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Sample records for double-stranded rna-activated protein

  1. Ethanol Promotes Thiamine Deficiency-Induced Neuronal Death: Involvement of Double-Stranded RNA-activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Zun-Ji; Wang, Xin; Fan, Zhiqin; Luo, Jia

    2011-01-01

    Background Heavy alcohol consumption causes cerebellar degeneration, and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Chronic alcoholism is usually associated with thiamine deficiency (TD) which is known to induce selective neurodegeneration in the brain. However, the role of TD in alcohol-induced cerebellar degeneration remains to be elucidated. The double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a potent antiviral protein. Viral infection or binding to dsRNA causes PKR autophosphorylation and subsequent phosphorylation of the α-subunit of eukaryotic translation factor-2α, leading to inhibition of translation or apoptosis. PKR can also be activated by cellular stresses. Methods In this study, we used an in vitro model, cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), to investigate the interaction between TD and ethanol and evaluate the contribution of their interaction to neuronal loss. TD was induced by treatment with amprolium in association with ethanol. Cell viability was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. PKR expression/phosphorylation and subcellular distribution was analyzed with immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Results Thiamine deficiency caused death of CGNs but ethanol did not. However, TD plus ethanol induced a much greater cell loss than TD alone. TD-induced PKR phosphorylation and ethanol exposure significantly promoted TD-induced PKR phosphorylation as well as its nuclear translocation. A selective PKR inhibitor not only protected CGNs against TD toxicity, but also abolished ethanol potentiation of TD-induced loss of CGNs. Conclusions Ethanol promoted TD-induced PKR activation and neuronal death. PKR may be a convergent protein that mediates the interaction between TD and ethanol. PMID:19382901

  2. Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 and CREB-Binding Protein/p300 Are Subunits of Double-Stranded RNA-Activated Transcription Factor DRAF1

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Brian K.; Kumar, K. Prasanna; Reich, Nancy C.

    1998-01-01

    Cells respond to viral infection or double-stranded RNA with the transcriptional induction of a subset of alpha/beta interferon-stimulated genes by a pathway distinct from the interferon signal pathway. The transcriptional induction is mediated through a DNA sequence containing the alpha/beta interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE). We previously identified a novel transcription factor, designated double-stranded RNA-activated factor 1 (DRAF1), that recognizes this response element. The DNA-binding specificity of DRAF1 correlates with transcriptional induction, thereby distinguishing it as a positive regulator of alpha/beta interferon-stimulated genes. Two of the components of DRAF1 have now been identified as interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300. We demonstrate that IRF-3 preexists in the cytoplasm of uninfected cells and translocates to the nucleus following viral infection. Translocation of IRF-3 is accompanied by an increase in serine and threonine phosphorylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses of endogenous proteins demonstrate an association of IRF-3 with the transcriptional coactivators CBP and p300 only subsequent to infection. In addition, antibodies to the IRF-3, CBP, and p300 molecules react with DRAF1 bound to the ISRE target site of induced genes. The cellular response that leads to DRAF1 activation and specific gene expression may serve to increase host survival during viral infection. PMID:9488451

  3. Distinct roles of activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) in transcription during the mammalian unfolded protein response.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Hiderou; Akazawa, Rieko; Negishi, Manabu; Mori, Kazutoshi

    2002-01-01

    In response to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a homoeostatic response, termed the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated in all eukaryotic cells. The UPR involves only transcriptional regulation in yeast, and approx. 6% of all yeast genes, encoding not only proteins to augment the folding capacity in the ER, but also proteins working at various stages of secretion, are induced by ER stress [Travers, Patil, Wodicka, Lockhart, Weissman and Walter (2000) Cell (Cambridge, Mass.) 101, 249-258]. In the present study, we conducted microarray analysis of HeLa cells, although our analysis covered only a small fraction of the human genome. A great majority of human ER stress-inducible genes (approx. 1% of 1800 genes examined) were classified into two groups. One group consisted of genes encoding ER-resident molecular chaperones and folding enzymes, and these genes were directly regulated by the ER-membrane-bound transcription factor activating transcription factor (ATF) 6. The ER-membrane-bound protein kinase double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK)-mediated signalling pathway appeared to be responsible for induction of the remaining genes, which are not involved in secretion, but may be important after cellular recovery from ER stress. In higher eukaryotes, the PERK-mediated translational-attenuation system is known to operate in concert with the transcriptional-induction system. Thus we propose that mammalian cells have evolved a strategy to cope with ER stress different from that of yeast cells. PMID:12014989

  4. ADAR Proteins: Double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA Binding Domains

    PubMed Central

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H.-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We are reviewing here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains. PMID:21728134

  5. Modified capillary electrophoresis system for peptide, protein and double-stranded DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Belenkii, B G; Kassalainen, G E; Nasledov, D G

    2000-05-26

    The results of high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) studies of peptide, protein and double-stranded DNA separations on a laboratory-made HPCE system are presented. Parameters of the HPCE system are given. The new method of capillary surface modification by grafting poly(glycidyl methacrylate) is described. The problems of HPCE biopolymer analysis connected with the sample-wall interactions are discussed. PMID:10893035

  6. RNA Activation of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene (VEGF) Promoter by Double-Stranded RNA and Hypoxia: Role of Noncoding VEGF Promoter Transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Pascal; Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Hofman, Paul; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel

    2016-05-15

    RNA activation (RNAa) is a gene regulation process in which promoter-targeted short double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) or microRNAs (miRs) induce target gene expression at the transcriptional level. Here, we investigate the presence of cryptic promoter transcripts within the VEGF promoter. Single-strand sense and antisense noncoding vascular endothelial growth factor (NcVEGF) promoter transcripts are identified, and their respective expression is studied in cells transfected with a VEGF promoter targeted dsRNA, namely, dsVEGF706, in hypoxic cells and in human malignant lung tissues. Interestingly, in dsVEGF706-transfected, as well as in hypoxic cells, NcVEGF expression levels increase coordinately with coding VEGF expression. Ago2 interaction with both sense and antisense NcVEGFs is increased in hypoxic cells, whereas in dsVEGF706-transfected cells, Ago2 and the antisense strand of the dsRNA interact specifically with the sense NcVEGF transcript. Furthermore, both dsVEGF706 and ectopic NcVEGF transcripts are able to activate the VEGF promoter endogenously present or in a reporter construct. Finally, using small interfering RNA targeting Ago2, we show that RNAa plays a role in the maintenance of increased VEGF and NcVEGF expression after hypoxia. Given the central role of VEGF in major human diseases, including cancer, this novel molecular mechanism is poised to reveal promising possibilities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26976645

  7. Visualizing repetitive diffusion activity of double-strand RNA binding proteins by single molecule fluorescence assays.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Wang, Xinlei; Myong, Sua

    2016-08-01

    TRBP, one of double strand RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs), is an essential cofactor of Dicer in the RNA interference pathway. Previously we reported that TRBP exhibits repetitive diffusion activity on double strand (ds)RNA in an ATP independent manner. In the TRBP-Dicer complex, the diffusion mobility of TRBP facilitates Dicer-mediated RNA cleavage. Such repetitive diffusion of dsRBPs on a nucleic acid at the nanometer scale can be appropriately captured by several single molecule detection techniques. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to four different single molecule fluorescence assays by which the diffusion activity of dsRBPs on dsRNA can be detected. One color assay, termed protein induced fluorescence enhancement enables detection of unlabeled protein binding and diffusion on a singly labeled RNA. Two-color Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in which labeled dsRBPs is applied to labeled RNA, allows for probing the motion of protein along the RNA axis. Three color FRET reports on the diffusion movement of dsRBPs from one to the other end of RNA. The single molecule pull down assay provides an opportunity to collect dsRBPs from mammalian cells and examine the protein-RNA interaction at single molecule platform. PMID:27012177

  8. Toscana virus NSs protein promotes degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kalveram, Birte; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-04-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV), which is transmitted by Phlebotomus spp. sandflies, is a major etiologic agent of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis in the Mediterranean. Like other members of the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, TOSV encodes a nonstructural protein (NSs) in its small RNA segment. Although the NSs of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) has been identified as an important virulence factor, which suppresses host general transcription, inhibits transcription from the beta interferon promoter, and promotes the proteasomal degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), little is known about the functions of NSs proteins encoded by less-pathogenic members of this genus. In this study we report that TOSV is able to downregulate PKR with similar efficiency as RVFV, while infection with the other phleboviruses-i.e., Punta Toro virus, sandfly fever Sicilian virus, or Frijoles virus-has no effect on cellular PKR levels. In contrast to RVFV, however, cellular transcription remains unaffected during TOSV infection. TOSV NSs protein promotes the proteasome-dependent downregulation of PKR and is able to interact with kinase-inactive PKR in infected cells. PMID:23325696

  9. Toscana Virus NSs Protein Promotes Degradation of Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kalveram, Birte

    2013-01-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV), which is transmitted by Phlebotomus spp. sandflies, is a major etiologic agent of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis in the Mediterranean. Like other members of the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, TOSV encodes a nonstructural protein (NSs) in its small RNA segment. Although the NSs of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) has been identified as an important virulence factor, which suppresses host general transcription, inhibits transcription from the beta interferon promoter, and promotes the proteasomal degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), little is known about the functions of NSs proteins encoded by less-pathogenic members of this genus. In this study we report that TOSV is able to downregulate PKR with similar efficiency as RVFV, while infection with the other phleboviruses—i.e., Punta Toro virus, sandfly fever Sicilian virus, or Frijoles virus—has no effect on cellular PKR levels. In contrast to RVFV, however, cellular transcription remains unaffected during TOSV infection. TOSV NSs protein promotes the proteasome-dependent downregulation of PKR and is able to interact with kinase-inactive PKR in infected cells. PMID:23325696

  10. Chromosome Scaffold is a Double-Stranded Assembly of Scaffold Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Poonperm, Rawin; Takata, Hideaki; Hamano, Tohru; Matsuda, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Susumu; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome higher order structure has been an enigma for over a century. The most important structural finding has been the presence of a chromosome scaffold composed of non-histone proteins; so-called scaffold proteins. However, the organization and function of the scaffold are still controversial. Here, we use three dimensional-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) to reveal the axial distributions of scaffold proteins in metaphase chromosomes comprising two strands. We also find that scaffold protein can adaptably recover its original localization after chromosome reversion in the presence of cations. This reversion to the original morphology underscores the role of the scaffold for intrinsic structural integrity of chromosomes. We therefore propose a new structural model of the chromosome scaffold that includes twisted double strands, consistent with the physical properties of chromosomal bending flexibility and rigidity. Our model provides new insights into chromosome higher order structure. PMID:26132639

  11. Functional expression of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase in rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Nagahiro; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Nakamata, Junichi; Doi, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Koji

    2010-05-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are exposed to external environment, microbial and viral products, and serve as essential barriers to antigens. Recent studies have shown that IECs express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and respond to microbial components. The antimicrobial and antiviral barriers consist of many molecules including TLRs. To investigate the further component of this barrier in intestine, we examined the expression of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). PKR is a player in the cellular antiviral response and phosphorylates alpha-subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF-2alpha) to block protein synthesis and induces apoptosis. In this study, we showed that the expression of PKR was restricted to the cytoplasm of absorptive epithelial cells in the intestine of adult rat. We also demonstrated that PKR was expressed in the cultured rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6). The level of PKR protein expression and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) increased in the cultured IEC-6 cells in a time-dependent manner. Inhibition of PKR by the 2-aminopurine treatment decreased ALP activity in the IEC-6 cells. Treatment of IEC-6 cells with synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of hydrocortisone also provoked suppression of PKR expression and ALP activity. This modulation might be mediated by signal transducers and activators of transcription-1 (STAT-1) protein. We concluded that PKR is expressed in IECs as potent barriers to antigens and is a possible modulator of the differentiation of rat IECs. PMID:20213745

  12. Deficient signaling in mice devoid of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y L; Reis, L F; Pavlovic, J; Aguzzi, A; Schäfer, R; Kumar, A; Williams, B R; Aguet, M; Weissmann, C

    1995-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) has been implicated in interferon (IFN) induction, antiviral response and tumor suppression. We have generated mice devoid of functional PKR (Pkr%). Although the mice are physically normal and the induction of type I IFN genes by poly(I).poly(C) (pIC) and virus is unimpaired, the antiviral response induced by IFN-gamma and pIC was diminished. However, in embryo fibroblasts from Pkr knockout mice, the induction of type I IFN as well as the activation of NF-kappa B by pIC, were strongly impaired but restored by priming with IFN. Thus, PKR is not directly essential for responses to pIC, and a pIC-responsive system independent of PKR is induced by IFN. No evidence of the tumor suppressor activity of PKR was demonstrated. Images PMID:8557029

  13. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  14. Substrate recognition and specificity of double-stranded RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Lela; Koh, Hye Ran; Myong, Sua; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    Recognition of double-stranded (ds) RNA is an important part of many cellular pathways, including RNA silencing, viral recognition, RNA editing, processing, and transport. dsRNA recognition is often achieved by dsRNA binding domains (dsRBDs). We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to examine the binding interface of the transactivation response RNA binding protein (TRBP) dsRBDs to dsRNA substrates. Our results explain the exclusive selectivity of dsRBDs toward dsRNA and against DNA-RNA hybrid and dsDNA duplexes. We also provide corresponding experimental evidence. The dsRNA duplex is recognized by dsRBDs through the A-form of three duplex grooves and by the chemical properties of RNA bases, which have 2'-hydroxyl groups on their sugar rings. Our simulations show that TRBP dsRBD discriminates dsRNA- from DNA-containing duplexes primarily through interactions at two duplex grooves. The simulations also reveal that the conformation of the DNA-RNA duplex can be altered by dsRBD proteins, resulting in a weak binding of dsRBDs to DNA-RNA hybrids. Our study reveals the structural and molecular basis of protein-RNA interaction that gives rise to the observed substrate specificity of dsRNA binding proteins. PMID:24801449

  15. Characterizing the mechanism of action of double-stranded RNA activity against western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte).

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Renata; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Anderson, Jerry; Bachman, Pamela; Clinton, William; Flannagan, Ronald; Ilagan, Oliver; Lawrence, Christina; Levine, Steven; Moar, William; Mueller, Geoffrey; Tan, Jianguo; Uffman, Joshua; Wiggins, Elizabeth; Heck, Gregory; Segers, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has previously been shown to be effective in western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae via oral delivery of synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in an artificial diet bioassay, as well as by ingestion of transgenic corn plant tissues engineered to express dsRNA. Although the RNAi machinery components appear to be conserved in Coleopteran insects, the key steps in this process have not been reported for WCR. Here we characterized the sequence of events that result in mortality after ingestion of a dsRNA designed against WCR larvae. We selected the Snf7 ortholog (DvSnf7) as the target mRNA, which encodes an essential protein involved in intracellular trafficking. Our results showed that dsRNAs greater than or equal to approximately 60 base-pairs (bp) are required for biological activity in artificial diet bioassays. Additionally, 240 bp dsRNAs containing a single 21 bp match to the target sequence were also efficacious, whereas 21 bp short interfering (si) RNAs matching the target sequence were not. This result was further investigated in WCR midgut tissues: uptake of 240 bp dsRNA was evident in WCR midgut cells while a 21 bp siRNA was not, supporting the size-activity relationship established in diet bioassays. DvSnf7 suppression was observed in a time-dependent manner with suppression at the mRNA level preceding suppression at the protein level when a 240 bp dsRNA was fed to WCR larvae. DvSnf7 suppression was shown to spread to tissues beyond the midgut within 24 h after dsRNA ingestion. These events (dsRNA uptake, target mRNA and protein suppression, systemic spreading, growth inhibition and eventual mortality) comprise the overall mechanism of action by which DvSnf7 dsRNA affects WCR via oral delivery and provides insights as to how targeted dsRNAs in general are active against insects. PMID:23071820

  16. Characterizing the Mechanism of Action of Double-Stranded RNA Activity against Western Corn Rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte)

    PubMed Central

    Bolognesi, Renata; Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy; Anderson, Jerry; Bachman, Pamela; Clinton, William; Flannagan, Ronald; Ilagan, Oliver; Lawrence, Christina; Levine, Steven; Moar, William; Mueller, Geoffrey; Tan, Jianguo; Uffman, Joshua; Wiggins, Elizabeth; Heck, Gregory; Segers, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has previously been shown to be effective in western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae via oral delivery of synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in an artificial diet bioassay, as well as by ingestion of transgenic corn plant tissues engineered to express dsRNA. Although the RNAi machinery components appear to be conserved in Coleopteran insects, the key steps in this process have not been reported for WCR. Here we characterized the sequence of events that result in mortality after ingestion of a dsRNA designed against WCR larvae. We selected the Snf7 ortholog (DvSnf7) as the target mRNA, which encodes an essential protein involved in intracellular trafficking. Our results showed that dsRNAs greater than or equal to approximately 60 base-pairs (bp) are required for biological activity in artificial diet bioassays. Additionally, 240 bp dsRNAs containing a single 21 bp match to the target sequence were also efficacious, whereas 21 bp short interfering (si) RNAs matching the target sequence were not. This result was further investigated in WCR midgut tissues: uptake of 240 bp dsRNA was evident in WCR midgut cells while a 21 bp siRNA was not, supporting the size-activity relationship established in diet bioassays. DvSnf7 suppression was observed in a time-dependent manner with suppression at the mRNA level preceding suppression at the protein level when a 240 bp dsRNA was fed to WCR larvae. DvSnf7 suppression was shown to spread to tissues beyond the midgut within 24 h after dsRNA ingestion. These events (dsRNA uptake, target mRNA and protein suppression, systemic spreading, growth inhibition and eventual mortality) comprise the overall mechanism of action by which DvSnf7 dsRNA affects WCR via oral delivery and provides insights as to how targeted dsRNAs in general are active against insects. PMID:23071820

  17. Direct Activation of Ribosome-Associated Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKR) by Deoxynivalenol, Anisomycin and Ricin: A New Model for Ribotoxic Stress Response Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui-Ren; He, Kaiyu; Landgraf, Jeff; Pan, Xiao; Pestka, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a critical upstream mediator of the ribotoxic stress response (RSR) to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) and other translational inhibitors. Here, we employed HeLa cell lysates to: (1) characterize PKR’s interactions with the ribosome and ribosomal RNA (rRNA); (2) demonstrate cell-free activation of ribosomal-associated PKR and (3) integrate these findings in a unified model for RSR. Robust PKR-dependent RSR was initially confirmed in intact cells. PKR basally associated with 40S, 60S, 80S and polysome fractions at molar ratios of 7, 2, 23 and 3, respectively. Treatment of ATP-containing HeLa lysates with DON or the ribotoxins anisomycin and ricin concentration-dependently elicited phosphorylation of PKR and its substrate eIF2α. These phosphorylations could be blocked by PKR inhibitors. rRNA immunoprecipitation (RNA-IP) of HeLa lysates with PKR-specific antibody and sequencing revealed that in the presence of DON or not, the kinase associated with numerous discrete sites on both the 18S and 28S rRNA molecules, a number of which contained double-stranded hairpins. These findings are consistent with a sentinel model whereby multiple PKR molecules basally associate with the ribosome positioning them to respond to ribotoxin-induced alterations in rRNA structure by dimerizing, autoactivating and, ultimately, evoking RSR. PMID:25521494

  18. Crystallization of the avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA

    SciTech Connect

    Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Fox, Gavin C.; Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier; Raaij, Mark J. van

    2007-05-01

    The avian reovirus double-stranded RNA-binding and core protein σA has been crystallized in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2°. A complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution and analyzed. The avian reovirus protein σA plays a dual role: it is a structural protein forming part of the transcriptionally active core, but it has also been implicated in the resistance of the virus to interferon by strongly binding double-stranded RNA and thus inhibiting the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase. The σA protein has been crystallized from solutions containing ammonium sulfate at pH values around 6. Crystals belonging to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.2, b = 129.9, c = 144.0 Å, α = 93.8, β = 105.1, γ = 98.2° were grown and a complete data set has been collected to 2.3 Å resolution. The self-rotation function suggests that σA may form symmetric arrangements in the crystals.

  19. Interaction of double-stranded DNA with polymerized PprA protein from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Motoyasu; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Rumi; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay; Kuroki, Ryota

    2014-10-01

    Pleiotropic protein promoting DNA repair A (PprA) is a key protein that facilitates the extreme radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. To clarify the role of PprA in the radioresistance mechanism, the interaction between recombinant PprA expressed in Escherichia coli with several double-stranded DNAs (i.e., super coiled, linear, or nicked circular dsDNA) was investigated. In a gel-shift assay, the band shift of supercoiled pUC19 DNA caused by the binding of PprA showed a bimodal distribution, which was promoted by the addition of 1 mM Mg, Ca, or Sr ions. The dissociation constant of the PprA-supercoiled pUC19 DNA complex, calculated from the relative portions of shifted bands, was 0.6 μM with Hill coefficient of 3.3 in the presence of 1 mM Mg acetate. This indicates that at least 281 PprA molecules are required to saturate a supercoiled pUC19 DNA, which is consistent with the number (280) of bound PprA molecules estimated by the UV absorption of the PprA-pUC19 complex purified by gel filtration. This saturation also suggests linear polymerization of PprA along the dsDNA. On the other hand, the bands of linear dsDNA and nicked circular dsDNA that eventually formed PprA complexes did not saturate, but created larger molecular complexes when the PprA concentration was >1.3 μM. This result implies that DNA-bound PprA aids association of the termini of damaged DNAs, which is regulated by the concentration of PprA. These findings are important for the understanding of the mechanism underlying effective DNA repair involving PprA. PMID:25044036

  20. Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad32 protein: a phosphoprotein with an essential phosphoesterase motif required for repair of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S; Tavassoli, M; Watts, F Z

    1998-12-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rad32 protein is required for repair of DNA double strand breaks, minichromosome stability and meiotic recombination. We show here that the Rad32 protein is phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner and during meiosis. The phosphorylation is not dependent on the checkpoint protein Rad3. Analysis of a partially purified protein preparation indicates that Rad32 is likely to act in a complex. Characterisation of the rad32-1 mutation and site-directed mutagenesis indicate that three aspartate residues in the conserved phosphoesterase motifs are important for both mitotic and meiotic functions, namely response to UV and ionising radiation and spore viability. PMID:9826747

  1. TRIP: a novel double stranded RNA binding protein which interacts with the leucine rich repeat of flightless I.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S A; Brown, E C; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1998-01-01

    A northwestern screen of a CHO-K1 cell line cDNA library with radiolabelled HIV-1 TAR RNA identified a novel TAR RNA interacting protein, TRIP. The human trip cDNA was also cloned and its expression is induced by phorbol esters. The N-terminus of TRIP shows high homology to the coiled coil domain of FLAP, a protein which binds the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) of Flightless I (FLI) and the interaction of TRIP with the FLI LRR has been confirmed in vitro . TRIP does not bind single stranded DNA or RNA significantly and binds double stranded DNA weakly. In contrast, TRIP binds double stranded RNA with high affinity and two molecules of TRIP bind the TAR stem. The RNA binding domain has been identified and encompasses a lysine-rich motif. A TRIP-GFP fusion is localised in the cytoplasm and excluded from the nucleus. FLI has a C-terminal gelsolin-like domain which binds actin and therefore the association of TRIP with the FLI LRR may provide a link between the actin cytoskeleton and RNA in mammalian cells. PMID:9671805

  2. TRIP: a novel double stranded RNA binding protein which interacts with the leucine rich repeat of flightless I.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S A; Brown, E C; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1998-08-01

    A northwestern screen of a CHO-K1 cell line cDNA library with radiolabelled HIV-1 TAR RNA identified a novel TAR RNA interacting protein, TRIP. The human trip cDNA was also cloned and its expression is induced by phorbol esters. The N-terminus of TRIP shows high homology to the coiled coil domain of FLAP, a protein which binds the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) of Flightless I (FLI) and the interaction of TRIP with the FLI LRR has been confirmed in vitro . TRIP does not bind single stranded DNA or RNA significantly and binds double stranded DNA weakly. In contrast, TRIP binds double stranded RNA with high affinity and two molecules of TRIP bind the TAR stem. The RNA binding domain has been identified and encompasses a lysine-rich motif. A TRIP-GFP fusion is localised in the cytoplasm and excluded from the nucleus. FLI has a C-terminal gelsolin-like domain which binds actin and therefore the association of TRIP with the FLI LRR may provide a link between the actin cytoskeleton and RNA in mammalian cells. PMID:9671805

  3. Double stranded nucleic acid biochips

    DOEpatents

    Chernov, Boris; Golova, Julia

    2006-05-23

    This invention describes a new method of constructing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) microarrays based on the use of pre-synthesized or natural DNA duplexes without a stem-loop structure. The complementary oligonucleotide chains are bonded together by a novel connector that includes a linker for immobilization on a matrix. A non-enzymatic method for synthesizing double-stranded nucleic acids with this novel connector enables the construction of inexpensive and robust dsDNA/dsRNA microarrays. DNA-DNA and DNA-protein interactions are investigated using the microarrays.

  4. The TopoVIB-Like protein family is required for meiotic DNA double-strand break formation.

    PubMed

    Robert, T; Nore, A; Brun, C; Maffre, C; Crimi, B; Bourbon, H-M; de Massy, B

    2016-02-26

    Meiotic recombination is induced by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by SPO11, the ortholog of subunit A of TopoVI DNA topoisomerase (TopoVIA). TopoVI activity requires the interaction between A and B subunits. We identified a conserved family of plant and animal proteins [the TOPOVIB-Like (TOPOVIBL) family] that share strong structural similarity to the TopoVIB subunit of TopoVI DNA topoisomerase. We further characterize the meiotic recombination proteins Rec102 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), Rec6 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and MEI-P22 (Drosophila melanogaster) as homologs to the transducer domain of TopoVIB. We demonstrate that the mouse TOPOVIBL protein interacts and forms a complex with SPO11 and is required for meiotic DSB formation. We conclude that meiotic DSBs are catalyzed by a complex involving SPO11 and TOPOVIBL. PMID:26917764

  5. Surface shapes and surrounding environment analysis of single- and double-stranded DNA-binding proteins in protein-DNA interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Juan; Sun, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Protein-DNA bindings are critical to many biological processes. However, the structural mechanisms underlying these interactions are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the residues shape (peak, flat, or valley) and the surrounding environment of double-stranded DNA-binding proteins (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) in protein-DNA interfaces. In the results, we found that the interface shapes, hydrogen bonds, and the surrounding environment present significant differences between the two kinds of proteins. Built on the investigation results, we constructed a random forest (RF) classifier to distinguish DSBs and SSBs with satisfying performance. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein interfaces, which will deepen our understanding of the specificity of proteins binding to ssDNA (single-stranded DNA) or dsDNA (double-stranded DNA). Proteins 2016; 84:979-989. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27038080

  6. Sensitive and direct electrochemical detection of double-stranded DNA utilizing alkaline phosphatase-labelled zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Noh, Soodong; Ha, Dat Thinh; Yang, Haesik; Kim, Moon-Soo

    2015-06-21

    Direct detection of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) is of great importance in biomedical applications such as identifying pathogens and circulating DNAs. However, its sensitivity is still not sufficiently high because limited signalling labels can be conjugated or fused. Herein, we report sensitive and direct detection of dsDNA using (i) alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as a fast catalytic label conjugated to ZFPs along with (ii) electrochemical measurement of an ALP product (l-ascorbic acid) at the indium-tin oxide electrode with a high signal-to-background ratio. ALP is simply conjugated to a ZFP through lysine residues in a ZFP purification tag, a maltose binding protein (MBP). Sandwich-type electrochemical detection of dsDNA allows a detection limit of ca. 100 fM without using DNA amplification. PMID:25969923

  7. Yeast high mobility group protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin and is evicted during repair of DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Panday, Arvind; Xiao, LiJuan; Grove, Anne

    2015-01-01

    DNA is packaged into condensed chromatin fibers by association with histones and architectural proteins such as high mobility group (HMGB) proteins. However, this DNA packaging reduces accessibility of enzymes that act on DNA, such as proteins that process DNA after double strand breaks (DSBs). Chromatin remodeling overcomes this barrier. We show here that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMGB protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin as evidenced by faster chromatin remodeling in its absence. HMO1 was evicted along with core histones during repair of DSBs, and chromatin remodeling events such as histone H2A phosphorylation and H3 eviction were faster in absence of HMO1. The facilitated chromatin remodeling in turn correlated with more efficient DNA resection and recruitment of repair proteins; for example, inward translocation of the DNA-end-binding protein Ku was faster in absence of HMO1. This chromatin stabilization requires the lysine-rich C-terminal extension of HMO1 as truncation of the HMO1 C-terminal tail phenocopies hmo1 deletion. Since this is reminiscent of the need for the basic C-terminal domain of mammalian histone H1 in chromatin compaction, we speculate that HMO1 promotes chromatin stability by DNA bending and compaction imposed by its lysine-rich domain and that it must be evicted along with core histones for efficient DSB repair. PMID:25979266

  8. Arabidopsis Double-Stranded RNA Binding Protein DRB3 Participates in Methylation-Mediated Defense against Geminiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Priya; Jackel, Jamie N.; Li, Sizhun; Heard, Isaac M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arabidopsis encodes five double-stranded RNA binding (DRB) proteins. DRB1 and DRB2 are involved in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, while DRB4 functions in cytoplasmic posttranscriptional small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathways. DRB3 and DRB5 are not involved in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) processing but assist in silencing transcripts targeted by DRB2-associated miRNAs. The goal of this study was to determine which, if any, of the DRB proteins might also participate in a nuclear siRNA pathway that leads to geminivirus genome methylation. Here, we demonstrate that DRB3 functions with Dicer-like 3 (DCL3) and Argonaute 4 (AGO4) in methylation-mediated antiviral defense. Plants employ repressive viral genome methylation as an epigenetic defense against geminiviruses, using an RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway similar to that used to suppress endogenous invasive DNAs such as transposons. Chromatin methylation inhibits virus replication and transcription, and methylation-deficient host plants are hypersusceptible to geminivirus infection. Using a panel of drb mutants, we found that drb3 plants uniquely exhibit a similar hypersensitivity and that viral genome methylation is substantially reduced in drb3 compared to wild-type plants. In addition, like dcl3 and ago4 mutants, drb3 plants fail to recover from infection and cannot accomplish the viral genome hypermethylation that is invariably observed in asymptomatic, recovered tissues. Small RNA analysis, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments show that DRB3 acts downstream of siRNA biogenesis and suggest that it associates with DCL3 and AGO4 in distinct subnuclear compartments. These studies reveal that in addition to its previously established role in the miRNA pathway, DRB3 also functions in antiviral RdDM. IMPORTANCE Plants use RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) as an epigenetic defense against geminiviruses. RNA silencing pathways in Arabidopsis include five

  9. The coat protein of the yeast double-stranded RNA virus L-A attaches covalently to the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, A; Goyer, C; Sonenberg, N

    1992-01-01

    The eukaryotic mRNA 5' cap structure m7GpppX (where X is any nucleotide) interacts with a number of cellular proteins. Several of these proteins were studied in mammalian, yeast, and drosophila cells and found to be involved in translation initiation. Here we describe a novel cap-binding protein, the coat protein of L-A, a double-stranded RNA virus that is persistently maintained in many Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The results also suggest that the coat protein of a related double-stranded RNA virus (L-BC) is likewise a cap-binding protein. Strikingly, in contrast to the cellular cap-binding proteins, the interaction between the L-A virus coat protein and the cap structure is through a covalent bond. Images PMID:1630453

  10. The Axial Element Protein DESYNAPTIC2 Mediates Meiotic Double-Strand Break Formation and Synaptonemal Complex Assembly in Maize.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ding Hua; Kao, Yu-Hsin; Ku, Jia-Chi; Lin, Chien-Yu; Meeley, Robert; Jan, Ya-Shiun; Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel

    2015-09-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair and recombine via repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs are formed in the context of chromatin loops, which are anchored to the proteinaceous axial element (AE). The AE later serves as a framework to assemble the synaptonemal complex (SC) that provides a transient but tight connection between homologous chromosomes. Here, we showed that DESYNAPTIC2 (DSY2), a coiled-coil protein, mediates DSB formation and is directly involved in SC assembly in maize (Zea mays). The dsy2 mutant exhibits homologous pairing defects, leading to sterility. Analyses revealed that DSB formation and the number of RADIATION SENSITIVE51 (RAD51) foci are largely reduced, and synapsis is completely abolished in dsy2 meiocytes. Super-resolution structured illumination microscopy showed that DSY2 is located on the AE and forms a distinct alternating pattern with the HORMA-domain protein ASYNAPTIC1 (ASY1). In the dsy2 mutant, localization of ASY1 is affected, and loading of the central element ZIPPER1 (ZYP1) is disrupted. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments further demonstrated that ZYP1 interacts with DSY2 but does not interact with ASY1. Therefore, DSY2, an AE protein, not only mediates DSB formation but also bridges the AE and central element of SC during meiosis. PMID:26296964

  11. Novel Smad proteins localize to IR-induced double-strand breaks: interplay between TGFβ and ATM pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minli; Saha, Janapriya; Hada, Megumi; Anderson, Jennifer A.; Pluth, Janice M.; O’Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular damage from ionizing radiation (IR) is in part due to DNA damage and reactive oxygen species, which activate DNA damage response (DDR) and cytokine signaling pathways, including the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and transforming growth factor (TGF)β/Smad pathways. Using classic double-strand breaks (DSBs) markers, we studied the roles of Smad proteins in DDR and the crosstalk between TGFβ and ATM pathways. We observed co-localization of phospho-Smad2 (pSmad2) and Smad7 with DSB repair proteins following low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in human fibroblasts and epithelial cells. The decays of both foci were similar to that of γH2AX foci. Irradiation with high LET particles induced pSmad2 and Smad7 foci tracks indicating the particle trajectory through cells. pSmad2 foci were absent in S phase cells, while Smad7 foci were present in all phases of cell cycle. pSmad2 (but not Smad7) foci were completely abolished when ATM was depleted or inactivated. In contrast, a TGFβ receptor 1 (TGFβR1) inhibitor abrogated Smad7, but not pSmad2 foci at DSBs sites. In summary, we suggest that Smad2 and Smad7 contribute to IR-induced DSB signaling in an ATM or TGFβR1-dependent manner, respectively. PMID:23221633

  12. Crystal Structure of E. coli RecE Protein Reveals a Toroidal Tetramer for Processing Double-Stranded DNA Breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjin; Xing, Xu; Herr, Andrew B.; Bell, Charles E.

    2009-07-21

    Escherichia coli RecE protein is part of the classical RecET recombination system that has recently been used in powerful new methods for genetic engineering. RecE binds to free double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) ends and processively digests the 5{prime}-ended strand to form 5{prime}-mononucleotides and a 3{prime}-overhang that is a substrate for single strand annealing promoted by RecT. Here, we report the crystal structure of the C-terminal nuclease domain of RecE at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. RecE forms a toroidal tetramer with a central tapered channel that is wide enough to bind dsDNA at one end, but is partially plugged at the other end by the C-terminal segment of the protein. Four narrow tunnels, one within each subunit of the tetramer, lead from the central channel to the four active sites, which lie about 15 {angstrom} from the channel. The structure, combined with mutational studies, suggests a mechanism in which dsDNA enters through the open end of the central channel, the 5{prime}-ended strand passes through a tunnel to access one of the four active sites, and the 3{prime}-ended strand passes through the plugged end of the channel at the back of the tetramer.

  13. Distinct binding sites for zinc and double-stranded RNA in the reovirus outer capsid protein sigma3

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, L.A.; Nibert, M.L.; Co, M.S.; Brown, E.G.; Fields, B.N.

    1988-01-01

    By atomic absorption analysis, the authors determined that the reovirus outer capsid protein sigma3, which binds double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), is a zinc metalloprotein. Using Northwestern blots and a novel zinc blotting technique, the authors localized the zinc- and dsRNA-binding activities of sigma3 to distinct V8 protease-generated fragments. Zinc-binding activity was contained within an amino-terminal fragment that contained a transcription factor IIIA-like zinc-binding sequence, and dsRNA-binding activity was associated with a carboxy-terminal fragment. By these techniques, new zinc- and dsRNA-binding activities were also detected in reovirus core proteins. A sequence similarity was observed between the catalytic site of the picornavirus proteases and the transcription factor IIIA-like zinc-binding site within sigma3. The authors suggest that the zinc- and dsRNA-binding activities of sigma3 may be important for its proposed regulatory effects on viral and host cell transcription and translation.

  14. The Arabidopsis thaliana double-stranded RNA binding protein DRB1 directs guide strand selection from microRNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Eamens, Andrew L.; Smith, Neil A.; Curtin, Shaun J.; Wang, Ming-Bo; Waterhouse, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), DICER-LIKE1 (DCL1) functions together with the double-stranded RNA binding protein (dsRBP), DRB1, to process microRNAs (miRNAs) from their precursor transcripts prior to their transfer to the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). miRNA-loaded RISC directs RNA silencing of cognate mRNAs via ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1)-catalyzed cleavage. Short interefering RNAs (siRNAs) are processed from viral-derived or transgene-encoded molecules of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by the DCL/dsRBP partnership, DCL4/DRB4, and are also loaded to AGO1-catalyzed RISC for cleavage of complementary mRNAs. Here, we use an artificial miRNA (amiRNA) technology, transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana, to produce a series of amiRNA duplexes with differing intermolecular thermostabilities at the 5′ end of duplex strands. Analyses of amiRNA duplex strand accumulation and target transcript expression revealed that strand selection (amiRNA and amiRNA*) is directed by asymmetric thermostability of the duplex termini. The duplex strand possessing a lower 5′ thermostability was preferentially retained by RISC to guide mRNA cleavage of the corresponding target transgene. In addition, analysis of endogenous miRNA duplex strand accumulation in Arabidopsis drb1 and drb2345 mutant plants revealed that DRB1 dictates strand selection, presumably by directional loading of the miRNA duplex onto RISC for passenger strand degradation. Bioinformatic and Northern blot analyses of DCL4/DRB4-dependent small RNAs (miRNAs and siRNAs) revealed that small RNAs produced by this DCL/dsRBP combination do not conform to the same terminal thermostability rules as those governing DCL1/DRB1-processed miRNAs. This suggests that small RNA processing in the DCL1/DRB1-directed miRNA and DCL4/DRB4-directed sRNA biogenesis pathways operates via different mechanisms. PMID:19861421

  15. The scaffold protein WRAP53β orchestrates the ubiquitin response critical for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Sofia; Rassoolzadeh, Hanif; Hedström, Elisabeth; Coucoravas, Christos; Julner, Alexander; Goldstein, Michael; Imreh, Gabriela; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Kastan, Michael B.; Helleday, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The WD40 domain-containing protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA antisense to p53; also referred to as WDR79/TCAB1) controls trafficking of splicing factors and the telomerase enzyme to Cajal bodies, and its functional loss has been linked to carcinogenesis, premature aging, and neurodegeneration. Here, we identify WRAP53β as an essential regulator of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. WRAP53β rapidly localizes to DSBs in an ATM-, H2AX-, and MDC1-dependent manner. We show that WRAP53β targets the E3 ligase RNF8 to DNA lesions by facilitating the interaction between RNF8 and its upstream partner, MDC1, in response to DNA damage. Simultaneous binding of MDC1 and RNF8 to the highly conserved WD40 scaffold domain of WRAP53β facilitates their interaction and accumulation of RNF8 at DSBs. In this manner, WRAP53β controls proper ubiquitylation at DNA damage sites and the downstream assembly of 53BP1, BRCA1, and RAD51. Furthermore, we reveal that knockdown of WRAP53β impairs DSB repair by both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), causes accumulation of spontaneous DNA breaks, and delays recovery from radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Our findings establish WRAP53β as a novel regulator of DSB repair by providing a scaffold for DNA repair factors. PMID:25512560

  16. Identification and characterization of a double-stranded RNA- reovirus temperature-sensitive mutant defective in minor core protein mu2.

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, K M

    1996-01-01

    A newly identified temperature-sensitive mutant whose defect was mapped to the reovirus M1 gene (minor core protein mu2) was studied to better understand the functions of this virion protein. Sequence determination of the Ml gene of this mutant (tsH11.2) revealed a predicted methionine-to-threonine alteration at amino acid 399 and a change from proline to histidine at amino acid 414. The mutant made normal amounts of single-stranded RNA, both in in vitro transcriptase assays and in infected cells, and normal amounts of progeny viral protein at early times in a restrictive infection. However, tsH11.2 produced neither detectable progeny protein nor double-stranded RNA at late times in a restrictive infection. These studies indicate that mu2 plays a role in the conversion of reovirus mRNA to progeny double-stranded RNA. PMID:8676444

  17. A moonlighting metabolic protein influences repair at DNA double-stranded breaks

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Machorro, Ana Lilia; Aris, John P.; Pillus, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Catalytically active proteins with divergent dual functions are often described as ‘moonlighting’. In this work we characterize a new, chromatin-based function of Lys20, a moonlighting protein that is well known for its role in metabolism. Lys20 was initially described as homocitrate synthase (HCS), the first enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathway in yeast. Its nuclear localization led to the discovery of a key role for Lys20 in DNA damage repair through its interaction with the MYST family histone acetyltransferase Esa1. Overexpression of Lys20 promotes suppression of DNA damage sensitivity of esa1 mutants. In this work, by taking advantage of LYS20 mutants that are active in repair but not in lysine biosynthesis, the mechanism of suppression of esa1 was characterized. First we analyzed the chromatin landscape of esa1 cells, finding impaired histone acetylation and eviction. Lys20 was recruited to sites of DNA damage, and its overexpression promoted enhanced recruitment of the INO80 remodeling complex to restore normal histone eviction at the damage sites. This study improves understanding of the evolutionary, structural and biological relevance of independent activities in a moonlighting protein and links metabolism to DNA damage repair. PMID:25628362

  18. Comparative sequence analysis of double stranded RNA binding protein encoding gene of parapoxviruses from Indian camels.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, G; Swami, Shelesh Kumar; Dahiya, Shyam Singh; Sivakumar, G; Tuteja, F C; Narnaware, S D; Mehta, S C; Singh, Raghvendar; Patil, N V

    2014-03-01

    The dsRNA binding protein (RBP) encoding gene of parapoxviruses (PPVs) from the Dromedary camels, inhabitating different geographical region of Rajasthan, India were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using the primers of pseudocowpoxvirus (PCPV) from Finnish reindeer and cloned into pGEM-T for sequence analysis. Analysis of RBP encoding gene revealed that PPV DNA from Bikaner shared 98.3% and 76.6% sequence identity at the amino acid level, with Pali and Udaipur PPV DNA, respectively. Reference strains of Bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV) and PCPV (reindeer PCPV and human PCPV) shared 52.8% and 86.9% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner, respectively. But different strains of orf virus (ORFV) from different geographical areas of the world shared 69.5-71.7% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner. These findings indicate that the camel PPVs described are closely related to bovine PPV (PCPV) in comparison to caprine and ovine PPV (ORFV). PMID:25685494

  19. Activation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits proliferation of pancreatic β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Teng; Wang, Yi; Gu, Li-Ze; Wu, Hui-Wen; Tan, Lan; Guo, Jun

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in β-cells. •Activated PKR inhibited β-cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. •Activated PKR fully abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I on β-cells. -- Abstract: Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is revealed to participate in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Meanwhile, PKR is also characterized as a critical regulator of cell proliferation. To date, no study has focused on the impact of PKR on the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. Here, we adopted insulinoma cell lines and mice islet β-cells to investigate: (1) the effects of glucolipotoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines on PKR activation; (2) the effects of PKR on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and its underlying mechanisms; (3) the actions of PKR on pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I and its underlying pathway. Our results provided the first evidence that PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in pancreatic β-cells, and activated PKR significantly inhibited cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. Reductions in cyclin D1 and D2 as well as increases in p27 and p53 were associated with the anti-proliferative effects of PKR, and proteasome-dependent degradation took part in the reduction of cyclin D1 and D2. Besides, PKR activation abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I by activating JNK and disrupting IRS1/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of PKR on pancreatic β-cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  20. Double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Teramachi, Junpei; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Doi, Yoshiaki; Hirashima, Kanji; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2010-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) plays a critical role in antiviral defence of the host cells. PKR is also involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. We previously reported that PKR is required for differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts. However, it is unknown about the role of PKR in osteoclast differentiation. A dominant-negative PKR mutant cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine, was transfected into RAW264.7 cells. We have established the cell line that stably expresses the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR and {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the PKR-K/R cells. RANKL stimulated the formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells in RAW264.7 cells. However, TRAP-positive multinuclear cells were not formed in the PKR-K/R cells even when the cells were stimulated with higher doses of RANKL. A specific inhibitor of PKR, 2-aminopurine, also suppressed the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. The expression of macrophage fusion receptor and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein significantly decreased in the PKR-K/R cells by real time PCR analysis. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of osteoclast markers (cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor) was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and RAW264.7 cells treated with 2-aminopurine. Expression of NF-{kappa}B protein was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and 2-aminopurine-treated RAW264.7 cells. The level of STAT1 protein expression was elevated in the PKR-K/R cells compared with that of the wild-type cells. Immunohistochemical study showed that PKR was localized in osteoclasts of metatarsal bone of newborn mouse. The finding that the PKR-positive multinuclear cells should be osteoclasts was confirmed by TRAP-staining. Our present study indicates that PKR plays important

  1. ATM protein is indispensable to repair complex-type DNA double strand breaks induced by high LET heavy ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Fujimori, Akira; Anzai, Kazunori; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) protein responsible for a rare genetic disease with hyperradiosensitivity, is the one of the earliest repair proteins sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). ATM is known to phosphorylate DNA repair proteins such as MRN complex (Mre11, Rad50 and NBS1), 53BP1, Artemis, Brca1, gamma-H2AX, and MDC. We studied the interactions between ATM and DNA-PKcs, a crucial NHEJ repair protein, after cells exposure to high and low LET irradiation. Normal human (HFL III, MRC5VA) and AT homozygote (AT2KY, AT5BIVA, AT3BIVA) cells were irradiated with X-rays and high LET radiation (carbon ions: 290MeV/n initial energy at 70 keV/um, and iron ions: 500MeV/n initial energy at 200KeV/um), and several critical end points were examined. AT cells with high LET irradiation showed a significantly higher radiosensitivity when compared with normal cells. The behavior of DNA DSB repair was monitored by immuno-fluorescence techniques using DNA-PKcs (pThr2609, pSer2056) and ATM (pSer1981) antibodies. In normal cells, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was clearly detected after high LET irradiation, though the peak of phosphorylation was delayed when compared to X-irradiation. In contrast, almost no DNA-PKcs phosphorylation foci were detected in AT cells irradiated with high LET radiation. A similar result was also observed in normal cells treated with 10 uM ATM kinase specific inhibitor (KU55933) one hour before irradiation. These data suggest that the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with low LET X-rays is mostly ATM-independent, and the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with high LET radiation seems to require ATM probably due to its complex nature of DSB induced. Our study indicates that high LET heavy ion irradiation which we can observe in the space environment would provide a useful tool to study the fundamental mechanism associated with DNA DSB repair.

  2. Overexpression of the scaffold WD40 protein WRAP53β enhances the repair of and cell survival from DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rassoolzadeh, H; Böhm, S; Hedström, E; Gad, H; Helleday, T; Henriksson, S; Farnebo, M

    2016-01-01

    Altered expression of the multifunctional protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA Antisense to p53), which targets repair factors to DNA double-strand breaks and factors involved in telomere elongation to Cajal bodies, is linked to carcinogenesis. While loss of WRAP53β function has been shown to disrupt processes regulated by this protein, the consequences of its overexpression remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of WRAP53β disrupts the formation of and impairs the localization of coilin to Cajal bodies. At the same time, the function of this protein in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is enhanced. Following irradiation, cells overexpressing WRAP53β exhibit more rapid clearance of phospho-histone H2AX (γH2AX), and more efficient homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, in association with fewer DNA breaks. Moreover, in these cells the ubiquitylation of damaged chromatin, which is known to facilitate the recruitment of repair factors and subsequent repair, is elevated. Knockdown of the ubiquitin ligase involved, ring-finger protein 8 (RNF8), which is recruited to DNA breaks by WRAP53β, attenuated this effect, suggesting that overexpression of WRAP53β leads to more rapid repair, as well as improved cell survival, by enhancing RNF8-mediated ubiquitylation at DNA breaks. Our present findings indicate that WRAP53β and RNF8 are rate-limiting factors in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and raise the possibility that upregulation of WRAP53β may contribute to genomic stability in and survival of cancer cells. PMID:27310875

  3. Zygotic Expression of the Double-Stranded RNA Binding Motif Protein Drb2p Is Required for DNA Elimination in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila ▿

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Jason A.; Chalker, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA binding motif (DSRM)-containing proteins play many roles in the regulation of gene transcription and translation, including some with tandem DSRMs that act in small RNA biogenesis. We report the characterization of the genes for double-stranded RNA binding proteins 1 and 2 (DRB1 and DRB2), two genes encoding nuclear proteins with tandem DSRMs in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Both proteins are expressed throughout growth and development but exhibit distinct peaks of expression, suggesting different biological roles. In support of this, we show that expression of DRB2 is essential for vegetative growth while DRB1 expression is not. During conjugation, Drb1p and Drb2p localize to distinct nuclear foci. Cells lacking all DRB1 copies are able to produce viable progeny, although at a reduced rate relative to wild-type cells. In contrast, cells lacking germ line DRB2 copies, which thus cannot express Drb2p zygotically, fail to produce progeny, arresting late into conjugation. This arrest phenotype is accompanied by a failure to organize the essential DNA rearrangement protein Pdd1p into DNA elimination bodies and execute DNA elimination and chromosome breakage. These results implicate zygotically expressed Drb2p in the maturation of these nuclear structures, which are necessary for reorganization of the somatic genome. PMID:22021239

  4. Massive parallel analysis of the binding specificity of histone-like protein HU to single- and double-stranded DNA with generic oligodeoxyribonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, A. S.; Zasedateleva, O. A.; Prokopenko, D. V.; Rouviere-Yaniv, J.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Inst. de Biologie Physico-Chimique

    2001-06-15

    A generic hexadeoxyribonucleotide microchip has been applied to test the DNA-binding properties of HU histone-like bacterial protein, which is known to have a low sequence specificity. All 4096 hexamers flanked within 8mers by degenerate bases at both the 3'- and 5'-ends were immobilized within the 100 x 100 x 20 mm polyacrylamide gel pads of the microchip. Single-stranded immobilized oligonucleotides were converted in some experiments to the double-stranded form by hybridization with a specified mixture of 8mers. The DNA interaction with HU was characterized by three type of measurements: (i) binding of FITC-labeled HU to microchip oligonucleotides; (ii) melting curves of complexes of labeled HU with single-stranded microchip oligonucleotides; (iii) the effect of HU binding on melting curves of microchip double-stranded DNA labeled with another fluorescent dye, Texas Red. Large numbers of measurements of these parameters were carried out in parallel for all or many generic microchip elements in real time with a multi-wavelength fluorescence microscope. Statistical analysis of these data suggests some preference for HU binding to G/C-rich single-stranded oligonucleotides. HU complexes with double-stranded microchip 8mers can be divided into two groups in which HU binding either increased the melting temperature (T{sub m}) of duplexes or decreased it. The stabilized duplexes showed some preference for presence of the sequence motifs AAG, AGA and AAGA. In the second type of complex, enriched with A/T base pairs, the destabilization effect was higher for longer stretches of A/T duplexes. Binding of HU to labeled duplexes in the second type of complex caused some decrease in fluorescence. This decrease also correlates with the higher A/T content and lower T{sub m}. The results demonstrate that generic microchips could be an efficient approach in analysis of sequence specificity of proteins.

  5. Creating Directed Double-strand Breaks with the Ref Protein: A Novel Rec A-Dependent Nuclease from Bacteriophage P1

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenig, Marielle C.; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L.; Manlick, Angela J.; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.

    2012-03-16

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded {beta}-hairpin that is sandwiched between several {alpha}-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  6. Geometry of a complex formed by double strand break repair proteins at a single DNA end: recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces inward translocation of Ku protein.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S; Dynan, W S

    1999-12-15

    Ku protein and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) are essential components of the double-strand break repair machinery in higher eukaryotic cells. Ku protein binds to broken DNA ends and recruits DNA-PKcs to form an enzymatically active complex. To characterize the arrangement of proteins in this complex, we developed a set of photocross-linking probes, each with a single free end. We have previously used this approach to characterize the contacts in an initial Ku-DNA complex, and we have now applied the same technology to define the events that occur when Ku recruits DNA-PKcs. The new probes allow the binding of one molecule of Ku protein and one molecule of DNA-PKcs in a defined position and orientation. Photocross-linking reveals that DNA-PKcs makes direct contact with the DNA termini, occupying an approximately 10 bp region proximal to the free end. Characterization of the Ku protein cross-linking pattern in the presence and absence of DNA-PKcs suggests that Ku binds to form an initial complex at the DNA ends, and that recruitment of DNA-PKcs induces an inward translocation of this Ku molecule by about one helical turn. The presence of ATP had no effect on protein-DNA contacts, suggesting that neither DNA-PK-mediated phosphorylation nor a putative Ku helicase activity plays a role in modulating protein conformation under the conditions tested. PMID:10572166

  7. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells. PMID:26431054

  8. A Role for the Malignant Brain Tumour (MBT) Domain Protein LIN-61 in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas M.; Lemmens, Bennie B. L. G.; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Malignant brain tumour (MBT) domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR) for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT–deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair. PMID:23505385

  9. Cytoplasmic Granule Formation and Translational Inhibition of Nodaviral RNAs in the Absence of the Double-Stranded RNA Binding Protein B2

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Jessica E.; Venter, P. Arno; Short, James R.; Gopal, Radhika; Deddouche, Safia; Lamiable, Olivier; Imler, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Flock House virus (FHV) is a positive-sense RNA insect virus with a bipartite genome. RNA1 encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and RNA2 encodes the capsid protein. A third protein, B2, is translated from a subgenomic RNA3 derived from the 3′ end of RNA1. B2 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein that inhibits RNA silencing, a major antiviral defense pathway in insects. FHV is conveniently propagated in Drosophila melanogaster cells but can also be grown in mammalian cells. It was previously reported that B2 is dispensable for FHV RNA replication in BHK21 cells; therefore, we chose this cell line to generate a viral mutant that lacked the ability to produce B2. Consistent with published results, we found that RNA replication was indeed vigorous but the yield of progeny virus was negligible. Closer inspection revealed that infected cells contained very small amounts of coat protein despite an abundance of RNA2. B2 mutants that had reduced affinity for dsRNA produced analogous results, suggesting that the dsRNA binding capacity of B2 somehow played a role in coat protein synthesis. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization of FHV RNAs, we discovered that RNA2 is recruited into large cytoplasmic granules in the absence of B2, whereas the distribution of RNA1 remains largely unaffected. We conclude that B2, by binding to double-stranded regions in progeny RNA2, prevents recruitment of RNA2 into cellular structures, where it is translationally silenced. This represents a novel function of B2 that further contributes to successful completion of the nodaviral life cycle. PMID:24089564

  10. Mouse HORMAD1 is a meiosis i checkpoint protein that modulates DNA double- strand break repair during female meiosis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hyun; McGuire, Megan M; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2013-08-01

    Oocytes in embryonic ovaries enter meiosis I and arrest in the diplonema stage. Perturbations in meiosis I, such as abnormal double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair, adversely affect oocyte survival. We previously discovered that HORMAD1 is a critical component of the synaptonemal complex but not essential for oocyte survival. No significant differences were observed in the number of primordial, primary, secondary, and developing follicles between wild-type and Hormad1(−/−)newborn, 8-day, and 80-day ovaries. Meiosis I progression in Hormad1(−/−) embryonic ovaries was normal through the zygotene stage and in oocytes arrested in diplonema; however, we did not visualize oocytes with completely synapsed chromosomes. We investigated effects of HORMAD1 deficiency on the kinetics of DNA DSB formation and repair in the mouse ovary. We irradiated Embryonic Day 16.5 wild-type and Hormad1(−/−) ovaries and monitored DSB repair using gammaH2AX, RAD51, and DMC1 immunofluorescence. Our results showed a significant drop in unrepaired DSBs in the irradiated Hormad1(−/−) zygotene oocytes as compared to the wild-type oocytes. Moreover, Hormad1 deficiency rescued Dmc1(−/−) oocytes. These results indicate that Hormad1 deficiency promotes DMC1-independent DSB repairs, which in turn helps asynaptic Hormad1(−/−) oocytes resist perinatal loss. PMID:23759310

  11. Asymmetric segregation of the double-stranded RNA binding protein Staufen2 during mammalian neural stem cell divisions promotes lineage progression.

    PubMed

    Kusek, Gretchen; Campbell, Melissa; Doyle, Frank; Tenenbaum, Scott A; Kiebler, Michael; Temple, Sally

    2012-10-01

    Asymmetric cell divisions are a fundamental feature of neural development, and misregulation can lead to brain abnormalities or tumor formation. During an asymmetric cell division, molecular determinants are segregated preferentially into one daughter cell to specify its fate. An important goal is to identify the asymmetric determinants in neural progenitor cells, which could be tumor suppressors or inducers of specific neural fates. Here, we show that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein Stau2 is distributed asymmetrically during progenitor divisions in the developing mouse cortex, preferentially segregating into the Tbr2(+) neuroblast daughter, taking with it a subset of RNAs. Knockdown of Stau2 stimulates differentiation and overexpression produces periventricular neuronal masses, demonstrating its functional importance for normal cortical development. We immunoprecipitated Stau2 to examine its cargo mRNAs, and found enrichment for known asymmetric and basal cell determinants, such as Trim32, and identified candidates, including a subset involved in primary cilium function. PMID:22902295

  12. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress independent of DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxia; Lin, Yu-Fen; Palchik, Guillermo; Matsunaga, Shinji; Wang, Dong; Chen, Benjamin P.C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are the two major kinases involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, and are required for cellular resistance to ionizing radiation. While ATM is the key upstream kinase for DSB signaling, DNA-PKcs is primarily involved in DSB repair through the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) mechanism. In addition to DSB repair, ATM has been shown to be involved in oxidative stress response and could be activated directly in vitro upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. However, the role of DNA-PKcs in cellular response to oxidative stress is not clear. We hypothesize that DNA-PKcs may participate in the regulation of ATM activation in response to oxidative stress, and that this regulatory role is independent of its role in DNA double strand break repair. Our findings reveal that H2O2 induces hyperactivation of ATM signaling in DNA-PKcs deficient, but not Ligase 4 deficient cells, suggesting an NHEJ-independent role for DNA-PKcs. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs deficiency leads to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and to a decrease in cellular survival against H2O2. For the first time, our results reveal that DNA-PKcs plays a non-canonical role in the cellular response to oxidative stress, which is independent from its role in NHEJ. In addition, DNA-PKcs is a critical regulator of the oxidative stress response and contributes to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Our findings reveal that DNA-PKcs is required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and suppression of ROS build-up independently to its function in DSB repair. PMID:25224041

  13. Coordinate 5′ and 3′ endonucleolytic trimming of terminally blocked blunt DNA double-strand break ends by Artemis nuclease and DNA-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yannone, Steven M.; Khan, Imran S.; Zhou, Rui-Zhe; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; Povirk, Lawrence F.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work showed that, in the presence of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), Artemis slowly trims 3′-phosphoglycolate-terminated blunt ends. To examine the trimming reaction in more detail, long internally labeled DNA substrates were treated with Artemis. In the absence of DNA-PK, Artemis catalyzed extensive 5′→3′ exonucleolytic resection of double-stranded DNA. This resection required a 5′-phosphate, but did not require ATP, and was accompanied by endonucleolytic cleavage of the resulting 3′ overhang. In the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis-mediated trimming was more limited, was ATP-dependent and did not require a 5′-phosphate. For a blunt end with either a 3′-phosphoglycolate or 3′-hydroxyl terminus, endonucleolytic trimming of 2–4 nucleotides from the 3′-terminal strand was accompanied by trimming of 6 nt from the 5′-terminal strand. The results suggest that autophosphorylated DNA-PK suppresses the exonuclease activity of Artemis toward blunt-ended DNA, and promotes slow and limited endonucleolytic trimming of the 5′-terminal strand, resulting in short 3′ overhangs that are trimmed endonucleolytically. Thus, Artemis and DNA-PK can convert terminally blocked DNA ends of diverse geometry and chemical structure to a form suitable for polymerase-mediated patching and ligation, with minimal loss of terminal sequence. Such processing could account for the very small deletions often found at DNA double-strand break repair sites. PMID:18440975

  14. Autoantibodies define a family of proteins with conserved double-stranded RNA-binding domains as well as DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Shaheen, V M; Kao, P N; Okano, T; Shaw, M; Yoshida, H; Richards, H B; Reeves, W H

    1999-12-01

    Cellular responses to viral infection are signaled by double-stranded (ds) RNA, which is not found in substantial amounts in uninfected cells. Although cellular dsRNA-binding proteins have been described, their characterization is incomplete. We show that dsRNA-binding proteins are prominent autoantigens. Sera from B6 and B10.S mice with pristane-induced lupus and human autoimmune sera immunoprecipitated a novel set of 130-, 110-, 90-, 80-, and 45-kDa proteins. The proteins were all major cellular poly(IC)-binding factors. N-terminal amino acid sequences of p110 and p90 were identical and matched nuclear factor (NF) 90 and M phase phosphoprotein 4. p45 and p90 were identified as the NF45.NF90 complex, which binds the interleukin-2 promoter as well as certain highly structured viral RNAs. NF90.NF45 and M phase phosphoprotein 4 belong to a large group of proteins with conserved dsRNA-binding motifs. Besides binding dsRNA, NF90.NF45, p110, and p130 had single-stranded and dsDNA binding activity. Some sera contained autoantibodies whose binding was inhibited by poly(IC) but not single-stranded DNA or vice versa, suggesting that the DNA- and RNA-binding sites are different. These autoantibodies will be useful probes of the function of dsRNA-binding proteins. Their interaction with dsRNA, an immunological adjuvant, also could promote autoimmunity. PMID:10574923

  15. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  16. XRCC4 and XLF form long helical protein filaments suitable for DNA end protection and alignment to facilitate DNA double strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahaney, Brandi L.; Hammel, Michal; Meek, Katheryn; Tainer, John A.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and endogenous stress including replication failure, are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage. In human cells, most IR-induced DSBs are repaired by the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. One of the most critical steps in NHEJ is ligation of DNA ends by DNA ligase IV (LIG4), which interacts with, and is stabilized by, the scaffolding protein X-ray cross-complementing gene 4 (XRCC4). XRCC4 also interacts with XRCC4-like factor (XLF, also called Cernunnos); yet, XLF has been one of the least mechanistically understood proteins and precisely how XLF functions in NHEJ has been enigmatic. Here, we examine current combined structural and mutational findings that uncover integrated functions of XRCC4 and XLF and reveal their interactions to form long, helical protein filaments suitable to protect and align DSB ends. XLF-XRCC4 provides a global structural scaffold for ligating DSBs without requiring long complementary DNA ends, thus ensuring accurate and efficient ligation and repair. The assembly of these XRCC4-XLF filaments, providing both DNA end protection and alignment, may commit cells to NHEJ with general biological implications for NHEJ and DSB repair processes and their links to cancer predispositions and interventions. PMID:23442139

  17. XRCC4 and XLF form long helical protein filaments suitable for DNA end protection and alignment to facilitate DNA double strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Mahaney, Brandi L; Hammel, Michal; Meek, Katheryn; Tainer, John A; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2013-02-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and endogenous stress including replication failure, are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage. In human cells, most IR-induced DSBs are repaired by the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. One of the most critical steps in NHEJ is ligation of DNA ends by DNA ligase IV (LIG4), which interacts with, and is stabilized by, the scaffolding protein X-ray cross-complementing gene 4 (XRCC4). XRCC4 also interacts with XRCC4-like factor (XLF, also called Cernunnos); yet, XLF has been one of the least mechanistically understood proteins and precisely how XLF functions in NHEJ has been enigmatic. Here, we examine current combined structural and mutational findings that uncover integrated functions of XRCC4 and XLF and reveal their interactions to form long, helical protein filaments suitable to protect and align DSB ends. XLF-XRCC4 provides a global structural scaffold for ligating DSBs without requiring long DNA ends, thus ensuring accurate and efficient ligation and repair. The assembly of these XRCC4-XLF filaments, providing both DNA end protection and alignment, may commit cells to NHEJ with general biological implications for NHEJ and DSB repair processes and their links to cancer predispositions and interventions. PMID:23442139

  18. Role of Saccharomyces Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein RPA in the Strand Invasion Step of Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein replication protein A (RPA) is essential for both DNA replication and recombination. Chromatin immunoprecipitation techniques were used to visualize the kinetics and extent of RPA binding following induction of a double-strand break (DSB) and during its repair by homologous recombination in yeast. RPA assembles at the HO endonuclease-cut MAT locus simultaneously with the appearance of the DSB, and binding spreads away from the DSB as 5′ to 3′ exonuclease activity creates more ssDNA. RPA binding precedes binding of the Rad51 recombination protein. The extent of RPA binding is greater when Rad51 is absent, supporting the idea that Rad51 displaces RPA from ssDNA. RPA plays an important role during RAD51-mediated strand invasion of the MAT ssDNA into the donor sequence HML. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 (K45E) mutation in the large subunit of RPA is normal in facilitating Rad51 filament formation on ssDNA, but is unable to achieve synapsis between MAT and HML. Thus, RPA appears to play a role in strand invasion as well as in facilitating Rad51 binding to ssDNA, possibly by stabilizing the displaced ssDNA. PMID:14737196

  19. Xenopus Cds1 Is Regulated by DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase and ATR during the Cell Cycle Checkpoint Response to Double-Stranded DNA Ends

    PubMed Central

    McSherry, Troy D.; Mueller, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    The checkpoint kinase Cds1 (Chk2) plays a key role in cell cycle checkpoint responses with functions in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and induction of apoptosis. Proper regulation of Cds1 is essential for appropriate cellular responses to checkpoint-inducing insults. While the kinase ATM has been shown to be important in the regulation of human Cds1 (hCds1), here we report that the kinases ATR and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) play more significant roles in the regulation of Xenopus Cds1 (XCds1). Under normal cell cycle conditions, nonactivated XCds1 constitutively associates with a Xenopus ATR complex. The association of XCds1 with this complex does not require a functional forkhead activation domain but does require a putative SH3 binding region that is found in XCds1. In response to double-stranded DNA ends, the amino terminus of XCds1 is rapidly phosphorylated in a sequential pattern. First DNA-PK phosphorylates serine 39, a site not previously recognized as important in Cds1 regulation. Xenopus ATM, ATR, and/or DNA-PK then phosphorylate three consensus serine/glutamine sites. Together, these phosphorylations have the dual function of inducing dissociation from the ATR complex and independently promoting the full activation of XCds1. Thus, the checkpoint-mediated activation of XCds1 requires phosphorylation by multiple phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinases, protein-protein dissociation, and autophosphorylation. PMID:15509799

  20. The Axial Element Protein DESYNAPTIC2 Mediates Meiotic Double-Strand Break Formation and Synaptonemal Complex Assembly in Maize[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Yu-Hsin; Ku, Jia-Chi; Lin, Chien-Yu; Meeley, Robert

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair and recombine via repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs are formed in the context of chromatin loops, which are anchored to the proteinaceous axial element (AE). The AE later serves as a framework to assemble the synaptonemal complex (SC) that provides a transient but tight connection between homologous chromosomes. Here, we showed that DESYNAPTIC2 (DSY2), a coiled-coil protein, mediates DSB formation and is directly involved in SC assembly in maize (Zea mays). The dsy2 mutant exhibits homologous pairing defects, leading to sterility. Analyses revealed that DSB formation and the number of RADIATION SENSITIVE51 (RAD51) foci are largely reduced, and synapsis is completely abolished in dsy2 meiocytes. Super-resolution structured illumination microscopy showed that DSY2 is located on the AE and forms a distinct alternating pattern with the HORMA-domain protein ASYNAPTIC1 (ASY1). In the dsy2 mutant, localization of ASY1 is affected, and loading of the central element ZIPPER1 (ZYP1) is disrupted. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments further demonstrated that ZYP1 interacts with DSY2 but does not interact with ASY1. Therefore, DSY2, an AE protein, not only mediates DSB formation but also bridges the AE and central element of SC during meiosis. PMID:26296964

  1. Molecular architecture of tailed double-stranded DNA phages

    PubMed Central

    Fokine, Andrei; Rossmann, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages, or Caudovirales, constitute ~96% of all the known phages. Although these phages come in a great variety of sizes and morphology, their virions are mainly constructed of similar molecular building blocks via similar assembly pathways. Here we review the structure of tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages at a molecular level, emphasizing the structural similarity and common evolutionary origin of proteins that constitute these virions. PMID:24616838

  2. Quantitative genomic analysis of RecA protein binding during DNA double-strand break repair reveals RecBCD action in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cockram, Charlotte A.; Filatenkova, Milana; Danos, Vincent; El Karoui, Meriem; Leach, David R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms in the context of living cells requires the development of new methods of in vivo biochemical analysis to complement established in vitro biochemistry. A critically important molecular mechanism is genetic recombination, required for the beneficial reassortment of genetic information and for DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Central to recombination is the RecA (Rad51) protein that assembles into a spiral filament on DNA and mediates genetic exchange. Here we have developed a method that combines chromatin immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and mathematical modeling to quantify RecA protein binding during the active repair of a single DSB in the chromosome of Escherichia coli. We have used quantitative genomic analysis to infer the key in vivo molecular parameters governing RecA loading by the helicase/nuclease RecBCD at recombination hot-spots, known as Chi. Our genomic analysis has also revealed that DSBR at the lacZ locus causes a second RecBCD-mediated DSBR event to occur in the terminus region of the chromosome, over 1 Mb away. PMID:26261330

  3. Quantitative genomic analysis of RecA protein binding during DNA double-strand break repair reveals RecBCD action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cockram, Charlotte A; Filatenkova, Milana; Danos, Vincent; El Karoui, Meriem; Leach, David R F

    2015-08-25

    Understanding molecular mechanisms in the context of living cells requires the development of new methods of in vivo biochemical analysis to complement established in vitro biochemistry. A critically important molecular mechanism is genetic recombination, required for the beneficial reassortment of genetic information and for DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). Central to recombination is the RecA (Rad51) protein that assembles into a spiral filament on DNA and mediates genetic exchange. Here we have developed a method that combines chromatin immunoprecipitation with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and mathematical modeling to quantify RecA protein binding during the active repair of a single DSB in the chromosome of Escherichia coli. We have used quantitative genomic analysis to infer the key in vivo molecular parameters governing RecA loading by the helicase/nuclease RecBCD at recombination hot-spots, known as Chi. Our genomic analysis has also revealed that DSBR at the lacZ locus causes a second RecBCD-mediated DSBR event to occur in the terminus region of the chromosome, over 1 Mb away. PMID:26261330

  4. Ebola Virus VP35 Protein Binds Double-Stranded RNA and Inhibits Alpha/Beta Interferon Production Induced by RIG-I Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Washington B.; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Hartman, Amy L.; Kimberlin, Christopher R.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Basler, Christopher F.

    2006-01-01

    The Ebola virus (EBOV) VP35 protein blocks the virus-induced phosphorylation and activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), a transcription factor critical for the induction of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) expression. However, the mechanism(s) by which this blockage occurs remains incompletely defined. We now provide evidence that VP35 possesses double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding activity. Specifically, VP35 bound to poly(rI) · poly(rC)-coated Sepharose beads but not control beads. In contrast, two VP35 point mutants, R312A and K309A, were found to be greatly impaired in their dsRNA-binding activity. Competition assays showed that VP35 interacted specifically with poly(rI) · poly(rC), poly(rA) · poly(rU), or in vitro-transcribed dsRNAs derived from EBOV sequences, and not with single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) or double-stranded DNA. We then screened wild-type and mutant VP35s for their ability to target different components of the signaling pathways that activate IRF-3. These experiments indicate that VP35 blocks activation of IRF-3 induced by overexpression of RIG-I, a cellular helicase recently implicated in the activation of IRF-3 by either virus or dsRNA. Interestingly, the VP35 mutants impaired for dsRNA binding have a decreased but measurable IFN antagonist activity in these assays. Additionally, wild-type and dsRNA-binding-mutant VP35s were found to have equivalent abilities to inhibit activation of the IFN-β promoter induced by overexpression of IPS-1, a recently identified signaling molecule downstream of RIG-I, or by overexpression of the IRF-3 kinases IKKɛ and TBK-1. These data support the hypothesis that dsRNA binding may contribute to VP35 IFN antagonist function. However, additional mechanisms of inhibition, at a point proximal to the IRF-3 kinases, most likely also exist. PMID:16698997

  5. Acquisition of double-stranded DNA-binding ability in a hybrid protein between Escherichia coli CspA and the cold shock domain of human YB-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, N; Yamanaka, K; Inouye, M

    2000-11-01

    Escherichia coli CspA, a major cold shock protein, is dramatically induced upon temperature downshift. As it binds co-operatively to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and RNA without apparent sequence specificity, it has been proposed that CspA acts as an RNA chaperone to facilitate transcription and translation at low temperature. CspA consists of a five-stranded beta-barrel structure containing two RNA-binding motifs, RNP1 and RNP2. Eukaryotic Y-box proteins, such as human YB-1, are a family of nucleic acid-binding proteins that share a region of high homology with CspA (43% identity), termed the cold shock domain (CSD). Their cellular functions are very diverse and are associated with growth-related processes. Here, we replaced the six-residue loop region of CspA between the beta3 and beta4 strands with the corresponding region of the CSD of human YB-1 protein. The resulting hybrid protein became capable of binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in addition to ssDNA and RNA. The dsDNA-binding ability of an RNP1 point mutant (F20L) of the hybrid was almost unchanged. On the other hand, the dsDNA-binding ability of the hybrid protein was abolished in high salt concentrations in contrast to its ssDNA-binding ability. These results indicate that the loop region between the beta3 and beta4 strands of Y-box proteins, which is a little longer and more basic than that of CspA, plays an important role in their binding to dsDNA. PMID:11069676

  6. Cellular proteins specifically bind single- and double-stranded DNA and RNA from the initiation site of a transcript that crosses the origin of DNA replication of herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Roller, R J; McCormick, A L; Roizman, B

    1989-01-01

    The small-component origins of herpes simplex virus 1 DNA synthesis are transcribed late in infection by an RNA with heterogeneous initiation sites approximately 290-360 base pairs from the origins. We report that cellular proteins react with a labeled RNA probe representing the 5' terminus of a subset of this RNA but not with the complementary strand of this RNA. The proteins form two complexes. Complex 2 was formed by all nuclear extracts tested, whereas complex 1 was invariably formed by proteins present only in nuclear extracts of mock-infected cells. Complex 1 protects a contiguous stretch of 40 nucleotides of the labeled RNA probe from nuclease degradation. Formation of complex 1 was competitively inhibited in a sequence-specific fashion by single-stranded RNA and DNA and by double-stranded RNA and DNA. The protein(s) forming complex 1 is, thus, quite distinct from known nucleic acid-binding proteins in that they recognize a specific nucleotide sequence, irrespective of the nature (single- and double-stranded RNA and DNA) of the nucleic acid. We conclude the following: (i) the proteins forming complex 1 and 2 are probably different, (ii) complex 1 is neither required throughout infection for viral replication nor able to hinder viral replication in cells in culture, and (iii) cells susceptible to infection encode one or more proteins that recognize specific sequences in single-stranded nucleic acids; either these proteins impart a compatible conformation on single-stranded nucleic acids with the conformation of the same strand in the double-stranded nucleic acid, or these proteins confer a specific, distinct conformation to both single-stranded and double-stranded nucleic acids. Images PMID:2549540

  7. The proteomic investigation reveals interaction of mdig protein with the machinery of DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Yongju; Stemmer, Paul M; Zhang, Xiangmin; Bi, Yongyi; Yi, Zhengping; Chen, Fei

    2015-09-29

    To investigate how mineral dust-induced gene (mdig, also named as mina53, MINA, or NO52) promotes carcinogenesis through inducing active chromatin, we performed proteomics analyses for the interacting proteins that were co-immunoprecipitated by anti-mdig antibody from either the lung cancer cell line A549 cells or the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B cells. On SDS-PAGE gels, three to five unique protein bands were consistently observed in the complexes pulled-down by mdig antibody, but not the control IgG. In addition to the mdig protein, several DNA repair or chromatin binding proteins, including XRCC5, XRCC6, RBBP4, CBX8, PRMT5, and TDRD, were identified in the complexes by the proteomics analyses using both Orbitrap Fusion and Orbitrap XL nanoESI-MS/MS in four independent experiments. The interaction of mdig with some of these proteins was further validated by co-immunoprecipitation using antibodies against mdig and its partner proteins, respectively. These data, thus, provide evidence suggesting that mdig accomplishes its functions on chromatin, DNA repair and cell growth through interacting with the partner proteins. PMID:26293673

  8. Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is required for bone calcification in MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kaya; Okamura, Hirohiko; Amorim, Bruna Rabelo; Ozaki, Akiko; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2005-11-15

    In this study, we demonstrated that double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is required for the calcification of osteoblasts via the signal transducers and activators of transcription 1alpha (STAT1alpha) signaling in vitro. A dominant-negative mutant PKR cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine and which does not have catalytic activity, was transfected into mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells; thereby, we established cells that stably expressed the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the mutant cells. The PKR-K/R mutant cells exhibited up-regulated cell growth and had low alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The PKR-K/R mutant cells were not able to form bone nodules in vitro. In the PKR-K/R mutant cells, runt-related gene 2 (Runx2)-mediated transcription decreased compared with the levels in the control cells. The expression of STAT1alpha protein increased and the protein was translocated to the nucleus in the PKR-K/R mutant cells. When the expression of STAT1alpha protein in PKR mutant cells was suppressed using RNAi, the activity of Runx2-mediated transcription recovered to the control level. Our results indicate that PKR is a stimulator of Runx2 transcription and is a negative modulator of STAT1alpha expression. Our findings also suggest that PKR plays important roles in the differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts by modulating STAT1alpha and/or Runx2 expression. PMID:16216244

  9. Mutational Analysis of Vaccinia Virus E3 Protein: the Biological Functions Do Not Correlate with Its Biochemical Capacity To Bind Double-Stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Dueck, Kevin J.; Hu, YuanShen (Sandy); Chen, Peter; Deschambault, Yvon; Lee, Jocelyn; Varga, Jessie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccinia E3 protein has the biochemical capacity of binding to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The best characterized biological functions of the E3 protein include its host range function, suppression of cytokine expression, and inhibition of interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral activity. Currently, the role of the dsRNA binding capacity in the biological functions of the E3 protein is not clear. To further understand the mechanism of the E3 protein biological functions, we performed alanine scanning of the entire dsRNA binding domain of the E3 protein to examine the link between its biochemical capacity of dsRNA binding and biological functions. Of the 115 mutants examined, 20 were defective in dsRNA binding. Although the majority of the mutants defective in dsRNA binding also showed defective replication in HeLa cells, nine mutants (I105A, Y125A, E138A, F148A, F159A, K171A, L182A, L183A, and I187/188A) retained the host range function to various degrees. Further examination of a set of representative E3L mutants showed that residues essential for dsRNA binding are not essential for the biological functions of E3 protein, such as inhibition of protein kinase R (PKR) activation, suppression of cytokine expression, and apoptosis. Thus, data described in this communication strongly indicate the E3 protein performs its biological functions via a novel mechanism which does not correlate with its dsRNA binding activity. IMPORTANCE dsRNAs produced during virus replication are important pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for inducing antiviral immune responses. One of the strategies used by many viruses to counteract such antiviral immune responses is achieved by producing dsRNA binding proteins, such as poxvirus E3 family proteins, influenza virus NS1, and Ebola virus V35 proteins. The most widely accepted model for the biological functions of this class of viral dsRNA binding proteins is that they bind to and sequester viral dsRNA PAMPs; thus, they

  10. Insight into DNA and Protein Transport in Double-stranded DNA Viruses: The Structure of Bacteriophage N4

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung H.; McPartland, Jennifer; Kaganman, Irene; Bowman, Valorie D.; Rothman-Denes, Lucia B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacteriophage N4 encapsidates a 3,500 amino acid-long DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (vRNAP), which is injected into the host along with the N4 genome upon infection. The three-dimensional structures of wild-type and mutant N4 viruses lacking gp17, gp50, or gp65 were determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The virion has an icosahedral capsid with T = 9 quasi-symmetry that encapsidates well-organized dsDNA and vRNAP. The tail, attached at a unique pentameric vertex of the head, consists of a neck, twelve appendages, and six ribbons that constitute a non-contractile sheath around a central tail tube. Comparison of wild-type and mutant virus structures in conjunction with bioinformatics established the identity and virion locations of the major capsid protein (gp56), a decorating protein (gp17), the vRNAP (gp50), the tail sheath (gp65), the appendages (gp66), and the portal protein (gp59). The N4 virion organization provides insights into its assembly, and suggests a mechanism for genome and vRNAP transport strategies utilized by this unique system. PMID:18374942

  11. Conserved Surface Features Form the Double-stranded RNA Binding Site of Non-structural Protein 1 (NS1) from Influenza A and B Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Yin,C.; Khan, J.; Swapna, G.; Ertekin, A.; Krug, R.; Tong, L.; Montelione, G.

    2007-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause a highly contagious respiratory disease in humans and are responsible for periodic widespread epidemics with high mortality rates. The influenza A virus NS1 protein (NS1A) plays a key role in countering host antiviral defense and in virulence. The 73-residue N-terminal domain of NS1A (NS1A-(1-73)) forms a symmetric homodimer with a unique six-helical chain fold. It binds canonical A-form double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Mutational inactivation of this dsRNA binding activity of NS1A highly attenuates virus replication. Here, we have characterized the unique structural features of the dsRNA binding surface of NS1A-(1-73) using NMR methods and describe the 2.1-{angstrom} x-ray crystal structure of the corresponding dsRNA binding domain from human influenza B virus NS1B-(15-93). These results identify conserved dsRNA binding surfaces on both NS1A-(1-73) and NS1B-(15-93) that are very different from those indicated in earlier 'working models' of the complex between dsRNA and NS1A-(1-73). The combined NMR and crystallographic data reveal highly conserved surface tracks of basic and hydrophilic residues that interact with dsRNA. These tracks are structurally complementary to the polyphosphate backbone conformation of A-form dsRNA and run at an {approx}45{sup o} angle relative to the axes of helices {alpha}2/{alpha}2'. At the center of this dsRNA binding epitope, and common to NS1 proteins from influenza A and B viruses, is a deep pocket that includes both hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids. This pocket provides a target on the surface of the NS1 protein that is potentially suitable for the development of antiviral drugs targeting both influenza A and B viruses.

  12. Label-Free and Separation-Free Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry-Based Bioassay: Sensitive Determination of Single-Strand DNA, Protein, and Double-Strand DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Piaopiao; Wu, Peng; Chen, Junbo; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Xinfeng; Zheng, Chengbin; Hou, Xiandeng

    2016-02-16

    Based on selective and sensitive determination of Hg(2+) released from mercury complex by cold vapor generation (CVG) atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) using SnCl2 as a reductant, a novel label-free and separation-free strategy was proposed for DNA and protein bioassay. To construct the DNA bioassay platform, an Hg(2+)-mediated molecular beacon (hairpin) without labeling but possessing several thymine (T) bases at both ends was employed as the probe. It is well-known that Hg(2+) could trigger the formation of the hairpin structure through T-Hg(2+)-T connection. In the presence of a specific target, the hairpin structure could be broken and the captured Hg(2+) was released. Interestingly, it was found that SnCl2 could selectively reduce only free Hg(2+) to Hg(0) vapor in the presence of T-Hg(2+)-T complex, which could be separated from sample matrices for sensitive AFS detection. Three different types of analyte, namely, single-strand DNA (ssDNA), protein, and double-strand DNA (dsDNA), were investigated as the target analytes. Under the optimized conditions, this bioassay provided high sensitivity for ssDNA, protein, and dsDNA determination with the limits of detection as low as 0.2, 0.08, and 0.3 nM and the linear dynamic ranges of 10-150, 5-175, and 1-250 nM, respectively. The analytical performance for these analytes compares favorably with those by previously reported methods, demonstrating the potential usefulness and versatility of this new AFS-based bioassay. Moreover, the bioassay retains advantages of simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and sensitivity compared to most of the conventional methods. PMID:26781421

  13. Inhibition of single and double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase of RecA protein by ATP ribose-modified analogs.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Y; Hirano, H; Higashi, K

    1987-06-01

    The single-stranded (SS) DNA-dependent ATP hydrolysis at pH 7.5 and 6.2 and the double-stranded (DS) DNA-dependent ATP hydrolysis at pH 6.2 by recA protein (no reaction was detectable at pH 7.5) were found to be inhibited competitively by ribose-modified analogs of ATP, 3'-0-anthraniloyl-ATP (Ant-ATP) and 3'-0-(N-methylanthraniloyl)- ATP (Mant-ATP). The Ki values for Ant-ATP and Mant-ATP is SS DNA-dependent hydrolysis were about 8 and 5 microns at pH 7.5 and 12 and 10 microns at pH 6.2. For the DS DNA-dependent hydrolysis, the Ki values for Ant-ATP and Mant-ATP were about 7 and 6 microns. All these Ki values were much smaller than those of ADP which is also a competitive inhibitor for the ATPase activity of the recA protein. Ant-ATP and Mant-ATP caused a reduction in the Hill coefficients for ATP in SS DNA-dependent ATP hydrolysis at pH 7.5 and DS DNA-dependent hydrolysis. These observations showed that the ATP analogs which have a bulky substituent in the ribose moiety of ATP had strong hydrophobic interactions with the ATP binding site on the recA protein and also contributed to the cooperative effect of ATP. PMID:2956659

  14. Conserved surface features form the double-stranded RNA binding site of non-structural protein 1 (NS1) from influenza A and B viruses.

    PubMed

    Yin, Cuifeng; Khan, Javed A; Swapna, G V T; Ertekin, Asli; Krug, Robert M; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2007-07-13

    Influenza A viruses cause a highly contagious respiratory disease in humans and are responsible for periodic widespread epidemics with high mortality rates. The influenza A virus NS1 protein (NS1A) plays a key role in countering host antiviral defense and in virulence. The 73-residue N-terminal domain of NS1A (NS1A-(1-73)) forms a symmetric homodimer with a unique six-helical chain fold. It binds canonical A-form double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Mutational inactivation of this dsRNA binding activity of NS1A highly attenuates virus replication. Here, we have characterized the unique structural features of the dsRNA binding surface of NS1A-(1-73) using NMR methods and describe the 2.1-A x-ray crystal structure of the corresponding dsRNA binding domain from human influenza B virus NS1B-(15-93). These results identify conserved dsRNA binding surfaces on both NS1A-(1-73) and NS1B-(15-93) that are very different from those indicated in earlier "working models" of the complex between dsRNA and NS1A-(1-73). The combined NMR and crystallographic data reveal highly conserved surface tracks of basic and hydrophilic residues that interact with dsRNA. These tracks are structurally complementary to the polyphosphate backbone conformation of A-form dsRNA and run at an approximately 45 degrees angle relative to the axes of helices alpha2/alpha2'. At the center of this dsRNA binding epitope, and common to NS1 proteins from influenza A and B viruses, is a deep pocket that includes both hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids. This pocket provides a target on the surface of the NS1 protein that is potentially suitable for the development of antiviral drugs targeting both influenza A and B viruses. PMID:17475623

  15. Structural basis of nucleic-acid recognition and double-strand unwinding by the essential neuronal protein Pur-alpha.

    PubMed

    Weber, Janine; Bao, Han; Hartlmüller, Christoph; Wang, Zhiqin; Windhager, Almut; Janowski, Robert; Madl, Tobias; Jin, Peng; Niessing, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal DNA-/RNA-binding protein Pur-alpha is a transcription regulator and core factor for mRNA localization. Pur-alpha-deficient mice die after birth with pleiotropic neuronal defects. Here, we report the crystal structure of the DNA-/RNA-binding domain of Pur-alpha in complex with ssDNA. It reveals base-specific recognition and offers a molecular explanation for the effect of point mutations in the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome. Consistent with the crystal structure, biochemical and NMR data indicate that Pur-alpha binds DNA and RNA in the same way, suggesting binding modes for tri- and hexanucleotide-repeat RNAs in two neurodegenerative RNAopathies. Additionally, structure-based in vitro experiments resolved the molecular mechanism of Pur-alpha's unwindase activity. Complementing in vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrated the importance of a highly conserved phenylalanine for Pur-alpha's unwinding and neuroprotective function. By uncovering the molecular mechanisms of nucleic-acid binding, this study contributes to understanding the cellular role of Pur-alpha and its implications in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26744780

  16. Structural basis of nucleic-acid recognition and double-strand unwinding by the essential neuronal protein Pur-alpha

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Janine; Bao, Han; Hartlmüller, Christoph; Wang, Zhiqin; Windhager, Almut; Janowski, Robert; Madl, Tobias; Jin, Peng; Niessing, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal DNA-/RNA-binding protein Pur-alpha is a transcription regulator and core factor for mRNA localization. Pur-alpha-deficient mice die after birth with pleiotropic neuronal defects. Here, we report the crystal structure of the DNA-/RNA-binding domain of Pur-alpha in complex with ssDNA. It reveals base-specific recognition and offers a molecular explanation for the effect of point mutations in the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome. Consistent with the crystal structure, biochemical and NMR data indicate that Pur-alpha binds DNA and RNA in the same way, suggesting binding modes for tri- and hexanucleotide-repeat RNAs in two neurodegenerative RNAopathies. Additionally, structure-based in vitro experiments resolved the molecular mechanism of Pur-alpha's unwindase activity. Complementing in vivo analyses in Drosophila demonstrated the importance of a highly conserved phenylalanine for Pur-alpha's unwinding and neuroprotective function. By uncovering the molecular mechanisms of nucleic-acid binding, this study contributes to understanding the cellular role of Pur-alpha and its implications in neurodegenerative diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11297.001 PMID:26744780

  17. Novel double-stranded RNA viruses of plant-feeding insects encode a serine-alanine-proline rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to fungal viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel double stranded RNAs (~8 kbp) were isolated from the three cornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. Genome organization of the two new viruses, designated as Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and ...

  18. Plant-feeding insects harbor double-stranded RNA viruses encoding a novel proline-alanine rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to that of fungal viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel double-stranded RNAs (~8 kbp) were isolated from three cornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. Genomes of the two new viruses, designated as Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and Circulifer tenell...

  19. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 and DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Have Equivalent Roles in Double Strand Break Repair Following Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jody; Smith, Graeme; Curtin, Nicola J.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are predominantly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), involving DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), well characterized for its role in single strand break repair, may also facilitate DSB repair. We investigated the activation of these enzymes by differing DNA ends and their interaction in the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Methods and Materials: The effect of PARP and DNA-PK inhibitors (KU-0058684 and NU7441) on repair of IR-induced DSBs was investigated in DNA-PK and PARP-1 proficient and deficient cells by measuring gammaH2AX foci and neutral comets. Complementary in vitro enzyme kinetics assays demonstrated the affinities of DNA-PK and PARP-1 for DSBs with varying DNA termini. Results: DNA-PK and PARP-1 both promoted the fast phase of resolution of IR-induced DSBs in cells. Inactivation of both enzymes was not additive, suggesting that PARP-1 and DNA-PK cooperate within the same pathway to promote DSB repair. The affinities of the two enzymes for oligonucleotides with blunt, 3' GGG or 5' GGG overhanging termini were similar and overlapping (K{sub dapp} = 2.6-6.4nM for DNA-PK; 1.7-4.5nM for PARP-1). DNA-PK showed a slightly greater affinity for overhanging DNA and was significantly more efficient when activated by a 5' GGG overhang. PARP-1 had a preference for blunt-ended DNA and required a separate factor for efficient stimulation by a 5' GGG overhang. Conclusion: DNA-PK and PARP-1 are both required in a pathway facilitating the fast phase of DNA DSB repair.

  20. Coordinateendonucleolytic 5' and 3' trimming of terminally blocked blunt DNA double-strand break ends by Artemis nuclease and DNA-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Povirk, Lawrence; Yannone, Steven M.; Khan, Imran S.; Zhou, Rui-Zhe; Zhou, Tong; Valerie, Kristoffer; F., Lawrence

    2008-02-18

    Previous work showed that, in the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis slowly trims 3'-phosphoglycolate-terminated blunt ends. To examine the trimming reaction in more detail, long internally labeled DNA substrates were treated with Artemis. In the absence of DNA-PK, Artemis catalyzed extensive 5' {yields} 3' exonucleolytic resection of double-stranded DNA. This resection required a 5'-phosphate but did not require ATP, and was accompanied by endonucleolytic cleavage of the resulting 3' overhang. In the presence of DNA-PK, Artemis-mediated trimming was more limited, was ATP-dependent, and did not require a 5'-phosphate. For a blunt end with either a 3'-phosphoglycolate or 3'-hydroxyl terminus, endonucleolytic trimming of 2-4 nucleotides from the 3'-terminal strand was accompanied by trimming of 6 nucleotides from the 5'-terminal strand. The results suggest that autophosphorylated DNA-PK suppresses the exonuclease activity of Artemis toward blunt-ended DNA, and promotes slow and limited endonucleolytic trimming of the 5'-terminal strand, resulting in short 3' overhangs that are trimmed endonucleolytically. Thus, Artemis and DNA-PK can convert terminally blocked DNA ends of diverse geometry and chemical structure to a form suitable for polymerase mediated patching and ligation, with minimal loss of terminal sequence. Such processing could account for the very small deletions often found at DNA double-strand break repair sites.

  1. hnRNP-U is a specific DNA-dependent protein kinase substrate phosphorylated in response to DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, Fredrik M.; Clarke, Paul R.

    2009-03-27

    Cellular responses to DNA damage are orchestrated by the large phosphoinositol-3-kinase related kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK. We have developed a cell-free system to dissect the biochemical mechanisms of these kinases. Using this system, we identify heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U), also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), as a specific substrate for DNA-PK. We show that hnRNP-U is phosphorylated at Ser59 by DNA-PK in vitro and in cells in response to DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of hnRNP-U suggests novel functions for DNA-PK in the response to DNA damage.

  2. Cooperative Roles of Fish Protein Kinase Containing Z-DNA Binding Domains and Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase in Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Response▿†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting-Kai; Zhang, Yi-Bing; Liu, Ying; Sun, Fan; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR) inhibits protein synthesis by phosphorylating eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). In fish species, in addition to PKR, there exists a PKR-like protein kinase containing Z-DNA binding domains (PKZ). However, the antiviral role of fish PKZ and the functional relationship between fish PKZ and PKR remain unknown. Here we confirmed the coexpression of fish PKZ and PKR proteins in Carassius auratus blastula embryonic (CAB) cells and identified them as two typical interferon (IFN)-inducible eIF2α kinases, both of which displayed an ability to inhibit virus replication. Strikingly, fish IFN or all kinds of IFN stimuli activated PKZ and PKR to phosphorylated eIF2α. Overexpression of both fish kinases together conferred much more significant inhibition of virus replication than overexpression of either protein, whereas morpholino knockdown of both made fish cells more vulnerable to virus infection than knockdown of either. The antiviral ability of fish PKZ was weaker than fish PKR, which correlated with its lower ability to phosphorylate eIF2α than PKR. Moreover, the independent association of fish PKZ or PKR reveals that each of them formed homodimers and that fish PKZ phosphorylated eIF2α independently on fish PKR and vice versa. These results suggest that fish PKZ and PKR play a nonredundant but cooperative role in IFN antiviral response. PMID:21937641

  3. Single-stranded DNA oligomers stimulate error-prone alternative repair of DNA double-strand breaks through hijacking Ku protein

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ying; Britton, Sébastien; Delteil, Christine; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P.; Barboule, Nadia; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In humans, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by two mutually-exclusive mechanisms, homologous recombination or end-joining. Among end-joining mechanisms, the main process is classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) which relies on Ku binding to DNA ends and DNA Ligase IV (Lig4)-mediated ligation. Mostly under Ku- or Lig4-defective conditions, an alternative end-joining process (A-EJ) can operate and exhibits a trend toward microhomology usage at the break junction. Homologous recombination relies on an initial MRN-dependent nucleolytic degradation of one strand at DNA ends. This process, named DNA resection generates 3′ single-stranded tails necessary for homologous pairing with the sister chromatid. While it is believed from the current literature that the balance between joining and recombination processes at DSBs ends is mainly dependent on the initiation of resection, it has also been shown that MRN activity can generate short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssO) that may also be implicated in repair regulation. Here, we evaluate the effect of ssO on end-joining at DSB sites both in vitro and in cells. We report that under both conditions, ssO inhibit C-NHEJ through binding to Ku and favor repair by the Lig4-independent microhomology-mediated A-EJ process. PMID:26350212

  4. Single-stranded DNA oligomers stimulate error-prone alternative repair of DNA double-strand breaks through hijacking Ku protein.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Britton, Sébastien; Delteil, Christine; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P; Barboule, Nadia; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    In humans, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by two mutually-exclusive mechanisms, homologous recombination or end-joining. Among end-joining mechanisms, the main process is classical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) which relies on Ku binding to DNA ends and DNA Ligase IV (Lig4)-mediated ligation. Mostly under Ku- or Lig4-defective conditions, an alternative end-joining process (A-EJ) can operate and exhibits a trend toward microhomology usage at the break junction. Homologous recombination relies on an initial MRN-dependent nucleolytic degradation of one strand at DNA ends. This process, named DNA resection generates 3' single-stranded tails necessary for homologous pairing with the sister chromatid. While it is believed from the current literature that the balance between joining and recombination processes at DSBs ends is mainly dependent on the initiation of resection, it has also been shown that MRN activity can generate short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssO) that may also be implicated in repair regulation. Here, we evaluate the effect of ssO on end-joining at DSB sites both in vitro and in cells. We report that under both conditions, ssO inhibit C-NHEJ through binding to Ku and favor repair by the Lig4-independent microhomology-mediated A-EJ process. PMID:26350212

  5. The involvement of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and two Sid-1-like transmembrane proteins in double-stranded RNA uptake in the Colorado potato beetle midgut.

    PubMed

    Cappelle, K; de Oliveira, C F R; Van Eynde, B; Christiaens, O; Smagghe, G

    2016-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool in entomology and shows promise as a crop protection strategy, but variability in its efficiency across different insect species limits its applicability. For oral uptake of the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), the RNAi trigger, two different mechanisms are known: systemic RNA interference deficient-1 (Sid-1) transmembrane channel-mediated uptake and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. So far, a wide range of experiments has been conducted, confirming the involvement of one of the pathways in dsRNA uptake, but never both pathways in the same species. We investigated the role of both pathways in dsRNA uptake in the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, known to have an efficient RNAi response. Through RNAi-of-RNAi experiments, we demonstrated the contribution of two different sid-1-like (sil) genes, silA and silC, and clathrin heavy chain and the 16kDa subunit of the vacuolar H(+) ATPase (vha16), elements of the endocytic pathway, to the RNAi response. Furthermore, the sid-1-like genes were examined through phylogenetic and hydrophobicity analysis. This article reports for the first time on the involvement of two pathways in dsRNA uptake in an insect species and stresses the importance of evaluating both pathways through a well-devised reporter system in any future experiments on cellular dsRNA uptake. PMID:26959524

  6. His-154 is involved in the linkage of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae L-A double-stranded RNA virus Gag protein to the cap structure of mRNAs and is essential for M1 satellite virus expression.

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, A; Ribas, J C; Wickner, R B; Sonenberg, N

    1994-01-01

    The coat protein (Gag) of the double-stranded RNA virus L-A was previously shown to form a covalent bond with the cap structure of eukaryotic mRNAs. Here, we identify the linkage as a phosphoroimidazole bond between the alpha phosphate of the cap structure and a nitrogen in the Gag protein His-154 imidazole side chain. Mutations of His-154 abrogate the ability of Gag to bind to the cap structure, without affecting cap recognition, in vivo virus particle formation from an L-A cDNA clone, or in vitro specific binding and replication of plus-stranded single-stranded RNA. However, genetic analyses demonstrate that His-154 is essential for M1 satellite virus expression. Images PMID:8139566

  7. A Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay to Measure Ebola Virus Viral Protein 35-Associated Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Stimulated, Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene 1-Mediated Induction of Interferon β.

    PubMed

    Cannas, Valeria; Daino, Gian Luca; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, the type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) innate immune response is suppressed by EBOV viral protein 35 (VP35), a validated drug target. Identification of EBOV VP35 inhibitors requires a cellular system able to assess the VP35-based inhibitory functions of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) IFN-β induction. We established a miniaturized luciferase gene reporter assay in A549 cells that measures IFN-β induction by viral dsRNA and is dose-dependently inhibited by VP35 expression. When compared to influenza A virus NS1 protein, EBOV VP35 showed improved inhibition of viral dsRNA-based IFN-β induction. This assay can be used to screen for EBOV VP35 inhibitors. PMID:25926684

  8. Induction of dsRNA-activated protein kinase links mitochondrial unfolded protein response to the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Messlik, Anja; Nunes, Tiago; Liu, Bo; Kim, Sandy C; Hoogenraad, Nick; Sans, Miquel; Sartor, R Balfour; Haller, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) feature multiple cellular stress responses, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein responses (UPRs). UPRs represent autoregulatory pathways that adjust organelle capacity to cellular demand. A similar mechanism, mitochondrial UPR (mtUPR), has been described for mitochondria. ER UPR in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) contributes to the development of intestinal inflammation, and since mitochondrial alterations and dysfunction are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBDs, the authors characterised mtUPR in the context of intestinal inflammation. Methods Truncated ornithine transcarbamylase was used to selectively induce mtUPR in a murine IEC line. Dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) was administered to PKR (double-stranded-RNA-activated protein kinase) knockout mice to induce IEC stress in vivo and to test for their susceptibility to DSS-induced colitis. Expression levels of the mitochondrial chaperone chaperonin 60 (CPN60) and PKR were quantified in IECs from patients with IBDs and from murine models of colitis using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Results Selective mtUPR induction by truncated ornithine transcarbamylase transfection triggered the phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 2α and cJun through the recruitment of PKR. Using pharmacological inhibitors and small inhibitory RNA, the authors identified mtUPR-induced eIF2α phosphorylation and transcription factor activation (cJun/AP1) as being dependent on the activities of the mitochondrial protease ClpP and the cytoplasmic kinase PKR. Pkr−/− mice failed to induce CPN60 in IECs upon DSS treatment at early time points and subsequently showed an almost complete resistance to DSS-induced colitis. Under inflammatory conditions, primary IECs from patients with IBDs and two murine models of colitis exhibited a strong induction of the mtUPR marker protein CPN60 associated with enhanced expression of PKR

  9. Melting of persistent double-stranded polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahi, Sahand Jamal; Hertzberg, Mark Peter; Kardar, Mehran

    2008-11-01

    Motivated by recent DNA-pulling experiments, we revisit the Poland-Scheraga model of melting a double-stranded polymer. We include distinct bending rigidities for both the double-stranded segments and the single-stranded segments forming a bubble. There is also bending stiffness at the branch points between the two segment types. The transfer matrix technique for single persistent chains is generalized to describe the branching bubbles. Properties of spherical harmonics are then exploited in truncating and numerically solving the resulting transfer matrix. This allows efficient computation of phase diagrams and force-extension curves (isotherms). While the main focus is on exposition of the transfer matrix technique, we provide general arguments for a reentrant melting transition in stiff double strands. Our theoretical approach can also be extended to study polymers with bubbles of any number of strands, with potential applications to molecules such as collagen.

  10. Chk1 inhibition after replicative stress activates a double strand break response mediated by ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    McNeely, Samuel; Conti, Chiara; Sheikh, Tahir; Patel, Himali; Zabludoff, Sonya; Pommier, Yves; Schwartz, Gary; Tse, Archie

    2010-03-01

    Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) regulates cell cycle checkpoints and DNA damage repair in response to genotoxic stress. Inhibition of Chk1 is an emerging strategy for potentiating the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrate that AZD7762, an ATP -competitive Chk1/2 inhibitor induces gammaH2AX in gemcitabine-treated cells by altering both dynamics and stability of replication forks, allowing the firing of suppressed replication origins as measured by DNA fiber combing and causing a dramatic increase in DNA breaks as measured by comet assay. Furthermore, we identify ATM and DNA-PK, rather than ATR, as the kinases mediating gammaH2AX induction, suggesting AZD7762 converts stalled forks into double strand breaks (DSBs). Consistent with DSB formation upon fork collapse, cells deficient in DSB repair by lack of BRCA2, XRCC3 or DNA-PK were selectively more sensitive to combined AZD7762 and gemcitabine. Checkpoint abrogation by AZD7762 also caused premature mitosis in gemcitabine-treated cells arrested in G(1)/early S-phase. Prevention of premature mitotic entry via Cdk1 siRNA knockdown suppressed apoptosis. These results demonstrate that chemosensitization of gemcitabine by Chk1 inhibition results from at least three cellular events, namely, activation of origin firing, destabilization of stalled replication forks and entry of cells with damaged DNA into lethal mitosis. Additionally, the current study indicates that the combination of Chk1 inhibitor and gemcitabine may be particularly effective in targeting tumors with specific DNA repair defects. PMID:20160494

  11. Double-Stranded RNA Binding of Influenza B Virus Nonstructural NS1 Protein Inhibits Protein Kinase R but Is Not Essential To Antagonize Production of Alpha/Beta Interferon▿

    PubMed Central

    Dauber, Bianca; Schneider, Jana; Wolff, Thorsten

    2006-01-01

    Expression of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) in virus-infected vertebrate cells is a key event in the establishment of a sustained antiviral response, which is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) produced during viral replication. These antiviral cytokines initiate the expression of cellular proteins with activities that limit the replication and spread of the invading viruses. Within this response, the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase R (PKR) that is expressed at constitutive levels and upregulated by IFN-α/β acts as an important antiviral effector that can block the cellular translational machinery. We previously demonstrated that efficient replication of influenza B virus depends on the viral dsRNA-binding NS1 protein that inhibits the transcriptional activation of IFN-α/β genes. Here we tested the postulate that the viral NS1 protein counteracts antiviral responses through sequestering intracellular dsRNA by analyzing a collection of recombinant influenza B viruses. As expected, viruses expressing dsRNA-binding-defective NS1 proteins were strongly attenuated for replication in IFN-competent hosts. Interestingly, these virus mutants failed to prevent activation of PKR but could effectively limit IFN induction. Conversely, a mutant virus expressing the N-terminal dsRNA-binding domain of NS1 prevented PKR activation, but not IFN induction, suggesting an important role for the NS1 C-terminal part in silencing the activation route of IFN-α/β genes. Thus, our findings indicate an unexpected mechanistic dichotomy of the influenza B virus NS1 protein in the suppression of antiviral responses, which involves at least one activity that is largely separable from dsRNA binding. PMID:16987984

  12. DNA double-strand break repair: a relentless hunt uncovers new prey.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, JoAnn M; Ferguson, David O

    2006-01-27

    A major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks is nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). In this issue of Cell, and report the discovery of a new NHEJ factor called Cernunnos-XLF. Both groups report that this protein is mutated in a rare inherited human syndrome characterized by severe immunodeficiency, developmental delay, and hypersensitivity to agents that cause DNA double-strand breaks. PMID:16439201

  13. 'Black sheep' that don't leave the double-stranded RNA-binding domain fold.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Michael L; Maquat, Lynne E

    2014-07-01

    The canonical double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding domain (dsRBD) is composed of an α1-β1-β2-β3-α2 secondary structure that folds in three dimensions to recognize dsRNA. Recently, structural and functional studies of divergent dsRBDs revealed adaptations that include intra- and/or intermolecular protein interactions, sometimes in the absence of detectable dsRNA-binding ability. We describe here how discrete dsRBD components can accommodate pronounced amino-acid sequence changes while maintaining the core fold. We exemplify the growing importance of divergent dsRBDs in mRNA decay by discussing Dicer, Staufen (STAU)1 and 2, trans-activation responsive RNA-binding protein (TARBP)2, protein activator of protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR) (PACT), DiGeorge syndrome critical region (DGCR)8, DEAH box helicase proteins (DHX) 9 and 30, and dsRBD-like fold-containing proteins that have ribosome-related functions. We also elaborate on the computational limitations to discovering yet-to-be-identified divergent dsRBDs. PMID:24954387

  14. Loss of expression of the double strand break repair protein ATM is associated with worse prognosis in colorectal cancer and loss of Ku70 expression is associated with CIN

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Andrew D; Domingo, Enric; McGregor, Megan; Presz, Mikael; Johnstone, Elaine; Midgley, Rachel; Kerr, David; Oukrif, Dahmane; Novelli, Marco; Abulafi, Muti; Hodgson, Shirley V; Fadhil, Wakkas; Ilyas, Mohammad; Tomlinson, Ian PM

    2012-01-01

    Repair of double strand DNA breaks (DSBs) is pivotal in maintaining normal cell division and disruption of this system has been shown to be a key factor in carcinogenesis. Loss of expression of the DSB repair proteins have previously been shown to be associated with poorer survival in colorectal cancer. We wished to ascertain the relationship of altered expression of the DSB repair proteins γ-H2AX (gamma-H2AX), ATM and Ku70 with biological and clinico-pathological features of colorectal cancer. 908 tumours from the VICTOR clinical trial of stage II/III colorectal cancer were analysed for expression of γ-H2AX, ATM and Ku70 using immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were correlated with CIN and with disease-free survival, correcting for microsatellite instability, BRAF/KRAS mutation status, Dukes stage, chemo/radiotherapy, age, gender and tumour location. Down-regulated Ku70 expression was associated with chromosomal instability (p=0.029) in colorectal cancer. Reduced ATM expression was an independent marker of poor disease-free survival (HR=1.67, 95% CI 1.11-2.50, p=0.015). For Ku70, further studies are required to investigate the potential relationship of non-homologous end joining with chromosomal instability. Loss of ATM expression might serve as a biomarker of poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. PMID:23154512

  15. Synthesis of Biotinylated Inositol Hexakisphosphate To Study DNA Double-Strand Break Repair and Affinity Capture of IP6-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Chensong; Summerlin, Matthew; Bruzik, Karol S; Hanakahi, Leslyn

    2015-10-20

    Inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) is a soluble inositol polyphosphate, which is abundant in mammalian cells. Despite the participation of IP6 in critical cellular functions, few IP6-binding proteins have been characterized. We report on the synthesis, characterization, and application of biotin-labeled IP6 (IP6-biotin), which has biotin attached at position 2 of the myo-inositol ring via an aminohexyl linker. Like natural IP6, IP6-biotin stimulated DNA ligation by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in vitro. The Ku protein is a required NHEJ factor that has been shown to bind IP6. We found that IP6-biotin could affinity capture Ku and other required NHEJ factors from human cell extracts, including the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), XRCC4, and XLF. Direct binding studies with recombinant proteins show that Ku is the only NHEJ factor with affinity for IP6-biotin. DNA-PKcs, XLF, and the XRCC4:ligase IV complex interact with Ku in cell extracts and likely interact indirectly with IP6-biotin. IP6-biotin was used to tether streptavidin to Ku, which inhibited NHEJ in vitro. These proof-of-concept experiments suggest that molecules like IP6-biotin might be used to molecularly target biologically important proteins that bind IP6. IP6-biotin affinity capture experiments show that numerous proteins specifically bind IP6-biotin, including casein kinase 2, which is known to bind IP6, and nucleolin. Protein binding to IP6-biotin is selective, as IP3, IP4, and IP5 did not compete for binding of proteins to IP6-biotin. Our results document IP6-biotin as a useful tool for investigating the role of IP6 in biological systems. PMID:26397942

  16. Entropy in DNA Double-Strand Break, Detection and Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Schindler, Christina; Heermann, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    In biology, the term entropy is often understood as a measure of disorder - a restrictive interpretation that can even be misleading. Recently it has become clearer and clearer that entropy, contrary to conventional wisdom, can help to order and guide biological processes in living cells. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most dangerous lesions and efficient damage detection and repair is essential for organism viability. However, what remains unknown is the precise mechanism of targeting the site of damage within billions of intact nucleotides and a crowded nuclear environment, a process which is often referred to as recruitment or signaling. Here we show that the change in entropy associated with inflicting a DSB facilitates the recruitment of damage sensor proteins. By means of computational modeling we found that higher mobility and local chromatin structure accelerate protein association at DSB ends. We compared the effect of different chromatin architectures on protein dynamics and concentrations in the vicinity of DSBs, and related these results to experiments on repair in heterochromatin. Our results demonstrate how entropy contributes to a more efficient damage detection. We identify entropy as the physical basis for DNA double-strand break signaling.

  17. Production of HIV Particles Is Regulated by Altering Sub-Cellular Localization and Dynamics of Rev Induced by Double-Strand RNA Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Patiño, Claudia; Zapata, Ximena; García, María Patricia; Arteaga, José; Chamot, Christophe; Kumar, Ajit; Hernandez-Verdun, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 encoded Rev is essential for export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, of unspliced and singly spliced transcripts coding for structural and nonstructural viral proteins. This process is spatially and temporally coordinated resulting from the interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here we examined the effects of the sub-cellular localization and dynamics of Rev on the efficiency of nucleocytoplasmic transport of HIV-1 Gag transcripts and virus particle production. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after bleaching (FRAP), we report that NF90ctv, a cellular protein involved in Rev function, alters both the sub-cellular localization and dynamics of Rev in vivo, which drastically affects the accumulation of the viral protein p24. The CRM1–dependent nuclear export of Gag mRNA linked to the Rev Response Element (RRE) is dependent on specific domains of the NF90ctv protein. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the appropriate intracellular localization and dynamics of Rev could regulate Gag assembly and HIV-1 replication. PMID:21364984

  18. Double-Stranded RNA Resists Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois

    2011-03-01

    Much attention has been focused on DNA condensation because of its fundamental biological importance. The recent discovery of new roles for RNA duplexes demands efficient packaging of double-stranded RNA for therapeutics. Here we report measurements of short DNA and RNA duplexes in the presence of trivalent ions. Under conditions where UV spectroscopy indicates condensation of DNA duplexes into (insoluble) precipitates, RNA duplexes remain soluble. Small angle x-ray scattering results suggest that the differing surface topologies of RNA and DNA may be crucial in generating the attractive forces that result in precipitation.

  19. Purification of a cellular, double-stranded DNA-binding protein required for initiation of adenovirus DNA replication by using a rapid filter-binding assay.

    PubMed Central

    Diffley, J F; Stillman, B

    1986-01-01

    A rapid and quantitative nitrocellulose filter-binding assay is described for the detection of nuclear factor I, a HeLa cell sequence-specific DNA-binding protein required for the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. In this assay, the abundant nonspecific DNA-binding activity present in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts was greatly reduced by preincubation of these extracts with a homopolymeric competitor DNA. Subsequently, specific DNA-binding activity was detected as the preferential retention of a labeled 48-base-pair DNA fragment containing a functional nuclear factor I binding site compared with a control DNA fragment to which nuclear factor I did not bind specifically. This specific DNA-binding activity was shown to be both quantitative and time dependent. Furthermore, the conditions of this assay allowed footprinting of nuclear factor I in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts and quantitative detection of the protein during purification. Using unfrozen HeLa cells and reagents known to limit endogenous proteolysis, nuclear factor I was purified to near homogeneity from HeLa nuclear extracts by a combination of standard chromatography and specific DNA affinity chromatography. Over a 400-fold purification of nuclear factor I, on the basis of the specific activity of both sequence-specific DNA binding and complementation of adenovirus DNA replication in vitro, was affected by this purification. The most highly purified fraction was greatly enriched for a polypeptide of 160 kilodaltons on silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Furthermore, this protein cosedimented with specific DNA-binding activity on glycerol gradients. That this fraction indeed contained nuclear factor I was demonstrated by both DNase I footprinting and its function in the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Finally, the stoichiometry of specific DNA binding by nuclear factor I is shown to be most consistent with 2 mol of the 160-kilodalton polypeptide

  20. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    PubMed Central

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to inter-DNA attraction and eventual condensation. Surprisingly, the condensation is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same negative charge as DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. Here, we combine experiment and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that explains the variations in condensation of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplexes, from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA. Circular dichroism measurements suggest that duplex helical geometry is not the fundamental property that ultimately determines the observed differences in condensation. Instead, these differences are governed by the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding to NA. There are two major NA-CoHex binding modes—internal and external—distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. We find a significant difference, up to 5-fold, in the fraction of ions bound to the external surfaces of the different NA constructs studied. NA condensation propensity is determined by the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. PMID:25123663

  1. A double-stranded RNA element from a hypovirulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani occurs in DNA form and is genetically related to the pentafunctional AROM protein of the shikimate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lakshman, Dilip K.; Jian, Jianhua; Tavantzis, Stellos M.

    1998-01-01

    M2 is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) element occurring in the hypovirulent isolate Rhs 1A1 of the plant pathogenic basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani. Rhs 1A1 originated as a sector of the virulent field isolate Rhs 1AP, which contains no detectable amount of the M2 dsRNA. The complete sequence (3,570 bp) of the M2 dsRNA has been determined. A 6.9-kbp segment of total DNA from either Rhs 1A1 or Rhs 1AP hybridizes with an M2-specific cDNA probe. The sequences of M2 dsRNA and of PCR products generated from Rhs 1A1 total DNA were found to be identical. Thus this report describes a fungal host containing full-length DNA copies of a dsRNA element. A major portion of the M2 dsRNA is located in the cytoplasm, whereas a smaller amount is found in mitochondria. Based on either the universal or the mitochondrial genetic code of filamentous fungi, one strand of M2 encodes a putative protein of 754 amino acids. The resulting polypeptide has all four motifs of a dsRNA viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) and is phylogenetically related to the RDRP of a mitochondrial dsRNA associated with hypovirulence in strain NB631 of Cryphonectria parasitica, incitant of chestnut blight. This polypeptide also has significant sequence similarity with two domains of a pentafunctional polypeptide, which catalyzes the five central steps of the shikimate pathway in yeast and filamentous fungi. PMID:9600982

  2. Why double-stranded RNA resists condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette; Katz, Andrea M.; Chen, Yujie; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan A.; Pollack, Lois; Onufriev, Alexey

    2014-09-15

    The addition of small amounts of multivalent cations to solutions containing double-stranded DNA leads to attraction between the negatively charged helices and eventually to condensation. Surprisingly, this effect is suppressed in double-stranded RNA, which carries the same charge as the DNA, but assumes a different double helical form. However, additional characterization of short (25 base-pairs) nucleic acid (NA) duplex structures by circular dichroism shows that measured differences in condensation are not solely determined by duplex helical geometry. Here we combine experiment, theory, and atomistic simulations to propose a mechanism that connects the observed variations in condensation of short NA duplexes with the spatial variation of cobalt hexammine (CoHex) binding at the NA duplex surface. The atomistic picture that emerged showed that CoHex distributions around the NA reveals two major NA-CoHex binding modes -- internal and external -- distinguished by the proximity of bound CoHex to the helical axis. Decreasing trends in experimentally observed condensation propensity of the four studied NA duplexes (from B-like form of homopolymeric DNA, to mixed sequence DNA, to DNA:RNA hybrid, to A-like RNA) are explained by the progressive decrease of a single quantity: the fraction of CoHex ions in the external binding mode. Thus, while NA condensation depends on a complex interplay between various structural and sequence features, our coupled experimental and theoretical results suggest a new model in which a single parameter connects the NA condensation propensity with geometry and sequence dependence of CoHex binding.

  3. Saliva of Lygus lineolaris digests double stranded ribonucleic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prospects for development of highly specific pesticides based on double stranded ribonucleic acid have been a recent focus of scientific research. Creative applications have been proposed and demonstrated. However, not all insects are sensitive to double stranded RNA (dsRNA) gene knockdown effec...

  4. Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Martin; Lukasova, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    The genetic information of cells continuously undergoes damage induced by intracellular processes including energy metabolism, DNA replication and transcription, and by environmental factors such as mutagenic chemicals and UV and ionizing radiation. This causes numerous DNA lesions, including double strand breaks (DSBs). Since cells cannot escape this damage or normally function with a damaged genome, several DNA repair mechanisms have evolved. Although most "single-stranded" DNA lesions are rapidly removed from DNA without permanent damage, DSBs completely break the DNA molecule, presenting a real challenge for repair mechanisms, with the highest risk among DNA lesions of incorrect repair. Hence, DSBs can have serious consequences for human health. Therefore, in this chapter, we will refer only to this type of DNA damage. In addition to the biochemical aspects of DSB repair, which have been extensively studied over a long period of time, the spatio-temporal organization of DSB induction and repair, the importance of which was recognized only recently, will be considered in terms of current knowledge and remaining questions.

  5. Heavy Metal Exposure Influences Double Strand Break DNA Repair Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Maria E.; Derbes, Rebecca S.; Ade, Catherine M.; Ortego, Jonathan C.; Stark, Jeremy; Deininger, Prescott L.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel are classified as carcinogens. Although the precise mechanism of carcinogenesis is undefined, heavy metal exposure can contribute to genetic damage by inducing double strand breaks (DSBs) as well as inhibiting critical proteins from different DNA repair pathways. Here we take advantage of two previously published culture assay systems developed to address mechanistic aspects of DNA repair to evaluate the effects of heavy metal exposures on competing DNA repair outcomes. Our results demonstrate that exposure to heavy metals significantly alters how cells repair double strand breaks. The effects observed are both specific to the particular metal and dose dependent. Low doses of NiCl2 favored resolution of DSBs through homologous recombination (HR) and single strand annealing (SSA), which were inhibited by higher NiCl2 doses. In contrast, cells exposed to arsenic trioxide preferentially repaired using the “error prone” non-homologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) while inhibiting repair by HR. In addition, we determined that low doses of nickel and cadmium contributed to an increase in mutagenic recombination-mediated by Alu elements, the most numerous family of repetitive elements in humans. Sequence verification confirmed that the majority of the genetic deletions were the result of Alu-mediated non-allelic recombination events that predominantly arose from repair by SSA. All heavy metals showed a shift in the outcomes of alt-NHEJ repair with a significant increase of non-templated sequence insertions at the DSB repair site. Our data suggest that exposure to heavy metals will alter the choice of DNA repair pathway changing the genetic outcome of DSBs repair. PMID:26966913

  6. Genetics of x-ray induced double strand break repair in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Budd, M.E.

    1982-07-01

    The possible fates of x-ray-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were examined. One possible pathway which breaks can follow, the repair pathway, was studied by assaying strains with mutations in the RAD51, RAD54, and RAD57 loci for double-strand break repair. In order of increasing radiation sensitivity one finds: rad57-1(23/sup 0/)> rad51-1(30/sup 0/)> rad54-3(36/sup 0/). At 36/sup 0/, rad54-3 cells cannot repair double-strand breaks, while 23/sup 0/, they can. Strains with the rad57-1 mutation can rejoin broken chromosomes at both temperatures. However, the low survival at 36/sup 0/ shows that the assay is not distinguishing large DNA fragments which allow cell survival from those which cause cell death. A rad51-1 strain could also rejoin broken chromosomes, and was thus capable of incomplete repair. The data can be explained with the hypothesis that rad54-3 cells are blocked in an early step of repair, while rad51-1 and rad57-1 strains are blocked in a later step of repair. The fate of double-strand breaks when they are left unrepaired was investigated with the rad54-3 mutation. If breaks are prevented from entering the RAD54 repair pathway they become uncommitted lesions. These lesions are repaired slower than the original breaks. One possible fate for an uncommitted lesion is conversion into a fixed lesion, which is likely to be an unrepairable or misrepaired double-strand break. The presence of protein synthesis after irradiation increases the probability that a break will enter the repair pathway. Evidence shows that increased probability of repair results from enhanced synthesis of repair proteins shortly after radiation. (ERB)

  7. Diffusion and Segmental Dynamics of Double-Stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, E. P.; Ohrt, T.; Winkler, R. G.; Schwille, P.

    2006-12-01

    Diffusion and segmental dynamics of the double-stranded λ-phage DNA polymer are quantitatively studied over the transition range from stiff to semiflexible chains. Spectroscopy of fluorescence fluctuations of single-end fluorescently labeled monodisperse DNA fragments unambiguously shows that double-stranded DNA in the length range of 102 2×104 base pairs behaves as a semiflexible polymer with segmental dynamics controlled by hydrodynamic interactions.

  8. Buried territories: heterochromatic response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi-Li; Xiang, Ji-Feng; Kong, Na; Cai, Xiu-Jun; Xie, An-Yong

    2016-07-01

    Cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious type of DNA damage, is highly influenced by higher-order chromatin structure in eukaryotic cells. Compared with euchromatin, the compacted structure of heterochromatin not only protects heterochromatic DNA from damage, but also adds an extra layer of control over the response to DSBs occurring in heterochromatin. One key step in this response is the decondensation of heterochromatin structure. This decondensation process facilitates the DNA damage signaling and promotes proper heterochromatic DSB repair, thus helping to prevent instability of heterochromatic regions of genomes. This review will focus on the functions of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling cascade involving ATM, heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated protein-1 (KAP-1), tat-interacting protein 60 (Tip60), and many other protein factors in DSB-induced decondensation of heterochromatin and subsequent repair of heterochromatic DSBs. As some subsets of DSBs may be repaired in heterochromatin independently of the ATM signaling, a possible repair model is also proposed for ATM-independent repair of these heterochromatic DSBs. PMID:27151295

  9. ATM controls meiotic double-strand-break formation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Julian; Pan, Jing; Cole, Francesca; Thelen, Michael P; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott

    2011-11-10

    In many organisms, developmentally programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) formed by the SPO11 transesterase initiate meiotic recombination, which promotes pairing and segregation of homologous chromosomes. Because every chromosome must receive a minimum number of DSBs, attention has focused on factors that support DSB formation. However, improperly repaired DSBs can cause meiotic arrest or mutation; thus, having too many DSBs is probably as deleterious as having too few. Only a small fraction of SPO11 protein ever makes a DSB in yeast or mouse and SPO11 and its accessory factors remain abundant long after most DSB formation ceases, implying the existence of mechanisms that restrain SPO11 activity to limit DSB numbers. Here we report that the number of meiotic DSBs in mouse is controlled by ATM, a kinase activated by DNA damage to trigger checkpoint signalling and promote DSB repair. Levels of SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes, by-products of meiotic DSB formation, are elevated at least tenfold in spermatocytes lacking ATM. Moreover, Atm mutation renders SPO11-oligonucleotide levels sensitive to genetic manipulations that modulate SPO11 protein levels. We propose that ATM restrains SPO11 via a negative feedback loop in which kinase activation by DSBs suppresses further DSB formation. Our findings explain previously puzzling phenotypes of Atm-null mice and provide a molecular basis for the gonadal dysgenesis observed in ataxia telangiectasia, the human syndrome caused by ATM deficiency. PMID:22002603

  10. Interferon β (IFN-β) Production during the Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) Response in Hepatocytes Involves Coordinated and Feedforward Signaling through Toll-like Receptor 3 (TLR3), RNA-dependent Protein Kinase (PKR), Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), and Src Protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyong; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Guoliang; Yan, Zhengzheng; Zhu, Zhaowei; Guo, Zhong; Sengupta, Rajib; Chen, Alex F; Loughran, Patricia A; Lu, Ben; Wang, Qingde; Billiar, Timothy R

    2016-07-15

    The sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in the liver is important for antiviral defenses but can also contribute to sterile inflammation during liver injury. Hepatocytes are often the target of viral infection and are easily injured by inflammatory insults. Here we sought to establish the pathways involved in the production of type I interferons (IFN-I) in response to extracellular poly(I:C), a dsRNA mimetic, in hepatocytes. This was of interest because hepatocytes are long-lived and, unlike most immune cells that readily die after activation with dsRNA, are not viewed as cells with robust antimicrobial capacity. We found that poly(I:C) leads to rapid up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), and Src. The production of IFN-β was dependent on iNOS, PKR, and Src and partially dependent on TLR3/Trif. iNOS and Src up-regulation was partially dependent on TLR3/Trif but entirely dependent on PKR. The phosphorylation of TLR3 on tyrosine 759 was shown to increase in parallel to IFN-β production in an iNOS- and Src-dependent manner, and Src was found to directly interact with TLR3 in the endosomal compartment of poly(I:C)-treated cells. Furthermore, we identified a robust NO/cGMP/PKG-dependent feedforward pathway for the amplification of iNOS expression. These data identify iNOS/NO as an integral component of IFN-β production in response to dsRNA in hepatocytes in a pathway that involves the coordinated activities of TLR3/Trif and PKR. PMID:27226571

  11. Strand-specific attachment of avidin-spheres to double-stranded poliovirus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, O C; Ehrenfeld, E; Manning, J

    1979-01-01

    Poliovirus-specific double-stranded RNA molecules containing covalently attached protein were coupled with a biotin ester through the protein moiety. Subsequent interaction of the RNA-biotin with avidin attached to electronopaque plastic spheres led to the formation of complexes that were easily visualized in the electron microscope. Avidinspheres were associated only with one end of the RNA-biotin molecules, as seen in the electron microscope. Avidin-sphere attachment to poliovirus double-stranded RNA is strand specific, as shown by molecular hybridization of strand-specific probes to the separated strands of denatured complexes. [3H]DNA complementary to polio virion RNA hybridized exclusively to the strands bearing associated spheres [(+) strands] whereas 125I-labeled virion RNA hybridized predominantly with strands without spheres [(-)strands]. This biotin-avidin labeling technique provides a means for the isolation of full-length poliovirus (-) strands and may provide a general means for isolation of double-stranded polynucleotides containing tightly attached protein. Images PMID:218216

  12. Role of RAD52 Epistasis Group Genes in Homologous Recombination and Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Symington, Lorraine S.

    2002-01-01

    The process of homologous recombination is a major DNA repair pathway that operates on DNA double-strand breaks, and possibly other kinds of DNA lesions, to promote error-free repair. Central to the process of homologous recombination are the RAD52 group genes (RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RDH54/TID1, RAD55, RAD57, RAD59, MRE11, and XRS2), most of which were identified by their requirement for the repair of ionizing-radiation-induced DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Rad52 group proteins are highly conserved among eukaryotes, and Rad51, Mre11, and Rad50 are also conserved in prokaryotes and archaea. Recent studies showing defects in homologous recombination and double-strand break repair in several human cancer-prone syndromes have emphasized the importance of this repair pathway in maintaining genome integrity. Although sensitivity to ionizing radiation is a universal feature of rad52 group mutants, the mutants show considerable heterogeneity in different assays for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks and spontaneous mitotic recombination. Herein, I provide an overview of recent biochemical and structural analyses of the Rad52 group proteins and discuss how this information can be incorporated into genetic studies of recombination. PMID:12456786

  13. Theory for the force-stretched double-stranded chain molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Dai, Luru; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can

    2003-10-01

    We modify and extend the recently developed statistical mechanical theory of chain molecules having noncovalent double-stranded conformations, as in RNA or single-stranded DNA, and β sheets in protein, to the force-stretched case as in a typical single-molecule experiment. The conformations of double-stranded regions of the molecules are calculated based on polymer graph-theoretic approach [S.-J. Chen and K. A. Dill, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 4602 (1998)], while the unpaired single-stranded regions are treated as self-avoiding walks. Two classes of conformations—the hairpin conformations and RNA secondary structures—are explored. For the hairpin conformations, all possible end-to-end distances corresponding to the different types of double-stranded regions are enumerated exactly. For the RNA secondary structures, a recursive formula incorporating the secondary structure and end-to-end distribution has been derived. The sequence dependence and excluded volume interaction are taken into account explicitly. Using the extended theory, we investigate the extension-force and force-extension curves, distribution of the extensions at fixed forces, and reentering phenomenon, respectively. We find that the mechanical behaviors of homogeneous chains of hairpin conformations and secondary structures are quite different: the unfolding of the hairpin case is two state, while the unfolding of the latter is one state. In addition, a reentering transition is observed in hairpin conformations.

  14. Febrile seizures: characterization of double-stranded RNA-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazuya; Matsuo, Muneaki; Maeda, Toshiyuki; Zaitsu, Masafumi; Hamasaki, Yuhei

    2009-08-01

    An association has long been suspected between febrile seizures and interleukin-1beta, the most potent endogenous pyrogen. Interleukin-1beta production increases after double-stranded RNA stimulation in leukocytes of febrile seizure patients. To elucidate the genetics of the immune response, the gene expression pattern after double-stranded RNA stimulation was investigated using DNA microarray. Compared with the control group, expression of the genes ACCN4 (sodium channel), KCNC3 (potassium channel), GABRE (gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor epsilon subunit), RIPK2 (receptor interacting protein kinase-2), TLR4 (toll-like receptor-4), IL26 (interleukin-26), and TNF (tumor necrosis factor), and CASP1 (caspase-1) was increased in the febrile seizure group (P < 0.01). Because RIPK2 and CASP1 are associated with interleukin-1beta production, increased expression might cause increased interleukin-1beta production in the febrile seizure patients. The induced expression of several ion channel genes by double-stranded RNA may affect neuronal excitability which leads to seizure susceptibility during infection. PMID:19589459

  15. Staufen Negatively Modulates MicroRNA Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhiji; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Morrissey, David; Ambros, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen has been implicated in various posttranscriptional gene regulatory processes. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Staufen, STAU-1, functionally interacts with microRNAs. Loss-of-function mutations of stau-1 significantly suppress phenotypes of let-7 family microRNA mutants, a hypomorphic allele of dicer, and a lsy-6 microRNA partial loss-of-function mutant. Furthermore, STAU-1 modulates the activity of lin-14, a target of lin-4 and let-7 family microRNAs, and this modulation is abolished when the 3′ untranslated region of lin-14 is removed. Deep sequencing of small RNA cDNA libraries reveals no dramatic change in the levels of microRNAs or other small RNA populations between wild-type and stau-1 mutants, with the exception of certain endogenous siRNAs in the WAGO pathway. The modulation of microRNA activity by STAU-1 does not seem to be associated with the previously reported enhanced exogenous RNAi (Eri) phenotype of stau-1 mutants, since eri-1 exhibits the opposite effect on microRNA activity. Altogether, our results suggest that STAU-1 negatively modulates microRNA activity downstream of microRNA biogenesis, possibly by competing with microRNAs for binding on the 3′ untranslated region of target mRNAs. PMID:26921297

  16. Staufen Negatively Modulates MicroRNA Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhiji; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Morrissey, David; Ambros, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen has been implicated in various posttranscriptional gene regulatory processes. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Staufen, STAU-1, functionally interacts with microRNAs. Loss-of-function mutations of stau-1 significantly suppress phenotypes of let-7 family microRNA mutants, a hypomorphic allele of dicer, and a lsy-6 microRNA partial loss-of-function mutant. Furthermore, STAU-1 modulates the activity of lin-14, a target of lin-4 and let-7 family microRNAs, and this modulation is abolished when the 3' untranslated region of lin-14 is removed. Deep sequencing of small RNA cDNA libraries reveals no dramatic change in the levels of microRNAs or other small RNA populations between wild-type and stau-1 mutants, with the exception of certain endogenous siRNAs in the WAGO pathway. The modulation of microRNA activity by STAU-1 does not seem to be associated with the previously reported enhanced exogenous RNAi (Eri) phenotype of stau-1 mutants, since eri-1 exhibits the opposite effect on microRNA activity. Altogether, our results suggest that STAU-1 negatively modulates microRNA activity downstream of microRNA biogenesis, possibly by competing with microRNAs for binding on the 3' untranslated region of target mRNAs. PMID:26921297

  17. Targeting DNA Double-Strand Breaks with TAL Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Michelle; Cermak, Tomas; Doyle, Erin L.; Schmidt, Clarice; Zhang, Feng; Hummel, Aaron; Bogdanove, Adam J.; Voytas, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    Engineered nucleases that cleave specific DNA sequences in vivo are valuable reagents for targeted mutagenesis. Here we report a new class of sequence-specific nucleases created by fusing transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) to the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease. Both native and custom TALE-nuclease fusions direct DNA double-strand breaks to specific, targeted sites. PMID:20660643

  18. Double-Stranded Water on Stepped Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Manuel J.; Farber, Rachael G.; Derouin, Jonathan; Badan, Cansin; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Juurlink, Ludo B. F.; Killelea, Daniel R.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of platinum with water plays a key role in (electro)catalysis. Herein, we describe a combined theoretical and experimental study that resolves the preferred adsorption structure of water wetting the Pt(111)-step type with adjacent (111) terraces. Double stranded lines wet the step edge forming water tetragons with dissimilar hydrogen bonds within and between the lines. Our results qualitatively explain experimental observations of water desorption and impact our thinking of solvation at the Pt electrochemical interface.

  19. Multistrain Probiotic Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Cells' Immune Response to a Double-Stranded RNA Ligand, Poly(I·C)

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Chad; Audy, Julie; Mathieu, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    A commercially available product containing three probiotic bacterial strains (Lactobacillus helveticus R0052, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis R0033, and Bifidobacterium bifidum R0071) was previously shown in animal trials to modulate both TH1 and TH2 immune responses. Clinical studies on this combination of bacteria have also shown positive health effects against seasonal winter diseases and rotavirus infection. The goal of this study was to use a well-established in vitro intestinal epithelial (HT-29) cell model that has been shown to constitutively express double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) sensors (Toll-like receptor 3 [TLR3], retinoic acid-inducible gene I, melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, and dsRNA-activated protein kinase). By using the HT-29 cell model, we wanted to evaluate whether or not this combination of three bacteria had the capacity to immune modulate the host cell response to a dsRNA ligand, poly(I·C). Using a custom-designed, two-color expression microarray targeting genes of the human immune system, we investigated the response of HT-29 cells challenged with poly(I·C) both in the presence and in the absence of the three probiotic bacteria. We observed that the combination of the three bacteria had a major impact on attenuating the expression of genes connected to proinflammatory TH1 and antiviral innate immune responses compared to that obtained by the poly(I·C)-only challenge. Major pathways through which the multistrain combination may be eliciting its immune-modulatory effect include the TLR3 domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF), mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-κB signaling pathways. Such a model may be useful for selecting potential biomarkers for the design of future clinical trials. PMID:24375132

  20. Cloning of the cDNA of the heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2. alpha. (eIF-2. alpha. ) kinase of rabbit reticulocytes: Homology to yeast GCN2 protein kinase and human double-stranded-RNA-dependent eIF-2. alpha. kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.J.; Throop, M.S.; Kuo, I.; Pal, J.K.; Brodsky, M.; London, I.M. ); Gehrke, L. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have cloned the cDNA of the heme-regulated eIF-2{alpha} kinase (HRI) of rabbit reticulocytes. In vitro translation of mRNA transcribed from the HRI cDNA yields a 90-kDa polypeptide that exhibits eIF-2{alpha} kinase activity and is recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed against authentic HRI. The open reading frame sequence of the HRI cDNA contains all 11 catalytic domains of protein kinases with consensus sequences of protein-serine/threonine kinases in conserved catalytic domains VI and VIII. The HRI cDNA also contains an insert of {approx} 140 amino acids between catalytic domains V and VI. The HRI cDNA coding sequence has extensive homology to GCN2 protein kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to human double-stranded-RNA-dependent eIF-2{alpha} kinase. This observation suggests that GCN2 protein kinase may be an eIF-2{alpha} kinase in yeast. In addition, HRI has an unusually high degree of homology to three protein kinases (NimA, Wee1, and CDC2) that are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle.

  1. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers.

    PubMed

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-05-23

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs) orchestrates and regulates cellular responses to DSBs at multiple levels, often involving extensive crosstalk between these modifications. Recent findings have revealed compelling insights into the complex mechanisms by which ubiquitin and UBLs regulate protein interactions with DSB sites to promote accurate lesion repair and protection of genome integrity in mammalian cells. These advances offer new therapeutic opportunities for diseases linked to genetic instability. PMID:27211488

  2. A critical role for topoisomerase IIb and DNA double strand breaks in transcription.

    PubMed

    Calderwood, Stuart K

    2016-05-26

    Recent studies have indicated a novel role for topoisomerase IIb in transcription. Transcription of heat shock genes, serum-induced immediate early genes and nuclear receptor-activated genes, each required DNA double strands generated by topoisomerase IIb. Such strand breaks seemed both necessary and sufficient for transcriptional activation. In addition, such transcription was associated with initiation of the DNA damage response pathways, including the activation of the enzymes: ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase 1. DNA damage response signaling was involved both in transcription and in repair of DNA breaks generated by topoisomerase IIb. PMID:27100743

  3. RecG Directs DNA Synthesis during Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Azeroglu, Benura; Mawer, Julia S. P.; Cockram, Charlotte A.; White, Martin A.; Hasan, A. M. Mahedi; Filatenkova, Milana; Leach, David R. F.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination provides a mechanism of DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) that requires an intact, homologous template for DNA synthesis. When DNA synthesis associated with DSBR is convergent, the broken DNA strands are replaced and repair is accurate. However, if divergent DNA synthesis is established, over-replication of flanking DNA may occur with deleterious consequences. The RecG protein of Escherichia coli is a helicase and translocase that can re-model 3-way and 4-way DNA structures such as replication forks and Holliday junctions. However, the primary role of RecG in live cells has remained elusive. Here we show that, in the absence of RecG, attempted DSBR is accompanied by divergent DNA replication at the site of an induced chromosomal DNA double-strand break. Furthermore, DNA double-stand ends are generated in a recG mutant at sites known to block replication forks. These double-strand ends, also trigger DSBR and the divergent DNA replication characteristic of this mutant, which can explain over-replication of the terminus region of the chromosome. The loss of DNA associated with unwinding joint molecules previously observed in the absence of RuvAB and RecG, is suppressed by a helicase deficient PriA mutation (priA300), arguing that the action of RecG ensures that PriA is bound correctly on D-loops to direct DNA replication rather than to unwind joint molecules. This has led us to put forward a revised model of homologous recombination in which the re-modelling of branched intermediates by RecG plays a fundamental role in directing DNA synthesis and thus maintaining genomic stability. PMID:26872352

  4. Processing of 3'-Phosphoglycolate-Terminated DNA Double-StrandBreaks by Artemis Nuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Povrik, Lawrence F.; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Ruizhe; Cowan, Morton J.; Yannone, Steven M.

    2005-10-01

    The Artemis nuclease is required for V(D)J recombination and for repair of an as yet undefined subset of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. To assess the possibility that Artemis functions on oxidatively modified double-strand break termini, its activity toward model DNA substrates, bearing either 3{prime}-hydroxyl or 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate moieties, was examined. A 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate had little effect on Artemis-mediated trimming of long 3{prime} overhangs (>9 nucleotides), which were efficiently trimmed to 4-5 nucleotides. However, 3{prime}-phosphoglycolates on overhangs of 4-5 bases promoted selective Artemis-mediated trimming of a single 3{prime}-terminal nucleotide, while at least 2 nucleotides were trimmed from identical hydroxyl-terminated substrates. Artemis also efficiently removed a single nucleotide from a phosphoglycolate-terminated 3-base 3{prime} overhang, while leaving an analogous hydroxyl-terminated overhang largely intact. Such removal was dependent upon Ku, DNA-dependent protein kinase, and ATP. Together, these data suggest that Artemis-mediated cleavage of 3{prime} overhangs requires a minimum of 2 nucleotides, or a nucleotide plus a phosphoglycolate, 3{prime} to the cleavage site. Shorter 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated overhangs and blunt ends were also processed by Artemis, but much less efficiently. Consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of Artemis, human cells lacking Artemis exhibited hypersensitivity to X-rays, bleomycin and neocarzinostatin, which all induce 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated double-strand breaks. Collectively, these results suggest that 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate termini and/or specific classes of DNA ends that arise from such blocked termini are relevant Artemis substrates in vivo.

  5. Promoter-associated small double-stranded RNA interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 to induce transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Chen, Zhong; Xia, Ding; Wu, Jia; Xu, Hua; Ye, Zhang-Qun

    2012-11-01

    Several recent reports have demonstrated that small activating dsRNA [double-stranded RNA; saRNA (small activating dsRNA)] complementary to promoter regions can up-regulate gene expression in mammalian cells, a phenomenon termed RNAa (RNA activation). However, the mechanism of RNAa remains obscure with regard to what is the target molecule for promoter-targeted saRNA and what are the proteins involved in this process. p21Waf1/Cip1 (p21) [CDKN1A (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A)], an important tumour suppressor gene, is among the genes that can be activated by RNAa in tumour cells. In the present study, we provide direct evidence that p21 promoter-targeted saRNA interact with its intended target on the p21 promoter to activate p21 expression. This process is associated with recruitment of RNA polymerase II and AGO2 (argonaute 2) protein to the saRNA-target site. Additionally, we found that several hnRNPs (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins) (A1, A2/B1 and C1/C2) are associated with saRNA. Further studies show that hnRNPA2/B1 interacts with the saRNA in vivo and in vitro and is required for RNAa activity. These findings indicate that RNAa results from specific targeting of promoters and reveals additional mechanistic details of RNAa. PMID:23035981

  6. Adenosine triphosphatases of thermophilic archaeal double-stranded DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) of double-stranded (ds) DNA archaeal viruses are structurally related to the AAA+ hexameric helicases and translocases. These ATPases have been implicated in viral life cycle functions such as DNA entry into the host, and viral genome packaging into preformed procapsids. We summarize bioinformatical analyses of a wide range of archaeal ATPases, and review the biochemical and structural properties of those archaeal ATPases that have measurable ATPase activity. We discuss their potential roles in genome delivery into the host, virus assembly and genome packaging in comparison to hexameric helicases and packaging motors from bacteriophages. PMID:25105011

  7. Herpetic keratoconjunctivitis: Therapy with synthetic double-stranded RNA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Evans, C.; Meighan, C.W.; Foote, L.J.; Aiello, P.V.; Park, J.H.; Baron, S.

    1968-01-01

    A study was undertaken in rabbits to determine how late in the course of keratoconjunctivitis caused by herpes simplex recovery could be effected by an inducer of interferon. Interferon was induced by means of synthetic double-stranded RNA copolymer formed with polynosinic acid : polycytidilic acid RNA. Therapy promotes recovery from severe and fully established keratoconjunctivitis for which treatment was begun as late as 3 days after virus inoculation. No drug toxicity was observed in the therapeutic dose range. These findings further support the proposed role of the interferon mechanism in the natural recovery of already established viral infection. They also suggest the usefulness of interferon inducers in viral infections of man.

  8. Solid phase sequencing of double-stranded nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Cantor, Charles R.; Koster, Hubert; Smith, Cassandra L.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to methods for detecting and sequencing of target double-stranded nucleic acid sequences, to nucleic acid probes and arrays of probes useful in these methods, and to kits and systems which contain these probes. Useful methods involve hybridizing the nucleic acids or nucleic acids which represent complementary or homologous sequences of the target to an array of nucleic acid probes. These probe comprise a single-stranded portion, an optional double-stranded portion and a variable sequence within the single-stranded portion. The molecular weights of the hybridized nucleic acids of the set can be determined by mass spectroscopy, and the sequence of the target determined from the molecular weights of the fragments. Nucleic acids whose sequences can be determined include nucleic acids in biological samples such as patient biopsies and environmental samples. Probes may be fixed to a solid support such as a hybridization chip to facilitate automated determination of molecular weights and identification of the target sequence.

  9. Nucleolar responses to DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Stucki, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis is key to prevent transformation and disease. The cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, primarily orchestrated by the ATM/ATR kinases is one of many mechanisms that serve to uphold genome stability and homeostasis. Upon detection of double-strand breaks (DSBs), several signaling cascades are activated to halt cell cycle progression and initiate repair. Furthermore, the DNA damage response (DDR) controls cellular processes such as transcription, splicing and metabolism. Recent studies have uncovered aspects of how the DDR operates within nucleoli. It appears that the DDR controls transcription in the nucleoli, not only when DNA breaks occur in the rDNA repeats, but also when a nuclear DDR is activated. In addition, we have gained first insights into how repair of DSBs is organized in the nucleolus. Collectively, these recent studies provide a more comprehensive picture of how the DDR regulates basic cellular functions to maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review we will summarize recent findings and discuss their implications for our understanding of how the DDR regulates transcription and repair in the nucleolus. PMID:26615196

  10. Stretching and relaxation dynamics in double stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, D.; Archilla, J. F. R.

    2004-01-01

    We study numerically the mechanical stability and elasticity properties of duplex DNA molecules within the frame of a network model incorporating microscopic degrees of freedom related with the arrangement of the base pairs. We pay special attention to the opening-closing dynamics of double-stranded DNA molecules which are forced into non-equilibrium conformations. Mechanical stress imposed at one terminal end of the DNA molecule brings it into a partially opened configuration. We examine the subsequent relaxation dynamics connected with energy exchange processes between the various degrees of freedom and structural rearrangements leading to complete recombination to the double-stranded conformation. The similarities and differences between the relaxation dynamics for a planar ladder-like DNA molecule and a twisted one are discussed in detail. In this way we show that the attainment of a quasi-equilibrium regime proceeds faster in the case of the twisted DNA form than for its thus less flexible ladder counterpart. Furthermore we find that the velocity of the complete recombination of the DNA molecule is lower than the velocity imposed by the forcing unit which is in compliance with the experimental observations for the opening-closing cycle of DNA molecules.

  11. Nucleolar responses to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Dorthe Helena; Stucki, Manuel

    2016-01-29

    Maintenance of cellular homeostasis is key to prevent transformation and disease. The cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, primarily orchestrated by the ATM/ATR kinases is one of many mechanisms that serve to uphold genome stability and homeostasis. Upon detection of double-strand breaks (DSBs), several signaling cascades are activated to halt cell cycle progression and initiate repair. Furthermore, the DNA damage response (DDR) controls cellular processes such as transcription, splicing and metabolism. Recent studies have uncovered aspects of how the DDR operates within nucleoli. It appears that the DDR controls transcription in the nucleoli, not only when DNA breaks occur in the rDNA repeats, but also when a nuclear DDR is activated. In addition, we have gained first insights into how repair of DSBs is organized in the nucleolus. Collectively, these recent studies provide a more comprehensive picture of how the DDR regulates basic cellular functions to maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review we will summarize recent findings and discuss their implications for our understanding of how the DDR regulates transcription and repair in the nucleolus. PMID:26615196

  12. Mitochondrial DNA repairs double-strand breaks in yeast chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Ricchetti, M; Fairhead, C; Dujon, B

    1999-11-01

    The endosymbiotic theory for the origin of eukaryotic cells proposes that genetic information can be transferred from mitochondria to the nucleus of a cell, and genes that are probably of mitochondrial origin have been found in nuclear chromosomes. Occasionally, short or rearranged sequences homologous to mitochondrial DNA are seen in the chromosomes of different organisms including yeast, plants and humans. Here we report a mechanism by which fragments of mitochondrial DNA, in single or tandem array, are transferred to yeast chromosomes under natural conditions during the repair of double-strand breaks in haploid mitotic cells. These repair insertions originate from noncontiguous regions of the mitochondrial genome. Our analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial genome indicates that the yeast nuclear genome does indeed contain several short sequences of mitochondrial origin which are similar in size and composition to those that repair double-strand breaks. These sequences are located predominantly in non-coding regions of the chromosomes, frequently in the vicinity of retrotransposon long terminal repeats, and appear as recent integration events. Thus, colonization of the yeast genome by mitochondrial DNA is an ongoing process. PMID:10573425

  13. Force-Driven Separation of Short Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dominik; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Dehmelt, Florian A.; Steinbach, Uta; Erdmann, Matthias; Severin, Philip; Falter, Katja; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Short double-stranded DNA is used in a variety of nanotechnological applications, and for many of them, it is important to know for which forces and which force loading rates the DNA duplex remains stable. In this work, we develop a theoretical model that describes the force-dependent dissociation rate for DNA duplexes tens of basepairs long under tension along their axes (“shear geometry”). Explicitly, we set up a three-state equilibrium model and apply the canonical transition state theory to calculate the kinetic rates for strand unpairing and the rupture-force distribution as a function of the separation velocity of the end-to-end distance. Theory is in excellent agreement with actual single-molecule force spectroscopy results and even allows for the prediction of the rupture-force distribution for a given DNA duplex sequence and separation velocity. We further show that for describing double-stranded DNA separation kinetics, our model is a significant refinement of the conventionally used Bell-Evans model. PMID:20006953

  14. RAP1 stimulates single- to double-strand association of yeast telomeric DNA: implications for telomere-telomere interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, E; Müller, T; Sogo, J; Laroche, T; Gasser, S M

    1994-01-01

    Repressor Activator Protein 1 (RAP1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an abundant nuclear protein implicated in telomere length maintenance, transactivation, and in the establishment of silent chromatin domains. The RAP1 binding site 5' of the yeast HIS4 gene is also a region of hyperrecombination in meiosis. We report here that as RAP1 binds its recognition consensus, it appears to untwist double-stranded DNA, which we detect as the introduction of a negative supercoil in circularization assays. Coincident with the RAP1-dependent untwisting, we observe stimulation of the association of a single-stranded yeast telomeric sequence with its homologous double-stranded sequence in a supercoiled plasmid. This unusual distortion of the DNA double helix by RAP1 may contribute to the RAP1-dependent enhancement of recombination rates and promote non-duplex strand interactions at telomeres. Images PMID:7816621

  15. Origin of the catalytic activity of bovine seminal ribonuclease against double-stranded RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opitz, J. G.; Ciglic, M. I.; Haugg, M.; Trautwein-Fritz, K.; Raillard, S. A.; Jermann, T. M.; Benner, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    Bovine seminal ribonuclease (RNase) binds, melts, and (in the case of RNA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of double-stranded nucleic acid 30-fold better under physiological conditions than its pancreatic homologue, the well-known RNase A. Reported here are site-directed mutagenesis experiments that identify the sequence determinants of this enhanced catalytic activity. These experiments have been guided in part by experimental reconstructions of ancestral RNases from extinct organisms that were intermediates in the evolution of the RNase superfamily. It is shown that the enhanced interactions between bovine seminal RNase and double-stranded nucleic acid do not arise from the increased number of basic residues carried by the seminal enzyme. Rather, a combination of a dimeric structure and the introduction of two glycine residues at positions 38 and 111 on the periphery of the active site confers the full catalytic activity of bovine seminal RNase against duplex RNA. A structural model is presented to explain these data, the use of evolutionary reconstructions to guide protein engineering experiments is discussed, and a new variant of RNase A, A(Q28L K31C S32C D38G E111G), which contains all of the elements identified in these experiments as being important for duplex activity, is prepared. This is the most powerful catalyst within this subfamily yet observed, some 46-fold more active against duplex RNA than RNase A.

  16. Merging Two Strategies for Mixed-Sequence Recognition of Double-Stranded DNA: Pseudocomplementary Invader Probes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brooke A; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2016-04-15

    The development of molecular strategies that enable recognition of specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) regions has been a longstanding goal as evidenced by the emergence of triplex-forming oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), minor groove binding polyamides, and-more recently-engineered proteins such as CRISPR/Cas9. Despite this progress, an unmet need remains for simple hybridization-based probes that recognize specific mixed-sequence dsDNA regions under physiological conditions. Herein, we introduce pseudocomplementary Invader probes as a step in this direction. These double-stranded probes are chimeras between pseudocomplementary DNA (pcDNA) and Invader probes, which are activated for mixed-sequence dsDNA-recognition through the introduction of pseudocomplementary base pairs comprised of 2-thiothymine and 2,6-diaminopurine, and +1 interstrand zipper arrangements of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides, respectively. We demonstrate that certain pseudocomplementary Invader probe designs result in very efficient and specific recognition of model dsDNA targets in buffers of high ionic strength. These chimeric probes, therefore, present themselves as a promising strategy for mixed-sequence recognition of dsDNA targets for applications in molecular biology and nucleic acid diagnostics. PMID:26998918

  17. The PBAF chromatin remodeling complex represses transcription and promotes rapid repair at DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Kakarougkas, Andreas; Downs, Jessica A; Jeggo, Penny A

    2015-01-01

    Transcription in the vicinity of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is suppressed via a process involving ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM) and H2AK119 ubiquitylation.1 We discuss recent findings that components of the Polybromo and Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1)-associated factor (PBAF) remodeling complex and the polycomb repressive complex (PRC1/2) are also required.2 Failure to activate transcriptional suppression impedes a rapid DSB repair process. PMID:27308404

  18. The isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA based on a double-stranded fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Shang, Fanjin; Pan, Mei; Liu, Sen; Ma, Cuiping

    2016-06-15

    Here we have developed a novel method of isothermal amplification detection of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) based on double-stranded fluorescence probe (ds-probe). Target dsDNA repeatedly generated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with polymerase and nicking enzyme. The ds-probe as a primer hybridized with ssDNA and extended to its 5'-end. The displaced ssDNA served as a new detection target to initiate above-described reaction. Meanwhile, the extended ds-probe could dynamically dissociate from ssDNA and self-hybridize, converting into a turn-back structure to initiate another amplification reaction. In particular, the ds-probe played a key role in the entire experimental process, which not only was as a primer but also produced the fluorescent signal by an extension and displacement reaction. Our method could detect the pBluescript II KS(+) plasmid with a detection limit of 2.3 amol, and it was also verified to exhibit a high specificity, even one-base mismatch. Overall, it was a true isothermal dsDNA detection strategy with a strongly anti-jamming capacity and one-pot, only requiring one ds-probe, which greatly reduced the cost and the probability of contamination. With its advantages, the approach of dsDNA detection will offer a promising tool in the field of point-of-care testing (POCT). PMID:26803414

  19. DNA double-strand break repair inhibitors as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2015-01-22

    Among DNA damages, double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most harmful lesions to a cell. Failure in DSB repair could lead to genomic instability and cancer. Homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) are major DSB repair pathways in higher eukaryotes. It is known that expression of DSB repair genes is altered in various cancers. Activation of DSB repair genes is one of the reasons for chemo- and radioresistance. Therefore, targeting DSB repair is an attractive strategy to eliminate cancer. Besides, therapeutic agents introduce breaks in the genome as an intermediate. Therefore, blocking the residual repair using inhibitors can potentiate the efficacy of cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss the importance of targeting DSB repair pathways for the treatment of cancer. Recent advances in the development of DSB repair inhibitors and their clinical relevance are also addressed. PMID:25579208

  20. Double-stranded helical polymers consisting of complementary homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takeshi; Furusho, Yoshio; Sakurai, Shin-ichiro; Kumaki, Jiro; Okoshi, Kento; Yashima, Eiji

    2008-06-25

    Two complementary homopolymers of chiral amidines and achiral carboxylic acids with m-terphenyl-based backbones were synthesized by the copolymerization of a p-diiodobenzene derivative with the diethynyl monomers bearing a chiral amidine group and a carboxyl group using the Sonogashira reaction, respectively. Upon mixing in THF, the homopolymer strands assembled into a preferred-handed double helix through interstrand amidinium-carboxylate salt bridges, as evidenced by its absorption, circular dichroism, and IR spectra. In contrast, when mixed in less polar solvents, such as chloroform, the complementary strands kinetically formed an interpolymer complex with an imperfect double helical structure containing a randomly hybridized cross-linked structure, probably because of strong salt bridge formations. This primary complex was rearranged into the fully double helical structure by treatment with a strong acid followed by neutralization with an amine. High-resolution atomic force microscopy revealed the double-stranded helical structure and enabled the determination of the helical sense. PMID:18510315

  1. Current-voltage characteristics of double-strand DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerril, L. M.; Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; de Oliveira, E. L.; de Sousa, J. S.

    2009-09-01

    We use a tight-binding formulation to investigate the transmissivity and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of sequences of double-strand DNA molecules. In order to reveal the relevance of the underlying correlations in the nucleotides distribution, we compare the results for the genomic DNA sequence with those of artificial sequences (the long-range correlated Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro one) and a random sequence, which is a kind of prototype of a short-range correlated system. The random sequence is presented here with the same first neighbors pair correlations of the human DNA sequence. We found that the long-range character of the correlations is important to the transmissivity spectra, although the I-V curves seem to be mostly influenced by the short-range correlations.

  2. Do DNA Double-Strand Breaks Drive Aging?

    PubMed

    White, Ryan R; Vijg, Jan

    2016-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rare, but highly toxic, lesions requiring orchestrated and conserved machinery to prevent adverse consequences, such as cell death and cancer-causing genome structural mutations. DSBs trigger the DNA damage response (DDR) that directs a cell to repair the break, undergo apoptosis, or become senescent. There is increasing evidence that the various endpoints of DSB processing by different cells and tissues are part of the aging phenotype, with each stage of the DDR associated with specific aging pathologies. In this Perspective, we discuss the possibility that DSBs are major drivers of intrinsic aging, highlighting the dynamics of spontaneous DSBs in relation to aging, the distinct age-related pathologies induced by DSBs, and the segmental progeroid phenotypes in humans and mice with genetic defects in DSB repair. A model is presented as to how DSBs could drive some of the basic mechanisms underlying age-related functional decline and death. PMID:27588601

  3. RNA-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Gui; Qi, Yijun

    2015-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious DNA lesions, which if unrepaired or repaired incorrectly can cause cell death or genome instability that may lead to cancer. To counteract these adverse consequences, eukaryotes have evolved a highly orchestrated mechanism to repair DSBs, namely DNA-damage-response (DDR). DDR, as defined specifically in relation to DSBs, consists of multi-layered regulatory modes including DNA damage sensors, transducers and effectors, through which DSBs are sensed and then repaired via DNAprotein interactions. Unexpectedly, recent studies have revealed a direct role of RNA in the repair of DSBs, including DSB-induced small RNA (diRNA)-directed and RNA-templated DNA repair. Here, we summarize the recent discoveries of RNA-mediated regulation of DSB repair and discuss the potential impact of these novel RNA components of the DSB repair pathway on genomic stability and plasticity. PMID:25960340

  4. Unwinding of double-stranded DNA helix by dehydration.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C H; Mizusawa, H; Kakefuda, T

    1981-01-01

    Conformation changes of the double-stranded DNA helix in response to dehydration were investigated by monitoring, by agarose gel electrophoresis, the linking number of covalently closed circular DNA generated by ligation of linear DNA in the presence of different organic solvents or different temperatures. It was found that: (i) The DNA helix unwinds upon addition of certain organic solvents or elevation of temperature. (ii) The conformational change observed under the experimental conditions is a continuous process in response to the organic solvent concentration. (iii) The delta H of unwinding one linking of the DNA helix is constant at approximately 12.2 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol (1 kcal = 4.184 kJ); the corresponding delta S and d(delta S)/dn are 2nkR and 2kR, in which n is the relative equivalent linking number (referred to the state of delta S = 0 for unwinding) of the DNA, R is the gas constant, and k is equal to 1117/number of base pairs. The delta H, delta S, and d(delta S)/dn for unwinding i linkings are i X 12.2 kcal/mol, 2inkR, and 2ikR, respectively. (iv) d(delta S)/dn, like k, is inversely proportional to the number of base pairs in DNA. (v) Double-stranded DNAs of different chain lengths have average delta S = 35 cal/mol.K for unwinding one linking under the experimental conditions; this corresponds to 127 +/- 14 base pairs per "relative linking." Images PMID:7019913

  5. [p53 activation by PI-3K family kinases after DNA double-strand breaks].

    PubMed

    Pernin, D; Uhrhammer, N; Verrelle, P; Bignon, Y J; Bay, J O

    2000-09-01

    p53 plays a central role in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and to DNA damage in general. The protein kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK detect DSBs and transmit this information to p53 by phosphorylation. This phosphorylation dissociates p53 from its negative regulator, mdm2. p53 then undergoes further modification and activates transcription of the genes responsible for cell cycle arrest. In certain circumstances, p53 also activates transcription of the genes responsible for apoptosis. The dysfunction of this cascade of events is oncogenic, with P53 itself being the most commonly mutated gene in malignant cells, although mutations in both the DNA damage sensors and cell cycle checkpoint and apoptosis effectors are frequent. A more complete understanding of p53 and the proteins it interacts with may allow the development of new cancer treatments. PMID:11038413

  6. Visualization of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair at the Single-Molecule Level

    SciTech Connect

    Dynan, William S.; Li, Shuyi; Mernaugh, Raymond; Wragg, Stephanie; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2003-03-27

    Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is universal. The signature injury from ionizing radiation exposure is induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The first line of defense against DSBs is direct ligation of broken DNA ends via the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Because even a relatively high environmental exposure induces only a few DSBs per cell, our current understanding of the response to this exposure is limited by the ability to measure DSB repair events reliably in situ at a single-molecule level. To address this need, we have taken advantage of biological amplification, measuring relocalization of proteins and detection of protein phosphorylation as a surrogate for detection of broken ends themselves. We describe the use of specific antibodies to investigate the kinetics and mechanism of repair of very small numbers of DSBs in human cells by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway.

  7. Significant correlation of species longevity with DNA double strand break recognition but not with telomere length.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Antonello; Johnson, F Brad; Oliver, Anthony; Tresini, Maria; Smith, Jasmine S; Hdeib, Mona; Sell, Christian; Cristofalo, Vincent J; Stamato, Thomas D

    2009-01-01

    The identification of the cellular mechanisms responsible for the wide differences in species lifespan remains one of the major unsolved problems of the biology of aging. We measured the capacity of nuclear protein to recognize DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and telomere length of skin fibroblasts derived from mammalian species that exhibit wide differences in longevity. Our results indicate DNA DSB recognition increases exponentially with longevity. Further, an analysis of the level of Ku80 protein in human, cow, and mouse suggests that Ku levels vary dramatically between species and these levels are strongly correlated with longevity. In contrast mean telomere length appears to decrease with increasing longevity of the species, although not significantly. These findings suggest that an enhanced ability to bind to DNA ends may be important for longevity. A number of possible roles for increased levels of Ku and DNA-PKcs are discussed. PMID:19896964

  8. 75 FR 62820 - Screening Framework Guidance for Providers of Synthetic Double-Stranded DNA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ...- Stranded DNA AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary. ACTION: Notice... provides a framework for screening synthetic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This document, the Screening Framework Guidance for Providers of Synthetic Double-Stranded DNA (the Guidance), sets forth...

  9. RPA Antagonizes Microhomology-Mediated Repair of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Sarah K; Gibb, Bryan; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Greene, Eric C; Symington, Lorraine S

    2014-01-01

    Microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) is a Ku and Ligase IV independent mechanism for repair of DNA double-strand breaks, which contributes to chromosome rearrangements. Here we used a chromosomal end-joining assay to determine the genetic requirements for MMEJ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that end resection influences the ability to expose microhomologies; however, it is not rate limiting for MMEJ in wild-type cells. The frequency of MMEJ increased by up to 350-fold in rfa1 hypomorphic mutants, suggesting that replication protein A (RPA) bound to the ssDNA overhangs formed by resection prevents spontaneous annealing between microhomologies. In vitro, the mutant RPA complexes were unable to fully extend ssDNA and were compromised in their ability to prevent spontaneous annealing. We propose the helix-destabilizing activity of RPA channels ssDNA intermediates from mutagenic MMEJ to error-free homologous recombination, thus preserving genome integrity. PMID:24608368

  10. Coupling end resection with the checkpoint response at DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Villa, Matteo; Cassani, Corinne; Gobbini, Elisa; Bonetti, Diego; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2016-10-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a nasty form of damage that needs to be repaired to ensure genome stability. The DSB ends can undergo a strand-biased nucleolytic processing (resection) to generate 3'-ended single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) that channels DSB repair into homologous recombination. Generation of ssDNA also triggers the activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, which couples cell cycle progression with DSB repair. The checkpoint response is intimately linked to DSB resection, as some checkpoint proteins regulate the resection process. The present review will highlight recent works on the mechanism and regulation of DSB resection and its interplays with checkpoint activation/inactivation in budding yeast. PMID:27141941

  11. DNA double-strand break repair: a tale of pathway choices.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Xu, Xingzhi

    2016-07-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytotoxic lesions that must be repaired either through homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways. DSB repair is critical for genome integrity, cellular homeostasis and also constitutes the biological foundation for radiotherapy and the majority of chemotherapy. The choice between HR and NHEJ is a complex yet not completely understood process that will entail more future efforts. Herein we review our current understandings about how the choice is made over an antagonizing balance between p53-binding protein 1 and breast cancer 1 in the context of cell cycle stages, downstream effects, and distinct chromosomal histone marks. These exciting areas of research will surely bring more mechanistic insights about DSB repair and be utilized in the clinical settings. PMID:27217474

  12. Subdiffusion Supports Joining Of Correct Ends During Repair Of DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girst, S.; Hable, V.; Drexler, G. A.; Greubel, C.; Siebenwirth, C.; Haum, M.; Friedl, A. A.; Dollinger, G.

    2013-08-01

    The mobility of damaged chromatin regions in the nucleus may affect the probability of mis-repair. In this work, live-cell observation and distance tracking of GFP-tagged DNA damage response protein MDC1 was used to study the random-walk behaviour of chromatin domains containing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Our measurements indicate a subdiffusion-type random walk process with similar time dependence for isolated and clustered DSBs that were induced by 20 MeV proton or 43 MeV carbon ion micro-irradiation. As compared to normal diffusion, subdiffusion enhances the probability that both ends of a DSB meet, thus promoting high efficiency DNA repair. It also limits their probability of long-range movements and thus lowers the probability of mis-rejoining and chromosome aberrations.

  13. Multiple Pathways of Recombination Induced by Double-Strand Breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pâques, Frédéric; Haber, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the principal organism used in experiments to examine genetic recombination in eukaryotes. Studies over the past decade have shown that meiotic recombination and probably most mitotic recombination arise from the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). There are multiple pathways by which such DSBs can be repaired, including several homologous recombination pathways and still other nonhomologous mechanisms. Our understanding has also been greatly enriched by the characterization of many proteins involved in recombination and by insights that link aspects of DNA repair to chromosome replication. New molecular models of DSB-induced gene conversion are presented. This review encompasses these different aspects of DSB-induced recombination in Saccharomyces and attempts to relate genetic, molecular biological, and biochemical studies of the processes of DNA repair and recombination. PMID:10357855

  14. Mannan binding lectin attenuates double-stranded RNA-mediated TLR3 activation and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongzhi; Zhou, Jia; Ma, Di; Lu, Xiao; Ming, Siqi; Shan, Guiqiu; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Hou, Jinlin; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2014-03-18

    Mannan binding lectin (MBL) functions as a pattern recognition molecule (PRM) which is able to initiate complement activation. Here, we characterize a previously unrecognized attribute of MBL as a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein capable of modifying Toll like receptor 3 (TLR3) activation. MBL interacts with poly(I:C) and suppresses poly(I:C)-induced activation of TLR3 pathways and subsequent cytokine production. In addition, MBL binds to TLR3 directly. Surprisingly, disrupting the interaction between MBL and complement receptor 1 (CR1) or restraining the traffic of MBL to phagosome reversed the MBL limited TLR3 activation. We demonstrate the importance of MBL guided ligands intracellular localization, emphasizing the significance of understanding the dynamics of TLR agonists complexed with MBL or other PRMs inside the cell in immune defense. PMID:24530528

  15. Double-strand break repair on sex chromosomes: challenges during male meiotic prophase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic prophase, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair-mediated homologous recombination (HR) occurs for exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. Unlike autosomes or female sex chromosomes, human male sex chromosomes X and Y share little homology. Although DSBs are generated throughout male sex chromosomes, homologous recombination does not occur for most regions and DSB repair process is significantly prolonged. As a result, male sex chromosomes are coated with many DNA damage response proteins and form a unique chromatin structure known as the XY body. Interestingly, associated with the prolonged DSB repair, transcription is repressed in the XY body but not in autosomes, a phenomenon known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which is critical for male meiosis. Here using mice as model organisms, we briefly summarize recent progress on DSB repair in meiotic prophase and focus on the mechanism and function of DNA damage response in the XY body. PMID:25565522

  16. Binding by TRBP-dsRBD2 Does Not Induce Bending of Double-Stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Roderico; Evans, Declan; Penrod, Katheryn A; Showalter, Scott A

    2016-06-21

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions are central to a variety of biological processes, many of which involve large-scale conformational changes that lead to bending of the nucleic acid helix. Here, we focus on the nonsequence-specific protein TRBP, whose double-stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) interact with the A-form geometry of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Crystal structures of dsRBD-dsRNA interactions suggest that the dsRNA helix must bend in such a way that its major groove expands to conform to the dsRBD's binding surface. We show through isothermal titration calorimetry experiments that dsRBD2 of TRBP binds dsRNA with a temperature-independent observed binding affinity (KD ∼500 nM). Furthermore, a near-zero observed heat capacity change (ΔCp = 70 ± 40 cal·mol(-1)·K(-1)) suggests that large-scale conformational changes do not occur upon binding. This result is bolstered by molecular-dynamics simulations in which dsRBD-dsRNA interactions generate only modest bending of the RNA along its helical axis. Overall, these results suggest that this particular dsRBD-dsRNA interaction produces little to no change in the A-form geometry of dsRNA in solution. These results further support our previous hypothesis, based on extensive gel-shift assays, that TRBP preferentially binds to sites of nearly ideal A-form structure while being excluded from sites of local deformation in the RNA helical structure. The implications of this mechanism for efficient micro-RNA processing will be discussed. PMID:27332119

  17. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  18. Ku recruits XLF to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Wang, Shih-Ya; Uematsu, Naoya; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J

    2008-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF)--also known as Cernunnos--has recently been shown to be involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the main pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. XLF is likely to enhance NHEJ by stimulating XRCC4-ligase IV-mediated joining of DSBs. Here, we report mechanistic details of XLF recruitment to DSBs. Live cell imaging combined with laser micro-irradiation showed that XLF is an early responder to DSBs and that Ku is essential for XLF recruitment to DSBs. Biochemical analysis showed that Ku-XLF interaction occurs on DNA and that Ku stimulates XLF binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, XRCC4 is dispensable for XLF recruitment to DSBs, although photobleaching analysis showed that XRCC4 stabilizes the binding of XLF to DSBs. Our observations showed the direct involvement of XLF in the dynamic assembly of the NHEJ machinery and provide mechanistic insights into DSB recognition. PMID:18064046

  19. How a short double-stranded DNA bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Lee, O.-Chul; Sung, Wokyung

    2015-04-01

    A recent experiment using fluorescence microscopy showed that double-stranded DNA fragments shorter than 100 base pairs loop with the probabilities higher by the factor of 102-106 than predicted by the worm-like chain (WLC) model [R. Vafabakhsh and T. Ha, Science 337, 1101(2012)]. Furthermore, the looping probabilities were found to be nearly independent of the loop size. The results signify a breakdown of the WLC model for DNA mechanics which works well on long length scales and calls for fundamental understanding for stressed DNA on shorter length scales. We develop an analytical, statistical mechanical model to investigate what emerges to the short DNA under a tight bending. A bending above a critical level initiates nucleation of a thermally induced bubble, which could be trapped for a long time, in contrast to the bubbles in both free and uniformly bent DNAs, which are either transient or unstable. The trapped bubble is none other than the previously hypothesized kink, which releases the bending energy more easily as the contour length decreases. It leads to tremendous enhancement of the cyclization probabilities, in a reasonable agreement with experiment.

  20. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex. PMID:26876486

  1. End Resection at Double-Strand Breaks: Mechanism and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Symington, Lorraine S.

    2014-01-01

    RecA/Rad51 catalyzed pairing of homologous DNA strands, initiated by polymerization of the recombinase on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), is a universal feature of homologous recombination (HR). Generation of ssDNA from a double-strand break (DSB) requires nucleolytic degradation of the 5′-terminated strands to generate 3′-ssDNA tails, a process referred to as 5′–3′ end resection. The RecBCD helicase–nuclease complex is the main end-processing machine in Gram-negative bacteria. Mre11-Rad50 and Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2/Nbs1 can play a direct role in end resection in archaea and eukaryota, respectively, by removing end-blocking lesions and act indirectly by recruiting the helicases and nucleases responsible for extensive resection. In eukaryotic cells, the initiation of end resection has emerged as a critical regulatory step to differentiate between homology-dependent and end-joining repair of DSBs. PMID:25085909

  2. Looping of anisotropic, short double-stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Harold; Le, Tung

    2013-03-01

    Bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is associated with fundamental biological processes such as genome packaging and gene regulation, and therefore studying sequence-dependent dsDNA bending is a key to understanding biological impact of DNA sequence beyond the genetic code. Average mechanical behavior of long dsDNA is well described by the wormlike chain model, but sequence-dependent anisotropic bendability and bendedness of dsDNA can in principle lead to abnormally high looping probability at short length scales. Here, we measured the looping probability density (J factor) and kinetics of dsDNA as a function of length and curvature using single-molecule FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer). For theoretical comparison, we calculated the J-factor using a discrete dinucleotide chain model, and also simulated it by Monte Carlo methods. We provide evidences that even when the intrinsic shape of dsDNA is accounted for, the wormlike chain model fails to describe looping dynamics of dsDNA below 200-bp length scale. Georgia Tech FIRE program

  3. Fluid mechanics of DNA double-strand filter elution.

    PubMed Central

    Rudinger, George; Blazek, Ed Robert

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of infrequent DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in mammalian cells is essential for the understanding of cell damage by ionizing radiation and many DNA-reactive drugs. One of the most important assays for measuring DSB in cellular DNA is filter elution. This study is an attempt to determine whether standard concepts of fluid mechanics can yield a self-consistent model of this process. Major assumptions of the analysis are reptation through a channel formed by surrounding strands, with only strand ends captured by filter pores. Both viscosity and entanglement with surrounding strands are considered to determine the resistance to this motion. One important result is that the average elution time of a strand depends not only on its length, but also on the size distribution of the surrounding strands. This model is consistent with experimental observations, such as the dependence of elution kinetics upon radiation dose, but independence from the size of the DNA sample up to a critical filter loading, and possible overlap of elution times for strands of different length. It indicates how the dependence of elution time on the flow rate could reveal the relative importance of viscous and entanglement resistance, and also predicts the consequences of using different filters. PMID:11751292

  4. Euler buckling and nonlinear kinking of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alexander P; Meyer, Elisabeth A; Cohen, Adam E

    2013-11-01

    The bending stiffness of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) at high curvatures is fundamental to its biological activity, yet this regime has been difficult to probe experimentally, and literature results have not been consistent. We created a 'molecular vise' in which base-pairing interactions generated a compressive force on sub-persistence length segments of dsDNA. Short dsDNA strands (<41 base pairs) resisted this force and remained straight; longer strands became bent, a phenomenon called 'Euler buckling'. We monitored the buckling transition via Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between appended fluorophores. For low-to-moderate concentrations of monovalent salt (up to ∼150 mM), our results are in quantitative agreement with the worm-like chain (WLC) model of DNA elasticity, without the need to invoke any 'kinked' states. Greater concentrations of monovalent salts or 1 mM Mg(2+) induced an apparent softening of the dsDNA, which was best accounted for by a kink in the region of highest curvature. We tested the effects of all single-nucleotide mismatches on the DNA bending. Remarkably, the propensity to kink correlated with the thermodynamic destabilization of the mismatched DNA relative the perfectly complementary strand, suggesting that the kinked state is locally melted. The molecular vise is exquisitely sensitive to the sequence-dependent linear and nonlinear elastic properties of dsDNA. PMID:23956222

  5. DNA double strand break repair, aging and the chromatin connection.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    Are DNA damage and mutations possible causes or consequences of aging? This question has been hotly debated by biogerontologists for decades. The importance of DNA damage as a possible driver of the aging process went from being widely recognized to then forgotten, and is now slowly making a comeback. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are particularly relevant to aging because of their toxicity, increased frequency with age and the association of defects in their repair with premature aging. Recent studies expand the potential impact of DNA damage and mutations on aging by linking DNA DSB repair and age-related chromatin changes. There is overwhelming evidence that increased DNA damage and mutations accelerate aging. However, an ultimate proof of causality would be to show that enhanced genome and epigenome stability delays aging. This is not an easy task, as improving such complex biological processes is infinitely more difficult than disabling it. We will discuss the possibility that animal models with enhanced DNA repair and epigenome maintenance will be generated in the near future. PMID:26923716

  6. Chromatin modifications and DNA repair: beyond double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    House, Nealia C. M.; Koch, Melissa R.; Freudenreich, Catherine H.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair must take place in the context of chromatin, and chromatin modifications and DNA repair are intimately linked. The study of double-strand break repair has revealed numerous histone modifications that occur after induction of a DSB, and modification of the repair factors themselves can also occur. In some cases the function of the modification is at least partially understood, but in many cases it is not yet clear. Although DSB repair is a crucial activity for cell survival, DSBs account for only a small percentage of the DNA lesions that occur over the lifetime of a cell. Repair of single-strand gaps, nicks, stalled forks, alternative DNA structures, and base lesions must also occur in a chromatin context. There is increasing evidence that these repair pathways are also regulated by histone modifications and chromatin remodeling. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of chromatin modifications that occur during non-DSB repair, highlighting similarities and differences to DSB repair as well as remaining questions. PMID:25250043

  7. 8-Azido double-stranded RNA photoaffinity probes. Enzymatic synthesis, characterization, and biological properties of poly(I,8-azidoI).poly(C) and poly(I,8-azidoI).poly(C12U) with 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Li, S W; Moskow, J J; Suhadolnik, R J

    1990-04-01

    The technique of photoaffinity labeling has been applied to the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent enzyme 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase to provide a means for the examination of RNA-protein interaction(s) in the dsRNA allosteric binding domain of this enzyme. The synthesis, characterization, and biological properties of the photoaffinity probe poly[( 32P]I,8-azidoI).poly(C) and its mismatched analog poly[( 32P]I,8-azidoI).poly(C12U), which mimic the parent molecules poly(I).poly(C) and poly(I).poly(C12U), are described. The efficacy of poly[( 32P]I,8-azidoI).poly(C) and poly[( 32P]I,8-azidoI).poly(C12U) as allosteric site-directed activators is demonstrated using highly purified 2-5A synthetase from rabbit reticulocyte lysates and from extracts of interferon-treated HeLa cells. The dsRNA photoprobes activate these two 2-5A synthetases. Saturation of 2-5A synthetase is observed at 6 x 10(-4) g/ml poly[( 32P]I,8-azidoI).poly(C) following photolysis for 20 s at 0 degrees C. The photoincorporation of poly[( 32P]I,8-azidoI).poly(C) is specific, as demonstrated by the prevention of photoincorporation by native poly(I).poly(C). DNA, poly(I), and poly(C) are not competitors of poly[( 32P]I,8-azidoI).poly(C). Following UV irradiation of 2-5A synthetase with poly[( 32P]I,8-azidoI).poly(C), the reaction mixture is treated with micrococcal nuclease to hydrolyze azido dsRNA that is not cross-linked to the enzyme. A radioactive band of 110 kDa (the same as that reported for native rabbit reticulocyte lysate 2-5A synthetase) is observed following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. The specific photolabeling of the 2-5A synthetase suggests that the azido dsRNA is intrinsic to the allosteric binding domain. The utility of poly[( 32P]I,8-azidoI).poly(C) for the detection of dsRNA-dependent binding proteins and the isolation of peptides at or near the allosteric binding site is discussed. PMID:2318823

  8. Invader LNA – Efficient Targeting of Short Double Stranded DNA†

    PubMed Central

    Sau, Sujay P.; Kumar, T. Santhosh; Hrdlicka, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite progress with triplex-forming oligonucleotides or helix-invading peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), there remains a need for probes facilitating sequence-unrestricted targeting of double stranded DNA (dsDNA) at physiologically relevant conditions. Invader LNA probes, i.e., DNA duplexes with “+1 interstrand zipper arrangements” of intercalator-functionalized 2’-amino-α-L-LNA monomers, are demonstrated herein to recognize short mixed sequence dsDNA targets. This approach, like pseudo-complementary PNA (pcPNA), relies on relative differences in stability between probe duplexes and the corresponding probe:target duplexes for generation of a favourable thermodynamic gradient. Unlike pcPNA, Invader LNA probes take advantage of the “nearest neighbour exclusion principle”, i.e., intercalating units of Invader LNA monomers are poorly accommodated in probe duplexes but extraordinarily well tolerated in probe-target duplexes (ΔTm/modification up to +11.5 °C). Recognition of isosequential dsDNA-targets occurs: a) at experimental temperatures much lower than the thermal denaturation temperatures (Tm’s) of Invader LNAs or dsDNA-targets, b) at a wide range of ionic strengths, and c) with good mismatch discrimination. dsDNA recognition is monitored in real-time using inherent pyrene-pyrene excimer signals of Invader LNA probes, which provides insights into reaction kinetics and enables rational design of probes. These properties render Invader LNAs as promising probes for biomedical applications entailing sequence-unrestricted recognition of dsDNA. PMID:20401378

  9. DNA Double-Strand Break Rejoining in Complex Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Kuehne, Martin; Fricke, Andreas

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The clinical radiation responses of different organs vary widely and likely depend on the intrinsic radiosensitivities of their different cell populations. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious form of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the cells' capacity to rejoin radiation-induced DSBs is known to affect their intrinsic radiosensitivity. To date, only little is known about the induction and processing of radiation-induced DSBs in complex normal tissues. Using an in vivo model with repair-proficient mice, the highly sensitive {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence was established to investigate whether differences in DSB rejoining could account for the substantial differences in clinical radiosensitivity observed among normal tissues. Methods and Materials: After whole body irradiation of C57BL/6 mice (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy), the formation and rejoining of DSBs was analyzed by enumerating {gamma}H2AX foci in various organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding (lung, brain, heart, kidney) tissues. Results: The linear dose correlation observed in all analyzed tissues indicated that {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence allows for the accurate quantification of DSBs in complex organs. Strikingly, the various normal tissues exhibited identical kinetics for {gamma}H2AX foci loss, despite their clearly different clinical radiation responses. Conclusion: The identical kinetics of DSB rejoining measured in different organs suggest that tissue-specific differences in radiation responses are independent of DSB rejoining. This finding emphasizes the fundamental role of DSB repair in maintaining genomic integrity, thereby contributing to cellular viability and functionality and, thus, tissue homeostasis.

  10. RNF4 is required for DNA double-strand break repair in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vyas, R; Kumar, R; Clermont, F; Helfricht, A; Kalev, P; Sotiropoulou, P; Hendriks, I A; Radaelli, E; Hochepied, T; Blanpain, C; Sablina, A; van Attikum, H; Olsen, J V; Jochemsen, A G; Vertegaal, A C O; Marine, J-C

    2013-03-01

    Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signaling and repair proteins to the sites of DNA lesions. Coordinated protein SUMOylation and ubiquitylation have crucial roles in regulating the dynamic assembly of protein complexes at these sites. However, how SUMOylation influences protein ubiquitylation at DSBs is poorly understood. We show herein that Rnf4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets SUMO-modified proteins, accumulates in DSB repair foci and is required for both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining repair. To establish a link between Rnf4 and the DNA damage response (DDR) in vivo, we generated an Rnf4 allelic series in mice. We show that Rnf4-deficiency causes persistent ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage and signaling, and that Rnf4-deficient cells and mice exhibit increased sensitivity to genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, we show that Rnf4 targets SUMOylated MDC1 and SUMOylated BRCA1, and is required for the loading of Rad51, an enzyme required for HR repair, onto sites of DNA damage. Similarly to inactivating mutations in other key regulators of HR repair, Rnf4 deficiency leads to age-dependent impairment in spermatogenesis. These findings identify Rnf4 as a critical component of the DDR in vivo and support the possibility that Rnf4 controls protein localization at DNA damage sites by integrating SUMOylation and ubiquitylation events. PMID:23197296

  11. DNA double strand breaks and Hsp70 expression in proton irradiated living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Anja; Reinert, Tilo; Tanner, Judith; Butz, Tilman

    2007-07-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in living cells can be directly provoked by ionising radiation. DSBs can be visualized by immunostaining the phosphorylated histone γH2AX. Our concern was to test the feasibility of γH2AX staining for a direct visualization of single proton hits. If single protons produce detectable foci, DNA DSBs could be used as "biological track detectors" for protons. Ionising radiation can also damage proteins indirectly by inducing free radicals. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) help to refold or even degrade the damaged proteins. The level of the most famous heat shock protein Hsp70 is increased by ionising radiation. We investigated the expression of γH2AX and Hsp70 after cross and line patterned irradiation with counted numbers of 2.25 MeV protons on primary human skin fibroblasts. The proton induced DSBs appear more delocalised than it was expected by the ion hit accuracy. Cooling the cells before the irradiation reduces the delocalisation of DNA DSBs, which is probably caused by the reduced diffusion of DNA damaging agents. Proton irradiation seems to provoke protein damages mainly in the cytoplasm indicated by cytoplasmic Hsp70 aggregates. On the contrary, in control heat shocked cells the Hsp70 was predominantly localized in the cell nucleus. However, the irradiated area could not be recognized, all cells on the Si 3N 4 window showed a homogenous Hsp70 expression pattern.

  12. Assembly and function of DNA double-strand break repair foci in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2010-12-10

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most cytotoxic types of DNA damage, which if left unrepaired can lead to mutations or gross chromosomal aberrations, and promote the onset of diseases associated with genomic instability such as cancer. One of the most discernible hallmarks of the cellular response to DSBs is the accumulation and local concentration of a plethora of DNA damage signaling and repair proteins in the vicinity of the lesion, initiated by ATM-mediated phosphorylation of H2AX (γ-H2AX) and culminating in the generation of distinct nuclear compartments, so-called Ionizing Radiation-Induced Foci (IRIF). The assembly of proteins at the DSB-flanking chromatin occurs in a highly ordered and strictly hierarchical fashion. To a large extent, this is achieved by regulation of protein-protein interactions triggered by a variety of post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, SUMOylation, and acetylation. Over the last decade, insight into the identity of proteins residing in IRIF and the molecular underpinnings of their retention at these structures has been vastly expanded. Despite such advances, however, our understanding of the biological relevance of such DNA repair foci still remains limited. In this review, we focus on recent discoveries on the mechanisms that govern the formation of IRIF, and discuss the implications of such findings in light of our understanding of the physiological importance of these structures. PMID:21035408

  13. Double-Strand Breaks from a Radical Commonly Produced by DNA-Damaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Double-strand breaks are widely accepted to be the most toxic form of DNA damage. Molecules that produce double-strand breaks via a single chemical event are typically very cytotoxic and far less common than those that form single-strand breaks. It was recently reported that a commonly formed C4′-radical produces double-strand breaks under aerobic conditions. Experiments described herein indicate that a peroxyl radical initiates strand damage on the complementary strand via C4′-hydrogen atom abstraction. Inferential evidence suggests that a C3′-peroxyl radical induces complementary strand damage more efficiently than does a C4′-peroxyl radical. Complementary strand hydrogen atom abstraction by the peroxyl radical is efficiently quenched by thiols. This mechanism could contribute to the higher than expected yield of double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation. PMID:25749510

  14. Detection and Repair of Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks: New Developments in Nonhomologous End Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chen; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage can occur as a result of endogenous metabolic reactions and replication stress or from exogenous sources such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage, and defects in their repair can result in genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. The major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs in human cells is nonhomologous end joining. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism of nonhomologous end joining, as well as new findings on its component proteins and regulation.

  15. Blueberry anthocyanins ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury through the protein kinase RNA-activated pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunen; Tan, Dehong; Tong, Changci; Zhang, Yubiao; Xu, Ying; Liu, Xinwei; Gao, Yan; Hou, Mingxiao

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of blueberry anthocyanins (BA) on radiation-induced lung injury and investigate the mechanism of action. Seven days after BA(20 and 80 mg/kg/d)administration, 6 weeks old male Sprague-Dawley rats rats were irradiated by LEKTA precise linear accelerator at a single dose of 20 Gy only once. and the rats were continuously treated with BA for 4 weeks. Moreover, human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC) were transfected with either control-siRNA or siRNA targeting protein kinase R (PKR). Cells were then irradiated and treated with 75 μg/mL BA for 72 h. The results showed that BA significantly ameliorated radiation-induced lung inflammation, lung collagen deposition, apoptosis and PKR expression and activation. In vitro, BA significantly protected cells from radiation-induced cell death through modulating expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3. Suppression of PKR by siRNA resulted in ablation of BA protection on radiation-induced cell death and modulation of anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic proteins, as well as Caspase-3 expression. These findings suggest that BA is effective in ameliorating radiation-induced lung injury, likely through the PKR signaling pathway. PMID:26551926

  16. Regulation of DNA methylation using different tensions of double strands constructed in a defined DNA nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masayuki; Katsuda, Yousuke; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2010-02-10

    A novel strategy for regulation of an enzymatic DNA modification reaction has been developed by employing a designed nanoscale DNA scaffold. DNA modification using enzymes often requires bending of specific DNA strands to facilitate the reaction. The DNA methylation enzyme EcoRI methyltransferase (M.EcoRI) bends double helix DNA by 55 degrees-59 degrees during the reaction with flipping out of the second adenine in the GAATTC sequence as the methyl transfer reaction proceeds. In this study, two different double helical tensions, tense and relaxed states of double helices, were created to control the methyl transfer reaction of M.EcoRI and examine the structural effect on the methylation. We designed and prepared a two-dimensional (2D) DNA scaffold named the "DNA frame" using the DNA origami method that accommodates two different lengths of the double-strand DNA fragments, a tense 64mer double strand and a relaxed 74mer double strand. Fast-scanning atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging revealed the different dynamic movement of the double-strand DNAs and complexes of M.EcoRI with 64mer and 74mer double-strand DNAs. After treatment of the double strands in the DNA frame with M.EcoRI and the subsequent digestion with restriction enzyme EcoRI (R.EcoRI), AFM analysis revealed that the 74mer double-strand DNA was not effectively cleaved compared with the 64mer double-strand DNA, indicating that the methylation preferentially occurred in the relaxed 74mer double-strand DNA compared with that in the tense 64mer double strand. Biochemical analysis of the methylation and specific digestion using a real-time PCR also supported the above results. These results indicate the importance of the structural flexibility for bending of the duplex DNA during the methyl transfer reaction with M.EcoRI. Therefore, the DNA methylation can be regulated using the structurally controlled double-strand DNAs constructed in the DNA frame nanostructure. PMID:20078043

  17. High LET - induced H2AX phosphorylation at sites of DNA double strand breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, N.; Cucinotta, F.; Wu, H.

    Within cell nuclei, traversing charged heavy ion particles lead to the accumulation of proteins related to DNA lesions and repair along the ion trajectories. Irradiation using a standard geometric setup with the beam path perpendicular to the cell monolayer generates discrete foci of several proteins known to localize at sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). One such molecule is the histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which gets rapidly phosphorylated in response to ionizing radiation. Here we present data obtained with a modified irradiation geometry characterized by a beam path parallel to a monolayer of human fibroblast cells. This new irradiation geometry leads to the formation of gamma-H2AX aggregates in the shape of streaks stretching over several micrometers in the x/y plane, thus enabling the analysis of the fluorescence distributions along the particle trajectories. Qualitative analysis of these distributions presented insights into the DNA repair kinetics along the primary track structure and visualization of possible chromatin movement. We also present evidence of colocalization of gamma-H2AX with several other proteins in responses to ionizing radiation exposure. Analysis of gamma-H2AX has the potential to provide useful information on human cell responses to high LET radiation after exposure to space-like radiation.

  18. Immunofluorescent Detection of DNA Double Strand Breaks induced by High-LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Desai, Nirav

    2004-01-01

    Within cell nuclei, traversing charged heavy ion particles lead to the accumulation of proteins related to DNA lesions and repair along the ion trajectories. Irradiation using a standard geometric setup with the beam path perpendicular to the cell monolayer generates discrete foci of several proteins known to localize at sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). One such molecule is the histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which gets rapidly phosphorylated in response to ionizing radiation. Here we present data obtained with a modified irradiation geometry characterized by a beam path parallel to a monolayer of human fibroblast cells. This new irradiation geometry leads to the formation of gamma-H2AX aggregates in the shape of streaks stretching over several micrometers in the x/y plane, thus enabling the analysis of the fluorescence distributions along the particle trajectories. Qualitative analysis of these distributions presented insights into the DNA repair kinetics along the primary track structure and visualization of possible chromatin movement. We also present evidence of colocalization of gamma-H2AX with several other proteins in responses to ionizing radiation exposure. Analysis of gamma-H2AX has the potential to provide useful information on human cell responses to high LET radiation after exposure to space-like radiation.

  19. TrmBL2 from Pyrococcus furiosus Interacts Both with Double-Stranded and Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wierer, Sebastian; Daldrop, Peter; Ud Din Ahmad, Misbha; Boos, Winfried; Drescher, Malte; Welte, Wolfram; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    In many hyperthermophilic archaea the DNA binding protein TrmBL2 or one of its homologues is abundantly expressed. TrmBL2 is thought to play a significant role in modulating the chromatin architecture in combination with the archaeal histone proteins and Alba. However, its precise physiological role is poorly understood. It has been previously shown that upon binding TrmBL2 covers double-stranded DNA, which leads to the formation of a thick and fibrous filament. Here we investigated the filament formation process as well as the stabilization of DNA by TrmBL2 from Pyroccocus furiosus in detail. We used magnetic tweezers that allow to monitor changes of the DNA mechanical properties upon TrmBL2 binding on the single-molecule level. Extended filaments formed in a cooperative manner and were considerably stiffer than bare double-stranded DNA. Unlike Alba, TrmBL2 did not form DNA cross-bridges. The protein was found to bind double- and single-stranded DNA with similar affinities. In mechanical disruption experiments of DNA hairpins this led to stabilization of both, the double- (before disruption) and the single-stranded (after disruption) DNA forms. Combined, these findings suggest that the biological function of TrmBL2 is not limited to modulating genome architecture and acting as a global repressor but that the protein acts additionally as a stabilizer of DNA secondary structure. PMID:27214207

  20. Chromosomal double-strand break repair in Ku80-deficient cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, F; Romanienko, P J; Weaver, D T; Jeggo, P A; Jasin, M

    1996-01-01

    The x-ray sensitive hamster cell line xrs-6 is deficient in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and exhibits impaired V(D)J recombination. The molecular defect in this line is in the 80-kDa subunit of the Ku autoantigen, a protein that binds to DNA ends and recruits the DNA-dependent protein kinase to DNA. Using an I-SceI endonuclease expression system, chromosomal DSB repair was examined in xrs-6 and parental CHO-K1 cell lines. A DSB in chromosomal DNA increased the yield of recombinants several thousand-fold above background in both the xrs-6 and CHO-K1 cells, with recombinational repair of DSBs occurring in as many as 1 of 100 cells electroporated with the endonuclease expression vector. Thus, recombinational repair of chromosomal DSBs can occur at substantial levels in mammalian cells and it is not grossly affected in our assay by a deficiency of the Ku autoantigen. Rejoining of broken chromosome ends (end-joining) near the site of the DSB was also examined. In contrast to recombinational repair, end-joining was found to be severely impaired in the xrs-6 cells. Thus, the Ku protein appears to play a critical role in only one of the chromosomal DSB repair pathways. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8799130

  1. Cloning of cDNAs encoding mammalian double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, M A; Krause, S; Higuchi, M; Hsuan, J J; Totty, N F; Jenny, A; Keller, W

    1995-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-specific adenosine deaminase converts adenosine to inosine in dsRNA. The protein has been purified from calf thymus, and here we describe the cloning of cDNAs encoding both the human and rat proteins as well as a partial bovine clone. The human and rat clones are very similar at the amino acid level except at their N termini and contain three dsRNA binding motifs, a putative nuclear targeting signal, and a possible deaminase motif. Antibodies raised against the protein encoded by the partial bovine clone specifically recognize the calf thymus dsRNA adenosine deaminase. Furthermore, the antibodies can immunodeplete a calf thymus extract of dsRNA adenosine deaminase activity, and the activity can be restored by addition of pure bovine deaminase. Staining of HeLa cells confirms the nuclear localization of the dsRNA-specific adenosine deaminase. In situ hybridization in rat brain slices indicates a widespread distribution of the enzyme in the brain. PMID:7862132

  2. Writers, Readers, and Erasers of Histone Ubiquitylation in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Smeenk, Godelieve; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions, whose faulty repair may alter the content and organization of cellular genomes. To counteract this threat, numerous signaling and repair proteins are recruited hierarchically to the chromatin areas surrounding DSBs to facilitate accurate lesion repair and restoration of genome integrity. In vertebrate cells, ubiquitin-dependent modifications of histones adjacent to DSBs by RNF8, RNF168, and other ubiquitin ligases have a key role in promoting the assembly of repair protein complexes, serving as direct recruitment platforms for a range of genome caretaker proteins and their associated factors. These DNA damage-induced chromatin ubiquitylation marks provide an essential component of a histone code for DSB repair that is controlled by multifaceted regulatory circuits, underscoring its importance for genome stability maintenance. In this review, we provide a comprehensive account of how DSB-induced histone ubiquitylation is sensed, decoded and modulated by an elaborate array of repair factors and regulators. We discuss how these mechanisms impact DSB repair pathway choice and functionality for optimal protection of genome integrity, as well as cell and organismal fitness. PMID:27446204

  3. Mitotic Functions for SNAP45, a Subunit of the Small Nuclear RNA-activating Protein Complex SNAPc*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Hernandez, Nouria

    2008-01-01

    The small nuclear RNA-activating protein complex SNAPc is required for transcription of small nuclear RNA genes and binds to a proximal sequence element in their promoters. SNAPc contains five types of subunits stably associated with each other. Here we show that one of these polypeptides, SNAP45, also known as PTF δ, localizes to centrosomes during parts of mitosis, as well as to the spindle midzone during anaphase and the mid-body during telophase. Consistent with localization to these mitotic structures, both down- and up-regulation of SNAP45 lead to a G2/M arrest with cells displaying abnormal mitotic structures. In contrast, down-regulation of SNAP190, another SNAPc subunit, leads to an accumulation of cells with a G0/G1 DNA content. These results are consistent with the proposal that SNAP45 plays two roles in the cell, one as a subunit of the transcription factor SNAPc and another as a factor required for proper mitotic progression. PMID:18356157

  4. Primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with defective DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Gennery, A R

    2006-01-01

    Damaging DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, potentially lead to cell death or carcinogenesis. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the main repair pathway employed by vertebrate cells to repair such damage. Many repair pathway proteins have been identified. The creation of many diverse lymphocyte receptors to identify potential pathogens has evolved by breaking and randomly re-sorting the gene segments coding for antigen receptors. Subsequent DNA-DSB repair utilizes the NHEJ proteins. Individuals with defective repair pathways are increasingly recognized with radiosensitivity and immunodeficiency. Patients with defects in ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, nibrin, MRE11, Rad50, Artemis, DNA ligase IV and Cernunnos-XRCC4-like factor have been identified. Most exhibit immunodeficiency, with a spectrum of presentation and overlap between conditions. Conventional treatment with immunoglobulin replacement or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can be effective. A greater understanding of the molecular defect will enable better, tailored therapies to improve survival. PMID:16971555

  5. FBH1 promotes DNA double-strand breakage and apoptosis in response to DNA replication stress.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon-Tae; Rossi, Mario; Cermak, Lukas; Saraf, Anita; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Sung, Patrick; Schildkraut, Carl L; Schildkraut, Carl; Pagano, Michele

    2013-01-21

    Proper resolution of stalled replication forks is essential for genome stability. Purification of FBH1, a UvrD DNA helicase, identified a physical interaction with replication protein A (RPA), the major cellular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein complex. Compared with control cells, FBH1-depleted cells responded to replication stress with considerably fewer double-strand breaks (DSBs), a dramatic reduction in the activation of ATM and DNA-PK and phosphorylation of RPA2 and p53, and a significantly increased rate of survival. A minor decrease in ssDNA levels was also observed. All these phenotypes were rescued by wild-type FBH1, but not a FBH1 mutant lacking helicase activity. FBH1 depletion had no effect on other forms of genotoxic stress in which DSBs form by means that do not require ssDNA intermediates. In response to catastrophic genotoxic stress, apoptosis prevents the persistence and propagation of DNA lesions. Our findings show that FBH1 helicase activity is required for the efficient induction of DSBs and apoptosis specifically in response to DNA replication stress. PMID:23319600

  6. Double-stranded DNA-induced localized unfolding of HCV NS3 helicase subdomain 2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dingjiang; Windsor, William T; Wyss, Daniel F

    2003-12-01

    The NS3 helicase of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) unwinds double-stranded (ds) nucleic acid (NA) in an NTP-dependent fashion. Mechanistic details of this process are, however, largely unknown for the HCV helicase. We have studied the binding of dsDNA to an engineered version of subdomain 2 of the HCV helicase (d(2Delta)NS3h) by NMR and circular dichroism. Binding of dsDNA to d(2Delta)NS3h induces a local unfolding of helix (alpha(3)), which includes residues of conserved helicase motif VI (Q(460)RxxRxxR(467)), and strands (beta(1) and beta(8)) from the central beta-sheet. This also occurs upon lowering the pH (4.4) and introducing an R461A point mutation, which disrupt salt bridges with Asp 412 and Asp 427 in the protein structure. NMR studies on d(2Delta)NS3h in the partially unfolded state at low pH map the dsDNA binding site to residues previously shown to be involved in single-stranded DNA binding. Sequence alignment and structural comparison suggest that these Arg-Asp interactions are highly conserved in SF2 DEx(D/H) proteins. Thus, modulation of these interactions by dsNA may allow SF2 helicases to switch between conformations required for helicase function. PMID:14627736

  7. Double-stranded RNA in the biological control of grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Dahai; Liu, Qi; Li, Xia; Sun, Yongwei; Wang, Hui; Xia, Lanqin

    2015-03-01

    Grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F.) is the most dominant and destructive pest of wheat, which causes significant yield loss of cereal plants each year by inflicting damage both through the direct effects of feeding and by vectoring debilitating plant viruses. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing of grain aphid via Roche 454 GS-FLX pyrosequencing. A total of 1,106,696 reads were obtained and assembled into 32,277 unigenes, of which 25,389, 21,635, and 16,211 unigenes matched the Nt, Nr, and Swiss-Prot databases, respectively. Functional annotation of these unigenes revealed not only the presence of genes that encode the key components of RNAi machinery such as Dicer and Argonaute but also the genes encoding the TAR RNA binding protein (TRBP) and the SID-1 protein, which function in assisting the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) formation in microRNA (miRNA) pathway and mediating a systemic RNA interference (RNAi) effect though a cellular uptake mechanism. Furthermore, among a set of 66 unigenes selected for a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) artificial diet assay, four novel effective RNAi targets, which led to high mortality of aphids due to the down-regulation of the expression of the respective target gene, were identified. Moreover, the expansion of systemic RNAi effect in grain aphid was observed by adding the fluorescently labeled dsRNA in an artificial diet assay. PMID:25467938

  8. Biophysical and biochemical characterization of five animal viruses with bisegmented double-stranded RNA genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Dobos, P; Hill, B J; Hallett, R; Kells, D T; Becht, H; Teninges, D

    1979-01-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus of fish, infectious bursal disease virus of chickens, Tellina virus and oyster virus of bivalve molluscs, and drosophila X virus of Drosophila melanogaster are naked icosahedral viruses with an electron microscopic diameter of 58 to 60 nm. The genome of each of these viruses consists of two segments of double-stranded RNA (molecular weight range between 2.6 x 10(6) and 2.2 x 10(6), and the virion, capsid proteins fall into three size class categories (large, medium, and small; ranging from 100,000 to 27,000) as determined by polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis. The hydrodynamic properties of the five viruses are similar as determined by analytical ultracentrifugation and laser quasi-elastic, light-scattering spectroscopy. The calculated particle weights range between 55 x 10(6) and 81 x 10(6). Tryptic peptide comparisons of 125I-labeled virion proteins showed that five viruses are different from each other, although there was considerable overlap in the peptide maps of the three aquatic viruses, indicting a degree of relatedness. Cross-neutralization tests indicated that drosophila X, infectious pancreatic necrosis, and infectious bursal disease viruses were different from each other and from oyster and Tellina viruses. The same test showed oyster and Tellina viruses to be related. The biochemical and biophysical properties of the five viruses cannt be included in the family Reoviridae or in any of the present virus genera. Images PMID:228080

  9. Multiple pathways of DNA double-strand break processing in a mutant Indian muntjac cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bouffler, S.D.; Jha, B.; Johnson, R.T. )

    1990-09-01

    DNA break processing is compared in the Indian muntjac cell lines, SVM and DM. The initial frequencies and resealing of X-ray generated single- and double-strand breaks are similar in the two cell lines. Inhibiting the repair of UV damage leads to greater double-strand breakage in SVM than in DM, and some of these breaks are not repaired; however, repair-associated single-strand breakage and resealing are normal. Dimethylsulfate also induces excess double-strand breakage in SVM, and these breaks are irreparable. Restricted plasmids are reconstituted correctly in SVM at approximately 30% of the frequency observed in DM. Thus SVM has a reduced capacity to repair certain types of double-strand break. This defect is not due to a DNA ligase deficiency. We conclude that DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by a variety of pathways within mammalian cells and that the structure of the break or its mode of formation determines its subsequent fate.

  10. Using triplex-forming oligonucleotide probes for the reagentless, electrochemical detection of double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Adriana; Caprio, Felice; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Moscone, Danila; Plaxco, Kevin W; Palleschi, Giuseppe; Ricci, Francesco

    2010-11-01

    We report a reagentless, electrochemical sensor for the detection of double-stranded DNA targets that employs triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as its recognition element. These sensors are based on redox-tagged TFO probes strongly chemisorbed onto an interrogating gold electrode. Upon the addition of the relevant double-stranded DNA target, the probe forms a rigid triplex structure via reverse Hoogsteen base pairing in the major groove. The formation of the triplex impedes contact between the probe's redox moiety and the interrogating electrode, thus signaling the presence of the target. We first demonstrated the proof of principle of this approach by using a well-characterized 22-base polypurine TFO sequence that readily detects a synthetic, double-stranded DNA target. We then confirmed the generalizability of our platform with a second probe, a 19-base polypyrimidine TFO sequence that targets a polypurine tract (PPT) sequence conserved in all HIV-1 strains. Both sensors rapidly and specifically detect their double-stranded DNA targets at concentrations as low as ~10 nM and are selective enough to be employed directly in complex sample matrices such as blood serum. Moreover, to demonstrate real-world applicability of this new sensor platform, we have successfully detected unpurified, double-stranded PCR amplicons containing the relevant conserved HIV-1 sequence. PMID:20936782

  11. Using Triplex-Forming Oligonucleotide Probes for the Reagentless, Electrochemical Detection of Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Adriana; Caprio, Felice; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis; Moscone, Danila; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Palleschi, Giuseppe; Ricci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We report a reagentless, electrochemical sensor for the detection of double-stranded DNA targets that employs triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as its recognition element. These sensors are based on redox-tagged TFO probes strongly chemisorbed onto an interrogating gold electrode. Upon the addition of the relevant double-stranded DNA target, the probe forms a rigid triplex structure via reverse Hoogsteen base pairing in the major groove. The formation of the triplex impedes contact between the probe’s redox moiety and the interrogating electrode, thus signaling the presence of the target. We first demonstrated the proof of principle of this approach by using a well-characterized 22-base polypurine TFO sequence that readily detects a synthetic, double-stranded DNA target. We then confirmed the generalizability of our platform with a second probe, a 19-base polypyrimidine TFO sequence that targets a polypurine tract (PPT) sequence conserved in all HIV-1 strains. Both sensors rapidly and specifically detect their double-stranded DNA targets at concentrations as low as ~10 nM and are selective enough to be employed directly in complex sample matrices such as blood serum. Moreover, to demonstrate real-world applicability of this new sensor platform, we have successfully detected unpurified, double-stranded PCR amplicons containing the relevant conserved HIV-1 sequence. PMID:20936782

  12. The MRE11 GAR motif regulates DNA double-strand break processing and ATR activation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenbao; Vogel, Gillian; Coulombe, Yan; Dubeau, Danielle; Spehalski, Elizabeth; Hébert, Josée; Ferguson, David O; Masson, Jean Yves; Richard, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex is the primary sensor rapidly recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). MRE11 is known to be arginine methylated by PRMT1 within its glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) motif. In this study, we report a mouse knock-in allele of Mre11 that substitutes the arginines with lysines in the GAR motif and generates the MRE11RK protein devoid of methylated arginines. The Mre11RK/RK mice were hypersensitive to γ-irradiation (IR) and the cells from these mice displayed cell cycle checkpoint defects and chromosome instability. Moreover, the Mre11RK/RK MEFs exhibited ATR/CHK1 signaling defects and impairment in the recruitment of RPA and RAD51 to the damaged sites. The MRKRN complex formed and localized to the sites of DNA damage and normally activated the ATM pathway in response to IR. The MRKRN complex exhibited exonuclease and DNA-binding defects in vitro responsible for the impaired DNA end resection and ATR activation observed in vivo in response to IR. Our findings provide genetic evidence for the critical role of the MRE11 GAR motif in DSB repair, and demonstrate a mechanistic link between post-translational modifications at the MRE11 GAR motif and DSB processing, as well as the ATR/CHK1 checkpoint signaling. PMID:21826105

  13. Mechanisms of DNA Packaging by Large Double-Stranded DNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Rao, Venigalla B; Feiss, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Translocation of viral double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) into the icosahedral prohead shell is catalyzed by TerL, a motor protein that has ATPase, endonuclease, and translocase activities. TerL, following endonucleolytic cleavage of immature viral DNA concatemer recognized by TerS, assembles into a pentameric ring motor on the prohead's portal vertex and uses ATP hydrolysis energy for DNA translocation. TerL's N-terminal ATPase is connected by a hinge to the C-terminal endonuclease. Inchworm models propose that modest domain motions accompanying ATP hydrolysis are amplified, through changes in electrostatic interactions, into larger movements of the C-terminal domain bound to DNA. In phage ϕ29, four of the five TerL subunits sequentially hydrolyze ATP, each powering translocation of 2.5 bp. After one viral genome is encapsidated, the internal pressure signals termination of packaging and ejection of the motor. Current focus is on the structures of packaging complexes and the dynamics of TerL during DNA packaging, endonuclease regulation, and motor mechanics. PMID:26958920

  14. Identification of a pKa-regulating motif stabilizing imidazole-modified double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Buyst, Dieter; Gheerardijn, Vicky; Fehér, Krisztina; Van Gasse, Bjorn; Van Den Begin, Jos; Martins, José C.; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    The predictable 3D structure of double-stranded DNA renders it ideally suited as a template for the bottom-up design of functionalized nucleic acid-based active sites. We here explore the use of a 14mer DNA duplex as a scaffold for the precise and predictable positioning of catalytic functionalities. Given the ubiquitous participation of the histidine-based imidazole group in protein recognition and catalysis events, single histidine-like modified duplexes were investigated. Tethering histamine to the C5 of the thymine base via an amide bond, allows the flexible positioning of the imidazole function in the major groove. The mutual interactions between the imidazole and the duplex and its influence on the imidazolium pKaH are investigated by placing a single modified thymine at four different positions in the center of the 14mer double helix. Using NMR and unrestrained molecular dynamics, a structural motif involving the formation of a hydrogen bond between the imidazole and the Hoogsteen side of the guanine bases of two neighboring GC base pairs is established. The motif contributes to a stabilization against thermal melting of 6°C and is key in modulating the pKaH of the imidazolium group. The general features, prerequisites and generic character of the new pKaH-regulating motif are described. PMID:25520197

  15. Mechanisms of DNA Packaging by Large Double-Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Venigalla B.; Feiss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Translocation of viral double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) into the icosahedral prohead shell is catalyzed by TerL, a motor protein that has ATPase, endonuclease, and translocase activities. TerL, following endonucleolytic cleavage of immature viral DNA concatemer recognized by TerS, assembles into a pentameric ring motor on the prohead’s portal vertex and uses ATP hydrolysis energy for DNA translocation. TerL’s N-terminal ATPase is connected by a hinge to the C-terminal endonuclease. Inchworm models propose that modest domain motions accompanying ATP hydrolysis are amplified, through changes in electrostatic interactions, into larger movements of the C-terminal domain bound to DNA. In phage φ29, four of the five TerL subunits sequentially hydrolyze ATP, each powering translocation of 2.5 bp. After one viral genome is encapsidated, the internal pressure signals termination of packaging and ejection of the motor. Current focus is on the structures of packaging complexes and the dynamics of TerL during DNA packaging, endonuclease regulation, and motor mechanics. PMID:26958920

  16. Chromosome position determines the success of double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Wang, Ruoxi W.; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Capurso, Daniel; Segal, Mark R.; Haber, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Repair of a chromosomal double-strand break (DSB) by gene conversion depends on the ability of the broken ends to encounter a donor sequence. To understand how chromosomal location of a target sequence affects DSB repair, we took advantage of genome-wide Hi-C analysis of yeast chromosomes to create a series of strains in which an induced site-specific DSB in budding yeast is repaired by a 2-kb donor sequence inserted at different locations. The efficiency of repair, measured by cell viability or competition between each donor and a reference site, showed a strong correlation (r = 0.85 and 0.79) with the contact frequencies of each donor with the DSB repair site. Repair efficiency depends on the distance between donor and recipient rather than any intrinsic limitation of a particular donor site. These results further demonstrate that the search for homology is the rate-limiting step in DSB repair and suggest that cells often fail to repair a DSB because they cannot locate a donor before other, apparently lethal, processes arise. The repair efficiency of a donor locus can be improved by four factors: slower 5′ to 3′ resection of the DSB ends, increased abundance of replication protein factor A (RPA), longer shared homology, or presence of a recombination enhancer element adjacent to a donor. PMID:26715752

  17. Analysis of DNA double-strand break response and chromatin structure in mitosis using laser microirradiation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Wu, Tao; Sherman, Adria J.; Lee, Christopher S.; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Zhongsheng, You; Yokomori, Kyoko; Berns, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the femtosecond near-IR and nanosecond green lasers are used to induce alterations in mitotic chromosomes. The subsequent double-strand break responses are studied. We show that both lasers are capable of creating comparable chromosomal alterations and that a phase paling observed within 1–2 s of laser exposure is associated with an alteration of chromatin as confirmed by serial section electron microscopy, DAPI, γH2AX and phospho-H3 staining. Additionally, the accumulation of dark material observed using phase contrast light microscopy (indicative of a change in refractive index of the chromatin) ∼34 s post-laser exposure corresponds spatially to the accumulation of Nbs1, Ku and ubiquitin. This study demonstrates that chromosomes selectively altered in mitosis initiate the DNA damage response within 30 s and that the accumulation of proteins are visually represented by phase-dark material at the irradiation site, allowing us to determine the fate of the damage as cells enter G1. These results occur with two widely different laser systems, making this approach to study DNA damage responses in the mitotic phase generally available to many different labs. Additionally, we present a summary of most of the published laser studies on chromosomes in order to provide a general guide of the lasers and operating parameters used by other laboratories. PMID:20923785

  18. PARP-1 and Ku compete for repair of DNA double strand breaks by distinct NHEJ pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minli; Wu, Weizhong; Wu, Wenqi; Rosidi, Bustanur; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Huichen; Iliakis, George

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) recognizes DNA strand interruptions in vivo and triggers its own modification as well as that of other proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose to form polymers. This modification causes a release of PARP-1 from DNA ends and initiates a variety of responses including DNA repair. While PARP-1 has been firmly implicated in base excision and single strand break repair, its role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. Here, we show that PARP-1, probably together with DNA ligase III, operates in an alternative pathway of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that functions as backup to the classical pathway of NHEJ that utilizes DNA-PKcs, Ku, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, XLF/Cernunnos and Artemis. PARP-1 binds to DNA ends in direct competition with Ku. However, in irradiated cells the higher affinity of Ku for DSBs and an excessive number of other forms of competing DNA lesions limit its contribution to DSB repair. When essential components of the classical pathway of NHEJ are absent, PARP-1 is recruited for DSB repair, particularly in the absence of Ku and non-DSB lesions. This form of DSB repair is sensitive to PARP-1 inhibitors. The results define the function of PARP-1 in DSB repair and characterize a candidate pathway responsible for joining errors causing genomic instability and cancer. PMID:17088286

  19. Cernunnos/XLF: a new player in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Yano, Ken-ichi; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Akiyama, Hidenori

    2009-06-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the predominant repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in vertebrates and also plays a crucial role in V(D)J recombination of immunoglobulin genes. Cernunnos/XLF is a newly identified core factor for NHEJ, and its defect causes a genetic disease characterized by neural disorders, immunodeficiency and increased radiosensitivity. Cernunnos/XLF has at least two distinct functions in NHEJ. Cernunnos/XLF interacts with and stimulates the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex, which acts at the final ligation step in NHEJ. In living cells, Cernunnos/XLF quickly responds to DSB induction and accumulates at damaged sites in a Ku-dependent but XRCC4-independent manner. These observations indicate that Cernunnos/XLF plays a unique role in bridging damage sensing and DSB rejoining steps of NHEJ. Recent crystallographic analyses of the homodimeric Cernunnos/XLF protein provide structural insights into the Cernunnos/XLF functions. These studies offer important clues toward understanding the molecular mechanism for NHEJ-defective diseases. PMID:18992362

  20. PARP-1 and Ku compete for repair of DNA double strand breaks by distinct NHEJ pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minli; Wu, Weizhong; Wu, Wenqi; Rosidi, Bustanur; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Huichen; Iliakis, George

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) recognizes DNA strand interruptions in vivo and triggers its own modification as well as that of other proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose to form polymers. This modification causes a release of PARP-1 from DNA ends and initiates a variety of responses including DNA repair. While PARP-1 has been firmly implicated in base excision and single strand break repair, its role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. Here, we show that PARP-1, probably together with DNA ligase III, operates in an alternative pathway of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that functions as backup to the classical pathway of NHEJ that utilizes DNA-PKcs, Ku, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, XLF/Cernunnos and Artemis. PARP-1 binds to DNA ends in direct competition with Ku. However, in irradiated cells the higher affinity of Ku for DSBs and an excessive number of other forms of competing DNA lesions limit its contribution to DSB repair. When essential components of the classical pathway of NHEJ are absent, PARP-1 is recruited for DSB repair, particularly in the absence of Ku and non-DSB lesions. This form of DSB repair is sensitive to PARP-1 inhibitors. The results define the function of PARP-1 in DSB repair and characterize a candidate pathway responsible for joining errors causing genomic instability and cancer. PMID:17088286

  1. PML nuclear body disruption impairs DNA double-strand break sensing and repair in APL

    PubMed Central

    di Masi, A; Cilli, D; Berardinelli, F; Talarico, A; Pallavicini, I; Pennisi, R; Leone, S; Antoccia, A; Noguera, N I; Lo-Coco, F; Ascenzi, P; Minucci, S; Nervi, C

    2016-01-01

    Proteins involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair localize within the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), whose disruption is at the root of the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) pathogenesis. All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment induces PML-RARα degradation, restores PML-NB functions, and causes terminal cell differentiation of APL blasts. However, the precise role of the APL-associated PML-RARα oncoprotein and PML-NB integrity in the DSB response in APL leukemogenesis and tumor suppression is still lacking. Primary leukemia blasts isolated from APL patients showed high phosphorylation levels of H2AX (γ-H2AX), an initial DSBs sensor. By addressing the consequences of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSB response in primary APL blasts and RA-responsive and -resistant myeloid cell lines carrying endogenous or ectopically expressed PML-RARα, before and after treatment with RA, we found that the disruption of PML-NBs is associated with delayed DSB response, as revealed by the impaired kinetic of disappearance of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci and activation of ATM and of its substrates H2AX, NBN, and CHK2. The disruption of PML-NB integrity by PML-RARα also affects the IR-induced DSB response in a preleukemic mouse model of APL in vivo. We propose the oncoprotein-dependent PML-NB disruption and DDR impairment as relevant early events in APL tumorigenesis. PMID:27468685

  2. Proliferation of Double-Strand Break-Resistant Polyploid Cells Requires Drosophila FANCD2.

    PubMed

    Bretscher, Heidi S; Fox, Donald T

    2016-06-01

    Conserved DNA-damage responses (DDRs) sense genome damage and prevent mitosis of broken chromosomes. How cells lacking DDRs cope with broken chromosomes during mitosis is poorly understood. DDRs are frequently inactivated in cells with extra genomes (polyploidy), suggesting that study of polyploidy can reveal how cells with impaired DDRs/genome damage continue dividing. Here, we show that continued division and normal organ development occurs in polyploid, DDR-impaired Drosophila papillar cells. As papillar cells become polyploid, they naturally accumulate broken acentric chromosomes but do not apoptose/arrest the cell cycle. To survive mitosis with acentric chromosomes, papillar cells require Fanconi anemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI, as well as Blm helicase, but not canonical DDR signaling. FANCD2 acts independently of previous S phases to promote alignment and segregation of acentric DNA produced by double-strand breaks, thus avoiding micronuclei and organ malformation. Because polyploidy and impaired DDRs can promote cancer, our findings provide insight into disease-relevant DNA-damage tolerance mechanisms. PMID:27270041

  3. Theory for the conformational changes of double-stranded chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi-Jie; Dill, Ken A.

    1998-09-01

    We develop statistical mechanical theory to predict the thermodynamic properties of chain molecules having noncovalent double-stranded conformations, as in RNA molecules and β-sheets in proteins. Sequence dependence and excluded volume interactions are explicitly taken into account. We classify conformations by their polymer graphs and enumerate all the conformations corresponding to each graph by a recently developed matrix method [S-J. Chen and K. A. Dill, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 5802 (1995)]. All such graphs are summed by a recursive method. Tests against exact computer enumeration for short chains on a 2D lattice show that the density of states and partition function are given quite accurately. So far, we have explored two classes of conformations; hairpins, which model small β-sheets, and RNA secondary structures. The main folding transition is predicted to be quite different for these two conformational classes: the hairpin transition is two-state while the RNA secondary structure transition is one-state for homopolymeric chains.

  4. A three-dimensional statistical mechanical model of folding double-stranded chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbing; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2001-05-01

    Based on a graphical representation of intrachain contacts, we have developed a new three-dimensional model for the statistical mechanics of double-stranded chain molecules. The theory has been tested and validated for the cubic lattice chain conformations. The statistical mechanical model can be applied to the equilibrium folding thermodynamics of a large class of chain molecules, including protein β-hairpin conformations and RNA secondary structures. The application of a previously developed two-dimensional model to RNA secondary structure folding thermodynamics generally overestimates the breadth of the melting curves [S-J. Chen and K. A. Dill, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 646 (2000)], suggesting an underestimation for the sharpness of the conformational transitions. In this work, we show that the new three-dimensional model gives much sharper melting curves than the two-dimensional model. We believe that the new three-dimensional model may give much improved predictions for the thermodynamic properties of RNA conformational changes than the previous two-dimensional model.

  5. Fine-tuning the ubiquitin code at DNA double-strand breaks: deubiquitinating enzymes at work

    PubMed Central

    Citterio, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a reversible protein modification broadly implicated in cellular functions. Signaling processes mediated by ubiquitin (ub) are crucial for the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), one of the most dangerous types of DNA lesions. In particular, the DSB response critically relies on active ubiquitination by the RNF8 and RNF168 ub ligases at the chromatin, which is essential for proper DSB signaling and repair. How this pathway is fine-tuned and what the functional consequences are of its deregulation for genome integrity and tissue homeostasis are subject of intense investigation. One important regulatory mechanism is by reversal of substrate ubiquitination through the activity of specific deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), as supported by the implication of a growing number of DUBs in DNA damage response processes. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of how ub-mediated signaling at DSBs is controlled by DUBs, with main focus on DUBs targeting histone H2A and on their recent implication in stem cell biology and cancer. PMID:26442100

  6. Solution structure of the Drosha double-stranded RNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drosha is a nuclear RNase III enzyme that initiates processing of regulatory microRNA. Together with partner protein DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 (DGCR8), it forms the Microprocessor complex, which cleaves precursor transcripts called primary microRNA to produce hairpin precursor microRNA. In addition to two RNase III catalytic domains, Drosha contains a C-terminal double-stranded RNA-binding domain (dsRBD). To gain insight into the function of this domain, we determined the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure. Results We report here the solution structure of the dsRBD from Drosha (Drosha-dsRBD). The αβββα fold is similar to other dsRBD structures. A unique extended loop distinguishes this domain from other dsRBDs of known structure. Conclusions Despite uncertainties about RNA-binding properties of the Drosha-dsRBD, its structure suggests it retains RNA-binding features. We propose that this domain may contribute to substrate recognition in the Drosha-DGCR8 Microprocessor complex. PMID:20226070

  7. Radiation dose determines the method for quantification of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Tanja; Keta, Otilija; Korićanac, Lela; Žakula, Jelena; Petrović, Ivan; Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra; Todorović, Danijela

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX (γH2AX). Immunofluorescent staining visualizes formation of γH2AX foci, allowing their quantification. This method, as opposed to Western blot assay and Flow cytometry, provides more accurate analysis, by showing exact position and intensity of fluorescent signal in each single cell. In practice there are problems in quantification of γH2AX. This paper is based on two issues: the determination of which technique should be applied concerning the radiation dose, and how to analyze fluorescent microscopy images obtained by different microscopes. HTB140 melanoma cells were exposed to γ-rays, in the dose range from 1 to 16 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA level were analyzed at different time intervals after irradiation by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunochemically stained cells were visualized with two types of microscopes: AxioVision (Zeiss, Germany) microscope, comprising an ApoTome software, and AxioImagerA1 microscope (Zeiss, Germany). Obtained results show that the level of γH2AX is time and dose dependent. Immunofluorescence microscopy provided better detection of DSBs for lower irradiation doses, while Western blot analysis was more reliable for higher irradiation doses. AxioVision microscope containing ApoTome software was more suitable for the detection of γH2AX foci. PMID:26959322

  8. Homozygous mutation of MTPAP causes cellular radiosensitivity and persistent DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Martin, N T; Nakamura, K; Paila, U; Woo, J; Brown, C; Wright, J A; Teraoka, S N; Haghayegh, S; McCurdy, D; Schneider, M; Hu, H; Quinlan, A R; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    2014-01-01

    The study of rare human syndromes characterized by radiosensitivity has been instrumental in identifying novel proteins and pathways involved in DNA damage responses to ionizing radiation. In the present study, a mutation in mitochondrial poly-A-polymerase (MTPAP), not previously recognized for its role in the DNA damage response, was identified by exome sequencing and subsequently associated with cellular radiosensitivity. Cell lines derived from two patients with the homozygous MTPAP missense mutation were radiosensitive, and this radiosensitivity could be abrogated by transfection of wild-type mtPAP cDNA into mtPAP-deficient cell lines. Further analysis of the cellular phenotype revealed delayed DNA repair, increased levels of DNA double-strand breaks, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased cell death after irradiation (IR). Pre-IR treatment of cells with the potent anti-oxidants, α-lipoic acid and n-acetylcysteine, was sufficient to abrogate the DNA repair and clonogenic survival defects. Our results firmly establish that mutation of the MTPAP gene results in a cellular phenotype of increased DNA damage, reduced repair kinetics, increased cell death by apoptosis, and reduced clonogenic survival after exposure to ionizing radiation, suggesting a pathogenesis that involves the disruption of ROS homeostasis. PMID:24651433

  9. Sulforaphane induces DNA double strand breaks predominantly repaired by homologous recombination pathway in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kubota, Nobuo; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-12-12

    Cytotoxicity and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were studied in HeLa cells treated with sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known chemo-preventive agent. Cell survival was impaired by SFN in a concentration and treatment time-dependent manner. Both constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and {gamma}-H2AX assay unambiguously indicated formation of DSBs by SFN, reflecting the cell survival data. These DSBs were predominantly processed by homologous recombination repair (HRR), judging from the SFN concentration-dependent manner of Rad51 foci formation. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) protein, was not observed by SFN treatment, suggesting that NHEJ may not be involved in DSBs induced by this chemical. G2/M arrest by SFN, a typical response for cells exposed to ionizing radiation was also observed. Our new data indicate the clear induction of DSBs by SFN and a useful anti-tumor aspect of SFN through the induction of DNA DSBs.

  10. PML nuclear body disruption impairs DNA double-strand break sensing and repair in APL.

    PubMed

    di Masi, A; Cilli, D; Berardinelli, F; Talarico, A; Pallavicini, I; Pennisi, R; Leone, S; Antoccia, A; Noguera, N I; Lo-Coco, F; Ascenzi, P; Minucci, S; Nervi, C

    2016-01-01

    Proteins involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair localize within the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), whose disruption is at the root of the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) pathogenesis. All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment induces PML-RARα degradation, restores PML-NB functions, and causes terminal cell differentiation of APL blasts. However, the precise role of the APL-associated PML-RARα oncoprotein and PML-NB integrity in the DSB response in APL leukemogenesis and tumor suppression is still lacking. Primary leukemia blasts isolated from APL patients showed high phosphorylation levels of H2AX (γ-H2AX), an initial DSBs sensor. By addressing the consequences of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSB response in primary APL blasts and RA-responsive and -resistant myeloid cell lines carrying endogenous or ectopically expressed PML-RARα, before and after treatment with RA, we found that the disruption of PML-NBs is associated with delayed DSB response, as revealed by the impaired kinetic of disappearance of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci and activation of ATM and of its substrates H2AX, NBN, and CHK2. The disruption of PML-NB integrity by PML-RARα also affects the IR-induced DSB response in a preleukemic mouse model of APL in vivo. We propose the oncoprotein-dependent PML-NB disruption and DDR impairment as relevant early events in APL tumorigenesis. PMID:27468685

  11. DNA double-strand breaks induced along the trajectory of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, I. C.; Niu, H.; Chen, C. H.; Yu, Y. C.; Hsu, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-known that the DNA damage caused by charged particles considerably differs from damage due to electromagnetic radiation. In the case of irradiation by charged particles the DNA lesions are more complex and clustered. Such clustered damage is presumed difficult to be repaired, and is potentially lethal. In this study, we utilize a 90°-scattering system and related imaging techniques to investigate the accumulation of γ-H2AX along the trajectory of charged particles. By immunostaining the γ-H2AX protein, optical images of corresponding double strand breaks were observed using a high resolution confocal microscope. We demonstrate the difference in the accumulation of γ-H2AX from irradiation by 1 MeV protons and that of 150 keV X-rays. The acquired images were arranged and reconstructed into a 3D image using ImageJ software. We discovered that the γ-H2AX foci, following irradiation by protons, have a tendency to extend in the beam direction, while those from X-ray irradiation tend to be smaller and more randomly distributed. These results can be explained by the physical model of energy deposition.

  12. DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Telomeres Play Important Roles in Trypanosoma brucei Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human-infecting microbial pathogens all face a serious problem of elimination by the host immune response. Antigenic variation is an effective immune evasion mechanism where the pathogen regularly switches its major surface antigen. In many cases, the major surface antigen is encoded by genes from the same gene family, and its expression is strictly monoallelic. Among pathogens that undergo antigenic variation, Trypanosoma brucei (a kinetoplastid), which causes human African trypanosomiasis, Plasmodium falciparum (an apicomplexan), which causes malaria, Pneumocystis jirovecii (a fungus), which causes pneumonia, and Borrelia burgdorferi (a bacterium), which causes Lyme disease, also express their major surface antigens from loci next to the telomere. Except for Plasmodium, DNA recombination-mediated gene conversion is a major pathway for surface antigen switching in these pathogens. In the last decade, more sophisticated molecular and genetic tools have been developed in T. brucei, and our knowledge of functions of DNA recombination in antigenic variation has been greatly advanced. VSG is the major surface antigen in T. brucei. In subtelomeric VSG expression sites (ESs), VSG genes invariably are flanked by a long stretch of upstream 70-bp repeats. Recent studies have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), particularly those in 70-bp repeats in the active ES, are a natural potent trigger for antigenic variation in T. brucei. In addition, telomere proteins can influence VSG switching by reducing the DSB amount at subtelomeric regions. These findings will be summarized and their implications will be discussed in this review. PMID:25576484

  13. Simultaneous characterization of sense and antisense genomic processes by the double-stranded hidden Markov model.

    PubMed

    Glas, Julia; Dümcke, Sebastian; Zacher, Benedikt; Poron, Don; Gagneur, Julien; Tresch, Achim

    2016-03-18

    Hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been extensively used to dissect the genome into functionally distinct regions using data such as RNA expression or DNA binding measurements. It is a challenge to disentangle processes occurring on complementary strands of the same genomic region. We present the double-stranded HMM (dsHMM), a model for the strand-specific analysis of genomic processes. We applied dsHMM to yeast using strand specific transcription data, nucleosome data, and protein binding data for a set of 11 factors associated with the regulation of transcription.The resulting annotation recovers the mRNA transcription cycle (initiation, elongation, termination) while correctly predicting strand-specificity and directionality of the transcription process. We find that pre-initiation complex formation is an essentially undirected process, giving rise to a large number of bidirectional promoters and to pervasive antisense transcription. Notably, 12% of all transcriptionally active positions showed simultaneous activity on both strands. Furthermore, dsHMM reveals that antisense transcription is specifically suppressed by Nrd1, a yeast termination factor. PMID:26578558

  14. Characterization of a novel double-stranded RNA mycovirus conferring hypovirulence from the phytopathogenic fungus Botryosphaeria dothidea.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lifeng; Xiang, Jun; Zhang, Meixin; Fu, Min; Yang, Zuokun; Hong, Ni; Wang, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    A novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus, designated as Botryosphaeria dothidea RNA virus 1 (BdRV1), isolated from a hypovirulent strain YZN115 of Botryosphaeria dothidea was biologically and molecularly characterized. The genome of BdRV1 comprises of five dsRNAs. Each dsRNA contains a single open reading frame. The proteins encoded by dsRNA1-4 shared significant amino acid identities of 55%, 47%, 43% and 53% with the corresponding proteins of Aspergillus fumigatus tetramycovirus-1. DsRNA1, 3, and 4 of BdRV1 encoded an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, a viral methyltransferase, and a P-A-S-rich protein, respectively. Function of proteins encoded by the dsRNA2 and dsRNA5 were unknown. BdRV1 conferred hypovirulence for its host and could be transmitted through conidia and hyphae contact. PMID:27015523

  15. Direct detection of synthetic and biologically generated double-stranded DNA by MALDI-TOF MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Daniel P.; Jacob, Anette; Becker, Thomas; Braun, Andreas; Darnhofer-Demar, Brigitte; Jurinke, Christian; van den Boom, Dirk; Koster, Hubert

    1997-12-01

    A synthetic 50-mer DNA was mixed at room temperature with a non-complementary or a complementary 27-mer and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The former resulted in negligible signals from a 27-/50- mer heterodimer, for the latter this was a dominant peak, consistent with maintaining Watson-Crick interactions in the gas phase. Double stranded DNA derived from an enzymatic digestion of a 252-base-pair polymerase chain reaction product when prepared at room temperature yielded very little specific double stranded DNA, but sample preparation at reduced temperature resulted in spectra dominated by the expected heterodimer signals with no random (i.e. non-Watson-Crick) dimers. As a DNA diagnostics genotyping application, apolipoprotein-E alleles were easily distinguished considering only the masses of their double stranded DNA digest fragments.

  16. Moloney murine sarcoma virions synthesize full-genome-length double-stranded DNA in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Benz, E W; Dina, D

    1979-01-01

    Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MSV) virions incubated under optimal conditions were shown to support extensive synthesis of double-stranded DNA. The major product, a 5950-base-pair (6-kilobase-pair DNA) double-stranded DNA, was characterized by cleavage with restriction endonucleases and shown to contain a 600-nucleotide-long direct repeat at both ends of the MSV genome. Linear DNA molecules made in vivo shortly after infection were compared to the linear double-stranded DNA synthesized in vitro. The restriction maps of both viral DNA products were indistinguishable. The 600-base-pair repeat results in a progeny DNA molecule that is longer than the parental MSV genomic RNA. The generation of this repeat must involve a mechanism that allows the viral reverse transcriptase (RNA-dependent DNA nucleotidyltransferase) to copy 5'- and 3'-terminal genomic (+) strand sequences twice. Images PMID:291003

  17. The radiomimetic enediyne C-1027 induces unusual DNA damage responses to double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Daniel R; Beerman, Terry A

    2006-03-21

    Cells lacking the protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) have defective responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), including an inability to activate damage response proteins such as p53. However, we previously showed that cells lacking ATM robustly activate p53 in response to DNA strand breaks induced by the radiomimetic enediyne C-1027. To gain insight into the nature of C-1027-induced ATM-independent damage responses to DNA DSBs, we further examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to this unique radiomimetic agent. Like ionizing radiation (IR) and other radiomimetics, breaks induced by C-1027 efficiently activate ATM by phosphorylation at Ser1981, yet unlike other radiomimetics and IR, DNA breaks induced by C-1027 result in normal phosphorylation of p53 and the cell cycle checkpoint kinases (Chk1 and Chk2) in the absence of ATM. In the presence of ATM, but under ATM and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) deficient conditions, C-1027 treatment resulted in a decrease in the level of Chk1 phosphorylation but not in the level of p53 and Chk2 phosphorylation. Only when cells were deficient in both ATM and ATR was there a reduction in the level of phosphorylation of each of these DNA damage response proteins. This reduction was also accompanied by an increased level of cell death in comparison to that of wild-type cells or cells lacking either ATM or ATR. Our findings demonstrate a unique cellular response to C-1027-induced DNA DSBs in that DNA damage response proteins are unaffected by the absence of ATM, as long as ATR is present. PMID:16533058

  18. Nucleolin mediates nucleosome disruption critical for DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Michael; Derheimer, Frederick A; Tait-Mulder, Jacqueline; Kastan, Michael B

    2013-10-15

    Recruitment of DNA repair factors and modulation of chromatin structure at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is a complex and highly orchestrated process. We developed a system that can induce DSBs rapidly at defined endogenous sites in mammalian genomes and enables direct assessment of repair and monitoring of protein recruitment, egress, and modification at DSBs. The tight regulation of the system also permits assessments of relative kinetics and dependencies of events associated with cellular responses to DNA breakage. Distinct advantages of this system over focus formation/disappearance assays for assessing DSB repair are demonstrated. Using ChIP, we found that nucleosomes are partially disassembled around DSBs during nonhomologous end-joining repair in G1-arrested mammalian cells, characterized by a transient loss of the H2A/H2B histone dimer. Nucleolin, a protein with histone chaperone activity, interacts with RAD50 via its arginine-glycine rich domain and is recruited to DSBs rapidly in an MRE11-NBS1-RAD50 complex-dependent manner. Down-regulation of nucleolin abrogates the nucleosome disruption, the recruitment of repair factors, and the repair of the DSB, demonstrating the functional importance of nucleosome disruption in DSB repair and identifying a chromatin-remodeling protein required for the process. Interestingly, the nucleosome disruption that occurs during DSB repair in cycling cells differs in that both H2A/H2B and H3/H4 histone dimers are removed. This complete nucleosome disruption is also dependent on nucleolin and is required for recruitment of replication protein A to DSBs, a marker of DSB processing that is a requisite for homologous recombination repair. PMID:24082117

  19. Use of double-stranded RNA interference in Drosophila cell lines to dissect signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, James C.; Worby, Carolyn A.; Simonson-Leff, Nancy; Muda, Marco; Maehama, Tomohiko; Hemmings, Brian A.; Dixon, Jack E.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) of gene expression in generating “knock-out” phenotypes for specific proteins in several Drosophila cell lines. We prove the applicability of this technique for studying signaling cascades by dissecting the well-characterized insulin signal transduction pathway. Specifically, we demonstrate that inhibiting the expression of the DSOR1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, MAPKK) prevents the activation of the downstream ERK-A (MAPK). In contrast, blocking ERK-A expression results in increased activation of DSOR1. We also show that Drosophila AKT (DAKT) activation depends on the insulin receptor substrate, CHICO (IRS1–4). Finally, we demonstrate that blocking the expression of Drosophila PTEN results in the activation of DAKT. In all cases, the interference of the biochemical cascade by RNAi is consistent with the known steps in the pathway. We extend this powerful technique to study two proteins, DSH3PX1 and Drosophila ACK (DACK). DSH3PX1 is an SH3, phox homology domain-containing protein, and DACK is homologous to the mammalian activated Cdc42 tyrosine kinase, ACK. Using RNAi, we demonstrate that DACK is upstream of DSH3PX1 phosphorylation, making DSH3PX1 an identified downstream target/substrate of ACK-like tyrosine kinases. These experiments highlight the usefulness of RNAi in dissecting complex biochemical signaling cascades and provide a highly effective method for determining the function of the identified genes arising from the Drosophila genome sequencing project. PMID:10823906

  20. The genome of infectious bursal disease virus consists of two segments of double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, H; Scholtissek, C; Becht, H

    1979-01-01

    The RNA of infectious bursal disease virus was reexamined in a detailed analysis. It could be established that its genome consists of two segments of double-stranded RNA. The RNA is RNase resistant and has a sedimentation coefficient of 14S and a buoyant density of 1.62 g/ml. The purine/pyrimidine ratio is nearly 1; the guanine plus cytosine content is 55.3%; the Tm is 95.5 degrees C. The molecular weights of the two double-stranded segments were determined to be 2.2 x 10(6) and 2.5 x 10(6). Images PMID:229240

  1. High-throughput detection of DNA double-strand breaks using image cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Tyler L.; Bailey, Alison M.; Bednarz, Bryan P.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of γH2AX expression for studying DNA double-strand break formation is often performed by manual counting of foci using immunofluorescence microscopy, an approach that is laborious and subject to significant foci selection bias. Here we present a novel high-throughput method for detecting DNA double-strand breaks using automated image cytometry assessment of cell average γH2AX immunofluorescence. Our technique provides an expedient, high-throughput, objective, and cost-effective method for γH2AX analysis. PMID:25605579

  2. High-throughput detection of DNA double-strand breaks using image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Tyler L; Bailey, Alison M; Bednarz, Bryan P; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of γH2AX expression for studying DNA double-strand break formation is often performed by manual counting of foci using immunofluorescence microscopy, an approach that is laborious and subject to significant foci selection bias. Here we present a novel high-throughput method for detecting DNA double-strand breaks using automated image cytometry assessment of cell average γH2AX immunofluorescence. Our technique provides an expedient, high-throughput, objective, and cost-effective method for γH2AX analysis. PMID:25605579

  3. The Transcriptional Response to DNA-Double-Strand Breaks in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Whitaker, John W; Cuming, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    The model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens is unique among plants in supporting the generation of mutant alleles by facile homologous recombination-mediated gene targeting (GT). Reasoning that targeted transgene integration occurs through the capture of transforming DNA by the homology-dependent pathway for DNA double-strand break (DNA-DSB) repair, we analysed the genome-wide transcriptomic response to bleomycin-induced DNA damage and generated mutants in candidate DNA repair genes. Massively parallel (Illumina) cDNA sequencing identified potential participants in gene targeting. Transcripts encoding DNA repair proteins active in multiple repair pathways were significantly up-regulated. These included Rad51, CtIP, DNA ligase 1, Replication protein A and ATR in homology-dependent repair, Xrcc4, DNA ligase 4, Ku70 and Ku80 in non-homologous end-joining and Rad1, Tebichi/polymerase theta, PARP in microhomology-mediated end-joining. Differentially regulated cell-cycle components included up-regulated Rad9 and Hus1 DNA-damage-related checkpoint proteins and down-regulated D-type cyclins and B-type CDKs, commensurate with the imposition of a checkpoint at G2 of the cell cycle characteristic of homology-dependent DNA-DSB repair. Candidate genes, including ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling helicases associated with repair and recombination, were knocked out and analysed for growth defects, hypersensitivity to DNA damage and reduced GT efficiency. Targeted knockout of PpCtIP, a cell-cycle activated mediator of homology-dependent DSB resection, resulted in bleomycin-hypersensitivity and greatly reduced GT efficiency. PMID:27537368

  4. Deregulation of DNA double-strand break repair in multiple myeloma: implications for genome stability.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Ana B; San Miguel, Jesús; Gutierrez, Norma C

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy characterized by frequent chromosome abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for this genome instability remains unknown. Since both impaired and hyperactive double strand break (DSB) repair pathways can result in DNA rearrangements, we investigated the functionality of DSB repair in MM cells. Repair kinetics of ionizing-radiation (IR)-induced DSBs was similar in MM and normal control lymphoblastoid cell lines, as revealed by the comet assay. However, four out of seven MM cell lines analyzed exhibited a subset of persistent DSBs, marked by γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci that elicited a prolonged G2/M DNA damage checkpoint activation and hypersensitivity to IR, especially in the presence of checkpoint inhibitors. An analysis of the proteins involved in DSB repair in MM cells revealed upregulation of DNA-PKcs, Artemis and XRCC4, that participate in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), and Rad51, involved in homologous recombination (HR). Accordingly, activity of both NHEJ and HR were elevated in MM cells compared to controls, as determined by in vivo functional assays. Interestingly, levels of proteins involved in a highly mutagenic, translocation-promoting, alternative NHEJ subpathway (Alt-NHEJ) were also increased in all MM cell lines, with the Alt-NHEJ protein DNA ligase IIIα, also overexpressed in several plasma cell samples isolated from MM patients. Overactivation of the Alt-NHEJ pathway was revealed in MM cells by larger deletions and higher sequence microhomology at repair junctions, which were reduced by chemical inhibition of the pathway. Taken together, our results uncover a deregulated DSB repair in MM that might underlie the characteristic genome instability of the disease, and could be therapeutically exploited. PMID:25790254

  5. The Transcriptional Response to DNA-Double-Strand Breaks in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Whitaker, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens is unique among plants in supporting the generation of mutant alleles by facile homologous recombination-mediated gene targeting (GT). Reasoning that targeted transgene integration occurs through the capture of transforming DNA by the homology-dependent pathway for DNA double-strand break (DNA-DSB) repair, we analysed the genome-wide transcriptomic response to bleomycin-induced DNA damage and generated mutants in candidate DNA repair genes. Massively parallel (Illumina) cDNA sequencing identified potential participants in gene targeting. Transcripts encoding DNA repair proteins active in multiple repair pathways were significantly up-regulated. These included Rad51, CtIP, DNA ligase 1, Replication protein A and ATR in homology-dependent repair, Xrcc4, DNA ligase 4, Ku70 and Ku80 in non-homologous end-joining and Rad1, Tebichi/polymerase theta, PARP in microhomology-mediated end-joining. Differentially regulated cell-cycle components included up-regulated Rad9 and Hus1 DNA-damage-related checkpoint proteins and down-regulated D-type cyclins and B-type CDKs, commensurate with the imposition of a checkpoint at G2 of the cell cycle characteristic of homology-dependent DNA-DSB repair. Candidate genes, including ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling helicases associated with repair and recombination, were knocked out and analysed for growth defects, hypersensitivity to DNA damage and reduced GT efficiency. Targeted knockout of PpCtIP, a cell-cycle activated mediator of homology-dependent DSB resection, resulted in bleomycin-hypersensitivity and greatly reduced GT efficiency. PMID:27537368

  6. The Double-Stranded DNA Virosphere as a Modular Hierarchical Network of Gene Sharing

    PubMed Central

    Iranzo, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virus genomes are prone to extensive gene loss, gain, and exchange and share no universal genes. Therefore, in a broad-scale study of virus evolution, gene and genome network analyses can complement traditional phylogenetics. We performed an exhaustive comparative analysis of the genomes of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses by using the bipartite network approach and found a robust hierarchical modularity in the dsDNA virosphere. Bipartite networks consist of two classes of nodes, with nodes in one class, in this case genomes, being connected via nodes of the second class, in this case genes. Such a network can be partitioned into modules that combine nodes from both classes. The bipartite network of dsDNA viruses includes 19 modules that form 5 major and 3 minor supermodules. Of these modules, 11 include tailed bacteriophages, reflecting the diversity of this largest group of viruses. The module analysis quantitatively validates and refines previously proposed nontrivial evolutionary relationships. An expansive supermodule combines the large and giant viruses of the putative order “Megavirales” with diverse moderate-sized viruses and related mobile elements. All viruses in this supermodule share a distinct morphogenetic tool kit with a double jelly roll major capsid protein. Herpesviruses and tailed bacteriophages comprise another supermodule, held together by a distinct set of morphogenetic proteins centered on the HK97-like major capsid protein. Together, these two supermodules cover the great majority of currently known dsDNA viruses. We formally identify a set of 14 viral hallmark genes that comprise the hubs of the network and account for most of the intermodule connections. PMID:27486193

  7. Interactions of Ku70/80 with Double-Strand DNA: Energetic, Dynamics, and Functional Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Space radiation is a proficient inducer of DNA damage leading to mutation, aberrant cell signaling, and cancer formation. Ku is among the first responding proteins in nucleus to recognize and bind the DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) whenever they are introduced. Once loaded Ku works as a scaffold to recruit other repair factors of non-homologous end joining and facilitates the following repair processes. The crystallographic study of the Ku70/80 heterodimer indicate the core structure of this protein shows virtually no conformational change after binding with DNA. To investigate the dynamical features as well as the energetic characteristics of Ku-DNA binding, we conduct multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations of a modeled Ku70/80 structure and several complexes with two 24-bp DNA duplexes. Free energy calculations show significant energy differences between the complexes with Ku bound at DSBs and those with Ku associated at an internal site of a chromosome. The results also reveal detailed interactions between different nucleotides and the amino acids along the DNA-binding cradle of Ku, indicating subtle binding preference of Ku at specific DNA sequences. The covariance matrix analyses along the trajectories demonstrate the protein is stimulated to undergo correlated motions of different domains once bound to DNA ends. Additionally, principle component analyses identify these low frequency collective motions suitable for binding with and translocation along duplex DNA. It is proposed that the modification of dynamical properties of Ku upon binding with DSBs may provide a signal for the further recruitment of other repair factors such as DNA-PKcs, XLF, and XRCC4.

  8. The Double-Stranded RNA Bluetongue Virus Induces Type I Interferon in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells via a MYD88-Dependent TLR7/8-Independent Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruscanu, Suzana; Pascale, Florentina; Bourge, Mickael; Hemati, Behzad; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Urien, Céline; Bonneau, Michel; Takamatsu, Haru; Hope, Jayne; Mertens, Peter; Meyer, Gilles; Stewart, Meredith; Roy, Polly; Meurs, Eliane F.; Dabo, Stéphanie; Zientara, Stéphan; Breard, Emmanuel; Sailleau, Corinne; Chauveau, Emilie; Vitour, Damien; Charley, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), especially plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), produce large amounts of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) upon infection with DNA or RNA viruses, which has impacts on the physiopathology of the viral infections and on the quality of the adaptive immunity. However, little is known about the IFN-α/β production by DCs during infections by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. We present here novel information about the production of IFN-α/β induced by bluetongue virus (BTV), a vector-borne dsRNA Orbivirus of ruminants, in sheep primary DCs. We found that BTV induced IFN-α/β in skin lymph and in blood in vivo. Although BTV replicated in a substantial fraction of the conventional DCs (cDCs) and pDCs in vitro, only pDCs responded to BTV by producing a significant amount of IFN-α/β. BTV replication in pDCs was not mandatory for IFN-α/β production since it was still induced by UV-inactivated BTV (UV-BTV). Other inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-12p40, were also induced by UV-BTV in primary pDCs. The induction of IFN-α/β required endo-/lysosomal acidification and maturation. However, despite being an RNA virus, UV-BTV did not signal through Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) for IFN-α/β induction. In contrast, pathways involving the MyD88 adaptor and kinases dsRNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) were implicated. This work highlights the importance of pDCs for the production of innate immunity cytokines induced by a dsRNA virus, and it shows that a dsRNA virus can induce IFN-α/β in pDCs via a novel TLR-independent and Myd88-dependent pathway. These findings have implications for the design of efficient vaccines against dsRNA viruses. PMID:22438548

  9. Significant Correlation of Species Longevity with DNA Double Strand Break-Recognition but not with Telomere Length

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzini, Antonello; Johnson, F. Brad; Oliver, Anthony; Tresini, Maria; Smith, Jasmine S.; Hdeib, Mona; Sell, Christian; Cristofalo, Vincent J.; Stamato, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The identification of the cellular mechanisms responsible for the wide differences in species lifespan remains one of the major unsolved problems of the biology of aging. We measured the capacity of nuclear protein to recognize DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and telomere length of skin fibroblasts derived from mammalian species that exhibit wide differences in longevity. Our results indicate DNA DSB recognition increases exponentially with longevity. Further, an analysis of the level of Ku80 protein in human, cow, and mouse suggests that Ku levels vary dramatically between species and these levels are strongly correlated with longevity. In contrast mean telomere length appears to decrease with increasing longevity of the species, although not significantly. These findings suggest that an enhanced ability to bind to DNA-ends may be important for longevity. A number of possible roles for increased levels of Ku and DNA-PKcs are discussed. PMID:19896964

  10. PAXX, a paralog of XRCC4 and XLF, interacts with Ku to promote DNA double-strand break repair**

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Mehmood, Shahid; Tamura, Naoka; Travers, Jon; Wu, Qian; Draviam, Viji M.; Robinson, Carol V.; Blundell, Tom L.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4 and XLF are two structurally-related proteins that function in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we identify human PAXX (PAralog of XRCC4 and XLF; also called C9orf142) as a new XRCC4-superfamily member, and show that its crystal structure resembles that of XRCC4. PAXX interacts directly with the DSB-repair protein Ku and is recruited to DNA-damage sites in cells. Using RNA interference and CRISPR-Cas9 to generate PAXX−/− cells, we demonstrate that PAXX functions with XRCC4 and XLF to mediate DSB repair and cell survival in response to DSB-inducing agents. Finally, we reveal that PAXX promotes Ku-dependent DNA ligation in vitro, and assembly of core non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) factors on damaged chromatin in cells. These findings identify PAXX as a new component of the NHEJ machinery. PMID:25574025

  11. Tying the loose ends together in DNA double strand break repair with 53BP1.

    PubMed

    Adams, Melissa M; Carpenter, Phillip B

    2006-01-01

    To maintain genomic stability and ensure the fidelity of chromosomal transmission, cells respond to various forms of genotoxic stress, including DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs), through the activation of DNA damage response signaling networks. In response to DSBs as induced by ionizing radiation (IR), during DNA replication, or through immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) rearrangements in B cells of lymphoid origin, the phosphatidyl inositol-like kinase (PIK) kinases ATM (mutated in ataxia telangiectasia), ATR (ATM and Rad3-related kinase), and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activate signaling pathways that lead to DSB repair. DSBs are repaired by either of two major, non-mutually exclusive pathways: homologous recombination (HR) that utilizes an undamaged sister chromatid template (or homologous chromosome) and non- homologous end joining (NHEJ), an error prone mechanism that processes and joins broken DNA ends through the coordinated effort of a small set of ubiquitous factors (DNA-PKcs, Ku70, Ku80, artemis, Xrcc4/DNA lig IV, and XLF/Cernunnos). The PIK kinases phosphorylate a variety of effector substrates that propagate the DNA damage signal, ultimately resulting in various biological outputs that influence cell cycle arrest, transcription, DNA repair, and apoptosis. A variety of data has revealed a critical role for p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) in the cellular response to DSBs including various aspects of p53 function. Importantly, 53BP1 plays a major role in suppressing translocations, particularly in B and T cells. This report will review past experiments and current knowledge regarding the role of 53BP1 in the DNA damage response. PMID:16945145

  12. DNA Double Strand Break Response and Limited Repair Capacity in Mouse Elongated Spermatids

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Emad A.; Scherthan, Harry; de Rooij, Dirk G.

    2015-01-01

    Spermatids are extremely sensitive to genotoxic exposures since during spermiogenesis only error-prone non homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathways are available. Hence, genomic damage may accumulate in sperm and be transmitted to the zygote. Indirect, delayed DNA fragmentation and lesions associated with apoptotic-like processes have been observed during spermatid elongation, 27 days after irradiation. The proliferating spermatogonia and early meiotic prophase cells have been suggested to retain a memory of a radiation insult leading later to this delayed fragmentation. Here, we used meiotic spread preparations to localize phosphorylate histone H2 variant (γ-H2AX) foci marking DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in elongated spermatids. This technique enabled us to determine the background level of DSB foci in elongated spermatids of RAD54/RAD54B double knockout (dko) mice, severe combined immunodeficiency SCID mice, and poly adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor (DPQ)-treated mice to compare them with the appropriate wild type controls. The repair kinetics data and the protein expression patterns observed indicate that the conventional NHEJ repair pathway is not available for elongated spermatids to repair the programmed and the IR-induced DSBs, reflecting the limited repair capacity of these cells. However, although elongated spermatids express the proteins of the alternative NHEJ, PARP1-inhibition had no effect on the repair kinetics after IR, suggesting that DNA damage may be passed onto sperm. Finally, our genetic mutant analysis suggests that an incomplete or defective meiotic recombinational repair of Spo11-induced DSBs may lead to a carry-over of the DSB damage or induce a delayed nuclear fragmentation during the sensitive programmed chromatin remodeling occurring in elongated spermatids. PMID:26694360

  13. DNA polymerase θ (POLQ), double-strand break repair, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Richard D; Doublié, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    DNA polymerase theta (pol θ) is encoded in the genomes of many eukaryotes, though not in fungi. Pol θ is encoded by the POLQ gene in mammalian cells. The C-terminal third of the protein is a family A DNA polymerase with additional insertion elements relative to prokaryotic homologs. The N-terminal third is a helicase-like domain with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Pol θ is important in the repair of genomic double-strand breaks (DSBs) from many sources. These include breaks formed by ionizing radiation and topoisomerase inhibitors, breaks arising at stalled DNA replication forks, breaks introduced during diversification steps of the mammalian immune system, and DSB induced by CRISPR-Cas9. Pol θ participates in a route of DSB repair termed "alternative end-joining" (altEJ). AltEJ is independent of the DNA binding Ku protein complex and requires DNA end resection. Pol θ is able to mediate joining of two resected 3' ends harboring DNA sequence microhomology. "Signatures" of Pol θ action during altEJ are the frequent utilization of longer microhomologies, and the insertion of additional sequences at joining sites. The mechanism of end-joining employs the ability of Pol θ to tightly grasp a 3' terminus through unique contacts in the active site, allowing extension from minimally paired primers. Pol θ is involved in controlling the frequency of chromosome translocations and preserves genome integrity by limiting large deletions. It may also play a backup role in DNA base excision repair. POLQ is a member of a cluster of similarly upregulated genes that are strongly correlated with poor clinical outcome for breast cancer, ovarian cancer and other cancer types. Inhibition of pol θ is a compelling approach for combination therapy of radiosensitization. PMID:27264557

  14. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This also represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.

  15. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This alsomore » represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.« less

  16. Deficiency in the response to DNA double-strand breaks in mouse early preimplantation embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Yukawa, Masashi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi; Nagata, Masao; Aoki, Fugaku . E-mail: aokif@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-06-29

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are caused by various environmental stresses, such as ionizing radiation and DNA-damaging agents. When DSBs occur, cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms function to stop the cell cycle until all DSBs are repaired; the phosphorylation of H2AX plays an important role in this process. Mouse preimplantation-stage embryos are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation, and X-irradiated mouse zygotes are arrested at the G2 phase of the first cell cycle. To investigate the mechanisms responding to DNA damage at G2 in mouse preimplantation embryos, we examined G2/M checkpoint and DNA repair mechanisms in these embryos. Most of the one- and two-cell embryos in which DSBs had been induced by {gamma}-irradiation underwent a delay in cleavage and ceased development before the blastocyst stage. In these embryos, phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) was not detected in the one- or two-cell stages by immunocytochemistry, although it was detected after the two-cell stage during preimplantation development. These results suggest that the G2/M checkpoint and DNA repair mechanisms have insufficient function in one- and two-cell embryos, causing hypersensitivity to {gamma}-irradiation. In addition, phosphorylated ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein and DNA protein kinase catalytic subunits, which phosphorylate H2AX, were detected in the embryos at one- and two-cell stages, as well as at other preimplantation stages, suggesting that the absence of {gamma}-H2AX in one- and two-cell embryos depends on some factor(s) other than these kinases.

  17. CRISPR-Mediated Base Editing without DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Plosky, Brian S

    2016-05-19

    Targeting point mutations using CRISPR/Cas9 so far has required efficient homologous recombination (HR) and donor oligonucleotides. In a recent Nature paper, Komor and colleagues (2016) describe a way to make specific base changes that does not depend on HR or donor DNA and does not involve making double-strand breaks. PMID:27203175

  18. Nanoconstructions based on double-stranded DNA molecules and their applications as optical biosensing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, M. A.; Kazankov, G. M.; Sergeeva, V. S.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    2006-02-01

    We describe the formation and the properties of biosensing units based on the cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions of the double-stranded nucleic acid molecules. The resulting biosensing units are proved to be sensitive to the presence of some relevant chemical or biological compounds in a liquid to be analyzed.

  19. A New Method for Extraction of Double-Stranded RNA from Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of high molecular weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in plants is associated with the presence of RNA viruses. DsRNA is stable and can be extracted easily from the majority of plant species and provides an excellent tool for characterization of novel viruses that are recalcitrant to pur...

  20. [Superparamagnetic Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles "Blow up" Spatial Ordering of Double-stranded DNA Molecules].

    PubMed

    Yevdokimov, Yu M; Pershina, A G; Salyanov, V I; Magaeva, A A; Popenko, V I; Shtykova, E V; Dadinova, L A; Skuridin, S G

    2015-01-01

    The formation of cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions formed by double-stranded DNA molecules, handled by positively charged superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, as well as action of these nanoparticles on DNA dispersion, are considered. The binding of magnetic nanoparticles to the linear double-stranded DNA in solution of high ionic strength (0.3 M NaCl) and subsequent phase exclusion of these complexes from polyethylene glycol-containing solutions lead to their inability to form dispersions, whose particles do possess the spatially twisted arrangement of neighboring double-stranded DNA molecules. The action of magnetic nanoparticles on DNA dispersion (one magnetic nanoparticle per one double-stranded DNA molecule) results in such "perturbation" of DNA structure at sites of magnetic nanoparticles binding that the regular spatial structure of DNA dispersion particles "blows up"; this process is accompanied by disappearance of both abnormal optical activity and characteristic Bragg maximum on the small-angle X-ray scattering curve. Allowing with the fact that the physicochemical properties of the DNA liquid-crystalline dispersion particles reflect features of spatial organization of these molecules in chromosomes of primitive organisms, it is possible, that the found effect can have the relevant biological consequences. PMID:26349206

  1. Understanding the similarity in thermophoresis between single- and double-stranded DNA or RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, Maren; Herzog, Mario; Greiss, Ferdinand; Wolff, Manuel; Braun, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Thermophoresis is the movement of molecules in a temperature gradient. For aqueous solutions its microscopic basis is debated. Understanding thermophoresis for this case is, however, important since it proved very useful to detect the binding affinity of biomolecules and since thermophoresis could have played an important role in early molecular evolution. Here we discuss why the thermophoresis of single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides - DNA and RNA - is surprisingly similar. This finding is understood by comparing the spherical capacitor model for single-stranded species with the case of a rod-shaped model for double-stranded oligonucleotides. The approach describes thermophoresis of DNA and RNA with fitted effective charges consistent with electrophoresis measurements and explains the similarity between single- and double-stranded species. We could not confirm the sign change for the thermophoresis of single- versus double-stranded DNA in crowded solutions containing polyethylene glycol [Y. T. Maeda, T. Tlusty, and A. Libchaber, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 17972 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1215764109], but find a salt-independent offset while the Debye length dependence still satisfies the capacitor model. Overall, the analysis documents the continuous progress in the microscopic understanding of thermophoresis.

  2. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Double-Stranded RNA Virus L-A-28

    PubMed Central

    Konovalovas, Aleksandras

    2016-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the complete genome of the L-A-28 virus from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K28 killer strain. This sequence completes the set of currently identified L-A helper viruses required for expression of double-stranded RNA-originated killer phenotypes in baking yeast. PMID:27313294

  3. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Double-Stranded RNA Virus L-A-28.

    PubMed

    Konovalovas, Aleksandras; Serviené, Elena; Serva, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the complete genome of the L-A-28 virus from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K28 killer strain. This sequence completes the set of currently identified L-A helper viruses required for expression of double-stranded RNA-originated killer phenotypes in baking yeast. PMID:27313294

  4. Branch Migration Prevents DNA Loss during Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mawer, Julia S. P.; Leach, David R. F.

    2014-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks must be accurate to avoid genomic rearrangements that can lead to cell death and disease. This can be accomplished by promoting homologous recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes. Here, using a unique system for generating a site-specific DNA double-strand break in one copy of two replicating Escherichia coli sister chromosomes, we analyse the intermediates of sister-sister double-strand break repair. Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, we show that when double-strand breaks are formed in the absence of RuvAB, 4-way DNA (Holliday) junctions are accumulated in a RecG-dependent manner, arguing against the long-standing view that the redundancy of RuvAB and RecG is in the resolution of Holliday junctions. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we explain the redundancy by showing that branch migration catalysed by RuvAB and RecG is required for stabilising the intermediates of repair as, when branch migration cannot take place, repair is aborted and DNA is lost at the break locus. We demonstrate that in the repair of correctly aligned sister chromosomes, an unstable early intermediate is stabilised by branch migration. This reliance on branch migration may have evolved to help promote recombination between correctly aligned sister chromosomes to prevent genomic rearrangements. PMID:25102287

  5. Zinc chromate induces chromosome instability and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Hong; Holmes, Amie L.; Young, Jamie L.; Qin Qin; Joyce, Kellie; Pelsue, Stephen C.; Peng Cheng; Wise, Sandra S.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Wallace, William T.; Hammond, Dianne; Wise, John Pierce E-mail: John.Wise@usm.maine.edu

    2009-02-01

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a respiratory toxicant and carcinogen, with solubility playing an important role in its carcinogenic potential. Zinc chromate, a water insoluble or 'particulate' Cr(VI) compound, has been shown to be carcinogenic in epidemiology studies and to induce tumors in experimental animals, but its genotoxicity is poorly understood. Our study shows that zinc chromate induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity, chromosome damage and DNA double strand breaks in human lung cells. In response to zinc chromate-induced breaks, MRE11 expression was increased and ATM and ATR were phosphorylated, indicating that the DNA double strand break repair system was initiated in the cells. In addition, our data show that zinc chromate-induced double strand breaks were only observed in the G2/M phase population, with no significant amount of double strand breaks observed in G1 and S phase cells. These data will aid in understanding the mechanisms of zinc chromate toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  6. Metallization of double-stranded DNA triggered by bound galactose-modified naphthalene diimide.

    PubMed

    Komizo, Kohei; Ikedo, Hideyuki; Sato, Shinobu; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2014-08-20

    Naphthalene diimide (NDI) derivatives bearing galactose moieties through different spacers, NDI-DS1 and NDI-DS2, were synthesized by the click reaction of the acetylene derivatives of NDI with galactose azide. They bound to double-stranded DNA with threading intercalation, as confirmed by the topoisomerase I assay and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The binding affinities of these ligands were on the order of 10(5) M(-1) with several-fold higher affinity for double-stranded DNA than for single-stranded DNA. The silver mirror reaction on the double-stranded DNA bound to these ligands afforded silver nanowires that were converted to gold nanowires. In the atomic force microscopy measurements, the increased height of DNA areas on a mica plate was observed in the case of double-stranded DNA after NDI-DS2 treatment and subsequently silver mirror reaction, whereas the increased height of DNA areas was not observed in the case of single-stranded DNA after the same treatment. PMID:25011665

  7. A New Protocol for Extraction of Double-Stranded RNA from Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are several unidentified virus-like diseases of blueberry that have been recalcitrant to standard methods of virus characterization based on double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Relatives of these viruses yield large amounts of dsRNA in hosts other than blueberry. Modifications in dsRNA extraction p...

  8. X-ray induced DNA double strand break production and repair in mammalian cells as measured by neutral filter elution.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, M O; Kohn, K W

    1979-01-01

    This work presents a neutral filter elution method for detecting DNA double strand breaks in mouse L1210 cells after X-ray. The assay will detect the number of double strand breaks induced by as little as 1000 rad of X-ray. The rate of DNA elution through the filters under neutral conditions increases with X-ray dose. Certain conditions for deproteinization, pH, and filter type are shown to increase the assay's sensitivity. Hydrogen peroxide and Bleomycin also induce apparent DNA double strand breaks, although the ratios of double to single strand breaks vary from those produced by X-ray. The introduction of double strand cuts by HpA I restriction endonuclease in DNA lysed on filters results in a rapid rate of elution under neutral conditions, implying that the method can detect double strand breaks if they exist in the DNA. The eluted DNA bands with a double stranded DNA marker in cesium chloride. This evidence suggests that the assay detects DNA double strand breaks. L1210 cells are shown to rejoin most of the DNA double strand breaks induced by 5-10 krad of X-ray with a half-time of about 40 minutes. PMID:92010

  9. Two Novel Relative Double-Stranded RNA Mycoviruses Infecting Fusarium poae Strain SX63

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luan; Zhang, Jingze; Zhang, Hailong; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Two novel double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycoviruses, termed Fusarium poae dsRNA virus 2 (FpV2) and Fusarium poae dsRNA virus 3 (FpV3), were isolated from the plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium poae strain SX63, and molecularly characterized. FpV2 and FpV3, with respective genome sequences of 9518 and 9419 base pairs (bps), are both predicted to contain two discontinuous open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1 and ORF2. A hypothetical polypeptide (P1) and a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) are encoded by ORF1 and ORF2, respectively. Phytoreo_S7 domain (pfam07236) homologs were detected downstream of the RdRp domain (RdRp_4; pfam02123) of the ORF2-coded proteins of both FpV2 and FpV3. The same shifty heptamers (GGAAAAC) were both found immediately before the stop codon UAG of ORF1 in FpV2 and FpV3, which could mediate programmed –1 ribosomal frameshifting (–1 PRF). Phylogenetic analysis based on RdRp sequences clearly place FpV2 and FpV3 in a taxonomically unassigned dsRNA mycovirus group. Together, with a comparison of genome organization, a new taxonomic family termed Fusagraviridae is proposed to be created to include FpV2- and FpV3-related dsRNA mycoviruses, within which FpV2 and FpV3 would represent two distinct virus species. PMID:27144564

  10. Effects of interferons and double-stranded RNA on human prostate cancer cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Haiyan; Zeng, Chun; Xie, Junbo; Alghamdi, Norah J.; Song, Ya; Zhang, Hongbing; Zhou, Aimin; Jin, Di

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among men in the United States. Prostate cancer therapy is severely hampered by lack of response and development of resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in patients. Therefore, the development and discovery of new drugs have become an urgent clinical need. Interferons (IFNs), a family of pleiotropic cytokines, exert antitumor activities due to their anti-proliferative, immunomodulatory and proapoptotic functions. Here, we report that pretreatment of prostate cancer PC-3 cells with IFNs sensitized these cells to double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs)-induced apoptosis. The enhancement effect of IFN treatment was dependent on IFN subtypes, in particular, IFN γ. In comparison with IFN α or β, IFN γ treatment remarkably augmented apoptosis in PC-3 cells induced with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a synthesized form of dsRNA. We demonstrated that IFN-signaling was necessary for these effects by using mutant cell lines. Transfection of 2–5A, the activator of RNase L, or silencing of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase R (PKR) by siRNA did not have any significant impact on this event, suggesting that neither RNase L nor PKR was involved in poly I:C/IFN γ-induced apoptosis in the cells. Further investigation of the apoptotic pathway revealed that Bak, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2family, was synergistically up-regulated by IFN γ and poly I:C, whereas other members of the family were not affected. Knocking down of Bak demonstrated its contribution to poly I:C/IFN γ-induced apoptosis in the cells. We believeour findings will precipitate the design of novel therapeutic strategies for prostate cancer. PMID:26452032