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1

Chromatographic separation of In(III) from Cd(II) in aqueous solutions using commercial resin (Dowex 50W-X8)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work assesses the potential of an adsorptive material, Dowex 50w-x8, for the separation of indium ions from cadmium ions\\u000a in aqueous media. The adsorption behavior of Dowex 50 w-x8 for indium and cadmium ions was investigated. The effect of pH,\\u000a initial concentration of metal ions, the weight of resins, and contact time on the sorption of each of the

Ayman Massoud; F. Abou El-Nour; H. Killa; U. Seddik

2010-01-01

2

Preconcentration of trace multi-elements in water samples using Dowex 50W-x8 and Chelex-100 resins prior to their determination using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work presents a solid phase extraction (SPE) method for simultaneous preconcentration of trace elements in water samples prior to their ICP-OES determination. Dowex 50W-x8 and Chelex-100 resins were used as SPE sorbent materials for preconcentration of trace Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn. The optimum sample pH, eluent concentration and sample flow rates were found to 6, 3.0 mol L-1 and 3.0 mL min-1, respectively. In terms of multi-element preconcentration capabilities, Dowex 50W-x8 appeared to be a better sorbent. The recoveries for all the tested analytes were >95%. However, Chelex-100 showed a better performance in terms of recovery (>95%) towards Cu, Fe and Zn. Under optimized conditions using Dowex 50W-x8, the relative standard deviations for different metals were <3%. The limits of detection and limits of quantification ranged from 0.01-0.39 ?g L-1 and 0.05-0.1.3 ?g L-1, respectively. The accuracy of the preconcentration method was confirmed by spike recovery test and the analysis of certified reference materials. The SPE method was applied for preconcentration of the analyte ions in tap water, bottled water and wastewater samples.

Nomngongo, Philiswa N.; Catherine Ngila, J.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Moodley, Brenda

3

LAB STUDY ON REGENERATION OF SPENT DOWEX 21K 16-20 MESH ION EXCHANGE RESIN  

SciTech Connect

Currently the effort to remove chromate from groundwater in the 100K and 100H Areas uses DOWEX 21K 16-20. This report addresses the procedure and results of a laboratory study for regeneration of the spent resin by sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid, or sodium sulfate to determine if onsite regeneration by the Effluent Treatment Facility is a feasible option.

DUNCAN, J.B.

2007-01-24

4

Determination of copper, lead and iron in water and food samples after column solid phase extraction using 1-phenylthiosemicarbazide on Dowex Optipore L-493 resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel solid phase extraction procedure for determination of copper, lead and iron in natural water and food samples has been established in the presented work. 1-Phenylthiosemicarbazide (1-PTSC) as ligand and Dowex Optipore L-493 resin as adsorbent were used in a mini chromatographic column. Various analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of analyte ions including pH, amounts of adsorbent, eluent,

Ozden Y?ld?z; Demirhan Citak; Mustafa Tuzen; Mustafa Soylak

2011-01-01

5

Use of Cation Exchange Resins for Production of UO Suitable for the Al-UO Powder Metallurgy Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the production of UO powders from three types of cation exchange resins: Dowex 50W, a strong acid, sulfonate resin; AG MP-50, a macroporous form of sulfonate resin; and Bio-Rex 70, a weak acid, carboxylic resin.

2001-01-01

6

Use of Cation Exchange Resins for Production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Suitable for the Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Powder Metallurgy Process  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the production of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powders from three types of cation exchange resins: Dowex 50W, a strong acid, sulfonate resin; AG MP-50, a macroporous form of sulfonate resin; and Bio-Rex 70, a weak acid, carboxylic resin.

Mosley, W.C.

2001-09-17

7

Determination of copper, lead and iron in water and food samples after column solid phase extraction using 1-phenylthiosemicarbazide on Dowex Optipore L-493 resin.  

PubMed

A novel solid phase extraction procedure for determination of copper, lead and iron in natural water and food samples has been established in the presented work. 1-Phenylthiosemicarbazide (1-PTSC) as ligand and Dowex Optipore L-493 resin as adsorbent were used in a mini chromatographic column. Various analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of analyte ions including pH, amounts of adsorbent, eluent, sample volume, etc. were investigated. The recovery values for analyte ions were higher than 95%. The determination of copper, lead and iron was performed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The influences of some alkali, alkali earth and transition metals on the recoveries of analyte ions were investigated. The preconcentration factor was 62.5. The limit of detections of the understudied analytes (k=3, N=21) were 0.64 ?g L(-1) for copper, 0.55 ?g L(-1) for lead and 0.82 ?g L(-1) for iron. The relative standard deviation was found to be lower than 6%. The accuracy of the method was confirmed with certified reference material (GBW 07605 Tea). The method was successively applied for the determination of copper, lead and iron in water and some food samples including cheese, bread, baby food, pekmez, honey, milk and red wine after microwave digestion. PMID:21111769

Yildiz, Ozden; Citak, Demirhan; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

2011-02-01

8

Preconcentration and Determination of Pb (II) in Aqueous Samples using Functionalized Dowex 1X8  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synthetic resin Dowex 1X8 was functionalized with ?-Nitroso ?-Naphthol (Dowex-?N?N) and with 8-Hydroxy Quinoline (Dowex-8HQ) to form chelating resin. The resultant chelating resins were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The efficiency of these resins for the removal\\/preconcentration of Pb (II) from aqueous samples was evaluated. Optimum conditions of pH,

Mohammad Rasul Jan; Jasmin Shah; Maria Sadia; Atta-ul-Haq

2012-01-01

9

SOME EXPERIMENTS ON THE USE OF THE CHELATING ION EXCHANGER DOWEX A-1 IN NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two preliminary experiments were performed to study the behavior of ; trivalent ions in the chelating ion exchanger Dowex A-1. The exchange between ; La and Cu in Cu saturated resins showed that the affinity of Dowex A-1 is ; slightly higher for La\\/sup 3+\\/ than for Cu\\/sup 2+\\/ under the conditions employed. ; The separation of La\\/sup 3+\\/ and

R. Christell; S. Forberg; T. Westermark

1961-01-01

10

Wideband 220 GHz, 50 W Serpentine Waveguide Amplifier.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Final assembly is underway for a 220 GHz, 50 W serpentine waveguide vacuum electron amplifier showcasing a novel embedded monofilament microfabrication technique based on UV-LIGA. Three microfabricated circuits from the same wafer exhibited matching frequ...

A. M. Cook C. D. Joye D. K. Abe J. P. Calame K. T. Nguyen

2013-01-01

11

Selective alkene epoxidation and alkane hydroxylation with sodium periodate catalyzed by cationic Mn(III)-salen supported on Dowex MSC1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dicationic Mn(III)-salen, containing phosphonium groups at 5,5?-positions of salen ligand, is supported on an ion-exchange resin, Dowex MSC1, via electrostatic interaction. The catalyst, Mn(salen)-Dowex, has been characterized by FTIR, UVvis spectroscopic techniques, scanning electron micrograph (SEM), thermal and elemental analysis. This heterogenized homogeneous manganese(III)-salen complex can be used as catalyst in the alkene epoxidation with sodium periodate. This catalytic system

Bahram Bahramian; Valiollah Mirkhani; Majid Moghadam; Shahram Tangestaninejad

2006-01-01

12

Dissolution of ion exchange resin by hydrogen peroxide  

SciTech Connect

The resin dissolution process was conducted successfully in full-scale equipment at the SRL Semiworks. A solution containing 0.001M Fe/sup 2 +/, or Fe/sup 3 +/, and 3 vol % H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in 0.1M HNO/sub 3/ is sufficient to dissolve up to 40 vol % resin slurry (Dowex 50W-X8). Foaming and pressurization can be eliminated by maintaining the dissolution temperature below 99/sup 0/C. The recommended dissolution temperature range is 85 to 90/sup 0/C. Premixing hydrogen peroxide with all reactants will not create a safety hazard, but operating with a continual feed of hydrogen peroxide is recommended to control the dissolution rate. An air sparging rate of 1.0 to 1.5 scfm will provide sufficient mixing. Spent resin from chemical separation contains DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) residue, and the resin must be washed with 0.1M NH/sub 4/ OH to remove excess DTPA before dissolution. Gamma irradiation of resin up to 4 kW-hr/L did not change the dissolution rate significantly.

Lee, S.C.

1981-08-01

13

All-fiber 50 W coherently combined passive laser array.  

PubMed

We experimentally demonstrate 50 W of spontaneously phase-locked two-laser array in an all-fiber and all-passive configuration using large-mode-area (LMA) polarization-maintaining fiber laser cavities and an LMA fiber coupler. We show that both laser cavity length difference and fiber nonlinearity play an important role in achieving efficient and stable coherent beam combining. In addition, we compare the difference in coherent combining efficiency by using fibers with different mode-field diameters and discuss the underlying phase-locking mechanism and its power scalability. PMID:19340152

Wang, Baishi; Mies, Eric; Minden, Monica; Sanchez, Anthony

2009-04-01

14

Operational characteristics of a 50 W DMFC stack  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characteristics of a 50 W direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) stack were investigated under various operating conditions in order to understand the behavior of the stack. The operating variables included the methanol concentration, the flow rate and the flow direction of the reactants (methanol and air) in the stack. The temperature of the stack was autonomously increased in proportion to the magnitude of the electric load, but it decreased with an increase in the flow rates of the reactants. Although the operation of the stack was initiated at room temperature, under a certain condition the internal temperature of the stack was higher than 80 C. A uniform distribution of the reactants to all the cells was a key factor in determining the performance of the stack. With the supply of 2 M methanol, a maximum power of the stack was found to be 54 W (85 mW cm -2) in air and 98 W (154 mW cm -2) in oxygen. Further, the system with counter-flow reactants produced a power output that was 20% higher than that of co-flow system. A post-load behavior of the stack was also studied by varying the electric load at various operating conditions.

Kim, Daejin; Lee, Jaeyoung; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Oh, In-Hwan; Ha, Heung Yong

15

Thermochemical comparisons of homogeneous and heterogeneous acids and bases. 1. Sulfonic acid solutions and resins as prototype Broensted acids  

SciTech Connect

Heats of ionization by thermometric titration for a series of bases (or acids) can be used to compare solid acids (or bases) with liquid analogues bearing the same functionalities in homogeneous solutions. The method is demonstrated for Broensted acids by reacting a series of substituted nitrogen bases with solutions of p-toluenesulfonic acid (PTSA) in acetonitrile and with suspensions of the microporous polymeric arylsulfonic acid resin-Dowex 50W-X8 in the same solvent. Under well-controlled anhydrous conditions there is a good correlation (r = 0.992) between the heats of reaction of the bases with the homogeneous and heterogeneous acid systems, but the homogeneous system gives a more exothermic interaction by 3-4 kcal mol/sup -1/ for a series of 29 substituted pyrimidines, anilines, and some other amines. This difference may be attributed to homohydrogen bonding interactions between excess acid and sulfonate anion sites which are more restricted geometrically in the resin than in solution. Other factors which affect the enthalpy change for the acid-base interaction are the acid/base ratio, the water content of the sulfonic acid, the solvent, and the resin structure (e.g., microporous vs. macroporous). Steric hindrance in the base does not differentiate solid from homogeneous acid. In addition to the use of titration calorimetry, heats of immersion are reported for the Dowex-arylsulfonic acid resins and the Nafion-perfluorinated sulfonic acid resin in a series of basic liquids. The results are compared with each other and with those from a previous study of several varieties of coal.

Arnett, E.M.; Haaksma, R.A.; Chawla, B.; Healy, M.H.

1986-08-06

16

Behavior of Tetravalent Plutonium with Various Ion Exchangers in Solutions Containing Nitric Acid and Oxalates.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The distribution behavior of tetravalent plutonium on the ion-exchange resins Dowex 50W-X8, Dowex 1-X8 and Dowex Chelating Resin Al-X8 in the presence of various concentrations of nitric acid and oxalate was studied. It was found that nitric acid and oxal...

E. Walter S. A. Ali

1983-01-01

17

Sigma-phase formation in Nitronic 50 and Nitronic 50W stainless steels  

Microsoft Academic Search

The formation of the sigma-phase has been studied in two heats of a nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steel, Nitronic 50 and Nitronic 50W, a weld filler wire composition. It was found that the presence of cold-work greatly enhanced the rate of sigma precipitation in the temperature range of 6001000 C. The nucleation and growth of the sigma-phase was accompanied by recrystallization

Ann M. Ritter

1988-01-01

18

Removal of limonin bitterness by treatment of ion exchange and adsorbent resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study, the selective removal of limonin bitterness from Washington navel orange juice by batch adsorption to the Amberlite\\u000a XAD-16HP and Dowex Optipore L285 was investigated and the determination of some compositional changes that occurred with orange\\u000a juices debittering using adsorption resins were the primary focus. Amberlite XAD-16HP and Dowex Optipore L285 have been successfully\\u000a used to reduce bitterness to

Osman Kola; Cemal Kaya; Hseyin Duran; Ali Altan

2010-01-01

19

Performance of selected anion exchange resins for the treatment of a high DOC content surface water  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was first to compare the performance of four strong anion exchange resins (AERs) (MIEX from Orica Pty Ltd, DOWEX-11 and DOWEX-MSA from DOW chemical and IRA-938 from Rohm and Haas) for their application in drinking water treatment (natural organic matter (NOM), mineral anions (nitrate, sulfate and bromide) and pesticide removal) using bench-scale experimental procedures on

Hugues Humbert; Herv Gallard; Herv Suty; Jean-Philippe Crou

2005-01-01

20

Characterization of soil phosphorus by anion exchange resin adsorption and P 32 -equilibration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Adsorption of phosphate by the anion-exchange resin Dowex-2 was investigated. The resin adsorbed small quantities of P from solution quantitatively. The rate of P-adsorption by resin agitated in solution was proportional to the P-concentration in solution, and was independent of the rate of diffusion of adsorbed P in the resin. When 1 g of soil was shaken continuously with

F. Amer; D. R. Bouldin; C. A. Black; F. R. Duke

1955-01-01

21

Development of Trouble Diagnosis Technology of 50W Grade Small Wind Turbine Generator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Establishment of an early trouble diagnosis system is demanded to prevent damage of wind turbine generator. Therefore, AE signal occurring by the damage of a wind blade was detected with the AE sensor which installed to the body of wind turbine generator and a pole. In this study, length of a blade of a small wind turbine generator was changed as simulated trouble in the constant wind velocity. The AE signal which occurred at this time was measured with an AE sensor. The signal was processed by FFT analysis, and a change of spectrum strength was examined. Then, trouble diagnosis technology of 50W grade small wind turbine generator was developed. As the results, a method to count the number of times more than threshold of AE signals was suggested by a wave pattern of an AE signal. It was understood that the number of the count was decided as standard to judge normality or abnormality of 50W grade small wind turbine generator.

Takaoka, Masashige; Inohata, Kazuki; Miyake, Takuma; Tashima, Daisuke; Otsubo, Masahisa; Bouno, Toshio

22

Ion-exchange resin catalysis in the synthesis of isopropyl lactate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isopropyl lactate is a very important pharmaceutical intermediate. The current practice is to use homogeneous acids as catalysts. These catalysts are hazardous and disposal of liquid acid effluents poses problems. The separation of the liquid catalyst and its reuse is another problem. The current paper deals with the application of heterogeneous catalysts Indion-130, Ambelyst-36, Amberlyst-15, Amberlite-120, Dowex 50W, Filtrol-44, 20%

G. D. Yadav; H. B. Kulkarni

2000-01-01

23

Ion-exchange sorption of quaternary ammonium bases on sulfo-resins of various structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.High selectivity of the polycondensation resins KU-5A and KU-1 with respect to the ion of a quarternary ammonium basetriethylbenzylammonium was detected.2.The coefficient of selectivity in the TEBA-Na system changes negligibly with increasing temperature: it decreases on the resins KU-6, Dowex 501, and KU-5A and increases on the resin KU-1.3.The coefficient of selectivity in the systems studied decreases sharply with increasing

G. V. Samsonov; B. V. Moskvichev

1967-01-01

24

Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) after their solid phase extraction as dibenzyldithiocarbamate chelates on Dowex Optipore V-493.  

PubMed

An enrichment procedure for cadmium and lead after their solid phase extraction as dibenzyldithiocarbamate chelates on Dowex Optipore V-493 has been established prior to their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The analytical parameters including pH, amounts of dibenzyldithiocarbamate, sample volume, etc., were investigated. The effects of alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some metal ions on the retentions of analytes on Dowex Optipore V-493 resin were examined. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits (3s, n=21) for cadmium and lead were 0.43 microg L(-1) and 0.65 microg L(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), and the recoveries of standard addition for this method were lower than 5% (n=11) and 95-102%, respectively. Three standard reference samples (LGC 6010 Hard drinking water, NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07605 Tea) were introduced for accuracy and precision of analytical data. The proposed solid phase extraction system was successfully applied to the analysis of environmental samples. PMID:17723714

Melek, Esra; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

2006-09-25

25

Mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Streptococcus pyogenes loaded Dowex Optipore SD2  

Microsoft Academic Search

A solid phase extraction procedure based on speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury on Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Dowex Optipore SD-2 has been established. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1molL?1 HCl for methyl mercury and 2molL?1 HCl for mercury(II) were performed at pH 8. The determination of mercury levels was performed by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal analytical

Mustafa Tuzen; Ozgur Dogan Uluozlu; Isa Karaman; Mustafa Soylak

2009-01-01

26

Evaluation of Selective Ion Exchange Resins for Removal of Mercury from the H-Area Water Treatment Unit  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated the ability of seven ion exchange (IX) resins, some of which were mercury specific, to remove mercury in H-Area WTU waters from three sources (Reverse Osmosis (RO) Feed, RO Permeate from Train A, and a mercury ''hot spot'' extraction well HEX 18). Seven ion exchange resins, including ResinTech CG8 and Dowex 21K (the cation and anion exchange resins currently used at the H-Area WTU) were screened against five alternative ion exchange materials plus an experimental blank. Mercury decontamination factors (DFs), mercury breakthrough, and post-test contaminant concentrations of IX resins were determined for each IX material tested.

Serkiz, S.M.

2000-09-05

27

Influence of Functional Sulfonic Acid Group on Pyrolysis Characteristics for Cation Exchange Resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pyrolysis of spent ion exchange resins is used to reduce radioactive waste volume and to make the final waste form more stable. The weight loss of cation exchange resin after pyrolysis is only 50w\\/o, while that of anion exchange resin is 90w\\/o. Fundamental experiments were performed to investigate the reason for the small weight loss of the former.The cation resin

Masami MATSUDA; Kiyomi FUNABASHI; Hideo YUSA; Makoto KIKUCHI

1987-01-01

28

Simple rapid hydrolysis of acetyl protecting groups in the FDG synthesis using cation exchange resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new solid phase method for hydrolysis of acetyl groups from the intermediate 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose tetraacetate ([18F]FDG-Ac4) was developed. Fast cleavage occurs with Dowex 50 sulfonic acid resin (H+ form) at ~100 C in the absence of bulk water. [18F]FDG-Ac4 reaction mixtures were efficiently converted to neutral aqueous solutions of pure FDG in 1015 min. The method avoids problems associated with

G. Keith Mulholland

1995-01-01

29

Mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Streptococcus pyogenes loaded Dowex Optipore SD-2.  

PubMed

A solid phase extraction procedure based on speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury on Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Dowex Optipore SD-2 has been established. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl for methyl mercury and 2 mol L(-1) HCl for mercury(II) were performed at pH 8. The determination of mercury levels was performed by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes, etc., were investigated. The influences of the some alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some transition metals on the recoveries were also investigated. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 4.8 and 3.4 mg g(-1). The detection limit (3 sigma) of the reagent blank for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 2.1 and 1.5 ng L(-1). Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The relative standard deviations of the procedure were below 7%. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material (NRCC-DORM 2 Dogfish Muscle). The procedure was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and environmental samples. PMID:19386416

Tuzen, Mustafa; Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan; Karaman, Isa; Soylak, Mustafa

2009-09-30

30

The effects of ionizing radiation on Reillex trademark HPQ, a new macroporous polyvinylpyridine resin, and on four conventional polystyrene anion exchange resins  

SciTech Connect

This study compares the effects of ionizing radiation on Reillex{trademark} HPQ, a recently available macroporous copolymer of 1-methyl-4-vinylpyridine/divinylbenzene, and on four conventional strong-base polystyrene anion exchange resins. The polystyrene resins investigated included one gel type, Dowex{trademark} 1 {times} 4, and three macroporous resins: Dow{trademark} MSA-1, Amberlite{trademark} IRA-900, and Lewatit{trademark} MP-500-FK. Each resin, in 7 M nitric acid, was subjected to seven different levels of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation ranging from 100 to 1000 megarads. Irradiated resins were measured for changes in dry weight, wet volume, chloride and Pu(IV) exchange capacities, and thermal stability. In separate experiments, each resin was subjected to approximately 340 megarads of in situ alpha particles from sorbed plutonium. Resin damage from alpha particles was less than half that caused by gamma rays, which may be a consequence of different production rates of radiolytic nitrite and nitro radicals in the two systems. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin provided the greatest radiation stability, whereas Lewatit{trademark} MP-500-FK was the least stable of the resins tested. Thermogravimetric analyses of dry, nitrate-form resin revealed that dry Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin offered the best thermal stability for absorbed gamma doses to 370 megarads, but the worst thermal stability after exposures of 550 megarads or more. 25 refs., 11 figs., 13 tabs.

Marsh, S.F.

1990-11-01

31

Evaluation of Free Moisture in Resins used at the F- and H-Area Groundwater Treatment Units  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this study was to determine the influence of total moisture content on the amount of free liquid released from two resins (CG-8 and Dowex 21K) and one absorbent (SP 400). An additional objective of this work was to provide some guidance as to how much moisture can be left with the resins before free-liquid is released from the materials. Finally, this work was intended to bench mark the standard vibration test (ASTM D999-96) to the amount of free-liquid measured in resins that had actually been shipped to Nevada Test Site in B-12 containers.

Kaplan, D.I.

2001-03-16

32

Solidphase extraction of copper, iron and zinc ions on Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis loaded on Dowex optipore V-493  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis loaded on Dowex optipore V-493 as new adsorbent for the separationpreconcentration of heavy metal ions has been proposed. The analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of copper(II), iron(III) and zinc(II) including pH, amounts of adsorbent, sample volume, etc. were investigated. The influences of alkaline and earth alkaline ions were also reported. The recovery values for the analytes

Mustafa Tuzen; Esra Melek; Mustafa Soylak

2008-01-01

33

Desorption by ultrasound: Phenol on activated carbon and polymeric resin  

SciTech Connect

An experimental feasibility study of using ultrasound to accomplish the difficult desorption of phenol from activated carbon and polymeric resin adsorbents is discussed. The desorption rates of activated carbon were found to significantly increase by ultrasound at 40 kHz and 1.44 MHz. Attrition of the activated carbon due to cavitation could be prevented by operating at a higher frequency and with an intensity below the threshold of the pulverization of carbon. According to the structural stability study of Amberlite XAD-4 and Dowex Optipore L-493 resins to withstand the abrasive cavitational effects of ultrasound at 40 kHz, the Dowex Optipore resin was stable under experimental conditions and phenol desorption rates were enhanced significantly with sonication. The ultrasonic desorption rates were favored by decreased temperature, aerated liquid medium, and increased ultrasound intensity. The desorption rates obtained without ultrasound appeared to be limited by pore diffusion, whereas those obtained without ultrasound appeared to be limited by pore diffusion, whereas those obtained in the presence of ultrasound were limited by surface reaction. The rate enhancement was due to an increase in diffusive transport within the pores caused by acoustic vortex microstreaming. The activation energy for desorption decreased with an increase in ultrasonic power density, thus making the ultrasound weaken the adsorption bond.

Rege, S.U.; Yang, R.T.; Cain, C.A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1998-07-01

34

Boron removal from aqueous solutions by ion-exchange resin: column sorption-elution studies.  

PubMed

A column sorption-elution study was carried out by using a strong base anion-exchange resin (Dowex 2 x 8) for the removal of boron from aqueous solutions. The breakthrough curve was obtained as a function of feed flow rate and the total and breakthrough capacity values of the resin were calculated. The boron on the resin was quantitatively eluted with 0.5M HCl solution at different flow rates. Three consecutive sorption-elution-washing-regeneration-washing cycles were applied to the resin in order to investigate the reusability of the ion-exchange resin. Total capacity values remained almost the same after three sorption-elution-regeneration cycles. The Thomas and the Yoon-Nelson models were applied to experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic column parameters required for process design. The results proved that the models would describe the breakthrough curves well. PMID:17716813

Kse, T Ennil; Oztrk, Ne?e

2008-04-01

35

Production of large quantities of 90Y by ion-exchange chromatography using an organic resin and a chelating agent  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of a system composed of an organic cation exchanger (Dowex 50Wx8) and a chelating agent (EDTA) previously described for the successful production of 90Y via a 90Sr\\/90Y generator is assessed under dynamic conditions. In an attempt to overcome the established limitation of ion-exchange resins for the separation of subcurie quantities of activity, 90Y is repeatedly isolated from an

Abmel Xiques Castillo; Marylaine Prez-Malo; Keila Isaac-Oliv; Heyam Mukhallalati; Edgar Casanova Gonzlez; Mirta Torres Berdeguez; Nstor Cornejo Daz

2010-01-01

36

Uranium removal from contaminated groundwater by synthetic resins.  

PubMed

Synthetic resins are shown to be effective in removing uranium from contaminated groundwater. Batch and field column tests showed that strong-base anion-exchange resins were more effective in removing uranium from both near-neutral-pH (6.5)- and high-pH (8)-low-nitrate-containing groundwaters, than metal-chelating resins, which removed more uranium from acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Y-12 S-3 Ponds area in Tennessee, USA. Dowex 1-X8 and Purolite A-520E anion-exchange resins removed more uranium from high-pH (8)-low-nitrate-containing synthetic groundwater in batch tests than metal-chelating resins. The Dowex 21K anion-exchange resin achieved a cumulative loading capacity of 49.8 mg g(-1) before breakthrough in a field column test using near-neutral-pH (6.5)-low-nitrate-containing groundwater. However, in an acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater, metal-chelating resins Diphonix and Chelex-100 removed more uranium than anion-exchange resins. In 15 m L of acidic-pH (5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater spiked with 20 mg L(-1) uranium, the uranium concentrations ranged from 0.95 mg L(-1) at 1-h equilibrium to 0.08 mg L(-1) at 24-h equilibrium for Diphonix and 0.17 mg L(-1) at 1-h equilibrium to 0.03 mg L(-1) at 24-h equilibrium for Chelex-100. Chelex-100 removed more uranium in the first 10 min in the 100mL of acidic-(pH 5)-high-nitrate-containing groundwater ( approximately 5 mg L(-1) uranium); however, after 10 min, Diphonix equaled or out-performed Chelex-100. This study presents an improved understanding of the selectivity and sorption kenetics of a range of ion-exchange resins that remove uranium from both low- and high-nitrate-containing groundwaters with varying pHs. PMID:17697694

Phillips, D H; Gu, B; Watson, D B; Parmele, C S

2008-01-01

37

Evaluation and application of anion exchange resins to measure groundwater uranium flux at a former uranium mill site.  

PubMed

Laboratory tests and a field validation experiment were performed to evaluate anion exchange resins for uranium sorption and desorption in order to develop a uranium passive flux meter (PFM). The mass of uranium sorbed to the resin and corresponding masses of alcohol tracers eluted over the duration of groundwater installation are then used to determine the groundwater and uranium contaminant fluxes. Laboratory based batch experiments were performed using Purolite A500, Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Lewatit S6328 A resins and silver impregnated activated carbon to examine uranium sorption and extraction for each material. The Dowex resins had the highest uranium sorption, followed by Lewatit, Purolite and the activated carbon. Recoveries from all ion exchange resins were in the range of 94-99% for aqueous uranium in the environmentally relevant concentration range studied (0.01-200 ppb). Due to the lower price and well-characterized tracer capacity, Lewatit S6328 A was used for field-testing of PFMs at the DOE UMTRA site in Rifle, CO. The effect on the flux measurements of extractant (nitric acid)/resin ratio, and uranium loading were investigated. Higher cumulative uranium fluxes (as seen with concentrations>1 ug U/gram resin) yielded more homogeneous resin samples versus lower cumulative fluxes (<1 ug U/gram resin), which caused the PFM to have areas of localized concentration of uranium. Resin homogenization and larger volume extractions yield reproducible results for all levels of uranium fluxes. Although PFM design can be improved to measure flux and groundwater flow direction, the current methodology can be applied to uranium transport studies. PMID:21798572

Stucker, Valerie; Ranville, James; Newman, Mark; Peacock, Aaron; Cho, Jaehyun; Hatfield, Kirk

2011-10-15

38

Diclofenac removal in urine using strong-base anion exchange polymer resins.  

PubMed

One of the major sources of pharmaceuticals in the environment is wastewater effluent of which human urine contributes the majority of pharmaceuticals. Urine source separation has the potential to isolate pharmaceuticals at a higher concentration for efficient removal as well as produce a nutrient byproduct. This research investigated the efficacy of using strong-base anion exchange polymer resins to remove the widely detected and abundant pharmaceutical, diclofenac, from synthetic human urine under fresh and ureolyzed conditions. The majority of experiments were conducted using a strong-base, macroporous, polystyrene resin (Purolite A520E). Ion-exchange followed a two-step removal rate with rapid removal in 1 h and equilibrium removal in 24 h. Diclofenac removal was >90% at a resin dose of 8 mL/L in both fresh and ureolyzed urine. Sorption of diclofenac onto A520E resin was concurrent with desorption of an equivalent amount of chloride, which indicates the ion-exchange mechanism is occurring. The presence of competing ions such as phosphate and citrate did not significantly impact diclofenac removal. Comparisons of three polystyrene resins (A520E, Dowex 22, Dowex Marathon 11) as well as one polyacrylic resin (IRA958) were conducted to determine the major interactions between anion exchange resin and diclofenac. The results showed that polystyrene resins provide the highest level of diclofenac removal due to electrostatic interactions between quaternary ammonium functional groups of resin and carboxylic acid of diclofenac and non-electrostatic interactions between resin matrix and benzene rings of diclofenac. Diclofenac was effectively desorbed from A520E resin using a regeneration solution that contained 4.5% (m/m) NaCl in an equal-volume mixture of methanol and water. The greater regeneration efficiency of the NaCl/methanol-water mixture over the aqueous NaCl solution supports the importance of non-electrostatic interactions between resin matrix and benzene rings of diclofenac. Experiments with ketoprofen, in addition to diclofenac, suggest that polystyrene anion exchange resins can be used to selectively remove other acidic pharmaceuticals from urine. PMID:24029637

Landry, Kelly A; Boyer, Treavor H

2013-11-01

39

Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium(II) and lead(II) after their solid phase extraction as dibenzyldithiocarbamate chelates on Dowex Optipore V-493  

Microsoft Academic Search

An enrichment procedure for cadmium and lead after their solid phase extraction as dibenzyldithiocarbamate chelates on Dowex Optipore V-493 has been established prior to their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The analytical parameters including pH, amounts of dibenzyldithiocarbamate, sample volume, etc., were investigated. The effects of alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some metal ions on the retentions of analytes

Esra Melek; Mustafa Tuzen; Mustafa Soylak

2006-01-01

40

High-COMD nitridized InAlGaAs laser facets for high-reliability 50-W bar operation at 805 nm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 40-year-old laser diode technology underpins applications such as data storage, industrial lasers and telecommunications but still suffers from reliability and longevity issues in high power applications, most notably in pumping of Nd:YVO4 and Nd:YAG lasers. Despite thermal advantages allowing expansion matched Au/Sn hard soldering, the main problem for InAlGaAs lasers is facet oxidation, which leads to increased absorption and COMD device failure. This article presents a novel process, which atomically seals the surface and eliminates oxidation by forming stable nitrides on the facet. Pulsed testing of 805 nm of Al>0.20InGaAs single mode devices with a protective nitride layer demonstrates stable median 1.3W COMD (30MW/cm2), after one hour of CW screening at 12.5mW/?m (50W bar power). A 200h burn-in at 12.5mW/?m (50W bar power) resulted in an initial power drop of 1-2% and a linear degradation rate of 0.1%/1000h, compared to an initial power drop of 5-18% and a degradation rate of 46%/1000h for lasers with only AR/HR-coatings. A subsequent 1000h life-test at 22.5mW/um (90W bar power) demonstrated a degradation rate of only 3%/1000h under stress test conditions due to p-side up mounting, 10C higher ambient temperature and 57% higher operating current over typical high power bar operating power levels. The QW temperature was 53C. No sudden device failures occurred.

Silfvenius, Christofer; Blixt, Peter; Lindstrom, Carsten; Feitisch, Alfred O.

2004-06-01

41

Determination of Pb(II) by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with a Solid-Phase Spectrophotometry Approach Using 2-(2-Thiazolylazo)--cresol (TAC) Coated on Resin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, preliminary results obtained for Pb(II) determination by photoacoustic spectroscopy are introduced. It is based on an amplitude measurement of a photoacoustic signal obtained from a Pb(II) complex formation with2-(2-thiazolylazo)- p-cresol (TAC) retained in an anionic resin such as Dowex 1X8. The Pb(II)-TAC complex spectrum reveals an absorption band, which is assigned to a Pb(II)-TAC complex retained on the resin. The peak height of this band is proportional to the Pb(II) concentration, and it can be used to obtain quantitative information of the metal content.

Saavedra, R.; Gmez, R.; Soto, C.; Aguayo, D.; Candia, C.; Yaez, J.; Zuiga, V.

2013-09-01

42

On-line preconcentration of palladium(II) using a microcolumn packed with a chelating resin, and its subsequent determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

.Palladium(II) is preconcentrated on a chelating resin microcolumn [1,5-Bis(2-pyridyl)-3-sulphophenyl methylene thiocarbonohydrazide\\u000a immobilized on an anion-exchange resin (Dowex 1 X8-200)] placed in the autosampler arm, followed by the elution of the Pd-chelate\\u000a with nitric acid and subsequent determination of Pd from the eluate by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The\\u000a method was applied to the recovery of Pd(II) ions from different

Catalina Bosch Ojeda; Fuensanta Snchez Rojas; Jos Manuel Cano Pavn

2007-01-01

43

20 W and 50 W solid-state sodium beacon guidestar laser systems for the Keck I and Gemini South Telescopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies (LMCT) is developing 20 W and 50 W commercial solid-state sodium beacon Guidestar Laser Systems (GLS) for the Keck I and Gemini South telescopes, respectively. This work represents a critical step toward addressing the need of the astronomical adaptive optics (AO) community for a standardized, robust, turn-key, commercial GLS that can be configured for different observatory facilities and for different AO formats - including multi-conjugate AO (MCAO) and future extremely large telescopes. These modular systems build on the proven laser technologies, user-friendly interface, and low maintenance design that were developed for the successful 12 W GLS delivered by LMCT to the Gemini North telescope in February 2005. This paper describes the GLS requirements for the Keck I and Gemini South telescopes, the design of the laser oscillators, amplifiers, sum-frequency generator, and diagnostics; the functionality of the automated remote laser control system; size, weight, power, and performance data; and the current status of the programs.

Hankla, Allen K.; Bartholomew, Jarett; Groff, Ken; Lee, Ian; McKinnie, Iain T.; Moule, Grant; Rogers, Nathan; Tiemann, Bruce; Tracy, Allen J.; VanHoudt, Paul; Adkins, Sean M.; d'Orgeville, Cline

2006-07-01

44

Long-term carrier-envelope-phase stabilized fiber-bulk hybrid laser with millihertz linewidth and 50 W average power  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term carrier-envelope-phase stabilization was demonstrated in high-power large-modearea fiber chirped-pulse spectral fraction amplification at 1030 nm of a broadband femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. The carrier enveloped phase was stably controlled with the maximum average power up to 50 W by pre-compensating the carrier-envelope phase changes in the high-power fiber amplifiers. The locked in loop and out of loop frequency fluctuation was measured to be 1.44 and 46 mHz within half an hour. The locked carrier-frequency exhibited an in loop and out of loop beat signal linewidth of 1.66 and 2.27 mHz, accordingly accumulated phase jitter was estimated to be 0.22 and 0.73 rad, respectively, with the integration range from 10 mHz to 100 kHz. The phase stabilization was measured to change little as the output power increased, confirming negligible amplitude-to-phase noise conversions in the linear high-power fiber chirped pulse amplification.

Li, W.; Yang, K.; Yan, M.; Zhou, H.; Ding, J.; Zeng, H.

2011-03-01

45

Solid-phase extraction of copper, iron and zinc ions on Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis loaded on Dowex optipore V-493.  

PubMed

Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis loaded on Dowex optipore V-493 as new adsorbent for the separation-preconcentration of heavy metal ions has been proposed. The analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of copper(II), iron(III) and zinc(II) including pH, amounts of adsorbent, sample volume, etc. were investigated. The influences of alkaline and earth alkaline ions were also reported. The recovery values for the analytes are generally higher than 95%. The preconcentration factor was 37. The limit of detections of the analyte ions (k=3, N=21) were 1.14 microgL(-1) for copper, 2.01 microgL(-1) for iron and 0.14 microgL(-1) for zinc. The relative standard deviations of the determinations were found to be lower than 9%. The procedure was validated by analyzing copper, iron and zinc contents in two certified reference materials, NRCC-SLRS-4 Riverine water and NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves. Agreements between the obtained results and the certified values were achieved. The developed preconcentration method was applied in the flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper, iron and zinc in several samples including a multivitamin-multimineral tablet, dialysis solutions, natural waters and some food samples. PMID:18359563

Tuzen, Mustafa; Melek, Esra; Soylak, Mustafa

2008-11-30

46

Decomposition of Rare Earth Loaded Resin Particles  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Cycle R and D (FCR and D) program within the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) is evaluating nuclear fuel cycle options, including once-through, modified open, and fully closed cycles. Each of these scenarios may utilize quite different fuel management schemes and variation in fuel types may include high thermal conductivity UO{sub 2}, thoria-based, TRISO, metal, advanced ceramic (nitride, carbide, composite, etc.), and minor actinide (MA) bearing fuels and targets. Researchers from the US, Europe, and japan are investigating methods of fabricating high-specific activity spherical particles for fuel and target applications. The capital, operating, and maintenance costs of such a fuel fabrication facility can be significant, thus fuel synthesis and fabrication processes that minimize waste and process losses, and require less footprint are desired. Investigations have been performed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) and the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) studying the impact of americium and curium on the fuel fabrication process. proof of concept was demonstrated for fabrication of MA-bearing spherical particles, however additional development will be needed for engineering scale-up. Researchers at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) and the Japan Atomic Energy Association (JAEA) have collaborated on research with ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuels using spherical particles as the ceramic component dispersed in the metal matrix. Recent work at the CEA evaluates the burning of MA in the blanket region of sodium fast reactors. There is also interest in burning MA in Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors. The fabrication of uranium-MA oxide pellets for a fast reactor blanket or MA-bearing fuel for CANDU reactors may benefit from a low-loss dedicated footprint for producing MA-spherical particles. One method for producing MA-bearing spherical particles is loading the actinide metal on a cation exchange resin. The AG-50W resin is made of sulfonic acid functional groups attached to a styrene divinylbenzene copolymer lattice (long chained hydrocarbon). The metal cation binds to the sulfur group, then during thermal decomposition in air the hydrocarbons will form gaseous species leaving behind a spherical metal-oxide particle. Process development for resin applications with radioactive materials is typically performed using surrogates. For americium and curium, a trivalent metal like neodymium can be used. Thermal decomposition of Nd-loaded resin in air has been studied by Hale. Process conditions were established for resin decomposition and the formation of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. The intermediate product compounds were described using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and wet chemistry. Leskela and Niinisto studied the decomposition of rare earth (RE) elements and found results consistent with Hale. Picart et al. demonstrated the viability of using a resin loading process for the fabrication of uranium-actinide mixed oxide microspheres for transmutation of minor actinides in a fast reactor. For effective transmutation of actinides, it will be desirable to extend the in-reactor burnup and minimize the number of recycles of used actinide materials. Longer burn times increases the chance of Fuel Clad Chemical or Mechanical Interaction (FCCI, FCMI). Sulfur is suspected of contributing to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) thus it is necessary to maximize the removal of sulfur during decomposition of the resin. The present effort extends the previous work by quantifying the removal of sulfur during the decomposition process. Neodymium was selected as a surrogate for trivalent actinide metal cations. As described above Nd was dissolved in nitric acid solution then contacted with the AG-50W resin column. After washing the column, the Nd-resin particles are removed and dried. The Nd-resin, seen in Figure 1 prior to decomposition, is ready to be converted to Nd oxide microspheres.

Voit, Stewart L [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL

2010-09-01

47

In situ product recovery of n-butanol using polymeric resins.  

PubMed

Polymeric resins with high n-butanol adsorption affinities were identified from a candidate pool of commercially available materials representing a wide array of physical and chemical properties. Resin hydrophobicity, which was dictated by the chemical structure of its constituent monomer units, most greatly influenced the resin-aqueous equilibrium partitioning of n-butanol whereas ionic functionalization appeared to have no effect. In general, those materials derived from poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) possessed the greatest n-butanol affinity, while the adsorption potential of these resins was limited by their specific surface area. Resins were tested for their ability to serve as effective in situ product recovery (ISPR) devices in the n-butanol fermentation by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. In small-scale batch fermentations, the addition of 0.05 kg/L Dowex Optipore SD-2 facilitated achievement of effective n-butanol titers as high as 2.22% (w/v), well above the inhibitory threshold of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824, and nearly twice that of traditional, single-phase fermentations. Retrieval of n-butanol from resins via thermal treatment was demonstrated with high efficiency and predicted to be economically favorable. Due to its modular nature, the proposed ISPR design exhibits strong potential for compatibility with future n-butanol fermentation efforts. PMID:18831001

Nielsen, David R; Prather, Kristala Jones

2009-02-15

48

Development of PBBI Laminating Resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

PBBI resin formulary studies were performed in order to increase resin toughness and to decrease resin shrinkage while maintaining improved moisture resistance over state of the art, 177 C (350 F) service epoxy resins. The most promising approach was iden...

R. W. Vaughan R. A. Buyny

1979-01-01

49

Biological Ion Exchanger Resins  

PubMed Central

The cell is presented as a biological ion exchanger resin. The similarities between ion accumulating cells and ion exchanger resins are correlated. The kinetic characteristics of biological ion exchange are shown to be amenable to analysis by a model commonly used for ion exchanger resins. The theories of ion exchange equilibria currently in use with ion exchanger resins are reviewed with their suitability for adaptation to biological ion exchange in mind. ImagesFIGURE 1

Damadian, Raymond

1971-01-01

50

Resin-Powder Dispenser  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

Standfield, Clarence E.

1994-01-01

51

Advanced Thermoplastic Resins, Phase 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Eight thermoplastic polyimide resin systems were evaluated as composite matrix materials. Two resins were selected for more extensive mechanical testing and both were versions of LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center - Thermoplastic Polyimide). One resin was ...

C. L. Hendricks S. G. Hill A. Falcone N. T. Gerken

1991-01-01

52

IRRADIATED PETROLEUM RESINS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for improving the properties of polymeric material produced by ; the Friedel-Crafts polymerization of light, cracked petroleum fractions is ; presented. The petroleum resins are mixed with a divinyl aromatic and irradiated ; at a dose rate of at least 0.1 equivalent Mr\\/hr until at least 1\\/2 equivalent Mr ; is absorbed. Resinous solids are obtained that have

J. E. Shewmaker; J. F. Nelson

1963-01-01

53

Incombustible resin composition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Incombustible resin compositions composed of aromatic compounds were obtained through (1) combustion polymer material and (2) bisphenol A or halogenated bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidl ether or halogenated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. The aromatic compound is an adduct of bifunctional phenols and bifunctional epoxy resins.

Akima, T.

1982-01-01

54

Delayed cure bismaleimide resins  

DOEpatents

Prior art polybismaleimides begin to polymerize at or just above the melting point of the monomer. This patent describes new bismaleimide resins which have an increased pot life and provide longer time periods in which the monomer remains fluid. The resins can be polymerized into molded articles with a high uniformity of properties. (DLC)

Not Available

1982-08-12

55

Reinforcement of stereolithographic resins for rapid prototyping with cellulose nanocrystals.  

PubMed

We report on the mechanical properties of optically curable stereolithographic resins (SLRs) which were reinforced through the addition of small amounts of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). The resin/filler mixtures are readily accessible via simple mixing processes. A detailed rheological investigation of such mixtures and the successful processing of these materials on a commercial SLR machine show that at low filler concentrations (below 5%) the processability of the materials is barely impacted. The storage modulus, E', increased steadily with increasing CNC content in the regimes below and above the glass transition. A remarkable modulus enhancement was observed in the rubbery regime, where E' increased by 166, 233, and 587% for CNC/SLR nanocomposites with 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0% w/w CNC, respectively. The modulus increase was less pronounced in the glassy state, where E' increased by 21, 32 and 57%, for the same compositions. The increase in tensile strength was of similar magnitude. In comparison to previously reported CNC and carbon-nanofiller based nanocomposites, the presently investigated nanocomposites display a comparably large increase of stiffness and strength, which appear to originate from the high level of dispersion and the intimate contact of the CNCs with the SLR matrix. Through the fabrication of 3-dimensional parts, it was shown that the CNC-filled resins can be processed with standard equipment in a stereolithographic process that is widely used for rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing. PMID:22992164

Kumar, Sandeep; Hofmann, Manfred; Steinmann, Bettina; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

2012-10-24

56

Development of resins for composites by resin transfer molding  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Designed to cover a wide range of resin technology and to meet the near-term and long-term needs of the aircraft industry, this research has three objectives: to produce resin transfer molding (RES) resins with improved processability, to produce prepreg systems with high toughness and service temperature, and to produce new resin systems. Progress on reaching the objectives is reported.

Woo, Edmund P.; Puckett, Paul M.; Maynard, Shawn J.

1991-01-01

57

Biocidal quaternary ammonium resin  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Activated carbon (charcoal) and polymeric resin sorbents are widely used in the filtration and treatment of drinking water, mainly to remove dissolved organic and inorganic impurities and to improve the taste. Earlier hopes that activated carbon might "disinfect' water proved to be unfounded. The feasibility of protecting against microbial infestation in charcoal and resin beds such as those to be incorporated into total water reuse systems in spacecraft was investigated. The biocidal effect of IPCD (insoluable polymeric contact disinfectants) in combination with a representative charcoal was assessed. The ion exchange resins (IPCD) were shown to adequately protect charcoal and ion exchange beds.

Janauer, G. E.

1983-01-01

58

Cation exchange resin (hydrogen form) assisted decomposition of 1-aryl-3,3-dialkyltriazenes. A mild and efficient method for the synthesis of aryl iodides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reported is a regioselective synthesis of aryl iodides, a process that is suitable for preparing isotopically labelled material. The treatment of several triazenes with a well-dried sample of sodium iodide and a sulfonic cation exchange resin (H\\/sup +\\/ form, Bio-Rad AG AG 50W-X12) in dry acetonitrile at 75°C produced excellent yields of the corresponding aryl iodides. A high probability exists

Nagichettiar Satyamurthy; Jorge R. Barrio

1983-01-01

59

Selective recovery of Cr and Cu in leachate from chromated copper arsenate treated wood using chelating and acidic ion exchange resins.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to selectively remove chromium and copper from CCA-treated wood acid leachates (initial concentrations of 447-651 mg As l(-1), 374-453 mg Cu l(-1) and 335-622 mg Cr l(-1)) using ion exchange resins and precipitation techniques. Batch experiments revealed that the chelating resin Dowex M4195 had a high copper selectivity in the presence of chromium while the Amberlite IR120 resin had a high chromium sorption capacity. Combining M4195 and IR120 resins in four successive columns, made with Plexiglas tube, led to 96% copper extraction and 68% chromium extraction. NH(4)OH (4M) efficiently eluted copper from the chelating resin while H(2)SO(4) (10%v/v) was used for IR120 resin elution. Copper and chromium recovery by elution reached 94% and 81%, respectively. Successive sorption and elution steps using M4195 and IR120 ion exchange resins presented similar metal removal capacities over the five cycles. No resin deterioration was observed but the results suggested arsenic bulk diffusion into the M4195 resin. Successive treatments of CCA-treated wood leachate with M4195 and IR120 allowed for copper and chromium removal while arsenic could be extracted by coagulation treatment with ferric chloride and precipitation with Ca(OH)(2) at pH 5.7. This final process led to 99.9% arsenic removal. The final effluent contained less than 1 mg l(-1) of arsenic, chromium and copper. PMID:19446391

Janin, Amlie; Blais, Jean-Franois; Mercier, Guy; Drogui, Patrick

2009-09-30

60

Dilatometry on Thermoset Resins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A simple capillary and bulb mercury dilatometer designed for making specific volume measurements on thermoset resin systems during the curing reaction and as a function of temperature is described. The design, calibration, operation, data treatment and er...

A. W. Snow J. P. Armistead

1991-01-01

61

Thermally stable laminating resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

1972-01-01

62

Emission spectrographic determination of barium in sea water using a cation exchange concentration procedure  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A concentration technique employing Dowex 50W cation exchange resin is described for the determination of barium in sea water. The separated barium is precipitated as fluoride together with calcium and strontium and measured by emission spectrographic analysis. The vertical distribution of barium in sea water has been measured in the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. The barium content varied between 7 and 23 ??g. per liter; in two profiles, the lowest concentrations were at a depth of about 1000 meters.

Szabo, B. J.; Joensuu, O.

1967-01-01

63

In vitro and in vivo anti-retroviral activity of the substance purified from the aqueous extract of Chelidonium majus L  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have isolated a substance with anti-retroviral activity from the freshly prepared crude extract of Chelidonium majus L. (greater celandine) by 9-aminoacridine precipitation method and ion exchange chromatography using Dowex-50W\\/H+ resin followed by the gel filtration on Sephadex-75 column. Elemental and phenol\\/sulfuric acid method analyses as well as the mass spectrometry of the purified substance indicated that it may represent

Marijan Geren?er; Peter L. Turecek; Otfried Kistner; Artur Mitterer; Helga Savidis-Dacho; Noel P. Barrett

2006-01-01

64

40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Ketone-Formaldehyde Resins *Melamine Resins *Phenolic Resins *Polyacetal Resins Polyacrylamide *Polyurethane Prepolymers *Polyurethane Resins *Urea Formaldehyde Resins *Urea Resins [52 FR 42568, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended...

2013-07-01

65

Phenoxy Resins Containing Pendent Ethynyl Groups and Cured Resins Therefrom.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups, the process for preparing the same, and the cured resin products obtained therefrom, are discussed. Upon the application of heat, the ethynyl groups react to provide branching and crosslinking. The cure te...

P. M. Hergenrother

1984-01-01

66

High-performance bismaleimide resin for resin film infusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel high-performance resin system, suitable for resin film infusion (RFI) process, has been developed. It was prepared from N,N?-diphenylbismaleimide, o,o?-diallylbisphenol A, and polyethylsulfone. The resin and its composite, reinforced by a glass fiber cloth, were prepared and characterized in detail. The results showed that the prepared resin film is stable at room temperature, the infusion temperature is 120C, and

Guozheng Liang; Dong Wang

2002-01-01

67

Method for regenerating ion exchange resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This invention is comprised of a method for regenerating ion exchange resin consisting of a mixed resin containing granular cation exchange resin and anion exchange resin contaminated during condensation treatment in steam power generating plants, charact...

M. Ogihara, K. Ichikawa, T. Idemizu

1991-01-01

68

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOEpatents

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09

69

Fractionation of sulphite spent liquor for biochemical processing using ion exchange resins.  

PubMed

Sulphite spent liquor (SSL) is a side product from acidic sulphite pulping of wood, which organic counterpart is composed mainly by lignosulphonates (LS) and sugars. The last are a prominent substrate for the bioprocessing although a previous purification step is necessary to eliminate microbial inhibitors. In this study a fractionation of hardwood SSL (HSSL) has been accomplished employing ion exchange resins in order to separate sugars fraction from concomitant inhibitors: LS, acetic acid, furan derivatives, phenolics, acetic acid and excess of inorganic salts. The fractionation of HSSL has been carried out using two fixed-bed ion exchangers in series (cationic+anionic). The first cation exchange column packed with Dowex 50WX2 resin was able to eliminate free cations and partially separate sugars from high molecular weight LS and furan derivatives. The second anion exchange column packed with Amberlite IRA-96 sorbed remaining LS, phenolics and acetic acid. Overall, the series arrangement under investigation has removed 99.99% of Mg(2+), 99.0% of Ca(2+), 99.6% of LS, and 100% of acetic acid, whereas the yield of recovered sugars was at least 72% of their total amount in HSSL. PMID:22465600

Fernandes, D L A; Silva, C M; Xavier, A M R B; Evtuguin, D V

2012-12-31

70

Phosphonic acid based exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

1995-01-01

71

Phosphonic acid based exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

1995-09-12

72

Graphite Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Resins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tens...

R. C. Novak

1975-01-01

73

Production of petroleum polymer resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

In other countries, petroleum polymer resins are being used successfully in large volumes. In the U.S. in 1982, for example, 128,000 tonnes of petroleum polymer resins were produced [2], much of which was used in the paint and varnish industry. In commercial production in the USSR are a dark-colored styrene-lndene resin and light-colored petroleum polymer resins of two types --

Yu. V. Dumskii; M. E. Belyakov; A. K. Suroto; G. F. Cherednikova; L. B. Grin'ko

1988-01-01

74

Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

1994-01-01

75

Development of Polyimide Resins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Polyimides are well-known to be attractive matrix resins for fiber-reinforced composites due to their superior thermal stability. However, their poor fabricability and high cost have been preventing them from being widely used. This paper reports three ap...

Y. Aito

1984-01-01

76

Nontoxic Resins Advance Aerospace Manufacturing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 2008 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year, PETI-330, is a polyimide matrix resin that performs well at high temperatures and is easily processed into composites in a simple, short curing cycle. Invented by scientists at Langley Research Center, PETI-330 is now licensed to Ube Industries, based in Japan with its American headquarters in New York. In addition to being durable and lightweight, the resin is also nontoxic, which makes it safe for workers to handle. PETI-330 was created specifically for heat-resistant composites formed with resin transfer molding and resin infusion, which formerly could only be used with low temperature resin systems.

2009-01-01

77

Sodium concentration measurement during hemodialysis through ion-exchange resin and conductivity measure approach: in vitro experiments.  

PubMed

Sodium measurement during hemodialysis treatment is important to preserve the patient from clinical events related to hypo- or hyper-natremia Usually, sodium measurement is performed through laboratory equipment which is typically expensive, and requires manual intervention. We propose a new method, based on conductivity measurement after treatment of dialysate solution through ion-exchange resin. To test this method, we performed in vitro experiments. We prepared 40 ml sodium chloride (NaCl) samples at 280, 140, 70, 35, 17.5, 8.75, 4.375 mEq/l, and some "mixed samples", i.e., with added potassium chloride (KCl) at different concentrations (4.375-17.5 mEq/l), to simulate the confounding factors in a conductivity-based sodium measurement. We measured the conductivity of all samples. Afterwards, each sample was treated for 1 min with 1 g of Dowex G-26 resin, and conductivity was measured again. On average, the difference in the conductivity between mixed samples and corresponding pure NaCl samples (at the same NaCl concentration) was 20.9%. After treatment with the exchange resin, it was 14.7%, i.e., 42% lower. Similar experiments were performed with calcium chloride and magnesium chloride as confounding factors, with similar results. We also performed some experiments on actual dialysate solution during hemodialysis sessions in 15 patients, and found that the correlation between conductivity measures and sodium concentration improved after resin treatment (R=0.839 before treatment, R=0.924 after treatment, P<0.0001). We conclude that ion-exchange resin treatment coupled with conductivity measures may improve the measurement of sodium compared to conductivity measures alone, and may become a possible simple approach for continuous and automatic sodium measurement during hemodialysis. PMID:23844253

Tura, Andrea; Sbrignadello, Stefano; Mambelli, Emanuele; Ravazzani, Paolo; Santoro, Antonio; Pacini, Giovanni

2013-01-01

78

Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

2004-01-01

79

Resin composite restorative materials.  

PubMed

This paper surveys the most important developments in resin-based dental composites and focuses on the deficits (e.g. polymerization shrinkage) and strengths of the materials and their clinical implications. Moreover, differences between composite categories, such as hybrid, nanohybrid, microfilled, packable, ormocer-based, silorane-based, polyacid-modified composites (compomers) and flowable composites are highlighted, especially in view of their mechanical behaviour. In addition to the classical dimethacrylate-based composites, special attention is given to alternative monomers, such as siloranes, ormocers or high-molecular-weight dimethacrylate monomers (e.g. dimer acid-based dimethacrylates and tricyclodecane (TCD)-urethane), analysing their advantages, behaviour and abilities. Finally, the paper attempts to establish the needs and wishes of clinicians for further development of resin-based composites. PMID:21564116

Ilie, N; Hickel, R

2011-06-01

80

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOEpatents

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23

81

Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Eight thermoplastic polyimide resin systems were evaluated as composite matrix materials. Two resins were selected for more extensive mechanical testing and both were versions of LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center - Thermoplastic Polyimide). One resin was made with LaRC-TPI and contained 2 weight percent of a di(amic acid) dopant as a melt flow aid. The second system was a 1:1 slurry of semicrystalline LaRC-TPI powder in a polyimidesulfone resin diglyme solution. The LaRC-TPI powder melts during processing and increases the melt flow of the resin. Testing included dynamic mechanical analysis, tension and compression testing, and compression-after-impact testing. The test results demonstrated that the LaRC-TPI resins have very good properties compared to other thermoplastics, and that they are promising matrix materials for advanced composite structures.

Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.; Gerken, N. T.

1991-01-01

82

Dry PMR-15 Resin Powders  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shelf lives of PMR-15 polymides lengthened. Procedure involves quenching of monomer reactions by vacuum drying of PRM-15 resin solutions at 70 to 90 degree F immediately after preparation of solutions. Absence of solvent eliminates formation of higher esters and reduces formation of imides to negligible level. Provides fully-formulated dry PMR-15 resin powder readily dissolvable in solvent at room temperature immediately before use. Resins used in variety of aerospace, aeronautical, and commercial applications.

Vannucci, Raymond D.; Roberts, Gary D.

1988-01-01

83

Vitrification of ion exchange resins  

DOEpatents

The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Workman, Rhonda Jackson (North Augusta, SC)

2001-01-01

84

Phosphorus-containing bisimide resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The production of fire-resistant resins particularly useful for making laminates with inorganic fibers such as graphite fibers is discussed. The resins are by (1) condensation of an ethylenically unsaturated cyclic anhydride with a bis(diaminophenyl) phosphine oxide, and (2) by addition polymerization of the bisimide so obtained. Up to about 50%, on a molar basis, of benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid anhydride can be substituted for some of the cyclic anhydride to alter the properties of the products. Graphite cloth laminates made with these resins show 800 C char yields greater than 70% by weight in nitrogen. Limiting oxygen indexes of more than 100% are determined for these resins.

Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (inventors)

1981-01-01

85

21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fluorocarbon resins. 177.1380 Section 177.1380 Food and Drugs...Food Contact Surfaces 177.1380 Fluorocarbon resins. Fluorocarbon resins may be safely used as articles or components...

2011-04-01

86

21 CFR 177.1595 - Polyetherimide resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyetherimide resin. 177.1595 Section 177.1595 Food and Drugs...Contact Surfaces 177.1595 Polyetherimide resin. The polyetherimide resin identified in this section may be safely...

2012-04-01

87

21 CFR 177.1595 - Polyetherimide resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyetherimide resin. 177.1595 Section 177.1595 Food and Drugs...Contact Surfaces 177.1595 Polyetherimide resin. The polyetherimide resin identified in this section may be safely...

2011-04-01

88

21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and Drugs...Adjuvants and Production Aids 178.3930 Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this...

2011-04-01

89

21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Polyestercarbonate resins. 177.1585 Section 177.1585 Food and...Contact Surfaces 177.1585 Polyestercarbonate resins. Polyestercarbonate resins may be safely used as articles or...

2010-01-01

90

21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and Drugs...Adjuvants and Production Aids 178.3930 Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this...

2012-04-01

91

21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680 Food and...Contact Surfaces 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane resins identified in paragraph (a) of this...

2011-04-01

92

40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section 721.9495 ...Substances 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a) Chemical substance and significant...chemical substances identified as acrylosilane resins (PMNs P-95-1024/1040) are...

2012-07-01

93

21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin applicator. 872.3140 Section 872.3140...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended...

2012-04-01

94

21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.  

... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resin applicator. 872.3140 Section 872.3140...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended...

2014-04-01

95

21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyestercarbonate resins. 177.1585 Section 177.1585 Food and...Contact Surfaces 177.1585 Polyestercarbonate resins. Polyestercarbonate resins may be safely used as articles or...

2011-04-01

96

21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin applicator. 872.3140 Section 872.3140...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended...

2011-04-01

97

40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section 721.9495 ...Substances 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a) Chemical substance and significant...chemical substances identified as acrylosilane resins (PMNs P-95-1024/1040) are...

2010-07-01

98

21 CFR 177.1560 - Polyarylsulfone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Polyarylsulfone resins. 177.1560 Section 177.1560 Food and Drugs...Contact Surfaces 177.1560 Polyarylsulfone resins. Polyarylsulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 79293-56-4) may be...

2010-01-01

99

21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Fluorocarbon resins. 177.1380 Section 177.1380 Food and Drugs...Food Contact Surfaces 177.1380 Fluorocarbon resins. Fluorocarbon resins may be safely used as articles or components...

2010-01-01

100

21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680 Food and...Contact Surfaces 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane resins identified in paragraph (a) of this...

2012-04-01

101

21 CFR 177.1560 - Polyarylsulfone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyarylsulfone resins. 177.1560 Section 177.1560 Food and Drugs...Contact Surfaces 177.1560 Polyarylsulfone resins. Polyarylsulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 79293-56-4) may be...

2011-04-01

102

21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin applicator. 872.3140 Section 872.3140...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended...

2010-04-01

103

40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section 721.9495 ...Substances 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a) Chemical substance and significant...chemical substances identified as acrylosilane resins (PMNs P-95-1024/1040) are...

2011-07-01

104

40 CFR 721.9495 - Acrylosilane resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false Acrylosilane resins. 721.9495 Section 721.9495 ...Substances 721.9495 Acrylosilane resins. (a) Chemical substance and significant...chemical substances identified as acrylosilane resins (PMNs P-95-1024/1040) are...

2013-07-01

105

21 CFR 177.2440 - Polyethersulfone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyethersulfone resins. 177.2440 Section 177.2440 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2440 Polyethersulfone resins. Polyethersulfone resins identified in paragraph (a) of this...

2011-04-01

106

21 CFR 177.1560 - Polyarylsulfone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyarylsulfone resins. 177.1560 Section 177.1560 Food and Drugs...Contact Surfaces 177.1560 Polyarylsulfone resins. Polyarylsulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 79293-56-4) may be...

2012-04-01

107

21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyestercarbonate resins. 177.1585 Section 177.1585 Food and...Contact Surfaces 177.1585 Polyestercarbonate resins. Polyestercarbonate resins may be safely used as articles or...

2012-04-01

108

21 CFR 177.1595 - Polyetherimide resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Polyetherimide resin. 177.1595 Section 177.1595 Food and Drugs...Contact Surfaces 177.1595 Polyetherimide resin. The polyetherimide resin identified in this section may be safely...

2010-01-01

109

21 CFR 177.2440 - Polyethersulfone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyethersulfone resins. 177.2440 Section 177.2440 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2440 Polyethersulfone resins. Polyethersulfone resins identified in paragraph (a) of this...

2012-04-01

110

21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fluorocarbon resins. 177.1380 Section 177.1380 Food and Drugs...Food Contact Surfaces 177.1380 Fluorocarbon resins. Fluorocarbon resins may be safely used as articles or components...

2012-04-01

111

Novel silica-based ion exchange resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Eichrom's highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchang...

1997-01-01

112

Indirect resin composites  

PubMed Central

Aesthetic dentistry continues to evolve through innovations in bonding agents, restorative materials, and conservative preparation techniques. The use of direct composite restoration in posterior teeth is limited to relatively small cavities due to polymerization stresses. Indirect composites offer an esthetic alternative to ceramics for posterior teeth. This review article focuses on the material aspect of the newer generation of composites. This review was based on a PubMed database search which we limited to peer-reviewed articles in English that were published between 1990 and 2010 in dental journals. The key words used were indirect resin composites, composite inlays, and fiber-reinforced composites.

Nandini, Suresh

2010-01-01

113

Imide Modified Epoxy Matrix Resins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evalu...

D. A. Scola

1982-01-01

114

Imide modified epoxy matrix resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

1981-01-01

115

Chromatography resin support  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

Dobos, James G. (North Augusta, SC)

2002-01-01

116

Flammability screening tests of resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Selected flammability characteristics of glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins are evaluated. A protocol for the evaluation of the flammability hazards presented by glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins and the usefulness of that protocol with two laminates are presented. The glass laminates of an epoxy resin, M-751 are evaluated for: (1) determination of smoke generation from the laminates; (2) analysis of products of oxidative degradation of the laminates; (3) determination of minimum oxygen necessary to maintain flaming oxidation; (4) evaluation of toxicological hazards.

Arhart, R. W.; Farrar, D. G.; Hughes, B. M.

1979-01-01

117

Resin/graphite fiber composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High temperature resin matrices suitable for use in advanced graphite fiber composites for jet engine applications were evaluated. A series of planned, sequential screening experiments with resin systems in composite form were performed to reduce the number of candidates to a single A-type polyimide resin that repetitively produced void-free, high strength and modulus composites acceptable for use in the 550 F range for 1000 hours. An optimized processing procedure was established for this system. Extensive mechanical property studies characterized this single system, at room temperature, 500 F, 550 F and 600 F, for various exposure times.

Cavano, P. J.; Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

1972-01-01

118

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-27

119

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

1997-04-08

120

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxbille, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01

121

Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

Weiss, J.

1983-01-01

122

Regenerating Water-Sterilizing Resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Iodine-dispensing resin can be regenerated after iodine content has been depleted, without being removed from water system. Resin is used to make water potable by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Regeneration technique may be come basis of water purifier for very long space missions. Enough crystalline iodine for multiple regenerations during mission can be stored in one small cartridge. Cartridge could be inserted in waterline as necessary on signal from iodine monitor or timer.

Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

1982-01-01

123

Resin glycosides from Porana duclouxii.  

PubMed

A new intact resin glycoside (3) and two glycosidic acids (1 and 2), all having a common trisaccharide moiety and (11S)-hydroxytetradecanoic acid or (3S,11S)-dihydroxytetradecanoic acid as the aglycone, were obtained from the roots of Porana duclouxii. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and chemical correlations. These compounds represent the first examples of resin glycosides from the genus Porana. PMID:24320876

Ding, Wen-Bing; Zhang, Dai-Gui; Liu, Chun-Jie; Li, Guan-Hua; Li, You-Zhi

2014-01-01

124

Microtensile bond strength of composite resin to glass-infiltrated alumina composite conditioned with Er,Cr:YSGG laser.  

PubMed

Tribochemical silica-coating is the recommended conditioning method for improving glass-infiltrated alumina composite adhesion to resin cement. High-intensity lasers have been considered as an alternative for this purpose. This study evaluated the morphological effects of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on aluminous ceramic, and verified the microtensile bond strength of composite resin to ceramic following silica coating or laser irradiation. In-Ceram Alumina ceramic blocks were polished, submitted to airborne particle abrasion (110 ?m Al(2)O(3)), and conditioned with: (CG) tribochemical silica coating (110 ?m SiO(2)) + silanization (control group); (L1-L10) Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2.78 ?m, 20 Hz, 0.5 to 5.0 W) + silanization. Composite resin blocks were cemented to the ceramic blocks with resin cement. These sets were stored in 37C distilled water (24 h), embedded in acrylic resin, and sectioned to produce bar specimens that were submitted to microtensile testing. Bond strength values (MPa) were statistically analyzed (? ?0.05), and failure modes were determined. Additional ceramic blocks were conditioned for qualitative analysis of the topography under SEM. There were no significant differences among silicatization and laser treatments (p > 0.05). Microtensile bond strength ranged from 19.2 to 27.9 MPa, and coefficients of variation ranged from 30 to 55%. Mixed failure of adhesive interface was predominant in all groups (75-96%). No chromatic alteration, cracks or melting were observed after laser irradiation with all parameters tested. Surface conditioning of glass-infiltrated alumina composite with Er,Cr:YSGG laser should be considered an innovative alternative for promoting adhesion of ceramics to resin cement, since it resulted in similar bond strength values compared to the tribochemical treatment. PMID:20737182

Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Moretto, Simone Gonalves; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

2012-01-01

125

21 CFR 178.3610 - ?-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... α-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated. 178.3610 Section... ?-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated. Hydrogenated ?-methylstyrene-vinyltoluene copolymer resins having a molar ratio of 1...

2010-01-01

126

21 CFR 178.3610 - ?-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... α-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated. 178.3610 Section... ?-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated. Hydrogenated ?-methylstyrene-vinyltoluene copolymer resins having a molar ratio of 1...

2012-04-01

127

21 CFR 178.3610 - ?-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... α-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated. 178.3610 Section... ?-Methylstyrene-vinyltoluene resins, hydrogenated. Hydrogenated ?-methylstyrene-vinyltoluene copolymer resins having a molar ratio of 1...

2011-04-01

128

Low Melt Viscosity Resins for Resin Transfer Molding  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In recent years, resin transfer molding (RTM) has become one of the methods of choice for high performance composites. Its cost effectiveness and ease of fabrication are major advantages of RTM. RTM process usually requires resins with very low melt viscosity (less than 10 Poise). The optimum RTM resins also need to display high thennal-oxidative stability, high glass transition temperature (T(sub g)), and good toughness. The traditional PMR-type polyimides (e.g. PMR-15) do not fit this requirement, because the viscosities are too high and the nadic endcap cures too fast. High T(sub g), low-melt viscosity resins are highly desirable for aerospace applications and NASA s Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) program. The objective of this work is to prepare low-melt viscosity polyimide resins for RTM or resin film infusion (RFI) processes. The approach involves the synthesis of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers. These materials have been designed to minimize their melt viscosity so that they can be readily processed. During the cure, the oligomers undergo both chain extension and crosslinking via the thermal polymerization of the phenylethynyl groups. The Phenylethynyl endcap is preferred over the nadic group due to its high curing temperature, which provides broader processing windows. This work involved the synthesis and polymerization of oligomers containing zig-zag backbones and twisted biphenyl structures. Some A-B type precursors which possessed both nitro and anhydride functionality, or both nitro and amine functionality, were also synthesized in order to obtain the well defined oligomers. The resulting zig-zag structured oligomers were then end-capped with 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) for further cure. The properties of these novel imide oligomers are evaluated.

Harris, Frank W.

2002-01-01

129

Characterization of PMR Polyimide Resin and Prepreg.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Procedures for the chemical characterization of PMR-15 resin solutions and graphite-reinforced prepregs were developed, and a chemical data base was established. In addition, a basic understanding of PMR-15 resin chemistry was gained; this was translated ...

C. H. Sheppard P. H. Lindenmeyer

1984-01-01

130

21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...following specifications: (i) The solution intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0...per gram, as determined by a method entitled Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by...

2013-04-01

131

Microparticle and Fiber Reinforcement of Epoxy Resins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Microparticle and fiber materials have been investigated as reinforcing agents for a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol a type of epoxy resin. These materials were limited to low concentrations in order to insure retention of the resin binder properties, such ...

A. G. Sands E. J. Kohn R. C. Clark

1966-01-01

132

Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

1994-01-25

133

Soluble high molecular weight polyimide resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High molecular weight polyimide resins have greater than 20 percent /by weight/ solubility in polar organic solvents. They permit fabrication into films, fibers, coatings, reinforced composite, and adhesive product forms. Characterization properties for one typical polyimide resin are given.

Jones, R. J.; Lubowitz, H. R.

1970-01-01

134

Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

1994-01-01

135

Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Ronato (Oak Park, IL)

1996-01-01

136

Hyperbranched Polymers for Resin Transfer Molding.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this proposal study new low viscosity thermoset additives - hyperbranched polymers (HBPs) - as processing aids and toughening additives for high performance resin transfer molding (RTM) resins. The proposed research project will culminate w...

P. T. Mather

2005-01-01

137

Rapid Curing Epoxy Resins Derived from Resorcinol.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Epoxy resins that can be cured rapidly at room temperature are highly desirable from the production standpoint. A new epoxy resin, diglycidyl ether of 4-methylol resorcinol was synthesized. In the molecule, the hydroxyl from the methylol substituent is pr...

J. J. Schmid W. McCarvill

1974-01-01

138

21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated...25154-01-2) consisting of basic resins produced when the disodium salt of 4,4?-isopropylidenediphenol...dimethylformamide. (b) The basic polysulfone resins...

2012-04-01

139

21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated...25154-01-2) consisting of basic resins produced when the disodium salt of 4,4?-isopropylidenediphenol...dimethylformamide. (b) The basic polysulfone resins...

2011-04-01

140

Resins with Identical Specifications are not Identical. Identifying a Useful Solid-Phase Resin  

PubMed Central

The quality of the most commonly used support for solid phase syntheses, polystyrene resin cross linked with 1% of divinylbenzene, differs considerably even among different lots of resin from the same source. Determination of the swelling capacity of resins before carrying out solid-phase synthesis represents a very simple means of nondestructive pre-synthetic resin characterization.

Bouillon, Isabelle; Soural, Miroslav; Miller, Marvin J.; Krchnak, Viktor

2009-01-01

141

Protection of dried probiotic bacteria from bile using bile adsorbent resins.  

PubMed

Enteric coated oral tablets or capsules can deliver dried live cells directly into the intestine. Previously, we found that a live attenuated bacterial vaccine acquired sensitivity to intestinal bile when dried, raising the possibility that although gastric acid can be bypassed, significant loss of viability might occur on release from an enteric coated oral formulations. Here we demonstrate that some food-grade lyophilised preparations of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus salivarius also show temporary bile sensitivity that can be rapidly reversed by rehydration. To protect dried bacterial cells from temporary bile sensitivity, we propose using bile acid adsorbing resins, such as cholestyramine, which are bile acid binding agents, historically used to lower cholesterol levels. Vcaps HPMC capsules alone provided up to 830-fold protection from bile. The inclusion of 50% w/w cholestyramine in Vcaps HPMC capsules resulted in release of up to 1700-fold more live Lactobacillus casei into simulated intestinal fluid containing 1% bile, when compared to dried cells added directly to bile. We conclude that delivery of dried live probiotic organisms to the intestine may be improved by providing protection from bile by addition of bile adsorbing resins and the use of HPMC capsules. PMID:24080386

Mahbubani, Krishnaa T; Slater, Nigel K H; Edwards, Alexander D

2014-01-25

142

Solventless LARC-160 Polyimide Matrix Resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The addition polyimide, LARC-160, which was originally synthesized from low cost liquid monomers as a laminating resin in ethanol, was prepared as a solventless, high viscosity, neat liquid resin. The resin was processed by hot-melt coating techniques int...

T. L. St Clair R. A. Jewell

1978-01-01

143

Catalysis with Metal Cation-Exchanged Resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

There have been a paucity of reports dealing with catalytic reactions involving metal or metal cations incorporated into ion-exchange resins. It is the objective of this review to summarize these reactions and to discuss in detail one such resin, a perfluorinated Exchange polymer, PFIEP. here survey two resin types, polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) and PFIEP or Nafion [11. Acid catalysis

F. J. Waller

1986-01-01

144

21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 true Polyaryletherketone resins. 177.1556 Section 177.1556 ...Surfaces 177.1556 Polyaryletherketone resins. The poly(oxy-1,4-phenylenecarbonyl-1...4-phenylenecarbonyl-1,4-phenylene) resins (CAS Reg. No. 55088-54-5 and...

2010-01-01

145

21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and Drugs...and Related Substances 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used in accordance with the...

2012-04-01

146

21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and Drugs...and Related Substances 172.280 Terpene resin. The food additive terpene resin may be safely used in accordance with the...

2011-04-01

147

21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyarylate resins. 177.1555 Section 177.1555 Food and Drugs...Food Contact Surfaces 177.1555 Polyarylate resins. Polyarylate resins (CAS Reg. No. 51706-10-6) may be...

2011-04-01

148

21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Polyaryletherketone resins. 177.1556 Section 177.1556 ...Surfaces 177.1556 Polyaryletherketone resins. The poly(oxy-1,4-phenylenecarbonyl-1...4-phenylenecarbonyl-1,4-phenylene) resins (CAS Reg. No. 55088-54-5 and...

2012-04-01

149

21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyarylate resins. 177.1555 Section 177.1555 Food and Drugs...Food Contact Surfaces 177.1555 Polyarylate resins. Polyarylate resins (CAS Reg. No. 51706-10-6) may be...

2012-04-01

150

21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Polyaryletherketone resins. 177.1556 Section 177.1556 ...Surfaces 177.1556 Polyaryletherketone resins. The poly(oxy-1,4-phenylenecarbonyl-1...4-phenylenecarbonyl-1,4-phenylene) resins (CAS Reg. No. 55088-54-5 and...

2011-04-01

151

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOEpatents

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18

152

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOEpatents

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30

153

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOEpatents

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07

154

Preparation of nano alumina via resin synthesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of type of precursor on the characteristics of alumina powders prepared via urea formaldehyde resin formation is demonstrated through the introduction of three different Al3+ precursors. An Al ester (aluminum acetate), and two inorganic salts aluminum sulphate and aluminum phosphate hydrate, were added during resin formation. The resins and the powders after burning out of the organic part

D. M. Ibrahim; Y. M. Abu-Ayana

2009-01-01

155

21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...5 0.5 5.1 Nylon 11 resins for use in articles intended...25 .3 5.2 Nylon 11 resins for use only: 1.04...with food b. In side-seam cements for articles intended for...this chapter 6.1 Nylon 6 resins 1.15±.015...

2009-04-01

156

21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...5 0.5 5.1 Nylon 11 resins for use in articles intended...25 .3 5.2 Nylon 11 resins for use only: 1.04...with food b. In side-seam cements for articles intended for...this chapter 6.1 Nylon 6 resins 1.15±.015...

2010-01-01

157

Synthesis of improved phenolic resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Twenty seven addition cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to give char residues comparable to state-of-the-art phenolic resins. Cyanate, epoxy, allyl, acrylate, methacrylate and ethynyl derivatized phenolic oligomers were investigated. The novolac-cyanate and propargyl-novolac resins provided anaerobic char yields at 800 C of 58 percent. A 59 percent char yield was obtained from modified epoxy novolacs. A phosphonitrilic derivative was found to be effective as an additive for increasing char yields. The novolac-cyanate, epoxy-novolac and methacrylate-epoxy-novolac systems were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. All three resins showed good potential as composite matrices. The free radical cured methacrylate-epoxy-novolac graphite composite provided short beam shear strengths at room temperature of 93.3 MPa (13.5 ksi). The novolac-cyanate graphite composite produced a short beam shear strength of 74 MPa (10.7 ksi) and flexural strength of 1302 MPa (189 ksi) at 177 C. Air heat aging of the novolac-cyanate and epoxy novolac based composites for 12 weeks at 204 C showed good property retention.

Delano, C. B.; Mcleod, A. H.

1979-01-01

158

Vinylstyrylpyridine-modified bismaleimide composite resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Vinylstilbazole (vinylstyrylpyridine) and vinylpolystyrylpyridine was prepared for the purpose of modifying bismaleimide composite resins. Cure studies of resin systems were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The vinylstyrylpyridine-modified bismaleimide composite resins were found to have lower cure and gel temperatures, and shorter cure times than the corresponding unmodified composite resins. The resin systems were reinforced with commercially available satin-weave carbon cloth fabricated by hot melt (or solvent) techniques. Thermal stability, flammability, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties of the composites (such as flexural strength, modulus, tensile and short beam shear strength) were determined. Composite laminates showed substantial improvements in both processability and mechanical properties compared to the bismaleimide control systems.

Hsu, M.-T. S.; Chen, T. S.; Parker, J. A.; Heimbuch, A. H.

1984-01-01

159

Contemporary denture base resins: Part 2.  

PubMed

Provision of partial and complete dentures constructed from resin is commonplace and a satisfactory outcome requires the consideration of the properties of the resin, the oral tissues and prosthodontic principles. This second of a two-part series examines the advantages and disadvantages of flexible nylon denture base resins, which have found popularity for the provision of partial dentures. Adverse effects of denture base resins are examined and the benefits and shortcomings of softliners are explored. Chairside adjustment and polishing, and denture hygiene are also discussed. Clinical Relevance: Knowledge of contemporary denture base resin systems will help to achieve optimal outcomes in removable prosthodontics. PMID:22675889

Rickman, Luke J; Padipatvuthikul, Pavinee; Satterthwaite, Julian D

2012-04-01

160

A Method for Characterizing PMR-15 Resin  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Quantitative analysis technique based on reverse-phase, highperformance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and paired-ion chromatography (PIC) developed for PMR-15 resins. In reverse-phase HPLC experiment, polar solvent containing material to be analyzed passed through column packed with nonpolar substrate. Composition of PMR-15 Resin of 50 weight percent changes as resin ages at room temperature. Verification of proper resin formulation and analysis of changes in resin composition during storage important to manufacturers of PMR-15 polymer matrix composite parts. Technique especially suitable for commercial use by manufacturers of high-performance composite components.

Roberts, G. D.; Lauver, R. W.

1986-01-01

161

Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

1995-01-01

162

Resin registration for interocclusal records.  

PubMed

An ideal material for registering interocclusal records should (1) have reproductive accuracy, (2) be easy to handle, (3) offer no resistance to closure during the registration, (4) be rigid when set, and (5) have a fair degree of hardness when set. The acrylic resin, Duralay, has these qualities. Techniques for utilizing Duralay to register interocclusal records for unilateral restorations, bilateral restorations, full-arch restorations, as well as fixed and removable restorations in the same arch have been demonstrated. PMID:319224

Skurnik, H

1977-02-01

163

Phosphorus-containing imide resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flame-resistant reinforced bodies are disclosed which are composed of reinforcing fibers, filaments or fabrics in a cured body of bis- and tris-imide resins derived from tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides by reaction with maleic anhydride or its derivatives, or of addition polymers of such imides, including a variant in which a mono-imide is condensed with a dianhydride and the product is treated with a further quantity of maleic anhydride.

Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (inventors)

1984-01-01

164

Wear rates of resin composites.  

PubMed

SUMMARY A laboratory study was conducted to examine the wear of resin composite materials using a generalized wear simulation model. Ten specimens each of five resin composites (EsthetX [EX], Filtek Supreme Plus [SP], Filtek Z250 [Z2], Tetric EvoCeram [EC], and Z100 Restorative [Z1]) were subjected to wear challenges of 100,000, 400,000, 800,000, and 1,200,000 cycles. The materials were placed in cylinder-shaped stainless-steel fixtures, and wear was generated using a flat stainless-steel antagonist in a slurry of polymethylmethacrylate beads. Wear (mean facet depth [?m] and volume loss [mm(3)]) was determined using a noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2000) with Proscan and ProForm software. Statistical analysis of the laboratory data using analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test showed a significant difference (p<0.05) for mean wear facet depth and volume loss for both the number of cycles and resin composite material. Linear regression analysis was used to develop predictive wear rates and volume loss rates. Linear wear was demonstrated with correlation coefficients (R(2)) ranging from 0.914 to 0.995. Mean wear values (mean facet depth [?m]) and standard deviations (SD) for 1200K cycles were as follows: Z1 13.9 (2.0), Z2 26.7 (2.7), SP 30.1 (4.1), EC 31.8 (2.3), and EX 67.5 (8.2). Volume loss (mm(3)) and SDs for 1200K cycles were as follows: Z1 0.248 (0.036), Z2 0.477 (0.044), SP 0.541 (0.072), EC 0.584 (0.037), and EX 1.162 (0.139). The wear rate (?m) and volume loss rate (mm(3)) per 100,000 cycles for the five resin composites were as follows: wear rate Z1 0.58, EC 1.27, Z2 1.49, SP 1.62, and EX 4.35, and volume loss rate Z1 0.009, EC 0.024, Z2 0.028, SP 0.029, and EX 0.075. The generalized wear model appears to be an excellent method for measuring relative wear of resin composite materials. PMID:22856679

Barkmeier, W W; Erickson, R I; Latta, M A; Wilwerding, T M

2013-01-01

165

Decomposition of ion exchange resins by pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis of spent ion exchange resins is one of the most effective methods for reducing radioactive waster volume and for making the final waste form more stable. Fundamental experiments were performed to clarify the pyrolysis characteristics of anion and cation exchange resins. Residual elemental analyses and off-gas analyses showed that the decomposition ratio of cation resins was only 50 wt% at 600/sup 0/C, while that of anion resins was 90 wt% at 400/sup 0/C. Infrared spectroscopy for cation resins attributed its low decomposition ratio to formation of a highly heat-resistant polymer (sulfur bridged) during pyrolysis. Measurements of residual hygroscopicity and cement package strength indicated that the optimum pyrolysis temperatures for preventing resins swelling and package expansion were between 300 and 500/sup 0/C.

Matsuda, M.; Funabashi, K.; Nishi, T.; Yusa, H.; Kikuchi, M.

1986-11-01

166

Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

1982-01-01

167

Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

The historical uses of ion-exchange resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchange process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange resins are provided. The utility of these agents to stabilize drugs are evaluated. Commonly occurring chemical and physical incompatibilities are reviewed. Ion-exchange resins have found applicability as inactive pharmaceutical constituents, particularly as disintegrants (inactive tablet

David P. Elder

2005-01-01

168

RADIATION STABILITY OF ION EXCHANGE RESINS  

Microsoft Academic Search

the structure of the micromolecular framework, the chemical nature, the ; exchange group, the type of crosslinkage and the radiation medium. Both in DVB-; styrene copolymers and in phenol-formaldehyde resins the C--R bond (KF-1 and RF ; resins) was more resistant towards ionizing radiation than the C--S bond (KU-2, ; KU-1 resins). By changing the structure of the crosslinking component

E. D. Kiseleva; K. V. Chmutov; V. N. Krupnova

1962-01-01

169

Radiation testing of organic ion exchange resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of ion exchange materials are being evaluated as part of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Pretreatment Project for the removal of ¹³⁷Cs from aqueous tank wastes. Two of these materials are organic resins; a phenol-formaldehyde resin (Duolite CS-100) produced by Rohm and Haas Co. (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) and a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin produced by

C. D. Carlson; L. A. Bray; S. A. Bryan

1995-01-01

170

Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

Dynys, Fred

2005-01-01

171

Solid phase synthesis of tertiary amines on amide REM resins: Grignard and metal hydride compatible resins.  

PubMed

Four new amide REM resins (AM REM 2-5) are described, and their use is illustrated for the synthesis of tertiary amines 6-9 and 13-16. Amide REM resins 4 and 5, which have a phenyl ring attached to the amide nitrogen, are found to give superior product yields and purities, and the resins are stable to a wider range of reagents and conditions compared to REM resin 1. PMID:11029176

Plater, M J; Murdoch, A M; Morphy, J R; Rankovic, Z; Rees, D C

2000-01-01

172

Characterization of PMR polyimide resin and prepreg  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Procedures for the chemical characterization of PMR-15 resin solutions and graphite-reinforced prepregs were developed, and a chemical data base was established. In addition, a basic understanding of PMR-15 resin chemistry was gained; this was translated into effective processing procedures for the production of high quality graphite composites. During the program the PMR monomers and selected model compounds representative of postulated PMR-15 solution chemistry were acquired and characterized. Based on these data, a baseline PMR-15 resin was formulated and evaluated for processing characteristics and composite properties. Commercially available PMR-15 resins were then obtained and chemically characterized. Composite panels were fabricated and evaluated.

Lindenmeyer, P. H.; Sheppard, C. H.

1984-01-01

173

Novel silica-based ion exchange resin  

SciTech Connect

Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

NONE

1997-11-01

174

Microbiological study of water-softener resins.  

PubMed

Microbial identification using effluents backflushed from exhausted urban and rural tank resins and cleaned resins containing the sulfonated copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene (SDB) were completed, along with microbial assessment of the concentrated stock salt brine. Forty-four different bacterial and fungal genera were identified. Extensive biochemical and animal virulence tests completed on one of the six bacterial salt brine isolates indicated a pathogenic staphylococcal strain. The retention of Staphylococcus aureus, a Flavobacterium sp, and Escherichia coli B bacteriophage was demonstrated both by using the nonexhausted sodium-regenerated resin and by using the same resin exchanged with different mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. Effluent counts completed after bacterial seepage through the resins indicated the Pb(++) exchanged resin removed 55% of the bacteria; Na(+), Fe(++), and Al(+++) removed 31 to 36% and Ca(++) and Cu(++) removed about 10 to 15%. Seventy per cent or more of the bacteriophage was removed by Fe(++), Cu(++), and Al(+++), whereas the Ca(++) and Na(++) cations removed 25 to 31%. Over a 77-day period, nonsterile tap water was passed through bacterial seeded and uninoculated SDB (Na) resin columns. Effluent and resin elution counts demonstrated the growth and survival of 2 different bacteria per column. Increased bacterial retention, survival, and multiplication occurred concomitantly with accumulation of organic and inorganic materials and the Ca(++) and Mg(++) cations from the tap water. Furthermore, microbial elution from resin particles taken from column depths of 1, 8, and 16 cm indicated a bacterial diminution with increasing depths. PMID:5373675

Stamm, J M; Engelhard, W E; Parsons, J E

1969-09-01

175

Microbiological Study of Water-Softener Resins  

PubMed Central

Microbial identification using effluents backflushed from exhausted urban and rural tank resins and cleaned resins containing the sulfonated copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene (SDB) were completed, along with microbial assessment of the concentrated stock salt brine. Forty-four different bacterial and fungal genera were identified. Extensive biochemical and animal virulence tests completed on one of the six bacterial salt brine isolates indicated a pathogenic staphylococcal strain. The retention of Staphylococcus aureus, a Flavobacterium sp, and Escherichia coli B bacteriophage was demonstrated both by using the nonexhausted sodium-regenerated resin and by using the same resin exchanged with different mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. Effluent counts completed after bacterial seepage through the resins indicated the Pb++ exchanged resin removed 55% of the bacteria; Na+, Fe++, and Al+++ removed 31 to 36% and Ca++ and Cu++ removed about 10 to 15%. Seventy per cent or more of the bacteriophage was removed by Fe++, Cu++, and Al+++, whereas the Ca++ and Na++ cations removed 25 to 31%. Over a 77-day period, nonsterile tap water was passed through bacterial seeded and uninoculated SDB (Na) resin columns. Effluent and resin elution counts demonstrated the growth and survival of 2 different bacteria per column. Increased bacterial retention, survival, and multiplication occurred concomitantly with accumulation of organic and inorganic materials and the Ca++ and Mg++ cations from the tap water. Furthermore, microbial elution from resin particles taken from column depths of 1, 8, and 16 cm indicated a bacterial diminution with increasing depths.

Stamm, John M.; Engelhard, Warren E.; Parsons, James E.

1969-01-01

176

Graphite composites with advanced resin matrices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effect of processing variables on the flammability and mechanical properties for state-of-the-art and advanced resin matrices for graphite composites were studied. Resin matrices which were evaluated included state-of-the-art epoxy, phenolic-novolac, phenolic-xylok, two types of bismaleimides, benzyl, polyethersulfone, and poly(p-phenylene sulfone). Comparable flammability and thermochemical data on graphite-reinforced laminates prepared with these resin matrices are presented, and the relationship of some of these properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins is described.

Kourtides, D. A.

1980-01-01

177

Flexible heat resistant neutron shielding resin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A flexible heat resistant neutron shielding material has been developed, which consists of polymer resin with 1 wt% boron. The neutron shielding performance of the developed resin, examined by the 252Cf neutron source, is almost the same as that of the polyethylene. The outgas of H 2, H 2O, CO and CO 2 from the resin have been measured at 250 C environment. The resin will be applied around the port of the vacuum vessel as an additional shielding material and reduce the neutron streaming from a superconducting tokamak device such as JT-60SA.

Sukegawa, Atsuhiko M.; Anayama, Yoshimasa; Okuno, Koichi; Sakurai, Shinji; Kaminaga, Atsushi

2011-10-01

178

Imide modified epoxy matrix resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear strength), and about 78% (shear strain to failure) relative to the control composite.

Scola, D. A.

1982-01-01

179

21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Phenolic resins in molded articles. 177.2410 Section 177.2410...Substances for Use Only as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2410 Phenolic resins in molded articles. Phenolic resins identified...

2013-04-01

180

40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721.5908 Section 721...Substances 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN P-01-561) is subject to...

2010-07-01

181

21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872.3690...Prosthetic Devices 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of...

2014-04-01

182

21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device...

2011-04-01

183

21 CFR 177.2430 - Polyether resins, chlorinated.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Polyether resins, chlorinated. 177.2430 Section 177...for Repeated Use 177.2430 Polyether resins, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyether resins may be safely used as articles or...

2010-01-01

184

21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.  

... 2014-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300 ...Prosthetic Devices 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device...

2014-04-01

185

21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phenolic resins in molded articles. 177.2410 Section 177...Intended for Repeated Use 177.2410 Phenolic resins in molded articles. Phenolic resins identified in this section may be...

2012-04-01

186

21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.  

...2014-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310 Section 872...Devices 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be...

2014-04-01

187

21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device...

2013-04-01

188

21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310 Section 872...Devices 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be...

2010-04-01

189

21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573.120 Food and Drugs...Listing 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin (hydrolized polyacrylamide), only for...

2012-04-01

190

21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food...872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a...

2010-04-01

191

40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721.2673 Section 721...Substances 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN P-99-1399) is subject to...

2013-07-01

192

21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32 Section 181.32 Food and... 181.32 Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. (a) Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins listed in this section, containing...

2011-04-01

193

21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310 Section 872...Devices 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be...

2013-04-01

194

40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). 721.2755 Section 721...Substances 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN P-98-105) is subject to...

2011-07-01

195

21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872.3690...Prosthetic Devices 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of...

2011-04-01

196

21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.  

...2014-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food...872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a...

2014-04-01

197

21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310 Section 872...Devices 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be...

2012-04-01

198

40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). 721.2755 Section 721...Substances 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN P-98-105) is subject to...

2012-07-01

199

21 CFR 173.10 - Modified polyacrylamide resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 true Modified polyacrylamide resin. 173.10 Section 173.10 Food and Drugs...Treatment 173.10 Modified polyacrylamide resin. Modified polyacrylamide resin may be safely used in food in accordance...

2010-01-01

200

21 CFR 181.32 - Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. 181.32 Section 181.32 Food and... 181.32 Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins. (a) Acrylonitrile copolymers and resins listed in this section, containing...

2012-04-01

201

21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section 177.2510 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or...

2012-04-01

202

21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food...872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a...

2012-04-01

203

21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section 177.2355 Food and...Use 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of this...

2012-04-01

204

21 CFR 177.2430 - Polyether resins, chlorinated.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyether resins, chlorinated. 177.2430 Section 177...for Repeated Use 177.2430 Polyether resins, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyether resins may be safely used as articles or...

2011-04-01

205

21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600 Section...Surfaces 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the...

2011-04-01

206

21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872.3820 Food...Devices 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material,...

2010-04-01

207

21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device...

2014-04-01

208

40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721.5908 Section 721...Substances 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN P-01-561) is subject to...

2011-07-01

209

21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section 177.2355 Food and...Use 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of this...

2011-04-01

210

21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section 177.2510 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or...

2010-01-01

211

21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device...

2010-04-01

212

40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). 721...Chemical Substances 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). ...substance identified generically as an epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN...

2012-07-01

213

21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device...

2013-04-01

214

21 CFR 173.10 - Modified polyacrylamide resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Modified polyacrylamide resin. 173.10 Section 173.10 Food and Drugs...Treatment 173.10 Modified polyacrylamide resin. Modified polyacrylamide resin may be safely used in food in accordance...

2012-04-01

215

21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.  

...2014-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872.3820 Food...Devices 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material,...

2014-04-01

216

21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device...

2010-04-01

217

21 CFR 173.10 - Modified polyacrylamide resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Modified polyacrylamide resin. 173.10 Section 173.10 Food and Drugs...Treatment 173.10 Modified polyacrylamide resin. Modified polyacrylamide resin may be safely used in food in accordance...

2011-04-01

218

21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872.3690...Prosthetic Devices 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of...

2013-04-01

219

21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310 Section 872...Devices 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be...

2011-04-01

220

21 CFR 177.2430 - Polyether resins, chlori-nated.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyether resins, chlori-nated. 177.2430 Section...for Repeated Use 177.2430 Polyether resins, chlori-nated. Chlorinated polyether resins may be safely used as articles or...

2012-04-01

221

40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). 721.3135 Section 721...721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as a phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and...

2012-07-01

222

21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600 Section...Surfaces 177.1600 Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. Carboxyl-modified polyethylene resins may be safely used as the...

2012-04-01

223

21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Polyphenylene sulfide resins. 177.2490 Section 177.2490 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene sulfide resins (poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide)...

2012-04-01

224

21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phenolic resins in molded articles. 177.2410 Section 177...Intended for Repeated Use 177.2410 Phenolic resins in molded articles. Phenolic resins identified in this section may be...

2011-04-01

225

21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872.3820 Food...Devices 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material,...

2011-04-01

226

21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300 ...Prosthetic Devices 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device...

2012-04-01

227

21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section 177.2510 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or...

2011-04-01

228

40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721.5908 Section 721...Substances 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN P-01-561) is subject to...

2012-07-01

229

40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). 721.3135 Section 721...721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as a phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and...

2011-07-01

230

21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food...872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a...

2011-04-01

231

21 CFR 172.215 - Coumarone-indene resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-04-01 false Coumarone-indene resin. 172.215 Section 172.215 Food and...Substances 172.215 Coumarone-indene resin. The food additive coumarone-indene resin may be safely used on grapefruit,...

2012-04-01

232

21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device...

2014-04-01

233

21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177.2500 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2500 Polyphenylene sulfone resins. The polyphenylene sulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 31833-61-1)...

2013-04-01

234

21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Phenolic resins in molded articles. 177.2410 Section 177...Intended for Repeated Use 177.2410 Phenolic resins in molded articles. Phenolic resins identified in this section may be...

2010-01-01

235

21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300 ...Prosthetic Devices 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device...

2010-04-01

236

76 FR 39896 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Review)] Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy Determination On the basis of...order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy would be likely to lead to continuation...entitled Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin from Italy: Investigation No....

2011-07-07

237

40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721.5908 Section 721...Substances 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN P-01-561) is subject to...

2013-07-01

238

21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-04-01 true Polyphenylene sulfide resins. 177.2490 Section 177.2490 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene sulfide resins (poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide)...

2010-01-01

239

21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Polyphenylene sulfide resins. 177.2490 Section 177.2490 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene sulfide resins (poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide)...

2011-04-01

240

21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177.2500 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2500 Polyphenylene sulfone resins. The polyphenylene sulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 31833-61-1)...

2012-04-01

241

40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). 721...Chemical Substances 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). ...substance identified generically as an epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN...

2011-07-01

242

40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721.2673 Section 721...Substances 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN P-99-1399) is subject to...

2011-07-01

243

21 CFR 172.215 - Coumarone-indene resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-04-01 false Coumarone-indene resin. 172.215 Section 172.215 Food and...Substances 172.215 Coumarone-indene resin. The food additive coumarone-indene resin may be safely used on grapefruit,...

2011-04-01

244

21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device...

2012-04-01

245

21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section 872.3690...Prosthetic Devices 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device composed of...

2010-04-01

246

21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573.120 Food and Drugs...Listing 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin (hydrolized polyacrylamide), only for...

2010-04-01

247

21 CFR 173.10 - Modified polyacrylamide resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Modified polyacrylamide resin. 173.10 Section 173.10 Food and Drugs...Treatment 173.10 Modified polyacrylamide resin. Modified polyacrylamide resin may be safely used in food in accordance...

2013-04-01

248

21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872.3820 Food...Devices 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material,...

2012-04-01

249

21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573.120 Food and Drugs...Listing 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin (hydrolized polyacrylamide), only for...

2011-04-01

250

21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device...

2011-04-01

251

21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Polyphenylene sulfone resins. 177.2500 Section 177.2500 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2500 Polyphenylene sulfone resins. The polyphenylene sulfone resins (CAS Reg. No. 31833-61-1)...

2011-04-01

252

40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721.2673 Section 721...Substances 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN P-99-1399) is subject to...

2012-07-01

253

21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300 ...Prosthetic Devices 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device...

2011-04-01

254

21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872...Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material,...

2012-04-01

255

21 CFR 872.3690 - Tooth shade resin material.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tooth shade resin material. 872.3690 Section...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3690 Tooth shade resin material. (a) Identification. Tooth shade resin material is a device...

2012-04-01

256

21 CFR 520.1242d - Levamisole resinate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Levamisole resinate. 520.1242d Section 520...FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1242d Levamisole resinate. (a) Specifications. The drug is levamisole adsorbed on a resin, in a...

2010-04-01

257

21 CFR 520.1242d - Levamisole resinate.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Levamisole resinate. 520.1242d Section 520...FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1242d Levamisole resinate. (a) Specifications. The drug is levamisole adsorbed on a resin, in a...

2009-04-01

258

40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). 721.2752 Section...721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as an epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject...

2013-07-01

259

21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872...Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification. A resin tooth bonding agent is a device material,...

2009-04-01

260

Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as additional government-funded testing proved that RP-46 is even more exceptional than originally thought.

2009-01-01

261

Phosphorus-containing imide resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cured polymers of bis and tris-imides derived from tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides by reaction with maleic anhydride or its derivatives, and addition polymers of such imides, including a variant in which a monoimide is condensed with a dianhydride and the product is treated with a further quantity of maleic anhydride prior to curing are disclosed and claimed. Such polymers are flame resistant. Also disclosed are an improved method of producing tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides from the nitro analogues by reduction with hydrazine hydrate using palladized charcoal or Raney nickel as the catalyst and fiber reinforced cured resin composites.

Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (inventors)

1985-01-01

262

Dentine sealing provided by smear layer/smear plugs vs. adhesive resins/resin tags.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of five experimental resins, which ranged from hydrophobic to hydrophilic blends, to seal acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. The experimental resins (R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5) were evaluated as neat bonding agents (100% resin) or as solutions solvated with absolute ethanol (70% resin/30% ethanol). Fluid conductance was measured at 20 cm H(2)O hydrostatic pressure after sound dentine surfaces were: (i) covered with a smear layer; (ii) acid-etched; or (iii) bonded with neat or solvated resins, which were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. In general, the fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine was significantly higher than that of smear layer-covered dentine. However, when the most hydrophobic neat resins (R1 and R2) were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with ethanol, the fluid conductance was as low as that produced by smear layers. The fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine saturated with ethanol was significantly lower than for resin bonded to water-saturated dentine, except for resin R4. Application of more hydrophobic resins may provide better sealing of acid-etched dentine if the substrate is saturated with ethanol instead of with water. PMID:17697173

Carrilho, Marcela R; Tay, Franklin R; Sword, Jeremy; Donnelly, Adam M; Agee, Kelli A; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Sadek, Fernanda T; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H

2007-08-01

263

Process of Resin Treating a Cotton Batting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The fibrous batts are used in the furniture and automotive industries for upholstery, mattresses and automotive cushioning. The web of opened textile fibers of cotton are treated before final forming with a resin. The resin is made of dimethylol ethyl car...

N. B. Knoepfler H. K. Gardner H. L. E. Vix

1965-01-01

264

Novel silica-based ion exchange resin  

SciTech Connect

Shortcomings of chelating resins have been addressed by a new class of ion exchange resins called dual mechanism bifunctional polymers (DMBPs). DMBPs use hydrophilic cation exchange ligands with rapid uptake kinetics and use chelating ligands for selectivity for one or more metals; result is a resin that quickly recognizes and removes targeted metals from waste, remediation, and process streams. Eichrom`s Diphonix {reg_sign} resin is the first DMBP to be widely released as a commercial product; it is polystyrene based. Objective of this work is to synthesize commercial quantities of a silica-based ion exchange resin with the same or better metal ion selectivity, metal uptake kinetics, and acid stability as Diphonix. Feasibility was determined, however the process needs to be optimized. Studies at Eichrom and ANL of the performance of Diphonix resin over a broad range of HNO3 and HCl conditions and inorganic salt loadings are discussed together with the proposed method of incorporating similar characteristics into a silica-based resin. The new, silica-based resin functionalized with diphosphonic acid ligands can be used in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving processing of low-level, transuranic, and high-level radioactive wastes; it can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste including wastes contaminated with organic compounds.

Gula, M.; Harvey, J.

1996-12-31

265

21 CFR 177.1550 - Perfluorocarbon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...characteristic infrared spectra. (2) Melt-viscosity. (i) The per-fluoro-carbon resins...1) of this section shall have a melt viscosity of not less than 104 poises at 380...ibr_locations.html. The melt viscosity of the perfluorocarbon resins...

2013-04-01

266

Modified resins for solid-phase extraction  

DOEpatents

A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA); Sun, Jeffrey J. (Ames, IA)

1991-12-10

267

THERMOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TOUGHENED PHENOLIC RESOL RESIN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in thermal and mechanical properties of polyvinylbutyral (PVB) modified phenolic resole resin were studied. The DSC and TGA studies show that an increase in PVB content results in a reduced thermal stability at temperatures above 360 C, but causes little change in thermal properties at temperatures below 300 C. The izod impact strength of cast moulded resin is maximum

I. N Ismail; Z. A. M. Ishak; M. F. Jaafar; S. Omar; M. F. Zainal Abidin; H. F Ahmad Marzuki

268

Modified resins for solid-phase extraction  

DOEpatents

A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

Fritz, James S. (Ames, IA) [Ames, IA; Sun, Jeffrey J. (Ames, IA) [Ames, IA

1993-07-27

269

Some experiences with epoxy resin grouting compounds.  

PubMed

Epoxy resin systems are used in tiling and grouting in the construction industry. Because of the nature of the application, skin contact is the primary hazard. The most prevalent reaction was reddening of the forearms, followed by whole body reddening and loss of appetite, these latter two being associated with smoking while applying the resin. PMID:7415974

Hosein, H R

1980-07-01

270

Treatment of Spent Ion-Exchange Resins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

PMMA was studied with the aim to evaluate its usefulness as an incorporation medium for the final containment of spent ion-exchange resins. The study of the effect of water content (ranging from 25 to 100%) of the incorporated resin into PMMA on the compr...

N. K. Ghattas N. E. Ikladious S. B. Eskander

1981-01-01

271

Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Six silicone modified resins were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 6-63%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 1,220 MPa and a modulus of 105 GPa. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 72 MPa.

Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

1980-01-01

272

Resin/graphite fiber composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques were developed that provided thermo-oxidatively stable A-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites using the approach of in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on reinforcing fibers, rather than employing separately prepared prepolymer varnish. This was accomplished by simply mixing methylene dianiline and two ester-acids and applying this solution to the fibers for subsequent molding. Five different formulated molecular weight resins were examined, and an optimized die molding procedure established for the 1500 formulated molecular weight system. Extensive ultrasonic inspection of composites was successfully utilized as a technique for monitoring laminate quality. Composite mechanical property studies were conducted with this polyimide resin at room temperature and after various time exposures in a thermo-oxidative environment at 561 K (550 F), 589 K (600 F) and 617 K (650 F). It was determined that such composites have a long term life in the temperature range of 561 K to 589 K. The final phase involved the fabrication and evaluation of a series of demonstration airfoil specimens.

Cavano, P. J.

1974-01-01

273

Release and toxicity of dental resin composite  

PubMed Central

Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined.

Gupta, Saurabh K.; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

2012-01-01

274

Continuous metal removal technique for resist resins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modern resists require very pure raw materials to insure highest quality images. Many methods have been developed to reduce metals in resins used to make photoresists. Extractive washing techniques and ion exchange methods have been the predominant methods used to reduce metal levels for these critical raw materials. This has been especially important for the novolak resins because of the generally poor quality of the starting materials used to make them and by the nature of the resin isolation steps traditionally used. Both of the commonly used cleaning methods are time consuming and are predominantly batch processes. Based upon techniques developed to efficiently fractionate resins, we have developed a technique for the rapid, continuous reduction of metal contaminants in film forming resin solutions by an extractive method using a double inlet liquid/liquid centrifuge.

Wanat, Stan F.; McKenzie, Douglas S.; Rahman, M. D.

2001-08-01

275

Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

Fishbein, Meyer

1939-01-01

276

Release and toxicity of dental resin composite.  

PubMed

Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined. PMID:23293458

Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A; Pant, Aditya B

2012-09-01

277

Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes  

SciTech Connect

Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

Not Available

1982-08-01

278

Mineralogy of fossil resins in Northern Eurasia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The investigation is focused on identification and origin of fossil resins from the Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary sediments of Northern Eurasia on the basis of detailed study of their physical and chemical characteristics: morphology; size; mass; density; optical, mechanical, and thermal properties; chemical composition; etc. The composition of amorphous organic minerals with polymeric structure, fossil resins included, is studied with IR spectrometry, the EPR method, derivatography at low heating rates, XRD, chemical analysis, emission spectrometry, etc. The results of investigation summarized for the Baltic-Dnieper, North Siberian, and Far East amber-bearing provinces show some similarity of fossil resins in combination with specific features inherent to each province. Resins from the Baltic-Dnieper province should be termed as amber (succinite). Their variety is the most characteristic of Northern and Eastern Europe. Amber-like fossil resins from the North Siberian and Far East provinces are irrelevant to succinite. They usually occur as brittle resins, namely, retinite and gedanite, without jewelry value. Viscous fossil resin rumnite with an expected high economic value occurs in the Far East, on the shore of Sakhalin Island.

Bogdasarov, M. A.

2007-12-01

279

Bead Settling During Cation and Anion Resin Separation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production of ultrapure water by ion exchange requires thorough mixing of cationic and anionic resins. In many cases the resins are regenerated; requiring bead-type separation prior to chemical treatment with the respective acid or base. Resin separation is predictable based upon backwash conditions, resin properties and system geometry. An important factor in an accurate model is the drag coefficient

Bharathwaj Gopalakrishnan; Gary L. Foutch; Drew Fleck; Hasith Suriyapperuma

2012-01-01

280

Improved microbial-check-valve resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improved microbial-check-valve resins have been tested for their microbicidal effectiveness and long-term stability. Resins give more-stable iodine concentrations than previous preparations and do not impart objectionable odor or taste to treated water. Microbial check valve is small cylindrical device, packed with iodide-saturated resin, that is installed in water line where contamination by micro-organisms is to be prevented. Prototype microbial check valve was tested for stability and performance under harsh environmental conditions. Effectiveness was 100 percent at 35 deg, 70 deg, and 160 deg F (2 deg, 21 deg, and 71 deg C).

Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

1980-01-01

281

Properties of a nanodielectric cryogenic resin  

SciTech Connect

Physical properties of a nanodielectric composed of in situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles ({le} 5 nm in diameter) and a cryogenic resin are reported. The dielectric losses were reduced by a factor of 2 in the nanocomposite, indicating that the presence of small TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles restricted the mobility of the polymer chains. Dielectric breakdown data of the nanodielectric was distributed over a narrower range than that of the unfilled resin. The nanodielectric had 1.56 times higher 1% breakdown probability than the resin, yielding 0.64 times thinner insulation thickness for the same voltage level, which is beneficial in high voltage engineering.

Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL

2010-01-01

282

Durability of isocyanate resin adhesives for wood I: Thermal properties of isocyanate resin cured with water  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thermal properties of isocyanate (IC) resin cured with water were studied using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and\\u000a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The thermal properties of cured phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin were also studied\\u000a for comparison purposes. The DMA specimens were prepared using a unique technique. The relation between the mechanical and\\u000a chemical changes of the resin during DMA was

Kenji Umemura; Akihiro Takahashi; Shuichi Kawai

1998-01-01

283

21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The resins identified in...articles intended for use in contact with...conditions. (a) The resins are produced by...condensation of xylene-formaldehyde resin and 4,4...or trimethylol phenol and capryl...

2010-01-01

284

Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups and cured resins obtained therefrom  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups, the process for preparing the same, and the cured resin products obtained therefrom are disclosed. Upon the application of heat, the ethynyl groups react to provide branching and crosslinking with the cure temperature being lowered by using a catalyst if desired but not required. The cured phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups have improved solvent resistance and higher use temperature than linear uncrosslinked phenoxy resins and are applicable for use as coatings, films, adhesives, composited matrices and molding compounds.

Hergenrother, P. M. (inventor)

1985-01-01

285

Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin  

DOEpatents

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

1997-07-29

286

Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin  

DOEpatents

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

Kochen, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Navratil, James D. (Simi Valley, CA)

1997-07-29

287

Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

Delano, C. B.

1980-01-01

288

21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...hydrocarbons obtainable from sulfate turpentine and meeting the following specifications: Drop-softening point of 118-138 C; iodine value less than 20. (b) Terpene resins consisting of polymers of beta-pinene and meeting the following...

2010-01-01

289

Some physicomechanical properties of polyformaldehyde (acetal resins)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method of testing polyformaldehyde (acetyl resin) film has been developed. Comparative tests have been carried out on the homopolymer and trioxane-dioxolan copolymer. Certain physicomechanical characteristics of these polymers have been obtained.

Yu. B. Kalmykov; G. P. Troshin

1967-01-01

290

21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Identity. Polyarylate resins (1, 3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, diphenyl ester, polymer with diphenyl 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate and 4-4-(1-methylethylidine) bis(phenol)) are formed by melt polycondensation of...

2009-04-01

291

21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Identity. Polyarylate resins (1, 3-benzenedicarboxylic acid, diphenyl ester, polymer with diphenyl 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate and 4-4-(1-methylethylidine) bis(phenol)) are formed by melt polycondensation of...

2010-01-01

292

Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Thermo-oxidative aging produces a nonuniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed ...

L. C. Tsuji

2000-01-01

293

An update on resin-bonded bridges.  

PubMed

Since the introduction of the 'Rochette' bridge in the 1970s the resin-bonded bridge has undergone a number of developments to become a commonly used technique for replacement of a missing tooth, especially in a minimally restored dentition. One of the major advantages of the resin-bonded bridge is that it requires less tooth preparation than conventional bridgework, with some authorities advising no preparation at all. Some reports have suggested poor long-term success rates, however, if used in appropriate clinical situations, this treatment modality can be extremely successful. The aim of this paper is to review the literature relating to resin-bonded bridges and suggest recommendations for clinicalpractice concerning the provision of resin-bonded bridges. PMID:18468318

Barber, M W; Preston, A J

2008-03-01

294

21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated...food-contact article made of polyaryletherketone resin, use a separate test sample for each required extracting solvent. [61 FR...

2013-04-01

295

Improved high-temperature resistant matrix resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was performed with the objective of developing matrix resins that exhibit improved thermo-oxidative stability over state-of-the-art high temperature resins for use at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and air pressures up to 0.7 MPa (100 psia). The work was based upon a TRW discovered family of polyimides currently licensed to and marketed by Ethyl Corporation as EYMYD(R) resins. The approach investigated to provide improved thermo-oxidative properties was to use halogenated derivatives of the diamine, 2, 2-bis (4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF). Polyimide neat resins and Celion(R) 12,000 composites prepared from fluorine substituted 4-BDAF demonstrated unexpectedly lower glass transition temperatures (Tg) and thermo-oxidative stabilities than the baseline 4-BDAF/PMDA polymer.

Green, H. E.; Chang, G. E.; Wright, W. F.; Ueda, K.; Orell, M. K.

1989-01-01

296

Dressing of Resin Bonded Diamond Grinding Wheels.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The effect of a driven rotary steel dressing device on the subsequent performance of a resin bonded diamond grinding wheel, used to grind silicon nitride ceramics, is described. The influence of increasing dressing parameters such as speed ratio and dress...

J. A. Scott T. M. A. Maksoud J. E. Morgan

1991-01-01

297

21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated...equal-weight mixtures of nylon 66 salts and nylon 610 salts. (4) Nylon 6/66 resins...and polymerization of Nylon 66 salts and epsilon...

2011-04-01

298

21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated...equal-weight mixtures of nylon 66 salts and nylon 610 salts. (4) Nylon 6/66 resins...and polymerization of Nylon 66 salts and epsilon...

2012-04-01

299

Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of silicon modified resins for graphite fiber laminates which will prevent the dispersal of graphite fibers when the composites are burned is discussed. Eighty-five silicone modified resins were synthesized and evaluated including unsaturated polyesters, thermosetting methacrylates, epoxies, polyimides, and phenolics. Neat resins were judged in terms of Si content, homogeneity, hardness, Char formation, and thermal stability. Char formation was estimated by thermogravimetry to 1,000 C in air and in N2. Thermal stability was evaluated by isothermal weight loss measurements for 200 hrs in air at three temperatures. Four silicone modified epoxies were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 25 to 50%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 140 kpsi and a modulus of 10 Mpsi. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 5.3 kpsi.

Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

1979-01-01

300

Radiation testing of organic ion exchange resins  

SciTech Connect

A number of ion exchange materials are being evaluated as part of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Pretreatment Project for the removal of {sup 137}Cs from aqueous tank wastes. Two of these materials are organic resins; a phenol-formaldehyde resin (Duolite CS-100) produced by Rohm and Haas Co. (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) and a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin produced by Boulder Scientific Co. (Mead, Colorado). One of the key parameters in the assessment of the organic based ion exchange materials is its useful lifetime in the radioactive and chemical environment that will be encountered during waste processing. The focus of the work presented in this report is the radiation stability of the CS-100 and the RF resins. The scope of the testing included one test with a sample of the CS-100 resin and testing of two batches of the RF resin (BSC-187 and BSC-210). Samples of the exchangers were irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source to a total absorbed dose of 10{sup 9} R over a period of 5 months in a static (no flow) and a flowing configuration with neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) simulant as a feed. Based on a maximum concentration of {sup 137}Cs on the resin that would result from processing NCAW, this dose represents an operational period of at least 150 days for the RF resin and at least 1260 days for the CS-100 resin. Gas generation in the static experiment was continuously monitored and G values (molecules of gas per 100 eV) were determined for each species. Resin samples were obtained periodically and the equilibrium behavior of the resins was assessed by determining the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}s). Structural information was also obtained by {sup 13}C cross polarization magic angle (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy so that changes to the chemical structure could be correlated with changes in K{sub d}.

Carlson, C.D.; Bray, L.A.; Bryan, S.A. [and others

1995-09-01

301

Heavy metal ions removal by chelating resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose Preparation of chelating resin to be used in the removal of heavy metal ions from solutions. Design\\/methodology\\/approach Chelating resin based on poly (glycidyl-methacrylate-co-N, N-methylene-bis-acrylamide) containing ethylenediamine was synthesised and used in removal of heavy metals from solutions. Findings The optimal pH values for adsorption of different metal ions occur in the range 4.0-10.0 depending on the

N. M. Abd El-Moniem; M. R. El-Sourougy; D. A. F. Shaaban

2005-01-01

302

Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin  

DOEpatents

A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio.

Bibler, Jane P. (Aiken, SC); Wallace, Richard M. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01

303

Nano composite from coal modified novolac resin  

SciTech Connect

Coal-modified novolac/clay nanocomposites were synthesized using clay as reinforcing materials. It was found that coal-modified novolac resin based silica nano-composites showed improved tensile strength compared to that of neat novolac resin. The structure of the nanocomposites was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies have also been undertaken to see the morphology of the nanocomposites prepared. The results obtained are being reported.

Ahmaruzzaman, M.; Sharma, D.K. [Industrial Technology Institute, Delhi (India)

2007-07-01

304

Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Modification with Lignin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lignin (poly?phenylpropane units) was precipitated from waste black liquor produced by paper manufacture from rice straw. The use of this lignin as partial substitution of phenol in phenol formaldehyde resin is investigated. The effect of different variables [e.g., lignin concentration, ratio of formaldehyde to phenol lignin (phenol+lignin), temperature, and polymerization time on the properties of the produced resin is studied].

2003-01-01

305

Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin  

DOEpatents

A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio. 2 figs.

Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.

1995-08-15

306

Clinical applications of preheated hybrid resin composite.  

PubMed

This clinical article describes and discusses the use of preheated nanohybrid resin composite for the placement of direct restorations and luting of porcelain laminate veneers. Two clinical cases are presented. Preheating hybrid composite decreases its viscosity and film thickness offering the clinician improved handling. Preheating also facilitates the use of nanohybrid composite as a veneer luting material with relatively low polymerisation shrinkage and coefficient of thermal expansion compared to currently available resin luting cements. PMID:21779058

Rickman, L J; Padipatvuthikul, P; Chee, B

2011-07-01

307

[Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures].  

PubMed

A resin-bonded fixed partial denture is a prosthetic construction which can replace I or several teeth in an occlusal system and which comprises a pontic element which is adhesively attached to 1 or more abutment teeth. To compensate for the limited shear strength of the adhesive layer, the Jixed partial denture is occlusally supported by the abutment(s). A direct resin-bonded fixed partial denture is made of composite, reinforced or not by a frame of flexible metal or fiber material. For an indirect resin-bonded fixed partial denture, a metal, fibre-reinforced composite or ceramic substructure is fabricated in a dental laboratory. The basic principle of a resin-bonded fixed partial denture is minimal invasiveness. However, a restoration in an abutment tooth requires a certain occlusal space which is realized by tooth preparation. Resistance preparations may be performed to improve the longevity of resin-bonded fixed partial dentures. Both financially and biologically, a resin-bonded bridge is a cost-effective prosthetic construction. The longevity is limited, but when the construction fails the negative consequences for the abutments are generally limited, which leaves open several types of other treatments. PMID:23495569

Kreulen, C M; Creugers, N H J

2013-02-01

308

Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin  

SciTech Connect

Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing 137Cs. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow using elevated temperature (45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 75C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45C. Above 60C the resin appears to not load at all.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-03-01

309

Resin characterization by electro-acoustic measurements.  

PubMed

The electro-acoustic effects, namely the ion vibration potential (IVP) and the colloidal vibration current (CVI), colloidal vibration potential (CVP) first described by P. Debye [P. Debye, J. Chem. Phys. 1 (1933) 13], are a result of charge separation of bound or free ions at different degrees by ultrasonic waves. Today commercial instruments are available to investigate liquid homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. In the present paper the application of this technique for the characterization of salts, protein solutions and resins for biochromatography is shown and valuable information about resins can be derived in a short time. Various resins were investigated with the following results: (1) the CVI magnitude is dependent of several parameters (such as particle size distribution, volume fraction, density difference); (2) the CVI is influenced by the surface modification of the resins. Polymeric modifications decrease the value of CVI. The CVI is generally lower for high capacity resins; (3) the measurement of the electro-acoustic effects can be used to detect small changes in resins. The CVI is dependent of the amount of adsorbed protein in "native" and denatured state. PMID:17194462

Mller, Egbert; Mann, Christian

2007-03-01

310

Imide modified epoxy matrix resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

Scola, D. A.

1984-01-01

311

40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Thermoplastic Resins § 414.40...Polybutadiene *Polybutenes Polybutenyl Succinic Anhydride *Polycarbonates *Polyester Resins *Polyester Resins,...

2009-07-01

312

40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Thermoplastic Resins § 414.40...Polybutadiene *Polybutenes Polybutenyl Succinic Anhydride *Polycarbonates *Polyester Resins *Polyester Resins,...

2010-07-01

313

Effect of elevated temperatures on the strength of cured resins and resin-based materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurement of the loss of weight and ultimate compressive strength of phenol-formaldehyde resins under the influence of elevated temperatures has shown that during thermal degradation there is an abrupt transition from a first to a second and third structural stage with steadily increasing stabilization of the strength properties. Apart from the dependence on the heat treatment conditions, all the resins

E. B. Trostyanskaya; V. U. Novikov; Yu. N. Kazanskii

1966-01-01

314

Reduction of non-enzymatic browning of orange juice and semi-concentrates by removal of reaction substrate.  

PubMed

A study was conducted to standardize the technology for the removal of amino acids (one of the browning reaction substrates) from sweet orange cv. Malta Common juice to reduce colour and quality deterioration in single strength juice and during subsequent concentration. Juice of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) cv. Malta Common fruits was extracted by screw type juice extractor, preserved in 500ppm SO2 and clarified by using "Pectinase CCM" enzyme (0.2% for 2h at 50??2C). For removal of amino acids juice was passed under gravity through a glass column packed with an acidic cation exchange resin (CER), Dowex-50W and quantity to be treated in one lot was standardized. The CER treated and untreated juices were concentrated to 15 and 30Brix in a rotary vacuum evaporator. Results indicate that 121ml of orange juice when passed through a glass column (5cm internal diameter) packed with cation exchange resin (Dowex-50W) upto a height of 8cm, could remove about 98.4% of the amino acids with minimum losses in other juice constituents. With cation exchange resin treatment, the non-enzymatic browning and colour deterioration of orange juice semi-concentrates was reduced to about 3 folds in comparison to untreated counterparts. The retention of vitamin C and sugars was also better in semi-concentrates prepared from cation exchange resin treated juice. Thus, cation exchange resin treatment of orange juice prior to concentration and storage is highly beneficial in reduction of non-enzymatic browning, colour deterioration and retention of nutritional, sensory quality of product during preparation and storage. PMID:24966423

Sharma, Satish K; Juyal, Shashibala; Rao, V K; Yadav, V K; Dixit, A K

2014-07-01

315

Thermal rearrangement of novolak resins used in microlithography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Changes in phenolic-formaldehyde resin properties are described in terms of thermal exposure. At high temperature, resin molecular weight, dissolution properties and chemical composition change depending on the presence or absence of monomers. Without monomer in the resin melt at 220 degree(s)C, resin molecular weight increases with a corresponding decrease in dissolution rate. In the presence of monomer, molecular weight generally decreases. Dissolution rate may fluctuate depending on the monomer mixture. Three,five- Xylenol and 2,3,5-trimethylphenol co-monomers induced the most extreme changes in resin properties with thermal treatment. Resin degradation-recombination processes suggest a classical Friedel-Craft rearrangement mechanism.

Hardy, Ricky; Zampini, Anthony; Monaghan, Michael J.; O'Leary, Michael J.; Cardin, William J.; Eugster, Timothy J.

1995-06-01

316

Diffusion of residual monomer in polymer resins.  

PubMed Central

A simplified mathematical model which made use of Fick's laws of diffusion written in spherical coordinates was developed to describe the rate of diffusion of residual monomers from polymer resins. The properties of the monomer-polymer system which influenced the amount of monomer remaining in the polymer as a function of time were the diffusivity and solubility of the monomer in the polymer, and the particle size of the polymer resin. This model was used to analyze literature data on the diffusion of residual vinyl chloride monomer in polyvinyl chloride resins made by the suspension process. It was concluded that particle size of the resin was a significant parameter which should be taken advantage of in process equipment designed to remove residual monomer from PVC resins. The diffusivity of the monomer in the polymer was a function of the solubility of the monomer in the polymer. Monomer solubility can be determined from Henry's law. It was suggested that this model could be adapted to describe diffusion of monomers from any monomer-polymer system, and would be a useful approach to modeling the transport of nonreactive chemical additives from plastics.

Piver, W T

1976-01-01

317

Polymerization characteristics of EMA-based resin.  

PubMed

To explore the feasibility of a new relining material, polymerization characteristics such as peak temperature, setting time, residual monomer, and postpolymerization were examined in ethyl methacrylate (EMA) resins composed of EMA and 4 kinds of EMA/methyl methacrylate (MMA) copolymers with high and low molecular weights and initiated by benzoyl peroxide/N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine system and compared with those of MMA/PMMA resins. Peak temperature (53.8-71.0 degrees C) and residual monomer (2.56-3.52% after 1 h and 1.57-2.31% after 24 h) of the EMA resins were significantly lower than those of the MMA resins (88.9-93.4 degrees C and 4.61-5.85% after 1 h and 4.09-4.84% after 24 h, respectively). The composition of the copolymers had a significant effect on peak temperature and setting time but no significant effect on residual monomer and postpolymerization. The molecular weight of the copolymers affected peak temperature, setting time and residual monomer significantly. This study suggested that EMA resins are worthy of further evaluation as a relining material. PMID:15164919

Saito, Yuji

2004-03-01

318

Development of a heterogeneous laminating resin system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The factors which effect the impact resistance of laminating resin systems and yet retain equivalent performance with the conventional 450 K curing epoxy matrix systems in other areas were studied. Formulation work was conducted on two systems, an all-epoxy and an epoxy/bismaleimide, to gain fundamental information on the effect formulation changes have upon neat resin and composite properties. The all-epoxy work involved formulations with various amounts and combinations of eight different epoxy resins, four different hardeners, fifteen different toughening agents, a filler, and a catalyst. The epoxy/bismaleimide effort improved formulations with various amounts and combinations of nine different resins, four different hardeners, eight different toughening agents, four different catalysts, and a filler. When a formulation appeared to offer the proper combination of properties required for a laminating resin Celion 3K-70P fabric was prepregged. Initial screening tests on composites primarily involved Gardner type impact and measurement of short beam shear strengths under dry and hot/wet conditions.

Biermann, T. F.; Hopper, L. C.

1985-01-01

319

Monomethacrylate co-monomers for dental resins.  

PubMed

Polymerisation shrinkage is widely recognised as a major drawback of resin based dental restoratives. Bis-GMA is often employed as the principal dimethacrylate monomer. Due to its high viscosity, Bis-GMA is normally mixed with large proportions of low viscosity glycol dimethacrylates. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the polymerisation shrinkage of Bis-GMA-based resins would be lower if alternative monomethacrylate co-monomers were used in place of conventional dimethacrylate co-monomers as viscosity modifiers. Conventional resins used were ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate and triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate; the alternative monofunctional co-monomers were tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate, hydroxypropyl methacrylate and isobornyl methacrylate. Model resins containing 54% mol/mol of co-monomer in Bis-GMA and 1% w/w of benzoyl peroxide as initiator were heat-cured at 70 degrees C for 8 h. Polymerisation shrinkage, degree of conversion and concentration of remaining methacrylate groups were calculated from density changes obtained gravimetrically. Other properties evaluated were Young's modulus, water uptake and viscosity of the monomer mixtures. The Bis-GMA-based resins exhibited lower shrinkage when mixed using the monomethacrylates rather than with conventional glycol dimethacrylates. Among the alternative co-monomers, tetrahydrofurfuryl methacrylate conferred the best balance of all measured properties. PMID:9672104

Labella, R; Davy, K W; Lambrechts, P; Van Meerbeek, B; Vanherle, G

1998-06-01

320

76 FR 42114 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy: Continuation of Antidumping Duty...polytetrafluoroethylene resin (``PTFE resin'') from Italy would likely lead to a continuation...antidumping duty order on PTFE resin from Italy, pursuant to section...

2011-07-18

321

40 CFR 63.5728 - What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations? 63.5728 Section 63...Manufacturing Standards for Closed Molding Resin Operations 63.5728 What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations? (a) If a resin...

2010-07-01

322

40 CFR 63.5728 - What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations? 63.5728 Section 63...Manufacturing Standards for Closed Molding Resin Operations 63.5728 What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations? (a) If a resin...

2012-07-01

323

40 CFR 63.5728 - What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations? 63.5728 Section 63...Manufacturing Standards for Closed Molding Resin Operations 63.5728 What standards must I meet for closed molding resin operations? (a) If a resin...

2011-07-01

324

Study of Mechanical and Physicochemical Properties of Cementated Spent Ion-Exchange-Resins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As first part of a study on the possibilities, to immobilize spent ion exchange resins, for final disposal, the dependence of compressive strength from the composition of cement - resin mixtures was detected. Powdered resins, bead resins and ashes from th...

P. Patek

1981-01-01

325

Improved high temperature resistant matrix resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective was to develop organic matrix resins suitable for service at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and at air pressures up to 0.4 MPa (60 psia) for time durations of a minimum of 100 hours. Matrix resins capable of withstanding these extreme oxidative environmental conditions would lead to increased use of polymer matrix composites in aircraft engines and provide significant weight and cost savings. Six linear condensation, aromatic/heterocyclic polymers containing fluorinated and/or diphenyl linkages were synthesized. The thermo-oxidative stability of the resins was determined at 644 K and compressed air pressures up to 0.4 MPa. Two formulations, both containing perfluoroisopropylidene linkages in the polymer backbone structure, exhibited potential for 644 K service to meet the program objectives. Two other formulations could not be fabricated into compression molded zero defect specimens.

Chang, G. E.; Powell, S. H.; Jones, R. J.

1983-01-01

326

Improved resin infiltration of natural caries lesions.  

PubMed

In artificial lesions, improved penetration and the caries-inhibiting properties of infiltrating resins could be observed with increasing penetration coefficients (PCs). The aim of the present study was to compare the penetration abilities of an experimental 'infiltrant' into natural lesions with those of an adhesive in vitro. Extracted human molars and premolars showing proximal white spots were cut across the lesions perpendicular to the surface. Corresponding lesion halves were etched for 120 sec with 15% hydrochloric acid gel and were subsequently treated with either an adhesive (PC: 31 cm/sec) or an infiltrant (PC: 273 cm/sec). Specimens were observed by confocal microscopy and transverse microradiography. Penetration depths of the adhesive were significantly lower compared with those of the infiltrant (p < 0.001; Wilcoxon). It can be concluded that resins with higher PCs (infiltrants) show superior ability to penetrate natural lesions compared with resins with lower PCs. PMID:19029077

Meyer-Lueckel, H; Paris, S

2008-12-01

327

Occupational epoxy resin allergic contact dermatitis.  

PubMed

Sixteen cases of occupational contact dermatitis to epoxy resins were seen over a 5-year period. All were men. Six cases worked in the construction industry, two worked as painters, two as engineers, two as car windscreen repairers, and one each worked in a timber yard, a car yard, on a farm and as a cane-furniture salesman. Most presented with rashes on their faces (56%), hands (50%) or arms (37%). Two patients were allergic to the reactive diluent phenyl glycidyl ether, and one was allergic to the epoxy hardener isophorone diamine. The rest were allergic to the epoxy resin itself. Outcome in this series was poor because most continued to be exposed to epoxy resins in their workplace environment. PMID:11105365

Rademaker, M

2000-11-01

328

The creep of laminated synthetic resin plastics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The long-time loading strength of a number of laminated synthetic resin plastics was ascertained and the effect of molding pressure and resin content determined. The best value was observed with a 30 to 40 percent resin content. The long-time loading strength also increases with increasing molding pressure up to 250 kg/cm(exp 2); a further rise in pressure affords no further substantial improvement. The creep strength is defined as the load which in the hundredth hour of loading produces a rate of elongation of 5 X 10(exp -4) percent per hour. The creep strength values of different materials were determined and tabulated. The effect of humidity during long-term tests is pointed out.

Perkuhn, H

1941-01-01

329

Morphological Changes in Ultraviolet-Nanoimprinted Resin Patterns Caused by Ultraviolet-Curable Resins Absorbing Pentafluoropropane  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article, we revealed the maximum values of pentafluoropropane (PFP) absorbed by acrylate-type monomers and UV-curable resins causing radical photopolymerization and measured the viscosities in a state saturated with PFP. We described the influences of PFP condensable gas effectively used in UV nanoimprinting on the morphologies of resin patterns fabricated by UV nanoimprinting. The weights of the resins and monomers were increased by exposure to a PFP atmosphere, while the viscosities were reduced markedly. The absorption of PFP depended on the chemical structures of the monomers. The solubility parameter calculated by the Hoy method clearly suggested that the monomer with a solubility parameter of 20 (J cm-3)1/2 absorbed the most PFP. The UV-curable resin composed of the monomer absorbing a large amount of PFP resulted in morphological changes in nanoimprinted resin patterns where the height was lowered and the outermost surface became rough. The UV-curable resins having hydroxyl groups play an important role in preserving the size fidelity of UV-nanoimprinted resin patterns.

Kaneko, Shu; Kobayashi, Kei; Tsukidate, Yoshitaka; Hiroshima, Hiroshi; Matsui, Shinji; Nakagawa, Masaru

2012-06-01

330

21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...exceed 0.2 percent of the polyester resin. 4. Solvents for... Asbestos Glass fiber Polyester fiber produced by the condensation...glycol 6000 Silicon dioxide Wax, petroleum Complying with... (c) The cross-linked polyester resins, with or...

2010-01-01

331

21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...exceed 0.2 percent of the polyester resin. 4. Solvents for... Asbestos Glass fiber Polyester fiber produced by the condensation...glycol 6000 Silicon dioxide Wax, petroleum Complying with... (c) The cross-linked polyester resins, with or...

2009-04-01

332

Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

Kourtides, Demetrius A.

1980-01-01

333

Standard tests for toughened resin composites, revised edition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several toughened resin systems are evaluated to achieve commonality for certain kinds of tests used to characterize toughened resin composites. Specifications for five tests were standardized; these test standards are described.

1983-01-01

334

21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin (hydrolized polyacrylamide...copolymerization of acrylamide and acrylic acid with the greater part of the...Viscometer or equivalent using a number 6 spindle at 20...

2013-04-01

335

Electrically Conductive Resinous Bond and Method of Manufacture.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages ...

T. M. Snowden B. J. Wells

1985-01-01

336

Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite ...

D. A. Kourtides

1980-01-01

337

Clinical aspects of resin-bonded bridges.  

PubMed

Resin-bonded bridges have emerged as an attractive, minimally invasive prosthodontic option for the restoration of edentulous spaces. Although success rates, determined by retrospective studies, vary greatly, resin-bonded bridges now have success rates approaching those of their cemented counterparts; success is dependent, however, upon appropriate design and careful technique. The metal framework must be rigid and of sufficient surface area to afford secure adhesion to the underlying teeth. Tooth preparation should be restricted to enhancing the bonding area, and it is important that prostheses are designed to maintain axial loading, and guidance upon metal. PMID:12642953

Stokes, Alastair

2002-12-01

338

Benzonorbornadiene end caps for PMR resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several ortho-disubstituted benzonorbornadiene derivatives are described. These molecules contain acid, ester, or anhydride functionality permitting their use as end caps in PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimide systems. The replacement of the currently used norbornenyl end caps with benzonorbornadienyl end caps affords resins of increased aromatic content. It also allows evaluation of some mechanistic aspects of PMR cross-linking. Initial testing of N-phenylimide model compounds and of actual resin formulations using the benzonorbornadienyl end cap reveals that they undergo efficient thermal crosslinking to give oligomers with physical properties and thermal stability comparable to commercial norbornene-end-capped PMR systems.

Panigot, Michael J.; Waters, John F.; Varde, Uday; Sutter, James K.; Sukenik, Chaim N.

1992-01-01

339

PMR Resin Compositions For High Temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report describes experiments to identify polymer matrix resins suitable for making graphite-fiber laminates used at 700 degree F (371 degree C) in such applications as aircraft engines to achieve higher thrust-to-weight ratios. Two particular high-molecular-weight formulations of PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) resins most promising. PMR compositions of higher FMW exhibit enhanced thermo-oxidative stability. Formation of high-quality laminates with these compositions requires use of curing pressures higher than those suitable for compositions of lower FMW.

Vannucci, Raymond D.

1989-01-01

340

Electronic structure and optical properties of resin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We used the density of functional theory (DFT) to study the electronic structure and density of states of resin by ab initio calculation. The results show the band gap of resin is 1.7 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The results of optical properties show the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.7 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is in 490 nm and the value is 75,000.

Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

2013-03-01

341

New phosphorus-containing bisimide resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Phosphorus-based flame retardants have been effectively used in a wide variety of polymeric materials. Such additives, however, may either influence the decomposition reaction in polymers or lack durability due to a tendency to be leached out by solvents. Attention is given to the synthesis, characterization, thermal stability and degradation mechanisms of bisimide resins, and an evaluation is conducted of the flammability and mechanical properties of graphite cloth-reinforced laminates fabricated from one of the six phosphorus-containing bisimide resins considered.

Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Hsu, M.-T.; Parker, J. A.

1984-01-01

342

Resin transfer molding of textile composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design and manufacture of textile composite panels, tubes, and angle sections that were provided to NASA for testing and evaluation are documented. The textile preform designs and requirements were established by NASA in collaboration with Boeing and several vendors of textile reinforcements. The following four types of preform architectures were used: stitched uniweave, 2D-braids, 3D-braids, and interlock weaves. The preforms consisted primarily of Hercules AS4 carbon fiber; Shell RSL-1895 resin was introduced using a resin transfer molding process. All the finished parts were inspected using ultrasonics.

Falcone, Anthony; Dursch, Harry; Nelson, Karl; Avery, William

1993-01-01

343

Technical assessment for quality control of resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Survey visits to companies involved in the manufacture and use of graphite-epoxy prepregs were conducted to assess the factors which may contribute to variability in the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy composites. In particular, the purpose was to assess the contributions of the epoxy resins to variability. Companies represented three segments of the composites industry - aircraft manufacturers, prepreg manufacturers, and epoxy resin manufacturers. Several important sources of performance variability were identified from among the complete spectrum of potential sources which ranged from raw materials to composite test data interpretation.

Gosnell, R. B.

1977-01-01

344

Differential Curing In Fiber/Resin Laminates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Modified layup schedule counteracts tendency toward delamination. Improved manufacturing process resembles conventional process, except prepregs partially cured laid on mold in sequence in degree of partial cure decreases from mold side to bag side. Degree of partial cure of each layer at time of layup selected by controlling storage and partial-curing temperatures of prepreg according to Arrhenius equation for rate of gel of resin as function of temperature and time from moment of mixing. Differential advancement of cure in layers made large enough to offset effect of advance bag-side heating in oven or autoclave. Technique helps prevent entrapment of volatile materials during manufacturing of fiber/resin laminates.

Webster, Charles N.

1989-01-01

345

Analysis of chromite by cation-exchange using ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid.  

PubMed

A method for the separation and determination of five major elements in chromite ore (and chrome-bearing refractories), based on complexation of the metals with EDTA is described. After removal of silica, the cations are separated into two groups by passing the solution through a cation-exchange resin (Dowex 50W-X8, in Na-form) in the presence of an excess of the complexing agent. The optimum conditions for the separation are discussed on the basis of exchange constants that were either known or determined. The first group contains Cr and Fe, which emerge in the filtrate at pH between 1.5 and 2.1, whereas A1, Mg and Ca, which are adsorbed on the resin, form another group. Complexometric titrations are used for the subsequent determination of the cations in each group. The method is simpler and more rapid and accurate for routine analysis than the current methods. PMID:18961783

Jawaid, M; Ingman, F

1975-12-01

346

Influence of novel additive on BMI resin and BMI resin matrix composite  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to achieve high performance BMI matrix composite manufactured by vacuum bag cure only technique, a novel additive\\u000a WD-01 was selected to modify BMI-B resin based on modified polyetherketone (PEK-C) toughened 4,4?-bismaleimidodiphenyl methane\\u000a (MBMI)\\/O,O?-diallybisphenol A (DABPA) system, and the properties of WD-01 modified BMI resin (BMI-WD) and resin matrix composite\\u000a were investigated here. Results indicated that the cure shrinkage

B. Y. Zhang; M. Li; X. B. Chen

2007-01-01

347

Exchange of Th, U and Pu on Macroporous Ion Exchange Resins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Absorption of Th, U and Pu on macroporous ion exchangers, Amberlyst 15 (cationic) and Amberlyst A-26 (anionic) were studied in nitric acid solutions and the results were found comparable with those on their microreticular counter parts, Dowex 50x8 and Dow...

M. N. Nadkarni P. C. Mayankutty N. S. Pillai S. S. Shinde

1977-01-01

348

Preparation of Cation-Exchange Resin from Lignin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lignin precipitated from black liquor of soda pulping of bagasse was used to prepare cation-exchange resin. The effects of sulfuric acid treatment and concentration of phenol and formaldehyde on the properties of the prepared cation-exchange resin were investigated. It was found that sulfonated resinified phenolized lignin gave a resin with an ion-exchange capacity higher than that of resin, which resulted

S. Kamel

2005-01-01

349

Co-condensation of adsorbents from Baltic shale resin  

SciTech Connect

Primary procedures of shale processing are directed to the production of shale resin for use as a fuel. Economic analysis has revealed that the use of shale resins and phenols as raw material for synthesis can significantly improve profitability of shale processing. The chemistry of shale phenols is well advanced but the chemical transformations of shale resin are as yet imperfectly understood. This article deals with such transformations; specifically with the preparation of adsorbents and ion exchangers from shale resin and asphaltite.

Pokonova, Y.V. (Leningrad Technological Inst., Leningrad (SU))

1991-01-01

350

Investigating highly crosslinked macroporous resins for solid-phase synthesis.  

PubMed

The washing efficiencies of a chromophore and the reaction rates of a classical esterification reaction are improved with macroporous resins (MRs) relative to a classical Merrifield resin. Furthermore, Wacker-oxidation of a MR bound alkene yielded the expected methylketone product whereas an alkene bound to a low-crosslinked Merrifield resin gave no product, a function of the relative permeability of each of these resins to the aqueous solvent conditions employed. PMID:9873542

Hori, M; Gravert, D J; Wentworth, P; Janda, K D

1998-09-01

351

NITRATE CONVERSION OF HB-LINE REILLEXTM HPQ RESIN  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reillex{trademark} HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the

J. Steimke; M. Williams; T. Steeper; R. Leishear

2012-01-01

352

Effects of nanoparticles on hygrothermal property of epoxy resin composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polymer composites are widely used in aerospace field, especially carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites, because of the outstanding performance, became the most popular polymer matrix composites. However, the hygrothermal property of epoxy resin, as the matrix of the structure composite, is crucial to the whole composites. In this paper, the main focus is to modify the epoxy resin with

Xinying Lv; Rongguo Wang; Wenbo Liu

2009-01-01

353

21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section...Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely...

2009-04-01

354

21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylate-acrylamide resins. 173.5 Section 173.5 Food...for Food Treatment § 173.5 Acrylate-acrylamide resins. Acrylate-acrylamide resins may be safely used in food under...

2010-01-01

355

21 CFR 173.5 - Acrylate-acrylamide resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Acrylate-acrylamide resins. 173.5 Section 173.5 Food...for Food Treatment § 173.5 Acrylate-acrylamide resins. Acrylate-acrylamide resins may be safely used in food under...

2009-04-01

356

21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section...Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely...

2010-01-01

357

21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 true Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175.270 Food and Drugs...Coatings 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins identified in this section may be safely...

2010-01-01

358

40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). 721.5762 Section 721...721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to...

2011-07-01

359

21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175.270 Food and Drugs...Coatings 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins identified in this section may be safely...

2012-04-01

360

40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380 Section 721.4380 ...Substances 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418) is subject to...

2012-07-01

361

40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499 Section 721.9499 ...Substances 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649) is subject to...

2013-07-01

362

40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380 Section 721.4380 ...Substances 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418) is subject to...

2011-07-01

363

21 CFR 177.2450 - Polyamide-imide resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyamide-imide resins. 177.2450 Section 177.2450 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2450 Polyamide-imide resins. Polyamide-imide resins identified in paragraph (a) of this...

2011-04-01

364

21 CFR 177.2450 - Polyamide-imide resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyamide-imide resins. 177.2450 Section 177.2450 Food and...Repeated Use 177.2450 Polyamide-imide resins. Polyamide-imide resins identified in paragraph (a) of this...

2012-04-01

365

21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyester resins, cross-linked. 177.2420 Section...for Repeated Use 177.2420 Polyester resins, cross-linked. Cross-linked polyester resins may be safely used as articles or...

2011-04-01

366

40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721.5905 Section 721...Substances 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as a modified phenolic resin (PMN P-01-441) is subject to...

2010-07-01

367

40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). 721.5762 Section 721...721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to...

2013-07-01

368

40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380 Section 721.4380 ...Substances 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418) is subject to...

2010-07-01

369

21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176.110 Food and...Paperboard 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of...

2013-04-01

370

21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176.110 Food and...Paperboard 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of...

2011-04-01

371

40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721.5905 Section 721...Substances 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as a modified phenolic resin (PMN P-01-441) is subject to...

2013-07-01

372

40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499 Section 721.9499 ...Substances 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649) is subject to...

2011-07-01

373

40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721.5905 Section 721...Substances 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as a modified phenolic resin (PMN P-01-441) is subject to...

2012-07-01

374

40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). 721.5762 Section 721...721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to...

2012-07-01

375

21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175.270 Food and Drugs...Coatings 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins identified in this section may be safely...

2011-04-01

376

21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Molecular sieve resins. 173.40 Section 173.40 Food and Drugs...for Food Treatment 173.40 Molecular sieve resins. Molecular sieve resins may be safely used in the processing of food...

2011-04-01

377

40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499 Section 721.9499 ...Substances 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649) is subject to...

2012-07-01

378

21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyester resins, cross-linked. 177.2420 Section...for Repeated Use 177.2420 Polyester resins, cross-linked. Cross-linked polyester resins may be safely used as articles or...

2012-04-01

379

40 CFR 721.10307 - Acrylate resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate resin (generic). 721.10307 Section 721...Chemical Substances 721.10307 Acrylate resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...substance identified generically as acrylate resin (PMN P-01-343) is subject to...

2013-07-01

380

40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). 721.5762 Section 721...721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to...

2010-07-01

381

21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Molecular sieve resins. 173.40 Section 173.40 Food and Drugs...for Food Treatment 173.40 Molecular sieve resins. Molecular sieve resins may be safely used in the processing of food...

2012-04-01

382

40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721.5905 Section 721...Substances 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as a modified phenolic resin (PMN P-01-441) is subject to...

2011-07-01

383

40 CFR 721.10307 - Acrylate resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate resin (generic). 721.10307 Section 721...Chemical Substances 721.10307 Acrylate resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...substance identified generically as acrylate resin (PMN P-01-343) is subject to...

2012-07-01

384

21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176.110 Food and...Paperboard 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of...

2012-04-01

385

21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770...Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a...

2013-04-01

386

Adsorption of Gallium with N503 Levextrel Resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The adsorptivity of N503 (N, N-di(sec-octyl)acetamide) levextrel resin to gallium in the HCl medium was studied. The absorption rate and absorption isotherm of the resin to gallium were measured. The results show that the absorption of the resin to galliu...

J. R. Chen J. Hu C. Peng

1995-01-01

387

21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section 177.2355 Food...Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of...

2009-04-01

388

21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section 177.2355 Food...Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of...

2010-01-01

389

40 CFR 721.2673 - Aromatic epoxide resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). 721.2673 Section...Chemical Substances 721.2673 Aromatic epoxide resin (generic). (a) Chemical...substance identified generically as aromatic epoxide resin (PMN P-99-1399) is...

2010-07-01

390

Tensile Properties of Resin-infiltrated Demineralized Human Dentin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability of adhesive resins to restore the physical properties of demineralized dentin has not been well-documented. The unfilled resins that are used for adhesion have relatively low moduli of elasticity and limited ability to increase dentin stiffness, although they may increase the ultimate tensile strength of dentin. This study tested the hypothesis that resin infiltration of demineralized dentin can

H. Sano; T. Takatsu; B. Ciucchi; C. M. Russell; D. H. Pashley

1995-01-01

391

21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...3 2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Molecular sieve resins. 173.40 Section 173.40...Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.40 Molecular sieve resins. Molecular sieve resins may be safely used in the...

2009-04-01

392

21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 3 2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Molecular sieve resins. 173.40 Section 173.40...Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.40 Molecular sieve resins. Molecular sieve resins may be safely used in the...

2010-01-01

393

40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499 Section 721...Substances § 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and...substance identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649) is...

2010-07-01

394

Subfractionation, characterization and photooxidation of crude oil resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resins of five crude oils were obtained using SARA fractionation. The maltenic fraction of Blend Arabian Light, was further separated into six polar fractions. These fractions which are the constituents of the resins were analysed by FTIR spectroscopy. They appeared to be more oxidized, more aliphatic and less aromatic than asphaltenes. Photooxidation of resins showed that they are easily oxidizable

A Boukir; E Aries; M Guiliano; L Asia; P Doumenq; G Mille

2001-01-01

395

Low-melt Viscosity Polyimide Resins for Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) II  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of polyimide resins with low-melt viscosities in the range of 10-30 poise and high glass transition temperatures (Tg s) of 330-370 C were developed for resin transfer molding (RTM) applications. These polyimide resins were formulated from 2,3,3 ,4 -biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (a-BPDA) with 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride endcaps along with either 3,4 - oxyaniline (3,4 -ODA), 3,4 -methylenedianiline, (3,4 -MDA) or 3,3 -methylenedianiline (3,3 -MDA). These polyimides had pot lives of 30-60 minutes at 260-280 C, enabling the successful fabrication of T650-35 carbon fiber reinforced composites via RTM process. The viscosity profiles of the polyimide resins and the mechanical properties of the polyimide carbon fiber composites will be discussed.

Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, Jim M.; Mintz, Eric A.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; McCorkle, Linda S.

2007-01-01

396

Development of Flexible Epoxy Resins and Coatings.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Coatings with excellent low temperature flexibility were made by blending 20 parts polyether diepoxide DER 732 and 80 parts aromatic epoxy resin Epon 1001 and curing with polyether diamine POPDA 400. Also coatings with good flexibility at -45F, high adhes...

S. V. Urs S. A. Puglia

1968-01-01

397

A perspective on resins for aqueous coatings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aqueous binder resins are becoming increasingly diversified and encompass classical latexes, latex-like polyurethane dispersions, and various aqueous dispersion polymers. Unlike classical and urethane latexes, the dispersion polymers are synthesized in non-aqueous media, have low molecular weights and are dispersed into water by mechanical means. The preparation of classical latexes from unsaturated monomers is scientifically well understood. Modem classical latex technology

John L Gardon

1997-01-01

398

Resin composition and articles molded therefrom  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A resin composition having a high refractive index and low dispersion characteristics including a carbonate residue, a phosphonic acid residue and a dihydric phenol residue, wherein the mol fractions of the phosphonic acid residue and the carbonate residue satisfy wherein (a) represents the number of moles of the phosphonic acid residues, and (b) represents the number of moles of the carbonate residues.

2004-06-15

399

21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Fahrenheit) Solubilityin boiling 4.2N HC1 Viscosity No.(mL/g) Maximum extractable fractionin...the sample and multiplying by 100. (5) Viscosity number (VN). (i) The viscosity number (VN) for Nylon 6/12 resin in a...

2013-04-01

400

Epoxy Schiff Base Resin Manufacturing Method.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A manufacturing method for epoxy Schiff base resin is described, characterized by the fact that at least one or more types of dicarboxylic acid having an azomethyne compound represented by the general expression: HOOC-R sub 1 -N=HC-R sub 2 -COOH, HOOC-R s...

T. Kimura

1986-01-01

401

Isothermal Aging Effects on PMR-15 Resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Specimens of PMR-15 polyimide neat resin were aged in air at temperatures of 288, 316, and 343 C. Weight losses and dimensional changes were monitored during the course of the exposure time. Physical changes were also observed by optical and electron micr...

K. J. Bowles D. Jayne T. A. Leonhardt

1992-01-01

402

Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Thermo-oxidative aging produces a non-uniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed...

H. L. McManus K. J. Bowles L. C. Tsuji

1998-01-01

403

Characterization of resins in alternative fuel mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Resins is a class of compounds believed to play an important role in the conversion processes of coal and coal-related material into oils. Methods currently used to isolate this fraction, generally lack reproducibility and yield impure and strongly overlapping fractions which do not reflect the actual group type distribution in the liquid fuel. A separation method based on liquid column chromatography was developed, which divides liquid fuels into eight distinct and minimally overlapping chemical classes: five non-polar (saturated, mono-, di-, tri-, and polynuclear aromatics), one intermediate polar (resins), and two polar (asphaltenes and asphaltols) fractions. Chemical characterization of resins fractions, derived from two alternative fuels (coal-derived liquid and sugarcane bagasse), was achieved by first subjecting them to acid-base-neutral separation, followed by analysis of each subfraction by GC/MS. Identification of the eluted components was carried out utilizing a library search system, by comparing retention time (indices) of 150 model compounds believed to exist in liquid fuels, on two fused silica capillary columns (Carbowax 20 M and Se-54), and by mass spectral interpretation. GC/MS results indicate that resins are mainly composed of weakly acidic (phenols, indanols, naphthols), mildly basic (benzoquinolines, choroanilines, etc.), neutral-nitrogen (indoles and carbazoles), and oxygen (carbonyl) compounds, and are free of hydrocarbons.

Karam, H.S.

1986-01-01

404

Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treat...

P. A. Taylor

2010-01-01

405

Epoxy resins produce improved plastic scintillators  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plastic scintillator produced by the substitution of epoxy resins for the commonly used polystyrene is easy to cast, stable at room temperature, and has the desirable properties of a thermoset or cross-linked system. Such scintillators can be immersed directly in strong solvents, an advantage in many chemical and biological experiments.

Markley, F. W.

1967-01-01

406

Resin char oxidation retardant for composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boron powder stabilizes char, so burned substances are shiny, smooth, and free of loose graphite fibers. Resin weight loss of laminates during burning in air is identical for the first three minutes for unfilled and boron-filled samples, then boron samples stabilize.

Bowles, K. J.; Gluyas, R. E.

1981-01-01

407

Aging in CTBN Modified Epoxy Resin Stocks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The cause of degradation in the glass transition temperature (T/sub G/) of a partially crystallized polymer was investigated. Sample epoxy resin filled capacitors were cured at 90 exp 0 C for 24 hours, then stored at room atmospheric conditions. These sho...

K. E. Creed

1979-01-01

408

Radionuclide Leaching from Organic Ion Exchange Resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of leach treatments for decontaminating organic ion exchange resins (OIER), which have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East Basin sludge. Based on process records, the OIER found i...

C. H. Delegard D. E. Rinehart

1999-01-01

409

Temperature Investigations on Resin-Anchored Bolts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Temperature increases on the heads of resin-grouted bolts have been evaluated as indicators of the integrity of the anchoring of the bolt. Expected increases have been calculated by the finite difference method; the calculations were checked by bolthead t...

R. M. Stateham M. C. Sun

1976-01-01

410

Reliability of electronic devices containing epoxy resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epoxy resins, because of their favorable balance of properties including high adhesion and strength, and resistance to heat, chemicals and moisture, along with low shrinkage and dielectric constant, have been widely used in the packaging of electronic circuits containing silicon die, typically IC's, to achieve high reliability. Thus, conductive adhesives have generally replaced solder for die attach. When the more

J. C. Spitsbergen

1995-01-01

411

Stress Distribution Around Resin-Grouted Bolts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ninety-seven roof bolts were instrumented with strain gages and resin-grouted in three areas of the Bear coal mine, Somerset, Colo., by the Bureau of Mines. Measurements taken with these instruments indicate roof support is achieved through a combination ...

D. E. Radcliffe R. E. Stateham

1980-01-01

412

Resin Powder Slurry Process for Composite Fabrication  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Potentially useful process for fabrication of fiber-reinforced resinmatrix composites is powder slurry technique. Applicability of technique demonstrated using powdered resin made from thermoplastic polyimide LaRC/ TPI (thermoplastic polyimide). Use of process circumvents need for such high-cost organic solvents as N-methylpyrrolidinone and diglyme (diglycol methyl ether). Two basic slurries for LaRC/TPI powder investigated.

Mike, R. A.

1986-01-01

413

Application of curable resin-coated proppants  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a laboratory investigation of the interactions between fracturing fluids and resin-coated proppants (RCP's) which revealed (among other conclusions) that RCP's are incompatible with oxidizing breakers. Areas covered included RCP effect on fluid rheology, fluid relationship to RCP strength, theoretical study of required RCP strengths to prevent flowback, and experimental measurement to establish minimum strength.

Norman, L.R.; Terracina, J.M.; McCabe, M.A.; Nguyen, P.D. (Halliburton Services, Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-11-01

414

Application of Curable Resin-Coated Proppants  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a laboratory investigation of the interactions between fracturing fluids and resin-coated proppants (RCP's) which revealed (among other conclusions) that RCP's are incompatible with oxidizing breakers. Areas covered included RCP effect on fluid rheology, fluid relationship to RCP strength, theoretical study of required RCP strengths to prevent flowback, and experimental measurement to establish minimum strength.

L. R. Norman; J. M. Terracina; M. A. McCabe; P. D. Nguyen

1992-01-01

415

Crack propagation directions in unfilled resins.  

PubMed

Posterior composite restorative materials undergo accelerated wear in the occlusal contact area, primarily through a fatigue mechanism. To facilitate the timely development of new and improved materials, a predictive wear model is desirable. The objective of this study was to develop a finite element model enabling investigators to predict crack propagation directions in resins used as the matrix material in composites, and to verify these predictions by observing cracks formed during the pin-on-disc wear of a 60:40 BISGMA:TEGDMA resin and an EBPADMA resin. Laser confocal scanning microscopy was used to measure crack locations. Finite element studies were done by means of ABAQUS software, modeling a cylinder sliding on a material with pre-existing surface-breaking cracks. Variables included modulus, cylinder/material friction coefficient, crack face friction, and yield behavior. Experimental results were surprising, since most crack directions were opposite previously published observations. The majority of surface cracks, though initially orthogonal to the surface, changed direction to run 20 to 30 degrees from the horizontal in the direction of indenter movement. Finite element modeling established the importance of subsurface shear stresses, since calculations provided evidence that cracks propagate in the direction of maximum K(II)(theta), in the same direction as the motion of the indenter, and at an angle of approximately 20 degrees. These findings provide the foundation for a predictive model of sliding wear in unfilled glassy resins. PMID:9823724

Baran, G; Sadeghipour, K; Jayaraman, S; Silage, D; Paul, D; Boberick, K

1998-11-01

416

21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS...Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1555 Polyarylate...articles intended for use in contact with food in accordance with...resin articles may be used in contact with all foods except...

2013-04-01

417

Hydrosilicone resin and preparation process thereof  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

The present invention relates to a liquid hydrosilicone resin and a preparation process thereof. The average composition of the liquid hydrosilicone resin is represented by the following formula: (R.sup.1R.sup.2R.sup.3SiO.sub.1/2).sub.M.(R.sup.4R.sup.5SiO.sub.2/2).sub.- D. (R.sup.6SiO.sub.3/2).sub.T.(SiO.sub.4/2).sub.Q wherein R.sup.1 to R.sup.6 are identical or different radicals independently selected from the group consisting of organic groups and a hydrogen atom, with the proviso that at least one of R.sup.1to R.sup.6 is a hydrogen atom bonded directly to a silicon atom. The liquid hydrosilicone resin is obtained by dispersing a hydrosilicone oil, a hydroxyl silicone resin and a dehydrogenation catalyst in a solvent to form a dispersion, allowing the dispersion to react, and then removing the solvent and the catalyst.

2014-04-15

418

SANDWICH STRUCTURE DELAMINATION OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the apparent advantages of sandwich structures is that after the core is made, the sandwich is produced in one process by resin transfer molding (RTM) and no adhesive is used between the core and skins. The bond between the core and skins is therefore likely to depend upon the core material, the type of matrix and the core

Mohammed T. Hayajneh

2001-01-01

419

Propargyl-terminated ResinsA Hydrophobic Substitute for Epoxy Resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Propargyl derivatives of biphenols and phenol-formaldehyde resins (propargyl-terminated resinsPTRs) are being evaluated as non-polar matrices for advanced polymeric composites. The dipropargyl ether of bisphenol A and its B-staged materials are the most attractive candidates. PTR monomers are available in a one-step, easy preparation in quantitative yield from inexpensive starting materials. They are suitable for industrial production in large scale at

Stoil K. Dirlikov

1990-01-01

420

Resin Dynamics Contributes to the NMR Line Broadening of Organic Molecules Grafted onto a Polystyrene Resin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite the use of high resolution magic angle spinning NMR, the NMR linewidth of anchored molecules on the commonly used Merrifield solid phase resins remains larger than that of the corresponding molecules in solution. We investigate the different mechanisms that might be at the origin of this line broadening. Experimentally, we use the CPMG method to determine the 15N relaxation times of a tethered tripeptide and show that the slow resin dynamics significantly contributes to the transverse relaxation.

Lippens, Guy; Chessari, Gianni; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel

2002-06-01

421

Resin dynamics contributes to the NMR line broadening of organic molecules grafted onto a polystyrene resin.  

PubMed

Despite the use of high resolution magic angle spinning NMR, the NMR linewidth of anchored molecules on the commonly used Merrifield solid phase resins remains larger than that of the corresponding molecules in solution. We investigate the different mechanisms that might be at the origin of this line broadening. Experimentally, we use the CPMG method to determine the (15)N relaxation times of a tethered tripeptide and show that the slow resin dynamics significantly contributes to the transverse relaxation. PMID:12165259

Lippens, Guy; Chessari, Gianni; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel

2002-06-01

422

Thermal expansion characteristics of light-cured dental resins and resin composites.  

PubMed

The thermal expansion characteristics of dental resins prepared by light-curing of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA, Bis-EMA(4) or PCDMA dimethacrylate monomers and of commercial light-cured resin composites (Z-100 MP, Filtek Z-250, Sculpt-It and Alert), the organic matrix resin of which is based on different combinations of the above monomers, were studied by thermomechanical analysis (TMA). This study showed the existence of a glass transition temperature at around 35-47 degrees C for the resins and 40-45 degrees C for the composites; then the coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CLTE) was calculated at the temperature intervals 0-60 degrees C, 0-T(g) and T(g)-60 degrees C. The CLTE values of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA and UDMA resins are similar and lower than those of Bis-EMA (4) and PCDMA resins. The CLTE values of the composites indicated that the major factor that affects the CLTE of a composite is the filler content, but it also seems to be affected by the chemical structure of the matrix resin. TMA on water-saturated samples showed that water desorption takes place during the measurement and that the residual water acts as a plasticizer decreasing the T(g) and increasing the CLTE values. Furthermore, TMA on post-heated samples for 1, 3 or 6h showed, only for the resins, an initial decrease of CLTE and increase of the T(g) after 1h that was not significantly changed after 6h of heating. PMID:14967543

Sideridou, Irini; Achilias, Dimitris S; Kyrikou, Eleni

2004-07-01

423

ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY  

SciTech Connect

A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

2012-03-27

424

NITRATE CONVERSION OF HB-LINE REILLEXTM HPQ RESIN  

SciTech Connect

Reillex{trademark} HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL). To perform this task, SRNL treated two batches of resin in 2012. The first batch of resin from Reilly Industries Batch 80302MA was initially treated at SRNL in 2001 to remove chloride. This batch of resin, nominally 30 liters, has been stored wet in carboys since that time until being retreated in 2012. The second batch of resin from Batch 23408 consisted of 50 kg of new resin purchased from Vertellus Specialties in 2012. Both batches were treated in a column designed to convert resin using downflow of 1.0 M sodium nitrate solution through the resin bed followed by rinsing with deionized water. Both batches were analyzed for chloride concentration, before and after treatment, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The resin specification [Werling, 2003] states the total chlorine and chloride concentration shall be less than 250 ppm. The resin condition for measuring this concentration is not specified; however, in service the resin would always be fully wet. Measurements in SRNL showed that changing from oven dry resin to fully wet resin, with liquid in the particle interstices but no supernatant, increases the total weight by a factor of at least three. Therefore, concentration of chlorine or chloride expressed as parts per million (ppm) decreases by a factor of three. Therefore, SRNL recommends measuring chlorine concentration on an oven dry basis, then dividing by three to estimate chloride concentration in the fully wet condition. Chloride concentration in the first batch (No.80302MA) was nearly the same before the current treatment (759 ppm dry) and after treatment (745 ppm dry or {approx}248 ppm wet). Treatment of the second batch of resin (No.23408) was very successful. Chloride concentration decreased from 120,000 ppm dry to an average of 44 ppm dry or {approx}15ppm wet, which easily passes the 250 ppm wet criterion. Per guidance from HB Line Engineering, SRNL blended Batch 80302 resin with Batch P9059 resin which had been treated previously by ResinTech to remove chloride. The chloride concentrations for the two drums of Batch P9059 were 248 ppm dry ({approx}83 ppm wet) {+-}22.8% and 583 ppm dry ({approx}194 ppm wet) {+-} 11.8%. The blended resin was packaged in five gallon buckets.

Steimke, J.; Williams, M.; Steeper, T.; Leishear, R.

2012-05-29

425

Stability Of A Carbon-Dioxide-Removing Resin  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report describes experiments determing long-term chemical stability of IRA-45, commerical ion-exchange resin candidate for use in removing CO2 from atmosphere of Space Station. In proposed system, cabin air passes through resin, and acidic CO2 absorbed by weakly-basic hydrated diethylenetriamine bonded to porous resin substrate. When resin absorbs all CO2, disconnects from airstream and heated with steam to desorb CO2. Resin reuseable. Removed by post-treating process air with phosphoric acid on charcoal. Other chemicals removed by trace-contaminant-control subsystem of Space Station.

Wydeven, Theodore; Wood, Peter

1990-01-01

426

Wear of enamel cusps opposed by posterior composite resin.  

PubMed

The use of posterior composite resins has grown considerably over the past 5 years. While most research efforts have been devoted to improving wear resistance, little effort had been made to determine possible wear of the cusp of the opposing tooth. A recently developed in vitro wear system was used to evaluate a series of composite resins for their ability to abrade opposing enamel cusps. When the resins were tested under the same conditions, a considerable range in enamel wear was observed. Representing opposite ends of the scale, the quartz-containing composite resin caused the enamel to wear away ten times more than did the microfilled composite resin. PMID:20830885

Suzuki, S; Leinfelder, K F

1993-12-01

427

Resin film infusion mold tooling and molding method  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mold apparatus and method for resin film infusion molding including an outer mold tool having a facing sheet adapted to support a resin film and preform assembly. The facing sheet includes attachment features extending therefrom. An inner mold tool is positioned on the facing sheet to enclose the resin film and preform assembly for resin film infusion molding. The inner mold tool includes a plurality of mandrels positioned for engagement with the resin film and preform assembly. Each mandrel includes a slot formed therein. A plurality of locating bars cooperate with the slots and with the attachment features for locating the mandrels longitudinally on the outer mold tool.

Burgess, Roger (Inventor); Grossheim, Brian (Inventor); Mouradian, Karbis (Inventor); Thrash, Patrick J. (Inventor)

1999-01-01

428

Synthesis and Characterizations of Melamine-Based Epoxy Resins  

PubMed Central

A new, easy and cost-effective synthetic procedure for the preparation of thermosetting melamine-based epoxy resins is reported. By this innovative synthetic method, different kinds of resins can be obtained just by mixing the reagents in the presence of a catalyst without solvent and with mild curing conditions. Two types of resins were synthesized using melamine and a glycidyl derivative (resins I) or by adding a silane derivative (resin II). The resins were characterized by means of chemical-physical and thermal techniques. Experimental results show that all the prepared resins have a good thermal stability, but differ for their mechanical properties: resin I exhibits remarkable stiffness with a storage modulus value up to 830 MPa at room temperature, while lower storage moduli were found for resin II, indicating that the presence of silane groups could enhance the flexibility of these materials. The resins show a pot life higher than 30 min, which makes these resins good candidates for practical applications. The functionalization with silane terminations can be exploited in the formulation of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials.

Ricciotti, Laura; Roviello, Giuseppina; Tarallo, Oreste; Borbone, Fabio; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Catauro, Michelina; Cioffi, Raffaele

2013-01-01

429

Technique for removing resin from a molded object  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Resin is removed from a molded object in such a way that no cracks or expansion occurs in the casting. The resin is first mixed with a ceramics powder or metal powder. This mixture is then molded and the resin is removed by heat. The molded object is then placed into a container which is sealed and large enough to allow the gas from the resin to be controlled by heat from the resin. The gas pressure at the surface of the object is increased by the gas pressure generated from the resin and the resin removed. The increase in gas pressure from the surface of the molded object is 1.5 atm to 3 atm at 350 C to 400 C.

Hemmi, I.; Morishita, T.; Ono, T.

1983-01-01

430

Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture  

DOEpatents

A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40.degree. to 365.degree. C. to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

Snowden, Jr., Thomas M. (P.O. Box 4231, Clearwater, FL 33518); Wells, Barbara J. (865 N. Village Dr., Apt. 101B, St. Petersburg, FL 33702)

1987-01-01

431

Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture  

DOEpatents

A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40 to 365/sup 0/C to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

Snowden, T.M. Jr.; Wells, B.J.

1985-01-01

432

40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Wwww of... - Options Allowing Use of the Same Resin Across Different Operations That Use the Same Resin Type  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Options Allowing Use of the Same Resin Across Different Operations That Use the Same Resin Type 7 Table 7 to Subpart...Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt...Allowing Use of the Same Resin Across Different...

2010-07-01

433

40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Wwww of... - Options Allowing Use of the Same Resin Across Different Operations That Use the Same Resin Type  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Options Allowing Use of the Same Resin Across Different Operations That Use the Same Resin Type 7 Table 7 to Subpart...Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt...Allowing Use of the Same Resin Across Different...

2009-07-01

434

A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth.  

PubMed

Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth is very limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of five different methods of surface treatments on acrylic resin teeth on the shear bond strength between light activated composite resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Ninety cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were done upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into six groups, containing 15 samples each. Over all the treated and untreated surfaces of all groups, light-cured composite resin was applied. The shear strengths were measured in a Universal Testing Machine using a knife-edge shear test. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the F test. Application of bonding agent with prior treatment of methyl methacrylate on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin. PMID:22379301

Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K; Banerjee, Ardhendu

2011-03-01

435

The influence of a packable resin composite, conventional resin composite and amalgam on molar cuspal stiffness.  

PubMed

Packable resin composites may offer improved properties and clinical performance over conventional resin composites or dental amalgam. This in vitro study examined the cuspal stiffness of molars restored with a packable resin composite, a conventional posterior microfilled resin composite and amalgam. Forty-eight intact caries-free human third molars were distributed into four treatment groups (n=12) so that the mean cross-sectional areas of all groups were equal. Standardized MOD cavity preparations were made and specimens restored using one of four restorative materials: (1) a spherical particle amalgam (Tytin); (2) Tytin amalgam with a dentin adhesive liner (OptiBond Solo); (3) a conventional microfilled posterior resin composite (Heliomolar); (4) a packable posterior resin composite (Prodigy Posterior). Cuspal stiffness was measured using a Bionix 200 biomaterials testing machine (MTS). Specimens were loaded vertically to 300 N at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. Stiffness was measured at 10 intervals: (1) prior to cavity preparation (intact); (2) following cavity preparation, but before restoration; (3) seven days after restoration; then (4) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 12 months after restoration. All specimens were stored at 37 degrees C in deionized water throughout the study and thermocycled (5 degrees/55 degrees C; 2000 cycles) monthly for 12 months. Repeated Measures ANOVA revealed significant differences among treatment groups over time (p<0.0001). Cavity preparation reduced cuspal stiffness by more than 60%. At 12 months, the cuspal stiffness of restored teeth was, on average, 58% that of intact specimens. Neither the packable nor the conventional resin composite increased cuspal stiffness over that of amalgam. PMID:12216572

Molinaro, J D; Diefenderfer, K E; Strother, J M

2002-01-01

436

Improvement of physical and biological properties of particleboards by impregnation with phenolic resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Particleboards were treated with a low molecular-weight phenol-formaldehyde resin and their properties were evaluated. Particles were dipped into aqueous solutions of resin or sprayed with resin solutions before spraying the conventional phenol-formaldehyde resin adhesive, or sprayed with a mixture of low molecular-weight resin and the adhesive resin in a single step. Though mechanical properties and dimensional stability of the phenolic-resin-treated

Hiromu Kajita; Yuji Imamura

1991-01-01

437

Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

2005-01-01

438

Ethynylated aromatics as high temperature matrix resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Difunctional and trifunctional arylacetylenes were used as monomers to form thermoset matrix resin composites. Composites can be hot pressed at 180 C to react 80 percent of the acetylene groups. Crosslinking is completed by postcuring at 350 C. The postcured resins are thermally stable to nominally 460 C in air. As a result of their high crosslink density, the matrix exhibits brittle failure when unaxial composites are tested in tension. Failure of both uniaxial tensile and flexural specimens occurs in shear at the fiber matrix interface. Tensile fracture stresses for 0 deg composites fabricated with 60 v/o Celion 6K graphite fiber were 827 MPa. The strain to failure was 0.5 percent. Composites fabricated with 8 harness satin Celion cloth (Fiberite 1133) and tested in tension also failed in shear at tensile stresses of 413 MPa.

Hurwitz, Frances I.

1986-01-01

439

Ethynylated aromatics as high temperature matrix resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Difunctional and trifunctional arylacetylenes were used as monomers to form thermoset matrix resin composites. Composites can be hot-pressed at 180 C to react 80 percent of the acetylene groups. Crosslinking is completed by postcuring at 350 C. The postcured resins are thermally stable to nominally 460 C in air. As a result of their high crosslink density, the matrix exhibits brittle failure when uniaxial composites are tested in tension. Failure of both uniaixial tensile and flexural specimens occurs in shear at the fiber-matrix interface. Tensile fracture stresses for 0-deg composites fabricated with 60 v/o Celion 6K graphite fiber were 827 MPa. The strain to failure was 0.5 percent. Composites fabricated with 8 harness satin Celion cloth (Fiberite 1133) and tested in tension also failed in shear at tensile stresses of 413 MPa.

Hurwitz, F. I.

1987-01-01

440

Composites with improved fiber-resin interfacial adhesion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The adhesion of fiber reinforcement such as high modulus graphite to a matrix resin such as polycarbonate is greatly enhanced by applying a very thin layer, suitably from 50 Angstroms to below 1000 Angstroms, to the surface of the fiber such as by immersing the fiber in a dilute solution of the matrix resin in a volatile solvent followed by draining to remove excess solution and air drying to remove the solvent. The thin layer wets the fiber surface. The very dilute solution of matrix resin is able to impregnate multifilament fibers and the solution evenly flows onto the surface of the fibers. A thin uniform layer is formed on the surface of the fiber after removal of the solvent. The matrix resin coated fiber is completely wetted by the matrix resin during formation of the composite. Increased adhesion of the resin to the fibers is observed at fracture. At least 65 percent of the surface of the graphite fiber is covered with polycarbonate resin at fracture whereas uncoated fibers have very little matrix resin adhering to their surfaces at fracture and epoxy sized graphite fibers exhibit only slightly higher coverage with matrix resin at fracture. Flexural modulus of the composite containing matrix resin coated fibers is increased by 50 percent and flexural strength by 37 percent as compared to composites made with unsized fibers.

Cizmecioglu, Muzaffer (Inventor)

1989-01-01

441

Resin Infiltration of Natural Caries Lesions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infiltration of non-cavitated caries lesions with light-curing resins could lead to an arrest of lesion progression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the penetration of a conventional adhesive into natural enamel caries after pre-treatment with two different etching gels in vitro. Extracted human molars and premolars showing proximal white-spot lesions were cut across the lesions perpendicular to the

H. Meyer-Lueckel; A. M. Kielbassa

2007-01-01

442

REMOVAL OF Am WITH PHENOL BASED RESINS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste produced during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing could be reduced if the minor actinides (neptunium, americium and curium) contained within the waste are separated into short-lived radionuclides for their subsequent transmutation or for separate storage. Cross-linked phenolic resins based on different substituted phenol were shown to be very efficient for selective uptake of Eu from aqueous

M. Draye; A. Favre-Rguillon; D. Wruck; J. Foos; A. Guy; K. Czerwinski

2001-01-01

443

Resin bonded bridges: techniques for success.  

PubMed

Resin bonded bridges are a minimally invasive option for replacing missing teeth. Although they were first described over 30 years ago, evidence regarding their longevity remains limited and these restorations have developed an undeserved reputation for failure. This article provides a brief review of the literature regarding bridge success and continues to highlight aspects of case selection, bridge design and clinical procedure which may improve outcome. PMID:21836574

Durey, K A; Nixon, P J; Robinson, S; Chan, M F W-Y

2011-08-01

444

Acetylene-Terminated Aspartimides And Derived Resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New polymers and derived blends exhibit improved processability and properties. New toughened epoxies exhibit excellent properties, but use temperatures limited. Bismaleimide resins are some base materials formulated to develop materials having moderate use temperatures. Work conducted on use of acetylenic (ethynyl) group to cross-link and extend chains of oligomers and polymers to obtain materials to perform at higher temperatures. Extended to include acetylene-terminated aspartimides (ATA's).

Hergenrother, Paul M.; Connell, John W.; Havens, Stephen J.

1989-01-01

445

Electrical properties of a commercial resin  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study is to present electrical properties of a commercial resin. We report our findings on its dielectric and electrical breakdown characteristics. Dielectric measurements are performed by using the frequencyand time-domain impedance techniques at room temperature. Impedance data is analyzed with the distribution of relaxation times approach, which point-out individual polarization processes in a material. In addition, curing procedure is monitored with the impedance spectroscopy technique.

Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL

2006-01-01

446

Ethynyl terminated imidothioethers and resins therefrom  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ethynyl terminated imidothioethers (ETIs) are prepared by the reaction of a dimercaptan, such as 4,4'-dimercaptodiphenyl ether, and an ethynyl containing maleimide, such as N-(3-ethynylphenyl)maleimide. Blends of these ETIs and ethynyl terminated polymeric materials, such as ethynyl terminated sulfones and ethynyl terminated arylene ethers, are also prepared. These resin blends exhibit excellent processability, and the cured blends show excellent fracture toughness and solvent resistance, as well as excellent adhesive and composite properties.

Hergenrother, Paul M. (inventor); Connell, John W. (inventor); Bass, R. Gerald (inventor)

1991-01-01

447

Ethynyl terminated imidothioethers and resins therefrom  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ethynyl terminated imidothioethers (ETIs) are prepared by the reaction of a dimercaptan, such as 4,4'-dimercaptodiphenyl ether, and an ethynyl containing maleimide, such as N-(3-ethynylphenyl)maleimide. Blends of thse ETIs and ethynyl terminated polymeric materials, such as ethynyl terminated sulfones and ethynyl terminated arylene ethers, are also prepared. These resin blends exhibit excellent processability, and the cured blends show excellent fracture toughness and solvent resistance, as well as excellent adhesive and composite properties.

Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Bass, R. Gerald (Inventor)

1989-01-01

448

New selective resins with guanidyl groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conditions of reaction between nitrile groups of acrylonitrile\\/vinyl acetate\\/divinylbenzene (ANNA\\/DVB) copolymer and aminoguanidine bicarbonate (AGB) leading to N-substituted amides have been optimized. It has been found that the highest concentration of amino groups can be achieved carrying out aminolysis in the presence of a butanol\\/water mixture as solvent. Resin obtained under such conditions has 2.20 mmol\\/g of amino groups and

Bo?ena N. Kolarz; Dorota Bartkowiak; Andrzej W. Trochimczuk; Wies?aw Apostoluk; Barbara Paw?w

1998-01-01

449

Processable polyimide adhesive and matrix composite resin  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high temperature polyimide composition prepared by reacting 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride with metaphenylenediamine is employed to prepare matrix resins, adhesives, films, coatings, moldings, and laminates, especially those showing enhanced flow with retention of mechanical and adhesive properties. It can be used in the aerospace industry, for example, in joining metals to metals or metals to composite structures. One area of application is in the manufacture of lighter and stronger aircraft and spacecraft structures.

Pratt, J. Richard (inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (inventor); Progar, Donald J. (inventor)

1990-01-01

450

Transparent resins for 157-nm lithography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of sufficiently transparent resin systems is one of the key elements required for a successful and timely introduction for 157 nm lithography. This paper reports on the Simple Transmission Understanding and Prediction by Incremental Dilution (STUPID) model, a quick back-of-the-envelope increment scheme to estimate the absorption of polymers at 157 nm. A number of promising candidate resins based on norbornenes are discussed, and results with a first 157 nm resin system developed at the University of Austin are presented. The new system is based on copolymers of norbornene-5-methylenehexafluoroisopropanol (NMHFA) and t-butyl norbornene carboxylate (BNC), formulated with an acetal additive obtained by copolymerization of t-butyl norbornene-5-trifluoromethyl-5-carboxylate (BNTC) with carbon monoxide. Lithographic performance of this system extends to 110 nm dense features using standard illumination and a binary mask, or 80 nm semi-dense and 60 nm isolated features with a strong phase shift mask. The dry etch resistance of this resist is found to be slightly lower than APEX-E DUV resist for polysilicon but superior to it for oxide etches.

Dammel, Ralph R.; Sakamuri, Raj; Romano, Andrew R.; Vicari, Richard; Hacker, Cheryl; Conley, Will; Miller, Daniel A.

2001-08-01

451

Copper resinate: an XPS study of degradation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we describe an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of copper resinate, a transparent green glaze that is coloured by copper salts of resin acids. This pigment was used in Europe in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, but it does not seem to be a usual feature of the palette anywhere after the end of the sixteenth century, because its tendency to discolour was already widely known by artists. An essential prerequisite for the restoration of works of art is the understanding of the effects of various climatic parameters on the deterioration process. For this reason, pictorial models of copper resinate in linseed oil, capable of simulating the ancient paintings on mobile supports, were prepared and aged in a climatic chamber, under different conditions such as exposure to UV radiations, humidity and different concentration of chemical pollutants (NO2 and SO2). All the samples were investigated by XPS and the data obtained were evaluated in order to estimate aging effects as well as mechanisms of degradation. On these paint layers damage induced by X-ray irradiation was also verified.

Altavilla, C.; Ciliberto, E.

2006-06-01

452

Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology  

SciTech Connect

The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

1996-04-01

453

Effects of layering technique on the shade of resin overlays and the microhardness of dual cure resin cement.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess the color of layered resin overlays and to test the early microhardness of dual cure resin cement (DCRC) light cured through the layered resin overlays. Resin overlays of 1.5 mm thickness were fabricated with the A3 shade of Z350 (Group 1L), the A3B and A3E shades of Supreme XT (Group 2L), and the A3, E3, and T1 shades of Sinfony (Group 3L) using one, two, and three layers, respectively (n=7). Each layer of the resin overlays was set in equal thickness. The color of the resin overlays was measured with a colorimeter and compared with an A3 shade resin denture tooth. DCRC was light cured through the resin overlays, and the early microhardness of the DCRC was measured. The ?E value between the denture tooth and the resin overlays and the Vickers hardness number (VHN) of the DCRC were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. The color differences were 8.90.5, 5.31.0, and 7.30.5 and the VHNs were 19.41.1, 21.10.9, and 29.30.6 for Groups 1L, 2L, and 3L, respectively. Therefore, to match the designated tooth color of resin inlays and to increase the early microhardness of DCRC, layered resin inlays are more appropriate than single-dentin-layer resin inlays. However, the translucent layer should be used cautiously because the color difference of resin inlays with a translucent layer was affected more than those without a translucent layer. PMID:24918368

Chang, Hoon-Sang; Hong, Sung-Ok

2014-01-01

454

Machine for applying a two component resin to a roadway surface  

DOEpatents

A portable machine for spraying two component resins onto a roadway, the machine having a pneumatic control system, including means for purging the machine of mixed resin with air and then removing remaining resin with solvent. Interlocks prevent contamination of solvent and resin, and mixed resin can be purged in the event of a power failure.

Huszagh, D.W.

1984-01-01

455

Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Bismaleimide resins are prime candidates for nonflammable aircraft interior panels. Three resin types with different structures and processing characteristics were formulated. Resin M 751 was used to fabricate 100 kg of glass fabric prepregs which were used for the preparation of face sheets for honeycomb sandwich panels. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication are provided. In order to advance beyond the current solvent resin technology for fibre and fabric impregnation, a hot melt solvent-less resin system was prepared and characterized. Preliminary tests were performed to develop a wet bonding process for the fabrication of advanced sandwich honeycomb panels by use of polybismaleimide glass fabric face sheets and polybismaleimide Nomex honeycomb core. B-stage material was used for both the core and the face sheet, providing flatwise tensile properties equivalent to those obtained by the state-of-the-art 3-step process which includes an epoxy adhesive resin.

Stenzenberger, H. D.

1978-01-01

456

Inorganic resins for clinical use of .sup.213Bi generators  

DOEpatents

Applicant's invention is a radionuclide generator resin material for radiochemical separation of daughter radionuclides, particularly .sup.213Bi, from a solution of parental radionuclides, the resin material capable of providing clinical quantities of .sup.213Bi of at least 20-mCi, wherein the resin material comprises a silica-based structure having at least one bifunctional ligand covalently attached to the surface of the silica-based structure. The bifunctional ligand comprises a chemical group having desirable surface functionality to enable the covalent attachment of the bifunctional ligand thereon the surface of the structure and the bifunctional ligand further comprises a second chemical group capable of binding and holding the parental radionuclides on the resin material while allowing the daughter radionuclides to elute off the resin material. The bifunctional ligand has a carbon chain with a limited number of carbons to maintain radiation stability of the resin material.

DePaoli, David W. (Knoxville, TN); Hu, Michael Z. (Knoxville, TN); Mirzadeh, Saed (Knoxville, TN); Clavier, John W. (Elizabethton, TN)

2011-03-29

457

Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes in hydraulic cement  

SciTech Connect

Work has been conducted to investigate the solidification of ion exchange resin wastes with portland cements. These efforts have been directed toward the development of acceptable formulations for the solidification of ion exchange resin wastes and the characterization of the resultant waste forms. This paper describes formulation development work and defines acceptable formulations in terms of ternary phase compositional diagrams. The effects of cement type, resin type, resin loading, waste/cement ratio and water/cement ratio are described. The leachability of unsolidified and solidified resin waste forms and its relationship to full-scale waste form behavior is discussed. Gamma irradiation was found to improve waste form integrity, apparently as a result of increased resin crosslinking. Modifications to improve waste form integrity are described. 3 tables.

Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Kalb, P.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

1982-01-01

458

CCMR: Green Composites: Using Modified Sunflower Based Resins  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this research, green composites were developed using sunflower based resins and jute fabric material. More specifically, research was done on the effects of modification on the mechanical properties of the resin. By incorporating modified sunflower based resin, the protein content increases, which therefore enhance the mechanical properties. Modifying the resin by changing the pH, using a micro fabric filtration, and applying recycled newspaper fibers all enhance the youngs modulus, tensile stress, and tensile strain of the sunflower plant based resin. As more research on how to increase the properties of the resin develop, the more likely green composites can be used throughout society as biodegradable, renewable materials, rather than petroleum-based materials.

Yarbrough, Deanna S.

2010-08-15

459

Health Problems of Epoxy Resins and Amine-curing Agents  

PubMed Central

Epoxy resins were first introduced about 10 years ago. Toxic effects, particularly dermatitis, have been frequently described. An investigation into the possible causes of pathological sequelae following the use of epoxy resin/amine mixtures has been undertaken. The cause of most cases of dermatitis and sensitization appears to be uncombined amine which is present in recent mixtures and persists in hardened resin for long periods. The results of experiments with two of the most commonly used resin/amine mixtures confirm this. Cold-cured resins are more dangerous and remain so even when hardened. A simple theory is suggested for the mechanism of the reaction between epoxy resins, amines, and biological systems. This theory leads logically to the handling precautions outlined. Images

Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.; Alberman, K. B.

1959-01-01

460

Improved well stimulation with resin-coated proppants  

SciTech Connect

Resin-coated proppants improve well stimulation results by preventing flowback, or fracture evacuation, near the wellbore, a phenomenon that effectively ''decouples'' the wellbore and the productive formation. In addition, the deformable coating protects the resin-coated proppants from crushing and helps resist embedment in softer formations. The tough coating is chemically inert in crude oils, brines, and most acids. The resin-coated materials work best under actual downhole conditions since the closure stress and temperature help lock the materials in the fracture for the life of the well. This paper reviews case histories from four wells in which resin-coated proppants were used. In addition, simple lab tests of the resin-coated proppants in an API crush cell confirm their excellent properties and potential. Together, these results show the need for resin-coated proppants in many types of wells. In many ways they act as ''ideal'' proppants that can be economically justified over uncoated proppants.

Sinclair, A.R.; Graham, J.W.; Sinclair, C.P.

1983-02-01

461

[Fundamental study on photocured resin for crown and bridge].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to clarify the superiority of five polyfunctional acrylates to composite filler and comonomer system, and the reasonable concentration of catalyst, Camphor quinone/Dimethylamino-ethylmethacrylate (CQ/DMAEMA), in the photocured resin for crown and bridge. The results are summarized as follows: 1. The influence of acrylate resin matrix of composite fillers was found in the elastic modulus (Em), Knoop hardness (Hk) and the wear resistance (Rw) of the photocured resin. Two photocured resins including Dipentaerythrytol hexaacrylate (DPHA) or DPHA-4(3-acryloxy propyl) tetramethylol methane (DPHA-APTM) composite fillers showed a higher Em, Hk and Rw but slightly lower tensile strength (Ts) and bending strength (Bs) than the one which included Bis-2-methacryloxyethyl 2, 2, 4-trymethyl hexamethylene diurethane (UDMA) or Trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) under a wet condition. And these two resins showed as a high water sorption value (Ws) as that of the photocured resin of UDMA. 2. The conversion of polymerization, cured depth and physical properties (Em, Hk and Rw) of the photocured resins were examined. They increased up to 0.5/1.0 or 1.0/1.0 in proportion to the increase of the concentration of the catalysts (CQ/DMAEMA). 3. When DPHA was added into the photocured resins consisted with UDMA monomer and DPHA or DPHA-APTM composite fillers, these resins showed a higher Em, Hk and Rw than the photocured resin with only UDMA as monomer. No significant difference of Ts and Bs between the photocured resins with and without DPHA was observed under a dry condition, but the values of Ts and Bs decreased in proportion to the increase of DPHA monomer under the wet condition. The residual monomer of the photocured resins was less than 1.2 per cent. PMID:2486700

Komoto, T

1989-01-01

462

Application of Amberlite XE270 resin to purification of neptunium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amberlite XE-270, a macroreticular weak-base ion-exchange resin, was ; used successfully over an 8-month period in the Hanford Purex plant to purify ~8 ; kg of ²³⁷Np. For routine purification of ²³⁷Np, the Amberlite XE-270 ; resin provides four important advantages over conventional microreticular strong-; base resins used heretofore: greatly improved thorium decontamination ; performance, a much sharper neptunium elution

Schulz

1974-01-01

463

Thermal behaviour of hydroxymethyl compounds as models for adhesive resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ureaformaldehyde (UF) and phenolformaldehyde (PF) resins are the most widely used wood adhesives. The first stage in resin\\u000a manufacturing is the formation of methylol derivatives which polycondensation leads to building the tridimensional network.\\u000a Understanding the behaviour of methylol compounds in curing provides useful information for developing appropriate resin structures.\\u000a Thermal behaviour of N,N?-dihydroxymethylurea, 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenols, urea and phenol as

K. Siimer; P. Christjanson; T. Kaljuvee; T. Pehk; I. Saks

2009-01-01

464

Thermal degradation kinetics of phenolcrotonaldehyde resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of base catalysed phenol-crotonaldehyde and phenol-formaldehyde resins of different mole ratios were synthesized and their thermal behaviour was studied. The non-isothermal procedures of Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Mitzger were applied to study the thermal degradation kinetics of these resins in air. The softening temperature of phenol-crotonaldehyde resins after curing was found to be in the range of 143158 C and

M. P. Raghava Rao; B. S. M. Rao; C. R. Rajan; R. S. Ghadage

1998-01-01

465

Thermal stability of boron-containing phenol formaldehyde resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The boron-containing phenol-formaldehyde resin derived from phenol, formaldehyde and boric acid was synthesized. The mechanisms of synthesis and curing reactions were investigated by infrared spectroscopy and chemical analysis. The kinetics of thermal degradation and thermal stability were determined by thermal analysis. The results show that the resin has higher heat oxidation resistance than common phenol-formaldehyde resins. In addition, the fiberglass-reinforced

Jungang Gao; Yanfang Liu; Liting Yang

1999-01-01

466

Sand-Consolidation Resins - Their Stability in Hot Brine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four commercial in-situ sand-consolidation resin systems and one resin-sandpack system were tested for durability in hot (160°F (71.1°C)) flowing brine for up to 28 months, and in as much as 30 million PV brine. Brine was selected as the test fluid since it is considered to be more damaging than oil to the stability of resin consolidated sand. Two epoxy

Roger Rensvold

1983-01-01

467

Versatile composite resins simplifying the practice of restorative dentistry.  

PubMed

After decades of technical development and refinement, composite resins continue to simplify the practice of restorative dentistry, offering clinicians versatility, predictability, and enhanced physical properties. With a wide range of products available today, composite resins are a reliable, conservative, multi-functional restorative material option. As manufacturers strive to improve such properties as compression strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, water sorption, and wear resistance, several classification systems of composite resins have been developed. PMID:24571527

Margeas, Robert

2014-01-01

468

Quantifying the Strength of a Resin-coated Dental Ceramic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resin luting all-ceramic restorations increases clinical performance; however, the strengthening mechanisms are not fully understood. The authors have previously proposed the existence of a resin-ceramic hybrid layer, and the hypothesis tested was that ceramic strength enhancement was conferred by the characteristics of the resin-ceramic hybrid layer. Dentin porcelain discs were polished with a P4000-grade abrasive paper, and half were centrally

O. Addison; P. M. Marquis; G. J. P. Fleming

2008-01-01

469

Defensive use by an insect of a plant resin.  

PubMed

Larvae of the sawfly Neodiprion sertifer (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae), when disturbed, discharge an oily oral effluent essentially identical chemically to the terpenoid resin of its host plant (Pinus sylvestris). The resin is sequestered by the larva upon feeding, and stored in two compressible diverticular pouches of the foregut. The fluid is effectively deterrent to predators. The defensive use by an insect of a plant resin provides an instance of secondary utilization by a herbivore of the protective chemical weaponry of its host. PMID:4207808

Eisner, T; Johnessee, J S; Carrel, J; Hendry, L B; Meinwald, J

1974-05-31

470

Synthesis and characterization of siloxane-modified epoxy resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epoxy resins of the EBS, a bis-p-phenol S modified diglycidyl ether of bis-p-phenol A and the ESBS, a siloxane modified EBS epoxy resin were prepared. Both structures of EBS and ESBS were elucidated with IR,1H NMR, and13C NMR. The near perpendicular comformation of two phenyl rings of sulfone has been introduced into the epoxy resins of EBS und ESBS for

Shyue-Tzoo Lin; Steve K. Huang

1994-01-01

471

Carbonization behaviour of some polyimide resins reinforced with carbon fibers  

Microsoft Academic Search

It was shown that the low weight loss makes the polyimide resins based on acetyl derivatives of aromatic diamines a promising candidate for carboncarbon composites. The weight loss of this polyimide resin can reach about 30% in the composite, which is 1.5 times lower than that of the phenol-formaldehyde resin. It is suggested that the lower weight loss of the

V. E. Yudin; M. Ya. Goykhman; K. Balik; P. Glogar; G. N. Gubanova; V. V. Kudriavtsev

2000-01-01

472

The Sorption Capacity of Boron on Anionic-Exchange Resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron sorption capacities on anionic-exchange resins vary with temperature, concentration, and resin crosslinkage. A semiempirical correlation, developed from boron solution chemistry, is presented to account for these variations. The relationship, based on boron chemistry and changes in Gibb's energy, can be stated approximately as Q = a1CBz exp[-(a4T + a5T + a6z )]. Correlation parameters, which vary with resin type,

JIDONG LOU; GARY L. FOUTCH; JUNG WON NA

1999-01-01

473

Radiation-thickening of iso-polyester resin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel method to thicken iso-polyester resins using high-energy electrons is presented along with data characterizing the physical, structural, and thermal properties of the gelled-resin using compressive testing, DSC and IR spectroscopy. Additional data are presented on the tensile properties of a cured composite, made from a radiation-thickened molding compound, compared to traditional chemically thickened compound using the same base resin.

Czayka, M.; Fisch, M.; Uribe, Roberto M.; VargasAburto, C.

2007-06-01

474

Light transmittance characteristics of light-cured composite resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The purpose of this study was: (1) to examine the light transmittance characteristics of various shades of light-cured composite resins, and (2) to evaluate the effect of light transmittance characteristics on the color of the resins.Methods. Eleven shades of two composite resins were used. Specimens with four different thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0mm) were prepared. The transmittance at

Hiroyuki Arikawa; Koichi Fujii; Takahito Kanie; Kastuichiro Inoue

1998-01-01

475

Acrylic resin injection method for blood vessel investigations.  

PubMed

The injection of acrylic resin into vessels is an excellent method for macroscopically and microscopically observing their three-dimensional features. Conventional methods can be enhanced by removal of the polymerization inhibitor (hydroquinone) without requiring distillation, a consistent viscosity of polymerized resin, and a constant injection pressure and speed. As microvascular corrosion cast specimens are influenced by viscosity, pressure, and speed changes, injection into different specimens yields varying results. We devised a method to reduce those problems. Sodium hydroxide was used to remove hydroquinone from commercial methylmethacrylate. The solid polymer and the liquid monomer were mixed using a 1 : 9 ratio (low-viscosity acrylic resin, 9.07 0.52 mPas) or a 3:7 ratio (high-viscosity resin, 1036.33 144.02 mPas). To polymerize the acrylic resin for injection, a polymerization promoter (1.0% benzoyl peroxide) was mixed with a polymerization initiator (0.5%, N, N-dimethylaniline). The acrylic resins were injected using a precise syringe pump, with a 5-mL/min injection speed and 11.17 1.60 mPa injection pressure (low-viscosity resin) and a 1-mL/min injection speed and 58.50 5.75 mPa injection pressure (high-viscosity resin). Using the aforementioned conditions, scanning electron microscopy indicated that sufficient resin could be injected into the capillaries of the microvascular corrosion cast specimens. PMID:24107720

Suwa, Fumihiko; Uemura, Mamoru; Takemura, Akimichi; Toda, Isumi; Fang, Yi-Ru; Xu, Yuan Jin; Zhang, Zhi Yuan

2013-01-01

476

Acetylene-chromene terminated resins as high temperature thermosets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel phase transfer catalyzed process for the preparation of propargyl ethers has been developed. The propargyl ethers serve as precursors to a new class of thermosetting resins called acetylene-chromene terminated (ACT) resins. Heat treatment of a solution of propargyl ethers with various catalysts, followed by removal of solvent leads to the ACT resins via partial conversion of the propargyl ether groups to chromenes. This process reduces the energy content of the resin systems and reduces the amount of shrinkage found during cure. Due to the presence of the solvent the process is safe and gives rise to low viscosity products suitable for resin transfer molding and filament winding type applications. Due to the high glass transition temperature, high modulus, and low moisture uptake the cured resins display better than 232 C/wet performance. The thermal stability of the ACT resins in air at 204 C is superior to that of conventional bismaleimide resins. The resins also display excellent electrical properties.

Godschalx, J. P.; Inbasekaran, M. N.; Bartos, B. R.; Scheck, D. M.; Laman, S. A.

1990-01-01

477

A tool for increasing the lifetime of chromatography resins  

PubMed Central

There is a steadily increasing demand for speed, cost efficiency and process understanding within biopharmaceutical process development. To match this, a high-throughput method for screening of cleaning-in-place (CIP) conditions for chromatography resins has been developed. The methodology includes fouling of MabSelect SuRe chromatography resin in 96-well filter plates, cleaning of the fouled resin by incubation in different CIP agents, and finally, analysis of the residual impurities on the resin after cleaning. This article describes the improvements that transformed the method from low throughput and significant manual interference to a totally automated method with high throughput and good reproducibility.

Gronberg, Anna; Eriksson, Malin; Ersoy, Maria

2011-01-01

478

High T(sub g) Polymides for Resin Transfer Molding  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A series of new polyimide resins with low melt viscosities and high glass transition temperatures (T(sub g)'s) of 340-350 C were developed for resin transfer molding (RTM) applications. The viscosities of these polyimide resins, based on 2,3,3'4'-Biphenyltetracarboxylic Dianhydride (a-BPDA), are in the range of 10-30 poise. The composites were fabricated successfully at 260-280 C with a pot life of 30-60 minutes by the RTM process. The viscosity profiles of the polyimide resins and the mechanical properties of the polyimide carbon fiber composites will be discussed.

Chuang, Kathy C.; Criss, Jim M., Jr.; Mintz, Eric A.; Shonkwiler, Brian; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Nguyen, Baochau; McCorkle, Linda S.; Hardy-Green, DeNise

2005-01-01

479

Branched polymeric media: boron-chelating resins from hyperbranched polyethylenimine.  

PubMed

Extraction of boron from aqueous solutions using selective resins is important in a variety of applications including desalination, ultrapure water production, and nuclear power generation. Today's commercial boron-selective resins are exclusively prepared by functionalization of styrene-divinylbenzene (STY-DVB) beads with N-methylglucamine to produce resins with boron-chelating groups. However, such boron-selective resins have a limited binding capacity with a maximum free base content of 0.7 eq/L, which corresponds to a sorption capacity of 1.16 0.03 mMol/g in aqueous solutions with equilibrium boron concentration of ?70 mM. In this article, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new resin that can selectively extract boron from aqueous solutions. We show that branched polyethylenimine (PEI) beads obtained from an inverse suspension process can be reacted with glucono-1,5-D-lactone to afford a resin consisting of spherical beads with high density of boron-chelating groups. This resin has a sorption capacity of 1.93 0.04 mMol/g in aqueous solution with equilibrium boron concentration of ?70 mM, which is 66% percent larger than that of standard commercial STY-DVB resins. Our new boron-selective resin also shows excellent regeneration efficiency using a standard acid wash with a 1.0 M HCl solution followed by neutralization with a 0.1 M NaOH solution. PMID:22827255

Mishra, Himanshu; Yu, Changjun; Chen, Dennis P; Goddard, William A; Dalleska, Nathan F; Hoffmann, Michael R; Diallo, Mamadou S

2012-08-21

480

Sorption of organics from aqueous solution onto polymeric resins  

SciTech Connect

The uptake of phenol, toluene, chlorobenzene, and benzoic acid by several polymeric resins and activated carbon was investigated experimentally. Presentation of the sorption data in terms of the number of sorbed monolayers and fractional pore volume filled indicated that, for the polymeric resins, solute uptake cannot be viewed as only a surface adsorption phenomenon. It is suggested that the aqueous phase uptake of phenol, toluene, chlorobenzene, and benzoic acid by the polymeric resins is attributable, in part, to solute absorption. The present study also suggests that solute uptake is affected by the swelling of some of the polymeric resins in water.

Gusler, G.M.; Browne, T.E.; Cohen, Y. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1993-11-01

481

Mathematical Analysis of Resin Flow through Fibrous Porous Media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Resin flow through fiber preforms was analyzed mathematically. Closed form solutions for fiber volume fraction distribution and pressure field during resin infusion into fiber preforms were suggested, and a new effective permeability was defined. The effect of preform compressibility on the fiber volume fraction and pressure distributions in resin-saturated region was investigated analytically. The findings show that the compaction behavior of preforms has significant impact on the resin infusion process. The solutions derived analytically in this study can provide insight into a liquid composites molding (LCM) process.

Song, Young Seok

2006-09-01

482

Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.  

PubMed

The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 m of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment. PMID:24240901

Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

2013-11-30

483

Compressive deformation of phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin-impregnated wood related to the molecular weight of resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of molecular weight of PF resin on the deformation behaviour of NaClO2 treated resin-impregnated wood during compression were investigated. Blocks of Japanese cedar were subjected to 2% NaClO2 aqueous solution. This was repeated up to four times resulting in a weight loss of 28%. Treated and untreated samples were\\u000a impregnated with PF resin having different molecular weight. With

Hiroyuki Yano

2011-01-01

484

Microtensile Bond Strength of Indirect Resin Composite to Resin-coated Dentin: Interaction between Diamond Bur Roughness and Coating Material  

Microsoft Academic Search

This aim of this study was to determine the effect of type of bur and resin-coating material on microtensile bond strength (TBS) of indirect composite to dentin. Dentin surfaces were first ground with two types of diamond bur and resin-coated using UniFil Bond (UB) or Adper Single Bond (SB), and then bonded to a resin composite disc for indirect restoration

Atsushi Kameyama; Takumi Oishi; Toyotarou Sugawara; Yoshito Hirai

2009-01-01

485

Shear bond strength between light polymerized hard reline resin and denture base resin subjected to long term water immersion  

PubMed Central

Statement of the problem The effect of long-term water immersion on the shear bond strength between denture base resin and Triad visible-light-polymerized (VLP) direct hard reline resin is not known. Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the bonding characteristics of Triad VLP direct hard reline resin to heat-polymerized denture base resin subjected to long-term water immersion. Material and methods Ninety circular disks, 15mm in diameter and 3mm thick, of denture base resin were polymerized from a gypsum mold. Sixty specimens were subjected to water immersion and 30 were stored at ambient room temperature for 4months. Thirty water-immersed specimens were dried with gauze (group 1), while the other 30 water-immersed specimens were dried with a hair dryer (group 2). The dry specimens (n=30) represented the control group (group 3). All specimens were air abraded and painted with bonding agent before packing Triad VLP direct hard-reline resin. Specimens in each group were subjected to thermal cycling for 50,000 cycles between 4C and 60C water baths with 1-min dwell time at each temperature. The bond strength at which the bond failed under stress was recorded using a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc comparison were applied to find significant differences between groups (?=0.05). Results Significant differences in mean shear bond strength among the specimens existed because of variable water content in the denture base resin (P<0.05). Group 3 (dry) was higher than group 2 (desiccated), and the lowest was group 1 (saturated). Conclusion The shear bond strength of Triad VLP direct hard reline resin to denture base resin depended on the water content in the denture base resin. The dry denture base resin demonstrated superior bond strength compared with the desiccated and water-saturated denture base resins.

Al Rifaiy, Mohammad Q.

2011-01-01

486

Reactive Additives for Phenylethynyl-Containing Resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Phenylethynyl-containing reactive additive (PERA) compounds and mixtures have been found to be useful for improving the processability of oligomers, polymers, co-oligomers, and copolymers that contain phenylethynyl groups. The additives can be incorporated in different forms: A solution of an amide acid or an imide of a PERA can be added to a solution of phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer; or An imide powder of a PERA can be mixed with a dry powder of a phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer. The effect of a given PERA on the processability and other properties of the resin system depends on whether the PERA is used in the amide acid or an imide form. With proper formulation, the PERA reduces the melt viscosity of the resin and thereby reduces the processing pressures needed to form the adhesive bonds, consolidate filled or unfilled moldings, or fabricate fiber-reinforced composite laminates. During thermal cure, a PERA reacts with itself as well as with the phenylethynyl-containing host resin and thereby becomes chemically incorporated into the resin system. The effects of the PERA on mechanical properties, relative to those of the host resin, depend on the amount of PERA used. Typically, the incorporation of the PERA results in (1) increases in the glass-transition temperature (Tg), modulus of elasticity, and parameters that characterize behavior under compression, and (2) greater retention of the aforementioned mechanical properties at elevated temperatures without (3) significant reduction of toughness or damage tolerance. Of the formulations tested thus far, the ones found to yield the best overall results were those for which the host resin was the amide acid form of a phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) co-oligomer having a molecular weight of 5,000 g/mole [hence, designated PETI-5] and a PERA denoted as PERA-1. PETI-5 was made from 3,3',4'4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride, 3,4'-oxydianiline (3,4'-ODA), 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy) benzene (1,3-APB), and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA). PERA-1 was made from 3,5-diamino- 4.-phenylethynylbenzophenon and equimolar amounts of phthalic anhydride and PEPA. To make PERA-1 in the imide form, the aforementioned ingredients were processed by refluxing in glacial acetic acid. To make the amide form of PERA-1, the ingredients were reacted in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) under nitrogen at a temperature of 23 C (see figure). On the basis of the processability and other properties, a blend comprising 20 weight percent of PERA-1 and 80 weight percent PETI-5 was selected for further evaluation. Relative to neat PETI-5, the blend exhibited an increase in Tg; improved processability; and comparable values of shear strength in adhesion to titanium panels, open-hole compressive properties, compression properties after impact, and resistance to microcracking.

Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Rommel, Monica L.

2005-01-01

487

Characterization of Composite Fan Case Resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The majority of commercial turbine engines that power today s aircraft use a large fan driven by the engine core to generate thrust which dramatically increases the engine s efficiency. However, if one of these fan blades fails during flight, it becomes high energy shrapnel, potentially impacting the engine or puncturing the aircraft itself and thus risking the lives of passengers. To solve this problem, the fan case must be capable of containing a fan blade should it break off during flight. Currently, all commercial fan cases are made of either just a thick metal barrier or a thinner metal wall surrounded by Kevlar-an ultra strong fiber that elastically catches the blade. My summer 2004 project was to characterize the resins for a composite fan case that will be lighter and more efficient than the current metal. The composite fan case is created by braiding carbon fibers and injecting a polymer resin into the braid. The resin holds the fibers together, so at first using the strongest polymer appears to logically lead to the strongest fan case. Unfortunately, the stronger polymers are too viscous when melted. This makes the manufacturing process more difficult because the polymer does not flow as freely through the braid, and the final product is less dense. With all of this in mind, it is important to remember that the strength of the polymer is still imperative; the case must still contain blades with high impact energy. The research identified which polymer had the right balance of properties, including ease of fabrication, toughness, and ability to transfer the load to the carbon fibers. Resin deformation was studied to better understand the composite response during high speed impact. My role in this research was the testing of polymers using dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile, compression, and torsion testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis examines the response of materials under cyclic loading. Two techniques were used for dynamic mechanical analysis. The ARES Instrument analyzed the material through torsion. The second machine, TA Instruments apparatus, applied a bending force to the specimen. These experiments were used to explore the effects of temperature and strain rate on the stiffness and strength of the resins. The two different types of loading allowed us to verify our results. An axial-torsional load frame, manufactured by MTS Systems, Inc., was used to conduct the tensile, compression, and torsional testing. These tests were used to determine the stress-strain curves for the resins. The elastic and plastic deformation data was provided to another team member for characterization of high fidelity material property predictions. This information was useful in having a better understanding of the polymers so that the fan cases could be as sturdy as possible. Deformation studies are the foundation for the computational modeling that provides the structural design of a composite engine case as well as detailed analysis of the blade impact event.

Dvoracek, Charlene M.

2004-01-01

488

[Polymerization of visible-light cured veneering resins. 3. Influence of conversion on the bond strength of opaque resins].  

PubMed

New light-curable adhesive opaque resins were prepared using 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), di (methacryloxyethyl) trimethylhexamethylene diurethane (UDMA) and titanium dioxide. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between the conversion of opaque resins and the bond strengths. Amounts of residual monomers in the bulk-photo-polymerized resins with various compositions were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Shear bond strengths of light-cured opaque resins joined to surface-treated Au-Ag-Pd alloy were measured with various primers, components and curing conditions. Photo-polymerized resins which contained mehyl methacrylate (MMA) showed lower conversion compared with bifunctional methacrylate resins. Favorable shear bond strengths were obtained from TEGDMA/UDMA based opaque resins. The opaque resins without MMA bonded strongly to heated and 4-META primed Au-Ag-Pd alloy and 22-23 M Pa strengths were maintained after 20,000 thermocycles. The results revealed that the conversion of MMA with photo-initiater system was lower than that of bifunctional methacrylate, which affected bond strength of opaque resins. PMID:2489704

Yoshida, K

1989-02-01

489

Conversion of ion exchange resin to various functional resins and the application in the field of pharmaceutical sciences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ion exchange resins are widely used for separating ions in the solution, desalination, removal of impurities, and etc. Giving a new function to these ion exchange resins enables the application in more various fields. Until now, we carried out the research work about the following 5 project.: (1) Conversion of ion exchange resins into selective adsorbents by using low molecular reagents, which possess capabilities of a selective reaction with target ions, ion exchange reaction with the ion exchange resin and strong physical adsorption to the ion exchange resin. (2) Synthesis of resins for ion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (IEHPLC) and the analysis of biomaterials. (3) Development of insoluble macromolecular Sn(II) complex based on the aminophosphonic acid type ion exchange resin and its application to the 99mTc labeling of proteins. (4) Development of a new 68Ge-68Ga generator using N-methylglucamine type organic polymer as the adsorbent for 68Ge and production of 68Ga for PET. (5) Preparation of an ion-exchangeable polymer bead wrapped with bilayer membrane structures. In this paper, the application of various functional resins prepared based on ion exchange resin in the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been summarized.

Nakayama, Morio

490

Polymer resins with amino acid containing pendants for sorption of bilirubin. I. Comparison of Merrifield and polyamide resins.  

PubMed

Merrifield resins with various amino acid containing pendants and a water swellable polyamide resin with the peptide alanine-alanine-alanine-arginine as the pendant group have been prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis. Merrifield resins with either arginine or lysine pendants are capable of sorbing bilirubin from aqueous solution (pH = 7.8) but those with other amino acid pendants gave no indication of sorption. The polyamide-arginine resin showed, on a functional group basis, a higher capacity for bilirubin than does cholestyramine. It is proposed that the formation of salt linkages causes a strong interaction of bilirubin with arginine and lysine. PMID:6490193

Henning, D S; Lajoie, G A; Brown, G R; St-Pierre, L E; St-Pierre, S

1984-07-01

491

21 CFR 177.1460 - Melamine-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-01-01 2009-04-01 true Melamine-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. 177...Contact Surfaces § 177.1460 Melamine-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. Melamine-formaldehyde resins may be safely used...

2010-01-01

492

21 CFR 177.1460 - Melamine-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-04-01 2009-04-01 false Melamine-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. 177...Contact Surfaces § 177.1460 Melamine-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. Melamine-formaldehyde resins may be safely used...

2009-04-01

493

40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory. 414.40 Section 414...AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Thermoplastic Resins 414.40 Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory. The provisions...

2011-07-01

494

21 CFR 181.26 - Drying oils as components of finished resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Drying oils as components of finished resins. 181.26 Section 181.26 Food... Drying oils as components of finished resins. Substances classified as drying...food-packaging material (as components of finished resins) shall include: Chinawood oil...

2011-04-01

495

Loading and Unloading Resin from MPPF Rapid Ion-Exchange Columns.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A process was developed which permits changing the resin in the Multipurpose Processing Facility Rapid Ion Exchange columns, without replacing the entire column assembly. The columns remain on the rack during the resin removal and replacement. The resin d...

W. C. Ng

1981-01-01

496

21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760...Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. (a) Identification. A denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin is a device composed of...

2012-04-01

497

40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory. 414.40 Section 414...AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Thermoplastic Resins 414.40 Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory. The provisions...

2012-07-01

498

21 CFR 173.70 - Chloromethylated aminated styrene-divinylbenzene resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Chloromethylated aminated styrene-divinylbenzene resin. 173.70 Section 173.70 Food...Chloromethylated aminated styrene-divinylbenzene resin. Chloromethylated aminated styrene-divinylbenzene...the weight of the solids in the original resin dispersion. (c) The additive is...

2012-04-01

499

40 CFR 721.5380 - Mixed alkyl phenolic novolak resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Mixed alkyl phenolic novolak resin (generic). 721.5380 Section 721...721.5380 Mixed alkyl phenolic novolak resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as mixed alkyl phenolic novolak resin (PMN P-98-718) is subject to...

2011-07-01

500

40 CFR 721.9480 - Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (generic).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (generic). 721.9480 Section 721...formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance...formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (PMN P-89-769) is subject to...

2011-07-01