

  18. Double face sealing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A double face sealing device for mounting between two surfaces to provide an airtight and fluid-tight seal between a closure member bearing one of the surfaces and a structure or housing bearing the other surface which extends around the opening or hatchway to be closed. The double face sealing device includes a plurality of sections or segments mounted to one of the surfaces, each having a main body portion, a pair of outwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, and a pair of inwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the inwardly extending and diverging spring arms. The double face sealing device has application or use in all environments requiring a seal, but is particularly useful to seal openings or hatchways between compartments of spacecraft or aircraft.

  19. Double-heterojunction nanorods.

    PubMed

    Oh, Nuri; Nam, Sooji; Zhai, You; Deshpande, Kishori; Trefonas, Pete; Shim, Moonsub

    2014-01-01

    As semiconductor heterostructures play critical roles in today's electronics and optoelectronics, the introduction of active heterojunctions can impart new and improved capabilities that will enable the use of solution-processable colloidal quantum dots in future devices. Such heterojunctions incorporated into colloidal nanorods may be especially promising, since the inherent shape anisotropy can provide additional benefits of directionality and accessibility in band structure engineering and assembly. Here we develop double-heterojunction nanorods where two distinct semiconductor materials with type II staggered band offset are both in contact with one smaller band gap material. The double heterojunction can provide independent control over the electron and hole injection/extraction processes while maintaining high photoluminescence yields. Light-emitting diodes utilizing double-heterojunction nanorods as the electroluminescent layer are demonstrated with low threshold voltage, narrow bandwidth and high efficiencies. PMID:24710332

  20. Revisting the Double Helix

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Taekjip

    2010-12-08

    Properties of DNA double helix have been studied for over 60 years. Yet as more sensitive tools become available, fundamental assumptions in our understanding of these properties are being challenged. One such question is over the flexibility of DNA. Looping or bending of DNA on short length scales is essential for many cellular processes but it is highly controversial exactly how flexible the DNA is. Using a new, single-molecule based method, we found that DNA of lengths as short as 50 base pairs can form a circle more than 108 times faster than theoretical predictions. Another question concerns the physical principles governing the reversible, helix-coil transitions of DNA between the double helix and single strands. Using porous nanocontainers, we found that the rate of double helix formation shows an abrupt 100 fold change depending on whether there are 7 or more contiguous base pairs or not.

  1. Thermal barrier coatings application in diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    Commercial use of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines began in the mid 70's by Dr. Ingard Kvernes at the Central Institute for Industrial Research in Oslo, Norway. Dr. Kvernes attributed attack on diesel engine valves and piston crowns encountered in marine diesel engines in Norwegian ships as hot-corrosion attributed to a reduced quality of residual fuel. His solution was to coat these components to reduce metal temperature below the threshold of aggressive hot-corrosion and also provide protection. Roy Kamo introduced thermal barrier coatings in his 'Adiabatic Diesel Engine' in the late 70's. Kamo's concept was to eliminate the engine block water cooling system and reduce heat losses. Roy reported significant performance improvements in his thermally insulated engine at the SAE Congress in 1982. Kamo's work stimulates major programs with insulated engines, particularly in Europe. Most of the major diesel engine manufacturers conducted some level of test with insulated combustion chamber components. They initially ran into increased fuel consumption. The German engine consortium had Prof. Woschni of the Technical Institute in Munich. Woschni conducted testing with pistons with air gaps to provide the insulation effects. Woschni indicated the hot walls of the insulated engine created a major increase in heat transfer he refers to as 'convection vive.' Woschni's work was a major factor in the abrupt curtailment of insulated diesel engine work in continental Europe. Ricardo in the UK suggested that combustion should be reoptimized for the hot-wall effects of the insulated combustion chamber and showed under a narrow range of conditions fuel economy could be improved. The Department of Energy has supported thermal barrier coating development for diesel engine applications. In the Clean Diesel - 50 Percent Efficient (CD-50) engine for the year 2000, thermal barrier coatings will be used on piston crowns and possibly other components. The primary purpose of the thermal barrier coatings will be to reduce thermal fatigue as the engine peak cylinder pressure will nearly be doubled. As the coatings result in higher available energy in the exhaust gas, efficiency gains are achieved through use of this energy by turbochargers, turbocompounding or thermoelectric generators.

  2. Dynamics of Double Stochastic Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saburov, Mansoor

    2016-03-01

    A double stochastic operator is a generalization of a double stochastic matrix. In this paper, we study the dynamics of double stochastic operators. We give a criterion for a regularity of a double stochastic operator in terms of absences of its periodic points. We provide some examples to insure that, in general, a trajectory of a double stochastic operator may converge to any interior point of the simplex.

  3. Design friendly double patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilada, Emek

    2012-03-01

    Double patterning using 193nm immersion has been adapted as the solution to enable 2x nm technology nodes until the arrival of EUV tools. As a result the past few years have seen a huge effort in creating double patterning friendly design flows. These flows have so far proposed a combination of decomposition rules at cell level and/or at placement level as well as sophisticated decomposition tools with varying density, design iteration and decomposition complexity penalties. What is more, designers have to familiarize themselves with double patterning challenges and decomposition tools. In this paper an alternative approach is presented that allows the development of dense standard cells with minimal impact on design flow due to double patterning. A real case study is done on 20nm node first metal layer where standard cells are designed without considering decomposition restrictions. The resulting layout is carefully studied in order to establish decomposition or color rules that can map the layout into two masks required for double patterning but without the need of complex coloring algorithms. Since the rules are derived from a decomposition unaware design they do not in return impose heavy restrictions on the design at the cell or placement level and show substantial density gains compared to previously proposed methods. Other key advantages are a simplified design flow without complex decomposition tools that can generate a faster time to market solution all at the same time keeping designers isolated from the challenges of the double patterning. The derived design rules highlight process development path required for design driven manufacturing.

  4. Double Bragg Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, H; Müntinga, H; Wenzlawski, A; Krutzik, M; Tackmann, G; Abend, S; Gaaloul, N; Giese, E; Roura, A; Kuhl, R; Lämmerzahl, C; Peters, A; Windpassinger, P; Sengstock, K; Schleich, W P; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E M

    2016-04-29

    We employ light-induced double Bragg diffraction of delta-kick collimated Bose-Einstein condensates to create three symmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometers. They rely on (i) first-order, (ii) two successive first-order, and (iii) second-order processes which demonstrate the scalability of the corresponding momentum transfer. With respect to devices based on conventional Bragg scattering, these symmetric interferometers double the scale factor and feature a better suppression of noise and systematic uncertainties intrinsic to the diffraction process. Moreover, we utilize these interferometers as tiltmeters for monitoring their inclination with respect to gravity. PMID:27176520

  5. Double arch mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  6. Double-helix stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A {approx} 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-{beta} MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications.

  7. Barrier rf systems in synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra M. Bhat

    2004-06-28

    Recently, many interesting applications of the barrier RF system in hadron synchrotrons have been realized. A remarkable example of this is the development of longitudinal momentum mining and implementation at the Fermilab Recycler for extraction of low emittance pbars for the Tevatron shots. At Fermilab, we have barrier RF systems in four different rings. In the case of Recycler Ring, all of the rf manipulations are carried out using a barrier RF system. Here, the author reviews various uses of barrier rf systems in particle accelerators including some new schemes for producing intense proton beam and possible new applications.

  8. Silicon Carbide Schottky Barrier Diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Jian H.; Sheng, Kuang; Lebron-Velilla, Ramon C.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews the status of SiC Schottky barrier diode development. The fundamental of Schottky barrier diodes is first provided, followed by the review of high-voltage SiC Schottky barrier diodes, junction-barrier Schottky diodes, and merged-pin-Schottky diodes. The development history is reviewed ad the key performance parameters are discussed. Applications of SiC SBDs in power electronic circuits as well as other areas such as gas sensors, microwave and UV detections are also presented, followed by discussion of remaining challenges.

  9. Nurses' psychosocial barriers to suicide risk management.

    PubMed

    Valente, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Suicide remains a serious health care problem and a sentinel event tracked by The Joint Commission. Nurses are pivotal in evaluating risk and preventing suicide. Analysis of nurses' barriers to risk management may lead to interventions to improve management of suicidal patients. These data emerged from a random survey of 454 oncology nurses' attitudes, knowledge of suicide, and justifications for euthanasia. Instruments included a vignette of a suicidal patient and a suicide attitude questionnaire. Results. Psychological factors (emotions, unresolved grief, communication, and negative judgments about suicide) complicate the nurse's assessment and treatment of suicidal patients. Some nurses (n = 122) indicated that euthanasia was never justified and 11 were unsure of justifications and evaluated each case on its merits. Justifications for euthanasia included poor symptom control, poor quality of life, incurable illness or permanent disability, terminal illness, and terminal illness with inadequate symptom control or impending death, patient autonomy, and clinical organ death. The nurses indicated some confusion and misconceptions about definitions and examples of euthanasia, assisted suicide, and double effect. Strategies for interdisciplinary clinical intervention are suggested to identify and resolve these psychosocial barriers. PMID:21994837

  10. Thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, Mary Anne

    2010-06-22

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

  11. Oxygen diffusion barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, Jalaiah (Inventor); Clark, Ronald K. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method for coating a titanium panel or foil with aluminum and amorphous silicon to provide an oxygen barrier abrogating oxidation of the substrate metal is developed. The process is accomplished with known inexpensive procedures common in materials research laboratories, i.e., electron beam deposition and sputtering. The procedures are conductive to treating foil gage titanium and result in submicron layers which virtually add no weight to the titanium. There are no costly heating steps. The coatings blend with the substrate titanium until separate mechanical properties are subsumed by those of the substrate without cracking or spallation. This method appreciably increases the ability of titanium to mechanically perform in high thermal environments such as those witnessed on structures of space vehicles during re-entry

  12. Schottky barrier solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating a Schottky barrier solar cell is described. The cell consists of a thin substrate of low cost material with at least the top surface of the substrate being electrically conductive. A thin layer of heavily doped n-type polycrystalling germanium is deposited on the substrate after a passivation layer is deposited to prevent migration of impurities into the polycrystalline germanium. The polycrystalline germanium is recrystallized to increase the crystal sizes to serve as a base layer on which a thin layer of gallium arsenide is vapor-epitaxilly grown followed by a thermally-grown oxide layer. A metal layer is deposited on the oxide layer and a grid electrode is deposited to be in electrical contact with the top surface of the metal layer.

  13. Exposure, Uptake, and Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Lanone, Sophie

    The nanotechnologies market is booming, e.g., in the food industry (powder additives, etc.) and in medical applications (drug delivery, prosthetics, diagnostic imaging, etc.), but also in other industrial sectors, such as sports, construction, cosmetics, and so on. In this context, with an exponential increase in the number of current and future applications, it is particularly important to evaluate the problem of unintentional (i.e., non-medical) exposure to manufactured nanoparticles (so excluding nanoparticles found naturally in the environment). In this chapter, we begin by discussing the various parameters that must be taken into account in any serious assessment of exposure to man-made nanoparticles. We then list the potential routes by which nanoparticles might enter into the organism, and outline the mechanisms whereby they could get past the different biological barriers. Finally, we describe the biodistribution of nanoparticles in the organism and the way they are eliminated.

  14. Michael Heizer: "Double Negative."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanatani, Kim

    1988-01-01

    Uses a photograph of Michael Heizer's earthwork sculpture "Double Negative" to encourage students in grades 4-6 to discuss ways in which an artist may communicate ideas by creating ultra-large "landscape sculptures." Provides student objectives, background information on the artwork, instructional strategies, and evaluation criteria. (GEA)

  15. Double Helix Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glickstein, Neil M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of James Watson's book, "The Double Helix," as a multidisciplinary way of introducing students to actual science; the scientific method; dilemmas encountered in the world of research; and the rich setting of personalities, politics, and history in post-World War II Europe. (MKR)

  16. Weathering the Double Whammy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Jane V.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how governing boards can help their institutions weather the "double-whammy" of doing more with less: identify the institution's short-term and long-term challenges; refocus the institution's mission, planning, and programming; assess and integrate the institution's tuition, aid, and outreach strategies; redouble the institution's…

  17. Design for Double Rainbow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    Rare is the inspirational, spontaneous, transformative moment shared among 20 million people. In the summer of 2010, people around the world were moved by the sighting of a double rainbow--almost a triple rainbow--"all the way across the sky" in Yosemite National Park. Caught on video and posted to by YouTube by Paul Vasquez in January 2010, the…

  18. Double-Entry Bookkeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    Explains the principles and mechanics of double-entry bookkeeping as a part of the accounting cycle to produce a functioning set of accounting records. Suggests that libraries need to have accurate and timely information about their spending to gain financial control and protect against fraud and abuse. (LRW)

  19. Double-Glazing Interferometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toal, Vincent; Mihaylova, Emilia M.

    2009-01-01

    This note describes how white light interference fringes can be seen by observing the Moon through a double-glazed window. White light interferometric fringes are normally observed only in a well-aligned interferometer whose optical path difference is less than the coherence length of the light source, which is approximately one micrometer for

  20. Design for Double Rainbow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2011-01-01

    Rare is the inspirational, spontaneous, transformative moment shared among 20 million people. In the summer of 2010, people around the world were moved by the sighting of a double rainbow--almost a triple rainbow--"all the way across the sky" in Yosemite National Park. Caught on video and posted to by YouTube by Paul Vasquez in January 2010, the

  1. Rosette (Double Blossom)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rosette, or double blossom, is a serious disease of erect blackberries that is limited to the genus Rubus. Rosette may occur on trailing blackberries and dewberries, but rarely on red and black raspberries. In the United States, rosette occurs from New Jersey to Illinois and southwest to Texas and i...

  2. Teaching the Double Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockris, J. O'M.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various methods for teaching the double layer in electrochemistry courses. Topics addressed include measuring change in absolute potential difference (PD) at interphase, conventional electrode potential scale, analyzing absolute PD, metal-metal and overlap electron PDs, accumulation of material at interphase, thermodynamics of electrified

  3. Double-Glazing Interferometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toal, Vincent; Mihaylova, Emilia M.

    2009-01-01

    This note describes how white light interference fringes can be seen by observing the Moon through a double-glazed window. White light interferometric fringes are normally observed only in a well-aligned interferometer whose optical path difference is less than the coherence length of the light source, which is approximately one micrometer for…

  4. Weathering the Double Whammy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Jane V.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how governing boards can help their institutions weather the "double-whammy" of doing more with less: identify the institution's short-term and long-term challenges; refocus the institution's mission, planning, and programming; assess and integrate the institution's tuition, aid, and outreach strategies; redouble the institution's

  5. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1984-01-01

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  6. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.

    1982-09-23

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  7. Enhancement of tunnel magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junction by a superlattice barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2014-01-27

    Tunnel magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junction improved by a superlattice barrier composed of alternate layers of a nonmagnetic metal and an insulator is proposed. The forbidden band of the superlattice is used to predict the low transmission range in the superlattice barrier. By forbidding electron transport in the anti-parallel configuration, the tunnel magnetoresistance is enhanced in the superlattice junction. The results show that the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio for a superlattice magnetic tunnel junction is greater than that for traditional single or double barrier junctions.

  8. Optimization of barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, D.; Kluge, H.; Spiegel, K. H.

    1981-03-01

    A scale model of a SF6 engine fan installed in an anechoic chamber was used to examine diffraction effects behind sound screens. The screens were 22 mm thick covered with a 5 cm layer of mineral wool on the source side. Test data were stored on a 14 track tape device and later displayed using a real time analyzer after averaging 32 spectra with an absolute bandwidth of 20 Hz and, in the case of the double wall, partially also as third octave spectra. The sound screening effect is found to depend mainly on the directional characteristics of the fan due to the diffraction at the edges of the screen. The sound screen should therefore be dimensioned and positioned so that its edges are not in the region of the maxima of the directional characteristics.

  9. Barriers to Women in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, Rosemary Butler AM, has put the issue of barriers to women in public life at the top of the political agenda in Wales. She has held sessions with women across Wales to find out what those barriers are and how they can be tackled. On International Women's Day in February, she invited…

  10. TEST METHODS FOR INJECTABLE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grouts are becoming increasingly important in producing barriers to contaminated ground water flow at hazardous waste sites. Grouted barriers can be used at depths and under conditions where slurry trenches are impractical. To employ grouts to advantage at waste sites it is neces...

  11. Psychological Barriers to Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    Olson, James M.

    1992-01-01

    Adopting a healthy lifestyle often requires changing patterns of behavior. This article describes three categories of psychological barriers to behavior change: those that prevent the admission of a problem, those that interfere with initial attempts to change behavior, and those that make long-term change difficult. Strategies are identified that family physicians can use to overcome the barriers. PMID:21221258

  12. Barriers to Women in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, Rosemary Butler AM, has put the issue of barriers to women in public life at the top of the political agenda in Wales. She has held sessions with women across Wales to find out what those barriers are and how they can be tackled. On International Women's Day in February, she invited

  13. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  14. SUBSURFACE BARRIER VALIDATION WITH THE SEAFACE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra Dalvit Dunn

    1997-11-30

    The overall objective of the effort was to develop and demonstrate an integrated methodology and field system to evaluate the integrity of in situ, impermeable barriers constructed in the vadose zone. An autonomous, remotely accessible, automatic monitoring and analysis system was designed and fabricated. It was thoroughly tested under field conditions, and was able to function as designed throughout the test period. Data inversion software was developed with enhanced capabilities over the previous prototype version, and integrated with the monitoring system for real time operation. Analytical simulations were performed to determine the inversion code's sensitivity to model parameters. Numerical simulations were performed to better understand how typical field conditions differ from the ideal model(s) which are used (or have been developed for use) in the inversion code and to further validate the flux limited forward model developed for use with the system. Results from the analytical and numerical assessment of the inversion code showed that the SEAtrace{trademark} approach could locate leaks within 0.4 to 1.2 m. Leak size determination was less accurate, but produced results within a factor of 3 to 8 for leaks in the 2.5 to 10 cm diameter range. The smallest engineered leak in the test 1.1 cm diameter, could be located but its size estimate was high by a factor of 30. Data analysis was performed automatically after each gas scan was completed, yielding results in less than thirty minutes, although the bulk of the results reported required post test data analysis to remove effects of high background concentrations. The field test of the integrated system was problematic, primarily due to unanticipated, unintentional leaks formed in the impermeable liner. The test facility constructed to proof the system was ambitious, initially having 11 engineered leaks of various dimensions that could be independently operated. While a great deal of care went into the construction of the facility to assure there would be no undesired leaks, the primary barrier to diffusion (a 30-mil high density polyethylene membrane) failed. The unanticipated leaks were large enough that tracer gas diffusing from them masked the designed leaks. The test facility was re-excavated and a new membrane installed. Initial tests of this barrier showed that it also leaked near the bottom of the barrier. However, careful control of the subsequent tracer gas injections, coupled with extensive data analysis to minimize the effects of the high background tracer gas concentrations, allowed leak characterization to be completed successfully. The proposed Phase II demonstration for this project is a double wall, jet grouted coffer dam at the Dover Air Force Base Groundwater Remediation Field Laboratory. This barrier will be constructed of multiple thin wall panels (nominally 6 to 10-inch thick) installed to form a vertical right circular cylinder, approximately 30 ft. in diameter. The barrier will be keyed into a clay layer at the 45 ft. depth, forming the bottom of the barrier.

  15. Tests on Double Layer Metalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    28 page report describes experiments in fabrication of integrated circuits with double-layer metalization. Double-layer metalization requires much less silicon "real estate" and allows more flexibility in placement of circuit elements than does single-layer metalization.

  16. Barrier crossing by a star polymer.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ananya; Sebastian, K L

    2007-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a star polymer of F arms trapped in a double well potential. Initially the molecule is confined to one of the minima and can cross over the barrier to the other side. We use the continuum version of the Rouse-Ham model and calculate the rate of crossing using the multidimensional approach due to Langer [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 54, 258 (1969)]. Finding the transition state for the process is shown to be equivalent to the solution of Newton's equations for F independent particles, moving in an inverted potential. For each star polymer, there is a critical barrier top curvature, below which the star crosses over in coiled conformation. The value of the critical curvature is determined by the first Rouse mode of the star. If the curvature is greater than this critical value, the saddle point for the crossing is a stretched conformation of the star. For the coiled transition state, the activation energy is proportional to the total arm length of the star. For the stretched transition state, as one increases the length of an arm of the star, the activation energy at first increases and then decreases. This results from the fact that in the stretched state, only one arm of the polymer is stretched across the top of the barrier, while others need not be. We calculate the rate by expanding the energy around the saddle up to second order in the fluctuations. As we use the continuum model, there are infinite modes for the polymer and, consequently, the prefactor has infinite products. We show that these infinite products can be reduced to a simple expression, and evaluated easily. However, the rate diverges near NTc due to the multifurcation, which results in more than one unstable mode. The cure for this divergence is to keep terms up to fourth order in the expansion of energy for these modes. Performing this, we have calculated the rate as a function of the length of the star. It is found that the rate has a nonmonotonic dependence on the length, suggesting that longer stars may actually cross over the barrier faster. PMID:18233677

  17. Remeasuring the double helix

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew-Fenn, Rebecca S.; Das, Rhiju; Harbury, Pehr A.B.

    2008-10-20

    DNA is thought to behave as a stiff elastic rod with respect to the ubiquitous mechanical deformations inherent to its biology. To test this model at short DNA lengths, we measured the mean and variance of end-to-end length for a series of DNA double helices in solution, using small-angle x-ray scattering interference between gold nanocrystal labels. In the absence of applied tension, DNA is at least one order of magnitude softer than measured by single-molecule stretching experiments. Further, the data rule out the conventional elastic rod model. The variance in end-to-end length follows a quadratic dependence on the number of base pairs rather than the expected linear dependence, indicating that DNA stretching is cooperative over more than two turns of the DNA double helix. Our observations support the idea of long-range allosteric communication through DNA structure.

  18. Measuring the Double Helix

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew-Fenn, R.S.; Das, R.; Harbury, P.A.B.

    2009-05-26

    DNA is thought to behave as a stiff elastic rod with respect to the ubiquitous mechanical deformations inherent to its biology. To test this model at short DNA lengths, we measured the mean and variance of end-to-end length for a series of DNA double helices in solution, using small-angle x-ray scattering interference between gold nanocrystal labels. In the absence of applied tension, DNA is at least one order of magnitude softer than measured by single-molecule stretching experiments. Further, the data rule out the conventional elastic rod model. The variance in end-to-end length follows a quadratic dependence on the number of base pairs rather than the expected linear dependence, indicating that DNA stretching is cooperative over more than two turns of the DNA double helix. Our observations support the idea of long-range allosteric communication through DNA structure.

  19. The Double Chooz Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dracos, Marcos

    2011-10-06

    The Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment aims at observing the last neutrino oscillation not yet observed and at measuring the corresponding mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. A relatively big value of this angle will allow the measurement of CP violation in the leptonic sector by the next neutrino oscillation experiments. This disappearance experiment will precisely count the number of anti-neutrinos produced by the two nuclear reactors of the Chooz nuclear plant in France. In a first stage, Double Chooz will only use a far detector which could allow to give a sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) low limit of 0.06. Two years after, a near detector, identical to the far one, will be in operation and allow us to push this limit down to 0.03 by reducing the systematic errors. The status of this experiment is presented in this paper.

  20. Algebra of Majorana doubling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehoon; Wilczek, Frank

    2013-11-27

    Motivated by the problem of identifying Majorana mode operators at junctions, we analyze a basic algebraic structure leading to a doubled spectrum. For general (nonlinear) interactions the emergent mode creation operator is highly nonlinear in the original effective mode operators, and therefore also in the underlying electron creation and destruction operators. This phenomenon could open up new possibilities for controlled dynamical manipulation of the modes. We briefly compare and contrast related issues in the Pfaffian quantum Hall state. PMID:24329461

  1. Fabrication and characterization of tunnel barriers in a multi-walled carbon nanotube formed by argon atom beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomizawa, H.; Yamaguchi, T.; Akita, S.; Ishibashi, K.

    2015-07-01

    We have evaluated tunnel barriers formed in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by an Ar atom beam irradiation method and applied the technique to fabricate coupled double quantum dots. The two-terminal resistance of the individual MWNTs was increased owing to local damage caused by the Ar beam irradiation. The temperature dependence of the current through a single barrier suggested two different contributions to its Arrhenius plot, i.e., formed by direct tunneling through the barrier and by thermal activation over the barrier. The height of the formed barriers was estimated. The fabrication technique was used to produce coupled double quantum dots with serially formed triple barriers on a MWNT. The current measured at 1.5 K as a function of two side-gate voltages resulted in a honeycomb-like charge stability diagram, which confirmed the formation of the double dots. The characteristic parameters of the double quantum dots were calculated, and the feasibility of the technique is discussed.

  2. Tritium/hydrogen barrier development

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Simonen, E.P.; Kalinen, G.; Terlain, A.

    1994-06-01

    A review of hydrogen permeation barriers that can be applied to structural metals used in fusion power plants is presented. Both implanted and chemically available hydrogen isotopes must be controlled in fusion plants. The need for permeation barriers appears strongest in Li17-Pb blanket designs, although barriers also appear necessary for other blanket and coolant systems. Barriers that provide greater than a 1000 fold reduction in the permeation of structural metals are desired. In laboratory experiments, aluminide and titanium ceramic coatings provide permeation reduction factors, PRFS, from 1000 to over 100,000 with a wide range of scatter. The rate-controlling mechanism for hydrogen permeation through these barriers may be related to the number and type of defects in the barriers. Although these barriers appear robust and resistant to liquid metal corrosion, irradiation tests which simulate blanket environments result in very low PRFs in comparison to laboratory experiments, i.e., <150. It is anticipated from fundamental research activities that the REID enhancement of hydrogen diffusion in oxides may contribute to the lower permeation reduction factors during in-reactor experiments.

  3. Distributed Generalized Dynamic Barrier Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Shivali; Joshi, Saurabh; Shyamasundar, Rudrapatna K.

    Barrier synchronization is widely used in shared-memory parallel programs to synchronize between phases of data-parallel algorithms. With proliferation of many-core processors, barrier synchronization has been adapted for higher level language abstractions in new languages such as X10 wherein the processes participating in barrier synchronization are not known a priori, and the processes in distinct "places" don't share memory. Thus, the challenge here is to not only achieve barrier synchronization in a distributed setting without any centralized controller, but also to deal with dynamic nature of such a synchronization as processes are free to join and drop out at any synchronization phase. In this paper, we describe a solution for the generalized distributed barrier synchronization wherein processes can dynamically join or drop out of barrier synchronization; that is, participating processes are not known a priori. Using the policy of permitting a process to join only in the beginning of each phase, we arrive at a solution that ensures (i) Progress: a process executing phase k will enter phase k + 1 unless it wants to drop out of synchronization (assuming the phase execution of the processes terminate), and (ii) Starvation Freedom: a new process that wants to join a phase synchronization group that has already started, does so in a finite number of phases. The above protocol is further generalized to multiple groups of processes (possibly non-disjoint) engaged in barrier synchronization.

  4. Double face sealing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A double face sealing device is disclosed for mounting between two surfaces to provide an air-tight and fluid-tight seal between a closure member bearing one of the surfaces and a structure or housing bearing the other surface which extends around the opening or hatchway to be closed. The double face sealing device includes a plurality of sections or segments mounted to one of the surfaces, each having a main body portion, a pair of outwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, and a pair of inwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the inwardly extending and diverging spring arms. The double face sealing device has application or use in all environments requiring a seal, but is particularly useful to seal openings or hatchways between compartments of spacecraft or aircraft.

  5. The double massa intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Baydin, Serhat; Gungor, Abuzer; Baran, Oguz; Tanriover, Necmettin; Rhoton, Albert L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To describe the rare finding of a double massa intermedia (MI). Typically, the MI (interthalamic adhesion) is a single bridge of gray matter connecting the medial surfaces of the thalami. Methods: Twelve formalin- and alcohol-fixed human third ventricles were examined from superior to inferior by fiber dissection technique under ×6 to ×40 magnifications and with the endoscope. Results: In all hemispheres, the anterior and posterior commissure were defined. The MI, which bridges the medial surfaces of the thalami, was defined in all hemispheres. In one hemisphere, there was a second bridge between the thalami, located posteroinferior to the common MI. Endoscopic view confirmed that there was a second MI in this specimen. The MI usually traverses the third ventricle posterior to the foramen of Monro and connects the paired thalami. The MI is an important landmark during endoscopic and microscopic surgeries of the third ventricle. Although a double MI is very rare, surgeons should be aware of the possibility in their surgical planning. Conclusion: The surgeon should be aware of the possibility of a double MI to avoid confusion during third ventricle surgery. PMID:27127695

  6. A hybrid double-dot in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F.; Heiss, D.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2013-12-04

    We report electrical measurements of a single arsenic dopant atom in the tunnel barrier of a silicon single-electron transistor (SET). In addition to performing the electrical characterisation of the individual dopants, we study the series electrical transport through the dopant and SET. We measure the bias triangles of this hybrid double-dot and show that we can tune the electrostatic coupling between the two sub-systems. Additionally, we measured SET in which an additional plunger gate allows the reduction of the electron number in the SET down to the few-electron regime where the dot presents well-defined spin configurations. Finally, we discuss the challenges of operating a dopant-dot hybrid system in the few-electron regime.

  7. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    DOEpatents

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  8. Australia's Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Great Barrier Reef extends for 2,000 kilometers along the northeastern coast of Australia. It is not a single reef, but a vast maze of reefs, passages, and coral cays (islands that are part of the reef). This nadir true-color image was acquired by the MISR instrument on August 26, 2000 (Terra orbit 3679), and shows part of the southern portion of the reef adjacent to the central Queensland coast. The width of the MISR swath is approximately 380 kilometers, with the reef clearly visible up to approximately 200 kilometers from the coast. It may be difficult to see the myriad details in the browse image, but if you retrieve the higher resolution version, a zoomed display reveals the spectacular structure of the many reefs.

    The more northerly coastal area in this image shows the vast extent of sugar cane cultivation, this being the largest sugar producing area in Australia, centered on the city of Mackay. Other industries in the area include coal, cattle, dairying, timber, grain, seafood, and fruit. The large island off the most northerly part of the coast visible in this image is Whitsunday Island, with smaller islands and reefs extending southeast, parallel to the coast. These include some of the better known resort islands such as Hayman, Lindeman, Hamilton, and Brampton Islands.

    Further south, just inland of the small semicircular bay near the right of the image, is Rockhampton, the largest city along the central Queensland coast, and the regional center for much of central Queensland. Rockhampton is just north of the Tropic of Capricorn. Its hinterland is a rich pastoral, agricultural, and mining region.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  9. Jobs: women's double burden.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Whereas international conventions and national laws provide equal opportunities for women in employment, the reality of women's lives keeps a disproportionate number of women unemployed, underemployed, and living in poverty. The UN itself, which officially is working toward equity among its employees, has a staff composed of just 32.6% women, and women comprise only 10.5% of the top end of the hierarchy. In areas where women's labor force participation has increased dramatically, women typically earn 30-40% less than men doing the same job or else their employment is limited to "traditional female" service positions. The fact that women and girls have received an inadequate education makes it extremely difficult to break the barriers of discrimination in developing countries. The empowerment of women will break the education barrier, and, when that falls, many other barriers will follow suit. Efforts are already underway to break structural barriers caused by economic and social policies. For example, a more flexible pattern of work has been proposed which will include the voluntary assumption of flexible hours, job-sharing, and part-time work. The concept of work is also being broadened to include the important human services that women traditionally provide on a volunteer basis. This will lead to a valuation of women's contribution to society which can be added to calculations of gross domestic product. Women also need protection as they attempt to eke out a living in the informal sector which has been the traditional avenue for women to earn money. This sector is not protected by law and is subject to extortion by officials and by male competitors. A variety of measures is under consideration to increase the protection of informal sector workers. Women also need protection in the conventional work place, especially as they enter fields traditionally reserved for men. These questions are important even in the context of global unemployment because these issues must be addressed or their resolution to women's disadvantage will gain the mantle of tradition. PMID:12157784

  10. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  11. INFORMATION BARRIERS - A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

    SciTech Connect

    D. CLOSE; D. MACARTHUR; N. NICHOLAS

    2001-05-01

    The concept ''transparency'' was introduced into the safeguards lexicon in the early 1990s, and the term ''information barrier'' was introduced into the safeguards lexicon in the late 1990s. Although the terms might have been new, the concepts were not. Both concepts have been used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its inspectors since the early 1980s, but the terms ''transparency'' and ''information barrier'' were not used for those concepts then. The definitions of these concepts have evolved in recent years, and these concepts have been applied to a broader category of special nuclear material measurement problems. The origin and features of the information barrier concept will be traced from an early implementation by the IAEA to the current state-of-the-art information barrier technology used in nonproliferation, arms control, and dismantlement.

  12. Subwavelength slit acoustic metamaterial barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Constanza; Candelas, Pilar; Belmar, Francisco; Gomez-Lozano, Vicente; Uris, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Reduction of noise in the transmission path is a very important environmental problem. The standard method to reduce this noise level is the use of acoustic barriers. In this paper, an acoustic metamaterial based on sound transmission through subwavelength slits, is tailored to be used as an acoustic barrier. This system consists of two rows of periodic repetition of vertical rigid pickets separated by a slit of subwavelength width, embedded in air. Here, both the experimental and the numerical analyses are presented. These analyses have facilitated the identification of the parameters that affect the insertion loss performance. The results demonstrated that the proposed barrier can be tuned to mitigate a band noise in a mechanical plant for buildings where openings for air flow are required as well as industrial noise, without excessive barrier thickness.

  13. Optimistic barrier synchronization. Contractor report

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, D.M.

    1992-07-01

    Barrier synchronization is a fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that is has already processed all work required of it prior to the synchronization. This paper treats the alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all necessary pre-synchronization computation. The proble marises when the number of pre-synchronization messages to be received by a processor is unknown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. The authors describe an optimistic O(log2P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions, as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  14. Morphology and stratigraphy of small barrier-lagoon systems in Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffy, W.; Belknap, D.F.; Kelley, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The coast of Maine contains over 200 individual barrier-lagoon systems, most quite small, with an aggregate length of nearly 100 km. Although they represent less than 5% of the tidally influenced coastline of Maine, they are widely distributed and occur in a variety of dynamic regimes and physiographic regions. Their morphology and backbarrier stratigraphy are different from better studied coastal plain systems, and provide important clues to the Holocene evolution of the Maine coast. In a study of geomorphic form and backbarrier stratigraphy, inlet processes and Holocene sea-level rise have been identified as the principal controls on coarse-grained barrier stratigraphy. Barriers in Maine are found in five distinct geomorphic forms, identified herein as: barrier spits, pocket barriers, double tombolos, cuspate barriers and looped barriers. The few long sandy beaches in southwestern Maine are mostly barrier spits. The remainder of the barrier types is composed primarily of gravel or mixed sand and gravel. The barriers protect a variety of backbarrier environments: fresh and brackish ponds, lagoons and fresh- and saltwater marshes. The barriers may or may not have inlets. Normal wave action, coarse-grain size and a deeply embayed coast result in barriers with steep, reflective profiles several meters above MHW. Occasional storm events completely wash over the barriers, building steep, lobate gravel fans along their landward margin. Few, if any, extensive storm layers are recognized as extending into the distal backbarrier environments, however. During sea-level rise and landward barrier retreat, this abrupt, storm-generated transition zone inters the backbarrier sediments. Statistical comparisons of barrier morphology, location and backbarrier environment type with backbarrier stratigraphy show that Holocene backbarrier stratigraphy is best predicted by the modern backbarrier environment type. This, in turn, is influenced most by the absence or presence, and long-term stability or instability of a tidal inlet. Geomorphic barrier form and location in coastal geomorphic compartments show little or no correlation with backbarrier stratigraphy. In contrast to previous classifications of barrier-lagoon systems based primarily on sandy, coastal plain examples, in Maine the shape or origin of the backbarrier system is relatively unimportant. The presence or absence of a tidal inlet is of paramount importance in shaping the Holocene stratigraphy of the backbarrier region. ?? 1989.

  15. Superheavy nuclei and fission barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Nan; Zhao, Jie; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    In this chapter, we will present relativistic mean field (RMF) description of heavy and superheavy nuclei (SHN). We will discuss the shell structure and magic numbers in the mass region of SHN, binding energies and α decay Q values, shapes of ground states and potential energy surfaces and fission barriers. We particularly focus on the multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theories (CDFT) and the applications of CDFT to the study of exotic nuclear shapes and fission barriers.

  16. Overcoming barriers to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Aebersold, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    Creating a culture of patient safety is a critical goal of all patient care unit staff. An analysis of the key barriers to patient safety on a typical inpatient unit in an acute care hospital (unclear unit values), the fear of punishment for errors, the lack of systematic analysis of mistakes, the complexity of the nurses' work, and inadequate teamwork are presented. Nine practices to overcome these barriers and achieve patient safety are discussed. PMID:16786829

  17. Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This detailed view of the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia (19.5S, 149.5E) shows several small patch reefs within the overall reef system. The Great Barrier Reef, largest in the world, comprises thousands of individual reefs of great variety and are closely monitored by marine ecologists. These reefs are about 6000 years old and sit on top of much older reefs. The most rapid coral growth occurs on the landward side of the reefs.

  18. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains papers from the 1997 Thermal Barrier Coatings Workshop, sponsored by the TBC Interagency Coordination Committee. The Workshop was held in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky, May 19-21, 1997. The papers cover the topics of heat transfer and conductivity of thermal barrier coatings, failure mechanisms and characterization of the coatings as well as characterization of coating deposition methods. Speakers included research, development and user groups in academia, industry and government.

  19. Ab initio transport across bismuth selenide surface barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Awadhesh; Rungger, Ivan; Droghetti, Andrea; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the effect of potential barriers in the form of step edges on the scattering properties of Bi2Se3 (111) topological surface states by means of large-scale ab initio transport simulations. Our results demonstrate the suppression of perfect backscattering, while all other scattering processes, which do not entail a complete spin and momentum reversal, are allowed. Furthermore, we find that the spin of the surface state develops an out-of-plane component as it traverses the barrier. Our calculations reveal the existence of quasibound states in the vicinity of the surface barriers, which appear in the form of an enhanced density of states in the energy window corresponding to the topological state. For double barriers we demonstrate the formation of quantum well states. To complement our first-principles results we construct a two-dimensional low-energy effective model and illustrate its shortcomings. Our findings are discussed in the context of a number of recent experimental works.

  20. Barrier properties of testis microvessels.

    PubMed Central

    Holash, J A; Harik, S I; Perry, G; Stewart, P A

    1993-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier is believed to be constituted by tight junctions between Sertoli cells in seminiferous tubules and possibly by myoid cells that encircle these tubules. We now show that testis microvessels are endowed with several markers of barrier properties of brain microvessels, such as the glucose transporter, P-glycoprotein, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. Quantitative EM studies show that the endothelium in testis, as in brain, is continuous and has long junctional profiles and few vesicles. However, a small proportion of testis capillaries have expansions in their junctional clefts suggestive of patent paracellular channels, which may explain their higher permeability. Because barrier features are thought to be induced and/or maintained in brain microvessels by astrocytes, we assessed whether astrocyte-like cells exist in the testis. We found that the intertubular Leydig cells, adjacent to microvessels, express the astrocyte markers: glial fibrillary acidic protein, glutamine synthetase, and S-100 protein. We suggest that the testis endothelium contributes to the blood-testis barrier and that these endothelial barrier features are influenced by Leydig cells. We believe that the endothelial and the epithelial (Sertoli) components of the blood-testis barrier are "in series" and complement each other in achieving a stable milieu for spermatogenesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7902579

  1. Global interrupt and barrier networks

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E; Heidelberger, Philip; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.; Takken, Todd E.

    2008-10-28

    A system and method for generating global asynchronous signals in a computing structure. Particularly, a global interrupt and barrier network is implemented that implements logic for generating global interrupt and barrier signals for controlling global asynchronous operations performed by processing elements at selected processing nodes of a computing structure in accordance with a processing algorithm; and includes the physical interconnecting of the processing nodes for communicating the global interrupt and barrier signals to the elements via low-latency paths. The global asynchronous signals respectively initiate interrupt and barrier operations at the processing nodes at times selected for optimizing performance of the processing algorithms. In one embodiment, the global interrupt and barrier network is implemented in a scalable, massively parallel supercomputing device structure comprising a plurality of processing nodes interconnected by multiple independent networks, with each node including one or more processing elements for performing computation or communication activity as required when performing parallel algorithm operations. One multiple independent network includes a global tree network for enabling high-speed global tree communications among global tree network nodes or sub-trees thereof. The global interrupt and barrier network may operate in parallel with the global tree network for providing global asynchronous sideband signals.

  2. Fusion under a complex barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Basudeb; Jamir, I.; Lyngdoh, E. F. P.; Shastry, C. S.

    1998-04-01

    The mechanism of fusion of two heavy nuclei is formulated within the concept of transmission across a mildly absorptive effective fusion barrier (EFB). The intensity of transmitted waves across such a barrier could be represented by the product TRPS where TR stands for the transmission coefficient across the corresponding real barrier and PS is a factor of survival probability against absorption under the complex barrier. The justification of this result and the physical basis of the above EFB transmission model of fusion, which is complementary to the definition of fusion based on absorption in the interior region known as the direct reaction model (DRM), are demonstrated in the case of a complex square well potential with a complex rectangular barrier. Based on a WKB approach, expressions for TR for different partial waves utilizing a realistic nucleus-nucleus potential are derived. Using the resulting expressions for the fusion cross section (?F), the experimental values of ?F and the corresponding data of the average angular momentum of the fused body are explained satisfactorily over a wide range of energy around the Coulomb barrier in various heavy ion systems such as 16O+152,154Sm, 58,64Ni+58,64Ni, 64Ni+92Zr, and 64Ni+100Mo.

  3. Induction barrier RF and applications in Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-07-01

    Two induction barrier rf systems have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab and installed in the Main Injector. They use the nanocrystal magnetic alloy called Finemet for the cavities and high voltage fast MOSFET switches for the modulators. Each system delivers {+-}10 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. They have been used for adiabatic beam stacking (beam compression), machine acceptance measurement and gap cleaning in the injection area for magnet protection, and will be tested for fast beam stacking for doubling the proton flux on the NuMI production target. The systems work reliably and cost much less than a resistive barrier rf system. Comparison with a similar system built at KEK reveals many similarities and also some important differences. This work is partially funded by the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  4. Finite-time barriers to reaction front propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Rory; Mahoney, John; Mitchell, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Front propagation in advection-reaction-diffusion systems gives rise to rich geometric patterns. It has been shown for time-independent and time-periodic fluid flows that invariant manifolds, termed burning invariant manifolds (BIMs), serve as one-sided dynamical barriers to the propagation of reaction front. More recently, theoretical work has suggested that one-sided barriers, termed burning Lagrangian Coherent structures (bLCSs), exist for fluid velocity data prescribed over a finite time interval, with no assumption on the time-dependence of the flow. In this presentation, we use a time-varying fluid ``wind'' in a double-vortex channel flow to demonstrate that bLCSs form the (locally) most attracting or repelling fronts.

  5. Yucca Mountain engineered barrier system corrosion model (EBSCOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, F.; Kolar, M.; Kessler, J. H.; Apted, M.

    2008-09-01

    A revised engineered barrier system model has been developed by the Electric Power Research Institute to predict the time dependence of the failure of the drip shields and waste packages in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The revised model is based on new information on various corrosion processes developed by the US Department of Energy and others and for a 20-mm-thick waste package design with a double closure lid system. As with earlier versions of the corrosion model, the new EBSCOM code produces a best-estimate of the failure times of the various barriers. The model predicts that only 15% of waste packages will fail within a period of 1 million years. The times for the first corrosion failures are 40,000 years, 336,000 years, and 375,000 years for the drip shield, waste package, and combination of drip shield and the associated waste package, respectively.

  6. Study of internal transport barrier triggering mechanism in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J.Q.; Mou, Z.Z.; Long, Y.X.; Mahajan, S.M.

    2004-12-01

    Sheared flow layers driven by magnetic energy, released in tearing-reconnection processes inherent in dissipative magnetohydrodynamics, are proposed as a triggering mechanism for the creation of the internal transport barrier (ITB) in tokamak plasmas. The double tearing mode, mediated by anomalous electron viscosity in configurations with a nonmonotonic safety factor, is investigated as an example. Particular emphasis is placed on the formation of sheared poloidal flow layers in the vicinity of the magnetic islands. A quasilinear simulation demonstrates that the sheared flows induced by the mode have desirable characteristics (lying just outside the magnetic islands), and sufficient levels required for ITB formation. A possible explanation is also proffered for the experimental observation that the transport barriers are preferentially formed in the proximity of low-order rational surfaces.

  7. Double pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Iacovazzo, D; Bianchi, A; Lugli, F; Milardi, D; Giampietro, A; Lucci-Cordisco, E; Doglietto, F; Lauriola, L; De Marinis, L

    2013-04-01

    Double pituitary adenomas represent up to 2.6 % of pituitary adenomas in large surgical series and up to 3.3 % of patients with Cushing's disease have been found to have double or multiple pituitary adenomas. We report the case of a 60-year-old male patient whose medical history began in 2002 with erectile dysfunction; hyperprolactinemia was found and MRI showed a 6-mm area of delayed enhancement in the lateral portion of the right pituitary lobe. Treatment with cabergoline was started with normalization of prolactin levels; the following MRI, performed in 2005 and 2008, showed shrinkage of the pituitary lesion. In 2005, the patient began to manifest weight gain, hypertension, and facial plethora, but no further evaluations were done. In January 2010, the patient came to our attention and underwent multiple tests that suggested Cushing's disease. A new MRI was negative. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling showed significant pituitary-to-peripheral ratio and, in May 2010, the patient underwent exploratory pituitary surgery with evidence of a 1-2-mm white-coloured midline area compatible with pituitary adenoma that was surgically removed. Post-operatively, the patient's clinical conditions improved with onset of secondary hypoadrenalism. The histologic examination confirmed a pituitary adenoma (immunostaining was found to be positive for ACTH and negative for prolactin). We report the case of an ACTH-producing microadenoma metachronous to a prolactin secreting microadenoma although not confirmed histologically, shrunk by medical treatment. A review of data in the literature regarding double or multiple pituitary adenomas has also been done. PMID:23325364

  8. Degradation of organic pollutants and microorganisms from wastewater using different dielectric barrier discharge configurations-a critical review.

    PubMed

    Mouele, Emile S Massima; Tijani, Jimoh O; Fatoba, Ojo O; Petrik, Leslie F

    2015-12-01

    The growing global drinking water crisis requires the development of novel advanced, sustainable, and cost-effective water treatment technologies to supplement the existing conventional methods. One such technology is advanced oxidation based on dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). DBD such as single and double planar and single and double cylindrical dielectric barrier configurations have been utilized for efficient degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants. The overall performance of the different DBD system varies and depends on several factors. Therefore, this review was compiled to give an overview of different DBD configurations vis-a-viz their applications and the in situ mechanism of generation of free reactive species for water and wastewater treatment. Our survey of the literature indicated that application of double cylindrical dielectric barrier configuration represents an ideal and viable route for achieving greater water and wastewater purification efficiency. PMID:26493299

  9. Stacking fault induced tunnel barrier in platelet graphite nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Chang, Wen-Hao; Li, Yuan-Yao; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chang, Chia-Seng; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2014-09-01

    A correlation study using image inspection and electrical characterization of platelet graphite nanofiber devices is conducted. Close transmission electron microscopy and diffraction pattern inspection reveal layers with inflection angles appearing in otherwise perfectly stacked graphene platelets, separating nanofibers into two domains. Electrical measurement gives a stability diagram consisting of alternating small-large Coulomb blockade diamonds, suggesting that there are two charging islands coupled together through a tunnel junction. Based on these two findings, we propose that a stacking fault can behave as a tunnel barrier for conducting electrons and is responsible for the observed double-island single electron transistor characteristics.

  10. Stacking fault induced tunnel barrier in platelet graphite nanofiber

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Yann-Wen E-mail: ywlan@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chang, Chia-Seng; Chen, Chii-Dong E-mail: ywlan@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Chang, Wen-Hao; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2014-09-08

    A correlation study using image inspection and electrical characterization of platelet graphite nanofiber devices is conducted. Close transmission electron microscopy and diffraction pattern inspection reveal layers with inflection angles appearing in otherwise perfectly stacked graphene platelets, separating nanofibers into two domains. Electrical measurement gives a stability diagram consisting of alternating small-large Coulomb blockade diamonds, suggesting that there are two charging islands coupled together through a tunnel junction. Based on these two findings, we propose that a stacking fault can behave as a tunnel barrier for conducting electrons and is responsible for the observed double-island single electron transistor characteristics.

  11. Doubling an investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2004-01-01

    We study the issue of optimal long-term portfolio management in continuous time multi-asset financial markets. Rather than following the abstract notion of ‘utility’ and its implied paradigm of ‘maximization of expected utility’ we suggest a different approach: The investor sets a goal-such as reaching a desired fortune level, or doubling the initial investment-and then operates to minimize the expected time-to-goal, i.e., achieving the goal as quick as possible. We assume the ‘standard model’ of multi-asset financial markets where assets are governed by correlated Geometric Brownian motion dynamics, and study optimality under the criteria of ‘minimization of the expected time-to-goal’. We explicitly compute: (i) the optimal holding strategies; (ii) the dynamics and behavior of the optimal investment portfolios; and, (iii) the statistics-mean, variance, and Laplace transform-of the time-to-goal (under the optimal investment strategy). Also, an investment paradox arising in this context-in which some portfolios have exponential mean growth but have a positive probability of never doubling their initial value-is discussed and explained.

  12. The Double Chooz Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfahler, Patrick; Double Chooz Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    Double Chooz is a reactor bar nue-disappearance experiment situated at the commercial nuclear power plant of Chooz in northern France. The experiment aims for the revelation of the last unknown mixing angle Θ13 as a part of the neutrino mixing matrix or the improvement of the upper limit for sin2(2Θ13), which is currently < 0.14 (90% CL). A newly developed gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator as target allows the detection of electron-anti-neutrinos (bar nue) using the inverse beta decay and its distinct decay pattern (bar nue + p → e+ +n). Double Chooz uses two identical detectors at different distances in order to reduce systematic uncertainties. This will allow, after a data taking phase of 4 years, an improvement on sin2(2Θ13) down to < 0.03 (90% CL). The first (far) detector has successfully been installed and filled, and takes data since April of 2011. A preliminary analysis of first 120 days revealed about 4000 Neutrino-candidates and a stable detector-setup with low backgrounds. The commissioning of the second (near) detector is expected for the beginning of 2013 and will provide maximum sensitivity for the experiment.

  13. Living Doubled-Up: Influence of Residential Environment on Educational Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    Homeless youth face many barriers that limit success in the educational process. Subgroups of homeless youth frequently experience the educational process differently depending upon their residential context. Recent years witness the federal government's expanding the definition of homelessness to include youth living doubled-up. This residential

  14. Living Doubled-Up: Influence of Residential Environment on Educational Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    Homeless youth face many barriers that limit success in the educational process. Subgroups of homeless youth frequently experience the educational process differently depending upon their residential context. Recent years witness the federal government's expanding the definition of homelessness to include youth living doubled-up. This residential…

  15. Some improvements in design of atmospheric ammonia storage tanks of the double integrity type

    SciTech Connect

    Herbertsson, G. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper describes a new atmospheric ammonia storage tank in Iceland. Some modifications have been made to the former common open cup design of double integrity tanks. Another modification is described, dry air is bled under the cladding of the sidewall insulation to protect the insulation from moisture penetration under the vapor barrier which results in frost damages.

  16. Bioenergetic Progress and Heat Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotin, A. A.; Lamprecht, I.; Zotin, A. I.

    2001-07-01

    Progressing biological evolution is discussed in the framework of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. It is connected with an increase of the mass specific standard metabolism given by coefficient a in the allometric relation (1) between oxygen consumption rate and body mass of an animal. Three “heat barriers” are found in the course of such a bioenergetic evolution. The first heat barrier concerns an animal's overheating during active movement and is overcome by the development of thermoregulation and the appearance of homeothermic animals. A second barrier arises when the coefficient a reaches values connected with lethal body temperatures. The transition across this second heat barrier occurs as result of reasonable activities and the appearance of civilization. The third heat barrier will arise during the further development of human civilization, connected with a highly increased energy production and a fatal warming of the Earth atmosphere. The manner to overcome this barrier will probably depend on the assimilation of space and the establishment of energy consuming industries outside the Earth. The bioenergetic evolution discussed in this paper does not exclude other trends of evolution, e.g. increase of size, and does not mean to be the only aspect of biological evolution.

  17. Graphene-Based Environmental Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Silverberg, Gregory; Bowers, Shin; Kim, Sang-Pil; Datta, Dibakar; Shenoy, Vivek; Hurt, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Many environmental technologies rely on containment by engineered barriers that inhibit the release or transport of toxicants. Graphene is a new, atomically thin, two-dimensional sheet material, whose aspect ratio, chemical resistance, flexibility, and impermeability make it a promising candidate for inclusion in a next generation of engineered barriers. Here we show that ultrathin graphene oxide (GO) films can serve as effective barriers for both liquid and vapor permeants. First, GO deposition on porous substrates is shown to block convective flow at much lower mass loadings than other carbon nanomaterials, and can achieve hydraulic conductivities of 5×10−12 cm/s or lower. Second we show that ultrathin GO films of only 20 nm thickness coated on polyethylene films reduce their vapor permeability by 90% using elemental mercury as a model vapor toxicant. The barrier performance of GO in this thin-film configuration is much better than the Nielsen model limit, which describes ideal behavior of flake-like fillers uniformly imbedded in a polymer. The Hg barrier performance of GO films is found to be sensitive to residual water in the films, which is consistent with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that show lateral diffusion of Hg atoms in graphene interlayer spaces that have been expanded by hydration. PMID:22717015

  18. Apple Valley Double Star Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The High Desert Astronomical Society hosts an annual double star workshop, where participants measure the position angles and separations of double stars. Following the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS), adopted by the California State Board of Education, participants are assigned to teams where they learn the process of telescope set-up and operation, the gathering of data, and the reduction of the data. Team results are compared to the latest epoch listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) and papers are written for publication in the Journal of Double Star Observations (JDSO). Each team presents a PowerPoint presentation to their peers about actual hands-on astronomical research.

  19. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  20. Doubled Color Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravyi, Sergey

    Combining protection from noise and computational universality is one of the biggest challenges in the fault-tolerant quantum computing. Topological stabilizer codes such as the 2D surface code can tolerate a high level of noise but implementing logical gates, especially non-Clifford ones, requires a prohibitively large overhead due to the need of state distillation. In this talk I will describe a new family of 2D quantum error correcting codes that enable a transversal implementation of all logical gates required for the universal quantum computing. Transversal logical gates (TLG) are encoded operations that can be realized by applying some single-qubit rotation to each physical qubit. TLG are highly desirable since they introduce no overhead and do not spread errors. It has been known before that a quantum code can have only a finite number of TLGs which rules out computational universality. Our scheme circumvents this no-go result by combining TLGs of two different quantum codes using the gauge-fixing method pioneered by Paetznick and Reichardt. The first code, closely related to the 2D color code, enables a transversal implementation of all single-qubit Clifford gates such as the Hadamard gate and the π / 2 phase shift. The second code that we call a doubled color code provides a transversal T-gate, where T is the π / 4 phase shift. The Clifford+T gate set is known to be computationally universal. The two codes can be laid out on the honeycomb lattice with two qubits per site such that the code conversion requires parity measurements for six-qubit Pauli operators supported on faces of the lattice. I will also describe numerical simulations of logical Clifford+T circuits encoded by the distance-3 doubled color code. Based on a joint work with Andrew Cross.

  1. Double optical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbertson, Steve

    The observation and control of dynamics in atomic and molecular targets requires the use of laser pulses with duration less than the characteristic timescale of the process which is to be manipulated. For electron dynamics, this time scale is on the order of attoseconds where 1 attosecond = 10 -18 seconds. In order to generate pulses on this time scale, different gating methods have been proposed. The idea is to extract or "gate" a single pulse from an attosecond pulse train and switch off all the other pulses. While previous methods have had some success, they are very difficult to implement and so far very few labs have access to these unique light sources. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new method, called double optical gating (DOG), and to demonstrate its effectiveness at generating high contrast single isolated attosecond pulses from multi-cycle lasers. First, the method is described in detail and is investigated in the spectral domain. The resulting attosecond pulses produced are then temporally characterized through attosecond streaking. A second method of gating, called generalized double optical gating (GDOG), is also introduced. This method allows attosecond pulse generation directly from a carrier-envelope phase un-stabilized laser system for the first time. Next the methods of DOG and GDOG are implemented in attosecond applications like high flux pulses and extreme broadband spectrum generation. Finally, the attosecond pulses themselves are used in experiments. First, an attosecond/femtosecond cross correlation is used for characterization of spatial and temporal properties of femtosecond pulses. Then, an attosecond pump, femtosecond probe experiment is conducted to observe and control electron dynamics in helium for the first time.

  2. Top-of-barrier electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, J. H.

    1997-04-01

    The energy and angular distribution of electrons ejected from one-electron species by fast ion impact show two noticable features, namely, the binary encounter ridge and the continuum capture cusp. No other features have been conclusively identified although there has been some contradictory evidence for a third feature, namely, saddle point or top-of-barrier electrons. For electrons ejected from atoms by ions with velocities below the mean electron velocity in the initial state, both the binary encounter ridge and the continuum capture cusp are suppressed. In this region the top-of-barrier mechanism is predicted to contribute strongly to ionization. Theoretical and experimental evidence for the associated top-of-barrier electrons is reviewed.

  3. Deceleration-Limiting Roadway Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); Locke, P. James (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Roadway barrier system and method are disclosed for decelerating a moving vehicle in a controlled manner and for retaining the decelerated vehicle. A net or mesh of the roadway barrier system receives and captures the moving vehicle. The net or mesh is secured to anchors by energy absorbing straps. The energy absorbing straps deploy under a tensional load to decelerate the moving vehicle, the straps providing a controlled resistance to the tensional load over a predefined displacement or stroke to bring the moving vehicle to rest. Additional features include a sacrificial panel or sheet in front of the net that holds up the net or mesh while deflecting vehicles that collide only tangentially with the roadway barrier system.

  4. Barrier height inhomogeneity in electrical transport characteristics of InGaN/GaN heterostructure interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Roul, Basanta; Mukundan, Shruti; Chandan, Greeshma; Mohan, Lokesh; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2015-03-15

    We have grown InGaN/GaN heterostructures using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and studied the temperature dependent electrical transport characteristics. The barrier height (φ{sub b}) and the ideally factor (η) estimated using thermionic emission model were found to be temperature dependent. The conventional Richardson plot of ln(J{sub s}/T{sup 2}) versus 1/kT showed two temperature regions (region-I: 400–500 K and region-II: 200–350 K) and it provides Richardson constants (A{sup ∗}) which are much lower than the theoretical value of GaN. The observed variation in the barrier height and the presence of two temperature regions were attributed to spatial barrier inhomogeneities at the heterojunction interface and was explained by assuming a double Gaussian distribution of barrier heights with mean barrier height values 1.61 and 1.21 eV with standard deviation (σ{sub s}{sup 2}) of 0.044 and 0.022 V, respectively. The modified Richardson plot of ln(J{sub s}/T{sup 2}) − (q{sup 2}σ{sub s}{sup 2}/2k{sup 2}T{sup 2}) versus 1/kT for two temperature regions gave mean barrier height values as 1.61 eV and 1.22 eV with Richardson constants (A{sup ∗}) values 25.5 Acm{sup −2}K{sup −2} and 43.9 Acm{sup −2}K{sup −2}, respectively, which are very close to the theoretical value. The observed barrier height inhomogeneities were interpreted on the basis of the existence of a double Gaussian distribution of barrier heights at the interface.

  5. Success in horizontal barrier developments

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, P.J.; Ridenour, D.E.; Jalovec, J.

    1996-06-01

    A successful proof of concept demonstration has been conducted of operational methods and tooling for the in situ construction of underground horizontal barriers for the control and containment of groundwater and contamination. The method involves jet grouting with specially adapted tools guided between twin, parallel wells for the placement of a grout beneath a waste site. The objective of the work is to develop reliable methods of constructing extensive, competent horizontal barriers underneath waste sites without excavating or penetrating the waste during the process.

  6. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    SciTech Connect

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G.

    1995-12-31

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications.

  7. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Samantha J.; Bainton, Roland J.

    2014-01-01

    The invertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through G-protein coupled receptor signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate BBB has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many BBB mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the BBB can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of BBB gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of BBB secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate BBB anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study. PMID:25565944

  8. Correlated double-proton transfer. I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Smedarchina, Zorka; Siebrand, Willem; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2007-11-01

    The dynamics of double-proton transfer reactions is studied on a model of transfer along two identical hydrogen bonds represented by quartic double-minimum potentials. Correlation between the proton motions is introduced by a coupling term that is bilinear in the two proton coordinates; it is shown that this form properly accounts for the polarity and symmetry of the interaction and correctly reproduces the observed transfer behavior in the strong- and weak-coupling limits. The model allows a universal description of double-proton transfer mechanisms in symmetric systems in terms of the variation of a single parameter, the (dimensionless) coupling between the two hydrogen bonds. The corresponding two-dimensional (2D) transfer potential has up to nine stationary points, depending on the coupling strength. The resulting dynamics and its dependence on temperature and isotopic substitution are studied analytically by instanton techniques for the full range of the correlation parameter whereby the potential has multiple saddle points. For any coupling, the dynamics at high temperatures is dominated by classical transitions over the saddle point of lowest barrier. Strong coupling leads exclusively to synchronous transfer along a single collective coordinate, weak coupling to competition between this synchronous transfer, and stepwise transfer along local coordinates, the relative contributions of these mechanisms being governed by the temperature. Below a certain crossover temperature, transfer dynamics is dominated by the instanton, i.e., the trajectory with maximum tunneling probability. Two types of instanton are found on the 2D potential. The well-known one-dimensional instanton, corresponding to synchronous motion, exists for any coupling. It dominates at low temperatures and is responsible for any observed tunneling splittings, independent of the number of saddle points of the symmetric potential. An alternative 2D instanton, corresponding to asynchronous motion, exists for weak coupling. It is shown that under conditions where 2D tunneling dominates, it is much slower than stepwise transfer. Therefore 2D tunneling trajectories do not contribute significantly to the rate of transfer and can be ignored. The favorable quantitative aspects of the model are illustrated by an application to double-proton rate constants in porphine, which have been measured in a wide range of temperatures. PMID:17994833

  9. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

  10. Barriers to and Facilitators of Research Utilization: A Survey of Registered Nurses in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Ping; Jiang, Xiao-Lian; Wang, Lei; Wang, Guo-Rong; Bai, Yang-Jing

    2013-01-01

    Aims This survey aims to describe the perception of barriers to and facilitators of research utilization by registered nurses in Sichuan province, China, and to explore the factors influencing the perceptions of the barriers to and facilitators of research utilization. Methods A cross sectional survey design and a double cluster sampling method were adopted. A total of 590 registered nurses from 3 tertiary level hospitals in Sichuan province, China, were recruited in a period from September 2006 to January 2007. A modified BARRUERS Scale and a Facilitators Scale were used. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, rank transformation test, and multiple linear regression. Results Barriers related to the setting subscale were more influential than barriers related to other subscales. The lack of authority was ranked as the top greatest barrier (15.7%), followed by the lack of time (13.4%) and language barrier (15.0%). Additional barriers identified were the reluctance of patients to research utilization, the lack of funding, and the lack of legal protection. The top three greatest facilitators were enhancing managerial support (36.9%), advancing education to increase knowledge base (21.1%), and increasing time for reviewing and implementing (17.5%), while cooperation of patients to research utilization, establishing a panel to evaluate researches, and funding were listed as additional facilitators. Hospital, educational background, research experience, and knowledge on evidence-based nursing were the factors influencing perceptions of the barriers and facilitators. Conclusions Nurses in China are facing a number of significant barriers in research utilization. Enhancing managerial support might be the most promising facilitator, given Chinese traditional culture and existing health care system. Hospital, educational background, research experience and knowledge on evidence-based nursing should be taken into account to promote research utilization. The BARRIERS Scale should consider funding and involvement of patients in research utilization. PMID:24312380

  11. Concepts and Mechanisms: Crossing Host Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Doran, Kelly S.; Banerjee, Anirban; Disson, Olivier; Lecuit, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The human body is bordered by the skin and mucosa, which are the cellular barriers that define the frontier between the internal milieu and the external nonsterile environment. Additional cellular barriers, such as the placental and the blood–brain barriers, define protected niches within the host. In addition to their physiological roles, these host barriers provide both physical and immune defense against microbial infection. Yet, many pathogens have evolved elaborated mechanisms to target this line of defense, resulting in a microbial invasion of cells constitutive of host barriers, disruption of barrier integrity, and systemic dissemination and invasion of deeper tissues. Here we review representative examples of microbial interactions with human barriers, including the intestinal, placental, and blood–brain barriers, and discuss how these microbes adhere to, invade, breach, or compromise these barriers. PMID:23818514

  12. Simple interpretation of nuclear orientation for Coulomb barrier distributions derived from a realistic effective interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, M.; Seif, W. M.

    2010-03-15

    A simple straightforward method has been presented to predict the dependence of barrier distributions at arbitrary orientations on different deformations. The proposed interpretation is developed independently of the complicated numerical calculations. It is related to the change of half-density radius of the deformed nucleus, in the direction of the separation vector. The microscopic calculations of Coulomb barrier are carried out by using a realistic density dependent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction, BDM3Y, for the interaction between spherical, {sup 48}Ca, and deformed, {sup 244}Pu, nuclei, as an example. To do so, the double-folding model for the interaction of spherical-deformed nuclei is put in a suitable computational form for the calculation of the potential at several separation distances and orientation angles using the density dependent NN force without consuming computational time. We found that the orientation distributions of the Coulomb barrier parameters show similar patterns to those of the interacting deformed nucleus radius. It is found that the orientation distribution of the Coulomb barrier radius follows the same variation of the deformed nucleus radius while the barrier height distribution follows it inversely. This correlation (anticorrelation) allows a simple evaluation of the orientation barrier distribution which would be very helpful to estimate when the barrier parameters will increase or decrease and at which orientations they will be independent of the deformation. This also allows us to estimate the compact and elongated configurations of the interacting nuclei which lead to hot and cold fusion, respectively.

  13. Simple interpretation of nuclear orientation for Coulomb barrier distributions derived from a realistic effective interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Seif, W. M.

    2010-03-01

    A simple straightforward method has been presented to predict the dependence of barrier distributions at arbitrary orientations on different deformations. The proposed interpretation is developed independently of the complicated numerical calculations. It is related to the change of half-density radius of the deformed nucleus, in the direction of the separation vector. The microscopic calculations of Coulomb barrier are carried out by using a realistic density dependent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction, BDM3Y, for the interaction between spherical, Ca48, and deformed, Pu244, nuclei, as an example. To do so, the double-folding model for the interaction of spherical-deformed nuclei is put in a suitable computational form for the calculation of the potential at several separation distances and orientation angles using the density dependent NN force without consuming computational time. We found that the orientation distributions of the Coulomb barrier parameters show similar patterns to those of the interacting deformed nucleus radius. It is found that the orientation distribution of the Coulomb barrier radius follows the same variation of the deformed nucleus radius while the barrier height distribution follows it inversely. This correlation (anticorrelation) allows a simple evaluation of the orientation barrier distribution which would be very helpful to estimate when the barrier parameters will increase or decrease and at which orientations they will be independent of the deformation. This also allows us to estimate the compact and elongated configurations of the interacting nuclei which lead to hot and cold fusion, respectively.

  14. New Galactic Double Periodic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennickent, R. E.; Rosales, J.

    2014-10-01

    We discovered two new Double Periodic Variables in the ASAS catalogue of variable stars, viz., V495 Cen and V4142 Sgr. Other 3 candidates for Double Periodic Variables were found. All systems have relatively long orbital periods. We present improved ephemerides and disentangled light curves.

  15. Natural double inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhionero, F.; Litterio, M.; Capozziello, S.; Amendola, L.

    The astronomical interest of double inflation stems from the possibility it gives of inserting a feature in an otherwise featureless (or scale invariant) perturbation spectrum, precisely at the scale (100 Mpc, say) that goes through the horizon at the (sharp) separations between the two successive inflations. Double inflation occurs when two scalar fields (or inflatons) dominate sequentially the cosmic expansion or when vacuum polarization Ricci scalar R squared added to the Lagrangian is taken into account and only one inflaton ? is present. (This perhaps is more natural as it exploits quantum effects to reduce to one the number of the ad hoc ingredients.) In that case we know from Starobinsky's pioneering work that the first inflation is driven by R rightly called then scalaron under the rules of Fourth Order Gravity, (FOG), while the second is driven by ? under the rules of ordinary General Relativity, (GR). Unfortunately most of the appeal of the scalaron-inflaton scenario in relation to the feature in the perturbation spectrum, is lost because a delicate fine tuning of the value of the (second) inflaton at the beginning of the second inflation is required, in the absence of which the two inflations merge in one and no scale is singled out. In order to overcome this difficulty, we introduce in the Lagrangian density a new scalar coupling between ? and R2, analogous to the well known non minimal coupling between ? and R of canonical GR. We show that in this way the two inflationary episodes of FOG and GR may be neatly distinguished from each other, regardless of the initial value of ?. This is due to the influence of the coupling on the shape of the conformal potential, in which one can easily carve a channel of evolution, consisting in fact of two orthogonal valleys. Then, for most of phase space the attractor is this doubly inflationary trajectory that lies at the bottom of the two valleys (Fig. 1). In fact, in this case the Universe first rolls down to the bottom of the first valley where the inflaton takes the desired value, and then goes on the course sketched above, consisting of the FOG inflation driven by the scalaron and the GR inflation driven by the inflaton. Numerical examples are given (Fig.2). In conclusion it is pointed out that this engineering of the conformal potential may also be exploited, perhaps more interestingly, far beyond the original motivation of this work: for example, to generate bubbles of astrophysical interest in a sort of first-order inflation, which does not have the graceful exit problem of old inflation and has been accordingly nicknamed by us getaway inflation (Fig. 3).

  16. Double valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Stassano, Paolo; Mannacio, Vito; Musumeci, Antonino; Golino, Alessandro; Maida, Piero; Ferrigno, Vincenzo; Buonocore, Gaetano; Spampinato, Nicola

    1991-01-01

    From January 1976 through December 1987, 194 patients with a mean age of 43.3 ± 13.7 years (range, 11 to 74 years) underwent double (mitral and aortic) replacement of native valves with 8 types of bioprostheses: Carpentier-Edwards, 127 valves; Hancock, 76 valves; Liotta-Bioimplant, 57 valves; Ionescu-Shiley, 53 valves; Vascor, 27 valves; Carpentier-Edwards Pericardial, 22 valves; Angell-Shiley, 20 valves; and Implamedic, 6 valves. Concomitant cardiac procedures were performed in 25 patients (12.8%). There were 18 operative deaths (9.27%). Our retrospective analysis was restricted to 352 bioprostheses implanted in the 176 patients who survived surgery and were considered at risk for valve tissue failure. The overall cumulative duration of follow-up was 1,174.1 patient-years (range, 1 to 13 years). The durations of follow-up for specific valves were: Carpentier-Edwards, 920.2 valve-years; Hancock, 383.8 valve-years; Liotta-Bioimplant, 310.2 valve-years; Ionescu-Shiley, 357.7 valve-years; Vascor, 131.2 valve-years; Carpentier-Edwards Pericardial, 52.0 valve-years; Angell-Shiley, 167.0 valve-years; and Implamedic, 31.0 valve-years. Thirty patients had thromboembolic accidents, for a linearized incidence of 2.5% per patient-year. At 13 years, the actuarial freedom from thromboembolic accidents was 85.8% ± 10.7%. Nine patients had endocarditis, for a linearized incidence of 0.7% per patient-year. At 13 years, the actuarial freedom from endocarditis was 92.0% ± 1.5%. Twenty-four patients had valve tissue failure, for a cumulative linearized incidence of 1.87% per valve-year. The cumulative actuarial probability of freedom from valve tissue failure was 78.6% ± 3.7% at 10 years and 51.2% ± 10.7% at 13 years. The 24 patients with valve tissue failure all underwent reoperation: 20 of these had double valve replacement, 3 had aortic valve replacement alone, and 1 had mitral valve replacement alone. The mean interval between initial valve implantation and reoperation was 66.9 ± 28.8 months. At reoperation, the hospital mortality was 15.1% (5 patients). This study showed that the long-term results of valve implantation are not significantly influenced by either prosthesis design or material. Moreover, the incidence of degenerative change was similar in the aortic and mitral positions. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:34-40) PMID:15227506

  17. The Visual Double Star Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.

    2015-08-01

    In visual double star work, production of the first comprehensive attempt to list all discovered pairs in his accessible sky was prepared by S.W. Burnham in 1906. A double star catalog for the southern hemisphere was prepared by R.T.A. Innes et al. in 1927 and the northern hemisphere catalog was updated by R.G. Aitken and E. Doolittle in 1932. Eventually, this led to Lick Observatory maintaining what became known as the Index Catalogue, an all-sky visual double star database.In 1964, under the aegis of Commission 26, the Lick double star database was transferred to the U.S. Naval Observatory where it was redesignated the Washington Double Star Catalog where it and it's ancillary catalogs, have been maintained for over half a century. The current statistics of the catalog and it's supplements are presented as are the enhancements currently under consideration.

  18. Processes of barrier island erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Sallenger, A.H. Jr. ); Williams, S.J. )

    1989-09-01

    During 1986, the US Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey began a 5-year study of the processes causing the extreme rates (up to 20 m/year) of erosion of Louisiana's barrier islands. These processes must be better understood in order to predict future erosion and to assess management and erosion mitigation plans. The study is divided into three parts: the geologic development of barrier islands, the critical processes leading to erosion, and applications of results. This paper provides an overview of the part of the study on critical processes. The process part includes modeling erosion of the barrier islands due to sea level rise, the net loss of sand offshore, gradients in longshore transport, and overwash. Evidence indicates that the low-lying barrier beaches on much of the Louisiana coast do not approach an equilibrium configuration. These beaches, which, in many places, are not protected by dunes, are overwashed even during moderate storms and apparently are not evolving to a configuration that limits overwash. As a result, even with stable sea level, the beaches will continue to overwash and migrate landward during storms. Commonly used methods of modeling beach response to rising sea level assume beaches approach an equilibrium configuration, hence applying these methods to coastal Louisiana is problematical.

  19. Thermal barrier and gas seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, J. O.; Surbat, M.

    1980-01-01

    Resilient baglike seal tolerates thousand-degree temperatures and accommodates small changes in gap size without losing gas-barrier properties; at same time, it maintains smooth aerodynamic surface across gap. Seal includes alumina filler backed by metal plate. Alumina-filled envelope is easily handled and installed, and can be used in high-temperature industrial processes like coal gasification and liquefaction.

  20. Overcoming Barriers: Women in Superintendency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Claire M.

    2009-01-01

    Women currently represent the largest number of teachers in the United States but remain underrepresented in the superintendent position. This suggests that the superintendency has been influenced by patriarchy. If women are to break through the barriers that prevent them from attaining a superintendency, we will need to understand the social…

  1. Injectable barriers for waste isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Apps, J.; Pruess, K.; Muller, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper the authors report laboratory work and numerical simulation done in support of development and demonstration of injectable barriers formed from either of two fluids: colloidal silica or polysiloxane. Two principal problems addressed here are control of gel time and control of plume emplacement in the vadose zone. Gel time must be controlled so that the viscosity of the barrier fluid remains low long enough to inject the barrier, but increases soon enough to gel the barrier in place. During injection, the viscosity must be low enough to avoid high injection pressures which could uplift or fracture the formation. To test the grout gel time in the soil, the injection pressure was monitored as grouts were injected into sandpacks. When grout is injected into the vadose zone, it slumps under the influence of gravity, and redistributes due to capillary forces as it gels. The authors have developed a new module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection into the vadose zone, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of gel concentration and time. They have also developed a model to calculate soil properties after complete solidification of the grout. The numerical model has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests. The authors present the results of computer simulations of grout injection, redistribution, and solidification.

  2. Planar doped barrier subharmonic mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T. H.; East, J. R.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Planar Doped Barrier (PDB) diode is a device consisting of a p(+) doping spike between two intrinsic layers and n(+) ohmic contacts. This device has the advantages of controllable barrier height, diode capacitance and forward to reverse current ratio. A symmetrically designed PDB has an anti-symmetric current vs. voltage characteristic and is ideal for use as millimeter wave subharmonic mixers. We have fabricated such devices with barrier heights of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 volts from GaAs and InGaAs using a multijunction honeycomb structure with junction diameters between one and ten microns. Initial RF measurements are encouraging. The 0.7 volt barrier height 4 micron GaAs devices were tested as subharmonic mixers at 202 GHz with an IF frequency of 1 GHz and had 18 dB of conversion loss. The estimated mismatch loss was 7 dB and was due to higher diode capacitance. The LO frequency was 100.5 GHz and the pump power was 8 mW.

  3. Alumina-Enhanced Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marnell; Leiser, Dan; Goldstein, Howard

    1989-01-01

    Rigid, fibrous ceramic tile material called "alumina-enhanced thermal barrier" (AETB) extends temperature capability of insulating materials. Material has obvious potential for terrestrial use in kilns, furnaces, heat engines, and other applications in which light weight and high operating temperature are specified. Three kinds of ceramic fibers are blended, molded, and sintered to make refractory tiles.

  4. Transforming Articulation Barriers in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Verle

    Barriers to educational mobility for nurses have existed since the mid-1960s. In 1963, the National League for Nursing (NLN) adopted a position that ruled out articulation of any kind between associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelors in science in nursing (BSN) programs. In the mid-1970s, a countermovement took shape, supporting open…

  5. Communication Barriers in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Aytekin; Dabaj, Fahme; Altinay, Fahriye; Altinay, Zehra

    2003-01-01

    Communication is a key concept as being the major tool for people in order to satisfy their needs. It is an activity which refers as process and effective communication requires qualified communication with the elimination of communication barriers. As it is known, distance education is a new trend by following contemporary facilities and tools…

  6. Transforming Articulation Barriers in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Verle

    Barriers to educational mobility for nurses have existed since the mid-1960s. In 1963, the National League for Nursing (NLN) adopted a position that ruled out articulation of any kind between associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelors in science in nursing (BSN) programs. In the mid-1970s, a countermovement took shape, supporting open

  7. Storm impact for barrier islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A new scale is proposed that categorizes impacts to natural barrier islands resulting from tropical and extra-tropical storms. The proposed scale is fundamentally different than existing storm-related scales in that the coupling between forcing processes and the geometry of the coast is explicitly included. Four regimes, representing different levels of impact, are defined. Within each regime, patterns and relative magnitudes of net erosion and accretion are argued to be unique. The borders between regimes represent thresholds defining where processes and magnitudes of impacts change dramatically. Impact level 1 is the 'swash' regime describing a storm where runup is confined to the foreshore. The foreshore typically erodes during the storm and recovers following the storm; hence, there is no net change. Impact level 2 is the 'collision' regime describing a storm where the wave runup exceeds the threshold of the base of the foredune ridge. Swash impacts the dune forcing net erosion. Impact level 3 is the 'overwash' regime describing a storm where wave runup overtops the berm or, if present, the foredune ridge. The associated net landward sand transport contributes to net migration of the barrier landward. Impact level 4 is the 'inundation' regime describing a storm where the storm surge is sufficient to completely and continuously submerge the barrier island. Sand undergoes net landward transport over the barrier island; limited evidence suggests the quantities and distance of transport are much greater than what occurs during the 'overwash' regime.

  8. Results of falling barrier analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.L.

    1994-10-31

    This document assesses the consequences if the isolation barrier plate is dropped and falls over on the fuel stored in the water-filled K-East basin. The water slows the rate of fall and some canister bending is expected but only a few rods, if any, would get crushed. The basin criticality calculations will not be affected.

  9. Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, James R.; Cohen, Marshall J.

    1984-01-24

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

  10. Oncogene-induced senescence is part of the tumorigenesis barrier imposed by DNA damage checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Bartkova, Jirina; Rezaei, Nousin; Liontos, Michalis; Karakaidos, Panagiotis; Kletsas, Dimitris; Issaeva, Natalia; Vassiliou, Leandros-Vassilios F; Kolettas, Evangelos; Niforou, Katerina; Zoumpourlis, Vassilis C; Takaoka, Munenori; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Tort, Frederic; Fugger, Kasper; Johansson, Fredrik; Sehested, Maxwell; Andersen, Claus L; Dyrskjot, Lars; Ørntoft, Torben; Lukas, Jiri; Kittas, Christos; Helleday, Thomas; Halazonetis, Thanos D; Bartek, Jiri; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G

    2006-11-30

    Recent studies have indicated the existence of tumorigenesis barriers that slow or inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions to neoplasia. One such barrier involves DNA replication stress, which leads to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and thereby to apoptosis or cell cycle arrest, whereas a second barrier is mediated by oncogene-induced senescence. The relationship between these two barriers, if any, has not been elucidated. Here we show that oncogene-induced senescence is associated with signs of DNA replication stress, including prematurely terminated DNA replication forks and DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibiting the DNA double-strand break response kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) suppressed the induction of senescence and in a mouse model led to increased tumour size and invasiveness. Analysis of human precancerous lesions further indicated that DNA damage and senescence markers cosegregate closely. Thus, senescence in human preneoplastic lesions is a manifestation of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress and, together with apoptosis, provides a barrier to malignant progression. PMID:17136093

  11. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.; Jackaway, Adam D.

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  12. Double Chooz Laser Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yujing

    2013-04-01

    The Double Chooz experiment focuses on measuring the neutrino mixing angle without the ambiguity of matter effects and CP violation. A multi-detector setup can extend the reach in sensitivity for theta-13 with reduced systematic error. Two identical detectors, the far and the near, are constructed at 1050 m and 400 m respectively, from the Chooz nuclear cores. The far detector is taking data while the near detector is being constructed. The university of alabama group is responsible for the laser calibration system development in both the hardware design and the analysis software including extracting calibration constants of the inner detector PMT gains, charge likelihoods, PMT time offsets and effective speed of light. Two types of lasers are used for the PMT charge and time related calibrations respectively. A UV laser with a wavelength of 380 nm is mainly responsible for the PMT gains and charge likelihoods calibrations. A blue laser of 470 nm wavelength is used in calibrating the PMT time offsets and measuring the speed of light in the medium. In this presentation I will talk about the laser system hardware design and laser calibration data analysis.

  13. Laser double Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poffo, L.; Goujon, J.-M.; Le Page, R.; Lemaitre, J.; Guendouz, M.; Lorrain, N.; Bosc, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive method for estimating the tissular blood flow and speed at a microscopic scale (microcirculation). It is used for medical research as well as for the diagnosis of diseases related to circulatory system tissues and organs including the issues of microvascular flow (perfusion). It is based on the Doppler effect, created by the interaction between the laser light and tissues. LDF measures the mean blood flow in a volume formed by the single laser beam, that penetrate into the skin. The size of this measurement volume is crucial and depends on skin absorption, and is not directly reachable. Therefore, current developments of the LDF are focused on the use of always more complex and sophisticated signal processing methods. On the other hand, laser Double Doppler Flowmeter (FL2D) proposes to use two laser beams to generate the measurement volume. This volume would be perfectly stable and localized at the intersection of the two laser beams. With FL2D we will be able to determine the absolute blood flow of a specific artery. One aimed application would be to help clinical physicians in health care units.

  14. Double acting bit holder

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.; Ruzzi, Peter L.

    1994-01-01

    A double acting bit holder that permits bits held in it to be resharpened during cutting action to increase energy efficiency by reducing the amount of small chips produced. The holder consist of: a stationary base portion capable of being fixed to a cutter head of an excavation machine and having an integral extension therefrom with a bore hole therethrough to accommodate a pin shaft; a movable portion coextensive with the base having a pin shaft integrally extending therefrom that is insertable in the bore hole of the base member to permit the moveable portion to rotate about the axis of the pin shaft; a recess in the movable portion of the holder to accommodate a shank of a bit; and a biased spring disposed in adjoining openings in the base and moveable portions of the holder to permit the moveable portion to pivot around the pin shaft during cutting action of a bit fixed in a turret to allow front, mid and back positions of the bit during cutting to lessen creation of small chip amounts and resharpen the bit during excavation use.

  15. Container lid gasket protective strip for double door transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Jr., Burgess M

    2013-02-19

    An apparatus and a process for forming a protective barrier seal along a "ring of concern" of a transfer container used with double door systems is provided. A protective substrate is supplied between a "ring of concern" and a safety cover in which an adhesive layer of the substrate engages the "ring of concern". A compressive foam strip along an opposite side of the substrate engages a safety cover such that a compressive force is maintained between the "ring of concern" and the adhesive layer of the substrate.

  16. Dissipative double-well potential: Nonlinear stationary and pulsating modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zezyulin, Dmitry A.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Alfimov, Georgy L.

    2010-11-15

    The analysis of nonlinear modes in a complex absorbing double-well potential supported by linear gain is presented. Families of the nonlinear modes and their bifurcations are found numerically by means of the properly modified 'shooting' method. Linear stability and dynamics of the modes are studied. It is shown that no stable modes exist in the case of attractive nonlinearity, while stable modes, including nonsymmetric ones, are found when the nonlinearity is repulsive. Varying a control parameter (e.g., the height of barrier between the wells) results in switching from one mode to another. Apart from stationary modes we have found pulsating solutions emergent from unstable modes.

  17. Barrier inhomogeneities and electronic transport of Pt contacts to relatively highly doped n-type 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lingqin; Wang, Dejun

    2015-05-01

    The barrier characteristics of Pt contacts to relatively highly doped (˜1 × 1018 cm-3) 4H-SiC were investigated using current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements in the temperature range of 160-573 K. The barrier height and ideally factor estimated from the I-V characteristics based on the thermionic emission model are abnormally temperature-dependent, which can be explained by assuming the presence of a double Gaussian distribution (GD) of inhomogeneous barrier heights. However, in the low temperature region (160-323 K), the obtained mean barrier height according to GD is lower than the actual mean value from C-V measurement. The values of barrier height determined from the thermionic field emission model are well consistent with those from the C-V measurements, which suggest that the current transport process could be modified by electron tunneling at low temperatures.

  18. Self-employment as a solution for attitudinal barriers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Quinton, Melanie C

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a case study to examine attitudinal barriers to employment and underemployment. We follow the career path of PR, a woman with multiple physical impairments, as she seeks financial independence through several employment strategies. In these, she faced attitudinal barriers and employment situations without opportunity for advancement. Eventually, PR opens her own business, turning to an alternative loan program to acquire the funds necessary to purchase a ready-made vehicle that matches her needs for accessible transportation. Use of this vehicle to provide delivery services for her business has more than doubled her income. PMID:24763347

  19. Solar UV radiation reduces the barrier function of human skin

    PubMed Central

    Biniek, Krysta; Levi, Kemal; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of solar UV radiation in human life is essential for vitamin D production but also leads to skin photoaging, damage, and malignancies. Photoaging and skin cancer have been extensively studied, but the effects of UV on the critical mechanical barrier function of the outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), are not understood. The SC is the first line of defense against environmental exposures like solar UV radiation, and its effects on UV targets within the SC and subsequent alterations in the mechanical properties and related barrier function are unclear. Alteration of the SCs mechanical properties can lead to severe macroscopic skin damage such as chapping and cracking and associated inflammation, infection, scarring, and abnormal desquamation. Here, we show that UV exposure has dramatic effects on cell cohesion and mechanical integrity that are related to its effects on the SCs intercellular components, including intercellular lipids and corneodesmosomes. We found that, although the keratin-controlled stiffness remained surprisingly constant with UV exposure, the intercellular strength, strain, and cohesion decreased markedly. We further show that solar UV radiation poses a double threat to skin by both increasing the biomechanical driving force for damage while simultaneously decreasing the skins natural ability to resist, compromising the critical barrier function of the skin. PMID:23027968

  20. Spontaneous Fission Barriers Based on a Generalized Liquid Drop Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shu-Qing; Bao, Xiao-Jun; Li, Jun-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Fei

    2014-05-01

    The barrier against the spontaneous fission has been determined within the Generalized Liquid Drop Model (GLDM) including the mass and charge asymmetry, and the proximity energy. The shell correction of the spherical parent nucleus is calculated by using the Strutinsky method, and the empirical shape-dependent shell correction is employed during the deformation process. A quasi-molecular shape sequence has been defined to describe the whole process from one-body shape to two-body shape system, and a two-touching-ellipsoid is adopted when the superdeformed one-body system reaches the rupture point. On these bases the spontaneous fission barriers are systematically studied for nuclei from 230Th to 249Cm for different possible exiting channels with the different mass and charge asymmetries. The double, and triple bumps are found in the fission potential energy in this region, which roughly agree with the experimental results. It is found that at around Sn-like fragment the outer fission barriers are lower, while the partner of the Sn-like fragment is in the range near 108Ru where the ground-state mass is lowered by allowing axially symmetric shapes. The preferable fission channels are distinctly pronounced, which should be corresponding to the fragment mass distributions.

  1. Barriers to improvements in energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.K.N.

    1991-10-01

    To promote energy-efficiency improvements, actions may be required at one or more levels -- from the lowest level of the consumer (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) through the highest level of the global agencies. But barriers to the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements exist or can arise at all these levels. Taking up each one of these barriers in turn, the paper discusses specific measures that can contribute to overcoming the barriers. However, a one-barrier-one-measure approach must be avoided. Single barriers may in fact involve several sub-barriers. Also, combinations of measures are much more effective in overcoming barriers. In particular, combinations of measures that simultaneously overcome several barriers are most successful. The paper discusses the typology of barriers, explores their origin and suggests measures that by themselves or in combination with other measures, will overcome these barriers. Since most of the barriers dealt with can be found in the ``barriers`` literature, any originality in the paper lies in its systematic organization, synoptic view and holistic treatment of this issue. This paper is intended to initiate a comprehensive treatment of barriers, their origins and the measures that contribute to overcoming them. Hopefully, such a treatment will facilitate the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements involving a wide diversity of ever-changing energy end uses and consumer preferences.

  2. Barriers to improvements in energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.K.N.

    1991-10-01

    To promote energy-efficiency improvements, actions may be required at one or more levels -- from the lowest level of the consumer (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) through the highest level of the global agencies. But barriers to the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements exist or can arise at all these levels. Taking up each one of these barriers in turn, the paper discusses specific measures that can contribute to overcoming the barriers. However, a one-barrier-one-measure approach must be avoided. Single barriers may in fact involve several sub-barriers. Also, combinations of measures are much more effective in overcoming barriers. In particular, combinations of measures that simultaneously overcome several barriers are most successful. The paper discusses the typology of barriers, explores their origin and suggests measures that by themselves or in combination with other measures, will overcome these barriers. Since most of the barriers dealt with can be found in the barriers'' literature, any originality in the paper lies in its systematic organization, synoptic view and holistic treatment of this issue. This paper is intended to initiate a comprehensive treatment of barriers, their origins and the measures that contribute to overcoming them. Hopefully, such a treatment will facilitate the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements involving a wide diversity of ever-changing energy end uses and consumer preferences.

  3. Optical properties of magnetoexcitons in double quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillak, Piotr; Czajkowski, Gerard

    2015-10-01

    Here we investigate the influence of a constant magnetic field on the energy levels and optical properties of excitons in a double quantum disk (quantum molecule). Taking into account the cylindrical symmetry of the double disk we calculate the wave functions and excitonic energies when the external constant magnetic field is applied along the symmetry axis. Having the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues and using the long-wave approximation we can compute all the optical functions. The double quantum dot is considered as one system rather than two interacting dots separated by narrow barrier. The screened Coulomb interaction between an electron and a hole is assumed. Since in the given structure the separation of the relative- and center-of-mass motion of the electron and the hole is not possible, we use an approach where the six-dimensional eigenvalue problem is transformed into the equivalent eigenvalue problem given by the system of the coupled two-dimensional second order differential equations. The so obtained differential equations are solved numerically. As an example, we give detailed results for a InP/InGaP double quantum dot. Satisfactory agreement with the available experimental data is obtained.

  4. Advanced double layer capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarangapani, S.; Lessner, P.; Forchione, J.; Laconti, A. B.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for large amounts of power to be delivered rapidly in a number of airborne and space systems. Conventional, portable power sources, such as batteries, are not suited to delivering high peak power pulses. The charge stored at the electrode-electrolyte double layer is, however, much more assessible on a short time scale. Devices exploiting this concept were fabricated using carbon and metal oxides (Pinnacle Research) as the electrodes and sulfuric acid as the electrolyte. The approach reported, replaces the liquid sulfuric acid electrolyte with a solid ionomer electrolyte. The challenge is to form a solid electrode-solid ionomer electrolyte composite which has a high capacitance per geometric area. The approach to maximize contact between the electrode particles and the ionomer was to impregnate the electrode particles using a liquid ionomer solution and to bond the solvent-free structure to a solid ionomer membrane. Ruthenium dioxide is the electrode material used. Three strategies are being pursued to provide for a high area electrode-ionomer contact: mixing of the RuOx with a small volume of ionomer solution followed by filtration to remove the solvent, and impregnation of the ionomer into an already formed RuOx electrode. RuOx powder and electrodes were examined by non-electrochemical techniques. X-ray diffraction has shown that the material is almost pure RuO2. The electrode structure depends on the processing technique used to introduce the Nafion. Impregnated electrodes have Nafion concentrated near the surface. Electrodes prepared by the evaporation method show large aggregates of crystals surrounded by Nafion.

  5. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental scientists are generally familiar with the concept of barriers for restricting the movement of contaminant plumes in ground water. Such barriers are typically constructed of highly impermeable emplacements of materials such as grouts, slurries, or sheet pilings to ...

  6. BARRIERS TO THE TRANSMISSION OF WATERBORNE DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multiple barrier concept is applied by public health professionals as they attempt to prevent waterborne transmission of communicable diseases. This chapter discusses two water treatment techniques, filtration and disinfection, that are commonly used to provide barriers to di...

  7. Classification of minimally doubled fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, Michael; Misumi, Tatsuhiro

    2010-10-01

    We propose a method to control the number of species of lattice fermions, which yields new classes of minimally doubled lattice fermions. We show it is possible to control the number of species by handling O(a) Wilson-term-like corrections in fermion actions, which we will term 'twisted-ordering method'. Using this method we obtain new minimally doubled actions with one exact chiral symmetry and exact locality. We classify the known minimally doubled fermions into two types based on the locations of the propagator poles in the Brillouin zone.

  8. Extension of 193 nm dry lithography to 45-nm half-pitch node: double exposure and double processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abani M.; Li, Jianliang; Hiserote, Jay A.; Melvin, Lawrence S., III

    2006-10-01

    Immersion lithography and multiple exposure techniques are the most promising methods to extend lithography manufacturing to the 45nm node. Although immersion lithography has attracted much attention recently as a promising optical lithography extension, it will not solve all the problems at the 45-nm node. The 'dry' option, (i.e. double exposure/etch) which can be realized with standard processing practice, will extend 193-nm lithography to the end of the current industry roadmap. Double exposure/etch lithography is expensive in terms of cost, throughput time, and overlay registration accuracy. However, it is less challenging compared to other possible alternatives and has the ability to break through the κ I barrier (0.25). This process, in combination with attenuated PSM (att-PSM) mask, is a good imaging solution that can reach, and most likely go beyond, the 45-nm node. Mask making requirements in a double exposure scheme will be reduced significantly. This can be appreciated by the fact that the separation of tightly-pitched mask into two less demanding pitch patterns will reduce the stringent specifications for each mask. In this study, modeling of double exposure lithography (DEL) with att-PSM masks to target 45-nm node is described. In addition, mask separation and implementation issues of optical proximity corrections (OPC) to improve process window are studied. To understand the impact of OPC on the process window, Fourier analysis of the masks has been carried out as well.

  9. Elucidating the mechanisms of double ionization using intense half-cycle, single-cycle, and double half-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamta, G. Lagmago; Starace, Anthony F.

    2003-10-01

    We investigate the interaction of a two-active electron system (Li{sup -}) with intense single-cycle and double half-cycle pulses. The 'intensity' and 'frequency' considered correspond to the 'multiphoton above-barrier regime'. For the single-cycle pulse (SCP), the electric field changes sign once, allowing electron wave packets created during the first half cycle to recollide with the parent ion when driven back by the field. For the double half-cycle pulse (DHP), however, the electric field does not change sign, and electron wave packets created during the first half cycle are not driven back to the parent ion. We find that both single and double ionization are significantly larger for the SCP than for the DHP, thereby elucidating the role of the rescattering mechanism. On the other hand, doubly ionized electrons produced by a half-cycle pulse and a DHP are found to have angular distributions in which one electron is ejected in the direction of the pulse field, and the other in the opposite direction. This clear signature of electron correlations suggests that 'shake-off', 'knockout', and, possibly, 'multiphoton-sharing' processes are alternative contributing mechanisms for double ionization in this regime.

  10. Double- β decay studies with JYFLTRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolhinen, V. S.; Rahaman, S.; Suhonen, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied JYFLTRAP double Penning trap mass spectrometer to study several double- β decay Q values that could be useful for the search of neutrinoless double- β decay and, hence for the determination of neutrino properties.

  11. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  12. The Barriers and Needs of Online Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srichanyachon, Napaporn

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated some specific barriers and needs that online students are facing when learning English through WebEx system. It compared students' barriers and needs with their background including gender, computer ownership, and monthly allowance. It also investigated the relationship among computer aptitude, barriers and needs of…

  13. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  14. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography

  15. Schottky Barrier with Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, B. P.; Patel, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    Schottky barrier with liquid metal may provide an attractive and new opportunity to look into various aspect of the evolution of Schottky interfaces in a relatively beneficial manner [1]. Here gallium-silicon diode has been fabricated and investigated especially around the melting point of gallium. Analysis of data no barrier height exhibits an anomalous change in the sense that there is a sharp deterioration in the rectifying nature near this temperature. It is believed to be related changes the phase transition driven physical process e.g. breaking of bonds both between gallium atoms and between gallium atoms and silicon interface; change from long range to short range order in gallium. Strain relaxations at the interface etc.

  16. Ductal barriers in mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Mark B; Hill, Arnold DK; Hopkins, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Tissue barriers play an integral role in the biology and pathobiology of mammary ductal epithelium. In normal breast physiology, tight and adherens junctions undergo dynamic changes in permeability in response to hormonal and other stimuli, while several of their proteins are directly involved in mammary tumorigenesis. This review describes first the structure of mammary ductal epithelial barriers and their role in normal mammary development, examining the cyclical changes in response to puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. It then examines the role of adherens and tight junctions and the participation of their constituent proteins in mammary tumorigenic functions such as migration, invasion and metastasis. Finally, it discusses the potential of these adhesion proteins as both prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:24665412

  17. Psoriasis genetics: breaking the barrier

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Elisha D.O.; Bowcock, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common incurable inflammatory skin disease affecting 23% of the European population. Psoriatic skin contains large numbers of immune cells which produce many cytokines, chemokines and inflammatory molecules. The epidermis divides much faster than normal and has a defective outer layer or barrier which under normal circumstances protects from infection and dehydration. Psoriatic skin is characterized by a distinct set of inflammation and epidermal proliferation and differentiation markers, and it has not been clear if the genetic basis of psoriasis is due to defects of the immune system or the skin. One genetic determinant lies within the major histocompatibility complex class 1 region. Genome-wide association studies have revealed genetic susceptibility factors that play a role in the formation of immune cells found in psoriasis lesions. Others affect epidermal proliferation and the formation of the skins barrier. Hence, genetic components of both the immune system and the epidermis predispose to disease. PMID:20692714

  18. Security barriers with automated reconnaissance

    DOEpatents

    McLaughlin, James O; Baird, Adam D; Tullis, Barclay J; Nolte, Roger Allen

    2015-04-07

    An intrusion delaying barrier includes primary and secondary physical structures and can be instrumented with multiple sensors incorporated into an electronic monitoring and alarm system. Such an instrumented intrusion delaying barrier may be used as a perimeter intrusion defense and assessment system (PIDAS). Problems with not providing effective delay to breaches by intentional intruders and/or terrorists who would otherwise evade detection are solved by attaching the secondary structures to the primary structure, and attaching at least some of the sensors to the secondary structures. By having multiple sensors of various types physically interconnected serves to enable sensors on different parts of the overall structure to respond to common disturbances and thereby provide effective corroboration that a disturbance is not merely a nuisance or false alarm. Use of a machine learning network such as a neural network exploits such corroboration.

  19. Flexible pile thermal barrier insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Fell, D. M.; Tesinsky, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible pile thermal barrier insulator included a plurality of upstanding pile yarns. A generally planar backing section supported the upstanding pile yarns. The backing section included a plurality of filler yarns forming a mesh in a first direction. A plurality of warp yarns were looped around said filler yarns and pile yarns in the backing section and formed a mesh in a second direction. A binder prevented separation of the yarns in the backing section.

  20. Wet Work and Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Fartasch, Manigé

    2016-01-01

    Wet work defined as unprotected exposure to humid environments/water; high frequencies of hand washing procedures or prolonged glove occlusion is believed to cause irritant contact dermatitis in a variety of occupations. This review considers the recent studies on wet-work exposure and focuses on its influence on barrier function. There are different methods to study the effect of wet work on barrier function. On the one hand, occupational cohorts at risk can be monitored prospectively by skin bioengineering technology and clinical visual scoring systems; on the other hand, experimental test procedures with defined application of water, occlusion and detergents are performed in healthy volunteers. Both epidemiological studies and the results of experimental procedures are compared and discussed. A variety of epidemiological studies analyze occupational cohorts at risk. The measurement of transepidermal water loss, an indicator of the integrity of the epidermal barrier, and clinical inspection of the skin have shown that especially the frequencies of hand washing and water contact/contact to aqueous mixtures seem to be the main factors for the occurrence of barrier alterations. On the other hand, in a single cross-sectional study, prolonged glove wearing (e.g. occlusion for 6 h per shift in clean-room workers) without exposure to additional hazardous substances seemed not to affect the skin negatively. But regarding the effect of occlusion, there is experimental evidence that previously occluded skin challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate leads to an increased susceptibility to the irritant with an aggravation of the irritant reaction. These findings might have relevance for the real-life situation in so far as after occupational glove wearing, the skin is more susceptible to potential hazards to the skin even during leisure hours. PMID:26844906

  1. Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Along the coast of Queensland, Australia (18.0S, 147.5E), timbered foothills of the Great Dividing Range separate the semi-arid interior of Queensland from the farmlands of the coastal plains. Prominent cleared areas in the forest indicate deforestation for farm and pasture lands. Offshore, islands and the Great Barrier Reef display sand banks along the southern sides of the structures indicating a dominant southerly wind and current direction.

  2. Entanglement purification with double selection

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Katsuji

    2009-10-15

    We investigate an entanglement purification protocol with double-selection process, which works under imperfect local operations. Compared with the usual protocol with single selection, this double-selection method has higher noise thresholds for the local operations and quantum communication channels and achieves higher fidelity of purified states. It also provides a yield comparable to that of the usual protocol with single selection. We discuss on general grounds how some of the errors which are introduced by local operations are left as intrinsically undetectable. The undetectable errors place a general upper bound on the purification fidelity. The double selection is a simple method to remove all the detectable errors in the first order, so that the upper bound on the fidelity is achieved in the low-noise regime. The double selection is further applied to purification of multipartite entanglement such as two-colorable graph states.

  3. Controls of barrier island morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, V.; Pilkey, O.H.; Keysworth, A.

    1988-08-01

    A study of 530 barrier islands from around the world has been made to determine broad physical and geologic controls on island occurrence and morphology. A total of 74 island chains, consisting of three or more islands each, was included in the investigation. Data for the study were derived from geologic and topographic maps and navigation charts. Environmental parameters considered include wind direction and velocity, mean significant wave height and storm-wave height, and tidal range. Island parameters include length, width, elevation, shape, volume, inlet width, tidal delta length, shoreface slope, coastal plain slope, and continental shelf slope. Most island chains (42%) occur along Amero-trailing edges of continents. Marginal seacoasts are second in importance (32%), and 22% of all island chains are found on collision coasts. Most islands (70%) are found in microtidal (< 2 m mean tide range) environments, with only 1% of individual islands occurring under macrotidal conditions (> 4 m mean tide range). According to the second-order coastal classification of Inman and Nordstrom, most barrier islands are found on either mountainous (32%) or wide shelf plains (32%). Next in importance are barrier islands on deltaic coasts (15%). Tidal range does not seem to play a strong role in determining island length (or inlet frequency). Islands are mostly less than 20 km in length, regardless of tidal range, although virtually all long islands (> 20 km) are found on microtidal coasts.

  4. Single- and double-electron processes in collisions of Xe{sup 23+} ions with helium

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Baowei; Wan Chengliang; Chen Shangwen; Yu Deyang; Ruan Fangfang; Lu Rongchun; Cai Xiaohong; Shao Caojie

    2010-09-15

    We report the measurements of relative cross sections for single capture (SC), double capture (DC), single ionization (SI), double ionization (DI), and transfer ionization (TI) in collisions of Xe{sup 23+} ions with helium atoms in the velocity range of 0.65-1.32 a.u. The relative cross sections show a weak velocity dependence. The cross-section ratio of double- (DE) to single-electron (SE) removal from He, {sigma}{sub DE}/{sigma}{sub SE}, is about 0.45. Single capture is the dominant reaction channel which is followed by transfer ionization, while only very small probabilities are found for pure ionization and double capture. The present experimental data are in satisfactory agreement with the estimations by the extended classical over-barrier (ECB) model.

  5. Reaction dynamics near the barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveland, W.

    2011-10-01

    The availability of modest intensity (103-107 p/s) radioactive nuclear beams has had a significant impact on the study of nuclear reactions near the interaction barrier. The role of isospin in capture reactions is a case in point. Using heavy elements as a laboratory to explore these effects, we note that the cross section for producing an evaporation residue is σEVR(Ec . m .) = ∑ J = 0 JmaxσCN(Ec . m . , J) Wsur(Ec . m . , J) where σCN is the complete fusion cross section and Wsur is the survival probability of the completely fused system. The complete fusion cross section can be written as, σCN(Ec . m .) = ∑ J = 0 Jmaxσcapture(Ec . m .) PCN(Ec . m . , J) where σcapture(Ec.m.,J) is the ``capture'' cross section at center-of mass energy Ec.m. and spin J and PCN is the probability that the projectile-target system will evolve inside the fission saddle point to form a completely fused system rather than re-separating (quasi-fission). The systematics of the isospin dependence of the capture cross sections has been developed and the deduced interaction barriers for all known studies of capture cross sections with radioactive beams are in good agreement with recent predictions of an improved QMD model and semi-empirical models. The deduced barriers for these n-rich systems are lower than one would expect from the Bass or proximity potentials. In addition to the barrier lowering, there is an enhanced sub-barrier cross section in these n-rich systems that is of advantage in the synthesis of new heavy nuclei. Recent studies of the ``inverse fission'' of uranium (124,132Sn + 100Mo) have yielded unexpectedly low upper limits for this process due apparently to low values of the fusion probability, PCN. The fusion of halo nuclei, like 11Li with heavy nuclei, like 208Pb, promises to give new information about these and related nuclei and has led/may lead to unusual reaction mechanisms. This work was sponsored, in part, by the USDOE Office of Nuclear Physics.

  6. Cryogenic Barrier Demonstration Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.A.; Yarmak, E.; Long, E.L.

    2000-03-01

    A long-term frozen soil barrier was implemented at the HRE (Homogeneous Reactor Experiment) Pond facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1997. This was performed to verify the technical feasibility and costs of deploying a frozen barrier at a radiologically contaminated site. Work began in September 1996 and progressed through to December 1999. The frozen barrier has been operational since November 1997. Verification of the barrier integrity was performed independently by the EPA's SITE Program. This project showed frozen barriers offer a proven technology to retain below grade hazardous substances at relatively low costs with minimal effect on the environment.

  7. Myosin di-phosphorylation and peripheral actin bundle formation as initial events during endothelial barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Mayumi; Hirano, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the 20-kD myosin light chain (MLC) and actin filament formation play a key role in endothelial barrier disruption. MLC is either mono- or di-phosphorylated (pMLC and ppMLC) at T18 or S19. The present study investigated whether there are any distinct roles of pMLC and ppMLC in barrier disruption induced by thrombin. Thrombin induced a modest bi-phasic increase in pMLC and a robust mono-phasic increase in ppMLC. pMLC localized in the perinuclear cytoplasm during the initial phase, while ppMLC localized in the cell periphery, where actin bundles were formed. Later, the actin bundles were rearranged into stress fibers, where pMLC co-localized. Rho-kinase inhibitors inhibited thrombin-induced barrier disruption and peripheral localization of ppMLC and actin bundles. The double, but not single, mutation of phosphorylation sites abolished the formation of peripheral actin bundles and the barrier disruption, indicating that mono-phosphorylation of MLC at either T18 or S19 is functionally sufficient for barrier disruption. Namely, the peripheral localization, but not the degree of phosphorylation, is suggested to be essential for the functional effect of ppMLC. These results suggest that MLC phosphorylation and actin bundle formation in cell periphery are initial events during barrier disruption. PMID:26863988

  8. Monitoring subsurface barrier integrity using perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.M.; Heiser, J.; Gard, A.; Senum, G.

    1998-06-01

    Subsurface barriers are an extremely promising remediation option to many waste-management problems. It is recognized that monitoring of the barrier is necessary to provide confidence in the ability of the barrier to contain the pollutants. However, the large size and deep placement of subsurface barriers make detection of leaks a challenging task. Therefore, typical geophysical methods are not suitable for the monitoring of an emplaced barrier`s integrity. Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) have been tested as a means of barrier verification at the Hanford geotechnical test facility, where a soil/cement barrier was emplaced around a buried drum. PFTs were injected beneath the drum for three days in the center of the barrier 3 m below grade. The concentration of PFTs in seven external and two internal monitoring wells has been measured as a function of time over a 17-day period. The data have been analyzed through numerical modeling to determine barrier integrity and PFT diffusion rates through the barrier. This paper discusses the experimental design, test results, data analysis, and modeling of PFT transport in the subsurface system.

  9. Anti-pollution and antifire floating barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Bossa, E.D.

    1981-07-21

    The barrier of this invention is formed by barrier sections and each of them can be wound up about a reel or bobbin, which is pivotably mounted within a main floating hollow element, which not only has the task of receiving, transporting, towing, launching and trawling the barrier section housed therein, but also it serves to provide anchoring points for this barrier. Each main barrier element is shaped in the form of a cage-like container provided with at least a side vertical entrance passage , through which a barrier section can be returned inside the container, or this section can be caused to come out, each main floating element thus serving as floating container for the transport of at least one of the barrier sections to or from their use place.

  10. Electric field effect on the nonlinear optical absorption in double semi-graded quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, E.; Sokmen, I.

    2013-09-01

    The electric field dependence of the linear and nonlinear intersubband optical absorption in double semi-graded quantum wells (DSGQWs) is investigated in the effective mass approximation. In our calculations, the position and the magnitude of the linear and total absorption coefficients depend on the electric field strength and barrier width. The resonant peak of total absorption coefficient can be bleached at sufficiently high incident optical intensities. The modulation of the absorption coefficients and the refractive index changes which can be suitable for good performance optical modulators and various infrared optical device applications can be easily obtained by tuning the electric field strength and barrier width.

  11. Interplay between aromaticity and strain in double group transfer reactions to 1,2-benzyne.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Cossío, Fernando P

    2016-05-30

    Density Functional Theory calculations are used to explore the double hydrogen atom transfer from different alkanes to 1,2-benzyne. State-of-the-art calculations including the Activation Strain Model of reactivity, Energy Decomposition Analysis, and Valence Bond methods, reveal the origins of the relatively low activation barriers computed for these processes compared to the analogous reaction involving acetylene. In addition, the interplay between the in-plane aromaticity of the corresponding transition states and the variation of the π-aromaticity associated with the benzyne moiety as well as their influence on the barrier heights of the transformations are analyzed in detail. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864872

  12. Translocation frequency of double-stranded DNA through a solid-state nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state nanopores are single-molecule sensors that measure changes in ionic current as charged polymers such as DNA pass through. Here, we present comprehensive experiments on the length, voltage, and salt dependence of the frequency of double-stranded DNA translocations through conical quartz nanopores with mean opening diameter 15 nm. We observe an entropic barrier-limited, length-dependent translocation frequency at 4M LiCl salt concentration and a drift-dominated, length-independent translocation frequency at 1M KCl salt concentration. These observations are described by a unifying convection-diffusion equation, which includes the contribution of an entropic barrier for polymer entry.

  13. Semi-microscopic calculations of the fusion barrier distributions for reactions involving deformed target nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gontchar, I.I.; Hinde, D.J.; Dasgupta, M.; Morton, C.R.; Newton, J.O.

    2006-03-15

    The double-folding model with an M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction was applied to obtain the angle-dependent bare nucleus-nucleus potential for heavy-ion fusion reactions involving deformed target nuclei. The angular dependence with a zero-range exchange NN interaction is almost identical to that with a finite-range interaction, allowing quick calculations of the fusion cross sections and corresponding barrier distributions D(E{sub c.m.}). Since in the literature the experimental D(E{sub c.m.}) have been analyzed usually using a Woods-Saxon shape for the nuclear part of the nucleus-nucleus potential, we fitted the spherical double-folding potentials at the barrier radii with a Woods-Saxon (WS) form. The calculated D(E{sub c.m.}) with this fitted WS potential, but now accounting for the deformation of the target nuclei, are significantly different from the D(E{sub c.m.}) calculated directly using the double-folding potential. This indicates that the finite size effects are substantial and should not be ignored in the analysis of experimental fusion cross sections and barrier distributions for reactions with statically deformed nuclei.

  14. The double loop mattress suture

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone, John; Samuel, Madan; Creagh, Terry; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    An interrupted stitch type with favorable tissue characteristics will reduce local wound complications. We describe a novel high-strength, low-tension repair for the interrupted closure of skin, cartilage, and muscle, the double loop mattress stitch, and compare it experimentally with other interrupted closure methods. The performance of the double loop mattress technique in porcine cartilage and skeletal muscle is compared with the simple, mattress, and loop mattress interrupted sutures in both a novel porcine loading chamber and mechanical model. Wound apposition is assessed by electron microscopy. The performance of the double loop mattress in vivo was confirmed using a series of 805 pediatric laparotomies/laparoscopies. The double loop mattress suture is 3.5 times stronger than the loop mattress in muscle and 1.6 times stronger in cartilage (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, the double loop mattress reduces tissue tension by 66% compared with just 53% for the loop mattress (p ≤ 0.001). Wound gapping is equal, and wound eversion appears significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) compared with the loop mattress in vitro. In vivo, the double loop mattress performs as well as the loop mattress and significantly better than the mattress stitch in assessments of wound eversion and dehiscence. There were no episodes of stitch extrusion in our series of patients. The mechanical advantage of its intrinsic pulley arrangement gives the double loop mattress its favorable properties. Wound dehiscence is reduced because this stitch type is stronger and exerts less tension on the tissue than the mattress stitch. We advocate the use of this novel stitch wherever a high-strength, low-tension repair is required. These properties will enhance wound repair, and its application will be useful to surgeons of all disciplines. PMID:24698436

  15. Double graphene-layer structures for adaptive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitin, V.; Ryzhii, V.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Shur, M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Among different carbon materials (diamond, graphite, fullerene, carbon nanotubes), graphene and more complex graphene-based structures attracted a considerable attention. The gapless energy spectrum of graphene implies that graphene can absorb and emit photons with rather low energies corresponding to terahertz (THz) and infrared (IR) ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this presentation, the discussion is focused on the double-graphene-layer (double-GL) structures. In these structures, GLs are separated by a barrier layer (Boron Nitride, Silicon Carbide, and so on). Applying voltage between GLs, one can realize the situation when one GL is filled with electrons while the other is filled with holes. The variation of the applied voltage leads to the variations of the Fermi energies and, hence, to the change of the interband and intraband absorption of electromagnetic radiation and to the variation of the tunneling current. The plasma oscillations in double-GL structures exhibit interesting features. This is mainly because each GL serves as the gate for the other GL. The spectrum of the plasma oscillations in the double-GL structures falls into the terahertz range (THz) of frequencies and can be effectively controlled by the bias voltage. In this paper, we discuss the effects of the excitation of the plasma oscillations by incoming THz radiation and by optical radiation of two lasers with close frequencies as well as negative differential conductivity of the N-type and Z-type. These effects can be used in resonant THz detectors and THz photomixers. The models of devices based on double-GL structures as well as their characteristics are discussed.

  16. Ferroelectric Schottky barrier tunnel FET with gate-drain underlap: Proposal and investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Sumit; Kondekar, P. N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, for the first time, a novel ferroelectric schottky barrier tunnel FET (Fe SB-TFET) is proposed and investigated. The Fe SB-TFET consists of ferroelectric gate stack with highly doped pocket at the source/drain and channel interface. In addition, for the suppression of ambipolar leakage current (IAMB), gate-drain underlap is employed. By using ferroelectric gate stack, we effectively amplified the applied gate voltage to enhance electric field for the reduction of tunneling barrier width at the source side schottky barrier. As a result, the increased tunneling probability improves the device performance in terms of high ION, high ION/IOFF ratio, reduced IAMB and low subthreshold swing (SS) as compared to the conventional SB-TFET having double pocket. We also investigate the influence of highly doped pocket (HDP) doping concentration and length on the device performance.

  17. Thermally activated resonant tunnelling in GaAs/AlGaAs triple barrier heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allford, C. P.; Legg, R. E.; O'Donnell, R. A.; Dawson, P.; Missous, M.; Buckle, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We report the observation of a thermally activated resonant tunnelling feature in the current-voltage characteristics (I(V)) of triple barrier resonant tunnelling structures (TBRTS) due to the alignment of the n = 1 confined states of the two quantum wells within the active region. With great renewed interest in tunnelling structures for high frequency (THz) operation, the understanding of device transport and charge accumulation as a function of temperature is critical. With rising sample temperature, the tunnelling current of the observed low voltage resonant feature increases in magnitude showing a small negative differential resistance region which is discernible even at 293 K and is unique to multiple barrier devices. This behaviour is not observed in conventional double barrier resonant tunnelling structures where the transmission coefficient at the Fermi energy is predominantly controlled by an electric field, whereas in TBRTS it is strongly controlled by the 2D to 2D state alignment.

  18. Double metric, generalized metric, and α' -deformed double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohm, Olaf; Zwiebach, Barton

    2016-03-01

    We relate the unconstrained "double metric" of the "α' -geometry" formulation of double field theory to the constrained generalized metric encoding the spacetime metric and b -field. This is achieved by integrating out auxiliary field components of the double metric in an iterative procedure that induces an infinite number of higher-derivative corrections. As an application, we prove that, to first order in α' and to all orders in fields, the deformed gauge transformations are Green-Schwarz-deformed diffeomorphisms. We also prove that to first order in α' the spacetime action encodes precisely the Green-Schwarz deformation with Chern-Simons forms based on the torsionless gravitational connection. This seems to be in tension with suggestions in the literature that T-duality requires a torsionful connection, but we explain that these assertions are ambiguous since actions that use different connections are related by field redefinitions.

  19. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization (CS) and allergy following increased penetration of potential allergens. However, the relationship between common dermatoses such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis (AD) and irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and the development of contact allergy (CA) is complex, and depends on immunologic responses and skin barrier status. Psoriasis has traditionally been regarded a Th1-dominated disease, but the discovery of Th17 cells and IL-17 provides new and interesting information regarding the pathogenesis of the disease. Research suggests an inverse relationship between psoriasis and CA, possibly due to increased levels of Th17 cells and its associated cytokines. As for AD, a positive association to CS has been established in epidemiological studies, but is still unresolved. Experimental studies show, however, an inverse relationship between AD and CS. The opposing and antagonistic influences of Th1 (CS) and Th2 (AD) have been proposed as an explanation. Finally, there is convincing evidence that exposure to irritants increases the risk of CS, and patients with ICD are, therefore, at great risk of developing CA. Skin irritation leads to the release of IL-1 and TNF-α, which affects the function of antigen-presenting cells and promotes their migration to local lymph nodes, thus increasing the probability of CS and ultimately the development of CA. PMID:26844901

  20. Channeling chaos by building barriers.

    PubMed

    Chandre, C; Ciraolo, G; Doveil, F; Lima, R; Macor, A; Vittot, M

    2005-02-25

    Chaotic diffusion often represents a severe obstacle for the setup of experiments, e.g., in fusion plasmas or particle accelerators. We present a complete test of a method of control of Hamiltonian chaos, with both its numerical test and its first experimental realization on a paradigm for wave-particle interaction, i.e., a travelling wave tube. The core of our approach is a small apt modification of the system which channels chaos by building barriers to diffusion. Its experimental realization opens the possibility to practically achieve the control of a wide range of systems at a low additional cost of energy. PMID:15783819

  1. Hydrogen-isotope permeation barrier

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Van Deventer, Erven H.

    1977-01-01

    A composite including a plurality of metal layers has a Cu-Al-Fe bronze layer and at least one outer layer of a heat and corrosion resistant metal alloy. The bronze layer is ordinarily intermediate two outer layers of metal such as austenitic stainless steel, nickel alloys or alloys of the refractory metals. The composite provides a barrier to hydrogen isotopes, particularly tritium that can reduce permeation by at least about 30 fold and possibly more below permeation through equal thicknesses of the outer layer material.

  2. Tunneling without barriers with gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Sugumi; Sasaki, Misao; Soda, Jiro

    2012-04-01

    We consider the vacuum decay of the flat Minkowski space to an anti-de Sitter space. We find a one-parameter family of potentials that allow exact, analytical instanton solutions describing tunneling without barriers in the presence of gravity. In the absence of gravity, such instantons were found by Linde and rediscovered and discussed by Lee and Weinberg more than a quarter of a century ago. The bounce action is also analytically computed. We discuss possible implications of these new instantons to cosmology in the context of the string theory landscape.

  3. Double proton transfer behavior and one-electron oxidation effect in double H-bonded glycinamide-formic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Bu, Yuxiang

    2004-11-22

    The behavior of double proton transfer occurring in a representative glycinamide-formic acid complex has been investigated at the B3LYP/6-311 + + G( * *) level of theory. Thermodynamic and, especially, kinetic parameters, such as tautomeric energy, equilibrium constant, and barrier heights have been discussed, respectively. The relevant quantities involved in the double proton transfer process, such as geometrical changes, interaction energies, and intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations have also been studied. Computational results show that the participation of a formic acid molecule favors the proceeding of the proton transfer for glycinamide compared with that without mediate-assisted case. The double proton transfer process proceeds with a concerted mechanism rather than a stepwise one since no ion-pair complexes have been located during the proton transfer process. The calculated barrier heights are 11.48 and 0.85 kcal/mol for the forward and reverse directions, respectively. However, both of them have been reduced by 2.95 and 2.61 kcal/mol to 8.53 and -1.76 kcal/mol if further inclusion of zero-point vibrational energy corrections, where the negative barrier height implies that the reverse reaction should proceed with barrierless spontaneously, analogous to that occurring between glycinamide and formamide. Furthermore, solvent effects on the thermodynamic and kinetic processes have also been predicted qualitatively employing the isodensity surface polarized continuum model within the framework of the self-consistent reaction field theory. Additionally, the oxidation process for the double H-bonded glycinamide-formic acid complex has also been investigated. Contrary to that neutral form possessing a pair of two parallel intermolecular H bonds, only a single H bond with a comparable strength has been found in its ionized form. The vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials for the neutral complex have been determined to be about 9.40 and 8.69 eV, respectively, where ionization is mainly localized on the glycinamide fragment. Like that ionized glycinamide-formamide complex, the proton transfer in the ionized complex is characterized by a single-well potential, implying that the proton initially attached to amide N4 in the glycinamide fragment cannot be transferred to carbonyl O13 in the formic acid fragment at the geometry of the optimized complex. PMID:15549872

  4. Double copper sheath multiconductor instrumentation cable is durable and easily installed in high thermal or nuclear radiation area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Crae, A. W., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Multiconductor instrumentation cable in which the conducting wires are routed through two concentric copper tube sheaths, employing a compressed insulator between the conductors and between the inner and outer sheaths, is durable and easily installed in high thermal or nuclear radiation area. The double sheath is a barrier against moisture, abrasion, and vibration.

  5. Monitoring of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: Electrical Properties and Barrier Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, D. J.; Adkins, P. L.; Slater, L. D.; Versteeg, R.; Sharpe, R.

    2007-12-01

    An innovative method of groundwater remediation invented in the 1990"s, Permeable Reactive Barriers, use sand-sized grains of scrap iron placed in trenches or injected under pressure to remediate a number of organic and inorganic contaminants. Monitoring the aging of these barriers becomes increasingly important as many of these barriers approach their predicted life spans. In-situ resistivity and induced polarization studies have been conducted at six barriers at four different sites: Monticello, Utah; the Denver Federal Center; Kansas City, Missouri; and East Helena, Montana. As some barriers tend to age dramatically faster than others, for this study we consider low permeability barriers as of greater age, as "old" barriers tend to loose permeability rather than exhaust reactive materials. One complicating factor is that two of the barriers studied appear to have issues related to installation. One site, the former Asarco Smelter Site near East Helena, Montana, has been instrumented with an autonomous monitoring system allowing continuous monitoring of the evolution of a relatively new (less than three years old) barrier. The barrier showed surprisingly rapid evolution over the first year of monitoring with changes in both resistivity and chargeability of tens of percent per month. In general, the electrical properties of all of the barriers studied follow a pattern. New barriers are fairly resistive with in-situ conductivity only a few times background (outside the barrier) values. Older barriers get increasingly conductive, with failed barriers showing values of over 100 S/m. The induced polarization response is more complicated. Chargeability values increase over time for young barriers, are largest for healthy barriers in the middle of their lifespan, and decrease as the barrier ages.

  6. New double soft emission theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachazo, Freddy; He, Song; Yuan, Ellis Ye

    2015-09-01

    We study the behavior of the tree-level S-matrix of a variety of theories as two particles become soft. By analogy with the recently found subleading soft theorems for gravitons and gluons, we explore subleading terms in double soft emissions. We first consider double soft scalar emissions and find subleading terms that are controlled by the angular momentum operator acting on hard particles. The order of the subleading theorems depends on the presence or not of color structures. Next we obtain a compact formula for the leading term in a double soft photon emission. The theories studied are a special Galileon, Dirac-Born-Infeld, Einstein-Maxwell-Scalar, nonlinear sigma model and Yang-Mills-Scalar. We use the recently found Cachazo-He-Yuan representation of these theories in order to give a simple proof of the leading order part of all these theorems.

  7. Double photoionization of C2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Naby, Shahin A.; Pindzola, Michael S.; Colgan, James

    2014-10-01

    The time-dependent close-coupling method is used to study the single photon double ionization of C2+ in support of possible experiments at FLASH/DESY using an EBIT. Energy and angle differential cross sections are calculated to fully investigate the correlated motion of the two photoelectrons. Single energy differential as well as total cross sections are calculated for different incident photon energies in the range of 125-225 eV. Good agreement is found between our results and available R-matrix results for the double ionization of C2+. The study is also extended to the double photoionization along the Be-like isoelectronic sequence (Be-F5+), where good agreement is found when compared with available theoretical calculations and experimental measurements.

  8. Double field theory inspired cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Houwen; Yang, Haitang E-mail: hyanga@scu.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    Double field theory proposes a generalized spacetime action possessing manifest T-duality on the level of component fields. We calculate the cosmological solutions of double field theory with vanishing Kalb-Ramond field. It turns out that double field theory provides a more consistent way to construct cosmological solutions than the standard string cosmology. We construct solutions for vanishing and non-vanishing symmetry preserving dilaton potentials. The solutions assemble the pre- and post-big bang evolutions in one single line element. Our results show a smooth evolution from an anisotropic early stage to an isotropic phase without any special initial conditions in contrast to previous models. In addition, we demonstrate that the contraction of the dual space automatically leads to both an inflation phase and a decelerated expansion of the ordinary space during different evolution stages.

  9. Double ionization of atomic cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Linusson, P.; Fritzsche, S.; Eland, J. H. D.; Hedin, L.; Karlsson, L.; Feifel, R.

    2011-02-15

    We have recorded the double photoionization spectrum of atomic Cd at four different photon energies in the range 40-200 eV. The main channel is single ionization and subsequent decay of excited Cd{sup +} states, some involving Coster-Kronig processes, whereas direct double ionization is found to be weak. The decay of the excited Cd{sup +} states shows a strong selectivity, related to the configuration of the final state. Double ionization leading to the Cd{sup 2+} ground state is investigated in some detail and is found to proceed mainly through ionization and decay of 4d correlation satellites. The most prominent autoionization peaks have been identified with the aid of quantum-mechanical calculations.

  10. Barriers to Medical Error Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Poorolajal, Jalal; Rezaie, Shirin; Aghighi, Negar

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to explore the prevalence of medical error underreporting and associated barriers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed from September to December 2012. Five hospitals, affiliated with Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, in Hamedan, Iran were investigated. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Participants consisted of physicians, nurses, midwives, residents, interns, and staffs of radiology and laboratory departments. Results: Overall, 50.26% of subjects had committed but not reported medical errors. The main reasons mentioned for underreporting were lack of effective medical error reporting system (60.0%), lack of proper reporting form (51.8%), lack of peer supporting a person who has committed an error (56.0%), and lack of personal attention to the importance of medical errors (62.9%). The rate of committing medical errors was higher in men (71.4%), age of 50–40 years (67.6%), less-experienced personnel (58.7%), educational level of MSc (87.5%), and staff of radiology department (88.9%). Conclusions: This study outlined the main barriers to reporting medical errors and associated factors that may be helpful for healthcare organizations in improving medical error reporting as an essential component for patient safety enhancement. PMID:26605018

  11. Saving the Barrier by Prevention.

    PubMed

    Weisshaar, Elke

    2016-01-01

    One third of all occupation-related diseases are diseases of the skin, and in most of these cases the skin barrier is involved. Professions such as metalworkers, hairdressers, and health care and construction workers are mainly affected. Among them, contact dermatitis is the leading skin disease. It usually presents as hand eczema caused by or leading to impaired barrier function. All this significantly impacts the function of the hands, reduces the ability to work and especially impairs the patient's quality of life. Diagnostics and therapy are of great importance; in addition, prevention programs are meanwhile an important mainstay of the overall therapeutic concept. They comprise measures of secondary (outpatient) and tertiary (inpatient) prevention. Secondary prevention measures include occupation-tailored teaching and prevention programs, and the dermatologist's examination and report. In severe cases or if therapy is not successful in the long term, or if the diagnosis is not clear, measures of tertiary prevention may come into action. They are offered as an inpatient treatment and prevention program. The aims are prevention of the job loss, but especially to reach a long-term healing up and getting back to normal occupational and leisure life in the sense of attaining full quality of life. During the last years, research in Germany has shown that the different measures of prevention in occupational dermatology are very effective. This integrated concept of an in-/outpatient disease management reveals remarkable pertinent efficacy for patients with severe occupational dermatoses in at-risk professions. PMID:26844907

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: breaking down barriers.

    PubMed

    Berube, Bryan J; Rangel, Stephanie M; Hauser, Alan R

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have evolved ingenious ways to escape from the lung during pneumonia to cause bacteremia. Unfortunately, the clinical consequences of this spread to the bloodstream are frequently dire. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to breach the lung barrier. We have recently shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired pneumonia, utilizes the type III secretion system effector ExoS to intoxicate pulmonary epithelial cells. Injection of these cells leads to localized disruption of the pulmonary-vascular barrier and dissemination of P. aeruginosa to the bloodstream. We put these data in the context of previous studies to provide a holistic model of P. aeruginosa dissemination from the lung. Finally, we compare P. aeruginosa dissemination to that of other bacteria to highlight the complexity of bacterial pneumonia. Although respiratory pathogens use distinct and intricate strategies to escape from the lungs, a thorough understanding of these processes can lay the foundation for new therapeutic approaches for bacterial pneumonia. PMID:26407972

  13. Elastic scattering of Beryllium isotopes near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Amorini, F.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Randisi, G.; Rizzo, F.; Santonocito, D.; Scalia, G.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Papa, M.; Acosta, L.; Martel, I.; Perez-Bernal, F.; Borge, M. J. G.; Tengblad, O.

    2011-10-28

    In this contribution, results of experiments performed with the three Beryllium isotopes {sup 9,10,11}Be on a medium mass {sup 64}Zn target, at a center of mass energy of {approx_equal}1.4 the Coulomb barrier, will be discussed. Elastic scattering angular distributions have been measured for the {sup 9,10}Be reactions. In the {sup 11}Be case the quasielastic scattering angular distribution was obtained. In the halo nucleus case, the angular distribution exhibit a non-Fresnel-type pattern with a strong damping of the Coulomb-nuclear interference peak. Moreover, it is found that the total reaction cross-section for the halo nucleus induced collision is more than double the ones extracted in the collisions induced by the non-halo Beryllium isotopes. A large contribution to the total-reaction cross-section in the {sup 11}Be case could be attributed to transfer and/or break-up events.

  14. Richards Barrier LA Reference Design Feature Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Kramer

    1999-11-17

    The Richards Barrier is one of the design features of the repository to be considered for the License Application (LA), Richards was a soil scientist who first described the diversion of moisture between two materials with different hydrologic properties. In this report, a Richards Barrier is a special type of backfill with a fine-grained material (such as sand) overlaying a coarse-grained material (such as gravel). Water that enters an emplacement drift will first encounter the fine-grained material and be transported around the coarse-grained material covering the waste package, thus protecting the waste package from contact with most of the groundwater. The objective of this report is to discuss the benefits and liabilities to the repository by the inclusion of a Richards Barrier type backfill in emplacement drifts. The Richards Barrier can act as a barrier to water flow, can reduce the waste package material dissolution rate, limit mobilization of the radionuclides, and can provide structural protection for the waste package. The scope of this report is to: (1) Analyze the behavior of barrier materials following the intrusion of groundwater for influxes of 1 to 300 mm per year. The report will demonstrate diversion of groundwater intrusions into the barrier over an extended time period when seismic activity and consolidation may cause the potential for liquefaction and settlement of the Richards Barrier. (2) Review the thermal effects of the Richards Barrier on material behavior. (3) Analyze the effect of rockfall on the performance of the Richards Barrier and the depth of the barrier required to protect waste packages under the barrier. (4) Review radiological and heating conditions on placement of multiple layers of the barrier. Subsurface Nuclear Safety personnel will perform calculations to determine the radiation reduction-time relationship and shielding capacity of the barrier. (5) Evaluate the effects of ventilation on cooling of emplacement drifts and dusting potential. (6) Evaluate drift conditions and configurations to determine the suitability of Richards Barrier installation methodology. (7) Perform cost assessment of barrier material placement. (8) Evaluate the feature with criteria that will be supplied by the License Application Design Selection (LADS) Team. (9) Comment on the use of depleted uranium as a Richards Barrier material.

  15. Electrical double layer effects on ion transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chuhong; Laborda, Eduardo; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Compton, Richard G

    2016-04-14

    The potential dependence of the thermodynamics and kinetics of ion transfer reactions as influenced by the electrical double layer are studied via two-dimensional free energy surfaces calculated with an extension of the Anderson-Newns Hamiltonian. The Gibbs energy difference between the reduced and oxidized states, the activation barrier and the resulting current-potential curves are investigated as a function of the potential of zero charge and the Debye length, which are applied to characterize the external electric field. It is found that the current-potential curves of different redox systems are distinctly affected by the electrical double layer depending on the charges of the solution-phase and adsorbed species. For the redox couples sensitive to double layer effects, it is shown that the external electric field can cause a decrease in the driving force for the ion transfer process, which leads to the reversible peak current deviating significantly from the ideal, Nernstian predictions and the effective transfer coefficient being less than 1 even though the ion transfer is kinetically fully reversible. PMID:27001630

  16. STI2679 - Fr. Stein's Neglected Double-Double

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Frank

    2010-01-01

    I report the measurement of neglected double STI2679 and two new companion stars "C" and "D". The CCD data images were taken with a 20in f/16.8 Ritchey-Chretien reflector. The observing run was conducted at the National Optical Observatory at Kitt Peak Visitor's Center Advanced Observer Program. Information about instrumentation, methodology, results and notes is included.

  17. Double-branched vortex generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, E. R.; Westphal, R. V.; Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    In order to assess the suitability of using a double branched vortex generator in parametric studies involving vortex interactions, an experimental study of the main vortex and secondary flows produced by a double branched vortex generator was conducted in a 20-by-40 cm indraft wind tunnel. Measurements of the cross flow velocities were made with a five hole pressure probe from which vorticity contours and vortex parameters were derived. The results showed that the optimum configuration consisted of chord extensions with the absence of a centerbody.

  18. Attosecond Double-Slit Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, F.; Schaetzel, M.G.; Baltuska, A.; Goulielmakis, E.; Walther, H.; Krausz, F.; Milosevic, D.B.; Bauer, D.; Becker, W.; Paulus, G.G.

    2005-07-22

    A new scheme for a double-slit experiment in the time domain is presented. Phase-stabilized few-cycle laser pulses open one to two windows (slits) of attosecond duration for photoionization. Fringes in the angle-resolved energy spectrum of varying visibility depending on the degree of which-way information are measured. A situation in which one and the same electron encounters a single and a double slit at the same time is observed. The investigation of the fringes makes possible interferometry on the attosecond time scale. From the number of visible fringes, for example, one derives that the slits are extended over about 500 as.

  19. Double stranded nucleic acid biochips

    DOEpatents

    Chernov, Boris; Golova, Julia

    2006-05-23

    This invention describes a new method of constructing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) microarrays based on the use of pre-synthesized or natural DNA duplexes without a stem-loop structure. The complementary oligonucleotide chains are bonded together by a novel connector that includes a linker for immobilization on a matrix. A non-enzymatic method for synthesizing double-stranded nucleic acids with this novel connector enables the construction of inexpensive and robust dsDNA/dsRNA microarrays. DNA-DNA and DNA-protein interactions are investigated using the microarrays.

  20. Attosecond double-slit experiment.

    PubMed

    Lindner, F; Schätzel, M G; Walther, H; Baltuska, A; Goulielmakis, E; Krausz, F; Milosević, D B; Bauer, D; Becker, W; Paulus, G G

    2005-07-22

    A new scheme for a double-slit experiment in the time domain is presented. Phase-stabilized few-cycle laser pulses open one to two windows (slits) of attosecond duration for photoionization. Fringes in the angle-resolved energy spectrum of varying visibility depending on the degree of which-way information are measured. A situation in which one and the same electron encounters a single and a double slit at the same time is observed. The investigation of the fringes makes possible interferometry on the attosecond time scale. From the number of visible fringes, for example, one derives that the slits are extended over about 500 as. PMID:16090782

  1. Linear and nonlinear optical properties in asymmetric double semi-V-shaped quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilgul, U.; Ungan, F.; Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Sökmen, I.

    2015-10-01

    In this present work, the effects of the structure parameters such as the right-well width and the right-barrier height on the linear, third-order nonlinear and total absorption and refractive index changes of asymmetric double semi-V-shaped quantum well are theoretically studied by using the compact-density matrix approach and iterative method. The electronic structure of this system is obtained by solving Schrödinger equation within the framework of effective mass approximation. Numerical results are presented for a typical GaAs /Alx Ga1-x As asymmetric double semi-V-shaped quantum well. The obtained results show that the right-well width and the right-barrier height have great effects on the optical characteristics of these structures.

  2. Double screened Coulomb barrier accounts for neutrons production in cluster and other fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaut, M.

    1992-04-01

    In a dense, fully ionized medium, containing fusible nuclei, a collision between two nuclei is accompanied by an electron concentration around them. By this, rate of tunneling is tremendously increased. The experimental results are in agreement with the calculations, the number of displaced electrons being typically in the range of one to two thousand.

  3. Resonant tunneling in double-barrier heterostructures tunable by long-wavelength radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadares, E. C.

    1990-01-01

    It is suggested that resonant-tunneling currents of electrons through AlxGa1-xAs-GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures can be tuned through a pulsed low-energy long-wavelength laser. This new tuning mechanism is based on the variation of the quasibound states of the quantum well with increasing intensity of the external laser field. The resonant-tunneling tuning conditions are discussed as well as the behavior of resonant-tunneling currents for different laser field strengths.

  4. Double-Barrier mechanism for chromium immobilization: A quantitative study of crystallization and leachability.

    PubMed

    Liao, Changzhong; Tang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin; Li, Fangbai

    2016-07-01

    Glass-ceramics are well known for the excellent combination properties provided by their components, a glassy matrix and crystalline phases, and have promising applications in the immobilization and detoxification of solid waste containing toxic metals. Glass-ceramic products were successfully synthesized in CaO-MgO-SiO2-Al2O3 -Cr2O3 system. Two key measures - partitioning ratio of Cr in the spinel and Cr leaching ratio - were used to investigate the mechanism of Cr immobilization in the glass-ceramic products. The results of powder X-ray diffraction revealed that both spinel and diopside were major crystalline phases in the products. The value of x in the MgCrxAl2-xO4 spinel was highly related to the amount of Cr2O3 added to the glass-ceramic system. As Cr2O3 content increased, the proportion of spinel phase increased, while that of glass phase decreased. The partitioning ratio of Cr in spinel phase was about 70% for 2wt.% Cr2O3, and increased to 90% when loaded with 10wt.% of Cr2O3. According to the results of the prolonged toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, the Cr leaching ratio decreased with the increase of Cr partitioning ratio into the spinel phase. The findings of this study clearly indicate that glass-ceramic formed by spinel structure and residual glass successfully immobilized Cr. PMID:26994355

  5. Trends in predicted chemoselectivity of cytochrome P450 oxidation: B3LYP barrier heights for epoxidation and hydroxylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, Patrik; Lonsdale, Richard; Harvey, Jeremy N; Mulholland, Adrian J; Olsen, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Prediction of epoxide formation in drug metabolism is a difficult but important task, as epoxide formation is linked to drug toxicity. A comparison of the energy barriers for cytochrome P450 mediated epoxidation of alkenes to the barriers for the hydroxylation of an aliphatic carbon atom next to a double bond has been performed using B3LYP and B3LYP-D3. Relevant experimental data on oxidation selectivity has also been assessed. The results show that density functional theory, when using B3LYP-D3, does well in reproducing the experimental trends. Considering that the comparison involves chemical steps with quite different features this is remarkable. We also find that B3LYP consistently underestimates the hydrogen abstraction barriers relative to the epoxidation barriers, and that including a dispersion correction reduces this problem. PMID:25000094

  6. Influence of breakup on fusion barrier distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, D.; Nayak, B. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Biswas, D. C.; Mirgule, E. T.; John, B. V.; Gupta, Y. K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Prajapati, G.; Danu, L. S.; Rath, P. K.; Desai, V.; Deshmukh, N.; Saxena, A.

    2013-04-01

    Fusion barrier distributions have been extracted from the quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions, measured at backward angle θlab = 160° in reactions of 6,7Li+209Bi. The present results have been compared with the barrier distributions obtained from the fusion excitation function measurements for the above mentioned systems. The fusion barrier distributions from the quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions have been analyzed with simplified Coupled Channels calculations using Fresco. Inclusions of resonant states for both 6,7Li projectiles improve the predictions to describe the measured quasi-elastic scattering excitation functions and barrier distributions. For both the reactions peak positions of fusion barrier distributions are shifted towards a lower energy side in comparison to that obtained from the fusion excitation function measurements. The observed discrepancy in peak positions of barrier distributions obtained from quasi-elastic scattering and fusion excitation function measurements has been discussed in terms of total reaction threshold distribution.

  7. Intestinal barrier dysfunction in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    McGuckin, Michael A; Eri, Rajaraman; Simms, Lisa A; Florin, Timothy H J; Radford-Smith, Graham

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of human inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) is believed to involve inappropriate host responses to the complex commensal microbial flora in the gut, although an altered commensal flora is not completely excluded. A multifunctional cellular and secreted barrier separates the microbial flora from host tissues. Altered function of this barrier remains a major largely unexplored pathway to IBD. Although there is evidence of barrier dysfunction in IBD, it remains unclear whether this is a primary contributor to disease or a consequence of mucosal inflammation. Recent evidence from animal models demonstrating that genetic defects restricted to the epithelium can initiate intestinal inflammation in the presence of normal underlying immunity has refocused attention on epithelial dysfunction in IBD. We review the components of the secreted and cellular barrier, their regulation, including interactions with underlying innate and adaptive immunity, evidence from animal models of the barrier's role in preventing intestinal inflammation, and evidence of barrier dysfunction in both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:18623167

  8. Graphene oxide and laponite composite films with high oxygen-barrier properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jongtae; Lee, Sang Bong; Lee, Chang Kee; Hwang, Sung Wook; Kim, Chaerin; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi; Shim, Jin Kie

    2014-08-01

    The design and fabrication of oxygen barrier films is important for both fundamental and industrial applications. We prepared three different thin films composed of graphene oxide (GO) and laponite (LN), a typical low cost inorganic clay, with the GO/LN volume ratios of 1.9/0.1, 1.7/0.3 and 1.5/0.5 together with a double layer film of the GO and LN. We found that the films with GO/LN = 1.9/0.1 and the double layers exhibited high oxygen barrier and oxygen transmission rate values that reached 0.55 and 0.37 cm3 per m2 per atm per day, respectively, which were much lower than those of the films prepared from the pure GO, only LN and GO/LN = 1.7/0.3 and 1.5/0.5. This study is important for the design and fabrication of a film from GO-based all inorganic nanomaterials for applications in gas-barrier membranes.The design and fabrication of oxygen barrier films is important for both fundamental and industrial applications. We prepared three different thin films composed of graphene oxide (GO) and laponite (LN), a typical low cost inorganic clay, with the GO/LN volume ratios of 1.9/0.1, 1.7/0.3 and 1.5/0.5 together with a double layer film of the GO and LN. We found that the films with GO/LN = 1.9/0.1 and the double layers exhibited high oxygen barrier and oxygen transmission rate values that reached 0.55 and 0.37 cm3 per m2 per atm per day, respectively, which were much lower than those of the films prepared from the pure GO, only LN and GO/LN = 1.7/0.3 and 1.5/0.5. This study is important for the design and fabrication of a film from GO-based all inorganic nanomaterials for applications in gas-barrier membranes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03429e

  9. Bubble pressure barrier and electrode composite

    SciTech Connect

    Karas, B.R.; Baumgartner, Ch.E.

    1985-02-19

    Utilizing an organometallic precursor, a metal oxide is formed within the pores of a porous sintered blank substantially uniformly throughout the porosity of the blank producing a porous bubble pressure barrier of predetermined pore size. The barrier is integrally sintered to a face of an electrode, the median pore size of the barrier being significantly smaller than that of the electrode, producing a composite useful as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell. The blank and the electrode are composed of metal.

  10. Bubble pressure barrier and electrode composite

    SciTech Connect

    Koras, B. R.; Baumgartner, C. E.

    1985-03-26

    Utilizing an organometallic precursor, a metal oxide is formed within the pores of a porous sintered blank substantially uniformly throughout the porosity of the blank producing a porous bubble pressure barrier of predetermined pore size. The barrier is integrally sintered to a face of an electrode, the median pore size of the barrier being significantly smaller than that of the electrode, producing a composite useful as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell. The blank and the electrode are composed of metal.

  11. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  12. Barrier paradox in the Klein zone

    SciTech Connect

    De Leo, Stefano; Rotelli, Pietro P.

    2006-04-15

    We study the solutions for a one-dimensional electrostatic potential in the Dirac equation when the incoming wave packet exhibits the Klein paradox (pair production). With a barrier potential we demonstrate the existence of multiple reflections (and transmissions). The antiparticle solutions which are necessarily localized within the barrier region create new pairs with each reflection at the potential walls. Consequently we encounter a new 'paradox' for the barrier because successive outgoing wave amplitudes grow geometrically.

  13. Tandem mirror thermal barrier experimental program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Coensgen, F.H.; Drake, R.P.; Simonen, T.C.

    1980-01-02

    This report describes an experimental plan for the development of the Tandem Mirror Thermal Barrier. Included is: (1) a description of thermal barrier related physics experiments; (2) thermal barrier related experiments in the existing TMX and Phaedrus experiments; (3) a thermal barrier TMX upgrade; and (4) initiation of investigations of axisymmetric magnetic geometry. Experimental studies of the first two items are presently underway. Results are expected from the TMX upgrade by the close of 1981 and from axisymmetric tandem mirror experiments at the end of 1983. Plans for Phaedrus upgrades are developing for the same period.

  14. Metallic seal for thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The invention is particularly concerned with sealing thermal barrier coating systems of the type in use and being contemplated for use in diesel and other internal combustion engines. The invention also would find application in moderately high temperature regions of gas turbine engines and any other application employing a thermal barrier coating at moderate temperatures. Ni-35Cr-6Al-1Y, Ni-35Cr-6Al-1Yb, or other metallic alloy denoted as MCrAlx is applied over a zirconia-based thermal barrier overlayer. The close-out layer is glass-bead preened to densify its surface. This seals and protects the thermal barrier coating system.

  15. Access to the US Department of Veterans Affairs health system: self-reported barriers to care among returnees of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) implemented the Polytrauma System of Care to meet the health care needs of military and veterans with multiple injuries returning from combat operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. Studies are needed to systematically assess barriers to use of comprehensive and exclusive VA healthcare services from the perspective of veterans with polytrauma and with other complex health outcomes following their service in Afghanistan and Iraq. These perspectives can inform policy with regard to the optimal delivery of care to returning veterans. Methods We studied combat veterans (n = 359) from two polytrauma rehabilitation centers using structured clinical interviews and qualitative open-ended questions, augmented with data collected from electronic health records. Our outcomes included several measures of exclusive utilization of VA care with our primary exposure as reported access barriers to care. Results Nearly two thirds of the veterans reported one or more barriers to their exclusive use of VA healthcare services. These barriers predicted differences in exclusive use of VA healthcare services. Experiencing any barriers doubled the returnees’ odds of not using VA exclusively, the geographic distance to VA barrier resulted in a 7 fold increase in the returnees odds of not using VA, and reporting a wait time barrier doubled the returnee’s odds of not using VA. There were no striking differences in access barriers for veterans with polytrauma compared to other returning veterans, suggesting the barriers may be uniform barriers that predict differences in using the VA exclusively for health care. Conclusions This study provides an initial description of utilization of VA polytrauma rehabilitation and other medical care for veteran returnees from all military services who were involved in combat operations in Afghanistan or Iraq. Our findings indicate that these veterans reported important stigmatization and barriers to receiving services exclusively from the VA, including mutable health delivery system factors. PMID:24289747

  16. Non-European nurses' perceived barriers to UK nurse registration.

    PubMed

    Allan, Helen; Westwood, Sue

    2016-05-11

    Aim To conduct a scoping project to identify perceived barriers to UK nurse registration as experienced by internationally educated nurses working as healthcare assistants in the UK. Method Eleven internationally educated nurses working as healthcare assistants in two London hospitals attended two facilitated focus groups. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings Study participants articulated frustration with UK English language testing requirements and a sense of injustice and unfairness relating to: double standards for nurses educated within and outside of the European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA); and what was perceived, by some, as arbitrary English language testing with unnecessarily high standards. Differences among study participants related to issues of competency and accountability regarding English language skills and passing English language skills tests, with many feeling they were playing 'a game' where the rules kept changing. Conclusion Language testing barriers are impeding UK nurse registration for some internationally educated nurses from outside the EU and EEA who, as a result, are working as healthcare assistants. The provision of English language training by employers would improve their prospects of achieving nurse registration. PMID:27206205

  17. A Polymer Membrane Containing Fe0 as a Contaminant Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Shimotori, Tsutomu; Nuxoll, Eric E.; Cussler, Edward L.; Arnold, William A.

    2003-11-03

    A polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) membrane containing iron (Fe0) particles was developed and tested as a model barrier for contaminant containment. Carbon tetrachloride, copper (Cu2+), nitrobenzene, 4-nitroacetophenone, and chromate (CrO4 2-) were selected as model contaminants. Compared with a pure PVA membrane, the Fe0/PVA membrane can increase the breakthrough lag time for Cu2+ and carbon tetrachloride by more than 100 fold. The increase in the lag time was smaller for nitrobenzene and 4-nitroacetophenone which stoichiometrically require more iron and for which the PVA membrane has a higher permeability. The effect of Fe0 was even smaller for CrO4 2- because of its slow reaction. Forty-five percent of the iron, based on the content in the dry membrane prior to hydration, was consumed by reaction with Cu2+ and 19% by reaction with carbon tetrachloride. Similarly, 25%, 17%, and 6% of the iron was consumed by nitrobenzene, 4-nitroacetophenone, and CrO4 2-, respectively. These percentages approximately double when the loss of iron during membrane hydration is considered. The permeability of the Fe0/PVA membrane after breakthrough was within a factor of three for that of pure PVA, consistent with theory. These results suggest that polymer membranes with embedded Fe0 have potential as practical contaminant barriers.

  18. Biphoton double-slit experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brida, G.; Cagliero, E.; Falzetta, G.; Genovese, M.; Gramegna, M.; Predazzi, E.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we present a double-slit experiment where two indistinguishable photons produced by type-I parametric down-conversion are each sent to a well-defined slit. Data about the diffraction and interference patterns for coincidences are presented and discussed. An analysis of these data allows a test of standard quantum mechanics against the de Broglie-Bohm theory.

  19. The double well mass filter

    SciTech Connect

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Rax, Jean-Marcel

    2014-02-15

    Various mass filter concepts based on rotating plasmas have been suggested with the specific purpose of nuclear waste remediation. We report on a new rotating mass filter combining radial separation with axial extraction. The radial separation of the masses is the result of a “double-well” in effective radial potential in rotating plasma with a sheared rotation profile.

  20. A Double-Minded Fractal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a fun activity of generating a double-minded fractal image for a linear algebra class once the idea of rotation and scaling matrices are introduced. In particular the fractal flip-flops between two words, depending on the level at which the image is viewed. (Contains 5 figures.)

  1. Natural products: DNA double whammy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Kent S.

    2014-06-01

    The lomaiviticins are exceedingly potent antibiotic agents, but the mechanism responsible for this activity has so far been unclear. Now, efficient generation of double-strand breaks in DNA by lomaiviticin A has been linked to the remarkable cytotoxicity of these diazobenzofluorene-containg natural products.

  2. Double Right Atrial Blood Cysts.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Arinaga, Kouichi; Fukuda, Toshifumi; Takaseya, Toru; Shojima, Takahiro; Takagi, Kazuyoshi; Wada, Kumiko; Tobinaga, Satoru; Akasu, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    Blood cysts are exceedingly rare benign cardiac tumors, generally involving the cardiac valves. They are found mainly in the first month of life and in children and are very uncommon in adults. We present a rare case of double right atrium blood cysts, incidentally detected by transthoracic echocardiography in an 85-year old patient. PMID:27106462

  3. Double Star Measurements for 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Frank

    2010-10-01

    I report the measurement of 19 WDS binary systems in 2009. The observations were conducted with the AREO2 robotic telescope located at the GRAS Observatory, Mayhill, NM, USA . Discussion includes remarks on several John Herschel "neglected" doubles. Information about instrumentation and methodology and results is included.

  4. Signalling of DNA damage and cytokines across cell barriers exposed to nanoparticles depends on barrier thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, A.; Salih, S.; Roh, D.; Lacharme-Lora, L.; Parry, M.; Hardiman, B.; Keehan, R.; Grummer, R.; Winterhager, E.; Gokhale, P. J.; Andrews, P. W.; Abbott, C.; Forbes, K.; Westwood, M.; Aplin, J. D.; Ingham, E.; Papageorgiou, I.; Berry, M.; Liu, J.; Dick, A. D.; Garland, R. J.; Williams, N.; Singh, R.; Simon, A. K.; Lewis, M.; Ham, J.; Roger, L.; Baird, D. M.; Crompton, L. A.; Caldwell, M. A.; Swalwell, H.; Birch-Machin, M.; Lopez-Castejon, G.; Randall, A.; Lin, H.; Suleiman, M.-S.; Evans, W. H.; Newson, R.; Case, C. P.

    2011-12-01

    The use of nanoparticles in medicine is ever increasing, and it is important to understand their targeted and non-targeted effects. We have previously shown that nanoparticles can cause DNA damage to cells cultured below a cellular barrier without crossing this barrier. Here, we show that this indirect DNA damage depends on the thickness of the cellular barrier, and it is mediated by signalling through gap junction proteins following the generation of mitochondrial free radicals. Indirect damage was seen across both trophoblast and corneal barriers. Signalling, including cytokine release, occurred only across bilayer and multilayer barriers, but not across monolayer barriers. Indirect toxicity was also observed in mice and using ex vivo explants of the human placenta. If the importance of barrier thickness in signalling is a general feature for all types of barriers, our results may offer a principle with which to limit the adverse effects of nanoparticle exposure and offer new therapeutic approaches.

  5. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    2004-10-01

    The waste package design for the License Application is a double-wall waste package underneath a protective drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]; BSC 2004 [DIRS 169480]). The purpose and scope of this model report is to document models for general and localized corrosion of the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) to be used in evaluating waste package performance. The WPOB is constructed of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), a highly corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy. The inner vessel of the waste package is constructed of Stainless Steel Type 316 (UNS S31600). Before it fails, the Alloy 22 WPOB protects the Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel from exposure to the external environment and any significant degradation. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner vessel provides structural stability to the thinner Alloy 22 WPOB. Although the waste package inner vessel would also provide some performance for waste containment and potentially decrease the rate of radionuclide transport after WPOB breach before it fails, the potential performance of the inner vessel is far less than that of the more corrosion-resistant Alloy 22 WPOB. For this reason, the corrosion performance of the waste package inner vessel is conservatively ignored in this report and the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Treatment of seismic and igneous events and their consequences on waste package outer barrier performance are not specifically discussed in this report, although the general and localized corrosion models developed in this report are suitable for use in these scenarios. The localized corrosion processes considered in this report are pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]).

  6. Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Krauss, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The project examined the effectiveness of studying the creep behavior of thermal barrier coating system through the use of a general purpose, large strain finite element program, NIKE2D. Constitutive models implemented in this code were applied to simulate thermal-elastic and creep behavior. Four separate ceramic-bond coat interface geometries were examined in combination with a variety of constitutive models and material properties. The reason for focusing attention on the ceramic-bond coat interface is that prior studies have shown that cracking occurs in the ceramic near interface features which act as stress concentration points. The model conditions examined include: (1) two bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion curves; (2) the creep coefficient and creep exponent of the bond coat for steady state creep; (3) the interface geometry; and (4) the material model employed to represent the bond coat, ceramic, and superalloy base.

  7. Fission Barriers of Heaviest Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobiczewski, A.; Kowal, M.; Shvedov, L.

    2008-11-01

    Recent macroscopic-microscopic studies on the static fission-barrier height B f st of heaviest nuclei, done in our Warsaw group, are shortly reviewed. The studies have been motivated by the importance of this quantity in calculations of cross sections for synthesis of these nuclei. Large deformation spaces, including as high multipolarities of deformation as λ = 8, are used in the analysis of B f st. Effects of various kinds of deformations, included into these spaces, on the potential energy of a nucleus are illustrated. In particular, the importance of non-axial shapes for this energy is demonstrated. They may reduce B f st by up to more than 2 MeV.

  8. Barriers to changing dietary behavior.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Kavita; Kapur, A; Ramachandran, Shobhana; Mohan, V; Aravind, S R; Badgandi, M; Srishyla, M V

    2008-01-01

    Dietary change requires giving up long established patterns of eating behavior and acquiring new habits. 'Non-compliance' to diet advice may be a result of inability to provide diet self-management training and getting the right messages across to change eating behavior. Using a pre-tested questionnaire based interview, we carried out a study amongst 350 adults (> 20 years) with type 2 diabetes from two metro cities in South India, who had previously received diet advice with the objective to understand perceptions, attitudes and practices, as well as study factors that enhance or reduce compliance to diet advice. Ninety six patients (28%) followed diet for the full duration of diabetes (Group1), 131 (38%) followed diet for a partial duration varying between more than a quarter to three quarters of the total diabetes duration (Group 2) and 115 (34%) did not follow diet advice (Group 3) - followed for a duration less than a quarter of their diabetes duration. Study results show that many factors both patient and health care provider related influence outcomes of dietary advice. Factors that have a positive impact on compliance are - older age, shorter duration, nuclear family, good family support, less busy work life, higher health consciousness, advice given by dietician, more frequent visits to dietician, advice that includes elements to promote overall health not merely control of blood sugar, diet counseling that is easy to understand and use and includes healthy food options, cooking methods, practical guidance to deal with lifestyle issues. We conclude that patient barriers related to life circumstance are mostly non-modifiable, most modifiable barriers are related to behavioural aspect and the inability of the health care provider to provide individualized diet advice and self management training. Efforts must be made to improve counseling skills. PMID:18472496

  9. Keepers of the double stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-03-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Early catalogues by the Herschels, Struves, and others began with their own discoveries. In 1906 court reporter and amateur astronomer Sherburne Wesley Burnham published a massive double star catalogue containing data from many observers on more than 13,000 systems. Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken produced a much larger catalogue in 1932 and coordinated with Robert Innes of Johannesburg, who catalogued the southern systems. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham's records of observations on handwritten file cards, and eventually turned them over to the Lick Observatory, where astrometrist Hamilton Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and together they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford had the new 120-inch reflector, the world's second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the United States Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley, and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,200,000 measures of more than 125,000 star systems.

  10. Orientation dependent behavior of the Coulomb barrier parameters for deformed-deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; Adel, A.

    2011-06-01

    The Coulomb barrier parameters (radius, R, and height, V) for the interaction between two deformed nuclei are calculated in phenomenological way in the framework of the double folding model with the realistic M3Y nucleon-nucleon ( NN) interaction. The variations of R and V for the reactions Ar48+Pu238, Mg26+Cm248, Mg26+U238, and Ne22+U238 in the orientation degrees of freedom are investigated. It is found that the distribution of the Coulomb barrier parameters in the orientation degrees of freedom shows almost the same patterns as the sum of the nuclear radii of the interacting nuclei along the direction of the separation vector joining their two centers of mass. The orientation Coulomb barrier radius distribution follows the same variations as the sum of radii while the barrier height distribution follows it inversely. This correlation (anticorrelation) between R ( V) and the nuclear radii of the deformed nuclei dose not give the values of R and V. This suggests a simple and straightforward way to predict the behavior of the barrier parameters with different orders of deformations without performing the heavy numerical calculations necessary when the two nuclei are being deformed. It also allows us to estimate, with reasonable accuracy, the compact and elongated configurations of the interacting nuclei which lead to hot and cold fusion reactions, respectively.

  11. Diamagnetic susceptibility: An indicator of pressure induced donor localization in a double quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignesh, G.; Nithiananthi, P.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of pressure along the growth axis on carrier localization in GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As Double Quantum Well (DQW) is studied under strongly coupled regime and isolated regimes of the well. The effective mass approximation combined with variation technique is adopted with the inclusion of mismatches in effective mass and dielectric constants of the well and barrier material. Effect of the barrier and well on carrier localization is investigated by observing the diamagnetic susceptibility (χdia) for various impurity locations (zi) and the critical limit of the barrier (Lb ≈ 50 Å) for tunneling has also been estimated. The effect of Γ-Χ crossover due to the application of pressure on the donor localization is picturized through diamagnetic susceptibility.

  12. Subsurface barrier verification technologies, informal report

    SciTech Connect

    Heiser, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    One of the more promising remediation options available to the DOE waste management community is subsurface barriers. Some of the uses of subsurface barriers include surrounding and/or containing buried waste, as secondary confinement of underground storage tanks, to direct or contain subsurface contaminant plumes and to restrict remediation methods, such as vacuum extraction, to a limited area. To be most effective the barriers should be continuous and depending on use, have few or no breaches. A breach may be formed through numerous pathways including: discontinuous grout application, from joints between panels and from cracking due to grout curing or wet-dry cycling. The ability to verify barrier integrity is valuable to the DOE, EPA, and commercial sector and will be required to gain full public acceptance of subsurface barriers as either primary or secondary confinement at waste sites. It is recognized that no suitable method exists for the verification of an emplaced barrier`s integrity. The large size and deep placement of subsurface barriers makes detection of leaks challenging. This becomes magnified if the permissible leakage from the site is low. Detection of small cracks (fractions of an inch) at depths of 100 feet or more has not been possible using existing surface geophysical techniques. Compounding the problem of locating flaws in a barrier is the fact that no placement technology can guarantee the completeness or integrity of the emplaced barrier. This report summarizes several commonly used or promising technologies that have been or may be applied to in-situ barrier continuity verification.

  13. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability barrier likely changed the character of volcanism on Mars, maybe preventing the formation of new localized volcanic edifices in the Amazonian.

  14. A laboratory investigation of potential double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip

    1987-01-01

    In a triple plasma device, the injection of electron current from the source chamber to the target chamber causes the formation of a potential double layer. At a low current density, the space charge of the injected current produces a virtual cathode-type potential double layer. This double layer is stable and various wave instabilities are observed to associate with this double layer. As the current density is increased, the double layer becomes unstable and a moving double layer results. As the current density is increased further, the enhanced ionization causes the neutralization of the space charge of the electron beam and the 'beam plasma discharge' is ignited.

  15. A laboratory investigation of potential double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip

    1987-01-01

    In a triple plasma device, the injection of electron current from the source chamber to the target chamber causes the formation of a potential double layer. At a low current density, the space charge of the injected current produces a virtual cathode-type potential double layer. This double layer is stable, and various wave instabilities are observed to associate with this double layer. As the current density is increased, the double layer becomes unstable, and a moving double layer results. As the current density is increased further, the enhanced ionization causes the neutralization of the space charge of the electron beam, and the beam plasma discharge is ignited.

  16. DOTS in China - removing barriers or moving barriers?

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Dong, H J; Zhao, Q; Bogg, L

    2006-09-01

    In 1992, China initiated its modern National TB Control Programme (NTP) with DOTS strategy through a project funded by a World Bank loan. Key motives for the revised NTP-DOTS were to reduce financial barriers to patients by removing fee charges for diagnosis and treatment, and to address regressive suppliers' incentives for appropriate referrals. This study aims to assess to what extent China's NTP subsidies are achieving the objective of removing financial barriers to care in terms of patients' expenditure. One county with NTP-DOTS - Jianhu - and one county without - Funing - were selected. A cohort of 493 tuberculosis patients newly diagnosed in 2002 was interviewed by questionnaire. The main outcome measure was tuberculosis patients' expenditure on medical care and transportation/accommodation from the onset of symptoms to treatment completion. During the follow-up period, Funing started implementing NTP-DOTS, which offered a possibility of longitudinal comparison both between counties and within county. Ninety-four per cent (465/493) of subjects were followed-up. The mean total patient's expenditure on TB medical care and transportation/accommodation before TB diagnosis was higher in Jianhu than in Funing (715 vs. 256CNY), whereas it was higher in Funing (835 vs. 157CNY) after diagnosis. After implementing NTP-DOTS in Funing, expenditure after diagnosis decreased slightly whereas expenditure before diagnosis increased remarkably. We found that the market incentive structures in the reformed health system appear to have a stronger regressive effect and may result in prolonged delays before effective treatment can be given. We believe that doctors adapt to new incentive structures, with bonus income being linked to the hospitals' fee-for-service revenue, and find new ways of keeping revenue at the old levels, which reduce or eliminate the intended effect of the subsidies. TB patients suffer a heavy economic burden even in counties where NTP-DOTS treatment is subsidized. The total patient expenditure was reduced only marginally, but shifted substantially from after diagnosis to before diagnosis. The shift could imply delays in diagnosis and treatment with an increased risk of infection transmission. PMID:16940302

  17. Double Photoionization into Double Core-Hole States in Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Hikosaka, Y.; Kaneyasu, T.; Shigemasa, E.; Lablanquie, P.; Penent, F.; Eland, J. H. D.; Aoto, T.; Ito, K.

    2007-05-04

    Double photoionization (DPI) leading to double core-hole states of Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} has been studied using a magnetic bottle time-of-flight spectrometer. The assignments of the Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} states are confirmed by the Auger lines extracted from fourfold coincidences including two photoelectrons and two Auger electrons. It is estimated that the core-core DPI into Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} at a photon energy of 301.6 eV has a favored cross section of about 0.3 MB. The intense core-core DPI is due to mixing of the 4d{sup -2} continuum with the 4p single photoionization, which is manifested in the relative intensities of the Xe{sup 2+} 4d{sup -2} components.

  18. Access in Action. Breaking down the Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowperthwaite, Peter, Ed.; And Others

    This booklet, developed by the Southampton (England) Adult Education Panel, provides a demonstration of how the barriers to education and training that confront disadvantaged adults can be overcome. It identifies 16 barriers to access as follows: money; value dominance in race, gender, or social class; child care; physical disability; bureaucracy;

  19. Barriers to Accessing Services for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Marian E.; Perrigo, Judith L.; Banda, Tanya Y.; Matic, Tamara; Goldfarb, Fran D.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates barriers to accessing services for children under age 3 presenting with language delays and behavioral difficulties, including language barriers for Spanish-speaking families. Using a telephone script, researchers called 30 agencies in Los Angeles County, including regional centers (the state network of Part C agencies for…

  20. Bridges and Barriers in Behavioral Consultation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilczynski, Susan M.; Mandal, Rebecca L.; Fusilier, Iantha

    2000-01-01

    Study identifies sources of support for consultation and barriers to this service delivery model. Analyzes responses to a consultation survey of 339 members of the National Association of School Psychologists. Results reveal that respondents feel qualified to provide consultation services. Major barriers to consultation include lack of time and

  1. Barriers to Adult Learning: Bridging the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falasca, Marina

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of adult education is engaging adults in becoming lifelong learners. More often than not, this requires removing barriers to learning, especially those relating to the actual organisational or institutional learning process. This article explores some of the main barriers to adult learning discussed in the literature and…

  2. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) Contact Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the CBIRD detector is enhanced by using new device contacting methods that have been developed. The detector structure features a narrow gap adsorber sandwiched between a pair of complementary, unipolar barriers that are, in turn, surrounded by contact layers. In this innovation, the contact adjacent to the hole barrier is doped n-type, while the contact adjacent to the electron barrier is doped p-type. The contact layers can have wider bandgaps than the adsorber layer, so long as good electrical contacts are made to them. If good electrical contacts are made to either (or both) of the barriers, then one could contact the barrier(s) directly, obviating the need for additional contact layers. Both the left and right contacts can be doped either n-type or ptype. Having an n-type contact layer next to the electron barrier creates a second p-n junction (the first being the one between the hole barrier and the adsorber) over which applied bias could drop. This reduces the voltage drop over the adsorber, thereby reducing dark current generation in the adsorber region.

  3. Barriers to entrepreneurship in healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Frank S; Garman, Andrew N

    2006-01-01

    Entrepreneurship has received little attention in the healthcare industry, perhaps in part because of barriers inherent in the structure and culture of healthcare organizations. Eliminating barriers can help promote entrepreneurial activities to drive continuing innovation and identify new sources of revenue. PMID:16583847

  4. Rocket Motor Joint Construction Including Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal barrier for extremely high temperature applications consists of a carbon fiber core and one or more layers of braided carbon fibers surrounding the core. The thermal barrier is preferably a large diameter ring, having a relatively small cross-section. The thermal barrier is particularly suited for use as part of a joint structure in solid rocket motor casings to protect low temperature elements such as the primary and secondary elastomeric O-ring seals therein from high temperature gases of the rocket motor. The thermal barrier exhibits adequate porosity to allow pressure to reach the radially outward disposed O-ring seals allowing them to seat and perform the primary sealing function. The thermal barrier is disposed in a cavity or groove in the casing joint, between the hot propulsion gases interior of the rocket motor and primary and secondary O-ring seals. The characteristics of the thermal barrier may be enhanced in different applications by the inclusion of certain compounds in the casing joint, by the inclusion of RTV sealant or similar materials at the site of the thermal barrier, and/or by the incorporation of a metal core or plurality of metal braids within the carbon braid in the thermal barrier structure.

  5. Electrical imagining of engineered hydraulic barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.L.

    2000-02-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to image the full-scale test emplacement of a thin-wall grout barrier installed by high-pressure jetting and a thick-wall polymer barrier installed by low-pressure permeation injection. Both case studies compared images of electrical resistivity before and after barrier installation. Barrier materials were imaged as anomalies which were more electrically conducting than the native sandy soils at the test sites. Although the spatial resolution of the ERT was insufficient to resolve flaws smaller than a reconstruction voxel (50 cm on a side), the images did show the spatial extent of the barrier materials and therefore the general shape of the structures. To verify barrier performance, ERT was also used to monitor a flood test of a thin-wall grout barrier. Electrical resistivity changes were imaged as a saltwater tracer moved through the barrier at locations which were later found to be defects in a wall or the joining of two walls.

  6. Reusable Thermal Barrier for Insulation Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saladee, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Filler composed of resilient, heat-resistant materials. Thermal barrier nestles snugly in gap between two tiles with minimal protrusion beyond faces of surrounding tiles. When removed from gap, barrier springs back to nearly original shape. Developed for filling spaces between tiles on Space Shuttle, also used in furnaces and kilns.

  7. Eliminating Barriers to Dual Enrollment in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Rick; Gamez Vargas, Juanita; David, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Policy, financial, and transportation barriers have limited participation in dual enrollment for marginalized (low-socioeconomic, first-generation, and ethnic minority) students in Oklahoma. This chapter presents a collaborative effort by education and community leaders that has successfully eliminated these barriers and increased the number of

  8. Eliminating Barriers to Dual Enrollment in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Rick; Gamez Vargas, Juanita; David, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Policy, financial, and transportation barriers have limited participation in dual enrollment for marginalized (low-socioeconomic, first-generation, and ethnic minority) students in Oklahoma. This chapter presents a collaborative effort by education and community leaders that has successfully eliminated these barriers and increased the number of…

  9. Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity

    DOEpatents

    Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P.

    1996-10-22

    This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosynthetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosynthetic monitoring system. 6 figs.

  10. Geomembrane barriers using integral fiber optics to monitor barrier integrity

    DOEpatents

    Staller, George E.; Wemple, Robert P.

    1996-01-01

    This invention provides a geomembrane or geotextile with embedded optical sensors that are used to monitor the status of containment site barriers. Fiber optic strands are used to form the sensors that can detect and monitor conditions at the sites such as breaches, slope creep, subsidence, leachate levels, fires, and types of materials present or leaking from the site. The strands are integral to the membrane or textile materials. The geosythetic membrane is deployed at the site in a fashion similar to carpet laying. Edges of the membrane or textile are joined to form a liner and the ends of the membrane or textile become the connection zones for obtaining signals from the sensors. A connection interface with a control system to generate Optical Time Delay Response or other light signals for transmission to the optic fiber strands or sensors and also to receive reflected signals from the sensors is included in the system. Software to interpret the sensor signals can be used in the geosythetic monitoring system.

  11. Measurements and Simulations of Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharges Used as Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    This report is a Ph.D. dissertation performed under NRA cooperative agreement and submitted as part of the final report. Asymmetric surface dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) have shown promise for use as aerodynamic actuators for active flow control. In this project we studied DBD actuators experimentally and numerically. Our DBDs used a symmetric triangular high voltage waveform to generate plasma in atmospheric pressure air. Time-averaged measurements indicated that the induced force of a single barrier actuator design (one electrode insulated from the plasma) can be increased exponentially above the results of previous studies by decreasing both the length and thickness of the electrode exposed to the plasma. This increased force may allow these devices to control flow separation in a wider range of flow environments. Experiments using an intensified digital camera to examine the plasma on time scales of a few nanoseconds showed that, in addition to the previously-observed filamentary and jet-like plasma structures, discharges with very thin exposed electrodes exhibited a weak but constant plasma immediately adjacent to those electrodes. In double-barrier actuators (both electrodes insulated), decreasing the diameter of the narrower electrode lead to increasing forces, and recorded images showed the simultaneous existence of both filamentary and jet-like plasma structures. The development and application of a time-dependent, two-dimensional computational fluid plasma model has aided in understanding the detailed physics of surface DBDs at all-time scales. For simulated single-barrier discharges, the model qualitatively reproduced the filamentary and jet-like micro-discharge structures. The model was somewhat successful in reproducing the observed characteristics of double-barrier actuators. For both actuator geometries, the model indicated that the majority of the forces induced on the neutral gas occur in between micro-discharges as the plasmas decay.

  12. Engineering kinetic barriers in copper metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hanchen; Wei, H. L.; Woo, C. H.; Zhang, X. X.

    2002-12-01

    In metallization processes of integrated circuits, it is desirable to deposit the metal lines (aluminum or copper) fast and at low temperatures. However, the lines (films) usually consist of undesirable columns and voids, because of the absence of sufficient diffusiona direct result of large kinetic barriers. Following the proposal and realization of the three-dimensional Ehrlich-Schwoebel (3D ES) barrier, we present here a method to engineer this kinetic barrier so as to improve quality of deposited copper films. We deposit copper films by magnetron sputtering, characterize the film structure and texture by using the scanning electron microscope and the x-ray diffraction, respectively. Taking indium as surfactant during copper deposition, we have achieved much better density and bottom coverage of copper filled trenches. The characterizations show that the improvement is the result of the 3D ES barrier reduction caused by indium addition. Engineering the 3D ES barrier therefore leads to improved film quality.

  13. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  14. Schottky barriers on p-GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, N.I.; Kalinina, E.V.; Soloviev, V.A.; Dmitriev, V.A.

    1996-11-01

    Schottky barriers were formed on p-GaN. p-GaN layers doped with Mg were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). 6H-SiC wafers were used as substrates. The barriers were made by vacuum thermal evaporation of Au. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the barriers were investigated. The concentration of the ionized acceptors in the p-layers was measured to be about {approximately} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3}. The barrier height was determined to be 2.48 eV by C-V measurements at room temperature. The forward current flow mechanism through the barriers is discussed.

  15. Multi-layer waste containment barrier

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Ann Marie; Gardner, Bradley M.; Nickelson, David F.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for constructing an underground containment barrier for containing an in-situ portion of earth. The apparatus includes an excavating device for simultaneously (i) excavating earthen material from beside the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming an open side trench defined by opposing earthen sidewalls, and (ii) excavating earthen material from beneath the in-situ portion of earth without removing the in-situ portion and thereby forming a generally horizontal underground trench beneath the in-situ portion defined by opposing earthen sidewalls. The apparatus further includes a barrier-forming device attached to the excavating device for simultaneously forming a side barrier within the open trench and a generally horizontal, multi-layer barrier within the generally horizontal trench. The multi-layer barrier includes at least a first layer and a second layer.

  16. SCRAPE-OFF LAYER FEATURES OF THE QH-MODE

    SciTech Connect

    LASNIER, C.J.; BURRELL, K.H.; deGRASSIE, J.S.; LEONARD, A.W.; MOYER, R.A.; PORTER, G.D.; WATKINS, J.G.; DIII-D TEAM

    2002-08-01

    The quiescent high confinement (QH-mode) and quiescent double barrier (QDB) modes in DIII-D have long-duration H-mode confinement without ELMs, possibly an alternative operating mode in future tokamaks for avoiding damage by ELMs . Instead of ELMs, there is an edge harmonic oscillation (EHO), which is a continuous electromagnetic mode with associated density fluctuations. The edge pedestal is similar to ELMing H-mode, but at very low density to date. We see C{sup +6} ion temperatures of 3-7 keV in scrape-off layer (SOL), 100 kV/m radial electric fields just inside the separatrix, and a hot area on the divertor baffle whose heating correlates with the presence of the EHO. We attribute the baffle heating to perturbation of trapped ion orbits by the EHO, allowing particles to strike the baffle. The outboard scrape-off layer is wider than the inboard, probably for lack of trapped ions on the inside.

  17. Electron dynamics of molecular double ionization by circularly polarized laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Aihong; Department of Physics and Electronics, Hubei University of Education, Wuhan 430205 ; Zhou, Yueming; Huang, Cheng; Lu, Peixiang

    2013-08-21

    Using the classical ensemble method, we have investigated double ionization (DI) of diatomic molecules driven by circularly polarized laser pulses with different internuclear distances (R). The results show that the DI mechanism changes from sequential double ionization (SDI) to nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) as the internuclear distance increases. In SDI range, the structure of the electron momentum distribution changes seriously as R increases, which indicates the sensitive dependence of the release times of the two electrons on R. For NSDI, because of the circular polarization, the ionization of the second electron is not through the well-known recollision process but through a process where the first electron ionizes over the inner potential barrier of the molecule, moves directly towards the other nucleus, and kicks out the second electron.

  18. Double-polysilicon SiGe HBT architecture with lateral base link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, A.; Heinemann, B.; Rücker, H.

    2011-06-01

    We present an analysis of a modified double-polysilicon SiGe:C HBT module showing a CML ring oscillator gate delay τD of 2.5 ps, and f T/ fmax/BV CEo values of 300 GHz/350 GHz/1.85 V (Fox et al., 2008) [1]. A key feature of the HBT module is a connection of the extrinsic and intrinsic base regions by lateral epitaxial overgrowth, which aims to overcome the limits of the conventional double-polysilicon architecture in simultaneously reducing RB and CBC. Potential benefits and barriers of the proposed device structure on the way to higher performance are reviewed with regard to the recently demonstrated performance gain of the classical double-polysilicon approach. The paper addresses technological challenges one is faced when the here presented device structure is scaled to minimum device dimensions.

  19. Bifurcation structure of successive torus doubling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekikawa, Munehisa; Inaba, Naohiko; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya; Tsubouchi, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    The authors discuss the “embryology” of successive torus doubling via the bifurcation theory, and assert that the coupled map of a logistic map and a circle map has a structure capable of generating infinite number of torus doublings.

  20. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the older ...

  1. Spin- and valley-polarized transport through ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic barriers on monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajić, P. M.; Vasilopoulos, P.; Tahir, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study ballistic electron transport through single or double barriers on monolayer MoS2, of width d, in the presence of a ferromagnetic field M or an antiferromagnetic field F. The total conductance gc, its spin-up and spin-down components, and the polarization oscillate with d or the distance b between two barriers. The corresponding oscillation periods are different. The conductance gc versus M decreases in a fluctuating manner with a steep decline at certain value of M. As a function of M the spin polarization Ps oscillates before it becomes 100% while the valley polarization Pv oscillates and steadily increases.

  2. Minimal Doubling and Point Splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    2010-06-14

    Minimally-doubled chiral fermions have the unusual property of a single local field creating two fermionic species. Spreading the field over hypercubes allows construction of combinations that isolate specific modes. Combining these fields into bilinears produces meson fields of specific quantum numbers. Minimally-doubled fermion actions present the possibility of fast simulations while maintaining one exact chiral symmetry. They do, however, introduce some peculiar aspects. An explicit breaking of hyper-cubic symmetry allows additional counter-terms to appear in the renormalization. While a single field creates two different species, spreading this field over nearby sites allows isolation of specific states and the construction of physical meson operators. Finally, lattice artifacts break isospin and give two of the three pseudoscalar mesons an additional contribution to their mass. Depending on the sign of this mass splitting, one can either have a traditional Goldstone pseudoscalar meson or a parity breaking Aoki-like phase.

  3. Hierarchy in a double braneworld

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Rommel; Rodriguez, R. Omar; Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson

    2006-10-15

    We show that the hierarchy between the Planck and the weak scales can follow from the tendency of gravitons and fermions to localize at different edges of a thick double wall embedded in an AdS{sub 5} spacetime without reflection symmetry. This double wall is a stable BPS thick-wall solution with two subwalls located at its edges; fermions are coupled to the scalar field through Yukawa interactions, but the lack of reflection symmetry forces them to be localized in one of the subwalls. We show that the graviton zero-mode wave function is suppressed in the fermion edge by an exponential function of the distance between the subwalls, and that the massive modes decouple so that Newtonian gravity is recuperated.

  4. Double layer energy storage device

    SciTech Connect

    Boland, R. C.

    1985-09-17

    The present invention provides an improved electrical double layer energy storage cell comprising a pair of electrodes, at least one of which is a carbon paste electrode, a porous ionically conductive separator and an ion insulated connector, the improvement wherein said carbon paste electrode comprises carbon exhibiting a pore volume of less than about 0.45 cc/gm and a median pore radius of less than about 150 Angstroms.

  5. Five-photon double ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Pindzola, M. S.; Colgan, J.

    2016-03-01

    A time-dependent close-coupling method is used to calculate the five-photon double ionization of He. It is found that the generalized cross section used in the past for two-photon double ionization of He cannot be extended to five-photon double ionization of He. Therefore only five-photon double ionization probabilities that depend on specific radiation field pulses can be calculated.

  6. Is Double Reionization Physically Plausible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlanetto, Steven R.; Loeb, Abraham

    2005-11-01

    Recent observations of z~6 quasars and the cosmic microwave background imply a complex history of cosmic reionization. Such a history requires some form of feedback to extend reionization over a long time interval, but the nature of the feedback and how rapidly it operates remain highly uncertain. Here we focus on one aspect of this complexity: which physical processes can cause the global ionized fraction to evolve nonmonotonically with cosmic time? We consider a range of mechanisms and conclude that double reionization is much less likely than a long, but still monotonic, ionization history. We first examine how galactic winds affect the transition from metal-free to normal star formation. Because the transition is actually spatially inhomogeneous and temporally extended, this mechanism cannot be responsible for double reionization, given plausible parameters for the winds. We next consider photoheating, which causes the cosmological Jeans mass to increase in ionized regions and hence suppresses galaxy formation there. In this case, double reionization requires that small halos form stars efficiently, that the suppression from photoheating is strong relative to current expectations, and that ionizing photons are preferentially produced outside previously ionized regions. Finally, we consider H2 photodissociation, in which the buildup of a soft ultraviolet background suppresses star formation in small halos. This can in principle cause the ionized fraction to temporarily decrease, but only during the earliest stages of reionization. Finally, we briefly consider the effects of some of these feedback mechanisms on the topology of reionization.

  7. Double-Plate Penetration Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    This report compares seven double-plate penetration predictor equations for accuracy and effectiveness of a shield design. Three of the seven are the Johnson Space Center original, modified, and new Cour-Palais equations. The other four are the Nysmith, Lundeberg-Stern-Bristow, Burch, and Wilkinson equations. These equations, except the Wilkinson equation, were derived from test results, with the velocities ranging up to 8 km/sec. Spreadsheet software calculated the projectile diameters for various velocities for the different equations. The results were plotted on projectile diameter versus velocity graphs for the expected orbital debris impact velocities ranging from 2 to 15 km/sec. The new Cour-Palais double-plate penetration equation was compared to the modified Cour-Palais single-plate penetration equation. Then the predictions from each of the seven double-plate penetration equations were compared to each other for a chosen shield design. Finally, these results from the equations were compared with test results performed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Because the different equations predict a wide range of projectile diameters at any given velocity, it is very difficult to choose the "right" prediction equation for shield configurations other than those exactly used in the equations' development. Although developed for various materials, the penetration equations alone cannot be relied upon to accurately predict the effectiveness of a shield without using hypervelocity impact tests to verify the design.

  8. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.

    2015-06-07

    The accurate and efficient description of strongly correlated systems remains an important challenge for computational methods. Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), in which all electrons are paired and no correlations which break these pairs are permitted, can in many cases provide an accurate account of strong correlations, albeit at combinatorial computational cost. Recently, there has been significant interest in a method we refer to as pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD), a variant of coupled cluster doubles in which the electrons are paired. This is simply because pCCD provides energies nearly identical to those of DOCI, but at mean-field computational cost (disregarding the cost of the two-electron integral transformation). Here, we introduce the more complete pair extended coupled cluster doubles (pECCD) approach which, like pCCD, has mean-field cost and reproduces DOCI energetically. We show that unlike pCCD, pECCD also reproduces the DOCI wave function with high accuracy. Moreover, pECCD yields sensible albeit inexact results even for attractive interactions where pCCD breaks down.

  9. Double Chooz and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meregaglia, A.; Double Chooz Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The reactor bar{{ν}}e^{} disappearance experiment Double Chooz, located in France near the power plant of Chooz, has as main goal the measurement of the θ_{{13}}^{} mixing angle. For the first time, in 2011, the experimental results gave an indication for a non-zero value of such an oscillation parameter. The mixing angle was successively measured using only the far detector finding the best fit value of sin2(2 θ_{{13}}^{}) = 0.090+0.033-0.029 . The near detector started data taking in December 2014 and it will allow to reduce the systematic errors so far dominated by the reactor flux uncertainty. In this paper a review of the experiment is presented focusing on the so-called Gadolinium-III results (DOUBLE CHOOZ COLLABORATION (ABE Y. et al.), JHEP, 10 (2014) 086; 02 (2015) 074). Furthermore additional physics measurements are presented such as the capability of Double Chooz to identify the ortho-positronium state on event by event basis.

  10. Double theta polynomials and equivariant Giambelli formulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamvakis, Harry; Wilson, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    We use Young's raising operators to introduce and study double eta polynomials, which are an even orthogonal analogue of Wilson's double theta polynomials. Our double eta polynomials give Giambelli formulas which represent the equivariant Schubert classes in the torus-equivariant cohomology ring of even orthogonal Grassmannians, and specialize to the single eta polynomials of Buch, Kresch, and the author.

  11. Reactions with the double-Borromean nucleus {sup 8}He

    SciTech Connect

    Lemasson, A.; Navin, A.; Rejmund, M.; France, G. de; Jacquot, B.; Raabe, R.; Stefan, I.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bazin, D.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Gupta, D.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Labiche, M.; Lemmon, R.; Nanal, V.

    2010-10-15

    Differential cross sections for elastic-scattering and neutron-transfer reactions along with cross sections for fusion in the {sup 8}He+{sup 65}Cu system are reported at energies above the Coulomb barrier (E{sub lab}= 19.9 and 30.6 MeV). The present work demonstrates the feasibility of using inclusive measurements of characteristic in-beam {gamma} rays with low-intensity ({approx}10{sup 5} pps) radioactive ion beams to obtain the residue cross sections for fusion and neutron transfer. Exclusive measurements of {gamma} rays in coincidence with light charged particles have been used to further characterize the direct reactions induced by this double-Borromean nucleus. Coupled reaction channels calculations are used to illustrate the important role played by the transfer channels and to help in understanding the influence of the structure of {sup 8}He on the reaction mechanism.

  12. Advances in Information Barrier Design.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R. B.; Frame, K. C.; Landry, R. P.; MacArthur, D. W.; Smith, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of an information barrier, or IB, has been widely discussed for a number of years. An IB is used in a measurement system that contains classified information to prevent the release (either intentional or inadvertent) of the classified information while still allowing an inspecting party to reach independent conclusions as to the contents of a storage container. Typically, an IB would be used in a measurement system regime that requires the owner of certain storage containers to declare the contents of the containers (in unclassified terms) and an inspecting party to confirm this declaration. The IB allows the owner's declaration to be confirmed without releasing any classified information to the inspecting party. Most IB design concepts are based on two attribute measruement systems (AMSs) that were built and demonstrated in the US in 1999 and 2000. These IBs relied heavily on simple hardware implementations and performed well in a 'one-time' demonstration mode. However, implementation of an AMS in a long-term verification regime will place a different set of requirements on the entire AMS system - and the IB, in particular. In this paper, they will concentrate on the effects of changing constraints on IB design, new IB concepts that have been developed since the earlier demonstrations, and design concepts that have been developed within a number of related verification regimes.

  13. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Methane Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chong; Fridman, Alexander; Rabinovich, Alexander; Dobrynin, Danil

    2015-09-01

    With the large amount of nature gas discovery every year, there is an increasing interest on modification of methane. The fact that methane is gaseous makes it less economic and efficient than liquid fuel. Here we propose a new way of converting methane from gas phase to liquid phase. Dielectric barrier discharge is used to treat methane and nitrogen mixture bubbles inside of liquid fuel. Nitrogen is here to help activate methane into an excited state, then it is possible for the excited molecules to react with other liquid hydrocarbon. Gaseous methane is converted in to liquid phase when excited methane replace a hydrogen and add onto the carbon chain. In this study some preliminary experiments is done to verify this hypothesis. There is equivalent weight increases with methane and nitrogen mixture discharging in diesel when compare to only nitrogen discharging in diesel. The same experiment have also been done with gas mixture discharged in 1-methylnaphthalene. And FTIR analysis of the after treatment hydrocarbon liquid all indicates that there is an increasing in C-H bond concentration and a decreasing in phenyl ring structure.

  14. Tunnel junctions with multiferroic barriers.

    PubMed

    Gajek, Martin; Bibes, Manuel; Fusil, Stéphane; Bouzehouane, Karim; Fontcuberta, Josep; Barthélémy, Agnès; Fert, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Multiferroics are singular materials that can exhibit simultaneously electric and magnetic orders. Some are ferroelectric and ferromagnetic and provide the opportunity to encode information in electric polarization and magnetization to obtain four logic states. However, such materials are rare and schemes allowing a simple electrical readout of these states have not been demonstrated in the same device. Here, we show that films of La(0.1)Bi(0.9)MnO(3) (LBMO) are ferromagnetic and ferroelectric, and retain both ferroic properties down to a thickness of 2 nm. We have integrated such ultrathin multiferroic films as barriers in spin-filter-type tunnel junctions that exploit the magnetic and ferroelectric degrees of freedom of LBMO. Whereas ferromagnetism permits read operations reminiscent of magnetic random access memories (MRAM), the electrical switching evokes a ferroelectric RAM write operation. Significantly, our device does not require the destructive ferroelectric readout, and therefore represents an advance over the original four-state memory concept based on multiferroics. PMID:17351615

  15. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfman, M. R.; Reardon, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of partially stabilized zirconia coatings plasma sprayed over a MCrAlY bond coat. Although these systems have excellent thermal shock properties, they have shown themselves to be deficient for a number of diesel and aircraft applications. Two ternary ceramic plasma coatings are discussed with respect to their possible use in TBC systems. Zirconia-ceria-yttria (ZCY) coatings were developed with low thermal conductivities, good thermal shock resistance and improved resistance to vanadium containing environments, when compared to the baseline yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings. In addition, dense zirconia-titania-yttria (ZTY) coatings were developed with particle erosion resistance exceeding conventional stabilized zirconia coatings. Both coatings were evaluated in conjunction with a NiCr-Al-Co-Y2O3 bond coat. Also, multilayer or hybrid coatings consisting of the bond coat with subsequent coatings of zirconia-ceria-yttria and zirconia-titania-yttria were evaluated. These coatings combine the enhanced performance characteristics of ZCY with the improved erosion resistance of ZTY coatings. Improvement in the erosion resistance of the TBC system should result in a more consistent delta T gradient during service. Economically, this may also translate into increased component life simply because the coating lasts longer.

  16. Thermal barrier coating evaluation needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J.; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    A 0.025 cm (0.010 in) thick thermal barrier coating (TBC) applied to turbine airfoils in a research gas turbine engine provided component temperature reductions of up to 190 C. These impressive temperature reductions can allow increased engine operating temperatures and reduced component cooling to achieve greater engine performance without sacrificing component durability. The significant benefits of TBCs are well established in aircraft gas turbine engine applications and their use is increasing. TBCs are also under intense development for use in the Low Heat Rejection (LHR) diesel engine currently being developed and are under consideration for use in utility and marine gas turbines. However, to fully utilize the benefits of TBCs it is necessary to accurately characterize coating attributes that affect the insulation and coating durability. The purpose there is to discuss areas in which nondestructive evaluation can make significant contributions to the further development and full utilization of TBCs for aircraft gas turbine engines and low heat rejection diesel engines.

  17. The immunological barriers to xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Vadori, M; Cozzi, E

    2015-10-01

    The availability of cells, tissues and organs from a non-human species such as the pig could, at least in theory, meet the demand of organs necessary for clinical transplantation. At this stage, the important goal of getting over the first year of survival has been reported for both cellular and solid organ xenotransplantation in relevant preclinical primate models. In addition, xenotransplantation is already in the clinic as shown by the broad use of animal-derived medical devices, such as bioprosthetic heart valves and biological materials used for surgical tissue repair. At this stage, however, prior to starting a wide-scale clinical application of xenotransplantation of viable cells and organs, the important obstacle represented by the humoral immune response will need to be overcome. Likewise, the barriers posed by the activation of the innate immune system and coagulative pathway will have to be controlled. As far as xenogeneic nonviable xenografts, increasing evidence suggests that considerable immune reactions, mediated by both innate and adaptive immunity, take place and influence the long-term outcome of xenogeneic materials in patients, possibly precluding the use of bioprosthetic heart valves in young individuals. In this context, the present article provides an overview of current knowledge on the immune processes following xenotransplantation and on the possible therapeutic interventions to overcome the immunological drawbacks involved in xenotransplantation. PMID:26381044

  18. Overcoming biological barriers with ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Dhaval; Gupta, Roohi; Mohan, Praveena; Monson, Kenneth; Rapoport, Natalya

    2012-10-01

    Effect of ultrasound on the permeability of blood vessels and cell membranes to macromolecules and nanodroplets was investigated using mouse carotid arteries and tumor cells. Model macromolecular drug, FITC-dextran with molecular weight of 70,000 Da was used in experiments with carotid arteries. The effect of unfocused 1-MHz ultrasound and and perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether nanodroplets stabilized with the poly(ethylene oxide)-co-poly(D, L-lactide) block copolymer shells was studied. In cell culture experiments, ovarian carcinoma cells and Doxorubicin (DOX) loaded poly(ethylene oxide)-co-polycaprolactone nanodroplets were used. The data showed that the application of ultrasound resulted in permeabilization of all biological barriers tested. Under the action of ultrasound, not only FITC-dextran but also nanodroplets effectively penetrated through the arterial wall; the effect of continuous wave ultrasound was stronger than that of pulsed ultrasound. In cell culture experiments, ultrasound triggered DOX penetration into cell nuclei, presumably due to releasing the drug from the carrier. Detailed mechanisms of the observed effects require further study.

  19. Information barriers for classified measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, James

    2003-03-01

    As the world works to significantly reduce inventories of nuclear weapons and nuclear weapons materials, problems of technical assurance in these reductions can become very important. U.S., Russian, and International Atomic Energy Scientists in the last few years have been working on ways to conduct cooperative assurance measurements on classified nuclear weapons items and materials in such a way that a host country's classified information is not revealed, but at the same time provide a monitoring party with good confidence that the measurement results are valid. Information Barriers consist of technology and procedures that accomplish these two concomitant objectives. Without a high degree of assurance in nuclear weapons inventory reductions, the pace will probably slow dramatically. Without what for all practical purposes amounts to an absolute guarantee that weapons information will be protected, authorities will not likely even allow measures to be put into place to provide the necessary assurances. Progress has reached the point that scientists in both the U.S and Russia have been able to win the approval of their respective security agencies to demonstrate relevant radiation measurements on classified nuclear weapons components to foreign counterparts. The history of these events provide an important backdrop from which to recommend further research and development.

  20. Market barriers to energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, R.B.; Andersson, B.

    1992-06-01

    Discussions of energy policy in an environmentally constrained world often focus on the use of tax instruments to internalize the external effects of energy utilization or achieve specified reductions in energy use in the most cost-effective manner. A substantial literature suggests, however, that significant opportunities exist to reduce energy utilization by implementing technologies that are cost-effective under prevailing economic conditions but that are not fully implemented by existing market institutions. This paper examines the theory of the market for energy-using equipment, showing that problems of imperfect information and transaction costs may bias rational consumers to purchase devices that use more energy than those that would be selected by a well-informed social planner guided by the criterion of economic efficiency. Consumers must base their purchase decisions on observed prices and expectations of postpurchase equipment performance. If it is difficult or costly for individuals to form accurate and precise expectations, the level of energy efficiency achieved by competitive markets will vary from the socially efficient outcome. Such ``market barriers`` suggest a role for regulatory intervention to improve market performance at prevailing energy prices.

  1. Market barriers to energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, R.B. ); Andersson, B. )

    1992-06-01

    Discussions of energy policy in an environmentally constrained world often focus on the use of tax instruments to internalize the external effects of energy utilization or achieve specified reductions in energy use in the most cost-effective manner. A substantial literature suggests, however, that significant opportunities exist to reduce energy utilization by implementing technologies that are cost-effective under prevailing economic conditions but that are not fully implemented by existing market institutions. This paper examines the theory of the market for energy-using equipment, showing that problems of imperfect information and transaction costs may bias rational consumers to purchase devices that use more energy than those that would be selected by a well-informed social planner guided by the criterion of economic efficiency. Consumers must base their purchase decisions on observed prices and expectations of postpurchase equipment performance. If it is difficult or costly for individuals to form accurate and precise expectations, the level of energy efficiency achieved by competitive markets will vary from the socially efficient outcome. Such market barriers'' suggest a role for regulatory intervention to improve market performance at prevailing energy prices.

  2. Model assessment of protective barrier designs

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Conbere, W.; Heller, P.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1985-11-01

    A protective barrier is being considered for use at the Hanford site to enhance the isolation of previously disposed radioactive wastes from infiltrating water, and plant and animal intrusion. This study is part of a research and development effort to design barriers and evaluate their performance in preventing drainage. A fine-textured soil (the Composite) was located on the Hanford site in sufficient quantity for use as the top layer of the protective barrier. A number of simulations were performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to analyze different designs of the barrier using the Composite soil as well as the finer-textured Ritzville silt loam and a slightly coarser soil (Coarse). Design variations included two rainfall rates (16.0 and 30.1 cm/y), the presence of plants, gravel mixed into the surface of the topsoil, an impermeable boundary under the topsoil, and moving the waste form from 10 to 20 m from the barrier edge. The final decision to use barriers for enhanced isolation of previously disposed wastes will be subject to decisions resulting from the completion of the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement, which addresses disposal of Hanford defense high-level and transuranic wastes. The one-dimensional simulation results indicate that each of the three soils, when used as the top layer of the protective barrier, can prevent drainage provided plants are present. Gravel amendments to the upper 30 cm of soil (without plants) reduced evaporation and allowed more water to drain.

  3. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  4. HgCdTe barrier infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytko, M.; Rogalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, new strategies to achieve high-operating temperature (HOT) detectors have been proposed, including barrier structures such as nBn devices, unipolar barrier photodiodes, and multistage (cascade) infrared detectors. The ability to tune the positions of the conduction and valence band edges independently in a broken-gap type-II superlattices is especially helpful in the design of unipolar barriers. This idea has been also implemented in HgCdTe ternary material system. However, the implementation of this detector structure in HgCdTe material system is not straightforward due to the existence of a valence band discontinuity (barrier) at the absorber-barrier interface. In this paper we present status of HgCdTe barrier detectors with emphasis on technological progress in fabrication of MOCVD-grown HgCdTe barrier detectors achieved recently at the Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology. Their performance is comparable with state-of-the-art of HgCdTe photodiodes. From the perspective of device fabrication their important technological advantage results from less stringent surface passivation requirements and tolerance to threading dislocations.

  5. Implementation of power barrier option valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyani, Agatha C. P.; Sumarti, Novriana

    2015-09-01

    Options are financial instruments that can be utilized to reduce risk in stock investment. Barrier options are one of the major types of options actively used in financial markets where its life period depends on the path of the underlying stock prices. The features of the barrier option can be used to modify other types of options. In this research, the barrier option will be implemented into power option, so it is called power barrier option. This option is an extension of the vanilla barrier options where the Call payoff being considered is defined as P C =max (STβ-Kβ,0 ) , and the Put payoff being considered is defined as P P =max (Kβ-STβ,0 ) . Here β > 0 and β ≠ 1, K is the strike price of the option, and ST is the price of the underlying stock at time maturity T. In this paper, we generate the prices of stock using binomial method which is adjusted to the power option. In the conclusion, the price of American power barrier option is more expensive than the price of European power barrier option.

  6. Double exposure double etch for dense SRAM: a designer's dream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Chandrasekhar; Gabor, Allen; Halle, Scott; Haffner, Henning; Herold, Klaus; Tsou, Len; Wang, Helen; Zhuang, Haoren

    2008-03-01

    As SRAM arrays become lithographically more aggressive than random logic, they are more and more determining the lithography processes used. High yielding, low leakage, dense SRAM cells demand fairly aggressive lithographic process conditions. This leads to a borderline process window for logic devices. The tradeoff obtained between process window optimization for random logic gates and dense SRAM is not always straightforward, and sometimes necessitates design rule and layout modifications. By delinking patterning of the logic devices from SRAM, one can optimize the patterning processes for these devices independently. This can be achieved by a special double patterning technique that employs a combination of double exposure and double etch (DE2). In this paper we show how a DE2 patterning process can be employed to pattern dense SRAM cells in the 45nm node on fully integrated wafers, with more than adequate overlap of gate line-end onto active area. We have demonstrated that this process has adequate process window for sustainable manufacturing. For comparison purpose we also demonstrate a single exposure single etch solution to treat such dense SRAM cells. In 45nm node, the dense SRAM cell can also be printed with adequate tolerances and process window with single expose (SE) with optimized OPC. This is confirmed by electrical results on wafer. We conclude that DE2 offers an attractive alternative solution to pattern dense SRAM in 45nm and show such a scheme can be extended to 32nm and beyond. Employing DE2 lets designers migrate to very small tip-to-tip distance in SRAM. The selection of DE2 or SE depends on layout, device performance requirements, integration schemes and cost of ownership.

  7. Telerobotics in rehabilitation: Barriers to a virtual existence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Larry; Vanderloos, Machiel; Michalowski, Stefan

    1991-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: the need for telerobotics in rehabilitation; barriers to telerobotics technology in rehabilitation and health care; institutional barriers; technical barriers; and a partial view of the future.

  8. Child Health USA 2013: Barriers to Prenatal Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Utilization > Barriers to Prenatal Care Barriers to Prenatal Care Narrative Early and adequate prenatal care is important ... Data Mothers Who Experienced Barriers to Receiving Prenatal Care as Early as Desired, by Maternal Age, 2009– ...

  9. Permanent isolation surface barrier development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The exhumation and treatment of wastes may not always be the preferred alternative in the remediation of a waste site. In-place disposal alternatives, under certain circumstances, may be the most desirable alternatives to use in the protection of human health and the environment. The implementation of an in-place disposal alternative will likely require some type of protective covering that will provide long-term isolation of the wastes from the accessible environment. Even if the wastes are exhumed and treated, a long-term barrier may still be needed to adequately dispose of the treated wastes or any remaining waste residuals. Currently, no {open_quotes}proven{close_quotes} long-term barrier is available. The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Development Program (BDP) was organized to develop the technology needed to provide a long-term surface barrier capability for the Hanford Site. The permanent isolation barrier technology also could be used at other sites. Permanent isolation barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with redundant protective features. Drawings of conceptual permanent isolation surface barriers are shown. The natural construction materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, asphalt) have been selected to optimize barrier performance and longevity. The objective of current designs is to use natural materials to develop a maintenance-free permanent isolation surface barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1,000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts; reducing the likelihood of plant, animal, and human intrusion; controlling the exhalation of noxious gases; and minimizing erosion-related problems.

  10. Homoepitaxial graphene tunnel barriers for spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam

    Tunnel barriers are key elements for both charge-and spin-based electronics, offering devices with reduced power consumption and new paradigms for information processing. Such devices require mating dissimilar materials, raising issues of heteroepitaxy, interface stability, and electronic states that severely complicate fabrication and compromise performance. Graphene is the perfect tunnel barrier. It is an insulator out-of-plane, possesses a defect-free, linear habit, and is impervious to interdiffusion. Nonetheless, true tunneling between two stacked graphene layers is not possible in environmental conditions (magnetic field, temperature, etc.) usable for electronics applications. However, two stacked graphene layers can be decoupled using chemical functionalization. We demonstrate successful tunneling, charge, and spin transport with a fluorinated graphene tunnel barrier on a graphene channel. We show that while spin transport stops short of room temperature, spin polarization efficiency values are the highest of any graphene spin devices. We also demonstrate that hydrogenation of graphene can also be used to create a tunnel barrier. We begin with a four-layer stack of graphene and hydrogenate the top few layers to decouple them from the graphene transport channel beneath. We demonstrate successful tunneling by measuring non-linear IV curves and a weakly temperature dependent zero-bias resistance. We demonstrate lateral transport of spin currents in non-local spin-valve structures and determine spin lifetimes with the non-local Hanle effect to be commensurate with previous studies. The measured spin polarization efficiencies for hydrogenated graphene are higher than most oxide tunnel barriers on graphene, but not as high as with fluorinated graphene tunnel barriers. However, here we show that spin transport persists up to room temperature. Our results for the hydrogenated graphene tunnel barriers are compared with fluorinated tunnel barriers and we discuss the possibility that magnetic moments in the graphene tunnel barriers affect the spin transport of our devices.

  11. Intestinal barriers to bacteria and their toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.I.; Owen, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Immunologic and nonimmunologic processes work together to protect the host from the multitude of microorganisms residing within the intestinal lumen. Mechanical integrity of the intestinal epithelium, mucus in combination with secretory antibody, antimicrobial metabolites of indigenous microorganisms, and peristalsis each limit proliferation and systemic dissemination of enteric pathogens. Uptake of microorganisms by Peyer's patches and other intestinal lymphoid structures and translocation circumvent the mucosal barrier, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. Improved understanding of the composition and limitation of the intestinal barrier, coupled with advances in genetic engineering of immunogenic bacteria, development of oral delivery systems, and immunomodulators, now make enhancement of mucosal barriers feasible. 32 references.

  12. Barrier/n/n+ Varactor Frequency Multipliers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, Udo; Tolmunen, Timo J.; Frerking, Margaret A.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Barrier/n/n+ (BNN+) varactor diodes developed as frequency multipliers at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Devices required to serve as frequency triplers or quintuplers to provide powers of order of milliwatts at frequencies from 0.1 THz to about 1 THz. Feature Mott or heterojunction barriers and back-to-back diode configuration, which make it possible to obtain symmetrical capacitance-versus-voltage characteristics with high ratio between maximum and minimum capacitances. Extension of barrier/intrinsic/n+ (BIN+) concept described in "BIN Diode for Submillimeter Wavelengths" (NPO-17258).

  13. Tight Junction Proteins: From Barrier to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Runkle, E. Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-01-01

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis. PMID:23743355

  14. Newton modified barrier method in constrained optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polyak, R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we develop and investigate the Newton method for solving constrained (non-smooth) optimization problems. This approach is based on the modified barrier functions (MBF) theory and on the global converging step-size version of the Newton method for smooth unconstrained optimization. Due to the excellent properties of the MBF near primal-dual solution, the Newton modified barrier method (NMBM) has a better rate of convergence, better complexity bound, and is much more stable in the final stage of the computational process than the methods which are based on the classical barrier functions (CBF).

  15. Method for forming a barrier layer

    DOEpatents

    Weihs, Timothy P.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2002-01-01

    Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

  16. DNA dynamics in aqueous solution: opening the double helix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Ross, W. S.; Tinoco, I. Jr; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    The opening of a DNA base pair is a simple reaction that is a prerequisite for replication, transcription, and other vital biological functions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of biological reactions is crucial for predicting and, ultimately, controlling them. Realistic computer simulations of the reactions can provide the needed understanding. To model even the simplest reaction in aqueous solution requires hundreds of hours of supercomputing time. We have used molecular dynamics techniques to simulate fraying of the ends of a six base pair double strand of DNA, [TCGCGA]2, where the four bases of DNA are denoted by T (thymine), C (cytosine), G (guanine), and A (adenine), and to estimate the free energy barrier to this process. The calculations, in which the DNA was surrounded by 2,594 water molecules, required 50 hours of CRAY-2 CPU time for every simulated 100 picoseconds. A free energy barrier to fraying, which is mainly characterized by the movement of adenine away from thymine into aqueous environment, was estimated to be 4 kcal/mol. Another fraying pathway, which leads to stacking between terminal adenine and thymine, was also observed. These detailed pictures of the motions and energetics of DNA base pair opening in water are a first step toward understanding how DNA will interact with any molecule.

  17. Simulation of plasma double-layer structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, J. E.; Joyce, G.

    1982-01-01

    Electrostatic plasma double layers are numerically simulated by means of a magnetized 2 1/2 dimensional particle in cell method. The investigation of planar double layers indicates that these one dimensional potential structures are susceptible to periodic disruption by instabilities in the low potential plasmas. Only a slight increase in the double layer thickness with an increase in its obliqueness to the magnetic field is observed. Weak magnetization results in the double layer electric field alignment of accelerated particles and strong magnetization results in their magnetic field alignment. The numerical simulations of spatially periodic two dimensional double layers also exhibit cyclical instability. A morphological invariance in two dimensional double layers with respect to the degree of magnetization implies that the potential structures scale with Debye lengths rather than with gyroradii. Electron beam excited electrostatic electron cyclotron waves and (ion beam driven) solitary waves are present in the plasmas adjacent to the double layers.

  18. The BARRIERS scale -- the barriers to research utilization scale: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A commonly recommended strategy for increasing research use in clinical practice is to identify barriers to change and then tailor interventions to overcome the identified barriers. In nursing, the BARRIERS scale has been used extensively to identify barriers to research utilization. Aim and objectives The aim of this systematic review was to examine the state of knowledge resulting from use of the BARRIERS scale and to make recommendations about future use of the scale. The following objectives were addressed: To examine how the scale has been modified, to examine its psychometric properties, to determine the main barriers (and whether they varied over time and geographic locations), and to identify associations between nurses' reported barriers and reported research use. Methods Medline (1991 to September 2009) and CINHAL (1991 to September 2009) were searched for published research, and ProQuest® digital dissertations were searched for unpublished dissertations using the BARRIERS scale. Inclusion criteria were: studies using the BARRIERS scale in its entirety and where the sample was nurses. Two authors independently assessed the study quality and extracted the data. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Results Sixty-three studies were included, with most using a cross-sectional design. Not one study used the scale for tailoring interventions to overcome identified barriers. The main barriers reported were related to the setting, and the presentation of research findings. Overall, identified barriers were consistent over time and across geographic locations, despite varying sample size, response rate, study setting, and assessment of study quality. Few studies reported associations between reported research use and perceptions of barriers to research utilization. Conclusions The BARRIERS scale is a nonspecific tool for identifying general barriers to research utilization. The scale is reliable as reflected in assessments of internal consistency. The validity of the scale, however, is doubtful. There is no evidence that it is a useful tool for planning implementation interventions. We recommend that no further descriptive studies using the BARRIERS scale be undertaken. Barriers need to be measured specific to the particular context of implementation and the intended evidence to be implemented. PMID:20420696

  19. Field Studies of the Electrical Properties of Permeable Reactive Barriers for Monitoring Barrier Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, R.; Labrecque, D. J.; Slater, L.

    2006-12-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are a promising technology for the remediation of groundwater containing a range of organic and inorganic contaminants. Although there are number of different types of reactive barriers, some of the most important are constructed from granular zero valent iron (ZVI). One challenge in the large- scale, long-term implementation of PRBs is to monitor the change in barrier properties over time. For example, mineral precipitates can reduce the effectiveness of the barrier by either insulating the reaction surfaces of the ZVI particles and/or by filling the pore space in the barrier and thus reducing its hydraulic permeability. Previous research has shown that resistivity and induced polarization (IP) measurements are sensitive to corrosion and precipitation due to redox reactions between ions in solution and the ZVI mineral surface. New field studies, supported by additional laboratory studies appear to confirm this work. Resisitivity and IP surveys were conducted at a total of seven barriers at four different sites: the Denver Federal Center; Monticello, Utah; the Kansas City, Missouri Department of Energy site, and the Asarco Smelter Site in East Helena, Montana. These surveys used combinations of surface and borehole surveys to characterized barriers. The surveys are repeated at approximately six-month intervals to provide information on temporal changes. In addition, surveys at the Kansas City barrier followed up on earlier research by providing several years of historical data and a new barrier at East Helena Montana has been instrumented with an autonomous monitoring system allowing continuous monitoring of the barrier electrical properties. Results show an increase in both real and imaginary conductivity as barriers age. For new barriers, the conductivity of ZVI is typically a few tens of mS/m, only modestly higher than that of the background sediments surrounding the barrier. For heavily altered barriers such as the Monticello, Utah barrier, the conductivity is typically tens of S/m, a thousand times higher the unaltered barriers. Field values of chargeability (measured using a 1 Hz primary waveform and an integration window centered at 40 ms) also tend to increase from roughly a 100 mV/V at the East Helena Barrier to about 300 mV/V at Monticello. Other sites tend to be intermediate between these extremes.

  20. Semiconductor double quantum dot micromaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.-Y.; Stehlik, J.; Eichler, C.; Gullans, M. J.; Taylor, J. M.; Petta, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The coherent generation of light, from masers to lasers, relies upon the specific structure of the individual emitters that lead to gain. Devices operating as lasers in the few-emitter limit provide opportunities for understanding quantum coherent phenomena, from terahertz sources to quantum communication. Here we demonstrate a maser that is driven by single-electron tunneling events. Semiconductor double quantum dots (DQDs) serve as a gain medium and are placed inside a high-quality factor microwave cavity. We verify maser action by comparing the statistics of the emitted microwave field above and below the maser threshold.

  1. Semiconductor double quantum dot micromaser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-Y; Stehlik, J; Eichler, C; Gullans, M J; Taylor, J M; Petta, J R

    2015-01-16

    The coherent generation of light, from masers to lasers, relies upon the specific structure of the individual emitters that lead to gain. Devices operating as lasers in the few-emitter limit provide opportunities for understanding quantum coherent phenomena, from terahertz sources to quantum communication. Here we demonstrate a maser that is driven by single-electron tunneling events. Semiconductor double quantum dots (DQDs) serve as a gain medium and are placed inside a high-quality factor microwave cavity. We verify maser action by comparing the statistics of the emitted microwave field above and below the maser threshold. PMID:25593187

  2. Double resonance with coupled multiplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosnan, S. G. P.; Edmonds, D. T.

    Double resonance with coupled multiplets is a very high sensitivity technique for measuring the NQR spectra of nuclei with half integer ( I {1}/{2}) spins. The spectra of naturally abundant (0.037%) 17O are detected with ease. The spectra reveal fine structure which enhances the NQR technique as a probe of electronic structure. The theory of DRCM is given and its application in practice is discussed with examples. The effect of spin-lattice relaxation of the quadrupolar nuclei is described.

  3. Proton-deuteron double scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A simple but accurate form for the proton-deuteron elastic double scattering amplitude, which includes both projectile and target recoil motion and is applicable at all momentum transfer, is derived by taking advantage of the restricted range of Fermi momentum allowed by the deuteron wave function. This amplitude can be directly compared to approximations which have neglected target recoil or are limited to small momentum transfer; the target recoil and large momentum transfer effects are evaluated explicitly within the context of a Gaussian model.

  4. Double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Puckett, Ernest R.; Rowland, Kathryn J.; Warner, Brad W.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) have improved its spatial resolution and imaging speed. However, the penetration depth of OR-PAM is still limited to ~1 mm in tissue due to the strong tissue scattering. Here, we have developed double-illumination PAM (DI-PAM), which illuminates the sample from both top and bottom sides simultaneously. Through phantom and in vivo experiments, we have demonstrated for thin targets that DI-PAM has a penetration depth of ~2 mm in tissue at 532 nm and a focal zone of 260 µm, both significant improvements over traditional reflection or transmission mode OR-PAM. PMID:22344139

  5. Embryo loss and double effect.

    PubMed

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2013-08-01

    I defend the argument that if embryo loss in stem cell research is morally problematic, then embryo loss in in vivo conception is similarly morally problematic. According to a recent challenge to this argument, we can distinguish between in vivo embryo loss and the in vitro embryo loss of stem cell research by appealing to the doctrine of double effect. I argue that this challenge fails to show that in vivo embryo loss is a mere unintended side effect while in vitro embryo loss is an intended means and that, even if we refine the challenge by appealing to Michael Bratman's three roles of intention, the distinction is still unwarranted. PMID:23292218

  6. Double window viewing chamber assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Inventor); Owen, R. B. (Inventor); Elkins, B. R. (Inventor); White, W. T. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A viewing chamber which permits observation of a sample retained therein includes a pair of double window assemblies mounted in opposed openings in the walls thereof so that a light beam can directly enter and exit from the chamber. A flexible mounting arrangement for the outer windows of the window assemblies enables the windows to be brought into proper alignment. An electrical heating arrangement prevents fogging of the outer windows whereas desiccated air in the volume between the outer and inner windows prevents fogging of the latter.

  7. Booster double harmonic setup notes

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-02-17

    The motivation behind implementing a booster double harmonic include the reduced transverse space charge force from a reduced peak beam current and reduced momentum spread of the beam, both of which can be achieved from flattening the RF bucket. RF capture and acceleration of polarized protons (PP) is first set up in the single harmonic mode with RF harmonic h=1. Once capture and acceleration have been set up in the single harmonic mode, the second harmonic system is brought on and programmed to operate in concert with the single harmonic system.

  8. Resilient thermal barrier for high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Abrasion-resistant thermal barrier, consisting of two layers of woven fabric or braided sleeving with bulk insulation sandwiched between, shows excellent resilience even after compression at temperatures above 980C.

  9. ULTRA BARRIER TOPSHEET (UBT) FOR FLEXIBLE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect

    DeScioli, Derek

    2013-06-01

    This slide-show presents 3M photovoltaic-related products, particularly flexible components. Emphasis is on the 3M Ultra Barrier Solar Films. Topics covered include reliability and qualification testing and flexible photovoltaic encapsulation costs.

  10. Barrier function of airway tract epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Shyamala; Comstock, Adam T; Sajjan, Uma S

    2013-01-01

    Airway epithelium contributes significantly to the barrier function of airway tract. Mucociliary escalator, intercellular apical junctional complexes which regulate paracellular permeability and antimicrobial peptides secreted by the airway epithelial cells are the three primary components of barrier function of airway tract. These three components act cooperatively to clear inhaled pathogens, allergens and particulate matter without inducing inflammation and maintain tissue homeostasis. Therefore impairment of one or more of these essential components of barrier function may increase susceptibility to infection and promote exaggerated and prolonged innate immune responses to environmental factors including allergens and pathogens resulting in chronic inflammation. Here we review the regulation of components of barrier function with respect to chronic airways diseases. PMID:24665407

  11. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: Experimental plans

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    This document describes a general theory and experimental plans for predicting evapotranspiration in support of the Protective Barrier Program. Evapotranspiration is the combined loss of water from plants and soil surfaces to the atmosphere. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. References Concerning Architectural Barriers in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gust, Tim; Shaheen, Elaine

    A bibliography of references pertaining to architectural barriers to the handicapped is presented. The references center on the importance of architectural design for universities and colleges which make buildings and facilities accessible to, and usable by, the physically handicapped. (NS)

  13. Communicating across barriers at home and abroad

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper intends to catalyze the exchange of experience among technical communicators in meeting the challenge of communicating across a multitude of barriers: linguistic, disciplinary, cultural, political, intellectual, and emotional.

  14. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.

    2000-01-01

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  15. DOE UST interim subsurface barrier technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1992-09-01

    This document contains information which was presented at a workshop regarding interim subsurface barrier technologies that could be used for underground storage tanks, particularly the tank 241-C-106 at the Hanford Reservation.

  16. The lipid organisation in the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Bouwstra, J A; Dubbelaar, F E; Gooris, G S; Ponec, M

    2000-01-01

    The main function of the skin is to protect the body against exogenous substances. The skin barrier is located in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum. This layer consists of keratin enriched cells embedded in lipid lamellae. These lamellae form the main barrier for diffusion of substances through the skin. In diseased skin the barrier function is often impaired. For a full understanding of the properties of the human skin barrier, insight in the stratum corneum lipid organisation is of great importance. In this paper a short description of the lipid organisation in normal human stratum corneum will be given, after which the role the main lipid classes play in the stratum corneum lipid organisation will be described. In addition the effect of cholesterol sulfate and calcium on the lipid organisation will be discussed. Finally a new model, the "sandwich model", will be proposed that describe the localisation of the fluid phases in the stratum corneum. PMID:10884936

  17. Breast Cancer Screening Barriers and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ana; Stuifbergen, Alexa

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that early detection from breast cancer screening is an effective means to reduce overall mortality from breast cancer. Findings from multiple research studies suggest that women with chronic disabling conditions are less likely to participate in breast cancer screening due to the multiple barriers they face. Barriers include those related to finances, environment, physical limitations, health care providers’ attitudes and lack of knowledge, and psychosocial issues. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the existing evidence of the barriers to breast cancer screening experienced by women with physical disabilities. Rehabilitation nurses who work with women who have chronic disabling conditions can be instrumental in eliminating these barriers to breast cancer screening through their efforts to promote health which is consistent with the philosophy of maximizing the health potential and quality of life of these women whose needs are often overlooked. PMID:22434617

  18. Communicating across barriers at home and abroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. W.

    This paper intends to catalyze the exchange of experience among technical communicators in meeting the challenge of communicating across a multitude of barriers: linguistic, disciplinary, cultural, political, intellectual, and emotional.

  19. Contamination Barrier For Contour-Molding Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Release agent prevents molding compound from adhering to or contaminating surface. Cleaning agent, Turco 4215 NCLT, forms barrier preventing silicone molding compound from sticking to surface and leaving contaminating residue. Also see MFS-29243.

  20. Photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic devices with quantum barriers

    DOEpatents

    Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2007-04-10

    A photovoltaic or thermophotovoltaic device includes a diode formed by p-type material and n-type material joined at a p-n junction and including a depletion region adjacent to said p-n junction, and a quantum barrier disposed near or in the depletion region of the p-n junction so as to decrease device reverse saturation current density while maintaining device short circuit current density. In one embodiment, the quantum barrier is disposed on the n-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to electrons while in another, the barrier is disposed on the p-type material side of the p-n junction and decreases the reverse saturation current density due to holes. In another embodiment, both types of quantum barriers are used.

  1. CAPILLARY BARRIERS IN UNSATURATED FRACTURED ROCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu; W. Zhang; L. Pan; J. Hinds; G. Bodvarsson

    2000-10-01

    This work presents modeling studies investigating the effects of capillary barriers on fluid-flow and tracer-transport processes in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for storing high-level radioactive waste. These studies are designed to identify factors controlling the formation of capillary barriers and to estimate their effects on the extent of possible large-scale lateral flow in unsaturated fracture rocks. The modeling approach is based on a continuum formulation of coupled multiphase fluid and tracer transport through fractured porous rock. Flow processes in fractured porous rock are described using a dual-continuum concept. In addition, approximate analytical solutions are developed and used for assessing capillary-barrier effects in fractured rocks. This study indicates that under the current hydrogeologic conceptualization of Yucca Mountain, strong capillary-barrier effects exist for significantly diverting moisture flow.

  2. Federal Policies in Barrier Island Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, H. Crane

    1980-01-01

    Current federal policy towards barrier islands is ambivalent, both favoring and regulating development. Alternate policies are presently being examined by Congress and the Department of Interior. Several of these options are discussed in this article. (WB)

  3. Vapor-barrier Vacuum Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system includes a collimated beam source within a vacuum chamber, a condensable barrier gas, cooling material, a pump, and isolation chambers cooled by the cooling material to condense the barrier gas. Pressure levels of each isolation chamber are substantially greater than in the vacuum chamber. Coaxially-aligned orifices connect a working chamber, the isolation chambers, and the vacuum chamber. The pump evacuates uncondensed barrier gas. The barrier gas blocks entry of atmospheric vapor from the working chamber into the isolation chambers, and undergoes supersonic flow expansion upon entering each isolation chamber. A method includes connecting the isolation chambers to the vacuum chamber, directing vapor to a boundary with the working chamber, and supersonically expanding the vapor as it enters the isolation chambers via the orifices. The vapor condenses in each isolation chamber using the cooling material, and uncondensed vapor is pumped out of the isolation chambers via the pump.

  4. Pharmaceutical Nanoparticles and the Mucin Biopolymer Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Aljayyoussi, Ghaith; Abdulkarim, Muthanna; Griffiths, Peter; Gumbleton, Mark

    2012-01-01

    S U M M A R Y Mucus in the gastrointestinal tract remains a tenacious barrier that restricts the passage of many orally administered compounds into the GITs epithelial layer and consequently into the systemic circulation. This results in significant decreases in the oral bioavailability of many therapeutic molecules. Nanoparticles offer an avenue to surpass this mucus barrier. They can be used as drug carriers to improve the bioavailability of many compounds that are restricted by mucus. Nanoparticles achieve penetration of the mucus barrier through a multitude of properties that they possess as their size, charge density, and surface functional groups which can all be tailored to achieve optimal penetration of the thick and fibrous mucus barrier. This article offers a quick review about the use of nanoparticles as drug carriers to increase mucus penetration in the gastro intestinal tract. PMID:23678457

  5. Barriers to Disabled Women's Participation in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Paula S.; French, Lloyda

    1987-01-01

    Some of the barriers to athletic participation by disabled people, particularly girls and women, are examined in this article. Ways the situation may be improved by physical educators, program directors, and participants are suggested. (MT)

  6. Liquid junction schottky barrier solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1980-01-01

    A mixture of ceric ions (Ce.sup.+4) and cerous ions (Ce.sup.+3) in an aqueous electrolyte solution forms a Schottky barrier at the interface between an active region of silicon and the electrolyte solution. The barrier height obtained for hydrogenated amorphous silicon using the Ce.sup.+4 /Ce.sup.+3 redox couple is about 1.7 eV.

  7. Porosity determination of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Roode, Mark; Beardsley, Brad

    1988-01-01

    Coating porosity is believed to be a critical factor for the thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A number of different techniques have been used to determine the porosities of thermal barrier coatings for diesel applications as part of a NASA/DOE sponsored study. A comparison is made between methods based on water immersion, optical microscopy, eddy current thickness measurements, and Archimedes principle for TBC porosity determination.

  8. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  9. Allergy as an epithelial barrier disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this review is to focus on putative modified epithelial functions related to allergy. The dysregulation of the epithelial barrier might result in the allergen uptake, which could be the primary defect in the pathogenesis of allergic reaction. We review the literature of the role of respiratory epithelium as an active barrier, how allergens are transported through it and how it senses the hostile environmental allergens and other dangerous stimuli. PMID:22410284

  10. Nuclear structure and sub-barrier fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H. . Cyclotron Lab. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1990-01-01

    The influence of nuclear structure on heavy-ion fusion and elastic scattering, at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier, is discussed within the coupled channels formalism. The coupled channels approach provides a consistent description of the enhancement of sub-barrier fusion and the energy dependence of the effective potential for elastic scattering. This is illustrated by comparison to the data for several systems. 48 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Iron Nanoparticles in Reactive Environmental Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Nuxoll, Eric E.; Shimotori, Tsutomu; Arnold, William A.; Cussler, Edward L.

    2003-09-23

    Zero-valent iron is cheap, environmentally innocuous, and effective at reducing chlorinated organics. It has, as a result, become a popular candidate for remediating aquifers contaminated with trichloroethylene and other halogenated pollutants. In this paper, we discuss one such system, where iron nanoparticles are synthesized and incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol membranes, forming water-permeable barriers to these pollutants. These barriers are tested against a variety of contaminants, including carbon tetrachloride, copper, and chromate.

  12. Barriers to employment in severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Donna; Gregory, Nathan

    This article explores two issues related to the barriers to employment for people with severe mental illness: the mental health service user's perspective; and the efficacy of mental health nurses and community mental health teams. It suggests that clinical practice needs to be modified and further research carried out if these barriers are to be removed. This is a summary: the full paper and reference list can be accessed at nursingtimes.net. PMID:17564362

  13. Metal interfaces - Adhesive energies and electronic barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    We report a fully self-consistent calculation of the electron number density, barrier height and adhesive energy as a function of separation in an aluminum-aluminum (100) contact. The local density approximation is used for exchange and correlation. The electron number density and barrier heights are strong functions of the separation. The range of strong chemical bonding is about 0.2 nm.

  14. Drywall construction as a dental radiation barrier.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, J C; Reid, J A; Berthoty, D

    1983-03-01

    Six typical forms of drywall construction have been tested as barriers against primary and secondary dental x-radiation. It is concluded that this widely used type of wall construction is generally effective for this purpose, but with a heavy workload two thicknesses of wallboard on each side of the wall are required to provide a sufficient barrier. In general, no lead need be incorporated in the walls. PMID:6572885

  15. Drywall construction as a dental radiation barrier

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, J.C.; Reid, J.A.; Berthoty, D.

    1983-03-01

    Six typical forms of drywall construction have been tested as barriers against primary and secondary dental x-radiation. It is concluded that this widely used type of wall construction is generally effective for this purpose, but with a heavy workload two thicknesses of wallboard on each side of the wall are required to provide a sufficient barrier. In general, no lead need be incorporated in the walls.

  16. Determining collective barrier operation skew in a parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, Daniel A.

    2015-11-24

    Determining collective barrier operation skew in a parallel computer that includes a number of compute nodes organized into an operational group includes: for each of the nodes until each node has been selected as a delayed node: selecting one of the nodes as a delayed node; entering, by each node other than the delayed node, a collective barrier operation; entering, after a delay by the delayed node, the collective barrier operation; receiving an exit signal from a root of the collective barrier operation; and measuring, for the delayed node, a barrier completion time. The barrier operation skew is calculated by: identifying, from the compute nodes' barrier completion times, a maximum barrier completion time and a minimum barrier completion time and calculating the barrier operation skew as the difference of the maximum and the minimum barrier completion time.

  17. Determining collective barrier operation skew in a parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, Daniel A.

    2015-12-24

    Determining collective barrier operation skew in a parallel computer that includes a number of compute nodes organized into an operational group includes: for each of the nodes until each node has been selected as a delayed node: selecting one of the nodes as a delayed node; entering, by each node other than the delayed node, a collective barrier operation; entering, after a delay by the delayed node, the collective barrier operation; receiving an exit signal from a root of the collective barrier operation; and measuring, for the delayed node, a barrier completion time. The barrier operation skew is calculated by: identifying, from the compute nodes' barrier completion times, a maximum barrier completion time and a minimum barrier completion time and calculating the barrier operation skew as the difference of the maximum and the minimum barrier completion time.

  18. ABCG Transporters Are Required for Suberin and Pollen Wall Extracellular Barriers in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vandana; Molina, Isabel; Ranathunge, Kosala; Castillo, Indira Queralta; Rothstein, Steven J.; Reed, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    Effective regulation of water balance in plants requires localized extracellular barriers that control water and solute movement. We describe a clade of five Arabidopsis thaliana ABCG half-transporters that are required for synthesis of an effective suberin barrier in roots and seed coats (ABCG2, ABCG6, and ABCG20) and for synthesis of an intact pollen wall (ABCG1 and ABCG16). Seed coats of abcg2 abcg6 abcg20 triple mutant plants had increased permeability to tetrazolium red and decreased suberin content. The root system of triple mutant plants was more permeable to water and salts in a zone complementary to that affected by the Casparian strip. Suberin of mutant roots and seed coats had distorted lamellar structure and reduced proportions of aliphatic components. Root wax from the mutant was deficient in alkylhydroxycinnamate esters. These mutant plants also had few lateral roots and precocious secondary growth in primary roots. abcg1 abcg16 double mutants defective in the other two members of the clade had pollen with defects in the nexine layer of the tapetum-derived exine pollen wall and in the pollen-derived intine layer. Mutant pollen collapsed at the time of anther desiccation. These mutants reveal transport requirements for barrier synthesis as well as physiological and developmental consequences of barrier deficiency. PMID:25217507

  19. Finite-time barriers to front propagation in two-dimensional fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, John R; Mitchell, Kevin A

    2015-08-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations have demonstrated the role of certain invariant manifolds, termed burning invariant manifolds (BIMs), as one-way dynamical barriers to reaction fronts propagating within a flowing fluid. These barriers form one-dimensional curves in a two-dimensional fluid flow. In prior studies, the fluid velocity field was required to be either time-independent or time-periodic. In the present study, we develop an approach to identify prominent one-way barriers based only on fluid velocity data over a finite time interval, which may have arbitrary time-dependence. We call such a barrier a burning Lagrangian coherent structure (bLCS) in analogy to Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) commonly used in passive advection. Our approach is based on the variational formulation of LCSs using curves of stationary "Lagrangian shear," introduced by Farazmand et al. [Physica D 278-279, 44 (2014)] in the context of passive advection. We numerically validate our technique by demonstrating that the bLCS closely tracks the BIM for a time-independent, double-vortex channel flow with an opposing "wind." PMID:26328575

  20. Finite-time barriers to front propagation in two-dimensional fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, John R.; Mitchell, Kevin A.

    2015-08-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations have demonstrated the role of certain invariant manifolds, termed burning invariant manifolds (BIMs), as one-way dynamical barriers to reaction fronts propagating within a flowing fluid. These barriers form one-dimensional curves in a two-dimensional fluid flow. In prior studies, the fluid velocity field was required to be either time-independent or time-periodic. In the present study, we develop an approach to identify prominent one-way barriers based only on fluid velocity data over a finite time interval, which may have arbitrary time-dependence. We call such a barrier a burning Lagrangian coherent structure (bLCS) in analogy to Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) commonly used in passive advection. Our approach is based on the variational formulation of LCSs using curves of stationary "Lagrangian shear," introduced by Farazmand et al. [Physica D 278-279, 44 (2014)] in the context of passive advection. We numerically validate our technique by demonstrating that the bLCS closely tracks the BIM for a time-independent, double-vortex channel flow with an opposing "wind."