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Sample records for doxorubicin potential therapeutic

  1. Lovastatin induces apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells and synergizes with doxorubicin: potential therapeutic relevance

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ovarian carcinoma is a rarely curable disease, for which new treatment options are required. As agents that block HMG-CoA reductase and the mevalonate pathway, the statin family of drugs are used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and have been shown to trigger apoptosis in a tumor-specific manner. Recent clinical trials show that the addition of statins to traditional chemotherapeutic strategies can increase efficacy of targeting statin-sensitive tumors. Our goal was to assess statin-induced apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutics, and then determine these mechanisms of action. Methods The effect of lovastatin on ovarian cancer cell lines was evaluated alone and in combination with cisplatin and doxorubicin using several assays (MTT, TUNEL, fixed PI, PARP cleavage) and synergy determined by evaluating the combination index. The mechanisms of action were evaluated using functional, molecular, and pharmacologic approaches. Results We demonstrate that lovastatin induces apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells in a p53-independent manner and synergizes with doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic agent used to treat recurrent cases of ovarian cancer. Lovastatin drives ovarian tumor cell death by two mechanisms: first, by blocking HMG-CoA reductase activity, and second, by sensitizing multi-drug resistant cells to doxorubicin by a novel mevalonate-independent mechanism. This inhibition of drug transport, likely through inhibition of P-glycoprotein, potentiates both DNA damage and tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions The results of this research provide pre-clinical data to warrant further evaluation of statins as potential anti-cancer agents to treat ovarian carcinoma. Many statins are inexpensive, off-patent generic drugs that are immediately available for use as anti-cancer agents. We provide evidence that lovastatin triggers apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells as a single agent by a mevalonate-dependent mechanism

  2. Bone-Targeted Acid-Sensitive Doxorubicin Conjugate Micelles as Potential Osteosarcoma Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a malignancy of the bone that primarily affects adolescents. Current treatments retain mortality rates, which are higher than average cancer mortality rates for the adolescent age group. We designed a micellar delivery system with the aim to increase drug accumulation in the tumor and potentially reduce side effects associated with chemotherapy. The design features are the use of the hydrophilic d-aspartic acid octapeptide as both the effective targeting agent as well as the hydrophilic micelle corona. Micelle stabilization was accomplished by binding of model drug (doxorubicin) via an acid-sensitive hydrazone bond and incorporating one to four 11-aminoundecanoic acid (AUA) moieties to manipulate the hydrophobic/hydrophilic ratio. Four micelle-forming unimers have been synthesized and their self-assembly into micelles was evaluated. Size of the micelles could be modified by changing the architecture of the unimers from linear to branched. The stability of the micelles increased with increasing content of AUA moieties. Adsorption of all micelles to hydroxyapatite occurred rapidly. Doxorubicin release occurred at pH 5.5, whereas no release was detected at pH 7.4. Cytotoxicity toward human osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells correlated with drug release data. PMID:25291150

  3. Bone-targeted acid-sensitive doxorubicin conjugate micelles as potential osteosarcoma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Low, Stewart A; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-11-19

    Osteosarcoma is a malignancy of the bone that primarily affects adolescents. Current treatments retain mortality rates, which are higher than average cancer mortality rates for the adolescent age group. We designed a micellar delivery system with the aim to increase drug accumulation in the tumor and potentially reduce side effects associated with chemotherapy. The design features are the use of the hydrophilic D-aspartic acid octapeptide as both the effective targeting agent as well as the hydrophilic micelle corona. Micelle stabilization was accomplished by binding of model drug (doxorubicin) via an acid-sensitive hydrazone bond and incorporating one to four 11-aminoundecanoic acid (AUA) moieties to manipulate the hydrophobic/hydrophilic ratio. Four micelle-forming unimers have been synthesized and their self-assembly into micelles was evaluated. Size of the micelles could be modified by changing the architecture of the unimers from linear to branched. The stability of the micelles increased with increasing content of AUA moieties. Adsorption of all micelles to hydroxyapatite occurred rapidly. Doxorubicin release occurred at pH 5.5, whereas no release was detected at pH 7.4. Cytotoxicity toward human osteosarcoma Saos-2 cells correlated with drug release data. PMID:25291150

  4. The Therapeutic Potential of AN-7, a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, for Treatment of Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome Alone or with Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeiz, Neta; Rephaeli, Ada; Nudelman, Abraham; Weitman, Michal; Tarasenko, Nataly; Gorovitz, Batia; Maron, Leah; Yehezkel, Shiran; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Lubin, Ido; Hodak, Emmilia

    2016-01-01

    The 2 histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) including mycosis fungoides/sezary syndrome (MF/SS), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and romidepsin, are associated with low rates of overall response and high rates of adverse effects. Data regarding combination treatments with HDACIs is sparse. Butyroyloxymethyl diethylphosphate (AN-7) is a novel HDACI, which was found to have selective anticancer activity in several cell lines and animal models. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer effects of AN-7 and SAHA, either alone or combined with doxorubicin, on MF/SS cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with Sezary syndrome (SPBL). MyLa cells, Hut78 cells, SPBL, and PBL from healthy normal individuals (NPBL) were exposed to the test drugs, and the findings were analyzed by a viability assay, an apoptosis assay, and Western blot. AN-7 was more selectively toxic to MyLa cells, Hut78 cells, and SPBL (relative to NPBL) than SAHA and also acted more rapidly. Both drugs induced apoptosis in MF/SS cell lines, SAHA had a greater effect on MyLa cell line, while AN-7 induced greater apoptosis in SPBL; both caused an accumulation of acetylated histone H3, but AN-7 was associated with earlier kinetics; and both caused a downregulation of the HDAC1 protein in MF/SS cell lines. AN-7 acted synergistically with doxorubicin in both MF/SS cell lines and SPBL, and antagonistically with doxorubicin in NPBL. By contrast, SAHA acted antagonistically with doxorubicin on MF/SS cell lines, SPBL, and NPBL, leaving <50% viable cells. In conclusion, AN-7 holds promise as a therapeutic agent in MF/SS and has several advantages over SAHA. Our data provide a rationale for combining AN-7, but not SAHA, with doxorubicin to induce the cell death in MF/SS. PMID:26752418

  5. Therapeutic potential of targeted multifunctional nanocomplex co-delivery of siRNA and low-dose doxorubicin in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dawen; Gao, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2015-04-10

    Malignant tumors remain a major health burden throughout the world, and effective therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Combining gene therapy with chemotherapeutics in a single delivery system is more effective than co-treatment of cancer with individual delivery systems carrying either gene or drug. In this study, a multifunctional folate-decorated and pH-responsive PHD/PPF/siVEGF nanocomplex is developed via a self-assembly process utilizing ternary pre-functionalized polymers with vascular endothelial growth factor targeted siRNA. Antitumor effects of the combination therapy are evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo orthotopic xenograft models of breast cancer with systemic administration. The improved therapeutic response was supported by the observation of over 70% and 55% down-regulation of VEGF mRNA expressed in vitro and in vivo, effective antiproliferation and inhibition of tumor spheroids in vitro, significant decrease in tumor microvessel density in vivo, dramatic increase in life span of mice with a tumor xenograft and a decrease in toxicity in vivo. In addition, the current studies demonstrated the potential of combination of antiangiogenic therapy of siVEGF and killing off tumor cells of DOX, with the incorporation of tumor microenvironment sensitivity and target modified into a single nanoparticulate formulation for profound therapeutic effect. PMID:25592040

  6. Doxorubicin

    MedlinePlus

    ... or vomiting blood or brown material that resembles coffee grounds.Doxorubicin may increase your risk for developing leukemia ( ... stools bloody vomit vomited material that looks like coffee grounds

  7. Doxorubicin conjugated functionalizable carbon dots for nucleus targeted delivery and enhanced therapeutic efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Zheran; Wang, Ju; Jiang, Weihua; Jiang, Xuewei; Bai, Zhaoshi; He, Yunpeng; Jiang, Jianqi; Wang, Dongkai; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Carbon dots (CDs) have shown great potential in imaging and drug/gene delivery applications. In this work, CDs functionalized with a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS-CDs) were employed to transport doxorubicin (DOX) into cancer cells for enhanced antitumor activity. DOX was coupled to NLS-CDs (DOX-CDs) through an acid-labile hydrazone bond, which was cleavable in the weakly acidic intracellular compartments. The cytotoxicity of DOX-CD complexes was evaluated by the MTT assay and the cellular uptake was monitored using flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cell imaging confirmed that DOX-CDs were mainly located in the nucleus. Furthermore, the complexes could efficiently induce apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy of DOX-CDs was investigated in an A549 xenograft nude mice model and the complexes exhibited an enhanced ability to inhibit tumor growth compared with free DOX. Thus, the DOX-CD conjugates may be exploited as promising drug delivery vehicles in cancer therapy.Carbon dots (CDs) have shown great potential in imaging and drug/gene delivery applications. In this work, CDs functionalized with a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS-CDs) were employed to transport doxorubicin (DOX) into cancer cells for enhanced antitumor activity. DOX was coupled to NLS-CDs (DOX-CDs) through an acid-labile hydrazone bond, which was cleavable in the weakly acidic intracellular compartments. The cytotoxicity of DOX-CD complexes was evaluated by the MTT assay and the cellular uptake was monitored using flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cell imaging confirmed that DOX-CDs were mainly located in the nucleus. Furthermore, the complexes could efficiently induce apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy of DOX-CDs was investigated in an A549 xenograft nude mice model and the complexes exhibited an enhanced ability to inhibit tumor growth compared

  8. Lonidamine Induces Intracellular Tumor Acidification and ATP Depletion in Breast, Prostate and Ovarian Cancer Xenografts and Potentiates Response to Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Kavindra; Nelson, David S.; Heitjan, Daniel F.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Zhou, Rong; Glickson, Jerry D.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the effects of lonidamine (LND, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) are similar for a number of xenograft models of human cancer including DB-1 melanoma and HCC1806 breast, BT-474 breast, LNCaP prostate and A2870 ovarian carcinomas. Following treatment with LND, each of these tumors exhibits a rapid decrease in intracellular pH, a small decrease in extracellular pH, a concomitant monotonic decrease in nucleoside triphosphate and increase in inorganic phosphate over a 2–3 hr period. We previously demonstrated that selective intracellular tumor acidification potentiates response of this melanoma model to melphalan (7.5 mg/kg, i.v.), producing an estimated 89% cell kill based on tumor growth delay analysis. We now show that in both DB-1 melanoma and HCC1806 breast carcinoma, LND potentiates response to doxorubicin producing 95% cell kill in DB-1 melanoma at 7.5 mg/kg, i.v. doxorubicin and 98% cell kill at 10.0 mg/kg doxorubicin, and in HCC1806 breast carcinoma producing a 95% cell kill at 12.0 mg/kg doxorubicin. Potentiation of doxorubicin can result from cation trapping of the weakly basic anthracycline. Recent experience with the clinical treatment of melanoma and other forms of human cancer suggests that these diseases will probably not be cured by a single therapeutic procedure other than surgery. A multimodality therapeutic approach will be required. As a potent modulator of tumor response to N-mustards and anthracyclines as well as tumor thermo- and radiosensitivity, LND promises to play an important clinical role in the management and possible complete local control of a number of prevalent forms of human cancer. PMID:25504852

  9. Nanodiamonds enhance therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in treating metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaam, Amanee D.; Hwang, Patrick T. J.; Poonawalla, Aliza; Green, Hadiyah N.; Jun, Ho-wook; Dean, Derrick

    2014-10-01

    Enhancing therapeutic efficacy is essential for successful treatment of chemoresistant cancers such as metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). To improve the efficacy of doxorubicin (DOX) for treating chemoresistant disease, the feasibility of using nanodiamond (ND) particles was investigated. Utilizing the pH responsive properties of ND, a novel protocol for complexing NDs and DOX was developed using a pH 8.5 coupling buffer. The DOX loading efficiency, loading on the NDs, and pH responsive release characteristics were determined utilizing UV-Visible spectroscopy. The effects of the ND-DOX on HRPC cell line PC3 were evaluated with MTS and live/dead cell viability assays. ND-DOX displayed exceptional loading efficiency (95.7%) and drug loading on NDs (23.9 wt%) with optimal release at pH 4 (80%). In comparison to treatment with DOX alone, cell death significantly increased when cells were treated with ND-DOX complexes demonstrating a 50% improvement in DOX efficacy. Of the tested treatments, ND-DOX with 2.4 μg mL-1 DOX exhibited superior efficacy (60% cell death). ND-DOX with 1.2 μg mL-1 DOX achieved 42% cell death, which was comparable to cell death in response to 2.4 μg mL-1 of free DOX, suggesting that NDs aid in decreasing the DOX dose necessary to achieve a chemotherapeutic efficacy. Due to its enhanced efficacy, ND-DOX can be used to successfully treat HRPC and potentially decrease the clinical side effects of DOX.

  10. The endocytic pathway and therapeutic efficiency of doxorubicin conjugated cholesterol-derived polymers.

    PubMed

    Sevimli, Sema; Sagnella, Sharon; Macmillan, Alexander; Whan, Renee; Kavallaris, Maria; Bulmus, Volga; Davis, Thomas P

    2015-02-01

    Previously synthesized poly(methacrylic acid-co-cholesteryl methacrylate) P(MAA-co-CMA) copolymers were examined as potential drug delivery vehicles. P(MAA-co-CMA) copolymers were fluorescently labelled and imaged in SHEP and HepG2 cells. To understand their cell internalization pathway endocytic inhibition studies were conducted. It was concluded that P(MAA-co-CMA) are taken up by the cells via clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) (both caveolae mediated and cholesterol dependent endocytosis) mechanisms. The formation and characterization of P(MAA-co-CMA)-doxorubicin (DOX) nanocomplexes was investigated by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies. The toxicity screening between P(MAA-co-CMA)-DOX nanocomplexes (at varying w/w ratios) and free DOX, revealed nanocomplexes to exhibit higher cytotoxicity towards cancer cells in comparison to normal cells. FLIM and confocal microscopy were employed for investigating the time-dependent release of DOX in SHEP cells and the cellular uptake profile of P(MAA-co-CMA)-DOX nanocomplexes in cancer and normal cell lines, respectively. The endocytic pathway of P(MAA-co-CMA)-DOX nanocomplexes were examined in SHEP and HepG2 cells via flow cytometry revealing the complexes to be internalized through both clathrin-dependent (CDE) and CIE mechanisms. The drug delivery profile, reported herein, illuminates the specific endocytic route and therapeutic efficiency of P(MAA-co-CMA)-DOX nanocomplexes strongly suggesting these particles to be promising candidates for in vivo applications. PMID:26218123

  11. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 muM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt{sub max} of 105 +- 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 +- 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 +- 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 +- 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 +- 1 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 +- 3 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  12. Doxorubicin nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Kannan; Singha, Siddhartha; Panda, Tapobrata

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin is one of the most widely administered drugs for treatment of cancer. The shortcomings commonly encountered with this drug are severe cardiotoxicity, narrow therapeutic indices, and the development of multiple drug resistance. Hence, several nanoparticulate drug delivery systems have been designed to overcome these limitations and to improvise the overall therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin. This review outlines the doxorubicin delivery systems, viz., metals and metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, liposomes, nanoparticles of solid lipid materials, lipid microemulsions, polymer-based nanoparticles, protein-attached nanoparticles, polysaccharide nanoparticles, functional polymers, and nanoparticles of virus. PMID:24730306

  13. A comparative study of folate receptor-targeted doxorubicin delivery systems: dosing regimens and therapeutic index.

    PubMed

    Scomparin, Anna; Salmaso, Stefano; Eldar-Boock, Anat; Ben-Shushan, Dikla; Ferber, Shiran; Tiram, Galia; Shmeeda, Hilary; Landa-Rouben, Natalie; Leor, Jonathan; Caliceti, Paolo; Gabizon, Alberto; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2015-06-28

    Ligand-receptor mediated targeting may affect differently the performance of supramolecular drug carriers depending on the nature of the nanocarrier. In this study, we compare the selectivity, safety and activity of doxorubicin (Dox) entrapped in liposomes versus Dox conjugated to polymeric nanocarriers in the presence or absence of a folic acid (FA)-targeting ligand to cancer cells that overexpress the folate receptor (FR). Two pullulan (Pull)-based conjugates of Dox were synthesized, (FA-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox) and (NH2-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox). The other delivery systems are Dox loaded PEGylated liposomes (PLD, Doxil®) and the FR-targeted version (PLD-FA) obtained by ligand post-insertion into the commercial formulation. Both receptor-targeted drug delivery systems (DDS) were shown to interact in vitro specifically with cells via the folate ligand. Treatment of FR-overexpressing human cervical carcinoma KB tumor-bearing mice with three-weekly injections resulted in slightly enhanced anticancer activity of PLD-FA compared to PLD and no activity for both pullulan-based conjugates. When the DDS were administered intravenously every other day, the folated-Pull conjugate and the non-folated-Pull conjugate displayed similar and low antitumor activity as free Dox. At this dosing regimen, the liposome-based formulations displayed enhanced antitumor activity with an advantage to the non-folated liposome. However, both liposomal formulations suffered from toxicity that was reversible following treatment discontinuation. Using a daily dosing schedule, with higher cumulative dose, the folated-Pull conjugate strongly inhibited tumor growth while free Dox was toxic at this regimen. For polymeric constructs, increasing dose intensity and cumulative dose strongly affects the therapeutic index and reveals a major therapeutic advantage for the FR-targeted formulation. All DDS were able to abrogate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. This study constitutes the first side

  14. CD19-Targeted Nanodelivery of Doxorubicin Enhances Therapeutic Efficacy in B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vinu; Xu, Xian; Kelly, Dakota; Snook, Adam; Waldman, Scott A.; Mason, Robert W.; Jia, Xinqiao; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine has advanced to clinical trials for adult cancer therapy. However, the field is still in its infancy for treatment of childhood malignancies such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Nanotherapy offers multiple advantages over conventional therapy. It facilitates targeted delivery and enables controlled release of drugs to reduce treatment-related side effects. Here, we demonstrate, that doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) modified with targeting ligands against CD19 (CD19-DOX-NPs) can be delivered in a CD19-specific manner to leukemic cells. The CD19-DOX-NPs were internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis and imparted cytotoxicity in a CD19-dependent manner in CD19 positive ALL cells. Leukemic mice treated with CD19-DOX-NPs survived significantly longer and manifested a higher degree of agility indicating reduced apparent systemic toxicity during treatment compared to mice treated with free DOX. We suggest that targeted delivery of drugs used in childhood cancer treatment should improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce treatment-related side effects in children. PMID:25898125

  15. CD19-Targeted Nanodelivery of Doxorubicin Enhances Therapeutic Efficacy in B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vinu; Xu, Xian; Kelly, Dakota; Snook, Adam; Waldman, Scott A; Mason, Robert W; Jia, Xinqiao; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K

    2015-06-01

    Nanomedicine has advanced to clinical trials for adult cancer therapy. However, the field is still in its infancy for treatment of childhood malignancies such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Nanotherapy offers multiple advantages over conventional therapy. It facilitates targeted delivery and enables controlled release of drugs to reduce treatment-related side effects. Here, we demonstrate that doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) modified with targeting ligands against CD19 (CD19-DOX-NPs) can be delivered in a CD19-specific manner to leukemic cells. The CD19-DOX-NPs were internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis and imparted cytotoxicity in a CD19-dependent manner in CD19-positive ALL cells. Leukemic mice treated with CD19-DOX-NPs survived significantly longer and manifested a higher degree of agility, indicating reduced apparent systemic toxicity during treatment compared to mice treated with free DOX. We suggest that targeted delivery of drugs used in childhood cancer treatment should improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce treatment-related side effects in children. PMID:25898125

  16. Therapeutic Efficacy of Orally Delivered Doxorubicin Nanoparticles in Rat Tongue Cancer Induced by 4-Nitroquinoline 1-Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Rostami, Ahamd; Hamishekar, Hamed; Mesgari Abassi, Mehran; Aghbali, Amirala; Salehi, Roya; Abdollahi, Bita; Fotoohi, Soheila; Sina, Mahmud

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Oral cancer is one of the most significant cancers in the world, and squamous cell carcinoma makes up about 94% of oral malignancies. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of doxorubicin plus methotrexate - loaded nanoparticles on tongue squamous cell carcinoma induced by 4NQO and compare it with the commercial doxorubicin and methotrexate delivered orally on seventy SD male rats. Methods: 70 rats were divided into five groups. During the study, the animals were weighed by a digital scale once a week. Number of mortalities was recorded in the data collection forms. At the end of the treatment, biopsy samples were taken from rat tongues in order to evaluate the severity of dysplasia and the extent of cell proliferation. The results were analyzed using ANOVA, descriptive statistics and chi-square test. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in the mean weight of five groups (p>0.05). No significant relationship was found between groups and mortality rate (P = 0. 39). In addition, there was a significant relationship between groups and the degree of dysplasia (P <0.001). The statistical analysis showed a significant relationship between groups and the rate of cell proliferation (p <0.001). Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the use of doxorubicin plus methotrexate - loaded nanoparticles orally had more therapeutic effects than commercial doxorubicin plus methotrexate. PMID:26236659

  17. Evaluation of the potential cardioprotective activity of some Saudi plants against doxorubicin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Osama M; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Abdallah, Hossam M; Nagy, Ayman A; Mohamadin, Ahmed M; Abdel-Sattar, Essam A

    2012-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an anthracycline antibiotic widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of several tumours. However, its cardiac toxicity limits its use at maximum therapeutic doses. Most studies implicated increased oxidative stress as the major determinant of DOX cardiotoxicity. The local Saudi flora is very rich in a variety of plants of quite known folkloric or traditional medicinal uses. Tribulus macropterus Boiss., Olea europaea L. subsp. africana (Mill.) P. S. Green, Tamarix aphylla (L.) H. Karst., Cynomorium coccineum L., Cordia myxa L., Calligonum comosum L' Hér, and Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal are Saudi plants known to have antioxidant activities. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential protective effects of methanolic extracts of these seven Saudi plants against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. Two plants showed promising cardioprotective potential in the order Calligonum comosum > Cordia myxa. The two plant extracts showed potent in vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant properties. They significantly protected against DOX-induced alterations in cardiac oxidative stress markers (GSH and MDA) and cardiac serum markers (CK-MB and LDH activities). Additionally, histopathological examination indicated a protection against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. In conclusion, C. comosum and C. myxa exerted protective activity against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, which is, at least partly, due to their antioxidant effect. PMID:22888535

  18. MicroRNAs as potential biomarkers for doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, Gustav; Synnergren, Jane; Andersson, Christian X; Lindahl, Anders; Sartipy, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin, are well-established, highly efficient anti-neoplastic drugs used for treatment of a variety of cancers, including solid tumors, leukemia, lymphomas, and breast cancer. The successful use of doxorubicin has, however, been hampered by severe cardiotoxic side-effects. In order to prevent or reverse negative side-effects of doxorubicin, it is important to find early biomarkers of heart injury and drug-induced cardiotoxicity. The high stability under extreme conditions, presence in various body fluids, and tissue-specificity, makes microRNAs very suitable as clinical biomarkers. The present study aimed towards evaluating the early and late effects of doxorubicin on the microRNA expression in cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells. We report on several microRNAs, including miR-34a, miR-34b, miR-187, miR-199a, miR-199b, miR-146a, miR-15b, miR-130a, miR-214, and miR-424, that are differentially expressed upon, and after, treatment with doxorubicin. Investigation of the biological relevance of the identified microRNAs revealed connections to cardiomyocyte function and cardiotoxicity, thus supporting the findings of these microRNAs as potential biomarkers for drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:27033315

  19. Improved drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy of PEgylated liposomal doxorubicin by targeting anti-HER2 peptide in murine breast tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zahmatkeshan, Masoumeh; Gheybi, Fatemeh; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-04-30

    Targeted cancer therapy is a powerful therapeutic strategy to management of cancer. HER2 as an anticancer target has long been studied. Its overexpression plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progressiveness of breast and other cancers. To establish efficient and reliable drug delivery to HER2-overexpressing cells, the authors of this study have developed anti-HER2 (ErbB2) peptide-liposomal formulations of doxorubicin (DOX) by an engineered breast tumor-targeting peptide ligand, AHNP, Anti-HER2/neu peptide, (FCDGFYACYADV) with three glycine amino acids as spacer before its original sequencing. Towards this goal, PEGylated liposome doxorubicin (PLD) bearing different ligand densities of AHNP was prepared and characterized for their size, zeta potential and peptide conjugation. The AHNP functionalization and density effects on breast tumor cell uptake, selective cytotoxicity, prevention of tumor growth and the tissue biodistribution of encapsulated DOX were studied in mice bearing TUBO breast cancer tumor model. The findings demonstrated that increasing the ligand density of AHNP increases cytotoxicity and cell-uptake in SKBR3 and TUBO cells which overexpress HER2 but not in MDA-MB-231with low HER2 expression profile. The anticancer activity was also superior for targeted liposomal DOX with more AHNP densities. Overall, the results showed that optimum AHNP density functionalization of PLD can significantly improve selectivity and the therapeutic index of liposomal DOX in the treatment of HER2 positive breast cancer and merits further investigation. PMID:26972276

  20. Photostabilization of doxorubicin hydrochloride with radioprotective and photoprotective agents: Potential mechanism for enhancing chemotherapy during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, M.J.; Asker, A.F.

    1989-11-01

    p-Aminobenzoic acid (PABA), urocanic acid, and sodium urate were found to significantly enhance the photostability of doxorubicin hydrochloride (adriamycin, (ADR)). d1-Methionine, thiourea, and glycine also increased the photostability of this drug, but to a lesser degree. Sodium thiosulfate on the other hand, was found to be detrimental to the photostability of ADR. The photostabilizing effect of PABA was found to increase with increase of its concentration and was influenced by the pH and the buffer species of the vehicle. The findings would have an impact on the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of adriamycin when administered during radiation therapy.

  1. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    PubMed

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders. PMID:24006213

  2. Thymoquinone and its therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Darakhshan, Sara; Bidmeshki Pour, Ali; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicine has attracted great attention in the recent years and is increasingly used as alternatives to chemical drugs. Several lines of evidence support the positive impact of medicinal plants in the prevention and cure of a wide range of diseases. Thymoquinone (TQ) is the most abundant constituent of the volatile oil of Nigella sativa seeds and most properties of N sativa are mainly attributed to TQ. A number of pharmacological actions of TQ have been investigated including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-histaminic, anti-microbial and anti-tumor effects. It has also gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective and neuroprotective activities. In addition, positive effects of TQ in cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, reproductive disorders and respiratory ailments, as well as in the treatment of bone complications as well as fibrosis have been shown. In addition, a large body of data shows that TQ has very low adverse effects and no serious toxicity. More recently, a great deal of attention has been given to this dietary phytochemical with an increasing interest to investigate it in pre-clinical and clinical researches for assessing its health benefits. Here we report on and analyze numerous properties of the active ingredient of N. sativa seeds, TQ, in the context of its therapeutic potentials for a wide range of illnesses. We also summarize the drug's possible mechanisms of action. The evidence reported sugests that TQ should be developed as a novel drug in clinical trials. PMID:25829334

  3. Improving Drug Penetrability with iRGD Leverages the Therapeutic Response to Sorafenib and Doxorubicin in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schmithals, Christian; Köberle, Verena; Korkusuz, Hüdayi; Pleli, Thomas; Kakoschky, Bianca; Augusto, Eduardo Alonso; Ibrahim, Ahmed Atef; Arencibia, Jose M; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd; Korf, Horst-Werner; Kronenberger, Bernd; Zeuzem, Stefan; Vogl, Thomas J; Waidmann, Oliver; Piiper, Albrecht

    2015-08-01

    iRGD is a derivative of the integrin-binding peptide RGD, which selectively increases the penetrability of tumor tissue to various coadministered substances in several preclinical models. In this study, we investigated the ability of iRGD to improve the delivery of sorafenib and doxorubicin therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using established mouse models of the disease. A contrast-enhanced MRI method was developed in parallel to assess the in vivo effects of iRGD in this setting. We found that iRGD improved the delivery of marker substances to the tumors of HCC-bearing mice about three-fold without a parallel increase in normal tissues. Control peptides lacking the critical CendR motif had no effect. Similarly, iRGD also selectively increased the signal intensity from tumors in Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI. In terms of antitumor efficacy, iRGD coadministration significantly augmented the individual inhibitory effects of sorafenib and doxorubicin without increasing systemic toxicity. Overall, our results offered a preclinical proof of concept for the use of iRGD coadministration as a strategy to widen the therapeutic window for HCC chemotherapy, as monitored by Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI as a noninvasive, clinically applicable method to identify iRGD-reactive tumors. PMID:26239478

  4. [Therapeutic potential of optogenetic neuromodulation].

    PubMed

    Vandecasteele, Marie; Senova, Yann-Suhan; Palfi, Stéphane; Dugué, Guillaume P

    2015-04-01

    Optogenetic neuromodulation techniques, which have emerged during the last 15 years, have considerably enhanced our ability to probe the functioning of neural circuits by allowing the excitation and inhibition of genetically-defined neuronal populations using light. Having gained tremendous popularity in the field of fundamental neuroscience, these techniques are now opening new therapeutic avenues. Optogenetic neuromodulation is a method of choice for studying the physiopathology of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders in a range of animal models, and could accelerate the discovery of new therapeutic strategies. New therapeutic protocols employing optogenetic neuromodulation may also emerge in the near future, offering promising alternative approaches for disorders which lack appropriate treatments, such as pharmacoresistant epilepsy and inherited retinal degeneration. PMID:25958759

  5. Therapeutic potential of atmospheric neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Voyant, Cyril; Roustit, Rudy; Tatje, Jennifer; Biffi, Katia; Leschi, Delphine; Briançon, Jérome; Marcovici, Céline Lantieri

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive type of primary brain tumour in humans. It has a very poor prognosis despite multi-modality treatments consisting of open craniotomy with surgical resection, followed by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recently, a new treatment has been proposed – Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) – which exploits the interaction between Boron-10 atoms (introduced by vector molecules) and low energy neutrons produced by giant accelerators or nuclear reactors. Methods The objective of the present study is to compute the deposited dose using a natural source of neutrons (atmospheric neutrons). For this purpose, Monte Carlo computer simulations were carried out to estimate the dosimetric effects of a natural source of neutrons in the matter, to establish if atmospheric neutrons interact with vector molecules containing Boron-10. Results The doses produced (an average of 1 μGy in a 1 g tumour) are not sufficient for therapeutic treatment of in situ tumours. However, the non-localised yet specific dosimetric properties of 10B vector molecules could prove interesting for the treatment of micro-metastases or as (neo)adjuvant treatment. On a cellular scale, the deposited dose is approximately 0.5 Gy/neutron impact. Conclusion It has been shown that BNCT may be used with a natural source of neutrons, and may potentially be useful for the treatment of micro-metastases. The atmospheric neutron flux is much lower than that utilized during standard NBCT. However the purpose of the proposed study is not to replace the ordinary NBCT but to test if naturally occurring atmospheric neutrons, considered to be an ionizing pollution at the Earth's surface, can be used in the treatment of a disease such as cancer. To finalize this study, it is necessary to quantify the biological effects of the physically deposited dose, taking into account the characteristics of the incident particles (alpha particle and Lithium

  6. Zinc is a potential therapeutic for chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastow, Max; Kriedt, Christopher L; Baldassare, Joseph; Shah, Maulik; Klein, Claudette

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological cancer. The high mortality rate reflets the lack of early diagnosis and limited treatment alternatives. We have observed a number of properties of zinc cytotoxicity that make it attractive from a therapeutic standpoint. Using SKOV3 and ES2 cells, ovarian cancer cell lines that demonstrate varied degrees of resistance to known therapeutics, we show that zinc killing is time and concentration dependent. Death is preceded by distinct changes in cell shape and size. The effects of zinc are additive with cisplatin or doxorubicin, whose morphological effects are distinct from those of zinc. Cytotoxicity of paclitaxel is minimal, making it difficult to determine additivity with zinc. Paclitaxel results in changes in cell shape and size similar to those of zinc but has different effects on cell cycle progression and cyclin expression. The data indicate that the means by which zinc kills ovarian cancer cells is distinct from currently used chemotherapeutics. Based on the properties reported here, zinc has the potential to be developed as either a primary treatment or as a second line of defense against cancers that have developed resistance to currently used chemotherapeutics. PMID:22070048

  7. Tannic acid ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity and potentiates its anti-cancer activity: Potential role of tannins in cancer chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan Sane, Mukta Subhash; Gupta, Chanchal

    2011-03-15

    Doxorubicin, an anthracycline antibiotic, is widely used in the treatment of various solid tumors including breast cancer. However, its use is limited due to a variety of toxicities including cardiotoxicity. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of tannic acid, a PARG/PARP inhibitor and an antioxidant, on doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in H9c2 embryonic rat heart myoblasts and its anti-cancer activity in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells as well as in DMBA-induced mammary tumor animals. Doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity was assessed by measurement of heart weight, plasma LDH level and histopathology. Bcl-2, Bax, PARP-1 and p53 expression were examined by western blotting. Our results show that tannic acid prevents activation of PARP-1, reduces Bax and increases Bcl-2 expression in H9c2 cells, thus, preventing doxorubicin-induced cell death. Further, it reduces the cell viability of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, increases p53 expression in mammary tumors and shows maximum tumor volume reduction, suggesting that tannic acid potentiates the anti-cancer activity of doxorubicin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which shows that tannic acid ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity and potentiates its anti-cancer activity both in vitro (H9c2 and MDA-MB-231 cells) as well as in in vivo model of DMBA-induced mammary tumor animals.

  8. Coating doxorubicin-loaded nanocapsules with alginate enhances therapeutic efficacy against Leishmaniain hamsters by inducing Th1-type immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, S; Tandon, R; Verma, A; Misra, P; Choudhary, A K; Verma, R; Verma, P R P; Dube, A; Mishra, P R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory and chemotherapeutic potential of alginate-(SA) coated nanocapsule (NCs) loaded with doxorubicin (SA-NCs-DOX) against visceral leishmaniasis in comparison with nano-emulsions containing doxorubicin (NE-DOX). Experimental Approach NE-DOX was prepared using low-energy emulsification methods. Stepwise addition of protamine sulphate and SA in a layer-by-layer manner was used to form SA-NCs-DOX. SA-NCs-DOX, NE-DOX and Free DOX were compared for their cytotoxicity against Leishmania donovani-infected macrophages in vitro and generation of T-cell responses in infected hamsters in vivo. Key Results Size and ζ potential of the NE-DOX and SA-NCs-DOX formulations were 310 ± 2.1 nm and (−)32.6 ± 2.1 mV, 342 ± 4.1 nm and (−)29.3 ± 1.2 mV respectively. SA-NCs-DOX was better (1.5 times) taken up by J774A.1 macrophages compared with NE-DOX. SA-NCs -DOX showed greater efficacy than NE-DOX against intramacrophagic amastigotes. SA-NCs-DOX treatment exhibited enhanced apoptotic efficiency than NE-DOX and free DOX as evident by cell cycle analysis, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS and NO production. T-cell responses, when assessed through lymphoproliferative responses, NO production along with enhanced levels of iNOS, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-12 were found to be up-regulated after SA-NCs-DOX, compared with responses to NE-DOX in vivo. Parasitic burden was decreased in Leishmania-infected hamsters treated with SA-NCs-DOX, compared with NE-DOX. Conclusions and Implications Our results provide insights into the development of an alternative approach to improved management of leishmaniasis through a combination of chemotherapy with stimulation of the innate immune system. PMID:24837879

  9. Conotoxins: Structure, Therapeutic Potential and Pharmacological Applications.

    PubMed

    Mir, Rafia; Karim, Sajjad; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Wilson, Cornelia M; Mirza, Zeenat

    2016-01-01

    Cone snails, also known as marine gastropods, from Conus genus produce in their venom a diverse range of small pharmacologically active structured peptides called conotoxins. The cone snail venoms are widely unexplored arsenal of toxins with therapeutic and pharmacological potential, making them a treasure trove of ligands and peptidic drug leads. Conotoxins are small disulfide bonded peptides, which act as remarkable selective inhibitors and modulators of ion channels (calcium, sodium, potassium), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, noradrenaline transporters, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and neurotensin receptors. They are highly potent and specific against several neuronal targets making them valuable as research tools, drug leads and even therapeutics. In this review, we discuss their gene superfamily classification, nomenclature, post-translational modification, structural framework, pharmacology and medical applications of the active conopeptides. We aim to give an overview of their structure and therapeutic potential. Understanding these aspects of conopeptides will help in designing more specific peptidic analogues. PMID:26601961

  10. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sigrid A

    2011-02-15

    Curcumin, also known as diferuloylmethane, is derived from the plant Curcuma longa and is the active ingredient of the spice turmeric. The therapeutic activities of curcumin for a wide variety of diseases such as diabetes, allergies, arthritis and other chronic and inflammatory diseases have been known for a long time. More recently, curcumin's therapeutic potential for preventing and treating various cancers is being recognized. As curcumin's therapeutic promise is being explored more systematically in various diseases, it has become clear that, due to its increased bioavailability in the gastrointestinal tract, curcumin may be particularly suited to be developed to treat gastrointestinal diseases. This review summarizes some of the current literature of curcumin's anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer potential in inflammatory bowel diseases, hepatic fibrosis and gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:21607160

  11. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  12. Transferrin: structure, function and potential therapeutic actions.

    PubMed

    Gomme, Peter T; McCann, Karl B; Bertolini, Joseph

    2005-02-15

    There are many proteins that can multi-task. Transferrin, widely known as an iron-binding protein, is one such example of a multi-tasking protein. In this review, the multiple biological actions of transferrin, including its growth and cytoprotective activities, are discussed with the view of highlighting the potential therapeutic applications of this protein. PMID:15708745

  13. Pentoxifylline as a modulator of anticancer drug doxorubicin. Part II: Reduction of doxorubicin DNA binding and alleviation of its biological effects.

    PubMed

    Gołuński, Grzegorz; Borowik, Agnieszka; Derewońko, Natalia; Kawiak, Anna; Rychłowski, Michał; Woziwodzka, Anna; Piosik, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    Anticancer drug doxorubicin is commonly used in cancer treatment. However, drug's severe side effects make toxicity reduction important matter. Another biologically active aromatic compound, pentoxifylline, can sequester aromatic compounds in stacking complexes reducing their bioactivity. This work deals with the problem of alleviating doxorubicin side effects by pentoxifylline. We employed a wide spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cellular assays. In addition, we used the doxorubicin-pentoxifylline mixed association constant to quantitatively assess pentoxifylline influence on the doxorubicin mutagenic activity. Obtained results indicate strong protective effects of pentoxifylline towards doxorubicin, observed on bacteria and human keratinocytes with no such effects observed on the cancer cells. It may be hypothesized that, considering much shorter half-life of pentoxifylline than doxorubicin, simultaneous administration of doxorubicin and pentoxifylline will lead to gradual release of doxorubicin from complexes with pentoxifylline to reach desired therapeutic concentration. Proposed results shed light on the possible doxorubicin chemotherapy modification and its side effects reduction without the loss of its therapeutic potential. PMID:26855172

  14. Doxorubicin loaded polymeric gold nanoparticles targeted to human folate receptor upon laser photothermal therapy potentiates chemotherapy in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Banu, Hussaina; Sethi, Dipinder Kaur; Edgar, Andre; Sheriff, Adhnaan; Rayees, Nuthan; Renuka, N; Faheem, S M; Premkumar, Kumpati; Vasanthakumar, Geetha

    2015-08-01

    The current research focuses on the application of folate conjugated and doxorubicin loaded polymeric gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for the targeted treatment of folate receptor overexpressing breast cancers, augmented by adjunctive laser photothermal therapy. Herein, GNPs surface modified with folate, drug doxorubicin and polyethylene glycol were engineered and were used as vehicles for folate receptor targeted delivery of doxorubicin into cancer cells. Subsequently, the GNPs were photo-excited using laser light for mediating hyperthermia in the cancer cells. In vitro studies were performed to validate the efficacy of the combined modality of folate conjugated and doxorubicin loaded polymeric GNP mediated chemotherapy followed by photothermal therapy in comparison to treatment with free drug; and the combination modality showed better therapeutic efficacy than that of plain doxorubicin treatment in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that express increased levels of surface folate receptors when compared to MCF-7 breast cancer cells that express low levels of folate receptor. The mechanism of cell death was investigated using fluorescent microscopy. Immunoassays showed the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein p53 and down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Collectively, these results suggest that the folate tagged doxorubicin loaded GNPs are an attractive platform for targeted delivery of doxorubicin and are agents suitable for photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:26057021

  15. Tea nanoparticle, a safe and biocompatible nanocarrier, greatly potentiates the anticancer activity of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Huang, Yujian; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Xie, Meina; Lin, Derrick; Yang, Dong-Hua; Zhang, Mingjun; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    An infusion-dialysis based procedure has been developed as an approach to isolate organic nanoparticles from green tea. Tea nanoparticle (TNP) can effectively load doxorubicin (DOX) via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. We established an ABCB1 overexpressing tumor xenograft mouse model to investigate whether TNP can effectively deliver DOX into tumors and bypass the efflux function of the ABCB1 transporter, thereby increasing the intratumoral accumulation of DOX and potentiating the anticancer activity of DOX. MTT assays suggested that DOX-TNP showed higher cytotoxicity toward CCD-18Co, SW620 and SW620/Ad300 cells than DOX. Animal study revealed that DOX-TNP resulted in greater inhibitory effects on the growth of SW620 and SW620/Ad300 tumors than DOX. In pharmacokinetics study, DOX-TNP greatly increased the SW620 and SW620/Ad300 intratumoral concentrations of DOX. But DOX-TNP had no effect on the plasma concentrations of DOX. Furthermore, TNP is a safe nanocarrier with excellent biocompatibility and minimal toxicity. Ex vivo IHC analysis of SW620 and SW620/Ad300 tumor sections revealed evidence of prominent antitumor activity of DOX-TNP. In conclusion, our findings suggested that natural nanomaterials could be useful in combating multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells and potentiating the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer treatment. PMID:26716507

  16. Tea nanoparticle, a safe and biocompatible nanocarrier, greatly potentiates the anticancer activity of doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Huang, Yujian; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Xie, Meina; Lin, Derrick; Yang, Dong-Hua; Zhang, Mingjun; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    An infusion-dialysis based procedure has been developed as an approach to isolate organic nanoparticles from green tea. Tea nanoparticle (TNP) can effectively load doxorubicin (DOX) via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. We established an ABCB1 overexpressing tumor xenograft mouse model to investigate whether TNP can effectively deliver DOX into tumors and bypass the efflux function of the ABCB1 transporter, thereby increasing the intratumoral accumulation of DOX and potentiating the anticancer activity of DOX. MTT assays suggested that DOX-TNP showed higher cytotoxicity toward CCD-18Co, SW620 and SW620/Ad300 cells than DOX. Animal study revealed that DOX-TNP resulted in greater inhibitory effects on the growth of SW620 and SW620/Ad300 tumors than DOX. In pharmacokinetics study, DOX-TNP greatly increased the SW620 and SW620/Ad300 intratumoral concentrations of DOX. But DOX-TNP had no effect on the plasma concentrations of DOX. Furthermore, TNP is a safe nanocarrier with excellent biocompatibility and minimal toxicity. Ex vivo IHC analysis of SW620 and SW620/Ad300 tumor sections revealed evidence of prominent antitumor activity of DOX-TNP. In conclusion, our findings suggested that natural nanomaterials could be useful in combating multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells and potentiating the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer treatment. PMID:26716507

  17. Chondroitin sulfate-capped super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential carriers of doxorubicin hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Neha; Anwar, Mohammed; Asfer, Mohammed; Mehdi, Syed Hassan; Rizvi, Mohammed Moshahid Alam; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2016-10-20

    Chondroitin-4-sulfate (CS), a glycosaminoglycan, was used to prepare CS-capped super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which were further employed for loading a water-soluble chemotherapeutic agent (doxorubicin hydrochloride, DOX). CS-capped SPIONs have potential biomedical application in cancer targeting. The optimized formulation had a hydrodynamic size of 91.2±0.8nm (PDI; 0.228±0.004) and zeta potential of -49.1±1.66mV. DOX was loaded onto the formulation up to 2% (w/w) by physical interaction with CS. TEM showed nano-sized particles having a core-shell structure. XRD confirmed crystal phase of iron oxide. FT-IR conceived the interaction of iron oxide with CS as bidentate chelation and also confirmed DOX loading. Vibration sample magnetometry confirmed super-paramagnetic nature of nanoparticles, with saturation magnetization of 0.238emug(-1). In vitro release profile at pH 7.4 showed that 96.67% of DOX was released within 24h (first order kinetics). MTT assay in MCF7 cells showed significantly higher (p<0.0001) cytotoxicity for DOX in SPIONs than DOX solution (IC50 values 6.294±0.4169 and 11.316±0.1102μgmL(-1), respectively). PMID:27474599

  18. Monoclonal antibody-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG encapsulating doxorubicin as a potential theranostic agent.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Neus; Al-Ahmady, Zahraa S; Beziere, Nicolas S; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2015-03-30

    Indocyanine green (ICG) is an FDA-approved, strongly photo-absorbent/fluorescent probe that has been incorporated into a clinically-relevant PEGylated liposome as a flexible optoacoustic contrast agent platform. This study describes the engineering of targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG using the anti-MUC-1 "humanized" monoclonal antibody (MoAb) hCTM01 as a tumour-specific theranostic system. We aimed to visualise non-invasively the tumour accumulation of these MoAb-targeted liposomes over time in tumour-bearing mice using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT). Preferential accumulation of targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG was studied after intravenous administration in comparison to non-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG using both fast growing (4T1) and slow growing (HT-29) MUC-1 positive tumour models. Monitoring liposomal ICG in the tumour showed that both targeted and non-targeted liposome-ICG formulations preferentially accumulated into the tumour models studied. Rapid accumulation was observed for targeted liposomes at early time points mainly in the periphery of the tumour volume suggesting binding to available MUC-1 receptors. In contrast, non-targeted PEGylated liposomes showed accumulation at the centre of the tumour at later time points. In an attempt to take this a step further, we successfully encapsulated the anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) into both targeted and non-targeted PEGylated liposome-ICG. The engineering of DOX-loaded targeted ICG liposome systems present a novel platform for combined tumour-specific therapy and diagnosis. This can open new possibilities in the design of advanced image-guided cancer therapeutics. PMID:25445515

  19. Metabolism of Doxorubicin to the Cardiotoxic Metabolite Doxorubicinol Is Increased in a Mouse Model of Chronic Glutathione Deficiency: A Potential Role for Carbonyl Reductase 3

    PubMed Central

    Schaupp, Christopher M.; White, Collin C.; Merrill, Gary F.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin is highly effective at inducing DNA double-strand breaks in rapidly dividing cells, which has led to it being a widely used cancer chemotherapeutic. However, clinical administration of doxorubicin is limited by off-target cardiotoxicity, which is thought to be mediated by doxorubicinol, the primary alcohol metabolite of doxorubicin. Carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), a well-characterized monomeric enzyme present at high basal levels in the liver, is known to exhibit activity toward doxorubicin. Little is known about a closely related enzyme, carbonyl reductase 3 (CBR3), which is present in the liver at low basal levels but is highly inducible by the transcription factor Nrf2. Genetic polymorphisms in CBR3, but not CBR1, are associated with differential cardiac outcomes in doxorubicin treated pediatric patients. Cbr3 mRNA and CBR3 protein are highly expressed in the livers of Gclm −/− mice (a mouse model of glutathione deficiency) relative to wild type mice. In the present study, we first investigated the ability of CBR3 to metabolize doxorubicin. Incubations of doxorubicin and purified recombinant murine CBR3 (mCBR3) were analyzed for doxorubicinol formation using HPLC, revealing for the first time that doxorubicin is a substrate of mCBR3. Moreover, hepatocytes from Gclm −/− mice produced more doxorubicinol than Gclm +/+ hepatocytes. In addition, differentiated rat myoblasts (C2C12 cells) co-cultured with primary Gclm −/− murine hepatocytes were more sensitive to doxorubicin-induced cytostasis/cytotoxicity than incubations with Gclm +/+ hepatocytes. Our results indicate a potentially important role for CBR3 in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Because there is likely to be variability in hepatic CBR3 activity in humans (due to either genetic or epigenetic influences on its expression), these data also suggest that inhibition of CBR3 may provide protection from doxorubicinol cardiotoxicity. PMID:25446851

  20. L-Canavanine potentiates the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and cisplatin in arginine deprived human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid L-canavanine (L-CAV), an antimetabolite of L-arginine (L-ARG), can alter the 3D conformation of proteins when incorporated into a protein instead of L-ARG. L-CAV inhibits the proliferation of some tumour cells. The deprivation of L-ARG in the culture medium enhances the response of cells to L-CAV. This study aimed to investigate the interaction of L-CAV in combination with the chemotherapeutic drugs, doxorubicin (DOX) or cisplatin (CIS), in cancer cells, especially in the absence of L-ARG. A combination method based on the median-effect principle and mass-action law was used. The following cancer cells were employed: HeLa and Caco-2 cells, overexpressing argininosuccinate synthase (ASS), pancreatic cells (MIA PaCa-2 and BxPC-3) and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2 and SK-HEP-1), with down-regulated ASS. When constant and non-constant ratios of L-CAV were combined with DOX and CIS, a synergistic potentiation of cytotoxicity was recorded. Cells expressing high levels of ASS were more sensitive to the treatment as compared to the cells with reduced ASS levels. Overall, this study may provide a new approach to targeting some cancer cells with L-CAV in combination with DNA-targeting drugs such as DOX and CIS, especially those cells which overexpress ASS, such as human cervical and colorectal carcinoma cells. PMID:26839743

  1. L-Canavanine potentiates the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and cisplatin in arginine deprived human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nurcahyanti, Agustina Dr; Wink, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid L-canavanine (L-CAV), an antimetabolite of L-arginine (L-ARG), can alter the 3D conformation of proteins when incorporated into a protein instead of L-ARG. L-CAV inhibits the proliferation of some tumour cells. The deprivation of L-ARG in the culture medium enhances the response of cells to L-CAV. This study aimed to investigate the interaction of L-CAV in combination with the chemotherapeutic drugs, doxorubicin (DOX) or cisplatin (CIS), in cancer cells, especially in the absence of L-ARG. A combination method based on the median-effect principle and mass-action law was used. The following cancer cells were employed: HeLa and Caco-2 cells, overexpressing argininosuccinate synthase (ASS), pancreatic cells (MIA PaCa-2 and BxPC-3) and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2 and SK-HEP-1), with down-regulated ASS. When constant and non-constant ratios of L-CAV were combined with DOX and CIS, a synergistic potentiation of cytotoxicity was recorded. Cells expressing high levels of ASS were more sensitive to the treatment as compared to the cells with reduced ASS levels. Overall, this study may provide a new approach to targeting some cancer cells with L-CAV in combination with DNA-targeting drugs such as DOX and CIS, especially those cells which overexpress ASS, such as human cervical and colorectal carcinoma cells. PMID:26839743

  2. Cardioprotective Potentials of Plant-Derived Small Molecules against Doxorubicin Associated Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Shreesh; Al Taee, Hasan; Goyal, Sameer; Mahajan, Umesh B.; Patil, Chandrgouda R.; Arya, D. S.; Rajesh, Mohanraj

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent and widely used anthracycline antibiotic for the treatment of several malignancies. Unfortunately, the clinical utility of DOX is often restricted due to the elicitation of organ toxicity. Particularly, the increased risk for the development of dilated cardiomyopathy by DOX among the cancer survivors warrants major attention from the physicians as well as researchers to develop adjuvant agents to neutralize the noxious effects of DOX on the healthy myocardium. Despite these pitfalls, the use of traditional cytotoxic drugs continues to be the mainstay treatment for several types of cancer. Recently, phytochemicals have gained attention for their anticancer, chemopreventive, and cardioprotective activities. The ideal cardioprotective agents should not compromise the clinical efficacy of DOX and should be devoid of cumulative or irreversible toxicity on the naïve tissues. Furthermore, adjuvants possessing synergistic anticancer activity and quelling of chemoresistance would significantly enhance the clinical utility in combating DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. The present review renders an overview of cardioprotective effects of plant-derived small molecules and their purported mechanisms against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Phytochemicals serve as the reservoirs of pharmacophore which can be utilized as templates for developing safe and potential novel cardioprotective agents in combating DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:27313831

  3. Therapeutic potential of cannabis-related drugs.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen P H

    2016-01-01

    In this review, I will consider the dual nature of Cannabis and cannabinoids. The duality arises from the potential and actuality of cannabinoids in the laboratory and clinic and the 'abuse' of Cannabis outside the clinic. The therapeutic areas currently best associated with exploitation of Cannabis-related medicines include pain, epilepsy, feeding disorders, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. As with every other medicinal drug of course, the 'trick' will be to maximise the benefit and minimise the cost. After millennia of proximity and exploitation of the Cannabis plant, we are still playing catch up with an understanding of its potential influence for medicinal benefit. PMID:26216862

  4. Antioxidants as potential therapeutics for neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Chirayu D; Howell, Kristy R; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression etc. Both genetic and nongenetic factors have been found to cause increased cellular levels of reactive oxygen species beyond the capacity of antioxidant defense mechanism in patients of psychiatric disorders. These factors trigger oxidative cellular damage to lipids, proteins and DNA, leading to abnormal neural growth and differentiation. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies such as supplementation with antioxidants can be effective for long-term treatment management of neuropsychiatric disorders. The use of antioxidants and PUFAs as supplements in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders has provided some promising results. At the same time, one should be cautious with the use of antioxidants since excessive antioxidants could dangerously interfere with some of the protective functions of reactive oxygen species. The present article will give an overview of the potential strategies and outcomes of using antioxidants as therapeutics in psychiatric disorders. PMID:23123357

  5. A simple route to develop transparent doxorubicin-loaded nanodiamonds/cellulose nanocomposite membranes as potential wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaogang; Zhang, Hao; Cao, Zhenni; Cai, Ning; Xue, Yanan; Yu, Faquan

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop transparent porous nanodiamonds/cellulose nanocomposite membranes with controlled release of doxorubicin for potential applications as wound dressings, which were fabricated by tape casting method from dispersing carboxylated nanodiamonds and dissolving cellulose homogeneously in 7wt% NaOH/12wt% urea aqueous solution. By adjusting the carboxylated nanodiamonds content, various nanocomposite membranes were obtained. The structure and properties of these membranes have been investigated by light transmittance measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile tests, water loss analyses, etc. The drug loading and release was investigated using doxorubicin hydrochloride as a model drug. In vitro cytotoxicity assay of the membranes was also studied. This work presented a proof-of-concept utility of these membranes for loading and release of bioactive compounds to be employed as a candidate for wound dressing. PMID:27083364

  6. Cannabidiol and epilepsy: Rationale and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Leo, Antonio; Russo, Emilio; Elia, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    Despite the introduction of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the quality of life and therapeutic response for patients with epilepsy remains still poor. Unfortunately, besides several advantages, these new AEDs have not satisfactorily reduced the number of refractory patients. Therefore, the need for different other therapeutic options to manage epilepsy is still a current issue. To this purpose, emphasis has been given to phytocannabinoids, which have been medicinally used since ancient time in the treatment of neurological disorders including epilepsy. In particular, the nonpsychoactive compound cannabidiol (CBD) has shown anticonvulsant properties, both in preclinical and clinical studies, with a yet not completely clarified mechanism of action. However, it should be made clear that most phytocannabinoids do not act on the endocannabinoid system as in the case of CBD. In in vivo preclinical studies, CBD has shown significant anticonvulsant effects mainly in acute animal models of seizures, whereas restricted data exist in chronic models of epilepsy as well as in animal models of epileptogenesis. Likewise, clinical evidence seems to indicate that CBD is able to manage epilepsy both in adults and children affected by refractory seizures, with a favourable side effect profile. However, to date, clinical trials are both qualitatively and numerically limited, thus yet inconsistent. Therefore, further preclinical and clinical studies are undoubtedly needed to better evaluate the potential therapeutic profile of CBD in epilepsy, although the actually available data is promising. PMID:26976797

  7. Biopharmaceutics and Therapeutic Potential of Engineered Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xing-Jie; Chen, Chunying; Zhao, Yuliang; Jia, Lee; Wang, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials are at the leading edge of the rapidly developing nanosciences and are founding an important class of new materials with specific physicochemical properties different from bulk materials with the same compositions. The potential for nanomaterials is rapidly expanding with novel applications constantly being explored in different areas. The unique size-dependent properties of nanomaterials make them very attractive for pharmaceutical applications. Investigations of physical, chemical and biological properties of engineered nanomaterials have yielded valuable information. Cytotoxic effects of certain engineered nanomaterials towards malignant cells form the basis for one aspect of nanomedicine. It is inferred that size, three dimensional shape, hydrophobicity and electronic configurations make them an appealing subject in medicinal chemistry. Their unique structure coupled with immense scope for derivatization forms a base for exciting developments in therapeutics. This review article addresses the fate of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of engineered nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. It updates the distinctive methodology used for studying the biopharmaceutics of nanoparticles. This review addresses the future potential and safety concerns and genotoxicity of nanoparticle formulations in general. It particularly emphasizes the effects of nanoparticles on metabolic enzymes as well as the parenteral or inhalation administration routes of nanoparticle formulations. This paper illustrates the potential of nanomedicine by discussing biopharmaceutics of fullerene derivatives and their suitability for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Future direction is discussed as well. PMID:18855608

  8. [Lactoferrin - a glycoprotein of great therapeutic potentials].

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Ryszard; Kamińska, Ewa; Michalski, Piotr; Lauterbach, Jan Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein, which is present in most biological fluids with particularly high levels in colostrum and in mammalian milk. Bovine lactoferrin is more than 70% homologous with human lactoferrin. Most of the clinical trials have used bovine lactoferrin for supplementation. This review summarizes the recent advances in explaining the mechanisms, which are responsible for the multifunctional roles of lactoferrin, and presents its potential prophylactic and therapeutic applications. On the ground of the results of preliminary clinical observations, authors suggest beneficial effect of lactoferrin supplementation on the prevalence of necrotizing enterocolitis in infants with birth weight below 1250 grams. PMID:27442696

  9. Therapeutic Efficacy of Combining PEGylated Liposomal Doxorubicin and Radiofrequency (RF) Ablation: Comparison between Slow-Drug-Releasing, Non-Thermosensitive and Fast-Drug-Releasing, Thermosensitive Nano-Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Andriyanov, Alexander V.; Koren, Erez; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    2014-01-01

    Aims To determine how the accumulation of drug in mice bearing an extra-hepatic tumor and its therapeutic efficacy are affected by the type of PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin used, treatment modality, and rate of drug release from the liposomes, when combined with radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Materials and Methods Two nano-drugs, both long-circulating PEGylated doxorubicin liposomes, were formulated: (1) PEGylated doxorubicin in thermosensitive liposomes (PLDTS), having a burst-type fast drug release above the liposomes’ solid ordered to liquid disordered phase transition (at 42°C), and (2) non-thermosensitive PEGylated doxorubicin liposomes (PLDs), having a slow and continuous drug release. Both were administered intravenously at 8 mg/kg doxorubicin dose to tumor-bearing mice. Animals were divided into 6 groups: no treatment, PLD, RF, RF+PLD, PLDTS, and PLDTS+RF, for intra-tumor doxorubicin deposition at 1, 24, and 72 h post-injection (in total 41, mice), and 31 mice were used for randomized survival studies. Results Non-thermosensitive PLD combined with RF had the least tumor growth and the best end-point survival, better than PLDTS+RF (p<0.005) or all individual therapies (p<0.001). Although at 1 h post-treatment the greatest amount of intra-tumoral doxorubicin was seen following PLDTS+RF (p<0.05), by 24 and 72 h the greatest doxorubicin amount was seen for PLD+RF (p<0.05); in this group the tumor also has the longest exposure to doxorubicin. Conclusion Optimizing therapeutic efficacy of PLD requires a better understanding of the relationship between the effect of RF on tumor microenvironment and liposome drug release profile. If drug release is too fast, the benefit of changing the microenvironment by RF on tumor drug localization and therapeutic efficacy may be much smaller than for PLDs having slow and temperature-independent drug release. Thus the much longer circulation time of doxorubicin from PLD than from PLDTS may be beneficial in many therapeutic

  10. Potential interaction of green tea extract with hydrochlorothiazide against doxorubicin-induced myocardial damage

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Manodeep; Kamath, Jagadish V.; Bhattacharjee, Ananya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of ischemic hypertensive patients with hydrochlorothiazide can precipitate cardiac arrhythmias. Green tea, by virtue of its antioxidant potential, is responsible for cardio-protective activity. Objective: The present study was under taken to evaluate the pharmacodynamic interaction of green tea extract with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) against doxorubicin (DOX)-induced myocardial toxicity. Materials and Methods: Rats were treated with high (500 mg/kg, p.o.) and low (100 mg/kg, p.o.) dose of green tea extract in alone and interactive groups for 28 days. Standard, high and low dose of interactive groups received hydrochlorothiazide (10 mg/kg, p.o.) for the last 7 days. Apart from normal controls, all other groups were subjected to DOX (3 mg/kg, i.p.) toxicity on Days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28, and the effect of different treatments was evaluated by changes in electrocardiographic parameters, serum biomarkers and tissue antioxidant levels. Apart from that, lipid profile and histological studies were also carried out. Results: Compared with the DOX control group, both high and low dose of green tea exhibited a significant decrease in serum biomarkers and increase in tissue antioxidant levels. Green tea treatment was also responsible for significant improvement in ECG parameter, lipid profile and histological score. Incorporation of high and low dose of green tea with HCTZ exhibited significant protection compared with the HCTZ alone treated group. Conclusion: The present findings clearly suggest that the green tea extract dose-dependently reduces DOX-induced myocardial toxicity. Green tea when combined with HCTZ can reduce the associated side-effects and exhibits myocardial protection. PMID:26604554

  11. Therapeutic Potential of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Hovelsø, N; Sotty, F; Montezinho, L.P; Pinheiro, P.S; Herrik, K.F; Mørk, A

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) and is a major player in complex brain functions. Glutamatergic transmission is primarily mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptors, which include NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors. However, glutamate exerts modulatory actions through a family of metabotropic G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Dysfunctions of glutamatergic neurotransmission have been implicated in the etiology of several diseases. Therefore, pharmacological modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptors has been widely investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of several disorders associated with glutamatergic dysfunction. However, blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors might be accompanied by severe side effects due to their vital role in many important physiological functions. A different strategy aimed at pharmacologically interfering with mGluR function has recently gained interest. Many subtype selective agonists and antagonists have been identified and widely used in preclinical studies as an attempt to elucidate the role of specific mGluRs subtypes in glutamatergic transmission. These studies have allowed linkage between specific subtypes and various physiological functions and more importantly to pathological states. This article reviews the currently available knowledge regarding the therapeutic potential of targeting mGluRs in the treatment of several CNS disorders, including schizophrenia, addiction, major depressive disorder and anxiety, Fragile X Syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and pain. PMID:22942876

  12. Phytochemical and therapeutic potential of cucumber.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Nema, Neelesh K; Maity, Niladri; Sarkar, Birendra K

    2013-01-01

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family like melon, squash and pumpkins. It is a popular vegetable crop used in Indian traditional medicine since ancient times. This vegetable is very high in water content and very low in calories. It has potential antidiabetic, lipid lowering and antioxidant activity. Cucumber has a cleansing action within the body by removing accumulated pockets of old waste materials and chemical toxins. Fresh fruit juice is used for nourishing the skin. It gives a soothing effect against skin irritations and reduces swelling. Cucumber also has the power to relax and alleviate the sunburn's pain. The fruit is refrigerant, haemostatic, tonic and useful in hyperdipsia, thermoplegia etc. The seeds also have a cooling effect on the body and they are used to prevent constipation. Several bioactive compounds have been isolated from cucumber including cucurbitacins, cucumegastigmanes I and II, cucumerin A and B, vitexin, orientin, isoscoparin 2″-O-(6‴-(E)-p-coumaroyl) glucoside, apigenin 7-O-(6″-O-p-coumaroylglucoside) etc. Despite huge exploration of cucumber in agricultural field, comparatively very few studies have been published about its chemical profile and its therapeutic potential. This article reviews the therapeutic application, pharmacological and phytochemical profile of different parts of C. sativus. In this review we have explored the current phytochemical and pharmacological knowledge available with this well known plant and several promising aspects for research on cucumber. PMID:23098877

  13. Hyperthermic potentiation of doxorubicin and 4'-EPI-doxorubicin in a transplantable neurogenic rat tumor (BT/sub 4/A) in BD IX rats

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, O.

    1983-02-01

    The combined effect of hyperthermia and doxorubicin on the neurogenic rat cell line BT/sub 4/C was found to be synergistic in vitro. The present investigation was initiated to study if this synergistic effect also could be obtained in vivo. An enhanced effect occurred when doxorubicin and 4'-epi-doxorubicin 7 mg/kg body weight were given 30 minutes prior to local water bath hyperthermia (one hour at 44.0 degrees C). The local side effects of the combined treatment did not increase above that of hyperthermia alone. Therefore, local hyperthermia may become a useful modality for enhancement of the effect of anthracyclines on tumors with marginal drug sensitivity or bulky tumors with poor drug penetration.

  14. Neurosteroids, stress and depression: Potential therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Zorumski, Charles F.; Paul, Steven M.; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Covey, Douglas F.; Mennerick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Neurosteroids are potent and effective neuromodulators that are synthesized from cholesterol in the brain. These agents and their synthetic derivatives influence the function of multiple signaling pathways including receptors for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, the major inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS). Increasing evidence indicates that dysregulation of neurosteroid production plays a role in the pathophysiology of stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders, including mood and anxiety disorders. In this paper, we review the mechanisms of neurosteroid action in brain with an emphasis on those neurosteroids that potently modulate the function of GABAA receptors. We then discuss evidence indicating a role for GABA and neurosteroids in stress and depression, and focus on potential strategies that can be used to manipulate CNS neurosteroid synthesis and function for therapeutic purposes. PMID:23085210

  15. Garlic: a review of potential therapeutic effects

    PubMed Central

    Bayan, Leyla; Koulivand, Peir Hossain; Gorji, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Throughout history, many different cultures have recognized the potential use of garlic for prevention and treatment of different diseases. Recent studies support the effects of garlic and its extracts in a wide range of applications. These studies raised the possibility of revival of garlic therapeutic values in different diseases. Different compounds in garlic are thought to reduce the risk for cardiovascular diseases, have anti-tumor and anti-microbial effects, and show benefit on high blood glucose concentration. However, the exact mechanism of all ingredients and their long-term effects are not fully understood. Further studies are needed to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of action of garlic as well as its efficacy and safety in treatment of various diseases. PMID:25050296

  16. Potential and effective meaning in therapeutic ritual.

    PubMed

    McCreery, J L

    1979-03-01

    Anthropologists who accept the functionalist dogma that everything in a culture is related to everything else can easily demonstrate from their own point of view that any ritual is richly meaningful. If, then, the healing power of therapeutic ritual depends on making illness meaningful, any ritual, if seen from this perspective, should be efficacious. We must distinguish, however, between potential and effective meaning, i.e. what a ritual might mean and what it does mean to participants in it who generally lack an anthropologist's global view of their culture. Effective meaning can be assessed by examining a ritual's relevance to the situation in which it occurs and factors which facilitate or hinder communication of what it might mean to particular persons. This argument is illustrated by analyzing the meaning of a Chinese healing ritual in two different situations in which it occurs. PMID:498802

  17. The intratumoral administration of ferucarbotran conjugated with doxorubicin improved therapeutic effect by magnetic hyperthermia combined with pharmacotherapy in a hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Local hyperthermia of tumor in conjunction with chemotherapy is a promising strategy for cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intratumoral delivery of clinically approved magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) conjugated with doxorubicin to simultaneously induce magnetic hyperthermia and drug delivery in a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model. Materials and methods HCC cells expressing luciferase were implanted into the flank of BALB/c-nu mice (n = 19). When the tumor diameter reached 7–8 mm, the animals were divided into four groups according to the injected agents: group A (normal saline, n = 4), group B (doxorubicin, n = 5), group C (MNP, n = 5), and group D (MNP/doxorubicin complex, n = 5). Animals were exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to receive magnetic hyperthermia, and intratumoral temperature changes were measured. Bioluminescence imagings (BLIs) were performed before treatment and at 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment to measure the tumoral activities. The relative signal intensity (RSI) of each tumor was calculated by dividing the BLI signal at each time point by the value measured before treatment. At day 14 post-treatment, all tumor tissues were harvested to assess the apoptosis rates by pathological examination. Results The rise in temperature of the tumors was 1.88 ± 0.21°C in group A, 0.96 ± 1.05°C in B, 7.93 ± 1.99°C in C, and 8.95 ± 1.31°C in D. The RSI of the tumors at day 14 post-treatment was significantly lower in group D (0.31 ± 0.20) than in group A (2.23 ± 1.14), B (0.94 ± 0.47), and C (1.02 ± 0.21). The apoptosis rates of the tumors were 11.52 ± 3.10% in group A, 23.0 ± 7.68% in B, 25.4 ± 3.36% in C, and 39.0 ± 13.2% in D, respectively. Conclusions The intratumoral injection of ferucarbotran conjugated with doxorubicin shows an improved therapeutic effect compared with doxorubicin or ferucarbotran alone

  18. Neurosteroids and potential therapeutics: Focus on pregnenolone.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Monique

    2016-06-01

    Considerable evidence from preclinical and clinical studies shows that steroids and in particular neurosteroids are important endogenous modulators of several brain-related functions. In this context, it remains to be elucidated whether neurosteroids may serve as biomarkers in the diagnosis of disorders and might have therapeutic potential for the treatment of these disorders. Pregnenolone (PREG) is the main steroid synthesized from cholesterol in mammals and invertebrates. PREG has three main sources of synthesis, the gonads, adrenal glands and brain and is submitted to various metabolizing pathways which are modulated depending on various factors including species, steroidogenic tissues and steroidogenic enzymes. Looking at the whole picture of steroids, PREG is often known as the precursor to other steroids and not as an active steroid per se. Actually, physiological and brain functions have been studied mainly for steroids that are very active either binding to specific intracellular receptors, or modulating with high affinity the abundant membrane receptors, GABAA or NMDA receptors. However, when high sensitive and specific methodological approaches were available to analyze low concentrations of steroids and then match endogenous levels of different steroid metabolomes, several studies have reported more significant alterations in PREG than in other steroids in extraphysiological or pathological conditions, suggesting that PREG could play a functional role as well. Additionally, several molecular targets of PREG were revealed in the mammalian brain and beneficial effects of PREG have been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies. On this basis, this review will be divided into three parts. The first provides a brief overview of the molecular targets of PREG and the pharmacological effects observed in animal and human studies. The second will focus on the possible functional role of PREG with an outline of the modulation of PREG levels in animal and in

  19. Cannabinoids and Schizophrenia: Risks and Therapeutic Potential.

    PubMed

    Manseau, Marc W; Goff, Donald C

    2015-10-01

    A convergence of evidence shows that use of Cannabis sativa is associated with increased risk of developing psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia, and earlier age at which psychotic symptoms first manifest. Cannabis exposure during adolescence is most strongly associated with the onset of psychosis amongst those who are particularly vulnerable, such as those who have been exposed to child abuse and those with family histories of schizophrenia. Schizophrenia that develops after cannabis use may have a unique clinical phenotype, and several genetic polymorphisms may modulate the relationship between cannabis use and psychosis. The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in psychosis both related and unrelated to cannabis exposure, and studying this system holds potential to increase understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Anandamide signaling in the central nervous system may be particularly important. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol in cannabis can cause symptoms of schizophrenia when acutely administered, and cannabidiol (CBD), another compound in cannabis, can counter many of these effects. CBD may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of psychosis following cannabis use, as well as schizophrenia, possibly with better tolerability than current antipsychotic treatments. CBD may also have anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. Establishing the role of CBD and other CBD-based compounds in treating psychotic disorders will require further human research. PMID:26311150

  20. Cyclic depsipeptides as potential cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kitagaki, Jirouta; Shi, Genbin; Miyauchi, Shizuka; Murakami, Shinya; Yang, Yili

    2015-03-01

    Cyclic depsipeptides are polypeptides in which one or more amino acid is replaced by a hydroxy acid, resulting in the formation of at least one ester bond in the core ring structure. Many natural cyclic depsipeptides possessing intriguing structural and biological properties, including antitumor, antifungal, antiviral, antibacterial, anthelmintic, and anti-inflammatory activities, have been identified from fungi, plants, and marine organisms. In particular, the potent effects of cyclic depsipeptides on tumor cells have led to a number of clinical trials evaluating their potential as chemotherapeutic agents. Although many of the trials have not achieved the desired results, romidepsin (FK228), a bicyclic depsipeptide that inhibits histone deacetylase, has been shown to have clinical efficacy in patients with refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and has received Food and Drug Administration approval for use in treatment. In this review, we discuss antitumor cyclic depsipeptides that have undergone clinical trials and focus on their structural features, mechanisms, potential applications in chemotherapy, and pharmacokinetic and toxicity data. The results of this study indicate that cyclic depsipeptides could be a rich source of new cancer therapeutics. PMID:25419631

  1. Therapeutic potential of chalcones as cardiovascular agents.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Debarshi Kar; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death affecting 17.3 million people across the globe and are estimated to affect 23.3 million people by year 2030. In recent years, about 7.3 million people died due to coronary heart disease, 9.4 million deaths due to high blood pressure and 6.2 million due to stroke, where obesity and atherosclerotic progression remain the chief pathological factors. The search for newer and better cardiovascular agents is the foremost need to manage cardiac patient population across the world. Several natural and (semi) synthetic chalcones deserve the credit of being potential candidates to inhibit various cardiovascular, hematological and anti-obesity targets like angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), pancreatic lipase (PL), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), calcium (Ca(2+))/potassium (K(+)) channel, COX-1, TXA2 and TXB2. In this review, a comprehensive study of chalcones, their therapeutic targets, structure activity relationships (SARs), mechanisms of actions (MOAs) have been discussed. Chemically diverse chalcone scaffolds, their derivatives including structural manipulation of both aryl rings, replacement with heteroaryl scaffold(s) and hybridization through conjugation with other pharmacologically active scaffold have been highlighted. Chalcones which showed promising activity and have a well-defined MOAs, SARs must be considered as prototype for the design and development of potential anti-hypertensive, anti-anginal, anti-arrhythmic and cardioprotective agents. With the knowledge of these molecular targets, structural insights and SARs, this review may be helpful for (medicinal) chemists to design more potent, safe, selective and cost effective chalcone derivatives as potential cardiovascular agents. PMID:26876916

  2. Anticancer therapeutic potential of soy isoflavone, genistein.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Mepur H; Muthugounder, Sakunthala; Presser, Naftali; Viswanathan, Subramanian

    2004-01-01

    to recombinant EGF to target cancers overexpressing the EGF receptor. Although genistein has many potentially therapeutic actions against cancer, its biphasic bioactivity (inhibitory at high concentrations and activating at low concentrations) requires caution in determining therapeutic doses of genistein alone or in combination with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and/or immunotherapies. Of the more than 4500 genistein studies in peer-reviewed primary publications, almost one fifth pertain to its antitumor capabilities and more than 400 describe its mechanism of action in normal and malignant human and animal cells, animal models, in vitro experiments, or phase I/II clinical trials. Several biotechnological firms in Japan, Australia and in the United States (e.g., Nutrilite) manufacture genistein as a natural supplement under quality controlled and assured conditions. PMID:15584372

  3. Essential Oil from Myrica rubra Leaves Potentiated Antiproliferative and Prooxidative Effect of Doxorubicin and its Accumulation in Intestinal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrož, Martin; Hanušová, Veronika; Skarka, Adam; Boušová, Iva; Králová, Věra; Langhasová, Lenka; Skálová, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Essential oil from the leaves of Myrica rubra, a subtropical Asian fruit tree traditionally used in folk medicines, has a significant antiproliferative effect in several intestinal cancer cell lines. Doxorubicin belongs to the most important cytostatics used in cancer therapy. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of defined essential oil from M. rubra leaves on efficacy, prooxidative effect, and accumulation of doxorubicin in cancer cell lines and in non-cancerous cells. For this purpose, intestinal adenocarcinoma CaCo2 cells were used. Human fibroblasts (periodontal ligament) and a primary culture of rat hepatocytes served as models of non-cancerous cells. The results showed that the sole essential oil from M. rubra has a strong prooxidative effect in cancer cells while it acts as a mild antioxidant in hepatocytes. Combined with doxorubicin, the essential oil enhanced the antiproliferative and prooxidative effects of doxorubicin in cancer cells. At higher concentrations, synergism of doxorubicin and essential oil from M. rubra was proved. In non-cancerous cells, the essential oil did not affect the toxicity of doxorubicin and the doxorubicin-mediated reactive oxygen species formation. The essential oil increased the intracellular concentration of doxorubicin and enhanced selectively the doxorubicin accumulation in nuclei of cancer cells. Taken together, essential oil from M. rubra leaves could be able to improve the doxorubicin efficacy in cancer cells due to an increased reactive oxygen species production, and the doxorubicin accumulation in nuclei of cancer cells. PMID:26485638

  4. Therapeutic potential of monoamine transporter substrates.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Richard B; Baumann, Michael H

    2006-01-01

    Monoamine transporter proteins are targets for many psychoactive compounds, including therapeutic and abused stimulant drugs. This paper reviews recent work from our laboratory investigating the interaction of stimulants with transporters in brain tissue. We illustrate how determining the precise mechanism of stimulant drug action (uptake inhibitor vs. substrate) can provide unique opportunities for medication discovery. An important lesson learned from this work is that drugs which display equipotent substrate activity at dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) transporters have minimal abuse liability and few stimulant side-effects, yet are able to suppress ongoing drug-seeking behavior. As a specific example, we describe the development of PAL-287 (alpha-methylnapthylethylamine), a dual DA/5-HT releasing agent that suppresses cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys, without the adverse effects associated with older phenylethylamine 5-HT releasers (e.g., fenfluramine) and DA releasers (e.g., amphetamine). Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of developing non-amphetamine releasing agents as potential treatments for substance abuse disorders and other psychiatric conditions. PMID:17017961

  5. Therapeutic potential of berberine against neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, WenXiao; Li, ShiHua; Li, XiaoJiang

    2015-06-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an organic small molecule isolated from various plants that have been used in traditional Chinese medicine. Isolation of this compound was its induction into modern medicine, and its usefulness became quickly apparent as seen in its ability to combat bacterial diarrhea, type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, inflammation, heart diseases, and more. However, BBR's effects on neurodegenerative diseases remained relatively unexplored until its ability to stunt Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression was characterized. In this review, we will delve into the multi-faceted defensive capabilities and bio-molecular pathways of BBR against AD, Parkinson's disease (PD), and trauma-induced neurodegeneration. The multiple effects of BBR, some of which enhance neuro-protective factors/pathways and others counteract targets that induce neurodegeneration, suggest that there are many more branches to the diverse capabilities of BBR that have yet to be uncovered. The promising results seen provide a convincing and substantial basis to support further scientific exploration and development of the therapeutic potential of BBR against neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25749423

  6. Galectin-3 as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Tumors Arising from Malignant Endothelia1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kim D; Glinskii, Olga V; Mossine, Valeri V; Turk, James R; Mawhinney, Thomas P; Anthony, Douglas C; Henry, Carolyn J; Huxley, Virginia H; Glinsky, Gennadi V; Pienta, Kenneth J; Raz, Avraham; Glinsky, Vladislav V

    2007-01-01

    Angiosarcoma (ASA) in humans and hemangiosarcoma (HSA) in dogs are deadly neoplastic diseases characterized by an aggressive growth of malignant cells with endothelial phenotype, widespread metastasis, and poor response to chemotherapy. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding lectin implicated in tumor progression and metastasis, endothelial cell biology and angiogenesis, and regulation of apoptosis and neoplastic cell response to cytotoxic drugs, has not been studied before in tumors arising from malignant endothelia. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Gal-3 could be widely expressed in human ASA and canine HSA and could play an important role in malignant endothelial cell biology. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that 100% of the human ASA (10 of 10) and canine HSA (17 of 17) samples analyzed expressed Gal-3. Two carbohydrate-based Gal-3 inhibitors, modified citrus pectin (MCP) and lactulosyl-l-leucine (LL), caused a dose-dependent reduction of SVR murine ASA cell clonogenic survival through the inhibition of Gal-3 antiapoptotic function. Furthermore, both MCP and LL sensitized SVR cells to the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin to a degree sufficient to reduce the in vitro IC50 of doxorubicin by 10.7-fold and 3.6-fold, respectively. These results highlight the important role of Gal-3 in the biology of ASA and identify Gal-3 as a potential therapeutic target in tumors arising from malignant endothelial cells. PMID:17786185

  7. Therapeutic potential of monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Melinda M; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-03-19

    Marijuana and aspirin have been used for millennia to treat a wide range of maladies including pain and inflammation. Both cannabinoids, like marijuana, that exert anti-inflammatory action through stimulating cannabinoid receptors, and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, like aspirin, that suppress pro-inflammatory eicosanoid production have shown beneficial outcomes in mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Both cannabinoids and COX inhibitors, however, have untoward effects that discourage their chronic usage, including cognitive deficits and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered that the serine hydrolase monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) links the endocannabinoid and eicosanoid systems together through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) to provide the major arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pools for pro-inflammatory eicosanoid synthesis in specific tissues. Studies in recent years have shown that MAGL inhibitors elicit anti-nociceptive, anxiolytic, and anti-emetic responses and attenuate precipitated withdrawal symptoms in addiction paradigms through enhancing endocannabinoid signaling. MAGL inhibitors have also been shown to exert anti-inflammatory action in the brain and protect against neurodegeneration through lowering eicosanoid production. In cancer, MAGL inhibitors have been shown to have anti-cancer properties not only through modulating the endocannabinoid-eicosanoid network, but also by controlling fatty acid release for the synthesis of protumorigenic signaling lipids. Thus, MAGL serves as a critical node in simultaneously coordinating multiple lipid signaling pathways in both physiological and disease contexts. This review will discuss the diverse (patho)physiological roles of MAGL and the therapeutic potential of MAGL inhibitors in treating a vast array of complex human diseases. PMID:23142242

  8. Therapeutic aptamers: developmental potential as anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Hyun Jung; Heo, Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, composed of single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that interact with target molecules through a specific three-dimensional structure, are selected from pools of combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries. With their high specificity and affinity for target proteins, ease of synthesis and modification, and low immunogenicity and toxicity, aptamers are considered to be attractive molecules for development as anticancer therapeutics. Two aptamers - one targeting nucleolin and a second targeting CXCL12 - are currently undergoing clinical trials for treating cancer patients, and many more are under study. In this mini-review, we present the current clinical status of aptamers and aptamer-based cancer therapeutics. We also discuss advantages, limitations, and prospects for aptamers as cancer therapeutics. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(4): 234-237] PMID:25560701

  9. First In Vivo Evaluation of Liposome-encapsulated 223Ra as a Potential Alpha-particle-emitting Cancer Therapeutic Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Jonasdottir, Thora J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Borrebaek, Jorgen; Bruland, Oyvind S.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2006-09-13

    Liposomes carrying chemotherapeutics have had some success in cancer treatment and may be suitable carriers for therapeutic radionuclides. This study was designed to evaluate the biodistribution of and to estimate the radiation doses from the alpha emitter 223Ra loaded into pegylated liposomes in selected tissues. 223Ra was encapsulated in pegylated liposomal doxorubicin by ionophore-mediated loading. The biodistribution of liposomal 223Ra was compared to free cationic 223Ra in Balb/C mice. We showed that liposomal 223 Ra circulated in the blood with an initial half-time in excess of 24 hours, which agreed well with that reported for liposomal doxorubicin in rodents, while the blood half-time of cationic 223Ra was considerably less than one hour. When liposomal 223 Ra was catabolized, the released 223Ra was either excreted or taken up in the skeleton. This skeletal uptake increased up to 14 days after treatment, but did not reach the level seen with free 223Ra. Pre-treatment with non-radioactive liposomal doxorubicin 4 days in advance lessened the liver uptake of liposomal 223 Ra. Dose estimates showed that the spleen, followed by bone surfaces, received the highest absorbed doses. Liposomal 223 Ra was relatively stable in vivo and may have potential for radionuclide therapy and combination therapy with chemotherapeutic agents.

  10. Phytomodulatory potential of lycopene from Lycopersicum esculentum against doxorubicin induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Koul, Ashwani; Shubrant; Gupta, Prachi

    2013-08-01

    An elevated level of serum urea and creatinine was observed in doxorubicin (DOX) treated animals indicating DOX-induced nephrotoxicity. Enhanced lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the renal tissue was accompanied by a significant decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) activities. Administration of lycopene (LycT) extracted from tomato to DOX treated mice showed a significant reduction in serum creatinine and urea levels which were associated with significantly low levels of LPO and significantly enhanced level of GSH and related antioxidant enzymes activity (GPx, GR and CAT) when compared to DOX group. Histopathological analysis revealed severe damage in the renal tissue of DOX treated animals. However, animals pretreated with LycT were observed to have reduced damage. Thus, from present results it may be inferred that lycopene may be beneficial in mitigating DOX induced nephrotoxicity in mice. PMID:24228387

  11. Coadsorption of Doxorubicin and Selected Dyes on Carbon Nanotubes. Theoretical Investigation of Potential Application as a pH-Controlled Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Panczyk, Tomasz; Wolski, Pawel; Lajtar, Leszek

    2016-05-17

    This work shows results of a theoretical survey, based on molecular dynamics simulation, of potential applicability of doxorubicin coadsorption with various dyes molecules on/in carbon nanotubes as a drug delivery system. The central idea is to take advantage of the dyes charge distribution change upon switching the pH of the environment from neutral (physiological 7.4) to acidic one (∼5.5 which is typical for tumor tissues). This work discusses results obtained for four dye molecules revealing more or less interesting behavior. These were bromothymol blue, methyl red, neutral red, and p-phenylenediamine. All of them reveal pKa in the range 5-7 and thus will undergo protonation in that pH range. We considered coadsorption on external walls of carbon nanotubes and sequential filling of the nanotubes inner hollow space by drug and dyes. The latter approach, with the application of neutral red and p-phenylenediamine as blockers of doxorubicin, led to the most promising results. Closer analysis of these systems allowed us to state that neutral red can be particularly useful as a long-term blocker of doxorubicin encapsulated in the inner cavity of (30,0) carbon nanotube at neutral pH. At acidic pH we observed a spontaneous release of neutral red from the nanotube and unblocking of doxorubicin. We also confirmed, by analysis of free energy profiles, that unblocked doxorubicin can spontaneously leave the nanotube interior at the considered conditions. Thus, that system can realize pH controlled doxorubicin release in acidic environment of tumor tissues. PMID:27133585

  12. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase protects against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity through a transient receptor potential channel vanilloid 1-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Yuan, Ming; Ceylan, Asli F; Wang, Xiaoming; Ren, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Cardiotoxicity is one of the major life-threatening effects encountered in cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin and other anthracyclines. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) may alleviate doxorubicin toxicity although the mechanism remains elusive. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of ALDH2 overexpression on doxorubicin-induced myocardial damage with a focus on mitochondrial injury. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice overexpressing ALDH2 driven by chicken β-actin promoter were challenged with doxorubicin (15mg/kg, single i.p. injection, for 6days) and cardiac mechanical function was assessed using the echocardiographic and IonOptix systems. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate intracellular Ca(2+) regulatory and mitochondrial proteins, PKA and its downstream signal eNOS. Doxorubicin challenge altered cardiac geometry and function evidenced by enlarged left ventricular end systolic and diastolic diameters, decreased factional shortening, cell shortening and intracellular Ca(2+) rise, prolonged relengthening and intracellular Ca(2+) decay, the effects of which were attenuated by ALDH2. Doxorubicin challenge compromised mitochondrial integrity and upregulated 4-HNE and UCP-2 levels while downregulating levels of TRPV1, SERCA2a and PGC-1α, the effects of which were alleviated by ALDH2. Doxorubicin-induced cardiac functional defect and apoptosis were reversed by the TRPV1 agonist SA13353 and the ALDH-2 agonist Alda-1 whereas the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine nullified ALDH2/Alda-1-induced protection. Doxorubicin suppressed phosphorylation of PKA and eNOS, the effect of which was reversed by ALDH2. Moreover, 4-HNE mimicked doxorubicin-induced cardiomyocyte anomalies, the effect of which was ablated by SA13353. Taken together, our results suggested that ALDH2 may rescue against doxorubicin cardiac toxicity possibly through a TRPV1-mediated protection of mitochondrial integrity. PMID:26692169

  13. The therapeutic potential of regulated hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J

    2001-03-01

    Reducing body temperature of rodents has been found to improve their survival to ischaemia, hypoxia, chemical toxicants, and many other types of insults. Larger species, including humans, may also benefit from a lower body temperature when recovering from CNS ischaemia and other traumatic insults. Rodents subjected to these insults undergo a regulated hypothermic response (that is, decrease in set point temperature) characterised by preference for cooler ambient temperatures, peripheral vasodilatation, and reduced metabolic rate. However, forced hypothermia (that is, body temperature forced below set point) is the only method used in the study and treatment of human pathological insults. The therapeutic efficacy of the hypothermic treatment is likely to be influenced by the nature of the reduction in body temperature (that is, forced versus regulated). Homeostatic mechanisms counter forced reductions in body temperature resulting in physiological stress and decreased efficacy of the hypothermic treatment. On the other hand, regulated hypothermia would seem to be the best means of achieving a therapeutic benefit because thermal homeostatic systems mediate a controlled reduction in core temperature. PMID:11300205

  14. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in digestive diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dulbecco, Pietro; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin is a low-molecular-weight hydrophobic polyphenol that is extracted from turmeric, which possesses a wide range of biological properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative and anti-microbial activities. Despite its diverse targets and substantial safety, clinical applications of this molecule for digestive disorders have been largely limited to case series or small clinical trials. The poor bioavailability of curcumin is likely the major hurdle for its more widespread use in humans. However, complexation of curcumin into phytosomes has recently helped to bypass this problem, as it has been demonstrated that this new lecithin formulation enables increased absorption to a level 29-fold higher than that of traditional curcuminoid products. This allows us to achieve much greater tissue substance delivery using significantly lower doses of curcumin than have been used in past clinical studies. As curcumin has already been shown to provide good therapeutic results in some small studies of both inflammatory and neoplastic bowel disorders, it is reasonable to anticipate an even greater efficacy with the advent of this new technology, which remarkably improves its bioavailability. These features are very promising and may represent a novel and effective therapeutic approach to both functional and organic digestive diseases. PMID:24409053

  15. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in digestive diseases.

    PubMed

    Dulbecco, Pietro; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-12-28

    Curcumin is a low-molecular-weight hydrophobic polyphenol that is extracted from turmeric, which possesses a wide range of biological properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative and anti-microbial activities. Despite its diverse targets and substantial safety, clinical applications of this molecule for digestive disorders have been largely limited to case series or small clinical trials. The poor bioavailability of curcumin is likely the major hurdle for its more widespread use in humans. However, complexation of curcumin into phytosomes has recently helped to bypass this problem, as it has been demonstrated that this new lecithin formulation enables increased absorption to a level 29-fold higher than that of traditional curcuminoid products. This allows us to achieve much greater tissue substance delivery using significantly lower doses of curcumin than have been used in past clinical studies. As curcumin has already been shown to provide good therapeutic results in some small studies of both inflammatory and neoplastic bowel disorders, it is reasonable to anticipate an even greater efficacy with the advent of this new technology, which remarkably improves its bioavailability. These features are very promising and may represent a novel and effective therapeutic approach to both functional and organic digestive diseases. PMID:24409053

  16. Lipoic acid - biological activity and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Gorąca, Anna; Huk-Kolega, Halina; Piechota, Aleksandra; Kleniewska, Paulina; Ciejka, Elżbieta; Skibska, Beata

    2011-01-01

    α-Lipoic acid (LA; 5-(1,2-dithiolan-3-yl)pentanoic acid) was originally isolated from bovine liver by Reed et al. in 1951. LA was once considered a vitamin. Subsequently, it was found that LA is not a vitamin and is synthesized by plants and animals. LA is covalently bound to the ε-amino group of lysine residues and functions as a cofactor for mitochondrial enzymes by catalyzing the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate and branched-chain α-keto acids. LA and its reduced form - dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), meet all the criteria for an ideal antioxidant because they can easily quench radicals, can chelate metals, have an amphiphlic character and they do not exhibit any serious side effects. They interact with other antioxidants and can regenerate them. For this reason, LA is called an antioxidant of antioxidants. LA has an influence on the second messenger nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and attenuates the release of free radicals and cytotoxic cytokines. The therapeutic action of LA is based on its antioxidant properties. Current studies support its use in the ancillary treatment of many diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, autoimmune diseases, cancer and AIDS. This review was undertaken to gather the most recent information regarding the therapeutic properties of LA and its possible utility in disease treatment. PMID:22001972

  17. Solid lipid nanoparticles for potential doxorubicin delivery in glioblastoma treatment: preliminary in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Luigi; Gallarate, Marina; Peira, Elena; Chirio, Daniela; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Biasibetti, Elena; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Valazza, Alberto; Panciani, Pier Paolo; Lanotte, Michele; Schiffer, Davide; Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Riganti, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    The major obstacle to glioblastoma pharmacological therapy is the overcoming of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In literature, several strategies have been proposed to overcome the BBB: in this experimental work, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), prepared according to fatty acid coacervation technique, are proposed as the vehicle for doxorubicin (Dox), to enhance its permeation through an artificial model of BBB. The in vitro cytotoxicity of Dox-loaded SLN has been measured on three different commercial and patient-derived glioma cell lines. Dox was entrapped within SLN thanks to hydrophobic ion pairing with negatively charged surfactants, used as counterions. Results indicate that Dox entrapped in SLN maintains its cytotoxic activity toward glioma cell lines; moreover, its permeation through hCMEC/D3 cell monolayer, assumed as a model of the BBB, was increased when the drug was entrapped in SLN. In conclusion, SLN proved to be a promising vehicle for the delivery of Dox to the brain in glioblastoma treatment. PMID:24824141

  18. PP2A inhibition determines poor outcome and doxorubicin resistance in early breast cancer and its activation shows promising therapeutic effects

    PubMed Central

    Zazo, Sandra; Arpí, Oriol; Menéndez, Silvia; Manso, Rebeca; Lluch, Ana; Eroles, Pilar; Rovira, Ana; Albanell, Joan; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; Rojo, Federico

    2015-01-01

    The protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a key tumor suppressor which has emerged as a novel molecular target in some human cancers. Here, we show that PP2A inhibition is a common event in breast cancer and identified PP2A phosphorylation and deregulation SET and CIP2A as molecular contributing mechanisms to inactivate PP2A. Interestingly, restoration of PP2A activity after FTY720 treatment reduced cell growth, induced apoptosis and decreased AKT and ERK activation. Moreover, FTY720 led to PP2A activation then enhancing doxorubicin-induced antitumor effects both in vitro and in vivo. PP2A inhibition (CPscore: PP2A phosphorylation and/or CIP2A overexpression) was detected in 27% of cases (62/230), and associated with grade (p = 0.017), relapse (p < 0.001), negative estrogen (p < 0.001) and progesterone receptor expression (p < 0.001), HER2-positive tumors (p = 0.049), Ki-67 expression (p < 0.001), and higher AKT (p < 0.001) and ERK (p < 0.001) phosphorylation. Moreover, PP2A inhibition determined shorter overall (p = 0.006) and event-free survival (p = 0.003), and multivariate analysis confirmed its independent prognostic impact. Altogether, our results indicate that PP2A is frequently inactivated in breast cancer and determines worse outcome, and its restoration using PP2A activators represents an alternative therapeutic strategy in this disease. PMID:25726524

  19. Effect of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound on Drug Release from Doxorubicin-Loaded PEGylated Liposomes and Therapeutic Effect in Colorectal Cancer Murine Models.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hwan-Seok; Hwang, Hyosook; Oh, Phil-Sun; Kim, Eun-Mi; Lee, Tai Kyoung; Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Hyeon Soo; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2016-04-01

    The goal of the study described here was to evaluate the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in drug release and its application in cancer therapy. HIFU was set to minimize hyperthermia, particularly non-specific hyperthermia, of exposed areas. An in vitro temperature-sensitive hydrogel phantom model determined the parameters of HIFU under mild condition settings (spatial average temporal average intensity [ISATA] = 83.35 W/cm(2)). PEGylated liposomal indocyanine green (LCLP-ICG) and PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (LCLP-Dox) were prepared with the same mole ratio to allow direct comparison of drug release in vitro and in vivo. We induced drug release with HIFU treatment using LCLP-ICG coupled with optical imaging in vitro and in vivo. The size distribution changes in LCLP-ICG in vitro and fluorescence intensity changes in ICG after intra-tumoral injection of LCLP-ICG into CT26 solid tumors in vivo followed by HIFU confirmed the feasibility of the system. We validated the therapeutic effect of HIFU treatment of the CT26 mouse tumor model. The tumor growth rate was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) only in the group administered LCLP-Dox followed by cycles of HIFU treatment, and the chemotherapy of the CT26 solid tumors was found to be highly efficient. PMID:26795498

  20. Telomerase and its potential for therapeutic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, P; Burger, A M

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase and telomeres are attractive targets for anticancer therapy. This is supported by the fact that the majority of human cancers express the enzyme telomerase which is essential to maintain their telomere length and thus, to ensure indefinite cell proliferation – a hallmark of cancer. Tumours have relatively shorter telomeres compared to normal cell types, opening the possibility that human cancers may be considerably more susceptible to killing by agents that inhibit telomere replication than normal cells. Advances in the understanding of the regulation of telomerase activity and the telomere structure, as well as the identification of telomerase and telomere associated binding proteins have opened new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review telomere and telomerase biology and the various approaches which have been developed to inhibit the telomere/telomerase complex over the past decade. They include inhibitors of the enzyme catalytic subunit and RNA component, agents that target telomeres, telomerase vaccines and drugs targeting binding proteins. The emerging role of telomerase in cancer stem cells and the implications for cancer therapy are also discussed. PMID:17603541

  1. Novel bifunctional natriuretic peptides as potential therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Deborah M; Burnett, John C; Potter, Lincoln R

    2008-12-12

    Synthetic atrial natriuretic peptide (carperitide) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; nesiritide) are used to treat congestive heart failure. However, despite beneficial cardiac unloading properties, reductions in renal perfusion pressures limit their clinical effectiveness. Recently, CD-NP, a chimeric peptide composed of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) fused to the C-terminal tail of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), was shown to be more glomerular filtration rate-enhancing than BNP in dogs. However, the molecular basis for the increased responsiveness was not determined. Here, we show that the DNP tail has a striking effect on CNP, converting it from a non-agonist to a partial agonist of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A while maintaining the ability to activate NPR-B. This effect is specific for human receptors because CD-NP was only a slightly better activator of rat NPR-A due to the promiscuous nature of CNP in this species. Interesting, the DNP tail alone had no effect on any NPR even though it is effective in vivo. To further increase the potency of CD-NP for NPR-A, we converted two different triplet sequences within the CNP ring to their corresponding residues in BNP. Both variants demonstrated increased affinity and full agonist activity for NPR-A, whereas one was as potent as any NPR-A activator known. In contrast to a previous report, we found that DNP binds the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C). However, none of the chimeric peptides bound NPR-C with significantly higher affinity than endogenous ligands. We suggest that bifunctional chimeric peptides represent a new generation of natriuretic peptide therapeutics. PMID:18940797

  2. Novel Bifunctional Natriuretic Peptides as Potential Therapeutics*

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Burnett, John C.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic atrial natriuretic peptide (carperitide) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; nesiritide) are used to treat congestive heart failure. However, despite beneficial cardiac unloading properties, reductions in renal perfusion pressures limit their clinical effectiveness. Recently, CD-NP, a chimeric peptide composed of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) fused to the C-terminal tail of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), was shown to be more glomerular filtration rate-enhancing than BNP in dogs. However, the molecular basis for the increased responsiveness was not determined. Here, we show that the DNP tail has a striking effect on CNP, converting it from a non-agonist to a partial agonist of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A while maintaining the ability to activate NPR-B. This effect is specific for human receptors because CD-NP was only a slightly better activator of rat NPR-A due to the promiscuous nature of CNP in this species. Interesting, the DNP tail alone had no effect on any NPR even though it is effective in vivo. To further increase the potency of CD-NP for NPR-A, we converted two different triplet sequences within the CNP ring to their corresponding residues in BNP. Both variants demonstrated increased affinity and full agonist activity for NPR-A, whereas one was as potent as any NPR-A activator known. In contrast to a previous report, we found that DNP binds the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C). However, none of the chimeric peptides bound NPR-C with significantly higher affinity than endogenous ligands. We suggest that bifunctional chimeric peptides represent a new generation of natriuretic peptide therapeutics. PMID:18940797

  3. Potential new therapeutic targets for pathological pruritus.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Very few approved medications are indicated for the treatment of pruritus, and drug development for pruritic diseases is awaited. During the past two decades, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the physiology and pathophysiology of pruritus. Newly identified potential targets for pathological pruritus include receptors (histamine H4 receptor, leukotriene B4 receptors, interleukin-31 receptor A, bombesin BB2 receptor, toll-like receptor 3, α-adrenoceptor, and opioid μ- and κ-receptors), channels (transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 and TRPA1 channels), and enzymes (histidine decarboxylase, sphingomyelin glucosylceramide deacylase, 5-lipoxygenase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase, and autotaxin). The development of specific, effective blockers and agonists/antagonists of these targets is awaited. PMID:23902965

  4. The Therapeutic Potential of Medicinal Foods

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingum, Nelvana; Mahomoodally, M. Fawzi

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and nutritional sciences have recently witnessed a bloom in the scientific literature geared towards the use of food plants for their diversified health benefits and potential clinical applications. Health professionals now recognize that a synergism of drug therapy and nutrition might confer optimum outcomes in the fight against diseases. The prophylactic benefits of food plants are being investigated for potential use as novel medicinal remedies due to the presence of pharmacologically active compounds. Although the availability of scientific data is rapidly growing, there is still a paucity of updated compilation of data and concerns about the rationale of these health-foods still persist in the literature. This paper attempts to congregate the nutritional value, phytochemical composition, traditional uses, in vitro and in vivo studies of 10 common medicinal food plants used against chronic noncommunicable and infectious diseases. Food plants included were based on the criteria that they are consumed as a common food in a typical diet as either fruit or vegetable for their nutritive value but have also other parts which are in common use in folk medicine. The potential challenges of incorporating these medicinal foods in the diet which offers prospective opportunities for future drug development are also discussed. PMID:24822061

  5. Therapeutic Potential of Resveratrol in Lymphoid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Khan, Omar S; Bhat, Ajaz A; Krishnankutty, Roopesh; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Uddin, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    Natural products have always been sought as a dependable source for the cure of many fatal diseases including cancer. Resveratrol (RSV), a naturally occurring plant polyphenol, has been of recent research interest and is being investigated for its beneficial biological properties that include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, proapoptotic, and growth inhibitory activities. These effects are mainly mediated by cell cycle arrest, upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, loss of mitochondrial potential, and generation of reactive oxygen species. Among the beneficial properties of RSV, the anticancer property has been of the prime focus and extensively explored during the last few years. Although reports exist on the chemopreventive role of RSV in many solid tumors, limited information is available on the antiproliferative activity of RSV in human lymphoma cells and experimental models. Potential mechanisms for its antiproliferative effect include induction of cell differentiation, apoptosis, and inhibition of DNA synthesis. In this review, the different kinds of lymphoid malignancies and the main mechanisms of cell death induced by resveratrol are discussed. The challenges are limiting in vivo experimental studies involving resveratrol. An attempt for the translation of this compound into a clinical drug also forms a part of this review. PMID:27028800

  6. The therapeutic potential of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Fiona M.; Driskell, Ryan R.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an explosion of interest in stem cells, not just within the scientific and medical communities but also among politicians, religious groups and ethicists. Here, we summarize the different types of stem cells that have been described: their origins in embryonic and adult tissues and their differentiation potential in vivo and in culture. We review some current clinical applications of stem cells, highlighting the problems encountered when going from proof-of-principle in the laboratory to widespread clinical practice. While some of the key genetic and epigenetic factors that determine stem cell properties have been identified, there is still much to be learned about how these factors interact. There is a growing realization of the importance of environmental factors in regulating stem cell behaviour and this is being explored by imaging stem cells in vivo and recreating artificial niches in vitro. New therapies, based on stem cell transplantation or endogenous stem cells, are emerging areas, as is drug discovery based on patient-specific pluripotent cells and cancer stem cells. What makes stem cell research so exciting is its tremendous potential to benefit human health and the opportunities for interdisciplinary research that it presents. PMID:20008393

  7. The chemotherapeutic potential of doxorubicin-loaded PEG-b-PLGA nanopolymersomes in mouse breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Alibolandi, Mona; Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Abnous, Khalil; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ramezani, Mohammad; Hadizadeh, Farzin

    2015-08-01

    Vesicles of mPEG-PLGA block copolymer were developed to deliver a therapeutic quantity of doxorubicin (DOX) for breast cancer treatment. The DOX-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by the pH-gradient method and then evaluated in terms of morphology, size, DOX encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release mechanism. The PEG-PLGA nanopolymersomes were 134±1.2nm spherical NPs with a narrow size distribution (PDI=0.121). DOX was entrapped in mPEG-PLGA nanopolymersomes with an encapsulation efficiency and a loading content of 91.25±4.27% and 7.3±0.34%, respectively. The DOX-loaded nanopolymersomes were found to be stable, demonstrating no significant change in particle size and encapsulation efficiency (EE%) during the 6-month storage period of the lyophilized powder at 4°C. The nanopolymersomes sustained the release of DOX. In cytotoxicity studies of 4T1 cell line samples, free DOX showed a higher cytotoxicity (IC50=1.76μg/mL) than did DOX-loaded nanopolymersomes (15.82μg/mL) in vitro. In order to evaluate the antitumor efficacy and biodistribution of DOX-loaded nanopolymersomes, murine breast tumors were established on the BALB/c mice, and in vivo studies were performed. The obtained results demonstrated that the prepared drug delivery system was highly effective against a murine breast cancer tumor model and successfully accumulated in the tumor site through an enhanced permeation and retention mechanism. In vivo studies also proved that DOX-loaded nanopolymersomes are stable in blood circulation and could be considered a promising and effective DOX delivery system for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26170161

  8. gp130 receptor ligands as potential therapeutic targets for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Febbraio, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Obesity and its related cluster of pathophysiologic conditions including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are recognized as growing threats to world health. It is now estimated that 10% of the world’s population is overweight or obese. As a result, new therapeutic options for the treatment of obesity are clearly warranted. Recent research has focused on the role that gp130 receptor ligands may play as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. One cytokine in particular, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), acts both centrally and peripherally and mimics the biologic actions of the appetite control hormone leptin, but unlike leptin, CNTF appears to be effective in obesity and as such may have therapeutic potential. In addition, CNTF suppresses inflammatory signaling cascades associated with lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle. This review examines the potential role of gp130 receptor ligands as part of a therapeutic strategy to treat obesity. PMID:17404609

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Dietary Phenolic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Saibabu, Venkata; Fatima, Zeeshan; Khan, Luqman Ahmad; Hameed, Saif

    2015-01-01

    Although modern lifestyle has eased the quality of human life, this lifestyle's related patterns have imparted negative effects on health to acquire multiple diseases. Many synthetic drugs are invented during the last millennium but most if not all of them possess several side effects and proved to be costly. Convincing evidences have established the premise that the phytotherapeutic potential of natural compounds and need of search for novel drugs from natural sources are of high priority. Phenolic acids (PAs) are a class of secondary metabolites spread throughout the plant kingdom and generally involved in plethora of cellular processes involved in plant growth and reproduction and also produced as defense mechanism to sustain various environmental stresses. Extensive research on PAs strongly suggests that consumption of these compounds hold promise to offer protection against various ailments in humans. This paper focuses on the naturally derived PAs and summarizes the action mechanisms of these compounds during disease conditions. Based on the available information in the literature, it is suggested that use of PAs as drugs is very promising; however more research and clinical trials are necessary before these bioactive molecules can be made for treatment. Finally this review provides greater awareness of the promise that natural PAs hold for use in the disease prevention and therapy. PMID:26442119

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm: potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Garima; Rao, Saloni; Bansal, Ankiti; Dang, Shweta; Gupta, Sanjay; Gabrani, Reema

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative pathogen that has become an important cause of infection, especially in patients with compromised host defense mechanisms. It is frequently related to nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bacteremia. The biofilm formed by the bacteria allows it to adhere to any surface, living or non-living and thus Pseudomonal infections can involve any part of the body. Further, the adaptive and genetic changes of the micro-organisms within the biofilm make them resistant to all known antimicrobial agents making the Pseudomonal infections complicated and life threatening. Pel, Psl and Alg operons present in P. aeruginosa are responsible for the biosynthesis of extracellular polysaccharide which plays an important role in cell-cell and cell-surface interactions during biofilm formation. Understanding the bacterial virulence which depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors is essential to know the potential drug targets for future studies. Current novel methods like small molecule based inhibitors, phytochemicals, bacteriophage therapy, photodynamic therapy, antimicrobial peptides, monoclonal antibodies and nanoparticles to curtail the biofilm formed by P. aeruginosa are being discussed in this review. PMID:24309094

  11. Paradoxically, iron overload does not potentiate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in vitro in cardiomyocytes and in vivo in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Guenancia, Charles; Li, Na; Hachet, Olivier; Rigal, Eve; Cottin, Yves; Dutartre, Patrick; Rochette, Luc; Vergely, Catherine

    2015-04-15

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is known to induce serious cardiotoxicity, which is believed to be mediated by oxidative stress and complex interactions with iron. However, the relationship between iron and DOX-induced cardiotoxicity remains controversial and the role of iron chelation therapy to prevent cardiotoxicity is called into question. Firstly, we evaluated in vitro the effects of DOX in combination with dextran–iron on cell viability in cultured H9c2 cardiomyocytes and EMT-6 cancer cells. Secondly, we used an in vivo murine model of iron overloading (IO) in which male C57BL/6 mice received a daily intra-peritoneal injection of dextran–iron (15 mg/kg) for 3 weeks (D0–D20) and then (D21) a single sub-lethal intra-peritoneal injection of 6 mg/kg of DOX. While DOX significantly decreased cell viability in EMT-6 and H9c2, pretreatment with dextran–iron (125–1000 μg/mL) in combination with DOX, paradoxically limited cytotoxicity in H9c2 and increased it in EMT-6. In mice, IO alone resulted in cardiac hypertrophy (+ 22%) and up-regulation of brain natriuretic peptide and β-myosin heavy-chain (β-MHC) expression, as well as an increase in cardiac nitro-oxidative stress revealed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. In DOX-treated mice, there was a significant decrease in left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and an up-regulation of cardiac β-MHC and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression. However, prior IO did not exacerbate the DOX-induced fall in LVEF and there was no increase in ANP expression. IO did not impair the capacity of DOX to decrease cancer cell viability and could even prevent some aspects of DOX cardiotoxicity in cardiomyocytes and in mice. - Highlights: • The effects of iron on cardiomyocytes were opposite to those on cancer cell lines. • In our model, iron overload did not potentiate anthracycline cardiotoxicity. • Chronic oxidative stress induced by iron could mitigate doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. • The role of iron in

  12. Influence of the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole on distribution and activity of doxorubicin in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Man; Lee, Carol; Wang, Marina; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-01-01

    Cellular causes of resistance and limited drug distribution within solid tumors limit therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Acidic endosomes in cancer cells mediate autophagy, which facilitates survival of stressed cells, and may contribute to drug resistance. Basic drugs (e.g. doxorubicin) are sequestered in acidic endosomes, thereby diverting drugs from their target DNA and decreasing penetration to distal cells. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may raise endosomal pH, with potential to improve drug efficacy and distribution in solid tumors. We determined the effects of the PPI lansoprazole to modify the activity of doxorubicin. To gain insight into its mechanisms, we studied the effects of lansoprazole on endosomal pH, and on the spatial distribution of doxorubicin, and of biomarkers reflecting its activity, using in vitro and murine models. Lansoprazole showed concentration-dependent effects to raise endosomal pH and to inhibit endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin in cultured tumor cells. Lansoprazole was not toxic to cancer cells but potentiated the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and enhanced its penetration through multilayered cell cultures. In solid tumors, lansoprazole improved the distribution of doxorubicin but also increased expression of biomarkers of drug activity throughout the tumor. Combined treatment with lansoprazole and doxorubicin was more effective in delaying tumor growth as compared to either agent alone. Together, lansoprazole enhances the therapeutic effects of doxorubicin both by improving its distribution and increasing its activity in solid tumors. Use of PPIs to improve drug distribution and to inhibit autophagy represents a promising strategy to enhance the effectiveness of anticancer drugs in solid tumors. PMID:26212113

  13. Integrated Treatment of Aqueous Extract of Solanum nigrum-Potentiated Cisplatin- and Doxorubicin-Induced Cytotoxicity in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chien-Kai; Lin, Yi-Feng; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Wang, Chia-Wowi; Chang, Yu-Jia; Choong, Chen-Yen; Lin, Chi-Shian; Tai, Chen-Jei; Chang, Chun-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the main approach for treating advanced and recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the clinical performance of chemotherapy is limited by a relatively low response rate, drug resistance, and adverse effects that severely affect the quality of life of patients. The aqueous extract of Solanum nigrum (AE-SN) is a crucial ingredient in some traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formulas for treating cancer patients and exhibits antitumor effects in human HCC cells. Therefore, this study examined the tumor-suppression efficiency of AE-SN integrated with a standard chemotherapeutic drug, namely, cisplatin or doxorubicin, in human HCC cells, namely, Hep3B and HepJ5. The results suggested that the integrated treatment with AE-SN-potentiated cisplatin and doxorubicin induced cytotoxicity through the cleavage of caspase-7 and accumulation of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 A/1B II (LC-3 A/B II), which were associated with apoptotic and autophagic cell death, respectively, in both the Hep3B and HepJ5 cells. In conclusion, AE-SN can potentially be used in novel integrated chemotherapy with cisplatin or doxorubicin to treat HCC patients. PMID:26221175

  14. Lipid-polymer nanoparticles encapsulating doxorubicin and 2'-deoxy-5-azacytidine enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemical therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianwei; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Lili; Zheng, Mingbin; Zheng, Cuifang; Gong, Ping; Zhao, Pengfei; Ma, Yifan; Tao, Qian; Cai, Lintao

    2013-05-01

    Nanomedcine holds great potential in cancer therapy due to its flexibility on drug delivery, protection, releasing, and targeting. Epigenetic drugs, such as 2'-deoxy-5-azacytidine (DAC), are able to cause reactive expression of tumor suppressor genes (TSG) in human cancers and, therefore, might be able to enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy. In this report, we fabricated a lipid-polymer nanoparticle for codelivery of epigenetic drug DAC and traditional chemotherapeutic drug (DOX) to cancer cells and monitored the growth inhibition of the hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) on cancer cells. Our results showed that NPs encapsulating DAC, DOX, or both, could be effectively internalized by cancer cells. More importantly, incorporating DAC into NPs significantly enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to DOX by inhibiting cell growth rate and inducing cell apoptosis. Further evidence indicated that DAC encapsulated by NPs was able to rescue the expression of silenced TSG in cancer cells. Overall our work clearly suggested that the resulting lipid-polymer nanoparticle is a potential tool for combining epigenetic therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:23570548

  15. Doxorubicin loaded pH-responsive micelles capable of rapid intracellular drug release for potential tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Wu, Wei; Xiu, Kemao; Xu, Fujian; Li, Zhongming; Li, Jianshu

    2014-08-01

    Amphiphilic copolymers have been paid much attention for controlled drug release for many years due to their obvious advantages. In this study, an acid-triggered drug carrier system capable of rapid intracellular drug release is investigated for potential tumor therapy. The amphiphilic diblock copolymer poly(2-diisopropylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride) (PDPA-b-PAMA) is prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The molecular structure of the copolymer is confirmed by 1H NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of the PDPA-b-PAMA is 0.005 mg/mL, which can ensure the thermodynamical stability of micelles even after significant dilution. The drug loading and encapsulation efficiencies of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles are 9.96% and 55.31%, respectively. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) show that the amphiphilic block copolymers self-assemble into spherical micelles with narrow polydispersity indexes (PDLs) at pH 7.4 and 6.8, but disassemble into random chain aggregations at pH 5.0. The DOX-loaded PDPA-b-PAMA shows obvious pH-responsive drug release profile when the pH value changes from 7.4 to 5.0, since it transforms from amphiphilicity to double hydrophilicity through the protonation of PDPA block (pK(a) - 6.2) in a relatively low pH condition, thus the loaded DOX can be rapidly released from the disassembling micelles. In addition, the micellar system also exhibits relatively low cytotoxicity and rapid drug release behaviour in tumor cells, which make it promising for tumor therapy. PMID:25016648

  16. Repurposing antipsychotics as glioblastoma therapeutics: Potentials and challenges

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JIN-KU; NAM, DO-HYUN; LEE, JEONGWU

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and most lethal primary brain tumor, with tragically little therapeutic progress over the last 30 years. Surgery provides a modest benefit, and GBM cells are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. Despite significant development of the molecularly targeting strategies, the clinical outcome of GBM patients remains dismal. The challenges inherent in developing effective GBM treatments have become increasingly clear, and include resistance to standard treatments, the blood-brain barrier, resistance of GBM stem-like cells, and the genetic complexity and molecular adaptability of GBM. Recent studies have collectively suggested that certain antipsychotics harbor antitumor effects and have potential utilities as anti-GBM therapeutics. In the present review, the anti-tumorigenic effects and putative mechanisms of antipsychotics, and the challenges for the potential use of antipsychotic drugs as anti-GBM therapeutics are reviewed. PMID:26893731

  17. Assessing the therapeutic potential of lab-made hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Milad; Grimm, Andrew A; Willenbring, Holger

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has potential as a bridge or even alternative to whole-organ liver transplantation. Because donor livers are scarce, realizing this potential requires the development of alternative cell sources. To be therapeutically effective, surrogate hepatocytes must replicate the complex function and ability to proliferate of primary human hepatocytes. Ideally, they are also autologous to eliminate the need for immune suppression, which can have severe side effects and may not be sufficient to prevent rejection long term. In the past decade, several methods have been developed to generate hepatocytes from other readily and safely accessible somatic cells. These lab-made hepatocytes show promise in animal models of liver diseases, supporting the feasibility of autologous liver cell therapies. Here, we review recent preclinical studies exemplifying different types of lab-made hepatocytes that can potentially be used in autologous liver cell therapies. To define the therapeutic efficacy of current lab-made hepatocytes, we compare them to primary human hepatocytes, focusing on engraftment efficiency and posttransplant proliferation and function. In addition to summarizing published results, we discuss animal models and assays effective in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This analysis underscores the therapeutic potential of current lab-made hepatocytes, but also highlights deficiencies and uncertainties that need to be addressed in future studies aimed at developing liver cell therapies with lab-made hepatocytes. (Hepatology 2016;64:287-294). PMID:27014802

  18. Enhancing doxorubicin efficacy through inhibition of aspartate transaminase in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong

    2016-05-13

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines are identified to overexpress aspartate transaminase (GOT1), which can potentially control the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through NADPH synthesis and enhances tumor growth. In this study, the impact of GOT1 on the efficacy of doxorubicin was investigated. Following doxorubicin administration, TNBC cells acquire metabolic alteration, causing increased glutamine flux for the synthesis of aspartate which can be converted into OAA by GOT1. Subsequently, this OAA is converted into malate and then pyruvate, maintaining the NADP(+)/NADPH ratio which neutralize doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress. Repression of GOT1 using the shRNAs for GOT1 resulted in doxorubicin-induced formation of ROS, thereby increasing doxorubicin sensitivity. The enhanced efficacy of doxorubicin by simultaneous repression of GOT1 was also indicated in an in vivo tumor model of TNBC. These results demonstrate that targeting GOT1 in TNBCs may provide a novel therapeutic approach for improving the efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with these refractory tumors. PMID:27086848

  19. HER2-targeted liposomal doxorubicin displays enhanced anti-tumorigenic effects without associated cardiotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Joseph G.; Geretti, Elena; Hendriks, Bart S.; Lee, Helen; Leonard, Shannon C.; Klinz, Stephan G.; Noble, Charles O.; Lücker, Petra B.; Zandstra, Peter W.; Drummond, Daryl C.; Olivier, Kenneth J.; Nielsen, Ulrik B.; Niyikiza, Clet; Agresta, Samuel V.; Wickham, Thomas J.

    2012-07-01

    Anthracycline-based regimens are a mainstay of early breast cancer therapy, however their use is limited by cardiac toxicity. The potential for cardiotoxicity is a major consideration in the design and development of combinatorial therapies incorporating anthracyclines and agents that target the HER2-mediated signaling pathway, such as trastuzumab. In this regard, HER2-targeted liposomal doxorubicin was developed to provide clinical benefit by both reducing the cardiotoxicity observed with anthracyclines and enhancing the therapeutic potential of HER2-based therapies that are currently available for HER2-overexpressing cancers. While documenting the enhanced therapeutic potential of HER2-targeted liposomal doxorubicin can be done with existing models, there has been no validated human cardiac cell-based assay system to rigorously assess the cardiotoxicity of anthracyclines. To understand if HER2-targeting of liposomal doxorubicin is possible with a favorable cardiac safety profile, we applied a human stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte platform to evaluate the doxorubicin exposure of human cardiac cells to HER2-targeted liposomal doxorubicin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first known application of a stem cell-derived system for evaluating preclinical cardiotoxicity of an investigational agent. We demonstrate that HER2-targeted liposomal doxorubicin has little or no uptake into human cardiomyocytes, does not inhibit HER2-mediated signaling, results in little or no evidence of cardiomyocyte cell death or dysfunction, and retains the low penetration into heart tissue of liposomal doxorubicin. Taken together, this data ultimately led to the clinical decision to advance this drug to Phase I clinical testing, which is now ongoing as a single agent in HER2-expressing cancers. -- Highlights: ► Novel approach using stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes to assess preclinical safety. ► HER2-targeted liposomal doxorubicin has improved safety profile vs free doxorubicin

  20. Ursolic acid (UA): A metabolite with promising therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Dharambir; Tuli, Hardeep Singh; Sharma, Anil K

    2016-02-01

    Plants are known to produce a variety of bioactive metabolites which are being used to cure various life threatening and chronic diseases. The molecular mechanism of action of such bioactive molecules, may open up new avenues for the scientific community to develop or improve novel therapeutic approaches to tackle dreadful diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Ursolic acid (UA) is one among the categories of such plant-based therapeutic metabolites having multiple intracellular and extracellular targets that play role in apoptosis, metastasis, angiogenesis and inflammatory processes. Moreover, the synthetic derivatives of UA have also been seen to be involved in a range of pharmacological applications, which are associated with prevention of diseases. Evidences suggest that UA could be used as a potential candidate to develop a comprehensive competent strategy towards the treatment and prevention of health disorders. The review article herein describes the possible therapeutic effects of UA along with putative mechanism of action. PMID:26775565

  1. Autophagy: a potential therapeutic target in lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakahira, Kiichi

    2013-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is an evolutionally conserved intracellular process to maintain cellular homeostasis by facilitating the turnover of protein aggregates, cellular debris, and damaged organelles. During autophagy, cytosolic constituents are engulfed into double-membrane-bound vesicles called “autophagosomes,” which are subsequently delivered to the lysosome for degradation. Accumulated evidence suggests that autophagy is critically involved not only in the basal physiological states but also in the pathogenesis of various human diseases. Interestingly, a diverse variety of clinically approved drugs modulate autophagy to varying extents, although they are not currently utilized for the therapeutic purpose of manipulating autophagy. In this review, we highlight the functional roles of autophagy in lung diseases with focus on the recent progress of the potential therapeutic use of autophagy-modifying drugs in clinical medicine. The purpose of this review is to discuss the merits, and the pitfalls, of modulating autophagy as a therapeutic strategy in lung diseases. PMID:23709618

  2. Hydroxytyrosol ameliorates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in rats with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Granados-Principal, Sergio; El-Azem, Nuri; Pamplona, Reinald; Ramirez-Tortosa, Cesar; Pulido-Moran, Mario; Vera-Ramirez, Laura; Quiles, Jose L; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Naudí, Alba; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Perez-Lopez, Patricia; Ramirez-Tortosa, Mcarmen

    2014-07-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in several processes including cancer, aging and cardiovascular disease, and has been shown to potentiate the therapeutic effect of drugs such as doxorubicin. Doxorubicin causes significant cardiotoxicity characterized by marked increases in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Herein, we investigate whether doxorubicin-associated chronic cardiac toxicity can be ameliorated with the antioxidant hydroxytyrosol in rats with breast cancer. Thirty-six rats bearing breast tumors induced chemically were divided into 4 groups: control, hydroxytyrosol (0.5mg/kg, 5days/week), doxorubicin (1mg/kg/week), and doxorubicin plus hydroxytyrosol. Cardiac disturbances at the cellular and mitochondrial level, mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes I-IV and apoptosis-inducing factor, and oxidative stress markers have been analyzed. Hydroxytyrosol improved the cardiac disturbances enhanced by doxorubicin by significantly reducing the percentage of altered mitochondria and oxidative damage. These results suggest that hydroxytyrosol improve the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This study demonstrates that hydroxytyrosol protect rat heart damage provoked by doxorubicin decreasing oxidative damage and mitochondrial alterations. PMID:24727461

  3. Protein Engineering for Cardiovascular Therapeutics: Untapped Potential for Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Steven M.; Lee, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous new and innovative approaches for repairing damaged myocardium are currently under investigation, with several encouraging results. In addition to the progression of stem cell-based approaches and gene therapy/silencing methods, evidence continues to emerge that protein therapeutics may be used to directly promote cardiac repair and even regeneration. However, proteins are often limited in their therapeutic potential by short local half-lives and insufficient bioavailability and/or bioactivity, and many academic laboratories studying cardiovascular diseases are more comfortable with molecular and cellular biology compared with protein biochemistry. Protein engineering has been employed broadly to overcome weaknesses traditionally associated with protein therapeutics and has the potential to specifically enhance the efficacy of molecules for cardiac repair. Yet protein engineering as a strategy has not yet been employed in the development of cardiovascular therapeutics to the degree that it has in other fields. In this review, we discuss the role of engineered proteins in cardiovascular therapies to date. Further, we address the promise of applying emerging protein engineering technologies to cardiovascular medicine and the barriers that must be overcome to enable the ultimate success of this approach. PMID:24030023

  4. The therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Benzi; Triolo, Piera; Jones, Wallace; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    There is growing interest in the therapeutic potential of marijuana (cannabis) and cannabinoid-based chemicals within the medical community and, particularly, for neurological conditions. This interest is driven both by changes in the legal status of cannabis in many areas and increasing research into the roles of endocannabinoids within the central nervous system and their potential as symptomatic and/or neuroprotective therapies. We review basic science as well as preclinical and clinical studies on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids specifically as it relates to movement disorders. The pharmacology of cannabis is complex, with over 60 neuroactive chemicals identified to date. The endocannabinoid system modulates neurotransmission involved in motor function, particularly within the basal ganglia. Preclinical research in animal models of several movement disorders have shown variable evidence for symptomatic benefits, but more consistently suggest potential neuroprotective effects in several animal models of Parkinson's (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Clinical observations and clinical trials of cannabinoid-based therapies suggests a possible benefit of cannabinoids for tics and probably no benefit for tremor in multiple sclerosis or dyskinesias or motor symptoms in PD. Data are insufficient to draw conclusions regarding HD, dystonia, or ataxia and nonexistent for myoclonus or RLS. Despite the widespread publicity about the medical benefits of cannabinoids, further preclinical and clinical research is needed to better characterize the pharmacological, physiological, and therapeutic effects of this class of drugs in movement disorders. PMID:25649017

  5. The Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoids for Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, Benzi; Triolo, Piera; Jones, Wallace; Jankovic, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the therapeutic potential of marijuana (cannabis) and cannabinoid-based chemicals within the medical community and particularly for neurologic conditions. This interest is driven both by changes in the legal status of cannabis in many areas and increasing research into the roles of endocannabinoids within the central nervous system and their potential as symptomatic and/or neuroprotective therapies. We review basic science, preclinical and clinical studies on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids specifically as it relates to movement disorders. Results The pharmacology of cannabis is complex with over 60 neuroactive chemicals identified to date. The endocannabinoid system modulates neurotransmission involved in motor function, particularly within the basal ganglia. Preclinical research in animal models of several movement disorders have shown variable evidence for symptomatic benefits but more consistently suggest potential neuroprotective effects in several animal models of Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD). Clinical observations and clinical trials of cannabinoid-based therapies suggests a possible benefit of cannabinoids for tics and probably no benefit for tremor in multiple sclerosis or dyskinesias or motor symptoms in PD. Data are insufficient to draw conclusions regarding HD, dystonia or ataxia and nonexistent for myoclonus or restless legs syndrome. Conclusions Despite the widespread publicity about the medical benefits of cannabinoids, further preclinical and clinical research is needed to better characterize the pharmacological, physiological and therapeutic effects of this class of drugs in movement disorders. PMID:25649017

  6. Calcium modulation of doxorubicin cytotoxicity in yeast and human cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Thuy Trang; Lim, Ying Jun; Fan, Melanie Hui Min; Jackson, Rebecca A; Lim, Kim Kiat; Ang, Wee Han; Ban, Kenneth Hon Kim; Chen, Ee Sin

    2016-03-01

    Doxorubicin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, but its utility is limited by cellular resistance and off-target effects. To understand the molecular mechanisms regulating chemotherapeutic responses to doxorubicin, we previously carried out a genomewide search of doxorubicin-resistance genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe fission yeast and showed that these genes are organized into networks that counteract doxorubicin cytotoxicity. Here, we describe the identification of a subgroup of doxorubicin-resistance genes that, when disrupted, leads to reduced tolerance to exogenous calcium. Unexpectedly, we observed a suppressive effect of calcium on doxorubicin cytotoxicity, where concurrent calcium and doxorubicin treatment resulted in significantly higher cell survival compared with cells treated with doxorubicin alone. Conversely, inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity in the mutants. Consistent with these observations in fission yeast, calcium also suppressed doxorubicin cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. Further epistasis analyses in yeast showed that this suppression of doxorubicin toxicity by calcium was synergistically dependent on Rav1 and Vph2, two regulators of vacuolar-ATPase assembly; this suggests potential modulation of the calcium-doxorubicin interaction by fluctuating proton concentrations within the cellular environment. Thus, the modulatory effects of drugs or diet on calcium concentrations should be considered in doxorubicin treatment regimes. PMID:26891792

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell subpopulations: phenotype, property and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Mo, Miaohua; Wang, Shan; Zhou, Ying; Li, Hong; Wu, Yaojiong

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are capable of differentiating into cells of multiple cell lineages and have potent paracrine effects. Due to their easy preparation and low immunogenicity, MSC have emerged as an extremely promising therapeutic agent in regenerative medicine for diverse diseases. However, MSC are heterogeneous with respect to phenotype and function in current isolation and cultivation regimes, which often lead to incomparable experimental results. In addition, there may be specific stem cell subpopulations with definite differentiation capacity toward certain lineages in addition to stem cells with multi-differentiation potential. Recent studies have identified several subsets of MSC which exhibit distinct features and biological activities, and enhanced therapeutic potentials for certain diseases. In this review, we give an overview of these subsets for their phenotypic, biological and functional properties. PMID:27141940

  8. The pharmacology and therapeutic potential of (−)-huperzine A

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Maung Kyaw Moe; Herzon, Seth B

    2012-01-01

    (−)-Huperzine A (1) is an alkaloid isolated from a Chinese club moss. Due to its potent neuroprotective activities, it has been investigated as a candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacology and therapeutic potential of (−)-huperzine A (1). Synthetic studies of (−)-huperzine A (1) aimed at enabling its development as a pharmaceutical will be described.

  9. Aquaporin 1, a potential therapeutic target for migraine with aura

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiology of migraine remains largely unknown. However, evidence regarding the molecules participating in the pathophysiology of migraine has been accumulating. Water channel proteins, known as aquaporins (AQPs), notably AQP-1 and AQP-4, appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases. This review outlines newly emerging evidence indicating that AQP-1 plays an important role in pain signal transduction and migraine and could therefore serve as a potential therapeutic target for these diseases. PMID:20969805

  10. The Natural Flavonoid Pinocembrin: Molecular Targets and Potential Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xi; Wang, Wenzhu; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Pinocembrin is a natural flavonoid compound extracted from honey, propolis, ginger roots, wild marjoram, and other plants. In preclinical studies, it has shown anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects as well as the ability to reduce reactive oxygen species, protect the blood-brain barrier, modulate mitochondrial function, and regulate apoptosis. Considering these pharmaceutical characteristics, pinocembrin has potential as a drug to treat ischemic stroke and other clinical conditions. In this review, we summarize its pharmacologic characteristics and discuss its mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic applications. PMID:25744566

  11. miR-137 regulates the constitutive androstane receptor and modulates doxorubicin sensitivity in parental and doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Takwi, A A; Wang, Y-M; Wu, J; Michaelis, M; Cinatl, J; Chen, T

    2014-07-10

    Chemotherapy is the most common treatment for cancer. However, multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle to effective chemotherapy, limiting the efficacy of both conventional chemotherapeutic and novel biologic agents. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a xenosensor, is a key regulator of MDR. It functions in xenobiotic detoxification by regulating the expression of phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, whose overexpression in cancers and whose role in drug resistance make them potential therapeutic targets for reducing MDR. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous negative regulators of gene expression and have been implicated in most cellular processes, including drug resistance. Here, we report the inversely related expression of miR-137 and CAR in parental and doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma cells, wherein miR-137 is downregulated in resistant cells. miR-137 overexpression resulted in downregulation of CAR protein and mRNA (via mRNA degradation); it sensitized doxorubicin-resistant cells to doxorubicin (as shown by reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis and increased G2-phase cell cycle arrest) and reduced the in vivo growth rate of neuroblastoma xenografts. We observed similar results in cellular models of hepatocellular and colon cancers, indicating that the doxorubicin-sensitizing effect of miR-137 is not tumor type-specific. Finally, we show for the first time a negative feedback loop whereby miR-137 downregulates CAR expression and CAR downregulates miR-137 expression. Hypermethylation of the miR-137 promoter and negative regulation of miR-137 by CAR contribute in part to reduced miR-137 expression and increased CAR and MDR1 expression in doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma cells. These findings demonstrate that miR-137 is a crucial regulator of cancer response to doxorubicin treatment, and they identify miR-137 as a highly promising target to reduce CAR-driven doxorubicin resistance. PMID

  12. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma ( ...

  13. Doxorubicin Lipid Complex Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxorubicin lipid complex is used to treat ovarian cancer that has not improved or that has worsened after treatment with other medications. Doxorubicin lipid complex is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  14. Understanding the Mechanism of Hepatic Fibrosis and Potential Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Areeba; Ahmad, Riaz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis (HF) is a progressive condition with serious clinical complications arising from abnormal proliferation and amassing of tough fibrous scar tissue. This defiance of collagen fibers becomes fatal due to ultimate failure of liver functions. Participation of various cell types, interlinked cellular events, and large number of mediator molecules make the fibrotic process enormously complex and dynamic. However, with better appreciation of underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of fibrosis, the assumption that HF cannot be cured is gradually changing. Recent findings have underlined the therapeutic potential of a number of synthetic compounds as well as plant derivatives for cessation or even the reversal of the processes that transforms the liver into fibrotic tissue. It is expected that future inputs will provide a conceptual framework to develop more specific strategies that would facilitate the assessment of risk factors, shortlist early diagnosis biomarkers, and eventually guide development of effective therapeutic alternatives. PMID:22626794

  15. Therapeutic potential of icatibant (HOE-140, JE-049).

    PubMed

    Cruden, Nicholas L M; Newby, David E

    2008-09-01

    There is now a substantial body of work implicating bradykinin, an endogenous peptide neurohormone, in the pathophysiology of a variety of inflammatory conditions in man. Icatibant (HOE-140, JE-049), a highly selective antagonist at the bradykinin B2 receptor, blocks the vasodilatation and increased vascular permeability associated with exogenous bradykinin administration both in experimental models and in vivo in man. Recent attention has focused on the therapeutic potential of icatibant in a number of human disease states. The most promising of these is hereditary angioedema in which Phase III clinical trials have recently been completed and regulatory approval is currently being sought in Europe and the USA. A therapeutic role for icatibant has also been proposed in several other human conditions including drug-induced angioedema, airways disease, thermal injury, refractory ascites in patients with liver cirrhosis, and acute pancreatitis, although this work remains largely experimental. PMID:18710362

  16. Inhibition of PKM2 sensitizes triple-negative breast cancer cells to doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Yang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • Suppression of PKM2 sensitizes triple-negative breast cancer cells to doxorubicin. • Repression of PKM2 affects the glycolysis and decreases ATP production. • Downregulation of PKM2 increases the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin. • Inhibition of PKM2 enhances the antitumor efficacy of doxorubicin in vivo. - Abstract: Cancer cells alter regular metabolic pathways in order to sustain rapid proliferation. One example of metabolic remodeling in cancerous tissue is the upregulation of pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 (PKM2), which is involved in aerobic glycolysis. Indeed, PKM2 has previously been identified as a tumor biomarker and as a potential target for cancer therapy. Here, we examined the effects of combined treatment with doxorubicin and anti-PKM2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). The suppression of PKM2 resulted in changes in glucose metabolism, leading to decreased synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Reduced levels of ATP resulted in the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin, consequently enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of this drug in several triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the combined effect of PKM2 siRNA and doxorubicin was evaluated in an in vivo MDA-MB-231 orthotopic breast cancer model. The siRNA was systemically administered through a polyethylenimine (PEI)-based delivery system that has been extensively used. We demonstrate that the combination treatment showed superior anticancer efficacy as compared to doxorubicin alone. These findings suggest that targeting PKM2 can increase the efficacy of chemotherapy, potentially providing a new approach for improving the outcome of chemotherapy in patients with TNBC.

  17. Hsp90 as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Aguilà, Mònica; Cheetham, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a pivotal cellular regulator involved in the folding, activation and assembly of a wide range of proteins. Hsp90 has multiple roles in the retina and the use of different Hsp90 inhibitors has been shown to prevent retinal degeneration in models of retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Hsp90 is also a potential target in uveal melanoma. Mechanistically, Hsp90 inhibition can evoke a dual response in the retina; stimulating a stress response with molecular chaperone expression. Thereby leading to an improvement in visual function and photoreceptor survival; however, prolonged inhibition can also stimulate the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins potentially deleteriously affect vision. Here, we review the multiple roles of Hsp90 in the retina and the therapeutic potential of Hsp90 as a target. PMID:26427407

  18. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  19. Commercially available interactive video games in burn rehabilitation: therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Parry, Ingrid S; Bagley, Anita; Kawada, Jason; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2012-06-01

    Commercially available interactive video games (IVG) like the Nintendo Wii™ (NW) and PlayStation™II Eye Toy (PE) are increasingly used in the rehabilitation of patients with burn. Such games have gained popularity in burn rehabilitation because they encourage range of motion (ROM) while distracting from pain. However, IVGs were not originally designed for rehabilitation purposes but rather for entertainment and may lack specificity for achieving rehabilitative goals. Objectively evaluating the specific demands of IVGs in relation to common burn therapy goals will determine their true therapeutic benefit and guide their use in burn rehabilitation. Upper extremity (UE) motion of 24 normal children was measured using 3D motion analysis during play with the two types of IVGs most commonly described for use after burn: NW and PE. Data was analyzed using t-tests and One-way Analysis of Variance. Active range of motion for shoulder flexion and abduction during play with both PE and NW was within functional range, thus supporting the idea that IVGs offer activities with therapeutic potential to improve ROM. PE resulted in higher demands and longer duration of UE motion than NW, and therefore may be the preferred tool when UE ROM or muscular endurance are the goals of rehabilitation. When choosing a suitable IVG for application in rehabilitation, the user's impairment together with the therapeutic attributes of the IVG should be considered to optimize outcome. PMID:22385641

  20. Genetic determinants and potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Robert; Hendifar, Andrew E.; Tuli, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in the United States, carrying a 5-year survival rate of approximately 5%, which is the poorest prognosis of any solid tumor type. Given the dismal prognosis associated with PDAC, a more thorough understanding of risk factors and genetic predisposition has important implications not only for cancer prevention, but also for screening techniques and the development of personalized therapies. While screening of the general population is not recommended or practicable with current diagnostic methods, studies are ongoing to evaluate its usefulness in people with at least 5- to 10-fold increased risk of PDAC. In order to help identify high-risk populations who would be most likely to benefit from early detection screening tests for pancreatic cancer, discovery of additional pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes is crucial. Thus, specific gene-based, gene-product, and marker-based testing for the early detection of pancreatic cancer are currently being developed, with the potential for these to be useful as potential therapeutic targets as well. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the genetic basis for PDAC with a focus on germline and familial determinants. A discussion of potential therapeutic targets and future directions in screening and treatment is also provided. PMID:24624093

  1. Fatty acids and their therapeutic potential in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Lei, Enie; Vacy, Kristina; Boon, Wah Chin

    2016-05-01

    There is little doubt that we are what we eat. Fatty acid supplementation and diets rich in fatty acids are being promoted as ways to a healthier brain. Short chain fatty acids are a product of intestinal microbiota metabolism of dietary fibre; and their derivatives are used as an anti-convulstant. They demonstrated therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative conditions as HDAC inhibitors; and while the mechanism is not well understood, have been shown to lower amyloid β in Alzheimer's Disease in preclinical studies. Medium chain fatty acids consumed as a mixture in dietary oils can induce ketogenesis without the need for a ketogentic diet. Hence, this has the potential to provide an alternative energy source to prevent neuronal cell death due to lack of glucose. Long chain fatty acids are commonly found in the diet as omega fatty acids. They act as an anti-oxidant protecting neuronal cell membranes from oxidative damage and as an anti-inflammatory mediator in the brain. We review which agents, from each fatty acid class, have the most therapeutic potential for neurological disorders (primarily Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Autism Spectrum Disorder as well as possible applications to traumatic brain injury), by discussing what is known about their biological mechanisms from preclinical studies. PMID:26939763

  2. Leveraging biodiversity knowledge for potential phyto-therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivekanand; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify and highlight the feasibility, challenges, and advantages of providing a cross-domain pipeline that can link relevant biodiversity information for phyto-therapeutic assessment. Materials and methods A public repository of clinical trials information (ClinicalTrials.gov) was explored to determine the state of plant-based interventions under investigation. Results The results showed that ∼15% of drug interventions in ClinicalTrials.gov were potentially plant related, with about 60% of them clustered within 10 taxonomic families. Further analysis of these plant-based interventions identified ∼3.7% of associated plant species as endangered as determined from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Red List. Discussion The diversity of the plant kingdom has provided human civilization with life-sustaining food and medicine for centuries. There has been renewed interest in the investigation of botanicals as sources of new drugs, building on traditional knowledge about plant-based medicines. However, data about the plant-based biodiversity potential for therapeutics (eg, based on genetic or chemical information) are generally scattered across a range of sources and isolated from contemporary pharmacological resources. This study explored the potential to bridge biodiversity and biomedical knowledge sources. Conclusions The findings from this feasibility study suggest that there is an opportunity for developing plant-based drugs and further highlight taxonomic relationships between plants that may be rich sources for bioprospecting. PMID:23518859

  3. Codonopsis lanceolata: A Review of Its Therapeutic Potentials.

    PubMed

    Hossen, Muhammad Jahangir; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2016-03-01

    Codonopsis lanceolata (Campanulaceae) is dicotyledonous herbaceous perennial plant, predominantly found in Central, East, and South Asia. This plant has been widely used in traditional medicine and is considered to have medicinal properties to treat diseases and symptoms such as bronchitis, coughs, spasm, psychoneurosis, cancer, obesity, hyperlipidemia, edema, hepatitis, colitis, and lung injury. C. lanceolata contains many biologically active compounds, including polyphenols, saponins, tannins, triterpene, alkaloids, and steroids, which contribute to its numerous pharmacological activities. Through systematic studies, the pharmacological actions of these compounds have been revealed. Therapeutic potentialities of C. lanceolata and its previously reported molecular mechanisms are described in this review. PMID:26931614

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides and Their Analogs: Searching for New Potential Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Midura-Nowaczek, Krystyna; Markowska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an essential part of innate immunity. These compounds have been considered as potential therapeutics because of their broad-spectrum activities and proven ability to avoid antimicrobial resistance, but their clinical and commercial developments have some limitations, such as susceptibility to proteases and a high cost of peptide production. To overcome these problems, many researchers have tried to develop short active peptides, their modifications and mimics with better properties while retaining their basic features of natural AMPs such as cationic charge and the amphipathic structure. PMID:25374459

  5. Inflammation and hypertension: new understandings and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    De Miguel, Carmen; Rudemiller, Nathan P; Abais, Justine M; Mattson, David L

    2015-01-01

    Research studying the role of inflammation in hypertension and cardiovascular disease has flourished in recent years; however, the exact mechanisms by which the activated immune cells lead to the development and maintenance of hypertension remain to be elucidated. The objectives of this brief review are to summarize and discuss the most recent findings in the field, with special emphasis on potential therapeutics to treat or prevent hypertension. This review will cover novel immune cell subtypes recently associated to the disease including the novel role of cytokines, toll-like receptors, and inflammasomes in hypertension. PMID:25432899

  6. Potential therapeutic strategy to treat substance abuse related disorders.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sulie L

    2013-12-01

    The "Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Substance Abuse Related Disorders" session was chaired by Dr. Sulie Chang, director of NeuroImmune Phamacology at Seton University. The four presenters (and their topics) were: Dr. Wen-zhe Ho (Miniway to stop HIV/HCV), Dr. Ru-Band Lu (Low dose of memantine in the treatment of opioid dependence in human), Dr. Ping Zhang (Treatment of alcohol-related disorders-Learning from stem/progenitor cell), and Chia-Hsiang Chen (Treatment of methamphetamine abuse: an antibody-based immunotherapy approach). PMID:25267886

  7. Folate-receptor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin nano-aggregates stabilized by doxorubicin-PEG-folate conjugate.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hyuk Sang; Park, Tae Gwan

    2004-11-24

    For folate-receptor-targeted anti-cancer therapy, doxorubicin aggregates in a nano-scale size were produced employing doxorubicin-polyethylene glycol-folate (DOX-PEG-FOL) conjugate. Doxorubicin and folate were respectively conjugated to alpha- and omega-terminal end group of a PEG chain. The conjugates assisted to form doxorubicin nano-aggregates with an average size of 200 nm in diameter when combined with an excess amount of deprotonated doxorubicin in an aqueous phase. Hydrophobically deprotonated doxorubicin molecules were aggregated within the core, while the DOX-PEG-FOL conjugates stabilized the aggregates with exposing folate moieties on the surface. The doxorubicin nano-aggregates showed a greater extent of intracellular uptake against folate-receptor-positive cancer cells than folate-receptor-negative cells, indicating that the cellular uptake occurred via a folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. They also exhibited more potent cytotoxic effect on KB cells than free doxorubicin. In a human tumor xenograft nude mouse model, folate-targeted doxorubicin nano-aggregates significantly reduced the tumor volume compared to non-targeted doxorubicin aggregates or free doxorubicin. These results suggested that folate-targeted doxorubicin nano-aggregates could be a potentially useful delivery system for folate-receptor-positive cancer cells. PMID:15544872

  8. Adult stem cells: the therapeutic potential of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amarjit; Stewart, Claire E H

    2006-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells have revolutionised our understanding of normal and deregulated growth and development. The potential to produce cells and tissues as needed offers enormous therapeutic potential. The use of these cells, however, is accompanied by ongoing ethical, religious and biomedical issues. The expansion potential and plasticity of adult stem cells have therefore received much interest. Adult skeletal muscle is highly adaptable, responding to both the hypertrophic and degenerative stresses placed upon it. This extreme plasticity is in part regulated by resident stem cells. In addition to regenerating muscle, if exposed to osteogenic or adipogenic inducers, these cells spontaneously form osteoblasts or adipocytes. The potential for and heterogeneity of muscle stem cells is underscored by the observation that CD45+ muscle side population cells are capable of reconstituting bone marrow in lethally irradiated mice and of contributing to neo-vascularisation of regenerating muscle. Finally, first attempts to replace infarcted myocardium relied on injection of skeletal myoblasts into the heart. Cells successfully engrafted and cardiac function was improved. Harnessing their differentiation/trans-differentiation capacity provides enormous potential for adult stem cells. In this review, current understanding of the different stem cells within muscle will be discussed as will their potential utility for regenerative medicine. PMID:18220864

  9. Gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as potential multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jeong; Chae, Kwon Seok; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Potentials of hydrophilic and biocompatible ligand coated gadolinium oxide nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents, drug carriers, and therapeutic agents are reviewed. First of all, they can be used as advanced T1 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents because they have r1 larger than those of Gd(III)-chelates due to a high density of Gd(III) per nanoparticle. They can be further functionalized by conjugating other imaging agents such as fluorescent imaging (FI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) agents. They can be also useful for drug carriers through morphology modifications. They themselves are also potential CT and ultrasound imaging (USI) contrast and thermal neutron capture therapeutic (NCT) agents, which are superior to commercial iodine compounds, air-filled albumin microspheres, and boron ((10)B) compounds, respectively. They, when conjugated with targeting agents such as antibodies and peptides, will provide enhanced images and be also very useful for diagnosis and therapy of diseases (so called theragnosis). PMID:23432005

  10. Leptin, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids: potential therapeutic targets in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Støving, René Klinkby; Andries, Alin; Brixen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Hørder, Kirsten; Frystyk, Jan

    2009-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) has the highest mortality rate between psychiatric disorders, and evidence for managing it is still very limited. So far, pharmacological treatment has focused on a narrow range of drugs and only a few controlled studies have been performed. Furthermore, the studies have been of short duration and included a limited number of subjects, often heterogenic with regard to stage and acute nutritive status. Thus, novel approaches are urgently needed. Body weight homeostasis is tightly regulated throughout life. With the discovery of orexigenic and anorectic signals, an array of new molecular targets to control eating behavior has emerged. This review focuses on recent advances in three important signal systems: leptin, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids toward the identification of potential therapeutical breakthroughs in AN. Our review of the current literature shows that leptin may have therapeutic potentials in promoting restoration of menstrual cycles in weight restored patients, reducing motor restlessness in severely hyperactive patients, and preventing osteoporosis in chronic patients. Ghrelin and endocannabinoids exert orexigenic effects which may facilitate nutritional restoration. Leptin and endocannabinoids may exert antidepressive and anxiolytic effects. Finally, monitoring serum concentration of leptin may be useful in order to prevent refeeding syndrome. PMID:18926548

  11. Therapeutic potential and health benefits of Sargassum species

    PubMed Central

    Yende, Subhash R.; Harle, Uday N.; Chaugule, Bhupal B.

    2014-01-01

    Sargassum species are tropical and sub-tropical brown macroalgae (seaweed) of shallow marine meadow. These are nutritious and rich source of bioactive compounds such as vitamins, carotenoids, dietary fibers, proteins, and minerals. Also, many biologically active compounds like terpenoids, flavonoids, sterols, sulfated polysaccharides, polyphenols, sargaquinoic acids, sargachromenol, pheophytine were isolated from different Sargassum species. These isolated compounds exhibit diverse biological activities like analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, neuroprotective, anti-microbial, anti-tumor, fibrinolytic, immune-modulatory, anti-coagulant, hepatoprotective, anti-viral activity etc., Hence, Sargassum species have great potential to be used in pharmaceutical and neutralceutical areas. This review paper explores the current knowledge of phytochemical, therapeutic potential, and health benefits of different species of genus Sargassum. PMID:24600190

  12. Therapeutic Potential of Steroidal Alkaloids in Cancer and Other Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi-Wei; Chen, Mei-Wan; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Yu, Pei-Zhong; Wei, Xing; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal alkaloids are a class of secondary metabolites isolated from plants, amphibians, and marine invertebrates. Evidence accumulated in the recent two decades demonstrates that steroidal alkaloids have a wide range of bioactivities including anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, etc., suggesting their great potential for application. It is therefore necessary to comprehensively summarize the bioactivities, especially anticancer activities and mechanisms of steroidal alkaloids. Here we systematically highlight the anticancer profiles both in vitro and in vivo of steroidal alkaloids such as dendrogenin, solanidine, solasodine, tomatidine, cyclopamine, and their derivatives. Furthermore, other bioactivities of steroidal alkaloids are also discussed. The integrated molecular mechanisms in this review can increase our understanding on the utilization of steroidal alkaloids and contribute to the development of new drug candidates. Although the therapeutic potentials of steroidal alkaloids look promising in the preclinical and clinical studies, further pharmacokinetic and clinical studies are mandated to define their efficacy and safety in cancer and other diseases. PMID:25820039

  13. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT6 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Karila, Delphine; Freret, Thomas; Bouet, Valentine; Boulouard, Michel; Dallemagne, Patrick; Rochais, Christophe

    2015-10-22

    Given its predominant expression in the central nervous system (CNS), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT: serotonin) subtype 6 receptor (5-HT6R) has been considered as a valuable target for the development of CNS drugs with limited side effects. After 2 decades of intense research, numerous selective ligands have been developed to target this receptor; this holds potential interest for the treatment of neuropathological disorders. In fact, some agents (mainly antagonists) are currently undergoing clinical trial. More recently, a series of potent and selective agonists have been developed, and preclinical studies have been conducted that suggest the therapeutic interest of 5-HT6R agonists. This review details the medicinal chemistry of these agonists, highlights their activities, and discusses their potential for treating cognitive issues associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, or obesity. Surprisingly, some studies have shown that both 5-HT6R agonists and antagonists exert similar procognitive activities. This article summarizes the hypotheses that could explain this paradox. PMID:26099069

  14. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs. PMID:24827844

  15. Oncolytic adenovirus and doxorubicin-based chemotherapy results in synergistic antitumor activity against soft-tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Bramante, Simona; Vassilev, Lotta; Hirvinen, Mari; Parviainen, Suvi; Tähtinen, Siri; Guse, Kilian; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Kanerva, Anna; Kipar, Anja; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-02-15

    Despite originating from several different tissues, soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) are often grouped together as they share mesenchymal origin and treatment guidelines. Also, with some exceptions, a common denominator is that when the tumor cannot be cured with surgery, the efficacy of current therapies is poor and new treatment modalities are thus needed. We have studied the combination of a capsid-modified oncolytic adenovirus CGTG-102 (Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF) with doxorubicin, with or without ifosfamide, the preferred first-line chemotherapeutic options for most types of STS. We show that CGTG-102 and doxorubicin plus ifosfamide together are able to increase cell killing of Syrian hamster STS cells over single agents, as well as upregulate immunogenic cell death markers. When tested in vivo against established STS tumors in fully immunocompetent Syrian hamsters, the combination was highly effective. CGTG-102 and doxorubicin (without ifosfamide) resulted in synergistic antitumor efficacy against human STS xenografts in comparison with single agent treatments. Doxorubicin increased adenoviral replication in human and hamster STS cells, potentially contributing to the observed therapeutic synergy. In conclusion, the preclinical data generated here support clinical translation of the combination of CGTG-102 and doxorubicin, or doxorubicin plus ifosfamide, for the treatment of STS, and provide clues on the mechanisms of synergy. PMID:24975392

  16. Antioxidants as a Potential Preventive and Therapeutic Strategy for Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Malgorzata M; Borowska, Sylwia; Tomczyk, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies provide a growing number of evidences that chronic exposure to relatively low levels of cadmium (Cd), nowadays taking place in industrialized countries, may cause health hazard. Thus, growing interest has been focused on effective ways of protection from adverse effects of exposure to this heavy metal. Because numerous effects to Cd's toxic action result from its prooxidative properties, it seems reasonable that special attention should be directed to agents that can prevent or reduce this metal-induced oxidative stress and its consequences in tissues, organs and systems at risk of toxicity, including liver, kidneys, testes, ears, eyes, cardiovascular system and nervous system as well as bone tissue. This review discusses a wide range of natural (plant and animal origin) and synthetic antioxidants together with many plant extracts (e.g. black and green tea, Aronia melanocarpa, Allium sativum, Allium cepa, Ocimum sanctum, Phoenix dactylifera, Physalis peruviana, Zingiber officinale) that have been shown to prevent from Cd toxicity. Moreover, some attention has been focused on the fact that substances not possessing antioxidative potential may also prevent Cd-induced oxidative stress and its consequences. So far, most of the data on the protective effects of the natural and synthetic antioxidants and plant extracts come from studies in animals' models; however, numerous of them seem to be promising preventive/therapeutic strategies for Cd toxicity in humans. Further investigation of prophylactic and therapeutic use of antioxidants in populations exposed to Cd environmentally and occupationally is warranted, given that therapeutically effective chelation therapy for this toxic metal is currently lacking. PMID:25944010

  17. Injectable small molecule hydrogel as a potential nanocarrier for localized and sustained in vivo delivery of doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manish; Kundu, Somanath; Reddy M, Amarendar; Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Motiani, Rajender K.; Sengupta, Sagar; Srivastava, Aasheesh; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-10-01

    The majority of the localized drug delivery systems are based on polymeric or polypeptide scaffolds, as weak intermolecular interactions of low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs, Mw <500 Da) are significantly perturbed in the presence of anticancer drugs. Here, we present l-alanine derived low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs) that remain injectable even after entrapping the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). These DOX containing nanoassemblies (DOX-Gel) showed promising anticancer activity in mice models. Subcutaneous injection of DOX-Gel near the tumor achieved a greater decrease in tumour load than by intravenous injection of DOX (DOX-IV), and local injection of DOX alone (DOX-Local) at the tumor site. We noticed that DOX-Gel nanocarriers are especially effective when injected during the early stage of tumor progression, and achieve a substantial decrease in tumor load in the long term.The majority of the localized drug delivery systems are based on polymeric or polypeptide scaffolds, as weak intermolecular interactions of low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs, Mw <500 Da) are significantly perturbed in the presence of anticancer drugs. Here, we present l-alanine derived low molecular weight hydrogelators (LMHGs) that remain injectable even after entrapping the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). These DOX containing nanoassemblies (DOX-Gel) showed promising anticancer activity in mice models. Subcutaneous injection of DOX-Gel near the tumor achieved a greater decrease in tumour load than by intravenous injection of DOX (DOX-IV), and local injection of DOX alone (DOX-Local) at the tumor site. We noticed that DOX-Gel nanocarriers are especially effective when injected during the early stage of tumor progression, and achieve a substantial decrease in tumor load in the long term. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Scheme 1, Fig. S1-S6, synthesis of hydrogels; experimental section for gelation, rheology, MALDI, microscopy and

  18. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  19. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S; Steel, L P; Melcher, A; Lawler, S E; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previously shown to inhibit the migration of adult glioma cells, on two pHGG cell lines (SF188 and KNS42) and one patient-derived DIPG line (HSJD-DIPG-007) using 2D (transwell membrane, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging) and 3D (migration on nanofibre plates and spheroid invasion in collagen) assays. Results: All lines were migratory, but there were differences in morphology and migration rates. Both LiCl and BIO reduced migration and instigated cytoskeletal rearrangement of stress fibres and focal adhesions when viewed by immunofluorescence. In the presence of drugs, loss of polarity and differences in cellular movement were observed by live cell imaging. Conclusions: Ours is the first study to demonstrate that it is possible to pharmacologically target migration of paediatric glioma in vitro using LiCl and BIO, and we conclude that these agents and their derivatives warrant further preclinical investigation as potential anti-migratory therapeutics for these devastating tumours. PMID:25628092

  20. Potential Therapeutic Benefits of Strategies Directed to Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Stowe, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrion is the most important organelle in determining continued cell survival and cell death. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to many human maladies, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disease, and cancer. These mitochondria-related pathologies range from early infancy to senescence. The central premise of this review is that if mitochondrial abnormalities contribute to the pathological state, alleviating the mitochondrial dysfunction would contribute to attenuating the severity or progression of the disease. Therefore, this review will examine the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of several diseases and explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting mitochondria in mitigating the disease processes. Indeed, recent advances in mitochondrial biology have led to selective targeting of drugs designed to modulate and manipulate mitochondrial function and genomics for therapeutic benefit. These approaches to treat mitochondrial dysfunction rationally could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and various disease states. However, most of these approaches are in their infancy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 279–347. PMID:20001744

  1. Superoxide Dismutase Mimics: Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rebouças, Júlio S.; Spasojević, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress has become widely viewed as an underlying condition in a number of diseases, such as ischemia–reperfusion disorders, central nervous system disorders, cardiovascular conditions, cancer, and diabetes. Thus, natural and synthetic antioxidants have been actively sought. Superoxide dismutase is a first line of defense against oxidative stress under physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, the development of therapeutics aimed at mimicking superoxide dismutase was a natural maneuver. Metalloporphyrins, as well as Mn cyclic polyamines, Mn salen derivatives and nitroxides were all originally developed as SOD mimics. The same thermodynamic and electrostatic properties that make them potent SOD mimics may allow them to reduce other reactive species such as peroxynitrite, peroxynitrite-derived CO3·−, peroxyl radical, and less efficiently H2O2. By doing so SOD mimics can decrease both primary and secondary oxidative events, the latter arising from the inhibition of cellular transcriptional activity. To better judge the therapeutic potential and the advantage of one over the other type of compound, comparative studies of different classes of drugs in the same cellular and/or animal models are needed. We here provide a comprehensive overview of the chemical properties and some in vivo effects observed with various classes of compounds with a special emphasis on porphyrin-based compounds. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 877–918. PMID:20095865

  2. Vitamin D: preventive and therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Li, Yan-Wu; Tang, Ya-Lan; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Jun-Hao; Li, Qing-Gen; Yuan, Jian-Yong

    2013-11-01

    Vitamin D is one of the important nuclear steroid transcription regulators that controls transcriptions of a large number of genes. Vitamin D supplement is commonly recommended for the elderly to prevent bone diseases. Amounting new evidence has indicated that vitamin D plays a crucial role in brain development, brain function regulation and neuroprotection. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder commonly seen in the elderly, characterized by movement disorders including tremor, akinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. The motor symptoms largely result from the continued death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, despite use of current therapeutic interventions. The cause and mechanism of neuron death is currently unknown. Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with PD suggesting its preventive and therapeutic potential. Vitamin D may exert protective and neurotropic effects directly at cellular level, e.g. protection of dopamine system, and/or by regulating gene expression. This review summarizes the epidemiological, genetic and translational evidence implicating vitamin D as a candidate for prevention and treatment for PD. PMID:24160295

  3. Melanocyte Stem Cells as Potential Therapeutics in Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hee; Fisher, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Melanocytes produce pigment granules that color both skin and hair. In the hair follicles melanocytes are derived from stem cells (MelSC) that are present in hair bulges or sub-bulge regions and function as melanocyte reservoirs. Quiescence, maintenance, activation, and proliferation of MelSC are controlled by specific activities in the microenvironment that can influence the differentiation and regeneration of melanocytes. Therefore, understanding MelSC and their niche may lead to use of MelSC in new treatments for various pigmentation disorders. Areas covered We describe here pathophysiological mechanisms by which melanocyte defects lead to skin pigmentation disorders such as vitiligo and hair graying. The development, migration, and proliferation of melanocytes and factors involved in the survival, maintenance, and regeneration of MelSC are reviewed with regard to the biological roles and potential therapeutic applications in skin pigmentation diseases. Expert Opinion MelSC biology and niche factors have been studied mainly in murine experimental models. Human MelSC markers or methods to isolate them are much less well understood. Identification, isolation and culturing of human MelSC would represent a major step toward new biological therapeutic options for patients with recalcitrant pigmentary disorders or hair graying. By modulating the niche factors for MelSC it may one day be possible to control skin pigmentary disorders and prevent or reverse hair graying. PMID:25104310

  4. Biochemistry and therapeutic potential of hydrogen sulfide - reality or fantasy?

    PubMed

    Brodek, Paulina; Olas, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a signaling gasotransmitter, involved in different physiological and pathological processes. H2S regulates apoptosis, the cell cycle and oxidative stress. H2S exerts powerful effects on smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, inflammatory cells, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nuclear transcription factors. H2S is known to be produced from L-cysteine, D-cysteine and L-homocysteine in the body. Four enzymes - cystathionine-b synthase (CBS), mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST), cystathionine-γ lyase (CSE) and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT) - are involved in H2S synthesis. The biosynthetic pathway for the production of H2S from D-cysteine involves 3-MST and D-amino acid oxidase (DAO). The therapeutic potential of H2S is not clear. However, recently results have demonstrated that H2S has protective action for ischemic heart disease or hypertension, and protects against ischemia of the brain. This review summarizes the negative and the positive roles of H2S in various biological systems, for example the cardiovascular system and nervous system. We also discuss the function of classical, therapeutic and natural (for example garlic) donors of H2S in pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:27516569

  5. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRas(G12D) mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  6. Selection, design, and characterization of a new potentially therapeutic ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Zinnen, Shawn P; Domenico, Kristal; Wilson, Mike; Dickinson, Brent A; Beaudry, Amber; Mokler, Victor; Daniher, Andrew T; Burgin, Alex; Beigelman, Leonid

    2002-01-01

    An in vitro selection was designed to identify RNA-cleaving ribozymes predisposed for function as a drug. The selection scheme required the catalyst to be trans-acting with phosphodiesterase activity targeting a fragment of the Kras mRNA under simulated physiological conditions. To increase stabilization against nucleases and to offer the potential for improved functionality, modified sequence space was sampled by transcribing with the following NTPs: 2'-F-ATP, 2'-F-UTP, or 2'-F-5-[(N-imidazole-4-acetyl) propylamine]-UTP, 2'-NH2-CTP, and GTP. Active motifs were identified and assessed for their modified NMP and divalent metal dependence. The minimization of the ribozyme's size and the ability to substitute 2'-OMe for 2'-F and 2'-NH2 moieties yielded the motif from these selections most suited for both nuclease stability and therapeutic development. This motif requires only two 2'-NH2-Cs and functions as a 36-mer. Its substrate sequence requirements were determined to be 5'-Y-G-H-3'. Its half-life in human serum is >100 h. In physiologically relevant magnesium concentrations [approximately 1 mM] its kcat = 0.07 min(-1), Km = 70 nM. This report presents a novel nuclease stable ribozyme, designated Zinzyme, possessing optimal activity in simulated physiological conditions and ready for testing in a therapeutic setting. PMID:11911367

  7. Vitamin D: Implications for Ocular Disease and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Reins, Rose Y.; McDermott, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is a multifunctional hormone that is now known to play a significant role in a variety of biological functions in addition to its traditional role in regulating calcium homeostasis. There are a large number of studies demonstrating that adequate vitamin D levels are important in maintaining health and show that vitamin D is able to be utilized at local tissue sites. In the eye, we have increasing evidence of the association between disease and vitamin D. In this narrative review, we summarize recent findings on vitamin D and its relationship to various ocular pathologies and the therapeutic potential for some of these, as well as examine the basic science studies that demonstrate that vitamin D is biologically relevant in the eye. PMID:25724179

  8. Hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis: pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; You, Hong; Fan, Xu; Jia, Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic macrophages account for the largest non-parenchymal cell population in the liver. Recent studies have found that hepatic macrophages have different functions in different stages of experimental liver fibrosis. Some studies found that there are different types of hepatic macrophages in the liver, although others have suggested that hepatic macrophages could switch to different phenotypes in different environments. Many studies demonstrated that while hepatic macrophages promoted fibrosis through the recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells, and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the early stages, these also promoted the resolution of hepatic fibrosis through the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases in the late stages. This article will review the current role played by hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis and the potential therapeutic targets that modulate hepatic macrophages. PMID:27252881

  9. Functions of astrocytes and their potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kimelberg, Harold K.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytes are often referred to, and historically have been regarded as, support cells of the mammalian CNS. Work over the last decade suggests otherwise, that astrocytes may in fact play a more active role in higher neural processing than previously recognized. Because astrocytes can potentially serve as novel therapeutic targets, it is critical to understand how astrocytes execute their diverse supportive tasks while maintaining neuronal health. To that end, this review will focus on the supportive roles of astrocytes, a line of study relevant to essentially all acute and chronic neurological diseases. Furthermore, this review will critically re-evaluate our concepts of the functional properties of astrocytes and relate these tasks to their intricate morphology. PMID:20880499

  10. High therapeutic potential of Spilanthes acmella: A review

    PubMed Central

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2013-01-01

    Spilanthes acmella, a well known antitoothache plant with high medicinal usages, has been recognized as an important medicinal plant and has an increasingly high demand worldwide. From its traditional uses in health care and food, extensive phytochemical studies have been reported. This review provides an overview and general description of the plant species, bioactive metabolites and important pharmacological activities including the preparation, purification and in vitro large-scale production. Structure-activity relationships of the bioactive compounds have been discussed. Considering data from the literature, it could be demonstrated that S. acmella possesses diverse bioactive properties and immense utilization in medicine, health care, cosmetics and as health supplements. As a health food, it is enriched with high therapeutic value with high potential for further development. PMID:27092032

  11. Revisiting Metal Toxicity in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Stroke: Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Joy; Vasquez, Velmarini; Hegde, Pavana M; Boldogh, Istvan; Mitra, Sankar; Kent, Thomas A; Rao, Kosagi S; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of pro-oxidant metals, observed in affected brain regions, has consistently been implicated as a contributor to the brain pathology including neurodegenerative diseases and acute injuries such as stroke. Furthermore, the potential interactions between metal toxicity and other commonly associated etiological factors, such as misfolding/aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins or genomic damage, are poorly understood. Decades of research provide compelling evidence implicating metal overload in neurological diseases and stroke. However, the utility of metal toxicity as a therapeutic target is controversial, possibly due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of metal dyshomeostasis-mediated neuronal pathology. In this article, we discuss the current understanding of metal toxicity and the challenges associated with metal-targeted therapies. PMID:25717476

  12. The preventive and therapeutic potential of natural polyphenols on influenza.

    PubMed

    Bahramsoltani, Roodabeh; Sodagari, Hamid Reza; Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Abdolghaffari, Amir Hossein; Gooshe, Maziar; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus belongs to orthomyxoviridae family. This virus is a major public health problems, with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Despite a wide range of pharmacotherapeutic choices inhibiting specific sequences of pathological process of influenza, developing more effective therapeutic options is an immediate challenge. In this paper, a comprehensively review of natural polyphenolic products used worldwide for the management of influenza infection is presented. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of the natural polyphenols on influenza infection including suppressing virus replication cycle, viral hemagglutination, viral adhesion and penetration into the host cells, also intracellular transductional signaling pathways have been discussed in detail. Based on cellular, animal, and human evidence obtained from several studies, the current paper demonstrates that natural polyphenolic compounds possess potential effects on both prevention and treatment of influenza, which can be used as adjuvant therapy with conventional chemical drugs for the management of influenza and its complications. PMID:26567957

  13. Human-derived natural antibodies: biomarkers and potential therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohua; Ng, Sher May; Hassouna, Eamonn; Warrington, Arthur; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    The immune system generates antibodies and antigen-specific T-cells as basic elements of the immune networks that differentiate self from non-self in a finely tuned manner. The antigen-specific nature of immune responses ensures that normal immune activation contains non-self when tolerating self. Here we review the B-1 subset of lymphocytes which produce self-reactive antibodies. By analyzing the IgM class of natural antibodies that recognize antigens from the nervous system, we emphasize that natural antibodies are biomarkers of how the immune system monitors the host. The immune response activated against self can be detrimental when triggered in an autoimmune genetic background. In contrast, tuning immune activity with natural antibodies is a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:25678860

  14. The potential therapeutic effects of THC on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chuanhai; Li, Yaqiong; Liu, Hui; Bai, Ge; Mayl, Jonathan; Lin, Xiaoyang; Sutherland, Kyle; Nabar, Neel; Cai, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential therapeutic qualities of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) with respect to slowing or halting the hallmark characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. N2a-variant amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) cells were incubated with THC and assayed for amyloid-β (Aβ) levels at the 6-, 24-, and 48-hour time marks. THC was also tested for synergy with caffeine, in respect to the reduction of the Aβ level in N2a/AβPPswe cells. THC was also tested to determine if multiple treatments were beneficial. The MTT assay was performed to test the toxicity of THC. Thioflavin T assays and western blots were performed to test the direct anti-Aβ aggregation significance of THC. Lastly, THC was tested to determine its effects on glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and related signaling pathways. From the results, we have discovered THC to be effective at lowering Aβ levels in N2a/AβPPswe cells at extremely low concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. However, no additive effect was found by combining caffeine and THC together. We did discover that THC directly interacts with Aβ peptide, thereby inhibiting aggregation. Furthermore, THC was effective at lowering both total GSK-3β levels and phosphorylated GSK-3β in a dose-dependent manner at low concentrations. At the treatment concentrations, no toxicity was observed and the CB1 receptor was not significantly upregulated. Additionally, low doses of THC can enhance mitochondria function and does not inhibit melatonin's enhancement of mitochondria function. These sets of data strongly suggest that THC could be a potential therapeutic treatment option for Alzheimer's disease through multiple functions and pathways. PMID:25024327

  15. Therapeutic potential of intermittent hypoxia: a matter of dose

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete-Opazo, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) has been the subject of considerable research in recent years, and triggers a bewildering array of both detrimental and beneficial effects in multiple physiological systems. Here, we review the extensive literature concerning IH and its impact on the respiratory, cardiovascular, immune, metabolic, bone, and nervous systems. One major goal is to define relevant IH characteristics leading to safe, protective, and/or therapeutic effects vs. pathogenesis. To understand the impact of IH, it is essential to define critical characteristics of the IH protocol under investigation, including potentially the severity of hypoxia within episodes, the duration of hypoxic episodes, the number of hypoxic episodes per day, the pattern of presentation across time (e.g., within vs. consecutive vs. alternating days), and the cumulative time of exposure. Not surprisingly, severe/chronic IH protocols tend to be pathogenic, whereas any beneficial effects are more likely to arise from modest/acute IH exposures. Features of the IH protocol most highly associated with beneficial vs. pathogenic outcomes include the level of hypoxemia within episodes and the number of episodes per day. Modest hypoxia (9–16% inspired O2) and low cycle numbers (3–15 episodes per day) most often lead to beneficial effects without pathology, whereas severe hypoxia (2–8% inspired O2) and more episodes per day (48–2,400 episodes/day) elicit progressively greater pathology. Accumulating evidence suggests that “low dose” IH (modest hypoxia, few episodes) may be a simple, safe, and effective treatment with considerable therapeutic potential for multiple clinical disorders. PMID:25231353

  16. Terpenoids as potential chemopreventive and therapeutic agents in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thoppil, Roslin J; Bishayee, Anupam

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant advances in medicine, liver cancer, predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma remains a major cause of death in the United States as well as the rest of the world. As limited treatment options are currently available to patients with liver cancer, novel preventive control and effective therapeutic approaches are considered to be reasonable and decisive measures to combat this disease. Several naturally occurring dietary and non-dietary phytochemicals have shown enormous potential in the prevention and treatment of several cancers, especially those of the gastrointestinal tract. Terpenoids, the largest group of phytochemicals, traditionally used for medicinal purposes in India and China, are currently being explored as anticancer agents in clinical trials. Terpenoids (also called “isoprenoids”) are secondary metabolites occurring in most organisms, particularly plants. More than 40 000 individual terpenoids are known to exist in nature with new compounds being discovered every year. A large number of terpenoids exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells and cancer preventive as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. This review critically examines the potential role of naturally occurring terpenoids, from diverse origins, in the chemoprevention and treatment of liver tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of these agents and related cellular and molecular mechanisms are highlighted. Potential challenges and future directions involved in the advancement of these promising natural compounds in the chemoprevention and therapy of human liver cancer are also discussed. PMID:21969877

  17. The therapeutic potential of genome editing for β-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Astrid; McColl, Bradley; Vadolas, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advances in the field of genome editing using targeted endonucleases have called considerable attention to the potential of this technology for human gene therapy. Targeted correction of disease-causing mutations could ensure lifelong, tissue-specific expression of the relevant gene, thereby alleviating or resolving a specific disease phenotype. In this review, we aim to explore the potential of this technology for the therapy of β-thalassemia. This blood disorder is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the β-globin chain of hemoglobin, leading to severe anemia in affected patients. Curative allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is available only to a small subset of patients, leaving the majority of patients dependent on regular blood transfusions and iron chelation therapy. The transfer of gene-corrected autologous hematopoietic stem cells could provide a therapeutic alternative, as recent results from gene therapy trials using a lentiviral gene addition approach have demonstrated. Genome editing has the potential to further advance this approach as it eliminates the need for semi-randomly integrating viral vectors and their associated risk of insertional mutagenesis. In the following pages we will highlight the advantages and risks of genome editing compared to standard therapy for β-thalassemia and elaborate on lessons learned from recent gene therapy trials. PMID:26918126

  18. Terpenoids as potential chemopreventive and therapeutic agents in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Thoppil, Roslin J; Bishayee, Anupam

    2011-09-27

    Despite significant advances in medicine, liver cancer, predominantly hepatocellular carcinoma remains a major cause of death in the United States as well as the rest of the world. As limited treatment options are currently available to patients with liver cancer, novel preventive control and effective therapeutic approaches are considered to be reasonable and decisive measures to combat this disease. Several naturally occurring dietary and non-dietary phytochemicals have shown enormous potential in the prevention and treatment of several cancers, especially those of the gastrointestinal tract. Terpenoids, the largest group of phytochemicals, traditionally used for medicinal purposes in India and China, are currently being explored as anticancer agents in clinical trials. Terpenoids (also called "isoprenoids") are secondary metabolites occurring in most organisms, particularly plants. More than 40 000 individual terpenoids are known to exist in nature with new compounds being discovered every year. A large number of terpenoids exhibit cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells and cancer preventive as well as anticancer efficacy in preclinical animal models. This review critically examines the potential role of naturally occurring terpenoids, from diverse origins, in the chemoprevention and treatment of liver tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo effects of these agents and related cellular and molecular mechanisms are highlighted. Potential challenges and future directions involved in the advancement of these promising natural compounds in the chemoprevention and therapy of human liver cancer are also discussed. PMID:21969877

  19. Therapeutic and Prophylactic Potential of Morama (Tylosema esculentum): A Review.

    PubMed

    Chingwaru, Walter; Vidmar, Jerneja; Kapewangolo, Petrina T; Mazimba, Ofentse; Jackson, Jose

    2015-10-01

    Tylosema esculentum (morama) is a highly valued traditional food and source of medicine for the San and other indigenous populations that inhabit the arid to semi-arid parts of Southern Africa. Morama beans are a rich source of phenolic acids, flavonoids, certain fatty acids, non-essential amino acids, certain phytosterols, tannins and minerals. The plant's tuber contains griffonilide, behenic acid and starch. Concoctions of extracts from morama bean, tuber and other local plants are frequently used to treat diarrhoea and digestive disorders by the San and other indigenous populations. Information on composition and bioactivity of phytochemical components of T. esculentum suggests that the polyphenol-rich extracts of the bean testae and cotyledons have great potential as sources of chemicals that inhibit infectious microorganisms (viral, bacterial and fungal, including drug-resistant strains), offer protection against certain non-communicable diseases and promote wound healing and gut health. The potential antinutritional properties of a few morama components are also highlighted. More research is necessary to reveal the full prophylactic and therapeutic potential of the plant against diseases of the current century. Research on domestication and conservation of the plant offers new hope for sustainable utilisation of the plant. PMID:26206567

  20. The therapeutic potential of genome editing for β-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Astrid; McColl, Bradley; Vadolas, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advances in the field of genome editing using targeted endonucleases have called considerable attention to the potential of this technology for human gene therapy. Targeted correction of disease-causing mutations could ensure lifelong, tissue-specific expression of the relevant gene, thereby alleviating or resolving a specific disease phenotype. In this review, we aim to explore the potential of this technology for the therapy of β-thalassemia. This blood disorder is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the β-globin chain of hemoglobin, leading to severe anemia in affected patients. Curative allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is available only to a small subset of patients, leaving the majority of patients dependent on regular blood transfusions and iron chelation therapy. The transfer of gene-corrected autologous hematopoietic stem cells could provide a therapeutic alternative, as recent results from gene therapy trials using a lentiviral gene addition approach have demonstrated. Genome editing has the potential to further advance this approach as it eliminates the need for semi-randomly integrating viral vectors and their associated risk of insertional mutagenesis. In the following pages we will highlight the advantages and risks of genome editing compared to standard therapy for β-thalassemia and elaborate on lessons learned from recent gene therapy trials. PMID:26918126

  1. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  2. Immune repertoire: A potential biomarker and therapeutic for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingxin; Li, Hongmei; Guan, Yanfang; Huang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    The immune repertoire (IR) refers to the sum of B cells and T cells with functional diversity in the circulatory system of one individual at any given time. Immune cells, which reside within microenvironments and are responsible for protecting the human body, include T cells, B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. These dedicated immune cells have a characteristic structure and function. T and B cells are the main lymphocytes and are responsible for cellular immunity and humoral immunity, respectively. The T cell receptor (TCR) and B cell receptor (BCR) are composed of multiple peptide chains with antigen specificity. The amino acid composition and sequence order are more diverse in the complementarity-determining regions (including CDR1, CDR2 and CDR3) of each peptide chain, allowing a vast library of TCRs and BCRs. IR research is becoming increasingly focused on the study of CDR3 diversity. Deep profiling of CDR3s using high-throughput sequencing is a powerful approach for elucidating the composition and distribution of the CDR3s in a given sample, with in-depth information at the sequence level. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies in the world. To identify novel biomarkers for diagnosis and drug targets for therapeutic interventions, several groups attempted to describe immune repertoire characteristics of the liver in the physiological environment or/and pathological conditions. This paper reviews the recent progress in IR research on human diseases, including hepatocellular carcinoma, attempting to depict the relationships between hepatocellular carcinogenesis and the IR, and discusses the possibility of IR as a potential biomarker and therapeutic for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26188280

  3. Pharmacology and therapeutic potential of sigma(1) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Cobos, E J; Entrena, J M; Nieto, F R; Cendán, C M; Del Pozo, E

    2008-12-01

    Sigma (sigma) receptors, initially described as a subtype of opioid receptors, are now considered unique receptors. Pharmacological studies have distinguished two types of sigma receptors, termed sigma(1) and sigma(2). Of these two subtypes, the sigma(1) receptor has been cloned in humans and rodents, and its amino acid sequence shows no homology with other mammalian proteins. Several psychoactive drugs show high to moderate affinity for sigma(1) receptors, including the antipsychotic haloperidol, the antidepressant drugs fluvoxamine and sertraline, and the psychostimulants cocaine and methamphetamine; in addition, the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin allosterically modulates sigma(1) receptors. Certain neurosteroids are known to interact with sigma(1) receptors, and have been proposed to be their endogenous ligands. These receptors are located in the plasma membrane and in subcellular membranes, particularly in the endoplasmic reticulum, where they play a modulatory role in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Sigma(1) receptors also play a modulatory role in the activity of some ion channels and in several neurotransmitter systems, mainly in glutamatergic neurotransmission. In accordance with their widespread modulatory role, sigma(1) receptor ligands have been proposed to be useful in several therapeutic fields such as amnesic and cognitive deficits, depression and anxiety, schizophrenia, analgesia, and against some effects of drugs of abuse (such as cocaine and methamphetamine). In this review we provide an overview of the present knowledge of sigma(1) receptors, focussing on sigma(1) ligand neuropharmacology and the role of sigma(1) receptors in behavioral animal studies, which have contributed greatly to the potential therapeutic applications of sigma(1) ligands. PMID:19587856

  4. Therapeutic Potential of Temperate Forage Legumes: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cornara, Laura; Xiao, Jianbo; Burlando, Bruno

    2016-07-29

    The discovery of bioactive molecules from botanical sources is an expanding field, preferentially oriented to plants having a tradition of use in medicine and providing high yields and availability. Temperate forage legumes are Fabaceae species that include worldwide-important crops. These plants possess therapeutic virtues that have not only been used in veterinary and folk medicine, but have also attracted the interest of official medicine. We have examined here Medicago sativa (alfalfa), Trifolium pratense and T. repens (clovers), Melilotus albus and M. officinalis (sweet clovers), Lotus corniculatus (birdsfoot trefoil), Onobrychis viciifolia (sainfoin), Lespedeza capitata (roundhead lespedeza), and Galega officinalis (goat's rue). The phytochemical complexes of these species contain secondary metabolites whose pharmacological potentials deserve investigation. Major classes of compounds include alkaloids and amines, cyanogenic glycosides, flavonoids, coumarins, condensed tannins, and saponins. Some of these phytochemicals have been related to antihypercholesterolemia, antidiabetic, antimenopause, anti-inflammatory, antiedema, anthelmintic, and kidney protective effects. Two widely prescribed drugs have been developed starting from temperate forage legumes, namely, the antithrombotic warfarin, inspired from sweet clover's coumarin, and the antidiabetic metformin, a derivative of sainfoin's guanidine. Available evidence suggests that temperate forage legumes are a potentially important resource for the extraction of active principles to be used as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. PMID:26507574

  5. 5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptor Subtypes and their Modulators with Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pithadia, Anand B.; Jain, Sunita M.

    2009-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has become one of the most investigated and complex biogenic amines. The main receptors and their subtypes, e.g., 5-HTI (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HTID, 5-HTIE and 5-HT1F), 5-HT2 (5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C), 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5 (5-HT5A, 5-HT5B), 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 have been identified. Specific drugs which are capable of either selectively stimulating or inhibiting these receptor subtypes are being designed. This has generated therapeutic potentials of 5-HT receptor modulators in a variety of disease conditions. Conditions where 5-HT receptor modulators have established their use with distinct efficacy and advantages include migraine, anxiety, psychosis, obesity and cancer therapy-induced vomiting by cytotoxic drugs and radiation. Discovery of 5-HT, its biosynthesis, metabolism, physiological role and the potential of 5-HT receptor modulators in various nervous, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal tract disorders, bone growth and micturition have been discussed in this article. Keywords 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors; Modulators; Biogenic amines PMID:22505971

  6. Overview of the therapeutic potential of piplartine (piperlongumine).

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Daniel P; Pessoa, Claudia; de Moraes, Manoel O; Saker-Neto, Nicolau; Silveira, Edilberto R; Costa-Lotufo, Leticia V

    2013-02-14

    Piplartine (piperlongumine, 5,6-dihydro-1-[(2E)-1-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-2-propenyl]-2(1H)-pyridinone) is a biologically active alkaloid/amide from peppers, as from long pepper (Piper longum L. - Piperaceae). Long pepper is one of the most widely used in Ayurvedic medicine, which is used to treat many diseases, including tumors. The purpose of the current paper is to address to the chemical structure establishment and to systematically survey the published articles and highlight recent advances in the knowledge of the therapeutic potential of piplartine, establishing new goals for future research. The reported pharmacological activities of piplartine include cytotoxic, genotoxic, antitumor, antiangiogenic, antimetastatic, antiplatelet aggregation, antinociceptive, anxiolytic, antidepressant, anti-atherosclerotic, antidiabetic, antibacterial, antifungal, leishmanicidal, trypanocidal, and schistosomicidal activities. Among the multiple pharmacological effects of piplartine, its anticancer property is the most promising. Therefore, the preclinical anticancer potential of piplartine has been extensively investigated, which recently resulted in one patent. This compound is selectively cytotoxic against cancer cells by induction of oxidative stress, induces genotoxicity, as an alternative strategy to killing tumor cells, has excellent oral bioavailability in mice, inhibits tumor growth in mice, and presents only weak systemic toxicity. In summary, we conclude that piplartine is effective for use in cancer therapy and its safety using chronic toxicological studies should be addressed to support the viability of clinical trials. PMID:23238172

  7. DNA Triple Helices: biological consequences and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Aklank; Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    DNA structure is a critical element in determining its function. The DNA molecule is capable of adopting a variety of non-canonical structures, including three-stranded (i.e. triplex) structures, which will be the focus of this review. The ability to selectively modulate the activity of genes is a long-standing goal in molecular medicine. DNA triplex structures, either intermolecular triplexes formed by binding of an exogenously applied oligonucleotide to a target duplex sequence, or naturally occurring intramolecular triplexes (H-DNA) formed at endogenous mirror repeat sequences, present exploitable features that permit site-specific alteration of the genome. These structures can induce transcriptional repression and site-specific mutagenesis or recombination. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to duplex DNA in a sequence specific fashion with high affinity, and can be used to direct DNA-modifying agents to selected sequences. H-DNA plays important roles in vivo and is inherently mutagenic and recombinogenic, such that elements of the H-DNA structure may be pharmacologically exploitable. In this review we discuss the biological consequences and therapeutic potential of triple helical DNA structures. We anticipate that the information provided will stimulate further investigations aimed toward improving DNA triplex-related gene targeting strategies for biotechnological and potential clinical applications. PMID:18331847

  8. New therapeutic potentials of milk thistle (Silybum marianum).

    PubMed

    Milić, Natasa; Milosević, Natasa; Suvajdzić, Ljiljana; Zarkov, Marija; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2013-12-01

    Silymarin is a bioflavonoid complex extract derived from dry seeds of Milk thistle [(Silybum marianum(L.) Gaemrnt. (Fam. Asteraceae/Compositaceae)] whose hepatoprotective effect has clinically been proved. Low toxicity, favorable pharmacokinetics, powerful antioxidant, detoxifying, preventive, protective and regenerative effects and side effects similar to placebo make silymarin extremely attractive and safe for therapeutic use. The medicinal properties of silymarin and its main component silibinin have been studied in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, sepsis, burns, osteoporosis, diabetes, cholestasis and hypercholesterolemia. Owing to its apoptotic effect, without cytotoxic effects, silymarin possesses potential applications in the treatment of various cancers. Silymarin is being examined as a neuro-, nephro- and cardio-protective in the damage of different etiologies due to its strong antioxidant potentials. Furthermore, it has fetoprotective (against the influence of alcohol) and prolactin effects and is safe to be used during pregnancy and lactation. Finally, the cosmetics industry is examining the antioxidant and UV-protective effects of silymarin. Further clinical studies and scientific evidence that silymarin and silibinin are effective in the therapy of various pathologies are indispensable in order to confirm their different flavonolignan pharmacological effects. PMID:24555302

  9. Oligo/Polynucleotide-Based Gene Modification: Strategies and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, R. Geoffrey; Kim, Soya

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotide- and polynucleotide-based gene modification strategies were developed as an alternative to transgene-based and classical gene targeting-based gene therapy approaches for treatment of genetic disorders. Unlike the transgene-based strategies, oligo/polynucleotide gene targeting approaches maintain gene integrity and the relationship between the protein coding and gene-specific regulatory sequences. Oligo/polynucleotide-based gene modification also has several advantages over classical vector-based homologous recombination approaches. These include essentially complete homology to the target sequence and the potential to rapidly engineer patient-specific oligo/polynucleotide gene modification reagents. Several oligo/polynucleotide-based approaches have been shown to successfully mediate sequence-specific modification of genomic DNA in mammalian cells. The strategies involve the use of polynucleotide small DNA fragments, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides to mediate homologous exchange. The primary focus of this review will be on the mechanistic aspects of the small fragment homologous replacement, triplex-forming oligonucleotide-mediated, and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated gene modification strategies as it relates to their therapeutic potential. PMID:21417933

  10. DNA triple helices: biological consequences and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aklank; Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M

    2008-08-01

    DNA structure is a critical element in determining its function. The DNA molecule is capable of adopting a variety of non-canonical structures, including three-stranded (i.e. triplex) structures, which will be the focus of this review. The ability to selectively modulate the activity of genes is a long-standing goal in molecular medicine. DNA triplex structures, either intermolecular triplexes formed by binding of an exogenously applied oligonucleotide to a target duplex sequence, or naturally occurring intramolecular triplexes (H-DNA) formed at endogenous mirror repeat sequences, present exploitable features that permit site-specific alteration of the genome. These structures can induce transcriptional repression and site-specific mutagenesis or recombination. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to duplex DNA in a sequence-specific fashion with high affinity, and can be used to direct DNA-modifying agents to selected sequences. H-DNA plays important roles in vivo and is inherently mutagenic and recombinogenic, such that elements of the H-DNA structure may be pharmacologically exploitable. In this review we discuss the biological consequences and therapeutic potential of triple helical DNA structures. We anticipate that the information provided will stimulate further investigations aimed toward improving DNA triplex-related gene targeting strategies for biotechnological and potential clinical applications. PMID:18331847

  11. Harnessing the Therapeutic Potential of Th17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bystrom, Jonas; Taher, Taher E.; Muhyaddin, M. Sherwan; Clanchy, Felix I.; Mangat, Pamela; Jawad, Ali S.; Williams, Richard O.; Mageed, Rizgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Th17 cells provide protective immunity to infections by fungi and extracellular bacteria as well as cancer but are also involved in chronic inflammation. The cells were first identified by their ability to produce interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and, subsequently, associated with chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Th17 cells have some gene profile similarity with stem cells and can remain dormant in mucosal tissues for long periods. Indeed, recent studies suggest that functionally distinct subsets of pro- and anti-inflammatory Th17 cells can interchange phenotype and functions. For development, Th17 cells require activation of the transcription factors STAT3 and RORγt while RUNX1, c-Maf, and Aiolos are involved in changes of phenotype/functions. Attempts to harness Th17 cells against pathogens and cancer using vaccination strategies are being explored. The cells gain protective abilities when induced to produce interferon γ (IFNγ). In addition, treatment with antibodies to IL-17 is effective in treating patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and refectory rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, since RORγt is a nuclear receptor, it is likely to be a potential future drug target for modulating Th17 functions. This review explores pathways through which Th17 subsets are induced, the molecular basis of their plasticity, and potential therapeutic strategies for their modulation in diseases. PMID:26101460

  12. Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Devang M.; Shah, Jainy; Srivastava, Anand S.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation into both mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal lineages. The intrinsic properties of these cells make them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. MSCs are of keen interest because they can be isolated from a small aspirate of bone marrow or adipose tissues and can be easily expanded in vitro. Moreover, their ability to modulate immune responses makes them an even more attractive candidate for regenerative medicine as allogeneic transplant of these cells is feasible without a substantial risk of immune rejection. MSCs secrete various immunomodulatory molecules which provide a regenerative microenvironment for a variety of injured tissues or organ to limit the damage and to increase self-regulated tissue regeneration. Autologous/allogeneic MSCs delivered via the bloodstream augment the titers of MSCs that are drawn to sites of tissue injury and can accelerate the tissue repair process. MSCs are currently being tested for their potential use in cell and gene therapy for a number of human debilitating diseases and genetic disorders. This paper summarizes the current clinical and nonclinical data for the use of MSCs in tissue repair and potential therapeutic role in various diseases. PMID:23577036

  13. The Therapeutic Potential of Brown Adipocytes in Humans.

    PubMed

    Porter, Craig; Chondronikola, Maria; Sidossis, Labros S

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and its metabolic consequences represent a significant clinical problem. From a thermodynamic standpoint, obesity results from a discord in energy intake and expenditure. To date, lifestyle interventions based on reducing energy intake and/or increasing energy expenditure have proved ineffective in the prevention and/or treatment of obesity, owing to poor long-term adherence to such interventions. Thus, an effective strategy to prevent or correct obesity is currently lacking. As the combustion engines of our cells, mitochondria play a critical role in energy expenditure. At a whole-body level, approximately 80% of mitochondrial membrane potential generated by fuel oxidation is used to produce ATP, and the remaining 20% is lost through heat-producing uncoupling reactions. The coupling of mitochondrial respiration to ATP production represents an important component in whole-body energy expenditure. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is densely populated with mitochondria containing the inner mitochondrial proton carrier uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). UCP1 uncouples oxidative phosphorylation, meaning that mitochondrial membrane potential is dissipated as heat. The recent rediscovery of BAT depots in adult humans has rekindled scientific interest in the manipulation of mitochondrial uncoupling reactions as a means to increase metabolic rate, thereby counteracting obesity and its associated metabolic phenotype. In this article, we discuss the evidence for the role BAT plays in metabolic rate and glucose and lipid metabolism in humans and the potential for UCP1 recruitment in the white adipose tissue of humans. While the future holds much promise for a therapeutic role of UCP1 expressing adipocytes in human energy metabolism, particularly in the context of obesity, tissue-specific strategies that activate or recruit UCP1 in human adipocytes represent an obligatory translational step for this early promise to be realized. PMID:26528238

  14. The Therapeutic Potential of Brown Adipocytes in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Craig; Chondronikola, Maria; Sidossis, Labros S.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and its metabolic consequences represent a significant clinical problem. From a thermodynamic standpoint, obesity results from a discord in energy intake and expenditure. To date, lifestyle interventions based on reducing energy intake and/or increasing energy expenditure have proved ineffective in the prevention and/or treatment of obesity, owing to poor long-term adherence to such interventions. Thus, an effective strategy to prevent or correct obesity is currently lacking. As the combustion engines of our cells, mitochondria play a critical role in energy expenditure. At a whole-body level, approximately 80% of mitochondrial membrane potential generated by fuel oxidation is used to produce ATP, and the remaining 20% is lost through heat-producing uncoupling reactions. The coupling of mitochondrial respiration to ATP production represents an important component in whole-body energy expenditure. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is densely populated with mitochondria containing the inner mitochondrial proton carrier uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). UCP1 uncouples oxidative phosphorylation, meaning that mitochondrial membrane potential is dissipated as heat. The recent rediscovery of BAT depots in adult humans has rekindled scientific interest in the manipulation of mitochondrial uncoupling reactions as a means to increase metabolic rate, thereby counteracting obesity and its associated metabolic phenotype. In this article, we discuss the evidence for the role BAT plays in metabolic rate and glucose and lipid metabolism in humans and the potential for UCP1 recruitment in the white adipose tissue of humans. While the future holds much promise for a therapeutic role of UCP1 expressing adipocytes in human energy metabolism, particularly in the context of obesity, tissue-specific strategies that activate or recruit UCP1 in human adipocytes represent an obligatory translational step for this early promise to be realized. PMID:26528238

  15. p300 mediates cellular resistance to doxorubicin in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ario; Shiota, Masaki; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Yokomizo, Akira; Tanaka, Shingo; Kuroiwa, Kentaro; Eto, Masatoshi; Naito, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common urogenital malignancies. At the non-invasive stage, bladder cancer can be completely resected transurethrally. However, 70% of patients experience intravesical tumor recurrence within 5 years. Patients with advanced bladder cancer frequently receive a chemotherapy regimen containing doxorubicin. However, doxorubicin resistance is a major obstacle to cancer chemotherapy. Previously, we reported that the histone acetyltransferase p300/CBP-associated factor is involved in doxorubicin resistance in bladder cancer. However, the role of another histone acetyltransferase, p300, in bladder cancer resistance to doxorubicin remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of doxorubicin resistance in bladder cancer with regard to p300. The result showed that p300 expression was reduced in doxorubicin-resistant bladder cancer cells and in response to doxorubicin exposure. Furthermore, p300 suppression rendered bladder cancer cells resistant to doxorubicin. Taken together, the results from this study indicate that p300 may be a promising molecular therapeutic target through the modulation of cellular sensitivity to doxorubicin in bladder cancer. PMID:21935574

  16. Strategy to enhance the therapeutic effect of doxorubicin in human hepatocellular carcinoma by selenocystine, a synergistic agent that regulates the ROS-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Cundong; Zheng, Wenjie; Fu, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiaoling; Wong, Yum-Shing; Chen, Tianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin-based chemotherapy represents one of the most effective ways in combating human cancers. However, its clinical use is limited by severe side effects. Selenocystine (SeC) is a natural available selenoamino acid with novel anticancer efficacy. In this study, we used SeC to sensitize HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells to DOX, and to achieve anticancer synergism in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with DOX dose-dependently reduced HepG2 cell viability through initiating cell apoptosis and strong G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. Mechanistic studies indicated that this sensitization of SeC to DOX was achieved by triggering inactivation of ERK and AKT and DNA damage through reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. Pretreatment with inhibitors of ERK and AKT markedly enhanced combined treatment-induced cell killing, indicating that combined treatment-induced HCC cell killing with ERK- and AKT-dependent manner. Furthermore, inhibition of ROS effectively attenuated combined treatment-induced DNA damage and inactivation of ERK and AKT. Additionally, xenograft hepatocellular carcinoma growth was also effectively inhibited by combined treatment through induction of cell apoptosis in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that the strategy to use SeC and DOX in combination could be a highly efficient way to achieve anticancer synergism against HCC. PMID:24797310

  17. Silk polymer-based adenosine release: therapeutic potential for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wilz, Andrew; Pritchard, Eleanor M; Li, Tianfu; Lan, Jing-Quan; Kaplan, David L; Boison, Detlev

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine augmentation therapies (AAT) make rational use of the brain's own adenosine-based seizure control system and hold promise for the therapy of refractory epilepsy. In an effort to develop an AAT compatible with future clinical application, we developed a novel silk protein-based release system for adenosine. Adenosine releasing brain implants with target release doses of 0, 40, 200, and 1000ng adenosine per day were prepared by embedding adenosine containing microspheres into nanofilm-coated silk fibroin scaffolds. In vitro, the respective polymers released 0, 33.4, 170.5, and 819.0ng adenosine per day over 14 days. The therapeutic potential of the implants was validated in a dose-response study in the rat model of kindling epileptogenesis. Four days prior to the onset of kindling, adenosine releasing polymers were implanted into the infrahippocampal cleft and progressive acquisition of kindled seizures was monitored over a total of 48 stimulations. We document a dose-dependent retardation of seizure acquisition. In recipients of polymers releasing 819ng adenosine per day, kindling epileptogenesis was delayed by one week corresponding to 18 kindling stimulations. Histological analysis of brain samples confirmed the correct location of implants and electrodes. We conclude that silk-based delivery of around 1000ng adenosine per day is a safe and efficient strategy to suppress seizures. PMID:18514814

  18. Innate inflammatory responses in stroke: mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is more commonly encountered compared to hemorrhagic stroke, and leads to tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of a cerebral artery. Inflammation is known to result as a result of ischemic injury, long thought to be involved in initiating the recovery and repair process. However, work over the past few decades indicates that aspects of this inflammatory response may in fact be detrimental to stroke outcome. Acutely, inflammation appears to have a detrimental effect, and anti-inflammatory treatments have been been studied as a potential therapeutic target. Chronically, reports suggest that post-ischemic inflammation is also essential for the tissue repairing and remodeling. The majority of the work in this area has centered around innate immune mechanisms, which will be the focus of this review. This review describes the different key players in neuroinflammation and their possible detrimental and protective effects in stroke. A better understanding of the roles of the different immune cells and their temporal profile of damage versus repair will help to clarify more effective modulation of inflammation post stroke. Introduction Stroke refers to conditions caused by occlusion and/or rupture of blood vessels in the brain, and is a leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. PMID:24372209

  19. Astaxanthin: A Potential Therapeutic Agent in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fassett, Robert G.; Coombes, Jeff S.

    2011-01-01

    Astaxanthin is a xanthophyll carotenoid present in microalgae, fungi, complex plants, seafood, flamingos and quail. It is an antioxidant with anti-inflammatory properties and as such has potential as a therapeutic agent in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Synthetic forms of astaxanthin have been manufactured. The safety, bioavailability and effects of astaxanthin on oxidative stress and inflammation that have relevance to the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, have been assessed in a small number of clinical studies. No adverse events have been reported and there is evidence of a reduction in biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation with astaxanthin administration. Experimental studies in several species using an ischaemia-reperfusion myocardial model demonstrated that astaxanthin protects the myocardium when administered both orally or intravenously prior to the induction of the ischaemic event. At this stage we do not know whether astaxanthin is of benefit when administered after a cardiovascular event and no clinical cardiovascular studies in humans have been completed and/or reported. Cardiovascular clinical trials are warranted based on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties, the safety profile and preliminary experimental cardiovascular studies of astaxanthin. PMID:21556169

  20. Potential prognostic, diagnostic and therapeutic markers for human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Ming; Wang, Chia-Siu; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Tseng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The high incidence of gastric cancer (GC) and its consequent mortality rate severely threaten human health. GC is frequently not diagnosed until a relatively advanced stage. Surgery is the only potentially curative treatment. Thus, early screening and diagnosis are critical for improving prognoses in patients with GC. Gastroscopy with biopsy is an appropriate method capable of aiding the diagnosis of specific early GC tumor types; however, the stress caused by this method together with it being excessively expensive makes it difficult to use it as a routine method for screening for GC on a population basis. The currently used tumor marker assays for detecting GC are simple and rapid, but their use is limited by their low sensitivity and specificity. In recent years, several markers have been identified and tested for their clinical relevance in the management of GC. Here, we review the serum-based tumor markers for GC and their clinical significance, focusing on discoveries from microarray/proteomics research. We also review tissue-based GC tumor markers and their clinical application, focusing on discoveries from immunohistochemical research. This review provides a brief description of various tumor markers for the purposes of diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutics, and we include markers already in clinical practice and various forthcoming biomarkers. PMID:25320517

  1. Dopamine transporter ligands: recent developments and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Runyon, Scott P; Carroll, F Ivy

    2006-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a target for the development of pharmacotherapies for a number of central disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, Tourette's syndrome, Lesch-Nyhan disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obesity, depression, and stimulant abuse as well as normal aging. Considerable effort continues to be devoted to the development of new ligands for the DAT. In this review, we present some of the more interesting ligands developed during the last few years from the 3-phenytropane, 1,4-dialkylpiperazine, phenylpiperidine, and benztropine classes of DAT uptake inhibitors as well as a few less studied miscellaneous DAT uptake inhibitors. Studies related to the therapeutic potential of some of the more studied compounds are presented. A few of the compounds have been studied as pharmacotherapies for Parkinson's disease, ADHD, and obesity. However, most of the drug discovery studies have been directed toward pharmacotherapies for stimulant abuse (mainly cocaine). A number of the compounds showed decreased cocaine maintained responding in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine. One compound, GBR 12,909, was evaluated in a Phase 1 clinical trial. PMID:17017960

  2. Chelating polymeric beads as potential therapeutics for Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattová, Jana; Poučková, Pavla; Kučka, Jan; Skodová, Michaela; Vetrík, Miroslav; Stěpánek, Petr; Urbánek, Petr; Petřík, Miloš; Nový, Zbyněk; Hrubý, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Wilson's disease is a genetic disorder caused by a malfunction of ATPase 7B that leads to high accumulation of copper in the organism and consequent toxic effects. We propose a gentle therapy to eliminate the excessive copper content with oral administration of insoluble non-resorbable polymer sorbents containing selective chelating groups for copper(II). Polymeric beads with the chelating agents triethylenetetramine, N,N-di(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, and 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQB) were investigated. In a preliminary copper uptake experiment, we found that 8HQB significantly reduced copper uptake (using copper-64 as a radiotracer) after oral administration in Wistar rats. Furthermore, we measured organ radioactivity in rats to demonstrate that 8HQB radiolabelled with iodine-125 is not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract after oral administration. Non-resorbability and the blockade of copper uptake were also confirmed with small animal imaging (PET/CT) in mice. In a long-term experiment with Wistar rats fed a diet containing the polymers, we have found that there were no signs of polymer toxicity and the addition of polymers to the diet led to a significant reduction in the copper contents in the kidneys, brains, and livers of the rats. We have shown that polymers containing specific ligands could potentially be novel therapeutics for Wilson's disease. PMID:24815561

  3. Targeting CBLB as a potential therapeutic approach for disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Tang, Juan; Guo, Hui; Zhao, Yixia; Tang, Rong; Ouyang, Song; Zeng, Qiuming; Rappleye, Chad A; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Schlesinger, Larry S; Tao, Lijian; Brown, Gordon D; Langdon, Wallace Y; Li, Belinda T; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Disseminated candidiasis has become one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired blood stream infections with high mobility and mortality. However, the molecular basis of host defense against disseminated candidiasis remains elusive, and treatment options are limited. Here we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase CBLB directs polyubiquitination of dectin-1 and dectin-2, two key pattern-recognition receptors for sensing Candida albicans, and their downstream kinase SYK, thus inhibiting dectin-1- and dectin-2-mediated innate immune responses. CBLB deficiency or inactivation protects mice from systemic infection with a lethal dose of C. albicans, and deficiency of dectin-1, dectin-2, or both in Cblb(-/-) mice abrogates this protection. Notably, silencing the Cblb gene in vivo protects mice from lethal systemic C. albicans infection. Our data reveal that CBLB is crucial for homeostatic control of innate immune responses mediated by dectin-1 and dectin-2. Our data also indicate that CBLB represents a potential therapeutic target for protection from disseminated candidiasis. PMID:27428899

  4. Novel endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors and their therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Nithya; Lee, Yu Fei; Ge, Ruowen

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature is essential for embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. It also plays critical roles in diseases such as cancer and retinopathy. A delicate balance between pro- and anti-angiogenic factors ensures normal physiological homeostasis. Endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors are proteins or protein fragments that are formed in the body and have the ability to limit angiogenesis. Many endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors have been discovered, and the list continues to grow. Endogenous protein/peptide inhibitors are relatively less toxic, better tolerated and have a lower risk of drug resistance, which makes them attractive as drug candidates. In this review, we highlight ten novel endogenous protein angiogenesis inhibitors discovered within the last five years, including ISM1, FKBPL, CHIP, ARHGAP18, MMRN2, SOCS3, TAp73, ZNF24, GPR56 and JWA. Although some of these proteins have been well characterized for other biological functions, we focus on their new and specific roles in angiogenesis inhibition and discuss their potential for therapeutic application. PMID:26364800

  5. Physiological effects and therapeutic potential of proinsulin C-peptide

    PubMed Central

    Maric-Bilkan, Christine; Luppi, Patrizia; Wahren, John

    2014-01-01

    Connecting Peptide, or C-peptide, is a product of the insulin prohormone, and is released with and in amounts equimolar to those of insulin. While it was once thought that C-peptide was biologically inert and had little biological significance beyond its role in the proper folding of insulin, it is now known that C-peptide binds specifically to the cell membranes of a variety of tissues and initiates specific intracellular signaling cascades that are pertussis toxin sensitive. Although it is now clear that C-peptide is a biologically active molecule, controversy still remains as to the physiological significance of the peptide. Interestingly, C-peptide appears to reverse the deleterious effects of high glucose in some tissues, including the kidney, the peripheral nerves, and the vasculature. C-peptide is thus a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of diabetes-associated long-term complications. This review addresses the possible physiologically relevant roles of C-peptide in both normal and disease states and discusses the effects of the peptide on sensory nerve, renal, and vascular function. Furthermore, we highlight the intracellular effects of the peptide and present novel strategies for the determination of the C-peptide receptor(s). Finally, a hypothesis is offered concerning the relationship between C-peptide and the development of microvascular complications of diabetes. PMID:25249503

  6. New vitamin D analogs as potential therapeutics in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Szyszka, Paulina; Zmijewski, Michal A; Slominski, Andrzej T

    2012-01-01

    Extensive evidence shows that the active form of vitamin D3 – 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 – plays an important role in cancer prevention, has tumorostatic activity and may potentially be used in therapy for melanoma. Vitamin D3 and its analogs (secosteroids) exert multiple effects on cancer cells, including inhibition of cell growth and induction of differentiation. Activity of secosteroids depends on multiple cellular factors, including expression of the vitamin D receptor. Despite its endogenous origin, the key drawback for the use of pharmacologically effective doses of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is its hypercalcemic effect leading to profound toxicity. The solution may lie in properties of vitamin D3 analogs with modified side chains, which demonstrate low calcemic activity but conserve the anti-tumor properties. Noncalcemic vitamin D compounds were found to be potent in multiple studies that mandate further clinical testing. Finally, recent studies revealed alternative metabolic pathways for secosteroids and new targets in the cells, which opens up new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:22594894

  7. Islet neogenesis: a potential therapeutic tool in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lipsett, Mark; Aikin, Reid; Castellarin, Mauro; Hanley, Stephen; Jamal, Al-Maleek; Laganiere, Simon; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    Current therapies for type 1 diabetes, including fastidious blood glucose monitoring and multiple daily insulin injections, are not sufficient to prevent complications of the disease. Though pancreas and possibly islet transplantation can prevent the progression of complications, the scarcity of donor organs limits widespread application of these approaches. Understanding the mechanisms of beta-cell mass expansion as well as the means to exploit these pathways has enabled researchers to develop new strategies to expand and maintain islet cell mass. Potential new therapeutic avenues include ex vivo islet expansion and improved viability of islets prior to implantation, as well as the endogenous expansion of beta-cell mass within the diabetic patient. Islet neogenesis, through stem cell activation and/or transdifferentiation of mature fully differentiated cells, has been proposed as a means of beta-cell mass expansion. Finally, any successful new therapy for type 1 diabetes via beta-cell mass expansion will require prevention of beta-cell death and maintenance of long-term endocrine function. PMID:16216541

  8. Islet neogenesis: a potential therapeutic tool in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lipsett, Mark; Aikin, Reid; Hanley, Stephen; Al-Maleek, Jamal; Laganiere, Simon; Rosenburg, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    Current therapies for type 1 diabetes, including fastidious blood glucose monitoring and multiple daily insulin injections, are not sufficient to prevent complications of the disease. Though pancreas and possibly islet transplantation can prevent the progression of complications, the scarcity of donor organs limits widespread application of these approaches. Understanding the mechanisms of beta-cell mass expansion as well as the means to exploit these pathways has enabled researchers to develop new strategies to expand and maintain islet cell mass. Potential new therapeutic avenues include ex vivo islet expansion and improved viability of islets prior to implantation, as well as the endogenous expansion of beta-cell mass within the diabetic patient. Islet neogenesis, through stem cell activation and/or transdifferentiation of mature fully differentiated cells, has been proposed as a means of beta-cell mass expansion. Finally, any successful new therapy for type 1 diabetes via beta-cell mass expansion will require prevention of beta-cell death and maintenance of long-term endocrine function. PMID:16607698

  9. Epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylase: therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ian F; Dexter, David T

    2013-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder affecting more than 4million people worldwide. The primary motor symptoms of the disease are due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. Dopamine replacement therapies have therefore revolutionised disease management by partially controlling these symptoms. However these drugs can produce debilitating side effects when used long term and do not protect degenerating neurons against death. Recent evidence has highlighted a pathological imbalance in PD between the acetylation and deacetylation of the histone proteins around which deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is coiled, in favour of excessive histone deacetylation. This mechanism of adding/removing acetyl groups to histone lysine residues is one of many epigenetic regulatory processes which control the expression of genes, many of which will be essential for neuronal survival. Hence, such epigenetic modifications may have a pathogenic role in PD. It has therefore been hypothesised that if this pathological imbalance can be corrected with the use of histone deacetylase inhibiting agents then neurodegeneration observed in PD can be ameliorated. This article will review the current literature with regard to epigenetic changes in PD and the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in PD: examining the evidence of the neuroprotective effects of numerous HDACIs in cellular and animal models of Parkinsonian cell death. Ultimately answering the question: does epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylases hold therapeutic potential in PD? PMID:23711791

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptors: their therapeutic potential in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Spooren, Will; Lesage, Anne; Lavreysen, Hilde; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Steckler, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric and neurological disorders are linked to changes in synaptic excitatory processes with a key role for glutamate, that is, the most abundant excitatory amino-acid. Molecular cloning of the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors has led to the identification of eight mGlu receptors, which, in contrast to ligand-gated ion channels (responsible for fast excitatory transmission), modulate and fine-tune the efficacy of synaptic transmission. mGlu receptors are G protein-coupled and constitute a new group of "drugable" targets for the treatment of various CNS disorders. The recent discovery of small molecules that selectively bind to receptors of Groups I (mGlu1 and mGlu5) and II (mGlu2 and mGlu3) allowed significant advances in our understanding of the roles of these receptors in brain function and dysfunction including anxiety. Although investigation of the role of the Group III (mGlu4, 6, 7, and 8) receptors is less advanced, the generation of genetically manipulated animals and recent advances in the identification of subtype-selective compounds have revealed some first insights into the therapeutic potential of this group of receptors. PMID:21309118

  11. The therapeutic potential of milk thistle in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kazazis, Christos E; Evangelopoulos, Angelos A; Kollas, Aris; Vallianou, Natalia G

    2014-01-01

    Milk thistle has been known for more than 2.000 years as a herbal remedy for a variety of disorders. It has mainly been used to treat liver and gallbladder diseases. Silibum marianum, the Latin term for the plant, and its seeds contain a whole family of natural compounds, called flavonolignans. Silimarin is a dry mixture of these compounds; it is extracted after processing with ethanol, methanol, and acetone. Silimarin contains mainly silibin A, silibin B, taxifolin, isosilibin A, isosilibin B, silichristin A, silidianin, and other compounds in smaller concentrations. Apart from its use in liver and gallbladder disorders, milk thistle has recently gained attention due to its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic properties. Recently, a substance from milk thistle has been shown to possess peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist properties. PPARγ is the molecular target of thiazolidinediones, which are used clinically as insulin sensitizers to lower blood glucose levels in diabetes type 2 patients. The thiazolidinedione type of PPARγ ligands is an agonist with a very high binding affinity. However, this ligand type demonstrates a range of undesirable side effects, thus necessitating the search for new effective PPARγ agonists. Interestingly, studies indicate that partial agonism of PPARγ induces promising activity patterns by retaining the positive effects attributed to the full agonists, with reduced side effects. In this review, the therapeutic potential of milk thistle in the management of diabetes and its complications are discussed. PMID:25396404

  12. Glucocorticoid analogues: potential therapeutic alternatives for treating inflammatory muscle diseases.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Erica K M; Rayavarapu, Sree; Damsker, Jesse M; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2012-03-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been prescribed to treat a variety of diseases, including inflammatory myopathies and Duchenne muscular dystrophy for over 50 years. However, their prescription remains controversial due to the significant side effects associated with the chronic treatment. It is a common belief that the clinical efficacy of GCs is due to their transrepression of pro-inflammatory genes through inhibition of inflammatory transcription factors (i.e. NF-κB, AP-1) whereas the adverse side effects are attributed to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcription of target genes (transactivation). The past decade has seen an increased interest in the development of GR modulators that maintain the effective anti-inflammatory properties but lack the GR-dependent transcriptional response as a safe alternative to traditional GCs. Many of these analogues or "dissociative" compounds show potential promise in in vitro studies but fail to reach human clinical trials. In this review, we discuss molecular effects of currently prescribed GCs on skeletal muscle and also discuss the current state of development of GC analogues as alternative therapeutics for inflammatory muscle diseases. PMID:22214335

  13. The Therapeutic Potential of Milk Thistle in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kazazis, Christos E.; Evangelopoulos, Angelos A.; Kollas, Aris; Vallianou, Natalia G.

    2014-01-01

    Milk thistle has been known for more than 2.000 years as a herbal remedy for a variety of disorders. It has mainly been used to treat liver and gallbladder diseases. Silibum marianum, the Latin term for the plant, and its seeds contain a whole family of natural compounds, called flavonolignans. Silimarin is a dry mixture of these compounds; it is extracted after processing with ethanol, methanol, and acetone. Silimarin contains mainly silibin A, silibin B, taxifolin, isosilibin A, isosilibin B, silichristin A, silidianin, and other compounds in smaller concentrations. Apart from its use in liver and gallbladder disorders, milk thistle has recently gained attention due to its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic properties. Recently, a substance from milk thistle has been shown to possess peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist properties. PPARγ is the molecular target of thiazolidinediones, which are used clinically as insulin sensitizers to lower blood glucose levels in diabetes type 2 patients. The thiazolidinedione type of PPARγ ligands is an agonist with a very high binding affinity. However, this ligand type demonstrates a range of undesirable side effects, thus necessitating the search for new effective PPARγ agonists. Interestingly, studies indicate that partial agonism of PPARγ induces promising activity patterns by retaining the positive effects attributed to the full agonists, with reduced side effects. In this review, the therapeutic potential of milk thistle in the management of diabetes and its complications are discussed. PMID:25396404

  14. Pueraria tuberosa: a review on its phytochemical and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Maji, Amal K; Pandit, Subrata; Banerji, Pratim; Banerjee, Debdulal

    2014-01-01

    Pueraria tuberosa (Willd.) DC is a perennial herb commonly known as 'vidarikanda', distributed throughout south east Asia. The plant's tuber is widely used in ethanomedicine as well as in traditional systems of medicine, particularly in ayurveda. It has been used in various ayurvedic formulations as restorative tonic, antiaging, spermatogenic and immune booster and has been recommended for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, hepatosplenomegaly, fertility disorders, menopausal syndrome, sexual debility and spermatorrhoea. Numerous bioactive phytochemicals, mostly isoflavonoids such as puerarin, genistein, daidzein, tuberosin and so on have been identified in the tuber. In vivo and in vitro studies have provided the support against traditional demands of the tuber as spermatogenic, immune booster, aphrodisiac, anti-inflammatory, cardiotonic and brain tonic. However, further studies are required to define the active phytochemical compositions and to validate its clinical utilisation in the herbal formulations for human uses. This review provides an overview of traditional applications, current knowledge on the phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of P. tuberosa. This review also provides plausible hypotheses about how various isoflavones particularly puerarin, genistein and daidzein, individually or collectively, may be responsible for the therapeutic potential against a wide range of ailments. PMID:24980468

  15. Potential therapeutic mechanism of K(+) channel block for MS.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark D

    2013-10-01

    While the potential use of K(+) channel blockers in MS has been explored over many years, the approval in the US, and more recently in the UK, of fampyra (fampridine, 4-aminopyridine, 4-AP) as a symptomatic treatment for walking disability, has reawakened interest. Recent years have seen a real improvement in the treatment options for relapsing remitting MS, but the disease remains inadequately treated, with the progressive phase (characterised by irreversible functional loss) lacking any effective therapy. Whether the symptomatic relief afforded by 4-AP translates into neuroprotection, remains poorly investigated, although there is no clear reason why this would be expected. Importantly, future clinical studies may shed light on this question. This review includes an overview of axonal K(+) channel expression and pharmacology, and the logic of the use of K(+) channel blockers derived from observations in experimental studies of demyelination and synaptic transmission. It provides an insight into the probable biophysical actions of 4-AP, and how its action may aid in the symptomatic treatment of MS. The key message of this review is that 4-AP is a blocker of neuronal K(+) channels, and its administration is known to be of value in the symptomatic treatment of some patients. The details of the mechanism underlying the beneficial effects remain somewhat vague, and the molecular target has not been properly defined. The useful mechanism is likely to include an action on synaptic function, but whether it is the presynaptic terminal or the presynaptic axon that is the primary target is unknown. It is argued that because of the apparent inability of 4-AP to increase safety factor in experimental demyelination when clinically relevant concentrations are used, it cannot be the ideal pharmacological agent for treating demyelination by the widening of axonal action potentials. That said, it remains a possibility that the useful therapeutic effect of 4-AP may involve subtle

  16. Paradoxically, iron overload does not potentiate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in vitro in cardiomyocytes and in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Guenancia, Charles; Li, Na; Hachet, Olivier; Rigal, Eve; Cottin, Yves; Dutartre, Patrick; Rochette, Luc; Vergely, Catherine

    2015-04-15

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is known to induce serious cardiotoxicity, which is believed to be mediated by oxidative stress and complex interactions with iron. However, the relationship between iron and DOX-induced cardiotoxicity remains controversial and the role of iron chelation therapy to prevent cardiotoxicity is called into question. Firstly, we evaluated in vitro the effects of DOX in combination with dextran-iron on cell viability in cultured H9c2 cardiomyocytes and EMT-6 cancer cells. Secondly, we used an in vivo murine model of iron overloading (IO) in which male C57BL/6 mice received a daily intra-peritoneal injection of dextran-iron (15mg/kg) for 3weeks (D0-D20) and then (D21) a single sub-lethal intra-peritoneal injection of 6mg/kg of DOX. While DOX significantly decreased cell viability in EMT-6 and H9c2, pretreatment with dextran-iron (125-1000μg/mL) in combination with DOX, paradoxically limited cytotoxicity in H9c2 and increased it in EMT-6. In mice, IO alone resulted in cardiac hypertrophy (+22%) and up-regulation of brain natriuretic peptide and β-myosin heavy-chain (β-MHC) expression, as well as an increase in cardiac nitro-oxidative stress revealed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. In DOX-treated mice, there was a significant decrease in left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and an up-regulation of cardiac β-MHC and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression. However, prior IO did not exacerbate the DOX-induced fall in LVEF and there was no increase in ANP expression. IO did not impair the capacity of DOX to decrease cancer cell viability and could even prevent some aspects of DOX cardiotoxicity in cardiomyocytes and in mice. PMID:25711856

  17. Therapeutic cell carriers: a potential road to cure glioma.

    PubMed

    Young, Jacob S; Kim, Julius W; Ahmed, Atique U; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-06-01

    Many different experimental molecular therapeutic approaches have been evaluated in an attempt to treat brain cancer. However, despite the success of these experimental molecular therapies, research has shown that the specific and efficient delivery of therapeutic agents to tumor cells is a limitation. In this regard, cell carrier systems have garnered significant attraction due to their capacity to be loaded with therapeutic agents and carry them specifically to tumor sites. Furthermore, cell carriers can be genetically modified to express therapeutic agents that can directly eradicate cancerous cells or can modulate tumor microenvironments. This review describes the current state of cell carriers, their use as vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors, and future directions that will help overcome the present obstacles to cell carrier mediated therapy for brain cancer. PMID:24852229

  18. Therapeutic potential of thalidomide for gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen Ta; Cheng, Chuan Chu; Chiu, Ted H; Lai, Pei Chun

    2015-11-01

    Controversial effects of thalidomide for solid malignancies have been reported. In the present study, we evaluate the effects of thalidomide for transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), the most common type of bladder cancer. Thalidomide precipitates were observed when its DMSO solution was added to the culture medium. No precipitation was found when thalidomide was dissolved in 45% γ-cyclodextrin, and this concentration of γ-cyclodextrin elicited slight cytotoxicity on TCC BFTC905 and primary human urothelial cells. Thalidomide-γ-cyclodextrin complex exerted a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in TCC cells, but was relatively less cytotoxic (with IC50 of 200 µM) in BFTC905 cells than the other 3 TCC cell lines, possibly due to upregulation of Bcl-xL and HIF-1α mediated carbonic anhydrase IX, and promotion of quiescence. Gemcitabine-resistant BFTC905 cells were chosen for additional experiments. Thalidomide induced apoptosis through downregulation of survivin and securin. The secretion of VEGF and TNF-α was ameliorated by thalidomide, but they did not affect cell proliferation. Immune-modulating lenalidomide and pomalidomide did not elicit cytotoxicity. In addition, cereblon did not play a role in the thalidomide effect. Oxidative DNA damage was triggered by thalidomide, and anti-oxidants reversed the effect. Thalidomide also inhibited TNF-α induced invasion through inhibition of NF-κB, and downregulation of effectors, ICAM-1 and MMP-9. Thalidomide inhibited the growth of BFTC905 xenograft tumors in SCID mice via induction of DNA damage and suppression of angiogenesis. Higher average body weight, indicating less chachexia, was observed in thalidomide treated group. Sedative effect was observed within one-week of treatment. These pre-clinical results suggest therapeutic potential of thalidomide for gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer. PMID:26398114

  19. Myostatin/activin pathway antagonism: molecular basis and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Han, H Q; Zhou, Xiaolan; Mitch, William E; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2013-10-01

    Muscle wasting is associated with a wide range of catabolic diseases. This debilitating loss of muscle mass and functional capacity reduces the quality of life and increases the risks of morbidity and mortality. Major progress has been made in understanding the biochemical mechanisms and signaling pathways regulating muscle protein balance under normal conditions and the enhanced protein loss in atrophying muscles. It is now clear that activation of myostatin/activin signaling is critical in triggering the accelerated muscle catabolism that causes muscle loss in multiple disease states. Binding of myostatin and activin to the ActRIIB receptor complex on muscle cell membrane leads to activation of Smad2/3-mediated transcription, which in turn stimulates FoxO-dependent transcription and enhanced muscle protein breakdown via ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy. In addition, Smad activation inhibits muscle protein synthesis by suppressing Akt signaling. Pharmacological blockade of the myostatin/activin-ActRIIB pathway has been shown to prevent or reverse the loss of muscle mass and strength in various disease models including cancer cachexia and renal failure. Moreover, it can markedly prolong the lifespan of animals with cancer-associated muscle loss. Furthermore, inhibiting myostatin/activin actions also improves insulin sensitivity, reduces excessive adiposity, attenuates systemic inflammation, and accelerates bone fracture healing in disease models. Based on these exciting advances, the potential therapeutic benefits of myostatin/activin antagonism are now being tested in multiple clinical settings. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. PMID:23721881

  20. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    PONIEWIERSKA-BARAN, AGATA; SUSZYNSKA, MALWINA; SUN, WENYUE; ABDELBASET-ISMAIL, AHMED; SCHNEIDER, GABRIELA; BARR, FREDERIC G.; RATAJCZAK, MARIUSZ Z.

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  1. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional erythropoietin receptor: Potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Poniewierska-Baran, Agata; Suszynska, Malwina; Sun, Wenyue; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Schneider, Gabriela; Barr, Frederic G; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2015-11-01

    The erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) is expressed by cells from the erythroid lineage; however, evidence has accumulated that it is also expressed by some solid tumors. This is an important observation, because recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is employed in cancer patients to treat anemia related to chemo/radiotherapy. In our studies we employed eight rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines (three alveolar-type RMS cell lines and five embrional-type RMS cell lines), and mRNA samples obtained from positive, PAX7-FOXO1-positive, and fusion-negative RMS patient samples. Expression of EpoR was evaluated by RT-PCR, gene array and FACS. The functionality of EpoR in RMS cell lines was evaluated by chemotaxis, adhesion, and direct cell proliferation assays. In some of the experiments, RMS cells were exposed to vincristine (VCR) in the presence or absence of EPO to test whether EPO may impair the therapeutic effect of VCR. We report for a first time that functional EpoR is expressed in human RMS cell lines as well as by primary tumors from RMS patients. Furthermore, EpoR is detectably expressed in both embryonal and alveolar RMS subtypes. At the functional level, several human RMS cell lines responded to EPO stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. Moreover, RMS cells became more resistant to VCR treatment in the presence of EPO. Our findings have important potential clinical implications, indicating that EPO supplementation in RMS patients may have the unwanted side effect of tumor progression. PMID:26412593

  2. Llama Nanoantibodies with Therapeutic Potential against Human Norovirus Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Garaicoechea, Lorena; Aguilar, Andrea; Parra, Gabriel I.; Bok, Marina; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Canziani, Gabriela; Green, Kim Y.; Bok, Karin; Parreño, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis, but no vaccines or therapeutic drugs are available. Llama-derived single chain antibody fragments (also called VHH) are small, recombinant monoclonal antibodies of 15 kDa with several advantages over conventional antibodies. The aim of this study was to generate recombinant monoclonal VHH specific for the two major norovirus (NoV) genogroups (GI and GII) in order to investigate their potential as immunotherapy for the treatment of NoV diarrhea. To accomplish this objective, two llamas were immunized with either GI.1 (Norwalk-1968) or GII.4 (MD2004) VLPs. After immunization, peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected and used to generate two VHH libraries. Using phage display technology, 10 VHH clones specific for GI.1, and 8 specific for GII.4 were selected for further characterization. All VHH recognized conformational epitopes in the P domain of the immunizing VP1 capsid protein, with the exception of one GII.4 VHH that recognized a linear P domain epitope. The GI.1 VHHs were highly specific for the immunizing GI.1 genotype, with only one VHH cross-reacting with GI.3 genotype. The GII.4 VHHs reacted with the immunizing GII.4 strain and showed a varying reactivity profile among different GII genotypes. One VHH specific for GI.1 and three specific for GII.4 could block the binding of homologous VLPs to synthetic HBGA carbohydrates, saliva, and pig gastric mucin, and in addition, could inhibit the hemagglutination of red blood cells by homologous VLPs. The ability of Nov-specific VHHs to perform well in these surrogate neutralization assays supports their further development as immunotherapy for NoV treatment and immunoprophylaxis. PMID:26267898

  3. Adrenomedullin: A potential therapeutic target for retinochoroidal disease.

    PubMed

    Iesato, Yasuhiro; Yuda, Kentaro; Chong, Kelvin Teo Yi; Tan, Xue; Murata, Toshinori; Shindo, Takayuki; Yanagi, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52-amino acid peptide with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidative properties discovered in a human pheochromocytoma. It is a member of the calcitonin peptide superfamily, and its signal is mediated by calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). CLR interacts with receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs), among which RAMP-2 and RAMP-3 carry CLR from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cellular membrane to confer high affinity for AM. In addition to being implicated in a variety of systemic diseases, AM is a critical contributor to the pathogenesis of retinochoroidal disease. It is robustly upregulated in retinochoroidal disease models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) and laser-induced choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) as well as in human patients with retinochoroidal diseases. In this review, we discuss the most salient recent findings that strongly illustrate the role of AM in retinochoroidal disease. In the OIR model, AM was identified as a key angiogenic mediator of retinal vascularisation, and AM inhibition suppressed only pathological angiogenesis, not physiological angiogenesis. On the contrary, lesion size was larger in AM(+/-) CNV model mice, presumably due to the anti-inflammatory function of AM. Despite the success of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents for the treatment of retinochoroidal disease, therapeutic shortcomings remain. Finding ways to modulate AM activity will provide new treatment avenues. Potential treatment strategies modulating the action of AM and its signaling pathway have been studied extensively. AM and its signaling molecules are intriguing future treatment targets for retinochoroidal disease. PMID:26791747

  4. REOVIRUS: A TARGETED THERAPEUTIC – PROGRESS AND POTENTIAL

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Radhashree; Ghalib, Mohammad H.; Goel, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Medical therapy of patients with malignancy requires a paradigm shift through development of new drugs with a good safety record and novel mechanisms of activity. While there is no dearth of such molecules, one particular agent, “reovirus” is promising by its ability to target cancer cells with aberrant signaling pathways. This double stranded RNA virus has been therapeutically formulated and has rapidly progressed from pre-clinical validation of anti cancer activity to a phase III registration study in platinum refractory metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. During this process, reovirus has demonstrated safety both as a single agent when administered intratumorally and intravenously, as well as in combination therapy, with multiple chemotherapeutics such as gemcitabine, carboplatin/paclitaxel, and docetaxel; and similarly with radiation. The scientific rationale for its development as an anticancer agent stems from the fact that it preferentially replicates in and induces lyses of cells with an activated Kras pathway. As documented in many previous studies, the initial observation of greater tropism in Kras compromised situation might certainly not be the sole and possibly not even the predominant reason for enhanced virulence. All the same, scientists have emphasized on Kras optimistically due to its high prevalence in various types of cancers. Incidence of Kras mutation has been found to be highest in pancreatic cancer (85–90%) followed by colorectal (35–45%) and lung (25–30%). Reovirus, in fact has the potential not only as a therapy but also as a tool to unravel the aberrant cellular pathway leading to carcinogenicity. PMID:23038811

  5. Physiology and therapeutic potential of the thymic peptide thymulin.

    PubMed

    Reggiani, Paula C; Schwerdt, Jose I; Console, Gloria M; Roggero, Eduardo A; Dardenne, Mireille; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2014-01-01

    Thymulin is a thymic hormone exclusively produced by the epithelial cells of the thymus. After its discovery and initial characterization in the '70s, it was demonstrated that the production and secretion of thymulin are strongly influenced by the neuro-endocrine system. Conversely, a growing body of evidence, to be reviewed here, suggests that thymulin is a hypophysiotropic peptide. Additionally, a substantial body of information pointing to thymulin and a synthetic analog as anti-inflammatory and analgesic peptides in the central nervous system brain and other organs will be also reviewed. In recent years, a synthetic DNA sequence encoding a biologically active analog of thymulin, metFTS, was constructed and cloned in a number of adenovectors. These include bidirectional regulatable Tet-Off vector systems that simultaneously express metFTS and green fluorescent protein and that can be down-regulated reversibly by the addition of the antibiotic doxycycline. A number of recent studies indicate that gene therapy for thymulin may be an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent some of the hormonal and reproductive abnormalities that typically appear in congenitally athymic (nude) mice, used as a suitable model of neuroendocrine and reproductive aging. Summing up, this article briefly reviews the publications on the physiology of the thymulin-neuroendocrine axis and the anti-inflammatory properties of the molecule and its analog. The availability of novel biotechnological tools should boost basic studies on the molecular biology of thymulin and should also allow an assessment of the potential of gene therapy to restore circulating thymulin levels in thymodeficient animal models and eventually, in humans. PMID:24588820

  6. Llama nanoantibodies with therapeutic potential against human norovirus diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Garaicoechea, Lorena; Aguilar, Andrea; Parra, Gabriel I; Bok, Marina; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Canziani, Gabriela; Green, Kim Y; Bok, Karin; Parreño, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses are a major cause of acute gastroenteritis, but no vaccines or therapeutic drugs are available. Llama-derived single chain antibody fragments (also called VHH) are small, recombinant monoclonal antibodies of 15 kDa with several advantages over conventional antibodies. The aim of this study was to generate recombinant monoclonal VHH specific for the two major norovirus (NoV) genogroups (GI and GII) in order to investigate their potential as immunotherapy for the treatment of NoV diarrhea. To accomplish this objective, two llamas were immunized with either GI.1 (Norwalk-1968) or GII.4 (MD2004) VLPs. After immunization, peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected and used to generate two VHH libraries. Using phage display technology, 10 VHH clones specific for GI.1, and 8 specific for GII.4 were selected for further characterization. All VHH recognized conformational epitopes in the P domain of the immunizing VP1 capsid protein, with the exception of one GII.4 VHH that recognized a linear P domain epitope. The GI.1 VHHs were highly specific for the immunizing GI.1 genotype, with only one VHH cross-reacting with GI.3 genotype. The GII.4 VHHs reacted with the immunizing GII.4 strain and showed a varying reactivity profile among different GII genotypes. One VHH specific for GI.1 and three specific for GII.4 could block the binding of homologous VLPs to synthetic HBGA carbohydrates, saliva, and pig gastric mucin, and in addition, could inhibit the hemagglutination of red blood cells by homologous VLPs. The ability of Nov-specific VHHs to perform well in these surrogate neutralization assays supports their further development as immunotherapy for NoV treatment and immunoprophylaxis. PMID:26267898

  7. [Multiple sclerosis: potential therapeutic options and update of ongoing studies].

    PubMed

    Wiendl, H; Lehmann, H C; Hohlfeld, R; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2004-06-01

    The therapeutic options for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) have experienced enormous progress over recent years. Despite these encouraging developments, available therapies are only partially effective, and the ultimate goal of curing MS is still far from being attained. The improved understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of MS (immune) pathogenesis together with recent shifts in paradigms led to a variety of new therapeutic targets and approaches. In addition to modulation of the inflammatory process, therapeutic approaches focussing on active neuroprotection, remyelinization, and regeneration have become increasingly important. Based on current concepts of the MS pathogenesis, this article summarizes new therapeutic approaches. Substances and strategies currently tested in clinical trials are reviewed. PMID:15257377

  8. Therapeutic potential of chemokine signal inhibition for metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is incurable by current therapies including chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that tumor-infiltrating macrophages promote establishment of the lethal metastatic foci and contribute to therapeutic resistance. Recent studies suggest that the accumulation of these macrophages is regulated by a chemokine network established in the tumor microenvironment. In this perspective paper, we elaborate on the chemokine signals that can attract monocytes/macrophages to the site of metastasis, and discuss whether inhibition of these chemokine signals can represent a new therapeutic strategy for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26275794

  9. Novel hepatocellular carcinoma molecules with prognostic and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Scaggiante, Bruna; Kazemi, Maryam; Pozzato, Gabriele; Dapas, Barbara; Farra, Rosella; Grassi, Mario; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Grassi, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant form of primary liver cancer, is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. The difficulty to diagnose early cancer stages, the aggressive behaviors of HCC, and the poor effectiveness of therapeutic treatments, represent the reasons for the quite similar deaths per year and incidence number. Considering the fact that the diagnosis of HCC typically occurs in the advanced stages of the disease when the therapeutic options have only modest efficacy, the possibility to identify early diagnostic markers could be of significant benefit. So far, a large number of biomarkers have been associated to HCC progression and aggressiveness, but many of them turned out not to be of practical utility. This is the reason why active investigations are ongoing in this field. Given the huge amount of published works aimed at the identification of HCC biomarkers, in this review we mainly focused on the data published in the last year, with particular attention to the role of (1) molecular and biochemical cellular markers; (2) micro-interfering RNAs; (3) epigenetic variations; and (4) tumor stroma. It is worth mentioning that a significant number of the HCC markers described in the present review may be utilized also as targets for novel therapeutic approaches, indicating the tight relation between diagnosis and therapy. In conclusion, we believe that integrated researches among the different lines of investigation indicated above should represent the winning strategies to identify effective HCC markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:24574801

  10. Protein Nanocapsules Containing Doxorubicin as a pH-Responsive Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Dongmei; Kratz, Felix; Wang, Szu-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase has been engineered to form a caged, hollow dodecahedral protein assembly, and we have examined the feasibility of this scaffold to be used as a drug delivery system by introducing cysteines to the internal cavity (D381C). Fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532M) and the antitumor drug doxorubicin were coupled to this internal cavity through maleimides on the guest molecules. The virus-like particle’s structure and stability remained intact after binding of the molecules within the interior of the nanocapsule. The pH-dependent hydrolysis of a hydrazone linkage to doxorubicin allowed 90% drug release from the D381C scaffold within 72 hrs at pH 5.0. Fluorescence microscopy of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells indicated significant uptake of the D381C scaffold incorporating AF532M and doxorubicin and suggested internalization of the nanoparticles through endocytosis. We observed that the protein scaffold does not induce cell death, but doxorubicin encapsulated in D381C is indeed cytotoxic, yielding an IC50 of 1.3 ± 0.3 μM. While the majority of particulate-based drug delivery strategies encapsulates drugs within polymeric nanoparticles, our results show the potential of using macromolecular protein assemblies. This approach yields a promising new opportunity for designing highly-defined nanomaterials for therapeutic delivery. PMID:21456086

  11. Dextran-doxorubicin/chitosan nanoparticles for solid tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Savita; Maitra, Amarnath

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a major therapeutic approach for the treatment of localized and metastasized cancers. Whereas potent chemotherapeutic agents seem promising in the test tube, clinical trials often fail due to unfavorable pharmacokinetics, poor delivery, low local concentrations, and limited accumulation in the target cell. The pathophysiology of the tumor vasculature and stromal compartment presents a major obstacle to effective delivery of agents to solid tumors. Poor perfusion of the tumor, arterio-venous shunting, necrotic and hypoxic areas, as well as a high interstitial fluid pressure work against favorable drug uptake. Thus, targeted drug delivery using long-circulating particulate drug carriers such as hydrogels of controlled size (<100 nm diameter) holds immense potential to improve the treatment of cancer by selectively providing therapeutically effective drug concentrations at the tumor site [through enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect] while reducing undesirable side effects. This review focuses on the progress of targeted delivery of nanoparticulated anticancer drug such as doxorubicin chemically conjugated with dextran and encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles to solid tumor with reduced side effect of drug. Regulated particle size and long circulation of these hydrogel nanoparticles in blood help them accumulate in tumor tissue through EPR effect as evident from the significant regression of the tumor volume. The cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin can be minimized by coupling the drug with dextran and encapsulating it in chitosan nanoparticles. PMID:20049807

  12. Biochemical study on the protective potential of Nardostachys jatamansi extract on lipid profile and lipid metabolizing enzymes in doxorubicin intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Subashini, R; Ragavendran, B; Gnanapragasam, A; Yogeeta, S Kumar; Devaki, T

    2007-05-01

    Nardostachys jatamansi is a medicinally important herb of Indian origin used for centuries in Ayurvedic and Unani systems of medicine for the treatment of various ailments. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the effect of ethanolic extract of Nardostachys jatamansi rhizomes on doxorubicin induced myocardial injury with respect to lipid metabolism in serum and heart of Wistar albino rats. Altered lipid metabolism alters the cardiac function which is mainly due to changes in the property of the cardiac cell membrane. Doxorubicin exhibits cardiotoxicity by inhibition of fatty acid oxidation in the heart. The rats treated with a single dose of doxorubicin (15 mg/kg) intraperitoneally showed an increase in serum and cardiac lipids (cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids and phospholipids), along with a significant rise in serum low density lipoproteins (LDL), very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and drop in high density lipoproteins (HDL) levels, resulting in alteration of serum and cardiac lipid metabolizing enzymes. Pretreatment with a extract of Nardostachys jatamansi (500 mg/kg) orally for seven days to doxorubicin induced rats showed a significant prevention in the lipid status with the activities of the lipid metabolizing enzymes. Histopathological observations were also in correlation with the biochemical parameters. These findings suggest that the protective and hypolipidemic effect of Nardostachys jatamansi against doxorubicin induced myocardial injury in rats could possibly be mediated through its anti lipid peroxidative properties. PMID:17557749

  13. Liposomal Coencapsulation of Doxorubicin with Listeriolysin O Increases Potency via Subcellular Targeting.

    PubMed

    Walls, Zachary F; Gong, Henry; Wilson, Rebecca J

    2016-03-01

    Liposomal doxorubicin is a clinically important drug formulation indicated for the treatment of several different forms of cancer. For doxorubicin to exert a therapeutic effect, it must gain access to the nucleus. However, a large proportion of the liposomal doxorubicin dose fails to work because it is sequestered within endolysosomal organelles following endocytosis of the liposomes due to the phenomenon of ion trapping. Listeriolysin O (LLO) is a pore-forming protein that can provide a mechanism for endosomal escape. The present study demonstrates that liposomal coencapsulation of doxorubicin with LLO enables a significantly larger percentage of the dose to colocalize with the nucleus compared to liposomes containing doxorubicin alone. The change in intracellular distribution resulted in a significantly more potent formulation of liposomal doxorubicin as demonstrated in both the ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its doxorubicin-resistant derivative A2780ADR. PMID:26751497

  14. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D.; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R.; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M.; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H.; Aransay, Ana M.; Iovanna, Juan L.; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; dM Vivanco, Maria; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  15. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H; Aransay, Ana M; Iovanna, Juan L; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; Vivanco, Maria dM; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  16. Asparagus racemosus: a review on its phytochemical and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram

    2016-09-01

    Asparagus racemosus (Willd.) is a widely found medicinal plant in tropical and subtropical parts of India. The therapeutic applications of this plant have been reported in Indian and British Pharmacopoeias and in traditional system of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Unani and Siddha. The crude, semi-purified and purified extracts obtained from different parts of this plant have been useful in therapeutic applications. Numerous bioactive phytochemicals mostly saponins and flavonoids have been isolated and identified from this plant which are responsible alone or in combination for various pharmacological activities. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview of traditional applications, current knowledge on the phytochemistry, pharmacology and overuse of A. racemosus. PMID:26463825

  17. Therapeutic potential of vitamin D-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Gomme, Peter T; Bertolini, Joseph

    2004-07-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is a multi-functional plasma protein with many important functions. These include transport of vitamin D metabolites, control of bone development, binding of fatty acids, sequestration of actin and a range of less-defined roles in modulating immune and inflammatory responses. Exploitation of the unique properties of DBP could enable the development of important therapeutic agents for the treatment of a variety of diseases. PMID:15245906

  18. Therapeutic Potential of Non-Psychotropic Cannabidiol in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Mishima, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2010-01-01

    Cannabis contains the psychoactive component delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), and the non-psychoactive components cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol, and cannabigerol. It is well-known that delta9-THC and other cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists are neuroprotective during global and focal ischemic injury. Additionally, delta9-THC also mediates psychological effects through the activation of the CB1 receptor in the central nervous system. In addition to the CB1 receptor agonists, cannabis also contains therapeutically active components which are CB1 receptor independent. Of the CB1 receptor-independent cannabis, the most important is CBD. In the past five years, an increasing number of publications have focused on the discovery of the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and neuroprotective effects of CBD. In particular, CBD exerts positive pharmacological effects in ischemic stroke and other chronic diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cerebroprotective action of CBD is CB1 receptor-independent, long-lasting, and has potent anti-oxidant activity. Importantly, CBD use does not lead to tolerance. In this review, we will discuss the therapeutic possibility of CBD as a cerebroprotective agent, highlighting recent pharmacological advances, novel mechanisms, and therapeutic time window of CBD in ischemic stroke.

  19. The evidence for natural therapeutics as potential anti-scarring agents in burn-related scarring.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M; Branford, O A; Rolfe, K J

    2016-01-01

    Though survival rate following severe thermal injuries has improved, the incidence and treatment of scarring have not improved at the same speed. This review discusses the formation of scars and in particular the formation of hypertrophic scars. Further, though there is as yet no gold standard treatment for the prevention or treatment of scarring, a brief overview is included. A number of natural therapeutics have shown beneficial effects both in vivo and in vitro with the potential of becoming clinical therapeutics in the future. These natural therapeutics include both plant-based products such as resveratrol, quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate as examples and includes the non-plant-based therapeutic honey. The review also includes potential mechanism of action for the therapeutics, any recorded adverse events and current administration of the therapeutics used. This review discusses a number of potential 'treatments' that may reduce or even prevent scarring particularly hypertrophic scarring, which is associated with thermal injuries without compromising wound repair. PMID:27574685

  20. Surface functionalization of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes with octa-arginine for enhanced anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Swati; Dodwadkar, Namita S.; Deshpande, Pranali P.; Parab, Shruti; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes (commercially available as DOXIL® or Lipodox®) were surface functionalized with a cell-penetrating peptide, octa-arginine (R8). For this purpose, R8-peptide was conjugated to the polyethylene glycol–dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG–DOPE) amphiphilic co-polymer. The resultant R8–PEG–PE conjugate was introduced into the lipid bilayer of liposomes at 2 mol% of total lipid amount via spontaneous micelle-transfer technique. The liposomal modification did not alter the particle size distribution, as measured by Particle Size Analyzer and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, surface-associated cationic peptide increased zeta potential of the modified liposomes. R8-functionalized liposomes (R8-Dox-L) markedly increased the intracellular and intratumoral delivery of doxorubicin as measured by flow cytometry and visualizing by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) compared to unmodified Doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes (Dox-L). R8-Dox-L delivered loaded Doxorubicin to the nucleus, being released from the endosomes at higher efficiency compared to unmodified liposomes, which had marked entrapment in the endosomes at tested time point of 1 h. The significantly higher accumulation of loaded drug to its site of action for R8-Dox-L resulted in improved cytotoxic activity in vitro (cell viability of 58.5 ± 7% for R8-Dox-L compared to 90.6 ± 2% for Dox-L at Dox dose of 50 μg/mL for 4 h followed by 24 h incubation) and enhanced suppression of tumor growth (348 ± 53 mm3 for R8-Dox-L, compared to 504 ± 54 mm3 for Dox-L treatment) in vivo compared to Dox-L. R8-modification has the potential for broadening the therapeutic window of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin treatment, which could lead to lower non-specific toxicity. PMID:23333899

  1. MicroRNAs as potential therapeutic targets in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ivan G; Grafals, Monica; Portilla, Didier; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2014-01-01

    One cornerstone of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is fibrosis, as kidneys are susceptible due to their high vascularity and predisposition to ischemia. Presently, only therapies targeting the angiotensin receptor are used in clinical practice to retard the progression of CKD. Thus, there is a pressing need for new therapies designed to treat the damaged kidney. Several independent laboratories have identified a number of microRNAs that are dysregulated in human and animal models of CKD. We will explore the evidence suggesting that by blocking the activity of such dysregulated microRNAs, new therapeutics could be developed to treat the progression of CKD. PMID:23660218

  2. Ferulic Acid: Therapeutic Potential Through Its Antioxidant Property

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Marimuthu; Sudheer, Adluri R.; Menon, Venugopal P.

    2007-01-01

    There has been considerable public and scientific interest in the use of phytochemicals derived from dietary components to combat human diseases. They are naturally occurring substances found in plants. Ferulic acid (FA) is a phytochemical commonly found in fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, sweet corn and rice bran. It arises from metabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine by Shikimate pathway in plants. It exhibits a wide range of therapeutic effects against various diseases like cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative. A wide spectrum of beneficial activity for human health has been advocated for this phenolic compound, at least in part, because of its strong antioxidant activity. FA, a phenolic compound is a strong membrane antioxidant and known to positively affect human health. FA is an effective scavenger of free radicals and it has been approved in certain countries as food additive to prevent lipid peroxidation. It effectively scavenges superoxide anion radical and inhibits the lipid peroxidation. It possesses antioxidant property by virtue of its phenolic hydroxyl group in its structure. The hydroxy and phenoxy groups of FA donate electrons to quench the free radicals. The phenolic radical in turn forms a quinone methide intermediate, which is excreted via the bile. The past few decades have been devoted to intense research on antioxidant property of FA. So, the present review deals with the mechanism of antioxidant property of FA and its possible role in therapeutic usage against various diseases. PMID:18188410

  3. Sphingosine kinase-1--a potential therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites play critical functions in the regulation of a number of fundamental biological processes including cancer. Whereas ceramide and sphingosine mediate and trigger apoptosis or cell growth arrest, sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes proliferation and cell survival. The delicate equilibrium between the intracellular levels of each of these sphingolipids is controlled by the enzymes that either produce or degrade these metabolites. Sphingosine kinase-1 is a crucial regulator of this two-pan balance, because it produces the prosurvival sphingosine 1-phosphate, and reduces the content of both ceramide and sphingosine, the proapoptotic sphingolipids. Sphingosine kinase-1 controls the levels of sphingolipids having opposite effects on cell survival/death, its gene was found to be of oncogenic nature, its mRNA is overexpressed in many solid tumors, its overexpression protects cells from apoptosis and its activity is decreased during anticancer treatments. Therefore, sphingosine kinase-1 appears to be a target of interest for therapeutic manipulation via its pharmacological inhibition. Strategies to kill tumor cells by increasing their ceramide and/or sphingosine content while blocking sphingosine 1-phosphate generation should have a favorable therapeutic index. PMID:17159597

  4. Quercetin attenuates doxorubicin cardiotoxicity by modulating Bmi-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qinghua; Chen, Long; Lu, Qunwei; Sharma, Sherven; Li, Lei; Morimoto, Sachio; Wang, Guanyu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Doxorubicin-based chemotherapy induces cardiotoxicity, which limits its clinical application. We previously reported the protective effects of quercetin against doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity. In this study, we tested the effects of quercetin on the expression of Bmi-1, a protein regulating mitochondrial function and ROS generation, as a mechanism underlying quercetin-mediated protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Experimental Approach Effects of quercetin on doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity was evaluated using H9c2 cardiomyocytes and C57BL/6 mice. Changes in apoptosis, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and related signalling were evaluated in H9c2 cells. Cardiac function, serum enzyme activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were measured in mice after a single injection of doxorubicin with or without quercetin pre-treatment. Key Results In H9c2 cells, quercetin reduced doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS generation and DNA double-strand breaks. The quercetin-mediated protection against doxorubicin toxicity was characterized by decreased expression of Bid, p53 and oxidase (p47 and Nox1) and by increased expression of Bcl-2 and Bmi-1. Bmi-1 siRNA abolished the protective effect of quercetin against doxorubicin-induced toxicity in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, quercetin protected mice from doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction that was accompanied by reduced ROS levels and lipid peroxidation, but enhanced the expression of Bmi-1 and anti-oxidative superoxide dismutase. Conclusions and Implications Our results demonstrate that quercetin decreased doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in vitro and in vivo by reducing oxidative stress by up-regulation of Bmi-1 expression. The findings presented in this study have potential applications in preventing doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:24902966

  5. Yoga school of thought and psychiatry: Therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Rao, Naren P; Varambally, Shivarama; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2013-01-01

    Yoga is a traditional life-style practice used for spiritual reasons. However, the physical components like the asanas and pranayaamas have demonstrated physiological and therapeutic effects. There is evidence for Yoga as being a potent antidepressant that matches with drugs. In depressive disorder, yoga 'corrects' an underlying cognitive physiology. In schizophrenia patients, yoga has benefits as an add-on intervention in pharmacologically stabilized subjects. The effects are particularly notable on negative symptoms. Yoga also helps to correct social cognition. Yoga can be introduced early in the treatment of psychosis with some benefits. Elevation of oxytocin may be a mechanism of yoga effects in schizophrenia. Certain components of yoga have demonstrated neurobiological effects similar to those of vagal stimulation, indicating this (indirect or autogenous vagal stimulation) as a possible mechanism of its action. It is time, psychiatrists exploited the benefits if yoga for a comprehensive care in their patients. PMID:23858245

  6. The Bcl-2-regulated apoptosis switch: mechanism and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jerry M; Cory, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis is essential for tissue homeostasis, particularly in the hematopoietic compartment, where its impairment can elicit neoplastic or autoimmune diseases. Whether stressed cells live or die is largely determined by interplay between opposing members of the Bcl-2 protein family. Bcl-2 and its closest homologs promote cell survival, but two other factions promote apoptosis. The BH3-only proteins sense and relay stress signals, but commitment to apoptosis requires Bax or Bak. The BH3-only proteins appear to activate Bax and Bak indirectly, by engaging and neutralizing their pro-survival relatives, which otherwise constrain Bax and Bak from permeabilizing mitochondria. The Bcl-2 family may also regulate autophagy and mitochondrial fission/fusion. Its pro-survival members are attractive therapeutic targets in cancer and perhaps autoimmunity and viral infections. PMID:17629468

  7. Apoptotic cell clearance: basic biology and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Ivan K. H.; Lucas, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Prompt removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis. The molecular and cellular events that underpin apoptotic cell recognition and uptake, and the subsequent biological responses are increasingly better defined. The detection and disposal of apoptotic cells generally promote an anti-inflammatory response at the tissue level, as well as immunological tolerance. Consequently, defects in apoptotic cell clearance have been linked with a variety of inflammatory diseases and autoimmunity. Conversely, under certain conditions such as killing tumour cells by specific cell death inducers, the recognition of apoptotic tumour cells can promote an immunogenic response and anti-tumour immunity. Here, we review the current understanding of the complex process of apoptotic cell clearance in physiology and pathology, and discuss how this knowledge could be harnessed for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24481336

  8. Molecular and Therapeutic Potential and Toxicity of Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Chateauvieux, Sébastien; Morceau, Franck; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a branched short-chain fatty acid, is widely used as an antiepileptic drug and a mood stabilizer. Antiepileptic properties have been attributed to inhibition of Gamma Amino Butyrate (GABA) transaminobutyrate and of ion channels. VPA was recently classified among the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors, acting directly at the level of gene transcription by inhibiting histone deacetylation and making transcription sites more accessible. VPA is a widely used drug, particularly for children suffering from epilepsy. Due to the increasing number of clinical trials involving VPA, and interesting results obtained, this molecule will be implicated in an increasing number of therapies. However side effects of VPA are substantially described in the literature whereas they are poorly discussed in articles focusing on its therapeutic use. This paper aims to give an overview of the different clinical-trials involving VPA and its side effects encountered during treatment as well as its molecular properties. PMID:20798865

  9. [Mitochondrial dynamics: a potential new therapeutic target for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Kuzmicic, Jovan; Del Campo, Andrea; López-Crisosto, Camila; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Hechenleitner, Jonathan; Zepeda, Ramiro; Castro, Pablo F; Verdejo, Hugo E; Parra, Valentina; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles able to vary their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and fragmented disconnected arrays, through events of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. These events allow the transmission of signaling messengers and exchange of metabolites within the cell. They have also been implicated in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy. Although the majority of these studies have been confined to noncardiac cells, emerging evidence suggests that changes in mitochondrial morphology could participate in cardiac development, the response to ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. In this article, we review how the mitochondrial dynamics are altered in different cardiac pathologies, with special emphasis on heart failure, and how this knowledge may provide new therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21820793

  10. The pharmacological landscape and therapeutic potential of serine hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2012-01-01

    Serine hydrolases perform crucial roles in many biological processes, and several of these enzymes are targets of approved drugs for indications such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and infectious diseases. Despite this, most of the human serine hydrolases (of which there are more than 200) remain poorly characterized with respect to their physiological substrates and functions, and the vast majority lack selective, in vivo-active inhibitors. Here, we review the current state of pharmacology for mammalian serine hydrolases, including marketed drugs, compounds that are under clinical investigation and selective inhibitors emerging from academic probe development efforts. We also highlight recent methodological advances that have accelerated the rate of inhibitor discovery and optimization for serine hydrolases, which we anticipate will aid in their biological characterization and, in some cases, therapeutic validation. PMID:22212679

  11. The Pharmacological Landscape and Therapeutic Potential of Serine Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    Serine hydrolases play critical roles in many biological processes, and several are targets of approved drugs for indications such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and infectious disease. Despite this, most of the 200+ human serine hydrolases remain poorly characterized with respect to their physiological substrates and functions, and the vast majority lack selective, in vivo-active inhibitors. Here, we review the current state of pharmacology for mammalian serine hydrolases, including marketed drugs, compounds under clinical investigation, and selective inhibitors emerging from academic probe development efforts. We also highlight recent methodological advances that have accelerated the rate of inhibitor discovery and optimization for serine hydrolases, which we anticipate will aid in their biological characterization and, in some cases, therapeutic validation. PMID:22212679

  12. Bcl-2-regulated apoptosis: mechanism and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jerry M; Cory, Suzanne

    2007-10-01

    Apoptosis is essential for tissue homeostasis, particularly in the hematopoietic compartment, where its impairment can elicit neoplastic or autoimmune diseases. Whether stressed cells live or die is largely determined by interplay between opposing members of the Bcl-2 protein family. Bcl-2 and its closest homologs promote cell survival, but two other factions promote apoptosis. The BH3-only proteins sense and relay stress signals, but commitment to apoptosis requires Bax or Bak. The BH3-only proteins appear to activate Bax and Bak indirectly, by engaging and neutralizing their pro-survival relatives, which otherwise constrain Bax and Bak from permeabilizing mitochondria. The Bcl-2 family may also regulate autophagy and mitochondrial fission/fusion. Its pro-survival members are attractive therapeutic targets in cancer and perhaps autoimmunity and viral infections. PMID:17629468

  13. Hepatitis B vaccines: protective efficacy and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Michel, M-L; Tiollais, P

    2010-08-01

    Worldwide, two billion people have at some time been infected by hepatitis B virus, 370 millions suffer from chronic infection and around one million die each year from HBV-related liver diseases of which liver cancer is the ultimate stage. Vaccination is the measure that is most effective in reducing the global incidence of hepatitis B and hepatitis B vaccines have now been available for over 20 years. The first hepatitis B vaccine was prepared from inactivated hepatitis B surface antigen particles purified from plasma of asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus. Knowledge of the structure and genomic organization of hepatitis B virus has led to development of the first DNA recombinant vaccine. In preventing hepatocellular carcinoma development, hepatitis B virus vaccines are considered as the first available cancer vaccine. HBV vaccines have recently taken on a new role as therapeutic vaccines as an attempt to cure or to control hepatitis B virus infection in persistently infected individuals. PMID:20382485

  14. Potential role of bromelain in clinical and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Rathnavelu, Vidhya; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Sohila, Subramaniam; Kanagesan, Samikannu; Ramesh, Rajendran

    2016-01-01

    Pineapple has been used as part of traditional folk medicine since ancient times and it continues to be present in various herbal preparations. Bromelain is a complex mixture of protease extracted from the fruit or stem of the pineapple plant. Although the complete molecular mechanism of action of bromelain has not been completely identified, bromelain gained universal acceptability as a phytotherapeutic agent due to its history of safe use and lack of side effects. Bromelain is widely administered for its well-recognized properties, such as its anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic and fibrinolytic affects, anticancer activity and immunomodulatory effects, in addition to being a wound healing and circulatory improvement agent. The current review describes the promising clinical applications and therapeutic properties of bromelain. PMID:27602208

  15. Addiction and the potential for therapeutic drug development.

    PubMed

    Janssen, P A

    1994-01-01

    Therapeutic drug development in alcoholism could be targeted at any of the following: direct antagonism, substitution, treatment of abstinence, enhancement of aversion, modification of biodisposition, or craving. Ritanserin is a potent, centrally acting, highly selective 5-HT1C/2 antagonist which, in addition to having a sleep-regulating and anti-depression/anti-axiety effect, displays a unique pharmacological action in several animal paradigms of substance abuse which assess drug-craving. In fact, the latter pharmacological action was demonstrated after initial clinical observations suggested an effect of ritanserin in the chronic withdrawal phase after detoxification from alcohol in patients. The results of a recent double-blind, placebo-controlled, trial indicated that ritanserin did not induce aversion to drink alcohol in normal volunteers who display social drinking, but are not suffering alcohol dependence. Currently, a full clinical development program of ritanserin in cocaine and alcohol abuse is ongoing. Three major double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in alcohol dependent patients are in progress. Patients of different severity levels, ranging from mild to very severe, are studied. The dosages of ritanserin tested (2.5 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg o.d.) are known to be well tolerated and safe. Two trials aim for relapse prevention--clinically defined in one, biochemically defined in the other-, and one trial has improved (reduced) drinking behaviour as a therapeutic goal. This program, which involves close to 900 alcohol-dependent patients, is well under way, and is still picking up momentum. PMID:8032167

  16. Current and Potential Therapeutic Strategies for Hemodynamic Cardiorenal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Yoshitsugu; Kim, Taehee; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Amin, Alpesh N.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) encompasses conditions in which cardiac and renal disorders co-exist and are pathophysiologically related. The newest classification of CRS into seven etiologically and clinically distinct types for direct patient management purposes includes hemodynamic, uremic, vascular, neurohumoral, anemia- and/or iron metabolism-related, mineral metabolism-related and protein-energy wasting-related CRS. This classification also emphasizes the pathophysiologic pathways. The leading CRS category remains hemodynamic CRS, which is the most commonly encountered type in patient care settings and in which acute or chronic heart failure leads to renal impairment. Summary This review focuses on selected therapeutic strategies for the clinical management of hemodynamic CRS. This is often characterized by an exceptionally high ratio of serum urea to creatinine concentrations. Loop diuretics, positive inotropic agents including dopamine and dobutamine, vasopressin antagonists including vasopressin receptor antagonists such as tolvaptan, nesiritide and angiotensin-neprilysin inhibitors are among the pharmacologic agents used. Additional therapies include ultrafiltration (UF) via hemofiltration or dialysis. The beneficial versus unfavorable effects of these therapies on cardiac decongestion versus renal blood flow may act in opposite directions. Some of the most interesting options for the outpatient setting that deserve revisiting include portable continuous dobutamine infusion, peritoneal dialysis and outpatient UF via hemodialysis or hemofiltration. Key Messages The new clinically oriented CRS classification system is helpful in identifying therapeutic targets and offers a systematic approach to an optimal management algorithm with better understanding of etiologies. Most interventions including UF have not shown a favorable impact on outcomes. Outpatient portable dobutamine infusion is underutilized and not well studied. Revisiting traditional and

  17. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-2 Antagonists: Therapeutic Potential and Potential Risks

    PubMed Central

    Blankenbach, Kira V.; Schwalm, Stephanie; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling system with its specific G-protein-coupled S1P receptors, the enzymes of S1P metabolism and the S1P transporters, offers a multitude of promising targets for drug development. Until today, drug development in this area has nearly exclusively focused on (functional) antagonists at the S1P1 receptor, which cause a unique phenotype of immunomodulation. Accordingly, the first-in class S1P1 receptor modulator, fingolimod, has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and novel S1P1 receptor (functional) antagonists are being developed for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, lupus erythematodes, or polymyositis. Besides the S1P1 receptor, also S1P2 and S1P3 are widely expressed and regulate many diverse functions throughout the body. The S1P2 receptor, in particular, often exerts cellular functions which are opposed to the functions of the S1P1 receptor. As a consequence, antagonists at the S1P2 receptor have the potential to be useful in a contrasting context and different areas of indication compared to S1P1 antagonists. The present review will focus on the therapeutic potential of S1P2 receptor antagonists and discuss their opportunities as well as their potential risks. Open questions and areas which require further investigations will be emphasized in particular. PMID:27445808

  18. COGNITION AS A THERAPEUTIC TARGET IN LATE-LIFE DEPRESSION: POTENTIAL FOR NICOTINIC THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Zurkovsky, Lilia; Taylor, Warren D.; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Depression is associated with impairments to cognition and brain function at any age, but such impairments in the elderly are particularly problematic because of the additional burden of normal cognitive aging and in some cases, structural brain pathology. Individuals with late-life depression exhibit impairments in cognition and brain structural integrity, alongside mood dysfunction. Antidepressant treatment improves symptoms in some but not all patients, and those who benefit may not return to the cognitive and functional level of nondepressed elderly. Thus, for comprehensive treatment of late-life depression, it may be necessary to address both the affective and cognitive deficits. In this review, we propose a model for the treatment of late-life depression in which nicotinic stimulation is used to improve cognitive performance and improve the efficacy of an antidepressant treatment of the syndrome of late-life depression. The cholinergic system is well-established as important to cognition. Although muscarinic stimulation may exacerbate depressive symptoms, nicotinic stimulation may improve cognition and neural functioning without a detriment to mood. While some studies of nicotinic subtype specific receptor agonists have shown promise in improving cognitive performance, less is known regarding how nicotinic receptor stimulation affects cognition in depressed elderly patients. Late-life depression thus represents a new therapeutic target for the development of nicotinic agonist drugs and parallel treatment of cognitive dysfunction along with medical and psychological approaches to treating mood dysfunction may be necessary to ensure full resolution of depressive illness in aging. PMID:23933385

  19. MMP-9 triggered self-assembly of doxorubicin nanofiber depots halts tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Kalafatovic, Daniela; Nobis, Max; Son, Jiye; Anderson, Kurt I; Ulijn, Rein V

    2016-08-01

    A central challenge in cancer care is to ensure that therapeutic compounds reach their targets. One approach is to use enzyme-responsive biomaterials, which reconfigure in response to endogenous enzymes that are overexpressed in diseased tissues, as potential site-specific anti-tumoral therapies. Here we report peptide micelles that upon MMP-9 catalyzed hydrolysis reconfigure to form fibrillar nanostructures. These structures slowly release a doxorubicin payload at the site of action. Using both in vitro and in vivo models, we demonstrate that the fibrillar depots are formed at the sites of MMP-9 overexpression giving rise to enhanced efficacy of doxorubicin, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth in an animal model. PMID:27192421

  20. Adult mesenchymal stem cells: differentiation potential and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Jackson, L; Jones, D R; Scotting, P; Sottile, V

    2007-01-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a population of multipotent cells found primarily in the bone marrow. They have long been known to be capable of osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation and are currently the subject of a number of trials to assess their potential use in the clinic. Recently, the plasticity of these cells has come under close scrutiny as it has been suggested that they may have a differentiation potential beyond the mesenchymal lineage. Myogenic and in particular cardiomyogenic potential has been shown in vitro. MSCs have also been shown to have the ability to form neural cells both in vitro and in vivo, although the molecular mechanisms underlying these apparent transdifferentiation events are yet to be elucidated. We describe here the cellular characteristics and differentiation potential of MSCs, which represent a promising stem cell population for future applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:17495381

  1. Centipede venoms and their components: resources for potential therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Md Abdul; Yang, Shilong; Lai, Ren

    2015-11-01

    Venomous animals have evolved with sophisticated bio-chemical strategies to arrest prey and defend themselves from natural predators. In recent years, peptide toxins from venomous animals have drawn considerable attention from researchers due to their surprising chemical, biochemical, and pharmacological diversity. Similar to other venomous animals, centipedes are one of the crucial venomous arthropods that have been used in traditional medicine for hundreds of years in China. Despite signifying pharmacological importance, very little is known about the active components of centipede venoms. More than 500 peptide sequences have been reported in centipede venomous glands by transcriptome analysis, but only a small number of peptide toxins from centipede has been functionally described. Like other venomous animals such as snakes, scorpions, and spiders, the venom of centipedes could be an excellent source of peptides for developing drugs for treatments as well as bio-insecticides for agrochemical applications. Although centipede venoms are yet to be adequately studied, the venom of centipedes as well as their components described to date, should be compiled to help further research. Therefore, based on previous reports, this review focusses on findings and possible therapeutic applications of centipede venoms as well as their components. PMID:26593947

  2. Cardiovascular disorders in anorexia nervosa and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Di Cola, Giovanni; Jacoangeli, Francesca; Jacoangeli, Fabrizio; Lombardo, Mauro; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder in which a distorted self-perception of body image and an excessive fear of gaining weight result in extreme restrictions in eating habits. AN may be divided into two types: a "binge-eating/purging type" during which the individual regularly engages in overeating and then purging behavior, and a "restricting type", in which she does not. AN is a serious medical problem in young people in Western societies. It is widely reported that patients with AN exhibit an enhanced mortality rate as compared with age-matched healthy subjects, which has been mainly ascribed to cardiac complications. At least one-third of all deaths in patients with anorexia nervosa are estimated to be due to cardiac causes, mainly sudden death. Cardiovascular complications of AN can be present in up to 80% of cases, and among them alterations in cardiac electrical activity, structure and hemodynamics have been reported as causes of morbidity and mortality. The objective of this brief review is to summarize current knowledge on the main cardiovascular complications of AN, their underlying mechanisms and the possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:25056404

  3. MPHOSPH1: a potential therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinran; Zhou, Yafan; Liu, Xinyuan; Peng, Anlin; Gong, Hao; Huang, Lizi; Ji, Kaige; Petersen, Robert B; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2014-11-15

    MPHOSPH1 is a critical kinesin protein that functions in cytokinesis. Here, we show that MPHOSPH1 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, where it is essential for proliferation. Attenuating MPHOSPH1 expression with a tumor-selective shRNA-expressing adenovirus (Ad-shMPP1) was sufficient to arrest HCC cell proliferation in a manner associated with an accumulation of multinucleated polyploid cells, induction of postmitotic apoptosis, and increased sensitivity to taxol cytotoxicity. Mechanistic investigations showed that attenuation of MPHOSPH1 stabilized p53, blocked STAT3 phosphorylation, and prolonged mitotic arrest. In a mouse subcutaneous xenograft model of HCC, tumoral injection of Ad-shMPP1 inhibited MPHOSPH1 expression and tumor growth in a manner correlated with induction of apoptosis. Combining Ad-shMPP1 injection with taxol administration enhanced antitumor efficacy relative to taxol alone. Furthermore, Ad-shMPP1 tail vein injection suppressed formation of orthotopic liver nodules and prevented hepatic dysfunction. Taken together, our results identify MPHOSPH1 as an oncogenic driver and candidate therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:25269478

  4. Purinergic receptors as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Woods, Lucas T; Ajit, Deepa; Camden, Jean M; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of memory and cognitive ability and is a serious cause of mortality. Many of the pathological characteristics associated with AD are revealed post-mortem, including amyloid-β plaque deposition, neurofibrillary tangles containing hyperphosphorylated tau proteins and neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex. Although several genetic mutations and risk factors have been associated with the disease, the causes remain poorly understood. Study of disease-initiating mechanisms and AD progression in humans is inherently difficult as most available tissue specimens are from late-stages of disease. Therefore, AD researchers rely on in vitro studies and the use of AD animal models where neuroinflammation has been shown to be a major characteristic of AD. Purinergic receptors are a diverse family of proteins consisting of P1 adenosine receptors and P2 nucleotide receptors for ATP, UTP and their metabolites. This family of receptors has been shown to regulate a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including neuroinflammation, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and AD. Experimental evidence from human AD tissue has suggested that purinergic receptors may play a role in AD progression and studies using selective purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists in vitro and in AD animal models have demonstrated that purinergic receptors represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26519903

  5. Therapeutic Potential of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Daniel; Lee, Chih-Hung L; Flood, Dorothy; Marger, Fabrice; Donnelly-Roberts, Diana

    2015-10-01

    Progress in the fields of neuroscience and molecular biology has identified the forebrain cholinergic system as being important in many higher order brain functions. Further analysis of the genes encoding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has highlighted, in particular, the role of α7 nAChRs in these higher order brain functions as evidenced by their peculiar physiologic and pharmacological properties. As this receptor has gained the attention of scientists from academia and industry, our knowledge of its roles in various brain and bodily functions has increased immensely. We have also seen the development of small molecules that have further refined our understanding of the roles of α7 nAChRs, and these molecules have begun to be tested in clinical trials for several indications. Although a large body of data has confirmed a role of α7 nAChRs in cognition, the translation of small molecules affecting α7 nAChRs into therapeutics has to date only progressed to the stage of testing in clinical trials. Notably, however, most recent human genetic and biochemical studies are further underscoring the crucial role of α7 nAChRs and associated genes in multiple organ systems and disease states. The aim of this review is to discuss our current knowledge of α7 nAChRs and their relevance as a target in specific functional systems and disease states. PMID:26419447

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Hsin; Yang, Chih-Ching; Li, Ping-Chia; Chen, Wang-Chuan; Chien, Chiang-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress induces inflammation to several tissues/organs leading to cell death and long-term injury. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and autophagic regulatory functions has been widely used as preventive or therapeutic strategy in modern medicine. Oxidative stress and inflammation have been widely reported to contribute to cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation, hepatotoxicity, or sympathetic activation-induced liver inflammation, lipopolysaccharide-induced renal inflammation, and substance P-mediated neurogenic hyperactive bladder based on clinical findings. In this review, we introduce several evidences for TCM treatment including Monascus adlay (MA) produced by inoculating adlay (Cois lachrymal-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) with Monascus purpureus on lung injury, Amla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn. of Euphorbiaceae family) on hepatotoxin-induced liver inflammation, Virgate Wormwood Decoction (Yīn Chén Hāo tāng) and its active component genipin on sympathetic activation–induced liver inflammation, and green tea extract and its active components, catechins, or a modified TCM formula Five Stranguries Powder (Wǔ Lén Sǎn) plus Crataegi Fructus (Shān Zhā) on hyperactive bladder. The pathophysiologic and molecular mechanisms of TCM on ameliorating inflammatory diseases are discussed in the review. PMID:24716170

  7. [Mechanisms and potential of the therapeutic stimulation of arteriogenesis].

    PubMed

    Schirmer, S H; van Royen, N; Laufs, U; Böhm, M

    2009-02-01

    The stimulation of collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis) is a promising alternative approach to non-invasively treat arterial obstructive disease, such as coronary, peripheral or cerebral artery disease. Patients unable to undergo conventional revascularization strategies may benefit from adaptive arteriogenesis. Underlying mechanisms are experimentally validated and include an increase in shear stress after obstruction or occlusion of a major artery; monocyte adhesion, transmigration and perivascular accumulation, secretion of growth factors; and smooth muscle and endothelial cell proliferation and growth of pre-existent collateral arteries. Therapeutic stimulation of arteriogenesis with cytokines has been successfully performed in experimental models. Translation into clinical practice, however, has hitherto been problematic. Reasons for this include differences between the healthy laboratory animal and an often severely diseased patient, possible harmful effects of pro-arteriogenic therapies and unsuitable clinical endpoints for the detection of collateral artery growth. Recent investigations of human arteriogenesis demonstrate significant inter-individual differences and point towards the importance of anti-arteriogenic mechanisms in patients with impaired adaptive arteriogenesis and high cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:19197812

  8. Synthetic and natural iron chelators: therapeutic potential and clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Heather C; Singh, Ravi N; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2013-01-01

    Iron-chelation therapy has its origins in the treatment of iron-overload syndromes. For many years, the standard for this purpose has been deferoxamine. Recently, considerable progress has been made in identifying synthetic chelators with improved pharmacologic properties relative to deferoxamine. Most notable are deferasirox (Exjade®) and deferiprone (Ferriprox®), which are now available clinically. In addition to treatment of iron overload, there is an emerging role for iron chelators in the treatment of diseases characterized by oxidative stress, including cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. While iron is not regarded as the underlying cause of these diseases, it does play an important role in disease progression, either through promotion of cellular growth and proliferation or through participation in redox reactions that catalyze the formation of reactive oxygen species and increase oxidative stress. Thus, iron chelators may be of therapeutic benefit in many of these conditions. Phytochemicals, many of which bind iron, may also owe some of their beneficial properties to iron chelation. This review will focus on the advances in iron-chelation therapy for the treatment of iron-overload disease and cancer, as well as neurodegenerative and chronic inflammatory diseases. Established and novel iron chelators will be discussed, as well as the emerging role of dietary plant polyphenols that effectively modulate iron biochemistry. PMID:21425984

  9. GEMINs: potential therapeutic targets for spinal muscular atrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Rebecca; Cauchi, Ruben J.

    2014-01-01

    The motor neuron degenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) remains one of the most frequently inherited causes of infant mortality. Afflicted patients loose the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene but retain one or more copies of SMN2, a homolog that is incorrectly spliced. Primary treatment strategies for SMA aim at boosting SMN protein levels, which are insufficient in patients. SMN is known to partner with a set of diverse proteins collectively known as GEMINs to form a macromolecular complex. The SMN-GEMINs complex is indispensible for chaperoning the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), which are key for pre-mRNA splicing. Pharmaceutics that alleviate the neuromuscular phenotype by restoring the fundamental function of SMN without augmenting its levels are also crucial in the development of an effective treatment. Their use as an adjunct therapy is predicted to enhance benefit to patients. Inspired by the surprising discovery revealing a premier role for GEMINs in snRNP biogenesis together with in vivo studies documenting their requirement for the correct function of the motor system, this review speculates on whether GEMINs constitute valid targets for SMA therapeutic development. PMID:25360080

  10. Centipede Venoms and Their Components: Resources for Potential Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Md Abdul; Yang, Shilong; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Venomous animals have evolved with sophisticated bio-chemical strategies to arrest prey and defend themselves from natural predators. In recent years, peptide toxins from venomous animals have drawn considerable attention from researchers due to their surprising chemical, biochemical, and pharmacological diversity. Similar to other venomous animals, centipedes are one of the crucial venomous arthropods that have been used in traditional medicine for hundreds of years in China. Despite signifying pharmacological importance, very little is known about the active components of centipede venoms. More than 500 peptide sequences have been reported in centipede venomous glands by transcriptome analysis, but only a small number of peptide toxins from centipede has been functionally described. Like other venomous animals such as snakes, scorpions, and spiders, the venom of centipedes could be an excellent source of peptides for developing drugs for treatments as well as bio-insecticides for agrochemical applications. Although centipede venoms are yet to be adequately studied, the venom of centipedes as well as their components described to date, should be compiled to help further research. Therefore, based on previous reports, this review focusses on findings and possible therapeutic applications of centipede venoms as well as their components. PMID:26593947